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Sample records for actinic keratosis lesions

  1. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... Some actinic keratoses become squamous cell skin cancer . Have your health care provider look at all skin growths as soon as you find them. Your provider will ...

  2. Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis) Information for adults A A A Actinic ... the touch. Overview Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of ...

  3. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, if you work outdoors) Had many severe sunburns early in life Are older Symptoms Actinic keratosis ... and tanning salons. Other things to know about sun exposure: Sun exposure is stronger in or near surfaces ...

  4. [Actinic Keratosis].

    PubMed

    Dejaco, D; Hauser, U; Zelger, B; Riechelmann, H

    2015-07-01

    Actinic keratosis is a cutaneous lesion characterized by proliferation of atypical epidermal keratinocytes due to prolonged exposure to exogenous factors such as ultraviolet radiation. AKs are in-situ-squamous cell carcinomas (PEC) of the skin. AK typically presents as erythematous, scaly patch or papule (classic AK), occasionally as thick, adherent scale on an erythematous base. Mostly fair-skinned adults are affected. AKs typically occur in areas of frequent sun exposure (balding scalp, face, "H-region", lateral neck, décolleté, dorsum of the hand and lower extremities). Actinic Cheilitis is the term used for AKs appearing on the lips. The diagnosis of AK is based on clinical examination including inspection and palpation. The typical palpable rough surface of AK often precedes a visible lesion. Dermoscopy may provide additional information. If diagnosis is uncertain and invasion suspected, biopsy and histopathologic evaluation should be performed. The potential for progression to invasive PECs mandates therapeutic intervention. Treatment options include topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies are classified into physical, medical and combined physical-chemical approaches and a sequential combination of treatment modalities is possible. Topical-physical cryotherapy is the treatment of choice for isolated, non-hypertrophic AK. Topical-medical treatment, e. g. 5-fluoruracil (5FU) cream or Imiquomod or Ingenolmebutat application is used for multiple, non-hypertrophic AKs. For hypertrophic AKs, a dehorning pretreatment with salicinated vaseline is recommended. Isolated hypertrophic AKs often need cryotherapy with prolonged freezing time or several consecutive applications. Sequentially combined approaches are recommended for multiple, hypertrophic AKs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as example for a combined physical-chemical approach is an established treatment for multiple, non-hypertrophic and hypertrophic AKs. Prevention includes avoidance of sun and

  5. Conventional treatment of actinic keratosis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Peris, Ketty; Fargnoli, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    Nonsurgical procedures are the first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). The choice of therapy is based on AK features and patient characteristics. Numerous randomized clinical trials and open-label studies have provided robust data on the efficacy and tolerability of conventional topical therapies, such as cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy, or treatment with 5-fluorouracil, diclofenac, or imiquimod. Cryotherapy is recommended to treat single AK lesions (lesion-directed therapy), while topical medical therapies are used to treat multiple lesions on an entire sun-damaged area (field therapy) and have the advantage of highlighting and treating both visible and invisible lesions. Combined or sequential therapies have been proposed to improve treatment efficacy, while medication breaks between treatment cycles or lowering drug concentrations is used to increase treatment tolerability/adherence. The use of a field therapy to treat multiple lesions on a large area (the entire face or a balding scalp), followed by a lesion-targeted therapy for a specific recurrent or resistant AK lesion, is becoming an increasingly popular approach. Regarding surgical procedures, curettage with or without electrodessication and dermabrasion are seldom used, while excision is indicated when AK progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma is clinically suspected. Despite the availability of most such treatments for more than a decade and their common use in clinical practice, there is still a need for long-term follow-up studies to better determine the recurrence rate and for comparative studies to develop a truly patient-tailored therapy. PMID:25561214

  6. Oral nicotinamide and actinic keratosis: a supplement success story.

    PubMed

    Kim, Burcu; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide has shown potential as a safe and effective intervention for the prevention of malignant and premalignant skin lesions. Recent studies have shown that nicotinamide, in both oral and topical forms, is able to prevent ultraviolet-induced immunosuppression in humans [1,2,3] and mice [4,5]. Immunosuppression is a known factor for the progression of premalignant lesions, such as actinic keratosis [6]. Murine studies have shown that nicotinamide is also able to protect against photocarcinogenesis [4,5]. Preliminary human studies suggest that nicotinamide may help prevent skin cancers and enhance the regression of actinic keratoses. PMID:25561219

  7. New therapeutic options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sligh, James E

    2014-06-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common premalignant skin lesion that is frequently treated by cryosurgery. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy of man, and early-stage lesions are usually cured via surgery. Advanced basal cell carcinoma may require more extensive surgery resulting in deformity, and many advanced lesions cannot be treated surgically. Several recent developments have improved therapeutic options for both conditions. Cryosurgery is still a mainstay of treatment for AK, but the introduction of effective topical agents, imiquimod cream and ingenol mebutate, has provided alternatives to cryosurgery. For advanced basal cell carcinoma, the small-molecule inhibitor vismodegib has proven to be an effective therapy for lesions that are not amenable to surgery and has demonstrated ability to achieve dramatic improvement in advanced, potentially disfiguring cancer. PMID:25268601

  8. Retinoids for prevention and treatment of actinic keratosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ianhez, Mayra; Fleury, Luiz Fernando Fróes; Miot, Hélio Amante; Bagatin, Edileia

    2013-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common cause of dermatological consultations and it presents a strong association with squamous cell carcinoma. Many substances are used for treatment and prevention, such as retinoids. Nevertheless, many studies on retinoids emphasize their application in treating and preventing non melanoma skin cancers. In this article, we reviewed studies about systemic and topical retinoids used with immunocompetent patients and organ transplant recipients with actinic keratosis, as primary or secondary outcomes. The majority of these papers pointed to a reduction in actinic keratosis count after treatment with retinoids. However, studies need to be better-defined in order to address the lack of a standardized dose, the absence of control groups, the low number of patients and short follow-up periods. Blind, randomized and controlled clinical trials with adequate sample sizes, specifically focused on actinic keratosis, are needed to clarify the real benefit of topical and/or oral retinoids. Comparison of efficacy and safety between oral and topical retinoids in the prevention and treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers and actinic keratosis is an essential pre requisite to establish new strategies to control these conditions. PMID:24068130

  9. New developments in the treatment of actinic keratosis: focus on ingenol mebutate gel

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common disease in older, fair-skinned people, and is a consequence of cumulative ultraviolet exposure. It is part of a disease continuum in photodamaged skin that may lead to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Treatment options frequently used include cryosurgery and topical pharmacologic agents, which are examples of lesion-directed and field-directed strategies. Ingenol mebutate gel was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for topical treatment of actinic keratosis. While the mechanism of action of ingenol mebutate is not fully understood, in vitro and in vivo studies using tumor models indicate it has multiple mechanisms. Ingenol mebutate directly induces cell death by mitochondrial swelling and loss of cell membrane integrity preferentially in transformed keratinocytes. It promotes an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils and other immunocompetent cells that kills remaining tumor cells. The ability of ingenol mebutate to eliminate mutant p53 patches in ultraviolet-irradiated mouse skin suggests that it may have the potential to treat chronically ultraviolet-damaged skin. In human studies, ingenol mebutate achieved high clearance of actinic keratosis on the head and body after 2–3 consecutive daily treatments when measured by complete or partial clearance of lesions. Localized inflammatory skin responses were generally mild to moderate and resolved in less than a month. PMID:22956883

  10. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Bav; Zokaie, Simon; Carr, Alison J

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK). Objectives To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305) of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01): 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05). Conclusion This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved adherence rates. PMID:24379656

  11. Topical therapies for skin cancer and actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasnuva; Rahman, Khondaker M; Thurston, David E; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2015-09-18

    The global incidence of skin cancer and actinic keratosis (AK) has increased dramatically in recent years. Although many tumours are treated with surgery or radiotherapy topical therapy has a place in the management of certain superficial skin neoplasms and AK. This review considers skin physiology, non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the relationship between AK and skin cancer and drugs administered topically for these conditions. The dermal preparations for management of NMSC and AK are discussed in detail. Notably few studies have examined drug disposition in cancerous skin or in AK. Finally, recent novel approaches for targeting of drugs to skin neoplasms and AK are discussed. PMID:26091570

  12. Comparative study of actinic keratosis treatment with 3% diclofenac sodium and 5% 5-fluorouracil*

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Majoriê Mergen; Dornelles, Sérgio Ivan Torres; Silveira, Vera Bauer; Frantz, Gabriela de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Actinic keratosis is a frequent lesion which occurs in sunlight exposed areas. Diclofenac sodium and 5-Fluorouracil are effective, non-invasive and easy-to-apply topical treatment options. OBJECTIVES To assess and compare the effectiveness of 3% diclofenac sodium associated with 2.5% hyaluronic acid and of 5% 5-Fluorouracil for the treatment of actinic keratosis, as well as the patient's degree of satisfaction and tolerability. METHODS 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of actinic keratosis were randomized to receive diclofenac sodium or 5-Fluorouracil and were clinically assessed before and after treatment as well as 8 weeks after the end of treatment. Modified versions of the Investigator and Patient Global Improvement Scores were used. RESULTS The average number of lesions in the diclofenac sodium group before and after treatment was 13.6 and 6.6 (p<0,001), respectively, while it was 17.4 and 3.15 (p<0.001) in the 5-Fluorouracil group. There was a significant reduction in the number of lesions in the 5-Fluorouracil group in relation to the diclofenac sodium group (p<0.001). To the non-blinded physician, there was a higher satisfactory therapeutic response in the 5-Fluorouracil group (p<0.001); to the blinded physician, there was a higher satisfactory response in this same group, although not statistically significant (p=0.09). There was a high degree of satisfaction in both groups (73% in the diclofenac sodium group and 77% in the 5-Fluorouracil group; p=0.827). Regarding adverse effects, the diclofenac sodium group presented a higher degree of satisfaction (93.3% vs 38.4%; p=0.008). Erythema, edema, crusts and itching were significantly higher in the 5-Fluorouracil group. CONCLUSION We concluded that 5-Fluorouracil was more effective; however, it showed lower tolerability than diclofenac sodium. PMID:24173178

  13. Comparison of three light doses in the photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis using mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Tylcz, Jean-Baptiste; Vermandel, Maximilien; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for cancer therapy. Although high efficacy is demonstrated for PDT using standardized protocols in nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses, alternative light doses expected to increase efficiency, to reduce adverse effects or to expand the use of PDT, are still being evaluated and refined. We propose a comparison of the three most common light doses in the treatment of actinic keratosis with 5-aminolevulinic acid PDT through mathematical modeling. The proposed model is based on an iterative procedure that involves determination of the local fluence rate, updating of the local optical properties, and estimation of the local damage induced by the therapy. This model was applied on a simplified skin sample model including an actinic keratosis lesion, with three different light doses (red light dose, 37 J/cm2, 75 mW/cm2, 500 s blue light dose, 10 J/cm2, 10 mW/cm2, 1000 s and daylight dose, 9000 s). Results analysis shows that the three studied light doses, although all efficient, lead to variable local damage. Defining reference damage enables the nonoptimal parameters for the current light doses to be refined and the treatment to be more suitable.

  14. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Didona, Dario; Scarno, Marco; Faina, Valentina; Gobello, Tommaso; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK), considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild−moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex© camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female) were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1–3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits of DL

  15. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Didona, Dario; Scarno, Marco; Faina, Valentina; Gobello, Tommaso; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK), considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild-moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex(©) camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female) were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1-3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits of DL

  16. A consensus approach to improving patient adherence and persistence with topical treatment for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Peris, Ketty; Guillen, Carlos; Cerio, Rino; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Foley, Peter; Sanches, José; Culshaw, Alex; Erntoft, Sandra; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Topical therapy is important in the treatment of actinic keratosis, but guidance for improving adherence/persistence during topical therapy is still lacking. Objectives To utilize expert consensus to generate a list of recommendations to improve real-world efficacy when prescribing topical therapy for actinic keratosis. Methods An expert panel of eight dermatologists was convened to generate recommendations based on facilitated discussion and consensus generation using a modified Delphi session. The recommendations were ratified with the expert panel. Results Facilitated discussion generated 31 issues within five themes, which were prioritized using expert voting. Consensus was achieved on the importance of short and simple treatment regimens for maximizing patient compliance, physician awareness of the progression of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma, provision of appropriate patient information, and the use of effective communication strategies to educate physicians about actinic keratosis. Based on these key findings, eight recommendations were generated. Conclusions The recommendations will assist physicians when prescribing topical actinic keratosis therapy. Further research should focus on the types of patient outcomes that are influenced by the characteristics of topical field therapy. PMID:25865875

  17. Photodynamic Therapy with Ablative Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser in Treatment of Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Dong Jun; Shin, Jaeyoung; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Eun-So

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). However, a major limitation of PDT is the long incubation time required to allow penetration of the photosensitizer. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if pretreatment with an ablative carbon dioxide (CO2) fractional laser can reduce the incubation time of the photosensitizer. Methods Initially, 29 patients with a total of 34 AK lesions were treated with an ablative CO2 fractional laser at Ajou University Hospital between January and December 2010. Immediately after the laser treatment, topical 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid or methyl-aminolevulinate was applied to the AK lesions and incubated for 70 to 90 minutes. Then, the treated areas were illuminated with a red light source. Improvement was clinically or histologically assessed eight weeks after the treatment. Results In spite of the short incubation time, 24 lesions (70.6%) showed a complete response (CR) within three sessions of PDT (10 lesions a clinical CR and 14 lesions a clinical/histological CR). There were no significant side effects associated with the combination of ablative CO2 fractional laser and PDT. Conclusion Ablative CO2 fractional laser may be considered an additional treatment option for reducing the incubation time of the photosensitizer in PDT. PMID:24371387

  18. Prevalence and awareness of actinic keratosis: barriers and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore; Lebwohl, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are common skin lesions that appear after long-term exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The presence of AKs is associated with an increased risk for development of nonmelanoma skin cancer. AKs vary widely in clinical and histologic presentation, which contributes to inadequate identification and presents challenges for consensus classification. Clinically adequate reduction in AK prevalence requires a multifaceted approach. There is a reasonable need to increase awareness and knowledge about AK, including symptoms, prevention, and associated risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer, especially among the public at large. Safe and effective treatment strategies are needed to optimize clearance of AKs, ideally to prevent progression to invasive cutaneous neoplasia. PMID:23228302

  19. Italian expert consensus for the management of actinic keratosis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Peris, K; Calzavara-Pinton, P G; Neri, L; Girolomoni, G; Malara, G; Parodi, A; Piaserico, S; Rossi, R; Pellacani, G

    2016-07-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common skin disease which can potentially progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (iSCC). Given that mortality rates and health-care cost associated with iSCC are substantial, the management of AK represents an important public health issue. Several effective lesion-directed and field-directed treatments are available. Ablative procedures (e.g. cryosurgery, excision, laser ablation, curettage alone or with electrodessication) are considered cost-effective options for solitary lesions. Field-directed therapies (e.g. Ingenol Mebutate, imiquimod, PDT, 5-Fluorouracile, diclofenac 3%, 5-FU + Salicylic acid) can be used over large epidermal surfaces and are directed to treat both individual visible lesions and cancerization fields. In order to provide guidance for management choice in clinical practice, several guidelines concerning the diagnosis and treatment of AK have been published in the past decade. However, the introduction of novel therapeutic options requires continuous updates of recommendations and adaptation to national contexts. The present review summarizes the existing evidence and reports the results of a consensus workshop on the management of AK. PMID:27060910

  20. Defining Field Cancerization of the Skin Using Noninvasive Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging to Detect and Monitor Actinic Keratosis in Ingenol Mebutate 0.015%- Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michelle; Feldman, Eleanor; Bieber, Amy; Bienenfeld, Amanda; Nandanan, Naveen; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of optical coherence tomography to detect clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses confirmed by histopathology. The efficacy of ingenol mebutate treatment of actinic keratosis was also evaluated using optical coherence tomography, and correlation of treatment efficacy with severity of local skin reactions was determined. Design: Single-arm, open-label, split-face study. Setting: Hospital outpatient clinic. Participants: Male subjects (N=30) with seven actinic keratoses. Measurements: A suspected actinic keratosis and the normal-appearing, perilesional skin were imaged, biopsied for histopathologic analysis, and the results compared with the clinical and a blinded optical coherence tomography diagnosis. Treatment with ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% was randomly administered to three clinically suspected actinic keratoses and the perilesional skin; three additional, suspected actinic keratoses lesions and perilesional areas were left untreated. Clinical and optical coherence tomography images were obtained for all lesions. Severity of local skin reactions was recorded to evaluate the relationship between local skin reaction and treatment effect. Results: Optical coherence tomography analysis had a 100-percent (28/28) correlation with the clinical diagnosis of actinic keratosis and detected 16 of 22 (73%) histopathologically confirmed subclinical lesions from perilesional skin sites. By optical coherence tomography assessment, the clearance rate for clinically observed lesions was 76 percent for ingenol mebutate-treated areas versus 11 percent for untreated areas; the clearance rate for treated subclinical lesions was 88 percent versus 43 percent for untreated areas. Clearance rates did not vary with the severity of the local response. Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is effective at detecting clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses and monitoring their response to treatment. PMID:27386042

  1. Mucin1 expression in focal epidermal dysplasia of actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Luz Marina; Rojas, Héctor; Ramírez, Richard; Reyes, Oscar; Suárez, Ambar; Ortega, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Background Actinic keratoses (AKs) are generally considered as premalignant skin lesions that can progress into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ and invasive SCC. However, its progression to SCC is still matter of debate. A transmembrane glycoprotein that contributes to the progression of certain premalignant and malignant lesions is mucin1 (MUC1). Nevertheless, their functions in the skin lesions are not yet fully clear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to ascertain whether MUC1 is present in the focal epidermal dysplasia of AK. Methods Fourteen skin biopsies from patients diagnosed with AK were selected. They were classified according to the degree of dysplasia in keratinocyte intraepidermal neoplasia (KIN) I, KIN II, and KIN III. In five biopsies the three degrees were present, in two biopsies both KIN I and KIN II, in four biopsies only KIN I, and in three biopsies only KIN III. The presence of MUC1 was assessed by immunofluorescence staining using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Immunostaining revealed that MUC1 was present over the entire cell surface of only a few atypical basal keratinocytes confined to the lower third of the epidermis (KIN I). While in KIN II where atypical keratinocytes occupy the lower two thirds, MUC1 was localized at the apical surface of some atypical keratinocytes and over the entire cell surface of some of them. Interestingly, in KIN III where the atypical keratinocytes extend throughout the full thickness, MUC1 was localized at the apical surface and over the entire cell surface of many of these cells. Conversely, MUC1 expression was not detected in the epidermis of normal skin. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the expression of MUC1 in AK would be induced by alteration of keratinocyte stratification and differentiation and associated to the degree of dysplasia rather than the thickness of the epidermis. PMID:26605291

  2. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Marica B; Wennberg, Ann-Marie; Larkö, Olle

    2008-01-01

    The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field. PMID:18728698

  3. Evaluation of the therapeutic results of actinic keratosis treated with topical 5% fluorouracil by reflectance confocal laser microscopy: preliminary study*

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Priscila; Maia, Marcus; Rodrigues, Sarita Bartholomei; Marta, Alessandra Cristina; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Topical treatment for actinic keratosis with 5% fluorouracil has a recurrence rate of 54% in 12 months of follow-up. This study analyzed thirteen actinic keratoses on the upper limbs through confocal microscopy, at the time of clinical diagnosis and after 4 weeks of treatment with fluorouracil. After the treatment was established and evidence of clinical cure was achieved, in two of the nine actinic keratoses, confocal microscopy enabled visualization of focal areas of atypical honeycomb pattern in the epidermis indicating therapeutic failure. Preliminary data suggest the use of confocal microscopy as a tool for diagnosis and therapeutic control of actinic keratosis. PMID:26131881

  4. Pharmacotherapeutic management of actinic keratosis: focus on newer topical agents.

    PubMed

    Samrao, Aman; Cockerell, Clay J

    2013-08-01

    Actinic (solar) keratoses (AK) have the potential for malignant transformation and are the second most common diagnosis in dermatologic practices. No well-established clinical criteria are available to determine which AK are more likely to undergo malignant transformation; therefore, many dermatologists utilize field-directed approaches to treat all visible and subclinical AK on an affected skin surface. Current topical therapeutic agents require lengthy treatment regimens and are less well tolerated than many newer and investigational agents. We review and compare the efficacy and tolerability of well-established topical agents for the management of AK in the United States including 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod 5% cream as well as the newer 2.5 and 3.75% formulations, diclofenac 3% gel, photodynamic therapy, and the recently approved ingenol mebutate gel and discuss the therapeutic potential of investigational agents. Cryotherapy and 5-fluorouracil are efficacious at treating AK but less tolerable than imiquimod cream, particularly at its lower concentrations. The newer agents, diclofenac gel and ingenol mebutate, appear to be more tolerable than cryotherapy and 5- fluorouracil; however, comparative studies regarding efficacy are not available. PMID:23640424

  5. The continued use of sunscreen prevents the development of actinic keratosis in aged Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Kayo; Furukawa, Fukumi; Uede, Mikiko; Mizuno, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the trigger for actinic keratosis (AK) mainly depends on UV exposure. We evaluated the effects of long-term use of sunscreen on the histopathological and dermoscopic changes of AK in aged patients. Eighteen months use of sunscreen produced no change in the number of actinic keratoses or the advancement of histological grade. Although a significant decrease was not observed in the number of positive cells of p53, Ki-67 and COX-2 of the subjects who used sunscreen for 18 months, the downward tendencies of these proteins were observed. The continued use of sunscreen decreased the number of CD31-positive vessels significantly using the Chalkley method, and a significant improvement in scaling and vessel dots was found by dermoscopic study. Moreover, a relationship was found in the amount of sunscreen use and the number of actinic keratoses. Considering these results, it was thought that application of sunscreen reduces the risk of advancement of AK to higher grade AK and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27539900

  6. Tolerability of Ingenol Mebutate Gel, 0.05%, for Treating Patients with Actinic Keratosis on the Scalp in a Community Dermatology Practice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of treatment of actinic keratosis on the scalp with two consecutive, once-daily applications of ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%. Design: Retrospective chart review. Setting: Community dermatology practice. Participants: Male patients (N=78) with a long history of recurrent and relapsed scalp actinic keratosis. Measurements: This chart review extracted non-identifying information on patients’ medical history, pertinent history of actinic keratosis and skin cancer, and prior actinic keratosis treatments. Also collected was information on patients’ treatment of scalp actinic keratosis with ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%, including the occurrence of local skin reactions and their treatment, adverse events, and efficacy results at short-term and additional follow-up. Results: In these patients, a significant proportion of the scalp had numerous actinic keratoses that were often recurrent and/or hyperkeratotic. Most patients (83%) received cryosurgery to visible scalp actinic keratoses two weeks before ingenol mebutate treatment. Local skin reactions developed on the first day of topical treatment, were predominantly mild or moderate in intensity, and generally were resolved by 10 to 14 days. Local skin reactions were treated with a topical moisturizing product in 44 percent of the patients. Nearly half (45%) of the patients experienced application-site reactions, described as a combination of burning, itching, pain, and/or tenderness; the reactions were mild or moderate in intensity and lasted only a few days. Conclusions: Ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%, had a good safety and tolerability profile when used to treat scalp actinic keratosis in patients who had a prolonged history of actinic keratosis. PMID:27354884

  7. Comparison of morphologic criteria for actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma using in vivo multiphoton tomography.

    PubMed

    Klemp, Marisa; Meinke, Martina C; Weinigel, Martin; Röwert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; König, Karsten; Ulrich, Martina; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2016-03-01

    The routine diagnostic procedure of actinic keratosis (AK) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a histological examination after taking a biopsy. In the past decades, non-invasive optical methods for skin examination have been developed. Patients with clinical diagnosis of AK or SCC were examined. The morphological criteria were determined for healthy, AK and SCC skin and compared for statistically significant differences. In this study, the applicability of multiphoton tomography (MPT) as an in vivo diagnostic tool for AK and SCC was evaluated. Changes in the morphology of the keratinocytes such as broadened epidermis, large intercellular spaces, enlarged nucleus and a large variance in cell shape could easily be recognized. The cell nuclei of AK and SCC were significantly larger compared to healthy skin cells in all cell layers. The nucleus-cytoplasm ratio was also significantly higher for AK and SCC than for the healthy skin cells. It was even higher in SCC compared to spinous and basal cell layer of AK. The cell density in AK and SCC was significantly lower than in the basal and spinous cell layers of healthy skin. In SCC, the cell density was significantly lower than in AK. Concerning the intercellular spaces, significant differences were found for AK and healthy skin in spinous and basal cell layer and for SCC compared to AK and healthy skin. In this study, MPT proved to be a valuable non-invasive imaging method for in vivo detection and discrimination of AK and SCC from healthy skin. PMID:26659897

  8. Cytokeratin 17 immunoexpression in actinic keratosis (bowenoid and nonbowenoid) and in Bowen disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel

    2016-02-01

    Cytokeratin (CK) 17 immunoexpression has been investigated in nonmelanoma skin cancer as well as in many preinvasive epithelial malignancies. However, there is not any previous study of CK17 immunoexpression in actinic keratosis (AK) or Bowen disease in nonimmunocompromised patients. We evaluated CK17 immunoexpression in 20 cases of AK (10 nonbowenoid and 10 bowenoid) as well as in 10 cases of Bowen disease. We identified expression of CK17 in the superficial layers above the atypical foci. In some cases, there were foci of expression by the full thickness of the epidermis, which was the predominant pattern in very few cases (1 Bowen disease and 1 bowenoid AK). In addition, 1 case of bowenoid AK showed CK17 expression in a "skyline" pattern in the basal layer of the epidermis. Cytokeratin 17 immunostaining did not allow us to distinguish between the 3 entities studied. However, the immunostaining allowed us to distinguish atypical foci in the biopsies, even if atypicality was minimal. In addition, CK17 was useful in identifying surgical borders involved by disease in cases in which the hematoxylin-eosin was difficult to evaluate. Cytokeratin 17 immunoexpression might have a role in evaluating surgical borders in some cases of AK and Bowen disease. PMID:26740287

  9. Efficacy of a photolyase-based device in the treatment of cancerization field in patients with actinic keratosis and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Puviani, M; Barcella, A; Milani, M

    2013-12-01

    Eryfotona AK-NMSC (ISDIN Spain) is a film-forming medical device in cream or fluid formulation containing the DNA-repair enzyme photolyase and high-protection UV filters in liposomes (repairsomes) indicated in the treatment of cancerization field in patients with actinic keratosis (AK) or non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Photolyase is an enzyme that recognizes and directly repairs UV-induced DNA damage. The most common UV-induced DNA damage is the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Clinical studies evaluating the histological and cellular effects of Eryfotona AK-NMSC have shown a potential benefit in the treatment of the cancerization field in AK patients. In particular the use of Eryfotona AK-NMSC improves the confocal microscopic appearance of skin at the cancerization field level. In addition, Eryfotona AK-NMSC improves the p53 gene expression at keratinocyte level. In this study we reported a series of 6 cases of patients with AK or NMSC lesions treated with Eryfotona AK-NMSC fluid, both as coadjuvant and as single treatment, applied twice daily in the affected area with photograph documentation. Clinical photographs of the skin lesions at baseline and after Eryfotona AK-NMSC treatment were taken in all cases using a high-definition digital camera. Six patients with multiple AK lesions of the scalp or face with or without NMSC were treated for a mean of 1-3 months with Eryfotona AK-NMSC fluid formulation. Image documentations before and after treatment of this clinical series show a great improvement in AK lesions count and of cancerization field. This clinical series supports the clinical efficacy of the use of photolyase and high-protection UV filters in the treatment of cancerization field and AK lesions in patients with actinic damage. PMID:24442053

  10. Laser treatment and its implications for photodamaged skin and actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Karin; Prens, Errol P

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of widespread actinic keratoses (AKs) and extensive photodamage is a challenge. One of the treatment options is laser therapy, whereby physicians have the option of using ablative lasers (CO2 and Erbium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet) or nonablative fractional laser systems. With ablative laser systems, the superficial layers of the skin are ablated, including epidermal and superficial dermal actinic damage. Re-epithelialization occurs from uninvolved skin and keratinocytes from follicles. When using a CO2 laser, additional cosmetic improvements are a result of removal and tightening of the photodamaged collagen in the superficial dermis. The most important risks of this treatment are scarring and dyspigmentation. These risks are lessened when using fractional lasers, which produce small columns of ablation or coagulation in the skin, leaving the surrounding skin intact. This treatment may be combined with topical agents. Existing evidence suggests that both ablative laser resurfacing and fractional laser treatments are effective in reducing AKs and photodamage. Although these treatment modalities are widely used and clinical experiences are positive, large comparative studies are remarkably scarce. Still, laser resurfacing has a place in the (field) treatment of widespread AKs and extensive photodamage. PMID:25561217

  11. Key differences identified between actinic keratosis and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma by transcriptome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, S R; Mladkova, N; Gulati, A; Hamoudi, R; Purdie, K; Cerio, R; Leigh, I; Proby, C; Harwood, C A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is one of the most common malignancies in fair-skinned populations worldwide and its incidence is increasing. Despite previous observations of multiple genetic abnormalities in cSCC, the oncogenic process remains elusive. The purpose of this study was to elucidate key molecular events associated with progression from premalignant actinic keratoses (AKs) to invasive cSCC by transcriptome profiling. Methods: We combined laser capture microdissection with the Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0 microarrays to profile 30 cSCC and 10 AKs. Results: We identified a core set of 196 genes that are differentially expressed between AK and cSCC, and are enriched for processes including epidermal differentiation, cell migration, cell-cycle regulation and metabolism. Gene set enrichment analysis highlighted a key role for the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in cSCC compared with AK. Furthermore, the histological subtype of the tumour was shown to influence the expression profile. Conclusion: These data indicate that the MAPK pathway may be pivotal to the transition from AK to cSCC, thus representing a potential target for cSCC prevention. In addition, transcriptome differences identified between cSCC subtypes have important implications for future development of targeted therapies for this malignancy. PMID:24335922

  12. CONSENSUS REPORT: Recognizing non-melanoma skin cancer, including actinic keratosis, as an occupational disease - A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    John, S M; Trakatelli, M; Gehring, R; Finlay, K; Fionda, C; Wittlich, M; Augustin, M; Hilpert, G; Barroso Dias, J M; Ulrich, C; Pellacani, G

    2016-04-01

    1. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most common cancer diagnosed in westernized countries, and one of the few almost preventable cancers if detected and treated early as up to 90% of NMSC may be attributed to excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation. 2. The incidence of NMSC is increasing: 2-3 million people are diagnosed worldwide annually, with an average yearly increase of 3-8% among white populations in Australia, Europe, the US and Canada over the last 30 years. 3. The link between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and certain forms of NMSC is clearly recognized. It is estimated that outdoor workers are exposed to an UV radiation dose 2-3 times higher than indoor workers, and there is a growing body of research linking UV radiation exposure in outdoor workers to NMSC: I. Occupationally UV-exposed workers are at least at a 43% higher risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and almost doubled risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared to the average population, with risk increasing with decreasing latitude. II. The risk for BCC, SCC and actinic keratosis (AK) among workers who have worked outdoors for more than 5 years is 3-fold higher than the risk among those with no years of working outdoors. 4. Primary prevention, early detection, treatment and regular follow-up of skin cancer (NMSC and melanoma) are shown to be beneficial from a health economic perspective. 5. Action is needed at international, European and national level to legislate for recognizing AK and NMSC as an occupational disease, which has the potential to improve access to compensation and drive preventative activities. 6. This report is a Call to Action for: I. The engagement of key stakeholders, including supranational institutions, national governments, trade organizations, employers, workers and patient organizations to drive change in prevention and protection of at-risk groups. II. Employers should be obliged to prevent outdoor worker's UV exposure from exceeding limit values

  13. Efficacy of cryosurgery and 5-fluorouracil cream 0.5% combination therapy for the treatment of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Hoover, William D; Jorizzo, Joseph L; Clark, Adele R; Feldman, Steven R; Holbrook, Judy; Huang, Karen E

    2014-11-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are on a continuum of progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The most common AK treatment modalities are lesion-directed cryosurgery and field-directed therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, side effects can affect patient compliance. This study was performed to determine the efficacy and perceived side effects of combination treatment with cryosurgery and a shortened course of 5-FU cream 0.5% for AK lesions. Sixty participants with AK lesions underwent cryosurgery and were then randomized to apply 5-FU cream 0.5% or comparator cream once daily to the study area for 1 week. Participants were evaluated at weeks 3, 4, 8, and 26. After 8 weeks, treatment with cryosurgery and 5-FU cream 0.5% was more likely to result in complete clearance versus cryosurgery alone; however, no statistical difference was found in the complete clearance of AK lesions in the treatment group compared to cryosurgery alone at 26 weeks, while side effects in the treatment group were decreased. This study demonstrated the benefit of combination treatment of cryosurgery with 1 week of 5-FU compared to cryosurgery alone in clearing AK lesions for 2 months. This study shows promise for future studies with larger sample sizes to illustrate increased efficacy and decreased side effects with combination treatment of AKs with cryosurgery and 5-FU. PMID:25474455

  14. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... growths on the skin caused by too much sun exposure). Diclofenac is in a class of medications called ... side effects.talk to your doctor before applying sunscreen or cosmetics to skin that is being treated ...

  15. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin to treat arthritis pain. This monograph only gives information about diclofenac gel (Solaraze; generic) for ... or peeling skin.Diclofenac gel (Solaraze; generic) is only for use on the skin. Be careful not ...

  16. Inverted follicular keratosis successfully treated with imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Ozlu, Emin; Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Oman, Berkant

    2016-01-01

    Inverted follicular keratosis is a rare benign tumor of the follicular infundibulum characterized by exo-endophytic growing. It is thought to be a rare variant of the seborrheic keratosis. The diagnosis of inverted follicular keratosis is generally established histopathologically because clinical differentiation from other lesions is difficult. Herein, we present one such rare case, successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod cream. PMID:27294052

  17. Inverted follicular keratosis successfully treated with imiquimod

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Ozlu, Emin; Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Oman, Berkant

    2016-01-01

    Inverted follicular keratosis is a rare benign tumor of the follicular infundibulum characterized by exo-endophytic growing. It is thought to be a rare variant of the seborrheic keratosis. The diagnosis of inverted follicular keratosis is generally established histopathologically because clinical differentiation from other lesions is difficult. Herein, we present one such rare case, successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod cream. PMID:27294052

  18. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response.

  19. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  20. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  1. A Network Meta-Analysis of the Relative Efficacy of Treatments for Actinic Keratosis of the Face or Scalp in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Vegter, Stefan; Tolley, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Background Several treatments are available for actinic keratosis (AK) on the face and scalp. Most treatment modalities were compared to placebo and therefore little is known on their relative efficacy. Objectives To compare the different treatments for mild to moderate AK on the face and scalp available in clinical practice in Europe. Methods A network meta-analysis (NMA) was performed on the outcome “complete patient clearance”. Ten treatment modalities were included: two 5-aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapies (ALA-PDT), applied as gel (BF-200 ALA) or patch; methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT); three modalities with imiquimod (IMI), applied as a 4-week or 16-week course with 5% imiquimod, or a 2–3 week course with 3.75% imiquimod; cryotherapy; diclofenac 3% in 2.5% hyaluronic acid; 0.5% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); and ingenol mebutate (IMB). The only data available for 5% 5-FU was from one small study and was determined to be too limited to be reliably included in the analysis. For BF-200 ALA and MAL-PDT, data from illumination with narrow-band lights were selected as these are typically used in clinical practice. The NMA was performed with a random-effects Bayesian model. Results 25 trials on 5,562 patients were included in the NMA. All active treatments were significantly better than placebo. BF-200 ALA showed the highest efficacy compared to placebo to achieve total patient clearance. BF-200 ALA had the highest probability to be the best treatment and the highest SUCRA score (64.8% and 92.1%), followed by IMI 5% 4 weeks (10.1% and 74.2%) and 5-FU 0.5% (7.2% and 66.8%). Conclusions This NMA showed that BF-200 ALA, using narrow-band lights, was the most efficacious treatment for mild to moderate AK on the face and scalp. This analysis is relevant for clinical decision making and health technology assessment, assisting the improved management of AK. PMID:24892649

  2. Solar keratosis: epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Cara; Foley, Peter; Freeman, Michael; Chong, Alvin H

    2007-05-01

    Solar keratosis is a common problem encountered by dermatologists, particularly in Australia. Solar keratosis is most commonly found on sun-exposed areas such as the scalp, face and forearms. UV radiation is thought to be the major aetiological factor, with age, immunosuppression and human papillomavirus being important contributing factors. Solar keratosis usually presents as a discrete, variably erythematous and irregular lesion with a scaly surface. Although the exact rate of malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma is unknown, the majority of squamous cell carcinomas appear to arise from within solar keratosis. For this reason, solar keratosis is commonly treated and, consequently, an increasing number of therapeutic options is now available. Traditional therapies, such as liquid nitrogen cryotherapy, are still popular, but newer choices, such as photodynamic therapy and imiquimod cream, are now providing further options with similar efficacy and superior adverse effect profiles, albeit at a higher cost. PMID:17535191

  3. Treatment Options for Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  4. Ingenol mebutate gel treatment for actinic cheilitis: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Barrado Solís, Nerea; Molés Poveda, Paula; Lloret Ruiz, César; Pont Sanjuan, Virginia; Velasco Pastor, Manel; Quecedo Estébanez, Esther; Miquel Miquel, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) are premalignant lesions that have an increased risk of malignant transformation. Their treatment, therefore, is essential to prevent carcinogenesis. However, optimal therapy is not well established and different modalities yield variable results. Ingenol mebutate gel has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for topical treatment of actinic keratosis, with high clearance rates. On the basis of these findings, we report our experience with this drug for the treatment of AC. PMID:25545762

  5. Increased beta-actin and tubulin polymerization in regrowing axons: relationship to the conditioning lesion effect.

    PubMed

    Lund, Linda M; Machado, Victor M; McQuarrie, Irvine G

    2002-12-01

    Spinal motor neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats were examined to determine which of the neuronal isoforms of actin (beta or gamma) upregulate following axon injury. In situ hybridization studies showed greater beta-actin mRNA levels but no change in gamma-actin mRNA levels-suggesting that axon regrowth utilizes beta-actin. We radiolabeled the newly synthesized actin and tubulin that are subsequently transported in the axon to the site of an axotomizing injury. This allowed us to evaluate changes in polymerization as new cytoskeletal elements approach the injury site. Previous studies had shown that the rate of the most rapid subcomponent of actin and tubulin transport (called SCb) accelerates following axotomy (J. Jacob and I. McQuarrie, J. Neurobiol. 22: 570-583, 1991). This rate increase is associated with an increased proportion of SCb tubulin and actin in polymer (vs monomer) form (J. Jacob and I. McQuarrie, J. Neurosci, Res. 43: 412-419, 1996). However, in that study newly synthesized proteins were radiolabeled at 7 days after axotomy-which is at the peak of increased protein synthesis. This time-course did not examine actin and tubulin that were already in transit in axons when the injury occurred. This actin and tubulin would enter the regrowing axons first. Here, we have radiolabeled newly synthesized proteins 3 days prior to axotomy. For beta-tubulin, the ratio of monomer to polymer was unaffected. For actin, the equilibrium shifted strongly toward polymerization. We conclude that the acceleration of axonal outgrowth seen after the second of two serial axotomies (the "conditioning lesion effect") is related to the ability of actin that is already in transit to polymerize in response to the first axotomy. PMID:12504890

  6. [Chronic lichenoid keratosis].

    PubMed

    Skorupka, M; Kuhn, A; Mahrle, G

    1992-02-01

    We report on a 41-year-old woman with keratosis lichenoides chronica, a disorder first described by Kaposi in 1886 as "lichen moniliformis", who later also developed chronic lymphatic leukaemia. Since Kaposi's original report, 38 additional cases have been reported. Occurrence of keratosis lichenoides chronica associated with malignant disorders has not previously been described. PMID:1548136

  7. [Procedure for daylight methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy to treat actinic keratoses].

    PubMed

    Girard, C; Adamski, H; Basset-Séguin, N; Beaulieu, P; Dreno, B; Riboulet, J-L; Lacour, J-P

    2016-04-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK), also known as solar keratosis or pre-cancerous keratosis, is frequently observed in areas of skin exposed to sunlight, particularly in light-skinned patients. In France, photodynamic therapy using red light (conventional PDT) and methylamino 5-levulinate (MAL) is indicated in the treatment of thin or non-hyperkeratotic and non-pigmented multiple AK lesions or large zones covered with AK lesions. It is well-known for its efficacy but also for its side effects, especially pain during illumination, which can limit its use. An alternative to PDT using natural daylight has recently been proposed to treat actinic keratosis lesions, and results in greater flexibility as well as significant reduction in pain. The lesions are prepared as for conventional PDT, with MAL cream being applied by the physician or the patient, after which they are exposed to natural daylight for 2hours. The lesions are then gently cleansed and protected from natural light for 24hours. This paper seeks to provide a precise description of the daylight PDT procedure for the treatment of AK. PMID:27016200

  8. White oral lesions, actinic cheilitis, and leukoplakia: confusions in terminology and definition: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A

    2010-01-01

    Many diseases affecting the cutaneous tissues may incur observable changes to the mucosal tissues of the oral cavity. As a consequence, the dermatologist should always assess the oral mucosal tissues of their patients as a matter of routine. Equivocal lesions should be referred to a dentist for further assessment. Although most encountered white oral lesions are innocuous, some potentially serious conditions may mimic an innocuous white lesion. As examples, oral lichen planus may cause significant patient discomfort and is associated with some degree of increased malignant risk, whereas actinic cheilitis and leukoplakia have a confirmed association with an increased malignant risk. This contribution reviews the characteristics and management strategies for some of the more common white oral lesions that the dermatologist may observe in clinical practice. PMID:20541677

  9. Prevalence of precancerous skin lesions and non-melanoma skin cancer in Japanese-Brazilians in Bauru, São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, Priscila; Marques, Sílvio Alencar; Hirai, Amélia Toyomi; Marques, Mariangela E A; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique; Yamada, Sérgio

    2009-05-01

    Precancerous lesions and skin cancer are infrequent in Asians, and have received little documentation in the literature. Brazil has the world's largest contingent of Japanese immigrants and their descendants, and 70% live in the State of São Paulo. The prevalence of such skin lesions in Japanese-Brazilians is unknown. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of actinic keratoses and non-melanoma skin cancer in first and second-generation Japanese-Brazilians over 30 years of age, without miscegenation, living in the city of Bauru, São Paulo State, in 2006. Of the 567 Japanese-Brazilians that underwent dermatological examination, actinic keratosis was diagnosed in 76, with a mean age of 68.9 years, and a single case of basal cell carcinoma was detected in a 39-year-old female patient. In Japan, prevalence of actinic keratosis varies from 0.76% to 5%, and the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer is 1.2 to 5.4/100 thousand. Japanese-Brazilians from Bauru showed a 13.4% prevalence of actinic keratoses and earlier age at onset. Proximity to the Equator and a history of farming contribute to these higher rates. Presence of solar melanosis was associated with a 1.9-fold risk of developing actinic keratosis. PMID:19488481

  10. Seborrheic keratosis over genitalia masquerading as Buschke Lowenstein tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, N.; Venkatesan, S.; Mohanasundari, P. S.; Thilagavathy, S.; Elangovan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a common benign condition of the skin. It does not usually appear before middle age. Upper trunk and face are the sites most commonly involved. Lesions are also frequently seen on the extremities. SK of the genitalia is a rare entity. It has been frequently mistaken as genital warts and differentiation is made only on histopathology. We report a case of SK with polypoidal lesions restricted to the skin on and around the genitalia since 10 years. SK should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pedunculated lesions of the penis. The histopathology after shave excision is diagnostic. PMID:26392661

  11. Seborrheic keratosis over genitalia masquerading as Buschke Lowenstein tumor.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N; Venkatesan, S; Mohanasundari, P S; Thilagavathy, S; Elangovan, P

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a common benign condition of the skin. It does not usually appear before middle age. Upper trunk and face are the sites most commonly involved. Lesions are also frequently seen on the extremities. SK of the genitalia is a rare entity. It has been frequently mistaken as genital warts and differentiation is made only on histopathology. We report a case of SK with polypoidal lesions restricted to the skin on and around the genitalia since 10 years. SK should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pedunculated lesions of the penis. The histopathology after shave excision is diagnostic. PMID:26392661

  12. Dermatofibroma simulating seborrheic keratosis dermoscopically*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Daniel Holanda; Leite, Camila Pinon Zoby; Araujo, Gabriela Diniz de Souza; Teixeira, Márcia Almeida Galvão; Alencar, Eliane Ruth Barbosa; Cavalcanti, Silvana Maria de Morais

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibroma is a frequent benign tumor of easy clinical diagnosis in most cases, but that can mimic other dermatoses. Dermoscopy may help to define the diagnosis and its classical pattern is a central white area, similar to a scar, surrounded by a discrete pigment network. However, dermoscopic findings are not always typical. We describe here a case of dermatofibroma exhibiting ridges, furrows and pseudocomedos, a pattern which is typical of seborrheic keratosis, in dermoscopy. PMID:27438205

  13. Dermoscopic Features of Facial Pigmented Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Yana; Attia, Enas A. S.; Souid, Khawla; Vasilenko, Inna V.

    2013-01-01

    Four types of facial pigmented skin lesions (FPSLs) constitute diagnostic challenge to dermatologists; early seborrheic keratosis (SK), pigmented actinic keratosis (AK), lentigo maligna (LM), and solar lentigo (SL). A retrospective analysis of dermoscopic images of histopathologically diagnosed clinically-challenging 64 flat FPSLs was conducted to establish the dermoscopic findings corresponding to each of SK, pigmented AK, LM, and SL. Four main dermoscopic features were evaluated: sharp demarcation, pigment pattern, follicular/epidermal pattern, and vascular pattern. In SK, the most specific dermoscopic features are follicular/epidermal pattern (cerebriform pattern; 100% of lesions, milia-like cysts; 50%, and comedo-like openings; 37.50%), and sharp demarcation (54.17%). AK and LM showed a composite characteristic pattern named “strawberry pattern” in 41.18% and 25% of lesions respectively, characterized by a background erythema and red pseudo-network, associated with prominent follicular openings surrounded by a white halo. However, in LM “strawberry pattern” is widely covered by psewdonetwork (87.5%), homogenous structureless pigmentation (75%) and other vascular patterns. In SL, structureless homogenous pigmentation was recognized in all lesions (100%). From the above mentioned data, we developed an algorithm to guide in dermoscopic features of FPSLs. PMID:23431466

  14. Nilotinib-Induced Keratosis Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wai Mun Sean; Aw, Chen Wee Derrick

    2016-01-01

    Nilotinib is a second-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is approved for the treatment of imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia expressing the Bcr-Abl mutation. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur more frequently in patients using this medication. We present a case of nilotinib-induced keratosis pilaris that did not have accompanying symptoms of alopecia or pruritus. Greater recognition of this association is needed so that appropriate treatment can be instituted to ensure a good oncologic outcome. PMID:27194977

  15. Thermographic diagnostics to discriminate skin lesions: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringasci, Mirian Denise; Moriyama, Lilian Tan; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is responsible for about 13% of all causes of death in the world. Over 7 million people die annually of this disease. In most cases, the survival rates are greater when diagnosed in early stages. It is known that tumor lesions present a different temperature compared with the normal tissues. Some studies have been performed in an attempt to establish new diagnosis methods, targeting this temperature difference. In this study, we aim to investigate the use of a handheld thermographic camera to discriminate skin lesions. The patients presenting Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Actinic Keratosis, Pigmented Seborrheic Keratosis, Melanoma or Intradermal Nevus lesions have been investigated at the Skin Departament of Amaral Carvalho Hospital. Patients are selected by a dermatologist, and the lesion images are recorded using an infrared camera. The images are evaluated taken into account the temperature level, and differences into lesion areas, borders, and between altered and normal skin. The present results show that thermography may be an important tool for aiding in the clinical diagnostics of superficial skin lesions.

  16. Nilontinib induced keratosis pilaris atrophicans.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Shilpi; Sood, Apra; Billings, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a disorder of follicular keratinization that is characterized by keratin plugs in the hair follicles with surrounding erythema. A 46-year-old man with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was started on nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Two months later the patient noticed red bumps on the skin and patchy hair loss on the arms, chest, shoulders, back, and legs. Cutaneous reactions to nilotinib are the most frequent non-hematologic adverse effects reported. However, it is important to distinguish KP-like eruptions from more severe drug hypersensitivity eruptions, which can necessitate discontinuing the medication. Also, it is important to classify the cutaneous eruptions in patients on TKI according to the morphology instead of labeling them all as "chemotherapy eruption" to be able to better manage these adverse effects. PMID:27617940

  17. Clinical and Histopathological Investigation of Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common epidermal tumors of the skin. However, only a few large-scale clinicohistopathological investigations have been conducted on SK or on the possible correlation between histopathological SK subtype and location. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and histopathological features of a relatively large number of cases of diagnosed SK. Methods Two hundred and seventy-one pathology slides of skin tissue from patients with clinically diagnosed SK and 206 cases of biopsy-proven SK were analyzed. The biopsy-proven cases of SK were assessed for histopathological subclassification. The demographic, clinical, and histopathological data of the patients were collected for analysis of associated factors. Results The most frequent histopathological subtype was the acanthotic type, followed by mixed, hyperkeratotic, melanoacanthoma, clonal, irritated, and adenoid types; an unexpectedly high percentage (9.2%) of the melanoacanthoma variant was observed. The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites than in sun-protected sites (p=0.028). Premalignant and malignant entities together represented almost one-quarter (24.2%) of the clinicopathological mismatch cases (i.e., mismatch between the clinical and histopathological diagnoses). Regarding the location of SK development, the frequency of mismatch for the sun-exposed areas was significantly higher than that for sun-protected areas (p=0.043). Conclusion The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites. Biopsy sampling should be performed for lesions situated in sun-exposed areas to exclude other premalignant or malignant diseases. PMID:27081260

  18. Follicular keratosis of the chin treated with 1.24R-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ointment.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Makoto; Takeda, Kiminobu; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinya; Ishizaki, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In follicular keratosis of the chin, keratotic follicular papules occur on the chin and jaw due to localized prolonged pressure and friction on the naked skin. We present one patient with this disorder. The dermatoscopic examination revealed many well-demarcated yellow spindle bodies in the patchy lesion. Therapy with 1.24R-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ointment was effective during the treatment but had no residual positive effect. PMID:17845168

  19. Clinical practice trends in cryosurgery: a retrospective study of cutaneous lesions

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Ceren Dagar; Karaca, Semsettin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cryosurgery is an alternative treatment for many benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions of the skin. Aim To review the indications of cryosurgery for cutaneous lesions. Material and methods The retrospective study was based on the assessment of medical records of 1031 dermatology patients who had cryosurgery. Results One thousand two hundred and forty-four sessions of cryosurgery were applied to the total of 1031 patients. Of the 1031 patients, the most frequent indication for cryosurgery was common warts which were present in 535 (61.59%) patients, followed by anogenital warts in 119 (11.54%) patients, callosity in 81 (7.85%) patients, actinic keratosis in 77 (7.46%) patients, molluscum contagiosum in 35 (3.39%) patients, and other benign or malignant skin lesions. Conclusions Cryosurgery is still a valuable treatment of choice in various benign, premalignant, and malignant skin diseases but seems to be underused for indications other than viral warts. PMID:26015777

  20. Giant Seborrheic Keratosis of the Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Amiya Kumar; Kumari, Rashmi; Rajesh, G; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Basu, Debdatta

    2012-01-01

    Genital seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a rare entity, which can be easily misdiagnosed as genital warts. Dermoscopy is a useful tool to make diagnosis of SK in such cases. We report a 50-year-old woman with a large polypoidal growth on the external genitalia. Dermoscopic examination showed fissures and ridges, cerebriform appearance, and comedo-like openings consistent with SK. The histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of SK. PMID:22837573

  1. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: Case-based review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Federica; Peroni, Anna; Colato, Chiara; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-08-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a rare dermatological condition characterized by keratotic papules arranged in a parallel linear or reticular pattern and facial lesions resembling seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea. The clinical, histological and therapeutic information on 71 patients with KLC retrieved through a PubMed search plus one our new case were analyzed. KLC affects patients of all ages, with a modest male predominance. Pediatric cases represent about one quarter of patients. Diagnosis is usually delayed and histologically confirmed. All patients have thick, rough and scaly papules and plaques arranged in a linear or reticular pattern, on limbs (>80%) and trunk (about 60%). Face involvement is described in two-thirds of patients. Lesions are usually asymptomatic or mildly pruritic. Other manifestations, such as palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal involvement, ocular manifestations, nail dystrophy, are reported in 20-30% of patients. Children present more frequently alopecia. No controlled trials are available. Results from small case series or single case reports show that the best treatment options are phototherapy and systemic retinoids, alone or in combination, with nearly half of patients reaching complete remission. Systemic corticosteroids as well as antibiotics and antimalarials are not effective. PMID:26652284

  2. Association of Dowling-Degos disease and multiple seborrheic keratosis in a "Christmas tree pattern"

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Vitorino Modesto; Pereira, Nayanne Lays dos Santos; Silva, Renata Faria; Silva, Fabio Henrique de Oliveira; Garcia, Cacilda Joyce Ferreira da Silva; Sousa, Maria Aparecida Alves de Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease is a rare sporadic or autosomal dominant pigmentary entity, in which clusters of papules and reticulate macules slowly develop with predominance in flexural regions. This entity is due to mutations in the keratin 5 gene, and is related with other cutaneous disorders. We report the sporadic form of Dowling-Degos disease in an elderly man with multiple seborrheic keratosis in a "Christmas tree" pattern. Worthy of note in this case study is the lesions evolved for over than 30 years. The aim is to describe the association of these keratoses with Dowling-Degos disease in a healthy man. PMID:25405133

  3. Epidermal permeability barrier in the treatment of keratosis pilaris.

    PubMed

    Kootiratrakarn, Tanawatt; Kampirapap, Kowit; Chunhasewee, Chakkrapong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate and compare the efficacy, safety, hydrating properties, and tolerability of 10% lactic acid (LA) and 5% salicylic acid (SA) in the therapy of keratosis pilaris (KP). Material and Method. Patients with KP were randomized for treatment with either 10% LA or 5% SA creams being applied twice daily for 3 months. The patients were clinically assessed at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment and 4 weeks after treatment. The functional properties of the stratum corneum (SC) were determined before treatment, 12 weeks, and follow-up phase by high-frequency conductance and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Results. At the end of the trial, the mean reduction of the lesions from baseline was statistically significant for 10% LA (66%) and 5% SA (52%). During the treatment, higher conductance values were found on both group and this improvement was maintained until the follow up period. No significant differences in transepidermal water loss were observed after treatment. The adverse effects were limited to mild irritation localized on the skin without systemic side effect. Conclusion. The study demonstrated that 10% LA and 5% SA are beneficial to treat KP with the significantly clearance and marked improvement as by instrumental evaluation. PMID:25802513

  4. Epidermal Permeability Barrier in the Treatment of Keratosis Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Kootiratrakarn, Tanawatt; Kampirapap, Kowit; Chunhasewee, Chakkrapong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate and compare the efficacy, safety, hydrating properties, and tolerability of 10% lactic acid (LA) and 5% salicylic acid (SA) in the therapy of keratosis pilaris (KP). Material and Method. Patients with KP were randomized for treatment with either 10% LA or 5% SA creams being applied twice daily for 3 months. The patients were clinically assessed at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment and 4 weeks after treatment. The functional properties of the stratum corneum (SC) were determined before treatment, 12 weeks, and follow-up phase by high-frequency conductance and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Results. At the end of the trial, the mean reduction of the lesions from baseline was statistically significant for 10% LA (66%) and 5% SA (52%). During the treatment, higher conductance values were found on both group and this improvement was maintained until the follow up period. No significant differences in transepidermal water loss were observed after treatment. The adverse effects were limited to mild irritation localized on the skin without systemic side effect. Conclusion. The study demonstrated that 10% LA and 5% SA are beneficial to treat KP with the significantly clearance and marked improvement as by instrumental evaluation. PMID:25802513

  5. Natural history and management of keratosis, atypia, carcinoma-in situ, and microinvasive cancer of the larynx.

    PubMed

    Gillis, T M; Incze, J; Strong, M S; Vaughan, C W; Simpson, G T

    1983-10-01

    Keratosis, atypia, carcinoma in situ, and microinvasive cancer occurring as white or red patches on the vocal cords are part of the diathesis of cancer of the aerodigestive tract and represented a sequential continuum. Excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment for identification and potential cure of the lesion. If the margins of excision are inadequate, further treatment options are either reexcision or radiotherapy. Radiotherapy should be used only when the need for voice conservation prevails. Cessation of smoking does not remove the potential for progression of the disease, therefore, all patients must be followed indefinitely. Excisional biopsy of keratosis, carcinoma in situ, and microinvasive cancer of the larynx offers an excellent prognosis for voice preservation and survival. PMID:6625098

  6. Keratosis Follicularis Spinulosa Decalvans: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Malvankar, Dipali D; Sacchidanand, S

    2015-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans is a disorder affecting the hair follicles characterized by scarring alopecia of the scalp, eyebrows, and axillae, sometimes associated with photophobia and keratoderma. Being X-linked, it is more commonly seen in males but can be rarely seen in females also. We report three cases of this rare disorder including one in a female. PMID:26622157

  7. Actinic Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a precancerous condition related to cumulative lifetime sun exposure. The lower lip is most often affected. Individuals ... Wearing barrier clothing (eg, wide-brimmed hats) and sunscreen-containing lip balms can aid in preventing actinic ...

  8. Do actinic keratoses and superficial squamous cell carcinomas have a specific immunoprofile?

    PubMed

    Wells, James W

    2015-01-01

    The link between actinic keratosis (AK), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and a fully functional immune system has been frequently observed but is poorly understood. Elderly and immunosuppressed individuals and those with weakened immune systems caused by disease are all at increased risk of developing AK and/or SCC. This risk is particularly enhanced at sites that receive high levels of ultraviolet exposure from the sun, which is thought to be a driver of DNA mutations in the skin. The immune system appears to play a key role in preventing these mutations from progressing to malignant disease. AK is often considered to be a pre-cancerous lesion that may develop into SCC. However, the vast majority of AKs, in contrast to SCCs, regress naturally or in response to immune-modifying medications. The cellular mechanisms involved in this immune-based process remain elusive and raise the following question: does the immune make-up or immune functionality within AK differ fundamentally from that within SCC? This chapter will outline the skin as a site of considerable immunological activity, highlight the consequences of dysregulated immune activity in the skin, and discuss what little we know of immune infiltrates and their associated functions within AK and SCC. PMID:25561204

  9. Actinic reticuloid

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  10. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser for Keratosis Pilaris: A Single-Blind, Randomized, Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Vachiramon, Vasanop; Anusaksathien, Pattarin; Kanokrungsee, Silada; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a common condition which can frequently be cosmetically disturbing. Topical treatments can be used with limited efficacy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser for the treatment of KP. Patients and Methods. A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, intraindividual comparative study was conducted on adult patients with KP. A single session of fractional CO2 laser was performed to one side of arm whereas the contralateral side served as control. Patients were scheduled for follow-up at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment. Clinical improvement was graded subjectively by blinded dermatologists. Patients rated treatment satisfaction at the end of the study. Results. Twenty patients completed the study. All patients stated that the laser treatment improved KP lesions. At 12-week follow-up, 30% of lesions on the laser-treated side had moderate to good improvement according to physicians' global assessment (p = 0.02). Keratotic papules and hyperpigmentation appeared to respond better than the erythematous component. Four patients with Fitzpatrick skin type V developed transient pigmentary alteration. Conclusions. Fractional CO2 laser treatment may be offered to patients with KP. Dark-skinned patients should be treated with special caution. PMID:27247936

  11. Multiple Human Papilloma Virus 16 Infection Presenting as Various Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Jun Ho

    2016-06-01

    The 53-year-old woman admitted with multiple persistent, progressive, slightly raised, red, and crusted plague form masses that suddenly occurred on left thumb, both upper and lower extremity about 10 years ago. There was no induration in the lesion or in its surrounding skin. There was no unusual opinion on a radiologic test and family history. And she had no history of working in the business related to any chemical product such as arsenic or tar which was carcinogen. The patient has had total hysterectomy to treat uterine myoma 10 years ago. The wide excision and split thickness skin graft of 2 × 1.5 cm was performed around mass in the size of 1.5 × 1.2 cm on the left thumb and wide excision and local advancement flap was done on the other sites. As a result of biopsy, masses were diagnosed as Bowen disease, actinic keratosis, and Seborrheic keratosis. These specimens were obtained during surgery: broom-type cell sampling devices were used to collect samples from the specimens, and they were placed into PreservCyt solution (Cytyc Corp, Boxborough, MA). Then, the collected samples underwent the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics, Branchburg, NJ) that allows for the simultaneous identification of human papilloma virus (HPV) types from liquid-based cell preparations. On histopathological examination of the surgical specimen, atypical squamous cells proliferate through the whole thickness of the epidermis. The entire tumor was confined to the epidermis and did not invade into the dermis. The cells were often highly atypical. That were the irregular shape which the resection margin of masses had a negative tumor component. And HPV 16 genotyping test was positive although vaginal examination of HPV 16 genotyping was negative. PMID:27192658

  12. Actinic Prurigo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Georgina; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Mancheno-Valencia, Alexandra; Solís-Arias, Martha Patricia; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, María Teresa; Domínguez-Soto, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis that affects the skin, as well as the labial and conjunctival mucosa in indigenous and mestizo populations of Latin America. It starts predominantly in childhood, has a chronic course, and is exacerbated with solar exposure. Little is known of its pathophysiology, including the known mechanisms of the participation of HLA-DR4 and an abnormal immunologic response with increase of T CD4+ lymphocytes. The presence of IgE, eosinophils, and mast cells suggests that it is a hypersensitivity reaction (likely type IVa or b). The diagnosis is clinical, and the presence of lymphoid follicles in the mucosal histopathologic study of mucosa is pathognomonic. The best available treatment to date is thalidomide, despite its secondary effects. PMID:26861426

  13. Clinical Features of Cutaneous Premalignant Lesions in Busan City and the Eastern Gyeongnam Province, Korea: A Retrospective Review of 1,292 Cases over 19 Years (1995~2013)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The global prevalence of premalignant lesions has been continuously increasing in recent years, but there has been little research regarding the distribution and incidence of cutaneous premalignant lesions in Korean populations. Objective We conducted this retrospective study to analyze recent trends in the incidence and clinical patterns of cutaneous premalignant lesions in the Korean population. Methods We reviewed 1,292 cases (3,651 lesions) of patients with cutaneous premalignant lesions, including actinic keratosis (AK) and Bowen's disease (BD), from the Department of Dermatology at Dong-A University Hospital (January 1995 to December 2013). Results The average cutaneous premalignant lesion annual incidence was 1.82%, and the incidence continuously increased from 0.70% to 4.25% over the study period. The most common cutaneous premalignant lesion was AK (75.85%), followed by BD (24.15%). The mean age of onset was 68.76 years (men, 70.89 years; women, 65.56 years), and the male:female ratio of patients was 1:1.52. Major skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, 8.90%), basal cell carcinoma (BCC, 6.42%), and malignant melanoma (MM, 0.70%), were detected in 15.79% of patients with cutaneous premalignant lesions. Three patients (0.23%) were previously diagnosed with both SCC and BCC. In addition, 59.13% of patients had a single lesion, while 40.87% had multiple lesions. Patient age, history of previous skin cancers, and occupation-related exposure to ultraviolet radiation were more common in patients with multiple lesions. Conclusion Cutaneous premalignant lesion incidence has gradually increased in the Korean population. PMID:27081263

  14. Epidemiology of actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Green, Adèle C

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of actinic keratoses (AKs) reflects their causation by cumulative sun exposure, with the highest prevalence seen in pale-skinned people living at low latitudes and on the most sun-exposed body sites, namely the hands, forearms and face. AKs are markers of increased risk of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, especially when they are numerous and have coalesced into an area of 'field cancerisation'. The major risk factors are male sex, advanced age, sun-sensitive complexion, high lifetime sun exposure and prolonged immunosuppression. Clinical counts of AKs enable the assessment and monitoring of AK burden, but accurate counting is notoriously difficult, especially when skin is severely sun damaged. AK counting has been repeatedly shown to be unreliable, even among expert dermatologists. Notwithstanding these challenges, qualitative assessment of the natural history of AKs shows a high turnover, with new lesions developing and with other lesions regressing. A very small proportion of AKs undergo malignant transformation, but the precise rate of transformation is unknown due to the inaccuracies in monitoring AK lesions over time. Primary prevention of AKs is achieved by limiting intense sun exposure through sun-protective behaviour, including seeking deep shade, wearing sun-protective clothing and applying sunscreen regularly to exposed skin, from an early age. PMID:25561199

  15. Topical AC-11 abates actinic keratoses and early squamous cell cancers in hairless mice exposed to Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation.

    PubMed

    Mentor, Julian M; Etemadi, Amir; Patta, Abrienne M; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2015-04-01

    AC-11 is an aqueous extract of the botanical, Uncaria tomentosa, which has a variety of effects that enhance DNA repair and down regulate inflammation. AC-11 is essentially free of oxindole alkaloids (< 0.05%, w/w) but contains more than 8% carboxy alkyl esters (CAEs) as their active ingredients. Three groups of 10 outbred SK-1 hairless or SK-II hairless strains of mice each were treated with AC-11 at 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.0% in a non-irritating, dye-free, perfume-free, and fragrance-free vanishing cream vehicle. Ten mice used vehicle only and 10 were untreated. Each concentration of AC-11 and was applied daily to the backs of the mice prior to exposure to a 1,600-watt solar simulator used in this work (Solar Light Co. Philadelphia, PA) emitting (mainly Ultraviolet A (UVA) and B (UVB) radiation) duration of the experimental period with UVB wavelengths was filtered out with a 1.0 cm Schott WG 345 filter. AC-11 with a peak absorption at 200nm does act as a sun block. We tested for and focused on clinical appearance of mice and histological appearance of tumors in mice rather than metrics of radiation generated inflammation. Tumor progression scores were assigned as follows: 4+ = extensive tumor development; 3+ = early malignancies (raised palpable plaques)(early squamous cell cancers) 2+ = firm scaling, palpable keratosis (actinic keratoses); 1+ = light scaling with erythema. Following a total cumulative dose of 738 J/cm2, 85.7% all of the irradiated control animals, which did not receive AC-11 had precancerous actinic keratosis (AK)-type lesions (2+) (64.3% versus 42.9%) or early squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (3+) (21.4% vs. 4.8%), in comparison with 47.7 % of AC-11-treated animals. There were no significant differences between the AC-11 groups. Three months after cessation of exposure to UVA radiation, the lesions in all but three of the 14 animals which were treated with AC-11 that were still evaluable irradiated with UVA radiation progressed to papillomas and frank

  16. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty or scaly ... photosensitizing agents. When aminolevulinic acid is activated by light, it damages the cells of actinic keratosis lesions.

  17. Actinic prurigo of the lip: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Ana Mo; Ferrari, Thiago M; Werneck, Juliana T; Junior, Arley Silva; Cunha, Karin S; Dias, Eliane P

    2014-08-16

    Actinic prurigo is a photodermatosis that can affect the skin, conjunctiva and lips. It is caused by an abnormal reaction to sunlight and is more common in high-altitude living people, mainly in indigenous descendants. The diagnosis of actinic prurigo can be challenging, mainly when lip lesions are the only manifestation, which is not a common clinical presentation. The aim of this article is to report two cases of actinic prurigo showing only lip lesions. The patients were Afro-American and were unaware of possible Indian ancestry. Clinical exam, photographs, videoroscopy examination and biopsy were performed, and the diagnosis of actinic prurigo was established. Topical corticosteroid and lip balm with ultraviolet protection were prescribed with excellent results. The relevance of this report is to show that although some patients may not demonstrate the classical clinical presentation of actinic prurigo, the associated clinical and histological exams are determinants for the correct diagnosis and successful treatment of this disease. PMID:25133153

  18. Actinic prurigo of the lip: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Ana MO; Ferrari, Thiago M; Werneck, Juliana T; Junior, Arley Silva; Cunha, Karin S; Dias, Eliane P

    2014-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is a photodermatosis that can affect the skin, conjunctiva and lips. It is caused by an abnormal reaction to sunlight and is more common in high-altitude living people, mainly in indigenous descendants. The diagnosis of actinic prurigo can be challenging, mainly when lip lesions are the only manifestation, which is not a common clinical presentation. The aim of this article is to report two cases of actinic prurigo showing only lip lesions. The patients were Afro-American and were unaware of possible Indian ancestry. Clinical exam, photographs, videoroscopy examination and biopsy were performed, and the diagnosis of actinic prurigo was established. Topical corticosteroid and lip balm with ultraviolet protection were prescribed with excellent results. The relevance of this report is to show that although some patients may not demonstrate the classical clinical presentation of actinic prurigo, the associated clinical and histological exams are determinants for the correct diagnosis and successful treatment of this disease. PMID:25133153

  19. Morphometric analysis of suprabasal cells in oral white lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Shabana, A H; el-Labban, N G; Lee, K W; Kramer, I R

    1989-01-01

    Surgical specimens from the cheek mucosa of 73 patients with white lesions were studied to determine various morphometric parameters that would help differentiate between the various types of oral mucosal white lesions that carry a risk of malignant change. Four cell types were represented: traumatic keratosis, leucoplakia, candidal leucoplakia and lichen planus, in addition to a control group of normal mucosa. The shape and size of the epithelial cells in two cell compartments, parabasal and spinous, were investigated by an interactive image analysis system (IBAS-1). The results showed an increase in the cell size in the parabasal cell compartment of all the white lesions compared with the normal mucosa. In the spinous cell compartment there was an increase in the cell size in lichen planus and traumatic keratosis; leucoplakia and candidal leucoplakia showed a slight decrease in cell size compared with the normal mucosa. Attempts to discriminate between the four groups of white lesions showed that these parameters can provide a high level of separation between lichen planus and the three other groups, but not between leucoplakia, candidal leucoplakia, and traumatic keratosis. PMID:2703543

  20. Actin in Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kari L.; Baines, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Actin is important for a variety of cellular processes, including uptake of extracellular material and intracellular transport. Several emerging lines of evidence indicate that herpesviruses exploit actin and actin-associated myosin motors for viral entry, intranuclear transport of capsids, and virion egress. The goal of this review is to explore these processes and to highlight potential future directions for this area of research. PMID:21994736

  1. Actin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, C; Schekman, R

    1982-01-01

    Inhibition of DNase I activity has been used as an assay to purify actin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast actin). The final fraction, obtained after a 300-fold purification, is approximately 97% pure as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. Like rabbit skeletal muscle actin, yeast actin has a molecular weight of about 43,000, forms 7-nm-diameter filaments when polymerization is induced by KCl or Mg2+, and can be decorated with a proteolytic fragment of muscle myosin (heavy meromyosin). Although heavy meromyosin ATPase activity is stimulated by rabbit muscle and yeast actins to approximately the same Vmax (2 mmol of Pi per min per mumol of heavy meromyosin), half-maximal activation (Kapp) is obtained with 14 micro M muscle actin, but requires approximately 135 micro M yeast actin. This difference suggests a low affinity of yeast actin for muscle myosin. Yeast and muscle filamentous actin respond similarly to cytochalasin and phalloidin, although the drugs have no effect on S. cerevisiae cell growth. Images PMID:6217414

  2. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  3. The Effect of Multiple Sequential Light Sources to Activate Aminolevulinic Acid in the Treatment of Actinic Keratoses: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Mitchel P.; Fabi, Sabrina G.; Guiha, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of research regarding the sequential use of multiple light sources for topical 5-aminolevulinic acid activation in photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis. This study evaluated 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis using blue light combined with red light, pulsed dye laser, and/or intense pulsed light in a retrospective fashion. Field-directed 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy was performed with blue light only, blue light + pulsed dye laser, blue light + intense pulsed light, blue light + pulsed dye laser + intense pulsed light, or blue light + red light + pulsed dye laser + intense pulsed light for nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses of face, scalp, or upper trunk. Blue light + intense pulsed light + pulsed dye laser produced greater patient-reported improvement in actinic keratoses than blue light or blue light + intense pulsed light and greater subject-reported improvement in overall skin quality than blue light + intense pulsed light. The addition of red light led to no further benefit in either outcome measure. Photodynamic therapy with multiple, sequential laser and light sources led to greater patient-graded improvement in actinic keratoses than that with a single light source (blue light), without significant differences in post-treatment adverse events. However, the small, widely disparate number of patients between groups and follow-up times between patients, as well as retrospective assessments based on subjective patient recall, severely limit the significance of these findings. Nevertheless, the results raise interesting questions regarding the use of multiple light and laser sources for photodynamic therapy of actinic keratoses and warrant further research with a prospective, randomized, controlled study. PMID:25276272

  4. Direct dynamin–actin interactions regulate the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changkyu; Yaddanapudi, Suma; Weins, Astrid; Osborn, Teresia; Reiser, Jochen; Pollak, Martin; Hartwig, John; Sever, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin assembles into higher order structures that are thought to promote endocytosis. Dynamin also regulates the actin cytoskeleton through an unknown, GTPase-dependent mechanism. Here, we identify a highly conserved site in dynamin that binds directly to actin filaments and aligns them into bundles. Point mutations in the actin-binding domain cause aberrant membrane ruffling and defective actin stress fibre formation in cells. Short actin filaments promote dynamin assembly into higher order structures, which in turn efficiently release the actin-capping protein (CP) gelsolin from barbed actin ends in vitro, allowing for elongation of actin filaments. Together, our results support a model in which assembled dynamin, generated through interactions with short actin filaments, promotes actin polymerization via displacement of actin-CPs. PMID:20935625

  5. Genetic heterogeneity in families with non-epidermolytic palmar plantar keratosis

    SciTech Connect

    Spurr, N.K.; Kelshell, D.P.; Stevens, H.

    1994-09-01

    Following reports of linkage close to the keratin gene cluster in families with tylosis and the detection of mutations in the keratin 9 gene cosegregating in families with epidermolytic palmar plantar keratoderma (EPPK, and EPPK associated with breast and ovarian cancer), we have identified families with three phenotypically distinct forms of non-epidermolytic keratosis with either punctate, diffuse or focal keratoderma, one with diffuse lesions and one with punctate and malignancies. Initially we typed these families with 17q markers close to the keratin gene cluster; this included a dinucleotide repeat marker within the keratin 9 gene. Two point linkage analysis of the focal keratoderma family showed a positive lod score of 3.2 at a theta of 0 from the marker D17S855. The lod score for the diffuse family was -6.0 at a theta of 0.05 from the marker D17S776. The second focal keratoderma family showed a haplotype consistent with linkage to 17q close to the keratin gene cluster. A second keratin gene cluster has been mapped in humans on 12q, and we decided to test the unlinked diffuse and punctate keratoderma families with markers in that region. We used the markers: D12S87-D12S85-D12S368-D12S96-D12S90. Linkage analysis of the diffuse family gave a lod score of 3.1 at a theta of 0 from the marker D12S368. Currently studies are underway to look for mutations in specific keratin genes in the clusters on 17q and 12q that segregate with the observed phenotypes. The punctate keratoderma family gave lod scores of -3.9 at a theta of 0.55 with D17S855 and -6.0 at a theta of 0.05 with D12S90/D12S83. This would lead us to the conclusion that a separate susceptibility locus must exist for the punctate family associated with malignancy. Investigations of candidate regions are in progress.

  6. Actin Mechanics and Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell physiological processes require the regulation and coordination of both mechanical and dynamical properties of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we review recent advances in understanding the mechanical properties and stability of actin filaments and how these properties are manifested at larger (network) length scales. We discuss how forces can influence local biochemical interactions, resulting in the formation of mechanically sensitive dynamic steady states. Understanding the regulation of such force-activated chemistries and dynamic steady states reflects an important challenge for future work that will provide valuable insights as to how the actin cytoskeleton engenders mechanoresponsiveness of living cells. PMID:25957404

  7. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  8. Actin Automata with Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón; Adamatzky, Andy

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in eukaryotic. The actin filaments play the roles of cytoskeleton, motility units, information processing and learning. We model actin filament as a double chain of finite state machines, nodes, which take states “0” and “1”. The states are abstractions of absence and presence of a subthreshold charge on actin units corresponding to the nodes. All nodes update their state in parallel to discrete time. A node updates its current state depending on states of two closest neighbors in the node chain and two closest neighbors in the complementary chain. Previous models of actin automata consider momentary state transitions of nodes. We enrich the actin automata model by assuming that states of nodes depend not only on the current states of neighboring node but also on their past states. Thus, we assess the effect of memory of past states on the dynamics of acting automata. We demonstrate in computational experiments that memory slows down propagation of perturbations, decrease entropy of space-time patterns generated, transforms traveling localizations to stationary oscillators, and stationary oscillations to still patterns.

  9. The Molecular Evolution of Actin

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, Robin C.; Meagher, Richard B.

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the molecular evolution of plant and nonplant actin genes comparing nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 20 actin genes. Nucleotide changes resulting in amino acid substitutions (replacement substitutions) ranged from 3–7% for all pairwise comparisons of animal actin genes with the following exceptions. Comparisons between higher animal muscle actin gene sequences and comparisons between higher animal cytoplasmic actin gene sequences indicated <3% divergence. Comparisons between plant and nonplant actin genes revealed, with two exceptions, 11–15% replacement substitution. In the analysis of plant actins, replacement substitution between soybean actin genes SAc1, SAc3, SAc4 and maize actin gene MAc1 ranged from 8–10%, whereas these members within the soybean actin gene family ranged from 6–9% replacement substitution. The rate of sequence divergence of plant actin sequences appears to be similar to that observed for animal actins. Furthermore, these and other data suggest that the plant actin gene family is ancient and that the families of soybean and maize actin genes have diverged from a single common ancestral plant actin gene that originated long before the divergence of monocots and dicots. The soybean actin multigene family encodes at least three classes of actin. These classes each contain a pair of actin genes that have been designated kappa (SAc1, SAc6), lambda (SAc2, SAc4) and mu (SAc3, SAc7). The three classes of soybean actin are more divergent in nucleotide sequence from one another than higher animal cytoplasmic actin is divergent from muscle actin. The location and distribution of amino acid changes were compared between actin proteins from all sources. A comparison of the hydropathy of all actin sequences, except from Oxytricha, indicated a strong similarity in hydropathic character between all plant and nonplant actins despite the greater number of replacement substitutions in plant actins. These protein sequence

  10. Intranuclear Actin Regulates Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Uzer, Gunes; Thompson, William R.; Styner, Maya; Wu, Xin; Rubin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton induces nuclear trafficking of regulatory proteins and global effects on gene transcription. We here show that in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cytochalasin D treatment causes rapid cofilin-/importin-9-dependent transfer of G-actin into the nucleus. The continued presence of intranuclear actin, which forms rod-like structures that stain with phalloidin, is associated with induction of robust expression of the osteogenic genes osterix and osteocalcin in a Runx2-dependent manner, and leads to acquisition of osteogenic phenotype. Adipogenic differentiation also occurs, but to a lesser degree. Intranuclear actin leads to nuclear export of Yes-associated protein (YAP); maintenance of nuclear YAP inhibits Runx2 initiation of osteogenesis. Injection of cytochalasin into the tibial marrow space of live mice results in abundant bone formation within the space of 1 week. In sum, increased intranuclear actin forces MSC into osteogenic lineage through controlling Runx2 activity; this process may be useful for clinical objectives of forming bone. PMID:26140478

  11. The application of 5-aminolevulinic acid in the treatment of precancerous lesions, skin cancer, and a new approach to the control of therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulas, Zbigniew; Bereś-Pawlik, Elżbieta; Bieniek, Andrzej; Matusiak, Łukasz

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our work was to determine a therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Twenty five patients with the Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma (superficial, nodular) were examined. They were treated with photosensitizer - aminolevulinic acid (metabolized in protoporphyrin IX), and the new red light source built of high-power diodes. A new method, based on numerical analysis of fluorescence imaging of tissues, was proposed as a way for controlling therapy.

  12. Safety and efficacy of a novel short occlusive regimen of imiquimod for selected non-melanotic skin lesions in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Das, G; Tan, B; Nicholls, K

    2016-03-01

    Australian patients remain at very high risk of non-melanotic skin cancer after renal transplantation. Surgical excision offers a cure but destroys tissue and may jeopardise function and cosmesis. We report excellent safety and efficacy using topical imiquimod in a novel short intensive regimen in 10 renal transplant patients with superficial basal cell carcinomas, Bowen disease or actinic keratosis. Outcomes compare well to those reported with extended-use imiquimod protocols. PMID:26968597

  13. Myosins, Actin and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kruppa, Antonina J; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-08-01

    Myosin motor proteins working together with the actin cytoskeleton drive a wide range of cellular processes. In this review, we focus on their roles in autophagy - the pathway the cell uses to ensure homeostasis by targeting pathogens, misfolded proteins and damaged organelles for degradation. The actin cytoskeleton regulated by a host of nucleating, anchoring and stabilizing proteins provides the filament network for the delivery of essential membrane vesicles from different cellular compartments to the autophagosome. Actin networks have also been implicated in structurally supporting the expanding phagophore, moving autophagosomes and enabling efficient fusion with the lysosome. Only a few myosins have so far been shown to play a role in autophagy. Non-muscle myosin IIA functions in the early stages delivering membrane for the initial formation of the autophagosome, whereas myosin IC and myosin VI are involved in the final stages providing specific membranes for autophagosome maturation and its fusion with the lysosome. PMID:27146966

  14. [(18) F]-Fluorodeoxy-d-glucose uptake-positive seborrhoeic keratosis on positron emission tomography may result from high expression of glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Kariya, T; Kato, Y; Kanzaki, A; Kanda, Y; Ohara, T; Tsuboi, R

    2016-07-01

    [(18) F]-Fluorodeoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is known to be highly accurate in differentiating benign lesions from malignant lesions. In rare cases, benign tumours, viral infections and sarcoidosis of the skin have been reported to show FDG uptake, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report the first documented case of seborrhoeic keratosis (SK) showing increased FDG uptake. FDG PET-CT can be used to detect enhanced glycolysis of tumour cells by measuring increased levels of glucose transporters (GLUTs) indicative of higher glucose uptake. GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in this case was compared with that in PET-negative SK and two normal skin samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction with paraffin-embedded tissue. The expression of GLUT1 and GLUT3 was higher in PET-positive SK than in PET-negative SK or normal skin. More specifically, the expression of GLUT3 was observed only in the PET-positive case. This study revealed that high GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in SK might be associated with the uptake of FDG. PMID:26801868

  15. O’Brien Actinic Granuloma: A Case Report and Brief Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Inês D; Ramos, Leonor I C; Brites, Maria M; Tellechea, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    O’Brien first described the actinic granuloma in 1975, as an infrequent granulomatous disorder occurring in sun-exposed skin, with a slow but often self-limited course. Ever since its initial description, the actinic physiopathogenic hypothesis has been debated by many authors. We report a 60-year-old female rural worker that presented with a 14 × 7 cm annular lesion with erythematous elevated borders and an atrophic center on the right calf. The lesion was evolving for 2 years, and histopathology confirmed actinic granuloma. She started acitretin with halting of disease progression after 6 months of therapy. Our case can also be associated to actinic damage, despite its unusual location, therefore highlighting the role of solar elastosis in the development of O’Brien actinic granuloma. PMID:26288411

  16. Combination of 595-nm pulsed dye laser, long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion treatment for keratosis pilaris: retrospective analysis of 26 Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Choi, Min Ju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Chung, Won Soon; Kim, Young Koo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2013-06-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) has beenpresented as small keratotic follicular papules with or without surrounding erythema. Various treatments with laser or light therapy have been used for the management of KP with various clinical outcomes. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy and safety of a combination therapy for KP. A total of 29 anatomical sites with KP in 26 patients were treated using a 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) with nonpurpuragenic fluences, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion. Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing preand posttreatment clinical photographs and patient satisfaction rates. Evaluation of the clinical results three months after the treatments showed that 12 of the 29 anatomical sites (41.4%) demonstrated Grade 3 clinical improvement, ten (34.5%) had Grade 2 clinical improvement, four (13.8%) showed Grade 1 improvement, and three (10.3%) showed Grade 4 improvement. We observed that KP lesions improved not only in erythema and skin texture, but also in brownish dyschromias. Potential adverse events were not observed, except prolonged posttherapy scaling. Our observations demonstrate that combination therapy using a 595-nm PDL, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion can have a positive therapeutic effect on KP. PMID:23464682

  17. Bidirectional actin transport is influenced by microtubule and actin stability.

    PubMed

    Chetta, Joshua; Love, James M; Bober, Brian G; Shah, Sameer B

    2015-11-01

    Local and long-distance transport of cytoskeletal proteins is vital to neuronal maintenance and growth. Though recent progress has provided insight into the movement of microtubules and neurofilaments, mechanisms underlying the movement of actin remain elusive, in large part due to rapid transitions between its filament states and its diverse cellular localization and function. In this work, we integrated live imaging of rat sensory neurons, image processing, multiple regression analysis, and mathematical modeling to perform the first quantitative, high-resolution investigation of GFP-actin identity and movement in individual axons. Our data revealed that filamentous actin densities arise along the length of the axon and move short but significant distances bidirectionally, with a net anterograde bias. We directly tested the role of actin and microtubules in this movement. We also confirmed a role for actin densities in extension of axonal filopodia, and demonstrated intermittent correlation of actin and mitochondrial movement. Our results support a novel mechanism underlying slow component axonal transport, in which the stability of both microtubule and actin cytoskeletal components influence the mobility of filamentous actin. PMID:26043972

  18. Recurrent presumed herpes simplex keratitis and episcleritis in keratosis follicularis (Darier's disease).

    PubMed

    Radia, Meera; Gilhooley, Michael James; Panos, Chris; Claoué, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis (Darier's disease) is an autosomal dominant dermatological disorder characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation and loss of normal cell-to-cell adhesion. Cardinal features include diffuse hyperkeratotic warty papules with scaly plaques in seborrhoeic regions with associated mucous membrane changes. Darier's disease is rare (prevalence 2.7 in 100,000), with few ocular sequelae reported: commonly dry eye with or without Sjögren's syndrome. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, to describe a case of recurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis and episcleritis in a 47-year-old man suffering from Darier's disease. The patient's condition predisposed him towards developing ocular complications due to several factors: impaired desmosome function leading to poor cell-to-cell adhesion in the corneal epithelium, dry eye and HSV invasion of inflamed periocular skin presumably combining to allow viral colonisation of a poorly protected cornea. PMID:26184361

  19. Keratosis pilaris

    MedlinePlus

    ... very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). The condition is generally worse in winter and ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Eczema Skin Conditions Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  20. Keratosis Pilaris

    MedlinePlus

    ... alpha-hydroxy acids such as glycolic acid or lactic acid Creams containing urea Over-the-counter cortisone cream ( ... strength alpha- or beta-hydroxy acids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid) Prescription-strength urea A retinoid such ...

  1. [Intraepidermal mass of M. leprae in a case of seborrheic keratosis due to Hansen's disease (LLs)].

    PubMed

    Yajima, M; Suzuki, K; Wen, M; Yamada, N; Asano, G

    1995-11-01

    A 67-year-old patient has had exanthema in the lower right limb since 51 years ago (16 years old at onset), which underwent repeated remission and recurrence. At present, he has bilateral symmetrical widespread infiltrating exanthema and asymmetrical marked neuralhypertrophy, and has been diagnosed typical LLs (His father had the same disease). The exanthema recurred several years ago, and the patient is being treated for Hansen's disease. He had a dark brown flat elevation with a rough surface and the size of a small finger tip in his right abdominal skin for approximately 20 years. A biopsy was performed, and the specimen was fixed in 10% formalin and paraffin sections were prepared for histopathologic examination. A part of the specimen was processed forscanning electron microscopic examination. Seborrheic keratosis was diagnosed by H & E staining. Acid-fast (FITE) staining, immunohistochemical staining (keratin, S-100 protein, anti-PGL antibody and anti-BCG antibody) and scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of bacteria (M. leprae) in the dermal foam cells, the matrix with a banded structure and the squamous epithelial cells which normally lack phagocytosis function. Compared to the basal cells of normal epidermis, the basal cells located adjacent to the dermis affected with seborrheic keratosis showed increased proliferation and more marked characteristics of a germinative cell. The degree of differentiation of the basal cells appeared regressed, and they probably possessed augmented phagocytic activity. The phagocytosed bacteria were probably carried by the epidermal cell cycle toward the surface layer. However, bacteria could not be found in the stratum corneum, probably due to an association with the lysosome. PMID:8582883

  2. Squamous Cell Carcinoma as the Most Common Lesion of the Tongue in Iranians: a 22-Year Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, Nafiseh; Lotfi, Ali; Motazadian, Hamid Reza; Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The tongue has been globally considered as an indicator of general health for millennia. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and distribution of tongue lesions in an Iranian population. In this retrospective study, data from 6,435 oral biopsy reports over a 22-year period (1992-2014) were retrieved from archives of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department, Shahid Beheshti Dental School, Tehran, Iran. These reports were analyzed according to age, sex, type of lesion and location. Prevalence of tongue lesions were reported as percentages. Out of total oral lesions, 238 (3.7%) were found in the tongue, with the incidence peak (42%) being between 41-60 years. Men constituted 53% and women 47%of patients. The youngest patient was a 3-year-old girl with pyogenic granuloma and the oldest one was a 93-year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC was the most common (25%) lesion generally found in the lateral border of the tongue with a male predilection. The second and third most prevalent lesions of the tongue were benign keratosis (frictional keratosis) (13.4%) and leukoplakia (13%).White-red lesions (38.6%) were the most frequent subgroup followed by neoplastic lesions (28%). Moreover, irritation fibroma, non-specific ulcers, squamous papilloma, and hemangioma were found as the most frequent lesions in their related subgroups.Given the high rate of SCC of the tongue in Iranian patients, this area should be examined more carefully by dental practitioners and physicians. PMID:27039782

  3. Actin-based phagosome motility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangliang; Southwick, Frederick S; Purich, Daniel L

    2002-10-01

    Despite abundant evidence of actin's involvement at the particle internalization stage of phagocytosis, little is known about whether phagosomes undergo the same type of actin-based motility as observed with endocytic vesicles or such intracellular pathogens as Listeria and Shigella. By employing video microscopy to follow the fate of latex bead-containing phagosomes within the cytoplasm of bone marrow macrophages, we have made the novel observation of actin-based phagosome motility. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized, bovine serum albumin (or BSA) -coated or uncoated latex beads all formed actin-rich rocket tails that persisted only during a brief, 1-2 min period of actin-based motility. Average speeds of actin-based phagosome motility were 0.13 +/- 0.06 microm/s for IgG-coated beads, 0.14 +/- 0.04 microm/s for BSA-coated beads, and 0.11+/- 0.03 microm/s for uncoated beads. Moreover, the speeds and motile-phase duration of each type of phagosome were comparable to the behavior of pinosomes [Merrifield et al., 1999: Nat. Cell Biol. 1:72-74.]. Determination of optimal conditions for observing and analyzing actin-based phagosome motility should facilitate future investigations of phagocytosis and phagosome maturation. PMID:12211106

  4. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner. PMID:24637338

  5. Bacterial actins and their diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ozyamak, Ertan; Kollman, Justin M.; Komeili, Arash

    2015-01-01

    For many years bacteria were considered rather simple organisms, but the dogmatic notion that subcellular organization is a eukaryotic trait has been overthrown for more than a decade. The discovery of homologs of the eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, and intermediate filaments in bacteria has been instrumental in changing this view. Over the recent years we gained an incredible level of insight into the diverse family of bacterial actins and their molecular workings. Here we review the functional, biochemical and structural features of the most well-studied bacterial actins. PMID:24015924

  6. ACD toxin-produced actin oligomers poison formin-controlled actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Heisler, David B.; Kudryashova, Elena; Grinevich, Dmitry O.; Suarez, Cristian; Winkelman, Jonathan D.; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Kovar, David R.; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin crosslinking domain (ACD) is an actin-specific toxin produced by several pathogens, including life-threatening spp. of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Actin crosslinking by ACD is thought to lead to slow cytoskeleton failure owing to a gradual sequestration of actin in the form of nonfunctional oligomers. Here we found that ACD converted cytoplasmic actin into highly toxic oligomers that potently “poisoned” the ability of major actin assembly proteins, formins, to sustain actin polymerization. Thus, ACD can target the most abundant cellular protein by employing actin oligomers as secondary toxins to efficiently subvert cellular functions of actin while functioning at very low doses. PMID:26228148

  7. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  8. Regulation of water flow by actin-binding protein-induced actin gelatin.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, T; Suzuki, A; Stossel, T P

    1992-01-01

    Actin filaments inhibit osmotically driven water flow (Ito, T., K.S. Zaner, and T.P. Stossel. 1987. Biophys. J. 51: 745-753). Here we show that the actin gelation protein, actin-binding protein (ABP), impedes both osmotic shrinkage and swelling of an actin filament solution and reduces markedly the concentration of actin filaments required for this inhibition. These effects depend on actin filament immobilization, because the ABP concentration that causes initial impairment of water flow by actin filaments corresponds to the gel point measured viscometrically and because gelsolin, which noncovalently severs actin filaments, solates actin gels and restores water flow in a solution of actin cross-linked by ABP. Since ABP gels actin filaments in the periphery of many eukaryotic cells, such actin networks may contribute to physiological cell volume regulation. PMID:1318095

  9. Potentially malignant oral lesions: clinicopathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Maia, Haline Cunha de Medeiros; Pinto, Najara Alcântara Sampaio; Pereira, Joabe Dos Santos; Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa de; Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas da; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of potentially malignant oral lesions, and evaluate and correlate their clinical and pathological aspects. Methods The sample consisted of cases clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, and oral lichen planus treated at a diagnostic center, between May 2012 and July 2013. Statistical tests were conducted adopting a significance level of 5% (p≤0.05). Results Out of 340 patients, 106 (31.2%) had potentially malignant oral lesions; and 61 of these (17.9%) were submitted to biopsy. Actinic cheilitis was the most frequent lesion (37.5%) and the lower lip was the most affected site (49.6%). Among 106 patients in the sample, 48 (45.3%) reported nicotine consumption, 35 (33%) reported alcohol intake and 34 (32.1%) sun exposure while working. When clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compared, oral erythroplakia and atypical ulcer were the lesions that exhibited greater compatibility (100% each). Conclusion In most cases, clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compatible. An association between the occurrence of erythroplakia, leukoplakia and erythroleukoplakia with smoking was observed. Similarly, an association between actinic cheilitis and sun exposure was noted. Erythroleukoplakia presented the highest malignancy grade in this study. Finally, dental surgeons should draw special attention to diagnosis of potentially malignant oral lesions, choose the best management, and control the lesions to avoid their malignant transformation. PMID:27074232

  10. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  11. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  12. p53 AND MDM2 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN ACTINIC CHEILITIS

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Maria da Conceição Andrade; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Moreira, André Luis Gomes; Reis, Sílvia Regina Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant lip lesion caused by excessive and prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to histomorphological alterations indicative of abnormal cell differentiation. In this pathology, varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia may be found. There are few published studies regarding the p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis. Fifty-eight cases diagnosed with actinic cheilitis were histologically evaluated using Banóczy and Csiba (1976) parameters, and were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using the streptavidin-biotin method in order to assess p53 and MDM2 protein expression. All studied cases expressed p53 proteins in basal and suprabasal layers. In the basal layer, the nuclei testing positive for p53 were stained intensely, while in the suprabasal layer, cells with slightly stained nuclei were predominant. All cases also tested positive for the MDM2 protein, but with varying degrees of nuclear expression and a predominance of slightly stained cells. A statistically significant correlation between the percentage of p53 and MDM2-positive cells was established, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. The expression of p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis can be an important indicator in lip carcinogenesis, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. PMID:19082401

  13. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  14. Actin engine in immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Piragyte, Indre; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2012-06-01

    T cell activation and function require physical contact with antigen presenting cells at a specialized junctional structure known as the immunological synapse. Once formed, the immunological synapse leads to sustained T cell receptor-mediated signalling and stabilized adhesion. High resolution microscopy indeed had a great impact in understanding the function and dynamic structure of immunological synapse. Trends of recent research are now moving towards understanding the mechanical part of immune system, expanding our knowledge in mechanosensitivity, force generation, and biophysics of cell-cell interaction. Actin cytoskeleton plays inevitable role in adaptive immune system, allowing it to bear dynamic and precise characteristics at the same time. The regulation of mechanical engine seems very complicated and overlapping, but it enables cells to be very sensitive to external signals such as surface rigidity. In this review, we focus on actin regulators and how immune cells regulate dynamic actin rearrangement process to drive the formation of immunological synapse. PMID:22916042

  15. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  16. Apoptosis and apoptotic pathway in actinic prurigo by immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-González, Juan-Carlos; García-Vázquez, Francisco-Javier; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika; Farfán-Morales, José-Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Actinic prurigo (AP) is an idiopathic photodermatosis, this entity requires exposure to UV-B and -A to develop lesions. Apoptosis is a physiological death program that can be initiated by a permanently active mechanism (extrinsic pathway) or irreparable damage (intrinsic pathway). Material and Methods Descriptive study, the sample size comprised 64 paraffin blocks of tissue with a diagnosis of AP. In H&E-stained slides, the diagnosis of AP was corroborated, and 1-µm-thick sections were processed for immunohistochemistry (IHC). A database was constructed with SPSS version 20, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA, and descriptive statistics were analyzed by X2 test and comparison of means. Results A total of 64 cases were processed, of which 40 (62.5%) were cheilitis AP and 24 (37.5%) were AP in the skin. Of the 40 cheilitis samples, 27 were positive for Bcl-2 and caspase 3 (67.5%), p53 was expressed in 30 (75%). Of the skin lesions,p53 and caspase 3 were expressed in 18 of 24 cases (75%), and 13 were positive for Bcl-2 (54%). Conclusions We propose that apoptosis is the last step in the type IV subtype a-b hypersensitivity response-activation of the intrinsic pathway indicates that external factors, such as UV-A and -B are the trigger. Key words:Apoptosis, actinic prurigo, cheilitis actinic prurigo. PMID:26615506

  17. Correlation of serum IgE levels and clinical manifestations in patients with actinic prurigo*

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Lievanos-Estrada, Zahide; Vega-Memije, Maria Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, Maria Teresa; Dominguez-Soto, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis, the pathophysiology of which has been hypothesized to involve subtype IV type b (Th2) hypersensitive response, whereby IL4, IL5, and IL13 are secreted and mediate the production of B cells, IgE, and IgG4. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of serum IgE levels and the clinical severity of injuries. METHODS: This case-control study comprised patients with a clinical and histopathological diagnosis of actinic prurigo, as well as clinically healthy subjects, from whom 3cc of peripheral blood was taken for immunoassay. Cases were classified by lesion severity as mild, moderate, and severe. Descriptive statistics were analyzed, and chi-square test was performed. RESULTS: We included 21 actinic prurigo patients and 21 subjects without disease; 11 patients with actinic prurigo had elevated serum IgE levels, and 10 had low serum levels. Six actinic prurigo (AP) patients with elevated serum levels of IgE had moderate injuries, 4 had severe injuries, and 1 had minor injuries. Eight out of 10 patients with normal IgE levels presented with minor injuries in the clinical evaluation. The 21 controls did not have increased serum IgE levels. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated IgE levels are associated with moderate to severe clinical lesions, suggesting that actinic prurigo entails a type IV subtype b hypersensitivity response in which Th2 cells predominate. PMID:26982774

  18. Histopathologic Distinguishing Features Between Lupus and Lichenoid Keratosis on the Face

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Amanda F.; Dacso, Mara; High, Whitney A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of lichenoid keratosis (LK) on the face is not well characterized, and the histopathologic distinction between LK and lupus erythematosus (LE) occurring on the face is often indeterminate. The authors aimed to describe differences between LE and LK occurring on the face by hematoxylin and eosin alone. Methods: Cases of LK and LE were obtained using computer-driven queries. Clinical correlation was obtained for each lupus case. Other diagnoses were excluded for the LK cases. Hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections were reviewed. Results: Forty-five cases of LK and 30 cases of LE occurring on the face were identified. Shared features included follicular involvement, epidermal atrophy, pigment incontinence, paucity of eosinophils, and basket-weave orthokeratosis. Major differences between LK and LE, respectively, included perivascular inflammation (11%, 90%), high Civatte bodies (44%, 7%), solar elastosis (84%, 33%), a predominate pattern of cell-poor vacuolar interface dermatitis (7%, 73%), compact follicular plugging (11%, 50%), hemorrhage (22%, 70%), mucin (0%, 77%), hypergranulosis (44%, 17%), and edema (7%, 60%). A predominate pattern of band-like lichenoid interface was seen more commonly in LK as compared with LE (93% vs. 27%). Conclusions: The authors established the occurrence of LK on the face and identified features to help distinguish LK from LE. Follicular involvement, basket-weave orthokeratosis, pigment incontinence, paucity of eosinophils, and epidermal atrophy were not reliable distinguishing features. Perivascular inflammation, cell-poor vacuolar interface, compact follicular plugging, mucin, hemorrhage, and edema favored LE. High Civatte bodies, band-like lichenoid interface, and solar elastosis favored LK. PMID:26588332

  19. Chronology of lichen planus-like keratosis features by dermoscopy: a summary of 17 cases

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Soko; Sawada, Mizuki; Dekio, Itaru; Ishizaki, Sumiko; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Dermoscopic findings for 17 cases of lichen planus-like keratosis (LPLK) were chronologically evaluated. Three males and 14 females were included in the study and the ages ranged from 43 to 85 years (median 65 years). Three cases were diagnosed based on stereotypical dermoscopic findings, while the other 14 cases were histopathologically diagnosed as LPLK. Dermoscopy photographs were divided into four groups depending on the number of days (D) from the initial visit: 1) D = 0 (initial visit or biopsy day); 2) D = 61 to 180; 3) D = 181 to 270; 4) D = 271 to 360. Dermoscopic findings, described as light brown pseudonetwork, pinkish area, gray pseudonetwork, annular granular structures, and blue-gray fine dots, were evaluated at every visit to the hospital. Initial dermoscopy features included light brown pseudonetworks due to residual solar lentigo and overlapping pinkish areas attributed to lichenoid inflammation. Annular granular structures and gray pseudonetwork appeared to be the main features of the regressing stage; these features seemed to progress to “blue-gray fine dots” in the late regressing stage. Blue-gray dots or globules reflecting melanophages, the hallmark dermoscopic features of LPLK, were believed to resolve in approximately one to two years. Based on the clinical and dermoscopic observations, we have specified five stages of evolution of LPLK, namely 1) pre-existing solar lentigo, 2) early inflammatory stage, 3) early regressing stage, 4) regressing stage, and 5) late regressing stage. The limitations of the study are that this is a small-sized, retrospective, observational study and that ethnicity of participants is limited to Japanese patients with skin phototype III. PMID:27222769

  20. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  1. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredez, Alexander R.; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C.; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host. PMID:21444821

  2. Steady-state nuclear actin levels are determined by export competent actin pool.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Huet, Guillaume; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2013-10-01

    A number of studies in the last decade have irrevocably promoted actin into a fully fledged member of the nuclear compartment, where it, among other crucial tasks, facilitates transcription and chromatin remodeling. Changes in nuclear actin levels have been linked to different cellular processes: decreased nuclear actin to quiescence and increased nuclear actin to differentiation. Importin 9 and exportin 6 transport factors are responsible for the continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of actin, but the mechanisms, which result in modulated actin levels, have not been characterized. We find that in cells growing under normal growth conditions, the levels of nuclear actin vary considerably from cell to cell. To understand the basis for this, we have extensively quantified several cellular parameters while at the same time recording the import and export rates of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged actin. Surprisingly, our dataset shows that the ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity, but not nuclear shape, size, cytoplasm size, or their ratio, correlates negatively with both import and export rate of actin. This suggests that high-nuclear actin content is maintained by both diminished import and export. The high nuclear actin containing cells still show high mobility of actin, but it is not export competent, suggesting increased binding of actin to nuclear complexes. Creation of such export incompetent actin pool would ensure enough actin is retained in the nucleus and make it available for the various nuclear functions described for actin. PMID:23749625

  3. Actin dynamics: from nanoscale to microscale.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders E

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic nature of actin in cells manifests itself constantly. Polymerization near the cell edge is balanced by depolymerization in the interior, externally induced actin polymerization is followed by depolymerization, and spontaneous oscillations of actin at the cell periphery are frequently seen. I discuss how mathematical modeling relates quantitative measures of actin dynamics to the rates of underlying molecular level processes. The dynamic properties addressed include the rate of actin assembly at the leading edge of a moving cell, the disassembly rates of intracellular actin networks, the polymerization time course in externally stimulated cells, and spontaneous spatiotemporal patterns formed by actin. Although several aspects of actin assembly have been clarified by increasingly sophisticated models, our understanding of rapid actin disassembly is limited, and the origins of nonmonotonic features in externally stimulated actin polymerization remain unclear. Theory has generated several concrete, testable hypotheses for the origins of spontaneous actin waves and cell-edge oscillations. The development and use of more biomimetic systems applicable to the geometry of a cell will be key to obtaining a quantitative understanding of actin dynamics in cells. PMID:20462375

  4. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  5. Actin Interacting Protein1 and Actin Depolymerizing Factor Drive Rapid Actin Dynamics in Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Robert C.; Pattavina, Kelli A.; Tüzel, Erkan; Vidali, Luis; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    The remodeling of actin networks is required for a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, several actin binding proteins have been implicated in remodeling cortical actin filaments (F-actin). However, the extent to which these proteins support F-actin dynamics in planta has not been tested. Using reverse genetics, complementation analyses, and cell biological approaches, we assessed the in vivo function of two actin turnover proteins: actin interacting protein1 (AIP1) and actin depolymerizing factor (ADF). We report that AIP1 is a single-copy gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens. AIP1 knockout plants are viable but have reduced expansion of tip-growing cells. AIP1 is diffusely cytosolic and functions in a common genetic pathway with ADF to promote tip growth. Specifically, ADF can partially compensate for loss of AIP1, and AIP1 requires ADF for function. Consistent with a role in actin remodeling, AIP1 knockout lines accumulate F-actin bundles, have fewer dynamic ends, and have reduced severing frequency. Importantly, we demonstrate that AIP1 promotes and ADF is essential for cortical F-actin dynamics. PMID:22003077

  6. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  7. Quantifying actin wave modulation on periodic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parker, Joshua; Fourkas, John; Carlsson, Anders; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Actin is the essential builder of the cell cytoskeleton, whose dynamics are responsible for generating the necessary forces for the formation of protrusions. By exposing amoeboid cells to periodic topographical cues, we show that actin can be directionally guided via inducing preferential polymerization waves. To quantify the dynamics of these actin waves and their interaction with the substrate, we modify a technique from computer vision called ``optical flow.'' We obtain vectors that represent the apparent actin flow and cluster these vectors to obtain patches of newly polymerized actin, which represent actin waves. Using this technique, we compare experimental results, including speed distribution of waves and distance from the wave centroid to the closest ridge, with actin polymerization simulations. We hypothesize the modulation of the activity of nucleation promotion factors on ridges (elevated regions of the surface) as a potential mechanism for the wave-substrate coupling. Funded by NIH grant R01GM085574.

  8. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced actin glutathionylation controls actin dynamics in neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Jiro; Li, Jingyu; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Mondal, Subhanjan; Bajrami, Besnik; Hattori, Hidenori; Jia, Yonghui; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Zhong, Jia; Ye, Keqiang; Chang, Christopher J; Ho, Ye-Shih; Zhou, Jun; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The regulation of actin dynamics is pivotal for cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis, and thus is crucial for neutrophils to fulfill their roles in innate immunity. Many factors have been implicated in signal-induced actin polymerization, however the essential nature of the potential negative modulators are still poorly understood. Here we report that NADPH oxidase-dependent physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) negatively regulate actin polymerization in stimulated neutrophils via driving reversible actin glutathionylation. Disruption of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1), an enzyme that catalyzes actin deglutathionylation, increased actin glutathionylation, attenuated actin polymerization, and consequently impaired neutrophil polarization, chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Consistently, Grx1-deficient murine neutrophils showed impaired in vivo recruitment to sites of inflammation and reduced bactericidal capability. Together, these results present a physiological role for glutaredoxin and ROS- induced reversible actin glutathionylation in regulation of actin dynamics in neutrophils. PMID:23159440

  9. The Design of MACs (Minimal Actin Cortices)

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Sven K; Heinemann, Fabian; Chwastek, Grzegorz; Schwille, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The actin cell cortex in eukaryotic cells is a key player in controlling and maintaining the shape of cells, and in driving major shape changes such as in cytokinesis. It is thereby constantly being remodeled. Cell shape changes require forces acting on membranes that are generated by the interplay of membrane coupled actin filaments and assemblies of myosin motors. Little is known about how their interaction regulates actin cell cortex remodeling and cell shape changes. Because of the vital importance of actin, myosin motors and the cell membrane, selective in vivo experiments and manipulations are often difficult to perform or not feasible. Thus, the intelligent design of minimal in vitro systems for actin-myosin-membrane interactions could pave a way for investigating actin cell cortex mechanics in a detailed and quantitative manner. Here, we present and discuss the design of several bottom-up in vitro systems accomplishing the coupling of actin filaments to artificial membranes, where key parameters such as actin densities and membrane properties can be varied in a controlled manner. Insights gained from these in vitro systems may help to uncover fundamental principles of how exactly actin-myosin-membrane interactions govern actin cortex remodeling and membrane properties for cell shape changes. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24039068

  10. Mesoscopic model of actin-based propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this 'in silico' actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation. PMID:23133366

  11. Affinity chromatography of immobilized actin and myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, R C; Trayer, I P

    1975-01-01

    Actin and myosin were immobilized by coupling them to agarose matrices. Both immobilized G-actin and immobilized myosin retain most of the properties of the proteins in free solution and are reliable over long periods of time. Sepharose-F-actin, under the conditions used in this study, has proved unstable and variable in its properties. Sepharose-G-actin columns were used to bind heavy meromyosin and myosin subfragment 1 specifically and reversibly. The interaction involved is sensitive to variation in ionic strength, such that myosin itself is not retained by the columns at the high salt concentration required for its complete solubilization. Myosin, rendered soluble at low ionic strength by polyalanylation, will interact successfully with the immobilized actin. The latter can distinguish between active and inactive fractions of the proteolytic and polyalanyl myosin derivatives, and was used in the preparation of these molecules. The complexes formed between the myosin derivatives and Sepharose-G-actin can be dissociated by low concentrations of ATP, ADP and pyrophosphate in both the presence and the absence of Mg2+. The G-actin columns were used to evaluate the results of chemical modifications of myosin subfragments on their interactions with actin. F-Actin in free solution is bound specifically and reversibly to columns of insolubilized myosin. Thus, with elution by either ATP or pyrophosphate, actin has been purified in one step from extracts of acetone-dried muscle powder. PMID:241335

  12. The interaction of vinculin with actin.

    PubMed

    Golji, Javad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2013-04-01

    Vinculin can interact with F-actin both in recruitment of actin filaments to the growing focal adhesions and also in capping of actin filaments to regulate actin dynamics. Using molecular dynamics, both interactions are simulated using different vinculin conformations. Vinculin is simulated either with only its vinculin tail domain (Vt), with all residues in its closed conformation, with all residues in an open I conformation, and with all residues in an open II conformation. The open I conformation results from movement of domain 1 away from Vt; the open II conformation results from complete dissociation of Vt from the vinculin head domains. Simulation of vinculin binding along the actin filament showed that Vt alone can bind along the actin filaments, that vinculin in its closed conformation cannot bind along the actin filaments, and that vinculin in its open I conformation can bind along the actin filaments. The simulations confirm that movement of domain 1 away from Vt in formation of vinculin 1 is sufficient for allowing Vt to bind along the actin filament. Simulation of Vt capping actin filaments probe six possible bound structures and suggest that vinculin would cap actin filaments by interacting with both S1 and S3 of the barbed-end, using the surface of Vt normally occluded by D4 and nearby vinculin head domain residues. Simulation of D4 separation from Vt after D1 separation formed the open II conformation. Binding of open II vinculin to the barbed-end suggests this conformation allows for vinculin capping. Three binding sites on F-actin are suggested as regions that could link to vinculin. Vinculin is suggested to function as a variable switch at the focal adhesions. The conformation of vinculin and the precise F-actin binding conformation is dependent on the level of mechanical load on the focal adhesion. PMID:23633939

  13. Actinic Prurigo Cheilitis: A Clinicopathologic Review of 75 Cases.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Jose A; Toussaint, Sonia; Prieto, Victor G; Mercadillo, Patricia; Diez de Medina, Juan C; Lourenco, Silvia; Batdorf, Bjorn; Sangueza, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Actinic prurigo (AP) is a chronic idiopathic photodermatosis that primarily affects American Indians in the United States and Mestizos in Latin American countries. Clinically, the onset of the disease is usually in the first decade of life but may appear initially in adult life, and it is characterized by symmetric involvement of sun-exposed areas of the skin, particularly areas of the face, resulting in polymorphic erythematous papules, macules, and plaques in different stages of evolution. Lower lip involvement includes swelling, scaling, fissures, hyperpigmentation, and ulcerations of the vermilion border. and in some cases could represent the only manifestation of the disease. The histopathologic features of AP have been studied; however, there is a controversy regarding whether AP cheilitis has distinct histopathologic features that could allow accurate separation from other specific and nonspecific forms of cheilitis. The diagnosis can be challenging, mainly when lip lesions are the only manifestation of the disease. In this study, the authors investigate the clinicopathologic features of 75 cases of AP cheilitis to provide further criteria for its diagnosis and classification. All 75 patients presented with lip lesions. Thirty-three cases were diagnosed as AP cheilitis with cutaneous lesions and 42 cases were diagnosed as AP cheilitis without cutaneous lesions (only lip lesions). Histologically, of the 33 cases with AP cheilitis with cutaneous lesions, 17 (52%) cases showed follicular cheilitis, and of the 42 cases that had only lip lesions, 18 (43%) cases showed follicular cheilitis. Histologically, AP cheilitis can present as follicular cheilitis; thus, supporting the diagnosis. Also, our findings confirm that lip lesions can present as the only manifestation of the disease, showing typical histological and clinical features. This form of cheilitis has not being well described in the dermatologic and dermatopathologic literature. PMID:26981737

  14. Sequential Treatment of Multiple Actinic Keratoses with Solaraze and Actikerall

    PubMed Central

    Dirschka, Thomas; Lear, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Interest is increasing in the use of sequential or combined therapeutic modalities for spot or area treatment of actinic keratoses (AKs) to achieve complete sustained remission. For multiple lesions in a contained area, topical treatment offers less discomfort, better cosmesis and greater patient convenience than destructive/ablative techniques. Twelve patients with multiple grade I and II AK lesions of the scalp (cases 1–10) or the dorsum of the hand (cases 11 and 12), most with a history of recurrence, were treated with Solaraze gel (3% diclofenac sodium in 2.5% hyaluronic acid) twice daily for 12 weeks, followed by a 2-week treatment-free interval, then Actikerall cutaneous solution (5-fluorouracil 5 mg/g and salicylic acid 100 mg/g) once daily for up to 6 weeks as required. Sequential treatment provided complete (clinical and histological) clearance in 8/10 male patients. Two patients with numerous lesions had partial clearance (significant improvement) and the remaining few lesions were treated with erbium laser. Both female patients achieved complete clinical clearance with sequential treatment. Solaraze/Actikerall were well tolerated. A case of contact dermatitis with Solaraze resolved after discontinuation and the patient progressed to treatment with Actikerall. Local application site reactions resolved upon treatment completion. Topical lesion-directed sequential treatment with Solaraze/Actikerall is a rational approach to treat patients with multiple AKs. Sequential treatment produces excellent clearance rates which are accompanied by relevant improvement in patients’ quality of life. PMID:25120467

  15. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  16. Elasticity, adhesion and actin based propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinathan, Ajay

    2006-03-01

    When a cells crawls, its shape re-organizes via polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments. The growing ends of the filaments are oriented towards the outside of the cell, and their polymerization pushes the cell membrane forwards. The same mechanism comes into play when the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes infects a cell. The bacterium hijacks the host cell's actin machinery to create an actin network (the actin comet tail) that propels the bacterium through cells and into neighboring cells. We propose a mechanism for how polymerization gives rise to motility that incorporates the effects of inhomogeneous polymerization. We treat the actin comet tail as an elastic continuum tethered to the rear of the bacterium. The interplay of polymerization and tethering gives rise to inhomogeneous stresses calculated with a finite element analysis. We quantitatively reproduce many distinctive features of actin propulsion that have been observed experimentally, including stepped motion, hopping, tail shape and the propulsion of flat surfaces.

  17. Prevalence of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Attas, Safia Ali; Ibrahim, Suzan Seif; Amer, Hala Abbas; Darwish, Zeinab El-Said; Hassan, Mona Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is recognized as a health problem worldwide and there is an established tobacco epidemic in Saudi Arabia as in many other countries, with tobacco users at increased risk of developing many diseases. This cross sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal, potentially malignant or malignant, lesions associated with tobacco use among a stratified cluster sample of adults in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A sample size of 599 was collected and each participant underwent clinical conventional oral examination and filled a questionnaire providing information on demographics, tobacco use and other relevant habits. The most common form of tobacco used was cigarette smoking (65.6 %) followed by Shisha or Moasel (38.1%), while chewing tobacco, betel nuts and gat accounted for 21-2%, 7.7%, and 5% respectively. A high prevalence (88.8%) of soft tissue lesions was found among the tobacco users examined, and a wide range of lesions were detected, about 50% having hairy tongue, 36% smoker's melanosis, 28.9% stomatitis nicotina, 27% frictional keratosis, 26.7% fissured tongue, 26% gingival or periodontal inflammation and finally 20% leukodema. Suspicious potentially malignant lesions affected 10.5% of the subjects, most prevalent being keratosis (6.3%), leukoplakia (2.3%), erythroplakia (0.7%), oral submucous fibrosis (0.5%) and lichenoid lesions (0.4%), these being associated with male gender, lower level of education, presence of diabetes and a chewing tobacco habit. It is concluded that smoking was associated with a wide range of oral mucosal lesions , those suspicious for malignancy being linked with chewable forms, indicating serious effects. PMID:24568491

  18. Functional interdependence between septin and actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Katja; Nichols, Benjamin J

    2004-01-01

    Background Septin2 is a member of a highly conserved GTPase family found in fungi and animals. Septins have been implicated in a diversity of cellular processes including cytokinesis, formation of diffusion barriers and vesicle trafficking. Septin2 partially co-localises with actin bundles in mammalian interphase cells and Septin2-filamentmorphology depends upon an intact actin cytoskeleton. How this interaction is regulated is not known. Moreover, evidence that Septin2 is remodelled or redistributed in response to other changes in actin organisation is lacking. Results Septin2 filaments are associated with actin fibres, but Septin2 is not associated with actin at the leading edge of moving cells or in ruffles where actin is highly dynamic. Rather, Septin2 is spatially segregated from these active areas and forms O- and C-shaped structures, similar to those previously observed after latrunculin treatment. FRAP experiments showed that all assemblies formed by Septin2 are highly dynamic with a constant exchange of Septin2 in and out of these structures, and that this property is independent of actin. A combination of RNAi experiments and expression of truncated forms of Septin2 showed that Septin2 plays a significant role in stabilising or maintaining actin bundles. Conclusion We show that Septin2 can form dynamic structures with differing morphologies in living cells, and that these morphologies are dependent on the functional state of the actin cytoskeleton. Our data provide a link between the different morphological states of Septin2 and functions of Septin2 in actin-dynamics, and are consistent with the model proposed by Kinoshita and colleagues, that Septin2 filaments play a role in stabilisation of actin stress fibres thus preventing actin turnover. PMID:15541171

  19. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the “status” of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  20. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the "status" of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  1. Calcium control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, C; Schekman, R

    1982-01-01

    Low levels of Ca2+ dramatically influence the polymerization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin in KCl. The apparent critical concentration for polymerization (C infinity) increases eightfold in the presence of 0.1 mM Ca2+. This effect is rapidly reversed by the addition of ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid or of 0.1 mM Mg2+. Furthermore, the addition of Ca2+ to polymerized actin causes a reversible increase in the apparent C infinity. In the presence of Ca2+, at actin concentrations below the apparent C infinity, particles of 15 to 50 nm in diameter are seen instead of filaments. These particles are separated from soluble actin when Ca2+-treated filamentous actin is sedimented at high speed; both the soluble and particulate fractions retain Ca2+-sensitive polymerization. The Ca2+ effect is S. cerevisiae actin-specific: the C infinity for rabbit muscle actin is not affected by the presence of Ca2+ and S. cerevisiae actin. Ca2+ may act directly on S. cerevisiae actin to control the assembly state in vivo. Images PMID:6757718

  2. Architecture and Connectivity Govern Actin Network Contractility.

    PubMed

    Ennomani, Hajer; Letort, Gaëlle; Guérin, Christophe; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Cao, Wenxiang; Nédélec, François; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Actomyosin contractility plays a central role in a wide range of cellular processes, including the establishment of cell polarity, cell migration, tissue integrity, and morphogenesis during development. The contractile response is variable and depends on actomyosin network architecture and biochemical composition. To determine how this coupling regulates actomyosin-driven contraction, we used a micropatterning method that enables the spatial control of actin assembly. We generated a variety of actin templates and measured how defined actin structures respond to myosin-induced forces. We found that the same actin filament crosslinkers either enhance or inhibit the contractility of a network, depending on the organization of actin within the network. Numerical simulations unified the roles of actin filament branching and crosslinking during actomyosin contraction. Specifically, we introduce the concept of "network connectivity" and show that the contractions of distinct actin architectures are described by the same master curve when considering their degree of connectivity. This makes it possible to predict the dynamic response of defined actin structures to transient changes in connectivity. We propose that, depending on the connectivity and the architecture, network contraction is dominated by either sarcomeric-like or buckling mechanisms. More generally, this study reveals how actin network contractility depends on its architecture under a defined set of biochemical conditions. PMID:26898468

  3. Pushing with actin: from cells to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Small, J Victor

    2015-02-01

    Actin polymerization is harnessed by cells to generate lamellipodia for movement and by a subclass of pathogens to facilitate invasion of their infected hosts. Using electron tomography (ET), we have shown that lamellipodia are formed via the generation of subsets of actin filaments joined by branch junctions. Image averaging produced a 2.9 nm resolution model of branch junctions in situ and revealed a close fit to the electron density map of the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3)-actin complex in vitro. Correlated live-cell imaging and ET was also used to determine how actin networks are created and remodelled during the initiation and inhibition of protrusion in lamellipodia. Listeria, Rickettsia and viruses, such as vaccinia virus and baculovirus, exploit the actin machinery of host cells to generate propulsive actin comet tails to disseminate their infection. By applying ET, we have shown that baculovirus generates at its rear a fishbone-like array of subsets of branched actin filaments, with an average of only four filaments engaged in pushing at any one time. In both of these studies, the application of ET of negatively stained cytoskeletons for higher filament resolution and cryo-ET for preserving overall 3D morphology was crucial for obtaining a complete structure-function analysis of actin-driven propulsion. PMID:25619250

  4. Dynamic actin gene family evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liucun; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Yijun; Wen, Tieqiao; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Actin is one of the most highly conserved proteins and plays crucial roles in many vital cellular functions. In most eukaryotes, it is encoded by a multigene family. Although the actin gene family has been studied a lot, few investigators focus on the comparison of actin gene family in relative species. Here, the purpose of our study is to systematically investigate characteristics and evolutionary pattern of actin gene family in primates. We identified 233 actin genes in human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, rhesus monkey, and marmoset genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that actin genes in the seven species could be divided into two major types of clades: orthologous group versus complex group. Codon usages and gene expression patterns of actin gene copies were highly consistent among the groups because of basic functions needed by the organisms, but much diverged within species due to functional diversification. Besides, many great potential pseudogenes were found with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop codons. These results implied that actin gene family in primates went through "birth and death" model of evolution process. Under this model, actin genes experienced strong negative selection and increased the functional complexity by reproducing themselves. PMID:23841080

  5. Stochastic model of profilin-actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Brandon; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    A driving factor in cell motility and other processes that involve changes of cell shape is the rapid polymerization of actin subunits into long filaments. This process is regulated by profilin, a protein which binds to actin subunits and regulates elongation of actin filaments. Whether profilin stimulates polymerization by coupling to hydrolysis of ATP-bound actin is debated. Previous studies have proposed indirect coupling to ATP hydrolysis using rate equations, but did not include the effects of fluctuations that are important near the critical concentration. We developed stochastic simulations using the Gillespie algorithm to study single filament elongation at the barbed end in the presence of profilin. We used recently measured rate constants and estimated the rate of profilin binding to the barbed end such that detailed balance is satisfied. Fast phosphate release at the tip of the filament was accounted for. The elongation rate and length diffusivity as functions of profilin and actin concentration were calculated and used to extract the critical concentrations of free actin and of total actin. We show under what conditions profilin leads to an increase in the critical concentration of total actin but a decrease in the critical concentration of free actin.

  6. F-actin waves, actin cortex disassembly and focal exocytosis driven by actin-phosphoinositide positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Sheetz, Michael P; Gauthier, Nils C

    2016-04-01

    Actin polymerization is controlled by the phosphoinositide composition of the plasma membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spatiotemporal regulation of actin network organization over extended length scales are still unclear. To observe phosphoinositide-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics we combined the model system of frustrated phagocytosis, total internal reflection microscopy and manipulation of the buffer tonicity. We found that macrophages interacting with IgG-coated glass substrates formed circular F-actin waves on their ventral surface enclosing a region of plasma membrane devoid of cortical actin. Plasma membrane free of actin cortex was strongly depleted of PI(4,5)P2 , but enriched in PI(3,4)P2 and displayed a fivefold increase in exocytosis. Wave formation could be promoted by application of a hypotonic shock. The actin waves were characteristic of a bistable wavefront at the boundary between the regions of membrane containing and lacking cortical actin. Phosphoinositide modifiers and RhoGTPase activities dramatically redistributed with respect to the wavefronts, which often exhibited spatial oscillations. Perturbation of either lipid or actin cytoskeleton-related pathways led to rapid loss of both the polarized lipid distribution and the wavefront. As waves travelled over the plasma membrane, wavefront actin was seen to rapidly polymerize and depolymerize at pre-existing clusters of FcγRIIA, coincident with rapid changes in lipid composition. Thus the potential of receptors to support rapid F-actin polymerization appears to depend acutely on the local concentrations of multiple lipid species. We propose that interdependence through positive feedback from the cytoskeleton to lipid modifiers leads to coordinated local cortex remodeling, focal exocytosis, and organizes extended actin networks. PMID:26915738

  7. Applying laser speckle images to skin science: skin lesion differentiation by polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Sotoodian, Bahman; Kalai, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is a worldwide health problem. It is the most common cancer in the countries with a large white population; furthermore, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, has been increasing steadily over the last three decades. There is an urgent need to develop in-vivo, noninvasive diagnostic tools for the disease. This paper attempts to response to the challenge by introducing a simple and fast method based on polarization and laser speckle. The degree of maintaining polarization estimates the fraction of linearly maintaining polarization in the backscattered speckle field. Clinical experiments of 214 skin lesions including malignant melanomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, nevi, and seborrheic keratoses demonstrated that such a parameter can potentially diagnose different skin lesion types. ROC analyses showed that malignant melanoma and seborrheic keratosis could be differentiated by both the blue and red lasers with the area under the curve (AUC) = 0.8 and 0.7, respectively. Also malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma could be separated by the blue laser (AUC = 0.9), while nevus and seborrheic keratosis could be identified using the red laser (AUC = 0.7). These experiments demonstrated that polarization could be a potential in-vivo diagnostic indicator for skin diseases.

  8. Applying laser speckle images to skin science: skin lesion differentiation by polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Sotoodian, Bahman; Kalai, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.

    2011-09-01

    Skin cancer is a worldwide health problem. It is the most common cancer in the countries with a large white population; furthermore, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, has been increasing steadily over the last three decades. There is an urgent need to develop in-vivo, noninvasive diagnostic tools for the disease. This paper attempts to response to the challenge by introducing a simple and fast method based on polarization and laser speckle. The degree of maintaining polarization estimates the fraction of linearly maintaining polarization in the backscattered speckle field. Clinical experiments of 214 skin lesions including malignant melanomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, nevi, and seborrheic keratoses demonstrated that such a parameter can potentially diagnose different skin lesion types. ROC analyses showed that malignant melanoma and seborrheic keratosis could be differentiated by both the blue and red lasers with the area under the curve (AUC) = 0.8 and 0.7, respectively. Also malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma could be separated by the blue laser (AUC = 0.9), while nevus and seborrheic keratosis could be identified using the red laser (AUC = 0.7). These experiments demonstrated that polarization could be a potential in-vivo diagnostic indicator for skin diseases.

  9. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  10. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  11. Effects of F/G-actin ratio and actin turn-over rate on NADPH oxidase activity in microglia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most in vivo studies that have addressed the role of actin dynamics in NADPH oxidase function in phagocytes have used toxins to modulate the polymerization state of actin and mostly effects on actin has been evaluated by end point measurements of filamentous actin, which says little about actin dynamics, and without consideration for the subcellular distribution of the perturbed actin cytoskeleton. Results Here, we in addition to toxins use conditional expression of the major actin regulatory protein LIM kinase-1 (LIMK1), and shRNA knock-down of cofilin to modulate the cellular F/G-actin ratio in the Ra2 microglia cell line, and we use Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) in β-actin-YFP-transduced cells to obtain a dynamic measure of actin recovery rates (actin turn-over rates) in different F/G-actin states of the actin cytoskeleton. Our data demonstrate that stimulated NADPH oxidase function was severely impaired only at extreme actin recovery rates and F/G-actin ratios, and surprisingly, that any moderate changes of these parameters of the actin cytoskeleton invariably resulted in an increased NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusion moderate actin polymerization and depolymerization both increase the FMLP and PMA-stimulated NADPH oxidase activity of microglia, which is directly correlated with neither actin recovery rate nor F/G- actin ratio. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase functions in an enhanced state of activity in stimulated phagocytes despite widely different states of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:20825680

  12. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  13. Dynamics of active actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Simone

    2014-03-01

    Local mechanical and structural properties of a eukaryotic cell are determined by its cytoskeleton. To adapt to their environment, cells rely on constant self-organized rearrangement processes of their actin cytoskeleton. To shed light on the principles underlying these dynamic self-organization processes we investigate a minimal reconstituted active system consisting of actin filaments, crosslinking molecules and molecular motor filaments. Using quantitative fluorescence microscopy and image analysis, we show, that these minimal model systems exhibit a generic structure formation mechanism. The competition between force generation by molecular motors and the stabilization of the network by crosslinking proteins results in a highly dynamic reorganization process which is characterized by anomalous transport dynamics with a superdiffusive behavior also found in intracellular dynamics. In vitro, these dynamics are governed by chemical and physical parameters that alter the balance of motor and crosslinking proteins, such as pH. These findings can be expected to have broad implications in our understanding of cytoskeletal regulation in vivo.

  14. Actin-Regulator Feedback Interactions during Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Galletta, Brian J; Cooper, John A; Carlsson, Anders E

    2016-03-29

    Endocytosis mediated by clathrin, a cellular process by which cells internalize membrane receptors and their extracellular ligands, is an important component of cell signaling regulation. Actin polymerization is involved in endocytosis in varying degrees depending on the cellular context. In yeast, clathrin-mediated endocytosis requires a pulse of polymerized actin and its regulators, which recruit and activate the Arp2/3 complex. In this article, we seek to identify the main protein-protein interactions that 1) cause actin and its regulators to appear in pulses, and 2) determine the effects of key mutations and drug treatments on actin and regulator assembly. We perform a joint modeling/experimental study of actin and regulator dynamics during endocytosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We treat both a stochastic model that grows an explicit three-dimensional actin network, and a simpler two-variable Fitzhugh-Nagumo type model. The models include a negative-feedback interaction of F-actin onto the Arp2/3 regulators. Both models explain the pulse time courses and the effects of interventions on actin polymerization: the surprising increase in the peak F-actin count caused by reduced regulator branching activity, the increase in F-actin resulting from slowing of actin disassembly, and the increased Arp2/3 regulator lifetime resulting from latrunculin treatment. In addition, they predict that decreases in the regulator branching activity lead to increases in accumulation of regulators, and we confirmed this prediction with experiments on yeast harboring mutations in the Arp2/3 regulators, using quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Our experimental measurements suggest that the regulators act quasi-independently, in the sense that accumulation of a particular regulator is most strongly affected by mutations of that regulator, as opposed to the others. PMID:27028652

  15. Effect of alpha-actinin on actin structure. Actin ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Goll, D E; Robson, R M

    1981-08-28

    Alpha-Actinin increases the ATPase activity of actin by up to 84%, depending un pH, divalent cations present and the added Mg2+: ATP ratio. Dithiothreitol decreases actin ATPase activity approx. 20% but does not reduce the ability of alpha-actinin to increase actin ATP activity. Increasing amounts of added alpha-actinin up to 1 mos alpha-actinin to 49 mol actin cause in increasing increment in actin ATPase activity, but adding alpha-actinin beyond 1 mol alpha-actinin to 49 mol actin elicits only small additional increments in activity. Actin ATPase activity ranges from approx 100 nmol Pi/mg actin per h (4.3 mol Pi/mol actin per h) at high levels (10 mM) of ATP in the presence of lower amounts (1 mM) of added mg2+ to approx. 12.5 nmol Pi/mg actin per h (0.52 mol Pi/mol actin per h) at high pH (8.5) or at low levels (0.5-1.0 mM) of ATP in the presence of higher amounts (10 mM) of added Mg2+ ATp uncomplexed with Mg2+ inhibits the ability of alpha-actinin to increase F-actin ATPase activity. Activities with different divalent cations showed that the actin ATPase in these studies, which was 1/100 as great as Mg2+-modified actomyosin ATPase activity, was not due to trace amounts of myosin contaminating the actin preparations. The results are consistent with the concept that alpha-actinin can alter the structure of actin monomers. PMID:6456018

  16. Efficacy and safety of a topical carbon suspension photoenhancer adjunctive to intense pulsed light treatment for pigmented lesions in Japanese patients: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yushi; Kawana, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Pigmented lesions, e.g., senile lentigo and seborrheic keratosis are commonly seen in photodamaged skin in the Japanese general population. The use of the laser to treat such lesions is often painful, and intense pulsed light (IPL) systems have become widely used. Clearly demarcated pigmented lesions may be identified easily and treated with IPL. Less well demarcated lesions, however, which are very difficult to identify or thick melanogesic lesions like seborrheic keratosis represent one of the most challenging conditions to be treated using IPL. This pilot study evaluated carbon suspension-assisted IPL treatment of such lesions. Subjects and methods: Three female Japanese patients, Fitzpatrick skin type III–IV, comprised the subjects, aged 58, 78 and 85, with indistinct senile lentigines or thick seborrheic keratoses. The lesions were painted or demarcated with a carbon-based ink from a commercially-available Japanese writing instrument (Fude-pen™, Pentel, Japan) consisting of a brush-like pen nib with a refillable or replaceable ink reservoir, and then treated with a broadband (560 – 1200 nm) IPL system. Results: The poorly-demarcated lesions were quickly and easily marked with the pen, and the IPL treatments were well-tolerated. All patients had good improvement in their painted pigmented lesions based on the overall evaluation, compared with unpainted ones. Side effects after treatment, such as hyperpigmentation, persistent erythema, and scarring, were minimal. Conclusions: Topical carbon suspension-assisted IPL treatment could be a good option for patients with indistinct pigmented or thick melanogenesic lesions. Adverse reactions to this treatment were minimal and the results acceptable, though appropriate lesions need to be chosen carefully. PMID:24771967

  17. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike; Huber, Steven C; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  18. Extracellular signaling cues for nuclear actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Grosse, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to cytoplasmic actin structures, the biological functions of nuclear actin filaments remain largely enigmatic. Recent progress in the field, however, has determined nuclear actin structures in somatic cells either under steady state conditions or in response to extracellular signaling cues. These actin structures differ in size and shape as well as in their temporal appearance and dynamics. Thus, a picture emerges that suggests that mammalian cells may have different pathways and mechanisms to assemble nuclear actin filaments. Apart from serum- or LPA-triggered nuclear actin polymerization, integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction was recently implicated in nuclear actin polymerization through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Some of these extracellular cues known so far appear to converge at the level of nuclear formin activity and subsequent regulation of myocardin-related transcription factors. Nevertheless, as the precise signaling events are as yet unknown, the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization may be of significant importance for different cellular functions as well as disease conditions caused by altered nuclear dynamics and architecture. PMID:26059398

  19. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro-tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element. PMID:27307590

  20. Actin cytoskeleton redox proteome oxidation by cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Orr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies associate environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure with the risk of lung diseases. Although mechanisms are not fully elucidated, several studies demonstrate Cd effects on actin and actin-associated proteins. In a recent study of Cd at concentrations similar to environmental exposures, we found that redox-dependent inflammatory signaling by NF-κB was sensitive to the actin-disrupting agent, cytochalasin D. The goal of the present study was to use mass spectrometry-based redox proteomics to investigate Cd effects on the actin cytoskeleton proteome and related functional pathways in lung cells at low environmental concentrations. The results showed that Cd under conditions that did not alter total protein thiols or glutathione redox state caused significant oxidation of peptidyl Cys of proteins regulating actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence microscopy of lung fibroblasts and pulmonary artery endothelial cells showed that low-dose Cd exposure stimulated filamentous actin formation and nuclear localization of destrin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Taken together, the results show that redox states of peptidyl Cys in proteins associated with actin cytoskeleton pathways are selectively oxidized in lung by Cd at levels thought to occur from environmental exposure. PMID:24077948

  1. Actin motility: formin a SCAry tail.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Art; Way, Michael

    2011-01-11

    A new biochemical analysis has revealed that the Rickettsia bacterial protein Sca2--recently shown to be essential for virulence and actin-dependent motility--assembles actin filaments using a mechanism that functionally resembles the processive elongation tactics used by formins. PMID:21215933

  2. Effect of ATP on actin filament stiffness.

    PubMed

    Janmey, P A; Hvidt, S; Oster, G F; Lamb, J; Stossel, T P; Hartwig, J H

    1990-09-01

    Actin is an adenine nucleotide-binding protein and an ATPase. The bound adenine nucleotide stabilizes the protein against denaturation and the ATPase activity, although not required for actin polymerization, affects the kinetics of this assembly Here we provide evidence for another effect of adenine nucleotides. We find that actin filaments made from ATP-containing monomers, the ATPase activity of which hydrolyses ATP to ADP following polymerization, are stiff rods, whereas filaments prepared from ADP-monomers are flexible. ATP exchanges with ADP in such filaments and stiffens them. Because both kinds of actin filaments contain mainly ADP, we suggest the alignment of actin monomers in filaments that have bound and hydrolysed ATP traps them conformationally and stores elastic energy. This energy would be available for release by actin-binding proteins that transduce force or sever actin filaments. These data support earlier proposals that actin is not merely a passive cable, but has an active mechanochemical role in cell function. PMID:2168523

  3. Myelination: actin disassembly leads the way

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayshree; Salzer, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive the spiral wrapping of the myelin sheath around axons are poorly understood. Two papers in this issue of Developmental Cell demonstrate that actin disassembly, rather than actin assembly, predominates during oligodendrocyte maturation and is critical for the genesis of the central myelin sheath. PMID:26218317

  4. Colchicine activates actin polymerization by microtubule depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Jung, H I; Shin, I; Park, Y M; Kang, K W; Ha, K S

    1997-06-30

    Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts were treated with the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine to study any interaction between microtubule dynamics and actin polymerization. Colchicine increased the amount of filamentous actin (F-actin), in a dose- and time-dependent manner with a significant increase at 1 h by about 130% over control level. Confocal microscopic observation showed that colchicine increased F-actin contents by stress fiber formation without inducing membrane ruffling. Colchicine did not activate phospholipase C and phospholipase D, whereas lysophosphatidic acid did, indicating that colchicine may have a different mechanism of actin polymerization regulation from LPA. A variety of microtubule-disrupting agents stimulated actin polymerization in Swiss 3T3 and Rat-2 fibroblasts as did colchicine, but the microtubule-stabilizing agent taxol inhibited actin polymerization induced by the above microtubule-disrupting agents. In addition, colchicine-induced actin polymerization was blocked by two protein phosphatase inhibitors, okadaic acid and calyculin A. These results suggest that microtubule depolymerization activates stress fiber formation by serine/threonine dephosphorylation in fibroblasts. PMID:9264034

  5. Actin-binding proteins: the long road to understanding the dynamic landscape of cellular actin networks.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Pekka

    2016-08-15

    The actin cytoskeleton supports a vast number of cellular processes in nonmuscle cells. It is well established that the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are controlled by a large array of actin-binding proteins. However, it was only 40 years ago that the first nonmuscle actin-binding protein, filamin, was identified and characterized. Filamin was shown to bind and cross-link actin filaments into higher-order structures and contribute to phagocytosis in macrophages. Subsequently many other nonmuscle actin-binding proteins were identified and characterized. These proteins regulate almost all steps of the actin filament assembly and disassembly cycles, as well as the arrangement of actin filaments into diverse three-dimensional structures. Although the individual biochemical activities of most actin-regulatory proteins are relatively well understood, knowledge of how these proteins function together in a common cytoplasm to control actin dynamics and architecture is only beginning to emerge. Furthermore, understanding how signaling pathways and mechanical cues control the activities of various actin-binding proteins in different cellular, developmental, and pathological processes will keep researchers busy for decades. PMID:27528696

  6. Integration of linear and dendritic actin nucleation in Nck-induced actin comets

    PubMed Central

    Borinskaya, Sofya; Velle, Katrina B.; Campellone, Kenneth G.; Talman, Arthur; Alvarez, Diego; Agaisse, Hervé; Wu, Yi I.; Loew, Leslie M.; Mayer, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    The Nck adaptor protein recruits cytosolic effectors such as N-WASP that induce localized actin polymerization. Experimental aggregation of Nck SH3 domains at the membrane induces actin comet tails—dynamic, elongated filamentous actin structures similar to those that drive the movement of microbial pathogens such as vaccinia virus. Here we show that experimental manipulation of the balance between unbranched/branched nucleation altered the morphology and dynamics of Nck-induced actin comets. Inhibition of linear, formin-based nucleation with the small-molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 or overexpression of the formin FH1 domain resulted in formation of predominantly circular-shaped actin structures with low mobility (actin blobs). These results indicate that formin-based linear actin polymerization is critical for the formation and maintenance of Nck-dependent actin comet tails. Consistent with this, aggregation of an exclusively branched nucleation-promoting factor (the VCA domain of N-WASP), with density and turnover similar to those of N-WASP in Nck comets, did not reconstitute dynamic, elongated actin comets. Furthermore, enhancement of branched Arp2/3-mediated nucleation by N-WASP overexpression caused loss of the typical actin comet tail shape induced by Nck aggregation. Thus the ratio of linear to dendritic nucleation activity may serve to distinguish the properties of actin structures induced by various viral and bacterial pathogens. PMID:26609071

  7. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. PMID:24630119

  8. Actinic cheilitis: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wood, Neil Hamilton; Khammissa, Razia; Meyerov, Robin; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2011-01-01

    In actinic cheilitis, the current view is that the keratinocytes have undergone transformation forming a field of epithelium with the potential for neoplastic transformation. Clinical features include diffuse and poorly demarcated atrophic, erosive or keratotic plaques that may affect some parts of, or the entire vermilion border. Fair-complexioned people, those with albinism and people with eversion of the lip are all subject to actinic cheilitis. Prophylactic measures against all forms of sunlight-induced lesions must include limitation of exposure to the sun during peak sunlight hours, the use of appropriate protective clothing, and the use of a sunscreen cream. In this article, a case of albinism is used to illustrate the nature of actinic cheilitis, its clinical features and its treatment. PMID:21228959

  9. Actin dynamics shape microglia effector functions.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Ria; Gertz, Karen; Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Tobias; Nolte, Christiane; Freyer, Dorette; Kettenmann, Helmut; Endres, Matthias; Kronenberg, Golo

    2016-06-01

    Impaired actin filament dynamics have been associated with cellular senescence. Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are emerging as a central pathophysiological player in neurodegeneration. Microglia activation, which ranges on a continuum between classical and alternative, may be of critical importance to brain disease. Using genetic and pharmacological manipulations, we studied the effects of alterations in actin dynamics on microglia effector functions. Disruption of actin dynamics did not affect transcription of genes involved in the LPS-triggered classical inflammatory response. By contrast, in consequence of impaired nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT6, genes involved in IL-4 induced alternative activation were strongly downregulated. Functionally, impaired actin dynamics resulted in reduced NO secretion and reduced release of TNFalpha and IL-6 from LPS-stimulated microglia and of IGF-1 from IL-4 stimulated microglia. However, pathological stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton increased LPS-induced release of IL-1beta and IL-18, which belong to an unconventional secretory pathway. Reduced NO release was associated with decreased cytoplasmic iNOS protein expression and decreased intracellular arginine uptake. Furthermore, disruption of actin dynamics resulted in reduced microglia migration, proliferation and phagocytosis. Finally, baseline and ATP-induced [Ca(2+)]int levels were significantly increased in microglia lacking gelsolin, a key actin-severing protein. Together, the dynamic state of the actin cytoskeleton profoundly and distinctly affects microglia behaviours. Disruption of actin dynamics attenuates M2 polarization by inhibiting transcription of alternative activation genes. In classical activation, the role of actin remodelling is complex, does not relate to gene transcription and shows a major divergence between cytokines following conventional and unconventional secretion. PMID:25989853

  10. Probing actin incorporation into myofibrils using Asp11 and His73 actin mutants.

    PubMed

    Xia, D; Peng, B; Sesok, D A; Peng, I

    1993-01-01

    We used a cell free system Bouché et al.: J. Cell Biol. 107:587-596, 1988] to study the incorporation of actin into myofibrils. We used alpha-skeletal muscle actin and actins with substitutions of either His73 [Solomon and Rubenstein: J. Biol.Chem. 262:11382, 1987], or Asp11 [Solomon et al.: J. Biol. Chem. 263:19662, 1988]. Actins were translated in reticulocyte lysate and incubated with myofibrils. The incorporated wild type actin could be cross-linked into dimers using N,N'-1,4-phenylenebismaleimide (PBM), indicating that the incorporated actin is actually inserted into the thin filaments of the myofibril. The His73 mutants incorporated to the same extent as wild type actin and was also cross-linked with PBM. Although some of the Asp11 mutants co-assembled with carrier actin, only 1-3% of the Asp11 mutant actins incorporated after 2 min and did not increase after 2 hr. Roughly 17% of wild type actin incorporated after 2 min and 31% after 2 hr. ATP increased the release of wild type actin from myofibrils, but did not increase the release of Asp11 mutants. We suggest that (1) the incorporation of wild type and His73 mutant actins was due to a physiological process whereas association of Asp11 mutants with myofibrils was non-specific, (2) the incorporation of wild type actin involved a rapid initial phase, followed by a slower phase, and (3) since some of the Asp11 mutants can co-assemble with wild type actin, the ability to self-assemble was not sufficient for incorporation into myofibrils. Thus, incorporation probably includes interaction between actin and a thin filament associated protein. We also showed that incorporation occurred at actin concentrations which would cause disassembly of F-actin. Since the myofibrils did not show large scale disassembly but incorporated actin, filament stability and monomer incorporation are likely to be mediated by actin associated proteins of the myofibril. PMID:8287497

  11. Dynamics of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Christophe; Mahadevan, L.; Shin, Jennifer; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosome of the sperm of the horseshoe crab (Limulus Polyphemus) is an unusual actin based system that shows a spectacular dynamical transition in the presence of Ca++ that is present in abundance in the neighborhood of the egg. During this process, the bundle, which is initially bent and twisted uncoils and becomes straight in a matter of a few seconds. Based on microstructural data, we propose a model for the dynamics of uncoiling that is best represented by a triple-well potential corresponding to the different structural arrangements of the supertwisted filaments. Each of the false, true and coiled states corresponds to a local minimum of the energy, with the true state being the one with the lowest energy. Using an evolution equation derived by balancing torques, we investigate the nucleation and propagation of the phase transition and compare the results with those of experiments. Our model quantifies the hypothesis that the acrosomal bundle behaves like a mechano-chemical spring.

  12. Co-occurrence of Erythrosis Pigmentosa Mediofacialis and Erythromelanosis Follicularis Faciei et Colli Associated with Keratosis Pilaris in an Adolescent Female

    PubMed Central

    Kalwaniya, Sarita; Morgaonkar, Manjaree; Gupta, Savera; Jain, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Erythromelanosis follicularis faciei et colli (EFFC) is a rare disease characterized by a triad of reddish-brown pigmentation, erythema and follicular papules localized on face and neck and is usually described in males. Erythrosis pigmentosa mediofacialis (also known as Brocq or erythrosis pigmentosa peribuccalis) is a similar disorder of the mediofacial area but with female predominance. We report a case of simultaneous occurrence of erythrosis pigmentosa peribuccalis and EFFC associated with keratosis pilaris in an adolescent female. PMID:27512206

  13. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  14. Binding of WIP to Actin Is Essential for T Cell Actin Cytoskeleton Integrity and Tissue Homing

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Michel J.; Oyoshi, Michiko K.; Kane, Jennifer; Koduru, Suresh; Alcaide, Pilar; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Luscinskas, Francis W.; Hartwig, John

    2014-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is important for actin polymerization in T cells and for their migration. WASp-interacting protein (WIP) binds to and stabilizes WASp and also interacts with actin. Cytoskeletal and functional defects are more severe in WIP−/− T cells, which lack WASp, than in WASp−/− T cells, suggesting that WIP interaction with actin may be important for T cell cytoskeletal integrity and function. We constructed mice that lack the actin-binding domain of WIP (WIPΔABD mice). WIPΔABD associated normally with WASp but not F-actin. T cells from WIPΔABD mice had normal WASp levels but decreased cellular F-actin content, a disorganized actin cytoskeleton, impaired chemotaxis, and defective homing to lymph nodes. WIPΔABD mice exhibited a T cell intrinsic defect in contact hypersensitivity and impaired responses to cutaneous challenge with protein antigen. Adoptively transferred antigen-specific CD4+ T cells from WIPΔABD mice had decreased homing to antigen-challenged skin of wild-type recipients. These findings show that WIP binding to actin, independently of its binding to WASp, is critical for the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in T cells and for their migration into tissues. Disruption of WIP binding to actin could be of therapeutic value in T cell-driven inflammatory diseases. PMID:25246631

  15. Actin-curcumin interaction: insights into the mechanism of actin polymerization inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Gopa; Chakravarty, Devlina; Hazra, Joyita; Dhar, Jesmita; Poddar, Asim; Pal, Mahadeb; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Surolia, Avadhesha; Bhattacharyya, Bhabatarak

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin, derived from rhizomes of the Curcuma longa plant, is known to possess a wide range of medicinal properties. We have examined the interaction of curcumin with actin and determined their binding and thermodynamic parameters using isothermal titration calorimetry. Curcumin is weakly fluorescent in aqueous solution, and binding to actin enhances fluorescence several fold with a large blue shift in the emission maximum. Curcumin inhibits microfilament formation, which is similar to its role in inhibiting microtubule formation. We synthesized a series of stable curcumin analogues to examine their affinity for actin and their ability to inhibit actin self-assembly. Results show that curcumin is a ligand with two symmetrical halves, each of which possesses no activity individually. Oxazole, pyrazole, and acetyl derivatives are less effective than curcumin at inhibiting actin self-assembly, whereas a benzylidiene derivative is more effective. Cell biology studies suggest that disorganization of the actin network leads to destabilization of filaments in the presence of curcumin. Molecular docking reveals that curcumin binds close to the cytochalasin binding site of actin. Further molecular dynamics studies reveal a possible allosteric effect in which curcumin binding at the "barbed end" of actin is transmitted to the "pointed end", where conformational changes disrupt interactions with the adjacent actin monomer to interrupt filament formation. Finally, the recognition and binding of actin by curcumin is yet another example of its unique ability to target multiple receptors. PMID:25564154

  16. Nuclear actin and myosins in adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-11-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host's transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  17. Erbium laser resurfacing for actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L

    2013-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a precancerous condition characterized by grayish-whitish area(s) of discoloration on the mucosal lip, often blunting the demarcation between mucosa and cutaneous lip. Actinic cheilitis is considered to be an early part of the spectrum of squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma specifically of the lip has a high rate of recurrence and metastasis through the oral cavity leading to a poor overall survival. Risk factors for the development of actinic cheilitis include chronic solar irradiation, increasing age, male gender, light skin complexion, immunosuppression, and possibly tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment options include topical pharmacotherapy (eg, fluorouracil, imiquimod) or procedural interventions (eg, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, surgical vermillionectomy, laser resurfacing), each with their known advantages and disadvantages. There is little consensus as to which treatment options offer the most clinical utility given the paucity of comparative clinical data. In my practice, laser resurfacing has become an important tool for the treatment of actinic cheilitis owing to its ease of use and overall safety, tolerability, and cosmetic acceptability. Herein the use of erbium laser resurfacing is described for three actinic cheilitis presentations for which I find it particularly useful: clinically prominent actinic cheilitis, biopsy-proven actinic cheilitis, and treatment of the entire lip following complete tumor excision of squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with a 2940-nm erbium laser (Sciton Profile Contour Tunable Resurfacing Laser [TRL], Sciton, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). PMID:24196339

  18. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phasukthaworn, Ruedee; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2016-01-01

    Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies. PMID:27293392

  19. Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gressin, Laurène; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes, including morphogenesis, polarization, and motility, rely on a variety of actin-based structures. Although the biochemical composition and filament organization of these structures are different, they often emerge from a common origin. This is possible because the actin structures are highly dynamic. Indeed, they assemble, grow, and disassemble in a time scale of a second to a minute. Therefore, the reorganization of a given actin structure can promote the formation of another. Here, we discuss such transitions and illustrate them with computer simulations. PMID:26989473

  20. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  1. Nuclear shape descriptors by automated morphometry may distinguish aggressive variants of squamous cell carcinoma from relatively benign skin proliferative lesions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weixi; Tian, Rong; Xue, Tongqing

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated whether degrees of dysplasia may be consistently accessed in an automatic fashion, using different kinds of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) as a validatory model. Namely, we compared Bowen disease, actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma, low-grade squamous cell carcinoma, and invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We hypothesized that characterizing the shape of nuclei may be important to consistently diagnose the aggressiveness of a skin tumor. While basal cell carcinoma is comparatively relatively benign, management of squamous cell carcinoma is controversial because of its potential to recur and intraoperative dilemma regarding choice of the margin or the depth for the excision. We provide evidence here that progressive nuclear dysplasia may be automatically estimated through the thresholded images of skin cancer and quantitative parameters estimated to provide a quasi-quantitative data, which can thenceforth guide the management of the particular cancer. For circularity, averaging more than 2500 nuclei in each group estimated the means ± SD as 0.8 ± 0.007 vs. 0.78 ± 0.0063 vs. 0.42 ± 0.014 vs. 0.63 ± 0.02 vs. 0.51 ± 0.02 (F = 318063.56, p < 0.0001, one-way analyses of variance). The mean aspect ratios were (means ± SD) 0.97 ± 0.0014 vs. 0.95 ± 0.002 vs. 0.38 ± 0.018 vs. 0.84 ± 0.0035 vs. 0.74 ± 0.019 (F = 1022631.931, p < 0.0001, one-way analyses of variance). The Feret diameters averaged over 2500 nuclei in each group were the following: 1 ± 0.0001 vs. 0.9 ± 0.002 vs. 5 ± 0.031 vs. 1.5 ± 0.01 vs. 1.9 ± 0.004 (F = 33105614.194, p < 0.0001, one-way analyses of variance). Multivariate analyses of composite parameters potentially detect aggressive variants of squamous cell carcinoma as the most dysplastic form, in comparison to locally occurring squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma, or benign skin lesions. PMID:25753477

  2. Computational model of polarized actin cables and cytokinetic actin ring formation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haosu; Bidone, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast actin cables and contractile ring are important for polarized growth and division, revealing basic aspects of cytoskeletal function. To study these formin-nucleated structures, we built a 3D computational model with actin filaments represented as beads connected by springs. Polymerization by formins at the bud tip and bud neck, crosslinking, severing, and myosin pulling, are included. Parameter values were estimated from prior experiments. The model generates actin cable structures and dynamics similar to those of wild type and formin deletion mutant cells. Simulations with increased polymerization rate result in long, wavy cables. Simulated pulling by type V myosin stretches actin cables. Increasing the affinity of actin filaments for the bud neck together with reduced myosin V pulling promotes the formation of a bundle of antiparallel filaments at the bud neck, which we suggest as a model for the assembly of actin filaments to the contractile ring. PMID:26538307

  3. Regulation of actin polymerization by tropomodulin-3 controls megakaryocyte actin organization and platelet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhenhua; Nowak, Roberta B; Sanada, Chad; Halene, Stephanie; Krause, Diane S; Fowler, Velia M

    2015-07-23

    The actin cytoskeleton is important for platelet biogenesis. Tropomodulin-3 (Tmod3), the only Tmod isoform detected in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs), caps actin filament (F-actin) pointed ends and binds tropomyosins (TMs), regulating actin polymerization and stability. To determine the function of Tmod3 in platelet biogenesis, we studied Tmod3(-/-) embryos, which are embryonic lethal by E18.5. Tmod3(-/-) embryos often show hemorrhaging at E14.5 with fewer and larger platelets, indicating impaired platelet biogenesis. MK numbers are moderately increased in Tmod3(-/-) fetal livers, with only a slight increase in the 8N population, suggesting that MK differentiation is not significantly affected. However, Tmod3(-/-) MKs fail to develop a normal demarcation membrane system (DMS), and cytoplasmic organelle distribution is abnormal. Moreover, cultured Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit impaired proplatelet formation with a wide range of proplatelet bud sizes, including abnormally large proplatelet buds containing incorrect numbers of von Willebrand factor-positive granules. Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit F-actin disturbances, and Tmod3(-/-) MKs spreading on collagen fail to polymerize F-actin into actomyosin contractile bundles. Tmod3 associates with TM4 and the F-actin cytoskeleton in wild-type MKs, and confocal microscopy reveals that Tmod3, TM4, and F-actin partially colocalize near the membrane of proplatelet buds. In contrast, the abnormally large proplatelets from Tmod3(-/-) MKs show increased F-actin and redistribution of F-actin and TM4 from the cortex to the cytoplasm, but normal microtubule coil organization. We conclude that F-actin capping by Tmod3 regulates F-actin organization in mouse fetal liver-derived MKs, thereby controlling MK cytoplasmic morphogenesis, including DMS formation and organelle distribution, as well as proplatelet formation and sizing. PMID:25964668

  4. Nuclear actin levels as an important transcriptional switch

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Guillaume; Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear actin levels have recently been linked to different cellular fates, suggesting that actin could act as a switch between altered transcriptional states. Here we discuss our latest results on the mechanisms by which nuclear actin levels are regulated and their implications to the functional significance of nuclear actin. PMID:22771994

  5. Genetics Home Reference: actin-accumulation myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 7(3):160-8. Citation on PubMed Laing NG, Dye DE, Wallgren-Pettersson C, Richard G, Monnier ... Vigneron J, Wallgren-Pettersson C, Beggs AH, Laing NG. Mutations in the skeletal muscle alpha-actin gene ...

  6. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea).

    PubMed

    Souza, Ligia Cristina Kalb; Pinho, Rosana Elisa Gonçalves Gonçalves; Lima, Carla Vanessa de Paula; Fragoso, Stênio Perdigão; Soares, Maurilio José

    2013-08-01

    Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major), insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis) and plants (Phytomonas serpens). A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids. PMID:23903980

  7. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ligia Cristina Kalb; Pinho, Rosana Elisa Gonçalves Gonçalves; Lima, Carla Vanessa de Paula; Fragoso, Stênio Perdigão; Soares, Maurilio José

    2013-01-01

    Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major), insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis) and plants (Phytomonas serpens). A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids. PMID:23903980

  8. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field. PMID:19824469

  9. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  10. Structural dynamics of an actin spring.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, L; Riera, C S; Shin, Jennifer H

    2011-02-16

    Actin-based motility in cells is usually associated with either polymerization/depolymerization in the presence of cross-linkers or contractility in the presence of myosin motors. Here, we focus on a third distinct mechanism involving actin in motility, seen in the dynamics of an active actin spring that powers the acrosomal reaction of the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) sperm. During this process, a 60-μm bent and twisted bundle of cross-linked actin uncoils and becomes straight in a few seconds in the presence of Ca(2+). This straightening, which occurs at a constant velocity, allows the acrosome to forcefully penetrate the egg. Synthesizing ultrastructural information with the kinetics, energetics, and imaging of calcium binding allows us to construct a dynamical theory for this mechanochemical engine consistent with our experimental observations. It also illuminates the general mechanism by which energy may be stored in conformational changes and released cooperatively in ordered macromolecular assemblies. PMID:21320427

  11. Actinic review of EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Heiko; Ruoff, Johannes; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kaiser, Winfried

    2010-04-01

    Management of mask defects is a major challenge for the introduction of EUV for HVM production. Once a defect has been detected, its printing impact needs to be predicted. Potentially the defect requires some repair, the success of which needs to be proven. This defect review has to be done with an actinic inspection system that matches the imaging conditions of an EUV scanner. During recent years, several concepts for such an aerial image metrology system (AIMS™) have been proposed. However, until now no commercial solution exists for EUV. Today, advances in EUV optics technology allow envisioning a solution that has been discarded before as unrealistic. We present this concept and its technical cornerstones.While the power requirement for the EUV source is less demanding than for HVM lithography tools, radiance, floor space, and stability are the main criteria for source selection. The requirement to emulate several generations of EUV scanners demands a large flexibility for the ilumination and imaging systems. New critical specifications to the EUV mirrors in the projection microscope can be satisfied using our expertise from lithographic mirrors. In summary, an EUV AIMS™ meeting production requirements seems to be feasible.

  12. The actin cytoskeleton in presynaptic assembly.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jessica C; Stavoe, Andrea K H; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Dramatic morphogenetic processes underpin nearly every step of nervous system development, from initial neuronal migration and axon guidance to synaptogenesis. Underlying this morphogenesis are dynamic rearrangements of cytoskeletal architecture. Here we discuss the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in the development of presynaptic terminals, from the elaboration of terminal arbors to the recruitment of presynaptic vesicles and active zone components. The studies discussed here underscore the importance of actin regulation at every step in neuronal circuit assembly. PMID:23628914

  13. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  14. Value of videoroscopy in the detection of alterations of  Actinic Cheilitis and the selection of biopsy areas

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Ana-Maria; Ferrari, Thiago; Domingos, Tabata; Cunha, Karin; Dias, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the value of videoroscopy in identifying lesions and alterations not seen by oroscopy and to select the area for biopsy. Material and Methods Eighty patients were subjected to anamnesis, physical exam, videoroscopy exam, toluidine blue test and biopsy. A diagram of the lips was created to record the exact location where the lesion was found. Results Physical exam identified 287 lesions, and videoroscopy identified 587 lesions; erythema and white lesions were the most common lesions associated with actinic cheilitis. Of the 59 performed biopsies, 32 (52.4%) cases were identified by videoroscopy that showed lesions that were not detected during physical examination. Conclusions The establishment of a diagram of the lip permitted registration of the precise location of the lesion. Videoroscopy was effective in locating lesions not seen by oroscopy. Both videoroscopy and the diagram of the lips allowed for better and earlier diagnosis and better patient follow-up for those with actinic cheilitis. Key words: Actinic cheilitis, potentially malignant disorder, videoroscopy, dermatoscopy, lip. oroscopy, diagram of lip. PMID:25662549

  15. Actin filament curvature biases branching direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evan; Risca, Viviana; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Chia, Jia-Jun; Geissler, Phillip; Fletcher, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Actin filaments are key components of the cellular machinery, vital for a wide range of processes ranging from cell motility to endocytosis. Actin filaments can branch, and essential in this process is a protein complex known as the Arp2/3 complex, which nucleate new ``daughter'' filaments from pre-existing ``mother'' filaments by attaching itself to the mother filament. Though much progress has been made in understanding the Arp2/3-actin junction, some very interesting questions remain. In particular, F-actin is a dynamic polymer that undergoes a wide range of fluctuations. Prior studies of the Arp2/3-actin junction provides a very static notion of Arp2/3 binding. The question we ask is how differently does the Arp2/3 complex interact with a straight filament compared to a bent filament? In this study, we used Monte Carlo simulations of a surface-tethered worm-like chain to explore possible mechanisms underlying the experimental observation that there exists preferential branch formation by the Arp2/3 complex on the convex face of a curved filament. We show that a fluctuation gating model in which Arp2/3 binding to the actin filament is dependent upon a rare high-local-curvature shape fluctuation of the filament is consistent with the experimental data.

  16. The Bacterial Actin-Like Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-López, Rut

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances have shown conclusively that bacterial cells possess distant but true homologues of actin (MreB, ParM, and the recently uncovered MamK protein). Despite weak amino acid sequence similarity, MreB and ParM exhibit high structural homology to actin. Just like F-actin in eukaryotes, MreB and ParM assemble into highly dynamic filamentous structures in vivo and in vitro. MreB-like proteins are essential for cell viability and have been implicated in major cellular processes, including cell morphogenesis, chromosome segregation, and cell polarity. ParM (a plasmid-encoded actin homologue) is responsible for driving plasmid-DNA partitioning. The dynamic prokaryotic actin-like cytoskeleton is thought to serve as a central organizer for the targeting and accurate positioning of proteins and nucleoprotein complexes, thereby (and by analogy to the eukaryotic cytoskeleton) spatially and temporally controlling macromolecular trafficking in bacterial cells. In this paper, the general properties and known functions of the actin orthologues in bacteria are reviewed. PMID:17158703

  17. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  18. Nuclear and cytoplasmic actin in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, M O; Ausseil, J; Géraud, M L

    1996-01-01

    Experiments using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-actin antibodies allowed us to demonstrate the presence of F- or G-actin in original protists, dinoflagellates, either by biochemistry, immunofluorescence and in TEM. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and immunoblottings made either from total or nuclear protein extracts revealed the presence of a 44-kDa band reacting with monoclonal anti-actin antibody in two species, Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii, and thus demonstrated the presence of actin in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. After squash preparation of P micans cells, actin was identified within the nucleus and in some regions of the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence microscopy. Labelling of both the nucleolus and the centrosome region was evident together with amorphous nucleoplasmic material surrounding the chromosomes. The use of cryosections of intact P micans and C cohnii cells for immunofluorescence along with staining with DAPI to delineate the chromosomes themselves, yielded finer resolution of the intranuclear network labelling pattern and allowed us to complete our observations, in particular on the cytoplasmic labelling. In P micans, in addition to the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels passing through the nucleus in dividing cells are labelled. In C cohnii, the cortex, the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels, the region surrounding the nucleus, the filaments linking it to the cortex and the cleavage furrow are also labelled. In the nucleus of the two species, there is a prominent "weft' of fine actin filaments in the nucleoplasm forming a matrix of varying density around the persistent chromosomes. This actin matrix, of unknown function, is most conspicuous at the end of the S-phase of the cell cycle. Fluorescent derivatives of phalloidin, used as diagnostic cytochemical probes for polymeric actin (F-actin), gave similar results. Positive TEM immunolabelling of intranuclear actin confirms its presence in the nucleoplasm, in the

  19. Cofilin-induced cooperative conformational changes of actin subunits revealed using cofilin-actin fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Nobuhisa; Hirose, Keiko; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments induced by cofilin binding, we engineered a fusion protein made of Dictyostelium cofilin and actin. The filaments of the fusion protein were functionally similar to actin filaments bound with cofilin in that they did not bind rhodamine-phalloidin, had quenched fluorescence of pyrene attached to Cys374 and showed enhanced susceptibility of the DNase loop to cleavage by subtilisin. Quantitative analyses of copolymers made of different ratios of the fusion protein and control actin further demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the structure of multiple neighboring actin subunits in copolymers. Based on these and other recent related studies, we propose a mechanism by which conformational changes induced by cofilin binding is propagated unidirectionally to the pointed ends of the filaments, and cofilin clusters grow unidirectionally to the pointed ends following this path. Interestingly, the fusion protein was unable to copolymerize with control actin at pH 6.5 and low ionic strength, suggesting that the structural difference between the actin moiety in the fusion protein and control actin is pH-sensitive. PMID:26842224

  20. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  1. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Tian, Xia; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl), a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:23727244

  2. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  3. Glutamyl Phosphate Is an Activated Intermediate in Actin Crosslinking by Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD) Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Elena; Kalda, Caitlin; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2012-01-01

    Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD) is produced by several life-threatening Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria as part of larger toxins and delivered into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic host cells via Type I or Type VI secretion systems. Upon delivery, ACD disrupts the actin cytoskeleton by catalyzing intermolecular amide bond formation between E270 and K50 residues of actin, leading to the formation of polymerization-deficient actin oligomers. Ultimately, accumulation of the crosslinked oligomers results in structural and functional failure of the actin cytoskeleton in affected cells. In the present work, we advanced in our understanding of the ACD catalytic mechanism by discovering that the enzyme transfers the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP to the E270 actin residue, resulting in the formation of an activated acyl phosphate intermediate. This intermediate is further hydrolyzed and the energy of hydrolysis is utilized for the formation of the amide bond between actin subunits. We also determined the pH optimum for the reaction and the kinetic parameters of ACD catalysis for its substrates, ATP and actin. ACD showed sigmoidal, non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for actin (K0.5 = 30 µM) reflecting involvement of two actin molecules in a single crosslinking event. We established that ACD can also utilize Mg2+-GTP to support crosslinking, but the kinetic parameters (KM = 8 µM and 50 µM for ATP and GTP, respectively) suggest that ATP is the primary substrate of ACD in vivo. The optimal pH for ACD activity was in the range of 7.0–9.0. The elucidated kinetic mechanism of ACD toxicity adds to understanding of complex network of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23029200

  4. The natural product cucurbitacin E inhibits depolymerization of actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Pia M.; Iacob, Roxana E.; Fritzsche, Marco; Engen, John R.; Brieher, William M.; Charras, Guillaume; Eggert, Ulrike S.

    2012-01-01

    Although small molecule actin modulators have been widely used as research tools, only one cell permeable small molecule inhibitor of actin depolymerization (jasplakinolide) is commercially available. We report that the natural product cucurbitacin E inhibits actin depolymerization and show that its mechanism of action is different from jasplakinolide. In assays using pure fluorescently labeled actin, cucurbitacin E specifically affected depolymerization without affecting polymerization. It inhibited actin depolymerization at sub-stoichiometric concentrations up to 1:6 cucurbitacin:actin E. Cucurbitacin E specifically binds to filamentous actin (F-actin) forming a covalent bond at residue Cys257, but not to monomeric actin (G-actin). Based on its compatibility with phalloidin staining, we show that cucurbitacin E occupies a different binding site on actin filaments. Using loss of fluorescence after localized photoactivation, we found that cucurbitacin E inhibited actin depolymerization in live cells. Cucurbitacin E is a widely available plant-derived natural product, making it a useful tool to study actin dynamics in cells and actin-based processes such as cytokinesis. PMID:22724897

  5. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Paves, Heiti; Truve, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area. PMID:15102327

  6. Actin-dependent mechanisms in AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) number and subtype at the synapse is crucial for the regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and the consequent formation of appropriate neural circuits for learning and memory. AMPAR trafficking involves the dynamic processes of exocytosis, endocytosis and endosomal recycling, all of which involve the actin cytoskeleton. The actin cytoskeleton is highly dynamic and highly regulated by an abundance of actin-binding proteins and upstream signaling pathways that modulate actin polymerization and depolymerization. Actin dynamics generate forces that manipulate membranes in the process of vesicle biogenesis, and also for propelling vesicles through the cytoplasm to reach their destination. In addition, trafficking mechanisms exploit more stable aspects of the actin cytoskeleton by using actin-based motor proteins to traffic vesicular cargo along actin filaments. Numerous studies have shown that actin dynamics are critical for AMPAR localization and function. The identification of actin-binding proteins that physically interact with AMPAR subunits, and research into their mode of action is starting to shed light on the mechanisms involved. Such proteins either regulate actin dynamics to modulate mechanical forces exerted on AMPAR-containing membranes, or associate with actin filaments to target or transport AMPAR-containing vesicles to specific subcellular regions. In addition, actin-regulatory proteins that do not physically interact with AMPARs may influence AMPAR trafficking by regulating the local actin environment in the dendritic spine. PMID:25429259

  7. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-08-01

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT-associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus. PMID:27457955

  8. Dermoscopic and Clinical Features of Pigmented Skin Lesions of the Genital Area*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Wellenhof, Rainer Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermoscopic features of vulvar melanosis lesions are well known. To our knowledge, there are only a few case reports about dermoscopic features of pigmented genital lesions in male patients. OBJECTIVE To evaluate dermoscopic and clinical characteristics of benign lesions of the genital area in both males and females, and to assess the distinguishing dermoscopic criteria of vulvar melanosis and atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type. METHODS 68 patients with pigmented genital lesions were included in this observational study (28 male and 40 female). A punch biopsy was taken from all pigmented lesions and histopathological examination was performed on all specimens. RESULTS We histopathologically diagnosed: genital melanosis in 40 lesions, atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type in 15 lesions, melanocytic nevi in 9 lesions, seborrheic keratosis in 4 lesions. The most frequent locations were the glans penis (19 patients, 67.9%) in males and the labia minora (19 patients, 47.5%) in females. The mean age of patients with atypical nevi (28,6 ± 11,36) was significantly lower than the mean age of patients with genital melanosis (47,07 ± 15,33). CONCLUSIONS Parallel pattern is prominent in genital melanosis, ring-like pattern is only observed in genital melanosis. Most pigmented lesions on the genital area are solitary. Blue-white veil and irregular dots are only observed in AMNGT. According to these results, we propose that histopathological examination is performed, especially if blue-white veil and irregular dots are found by dermoscopy. PMID:25830986

  9. Supercoiling of f-actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Lednev, V V; Popp, D

    1990-05-01

    In the X-ray diffraction pattern from oriented gels of actin-containing filaments sampling of layer lines indicating the development of a well-ordered pseudo-hexagonal lattice within the gels at interfilament spacings as large as 13 nm is observed. This value exceeds by 3 nm the largest estimate of an external diameter of pure f-actin. The development of layer line sampling is always accompanied by: (i) the appearance of strong forbidden meridional reflections on the 5.9- and 5.1-nm layer lines; (ii) a drastic intensification of the first (expected) 2.75-nm meridional reflection by a factor of about 4; (iii) the appearance of streaks, connecting near-meridional reflections on the 5.9-, 5.1-, and 37-nm layer lines; and (iv) a slight decrease in the number of subunits per turn of the basic f-actin helix. All these features strongly indicate that f-actin filaments are supercoiled and make regular local contacts between themselves, which may lead to periodic distortions of the mobile external domain in the actin subunits. PMID:2261308

  10. Impact of Carbon Nanomaterials on Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Li, Xin; Zhao, Lina

    2016-03-01

    Many nanomaterials have entered people's daily lives and impact the normal process of biological entities consequently. As one kind of the important nanomaterials, carbon based nanomaterials have invoked a lot of concerns from scientific researches because of their unique physicochemical properties. In eukaryotes, actin is the most abundantly distributed protein in both cytoplasm and cell nucleus, and closely controls the cell proliferation and mobility. Recently, many investigations have found some carbon based nanomaterials can affect actin cytoskeleton remarkably, including fullerenes derivatives, carbon nanotubes, graphene and its derivatives. However, these interaction processes are complicated and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood clearly. In this review, we discussed the different mechanisms of carbon nanomaterials impact on actin polymerization into three pathways, as triggering the signaling pathways from carbon nanomaterials outside of cells, increasing the production of reactive oxygen species from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells and direct interaction from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells. As a result, the dimension and size of carbon nanomaterials play a key role in regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, we forecasted the possible investigation strategy for meeting the challenges of the future study on this topic. We hope the findings are helpful in understanding the molecular mechanism in carbon nanomaterials regulating actin polymerization, and provide new insight in novel nanomedicine development for inhibition tumor cell migration. PMID:27455649

  11. Structural Transitions of F-Actin:Espin Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin; Bartles, James; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Espin is an actin bundling protein involved in the formation of the parallel bundles of filamentous actin in hair cell stereocilia. Mutations in espin are implicated in deafness phenotypes in mice and humans. We present measurements of the F-actin structures induced by wild type and by mutated espin obtained via small angle x-ray scattering and fluorescence microscopy. We found that wild type espin induced a paracrystalline hexagonal array of twisted F-actin, whereas the mutated espin only condensed the F-actin into a nematic-like phase. The possibility of coexisting nematic and bundled actin in mixtures containing both mutant and wild type espins was also investigated.

  12. Actin Filament Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongsheng; Shen, Tian; Huang, Xiaolei

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for actin filament segmentation in 2D TIRFM image sequences. This problem is difficult because actin filaments dynamically change shapes during their growth, and the TIRFM images are usually noisy. We ask a user to specify the two tips of a filament of interest in the first frame. We then model the segmentation problem in an image sequence as a temporal chain, where its states are tip locations; given candidate tip locations, actin filaments' body points are inferred by a dynamic programming method, which adaptively generates candidate solutions. Combining candidate tip locations and their inferred body points, the temporal chain model is efficiently optimized using another dynamic programming method. Evaluation on noisy TIRFM image sequences demonstrates the accuracy and robustness of this approach. PMID:21761674

  13. Ionic wave propagation along actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Tuszyński, J A; Portet, S; Dixon, J M; Luxford, C; Cantiello, H F

    2004-04-01

    We investigate the conditions enabling actin filaments to act as electrical transmission lines for ion flows along their lengths. We propose a model in which each actin monomer is an electric element with a capacitive, inductive, and resistive property due to the molecular structure of the actin filament and viscosity of the solution. Based on Kirchhoff's laws taken in the continuum limit, a nonlinear partial differential equation is derived for the propagation of ionic waves. We solve this equation in two different regimes. In the first, the maximum propagation velocity wave is found in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. In the general case, we analyze the equation in terms of Fisher-Kolmogoroff modes with both localized and extended wave characteristics. We propose a new signaling mechanism in the cell, especially in neurons. PMID:15041636

  14. Spontaneous actin dynamics in contractile rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten; Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Riveline, Daniel

    Networks of polymerizing actin filaments are known to be capable to self-organize into a variety of structures. For example, spontaneous actin polymerization waves have been observed in living cells in a number of circumstances, notably, in crawling neutrophils and slime molds. During later stages of cell division, they can also spontaneously form a contractile ring that will eventually cleave the cell into two daughter cells. We present a framework for describing networks of polymerizing actin filaments, where assembly is regulated by various proteins. It can also include the effects of molecular motors. We show that the molecular processes driven by these proteins can generate various structures that have been observed in contractile rings of fission yeast and mammalian cells. We discuss a possible functional role of each of these patterns. The work was supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherche, France, (ANR-10-LABX-0030-INRT) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB1027.

  15. Prevalence and Distribution of Oral Mucosal Lesions in a Geriatric Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Doni, Bharti; Maheshwari, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral health is important to individuals of all age groups. Previous epidemiologic studies of the oral health status of the general population in India provided very little information about oral mucosal lesions in the elderly. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of the oral lesions in a geriatric Indian population. Methods 5,100 patients were clinically evaluated, with age ranging from 60 to 98 years. There were 3,100 males and 2,000 females, with a mean age of 69 ± 6.3 yrs. The statistical analysis was done using the SPSS software, where p < .05 was considered to be significant. Results 64% of the patients presented with one or more oral lesions, associated to tobacco, betel nut consumption, and lesions secondary to trauma and prosthesis. Males were more affected than females and this difference was clinically not significant (p > .05). The lesions were more frequently observed between 65 to 70 yrs. The most common alterations observed were smoker’s palate (43%), denture stomatitis (34%), oral submucous fibrosis (30%), frictional keratosis (23%), leukoplakia (22%), and pyogenic granuloma (22%). Hard palate was the most commonly affected site (23.1%). Conclusions The findings of the present study provide important information when clinically evaluating oral cavity in elderly. Close follow-up and systematic evaluation is required in the elderly population to plan future treatment needs. PMID:25825607

  16. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients visiting a dental school in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Anuna Laila; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Sholapurkar, Amar A; Vengal, Manoj

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in Manipal, Karnataka State, India. A total of 1190 subjects who visited the department of oral medicine and radiology for diagnosis of various oral complaints over a period of 3 months were interviewed and clinically examined for oral mucosal lesions. The result showed the presence of one or more mucosal lesions in (41.2%) of the population. Fordyce's condition was observed most frequently (6.55%) followed by frictional keratosis (5.79%), fissured tongue (5.71%), leukoedema (3.78%), smoker's palate (2.77%), recurrent aphthae, oral submucous fibrosis (2.01%), oral malignancies (1.76%), leukoplakia (1.59%), median rhomboid glossitis (1.50%), candidiasis (1.3%), lichen planus (1.20%), varices (1.17%), traumatic ulcer and oral hairy leukoplakia (1.008%), denture stomatitis, geographic tongue, betel chewer's mucosa and irritational fibroma (0.84%), herpes labialis, angular cheilitis (0.58%), and mucocele (0.16%). Mucosal lesions like tobacco-related lesions (leukoplakia, smoker's palate, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral malignancies) were more prevalent among men than among women. Denture stomatitis, herpes labialis, and angular cheilitis occurred more frequently in the female population. PMID:18445924

  17. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W P; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  18. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  19. F-actin Severing Facilitates Distinct Mechanisms of Stress Relaxation in the Actin Cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyoon; Jung, Wonyeong; Murrell, Michael

    Rheological behaviors of actin cytoskeleton play an important role in physiological processes including cell migration and division. The actin cytoskeleton shows a wide variety of viscoelastic responses to external mechanical cues, such as strain-stiffening and stress relaxation. It has been hypothesized that the stress relaxation originates mainly from transient nature of cross-linkers that connect pairs of F-actins. By contrast, potential impacts of rich F-actin dynamics to the stress relaxation have been neglected in most previous studies. Here, using a computational model, we demonstrated that severing of F-actins induced by buckling during strain-stiffening can facilitate a very distinct mode of stress relaxation in the actin cytoskeleton from that induced by the transient cross-linkers. We also explored conditions where the severing-induced stress relaxation becomes prominent. This finding provides a more complete understanding of rheological behaviors of the actin cytoskeleton. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation (1434013-CMMI and 1434095-CMMI).

  20. Actin age orchestrates myosin-5 and myosin-6 run lengths.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Santos, Alicja; Kovar, David R; Rock, Ronald S

    2015-08-01

    Unlike a static and immobile skeleton, the actin cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network of filamentous actin (F-actin) polymers that continuously turn over. In addition to generating mechanical forces and sensing mechanical deformation, dynamic F-actin networks serve as cellular tracks for myosin motor traffic. However, much of our mechanistic understanding of processive myosins comes from in vitro studies in which motility was studied on pre-assembled and artificially stabilized, static F-actin tracks. In this work, we examine the role of actin dynamics in single-molecule myosin motility using assembling F-actin and two highly processive motors, myosin-5 and myosin-6. These two myosins have distinct functions in the cell and travel in opposite directions along actin filaments [1-3]. Myosin-5 walks toward the barbed ends of F-actin, traveling to sites of actin polymerization at the cell periphery [4]. Myosin-6 walks toward the pointed end of F-actin [5], traveling toward the cell center along older segments of the actin filament. We find that myosin-5 takes 1.3- to 1.5-fold longer runs on ADP•Pi (young) F-actin, whereas myosin-6 takes 1.7- to 3.6-fold longer runs along ADP (old) F-actin. These results suggest that conformational differences between ADP•Pi and ADP F-actin tailor these myosins to walk farther toward their preferred actin filament end. Taken together, these experiments define a new mechanism by which myosin traffic may sort to different F-actin networks depending on filament age. PMID:26190073

  1. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  2. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces actin reorganization, intercellular gap formation, and endothelial barrier dysfunction in pulmonary vascular endothelial cells: concurrent F-actin depolymerization and new actin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Goldblum, S E; Ding, X; Brann, T W; Campbell-Washington, J

    1993-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) influences pulmonary vascular endothelial barrier function in vitro. We studied whether LPS regulates endothelial barrier function through actin reorganization. Postconfluent bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers were exposed to Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS 10 ng/ml or media for up to 6 h and evaluated for: 1) transendothelial 14C-albumin flux, 2) F-actin organization with fluorescence microscopy, 3) F-actin quantitation by spectrofluorometry, and 4) monomeric G-actin levels by the DNAse 1 inhibition assay. LPS induced increments in 14C-albumin flux (P < 0.001) and intercellular gap formation at > or = 2-6 h. During this same time period the endothelial F-actin pool was not significantly changed compared to simultaneous media controls. Mean (+/- SE) G-actin (micrograms/mg total protein) was significantly (P < 0.002) increased compared to simultaneous media controls at 2, 4, and 6 h but not at 0.5 or 1 h. Prior F-actin stabilization with phallicidin protected against the LPS-induced increments in G-actin (P = 0.040) as well as changes in barrier function (P < 0.0001). Prior protein synthesis inhibition unmasked an LPS-induced decrement in F-actin (P = 0.0044), blunted the G-actin increment (P = 0.010), and increased LPS-induced changes in endothelial barrier function (P < 0.0001). Therefore, LPS induces pulmonary vascular endothelial F-actin depolymerization, intercellular gap formation, and barrier dysfunction. Over the same time period, LPS increased total actin (P < 0.0001) and new actin synthesis (P = 0.0063) which may be a compensatory endothelial cell response to LPS-induced F-actin depolymerization. PMID:8408232

  3. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hair Small blood vessels in the skin Tattoos CRYOTHERAPY Cryotherapy is a method of super-freezing tissue in ... warts, actinic keratoses, solar keratoses, and molluscum contagiosum. Cryotherapy is done using a cotton swab that has ...

  4. CNS myelin wrapping is driven by actin disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Fu, Meng-Meng; Sloan, Steven A; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Olson, Andrew; Zaremba, Anita; Dugas, Jason C; Wienbar, Sophia; Caprariello, Andrew V; Kantor, Christopher; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Leonoudakus, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Soderling, Scott H; Miller, Robert H; Barres, Ben A

    2015-07-27

    Myelin is essential in vertebrates for the rapid propagation of action potentials, but the molecular mechanisms driving its formation remain largely unknown. Here we show that the initial stage of process extension and axon ensheathment by oligodendrocytes requires dynamic actin filament assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. Unexpectedly, subsequent myelin wrapping coincides with the upregulation of actin disassembly proteins and rapid disassembly of the oligodendrocyte actin cytoskeleton and does not require Arp2/3. Inducing loss of actin filaments drives oligodendrocyte membrane spreading and myelin wrapping in vivo, and the actin disassembly factor gelsolin is required for normal wrapping. We show that myelin basic protein, a protein essential for CNS myelin wrapping whose role has been unclear, is required for actin disassembly, and its loss phenocopies loss of actin disassembly proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism of myelin wrapping and identify it as an actin-independent form of mammalian cell motility. PMID:26166300

  5. The Interaction of Caldesmon with the COOH Terminus of Actin*

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, Rachelle; Adams, Susan; Chalovich, Joseph M.; Reisler, Emil

    2005-01-01

    Caldesmon interacts with the NH2-terminal region of actin. It is now shown in airfuge centrifugation experiments that modification of the penultimate cysteine residue of actin significantly weakens its binding to caldesmon both in the presence and absence of tropomyosin. Furthermore, as revealed by fluorescence measurements, caldesmon increases the exposure of the COOH-terminal region of actin to the solvent. This effect of caldesmon, like its inhibitory effect on actomyosin ATPase activity, is enhanced in the presence of tropomyosin. Proteolytic removal of the last three COOH-terminal residues of actin, containing the modified cysteine residue, restores the normal binding between caldesmon and actin. These results establish a correlation between the binding of caldesmon to actin and the conformation of the COOH-terminal region of actin and suggest an indirect rather than direct interaction between caldesmon and this part of actin. PMID:1939062

  6. Actin of Beta vulgaris seedlings under the clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L. Ye.

    We study the influence of altered gravity on actin expression in roots of Beta vulguris seedlings grown on the horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) from seed germination for three days. It is shown that the total actin quantity was not influenced. Three actin isoforms are revealed; a relative protein quantity of these isoforms was similar both in clinorotated seedlings and in ones grown in norm. This point to stable expression of actin under the altered gravity conditions.

  7. Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders E.

    2010-06-01

    The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: (a) traveling waves, (b) moving patches, and (c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism not involving myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated.

  8. Actinic comedonal plaque-variant of Favre-Racouchot syndrome: report of two cases*

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Fernanda; Nakandakari, Sadamitsu; Zattar, Gabrielle Aline; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    The actinic comedonal plaque is characterized by papules, cysts and comedones forming a yellowish plaque in areas of chronic sun exposure skin. There are few reports in literature about this entity, considered a rare and ectopic form of Favré-Racouchot Syndrome. We report two cases of lesions located on forearms and thorax. Favré-Racouchot Syndrome is a condition usually restricted to the periorbital area; however, there are reports of similar findings in atypical locations, such as forearms and chest, which are known as actinic comedonal plaque. Ultraviolet radiation exposure is the main factor involved in its pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to provide accurate knowledge of this dermatosis and stimulate dermatologists to provide a correct diagnosis of the condition. PMID:26312711

  9. Symmetry breaking in reconstituted actin cortices.

    PubMed

    Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-01-01

    The actin cortex plays a pivotal role in cell division, in generating and maintaining cell polarity and in motility. In all these contexts, the cortical network has to break symmetry to generate polar cytoskeletal dynamics. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms responsible for regulating cortical dynamics in vivo and inducing symmetry breaking are still unclear. Here we introduce a reconstituted system that self-organizes into dynamic actin cortices at the inner interface of water-in-oil emulsions. This artificial system undergoes spontaneous symmetry breaking, driven by myosin-induced cortical actin flows, which appears remarkably similar to the initial polarization of the embryo in many species. Our in vitro model system recapitulates the rich dynamics of actin cortices in vivo, revealing the basic biophysical and biochemical requirements for cortex formation and symmetry breaking. Moreover, this synthetic system paves the way for further exploration of artificial cells towards the realization of minimal model systems that can move and divide.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01433.001. PMID:24843007

  10. Curvature and torsion in growing actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2008-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia rickettsii move within a host cell by polymerizing a comet-tail of actin fibers that ultimately pushes the cell forward. This dense network of cross-linked actin polymers typically exhibits a striking curvature that causes bacteria to move in gently looping paths. Theoretically, tail curvature has been linked to details of motility by considering force and torque balances from a finite number of polymerizing filaments. Here we track beads coated with a prokaryotic activator of actin polymerization in three dimensions to directly quantify the curvature and torsion of bead motility paths. We find that bead paths are more likely to have low rather than high curvature at any given time. Furthermore, path curvature changes very slowly in time, with an autocorrelation decay time of 200 s. Paths with a small radius of curvature, therefore, remain so for an extended period resulting in loops when confined to two dimensions. When allowed to explore a three-dimensional (3D) space, path loops are less evident. Finally, we quantify the torsion in the bead paths and show that beads do not exhibit a significant left- or right-handed bias to their motion in 3D. These results suggest that paths of actin-propelled objects may be attributed to slow changes in curvature, possibly associated with filament debranching, rather than a fixed torque.

  11. Actin-aggregating cucurbitacins from Physocarpus capitatus.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Katherine N; Fujita, Masaki; Eggert, Ulrike S; Schroeder, Frank C; Field, Christine M; Mitchison, Timothy J; Clardy, Jon

    2008-11-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Physocarpus capitatus yielded two new cucurbitacins (3 and 4) along with the known cucurbitacin F (1) and dihydrocucurbitacin F (2). Preliminary mechanism of action studies indicate that the cucurbitacins cause actin aggregates and inhibit cell division. PMID:18959442

  12. Symmetry breaking in reconstituted actin cortices

    PubMed Central

    Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-01-01

    The actin cortex plays a pivotal role in cell division, in generating and maintaining cell polarity and in motility. In all these contexts, the cortical network has to break symmetry to generate polar cytoskeletal dynamics. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms responsible for regulating cortical dynamics in vivo and inducing symmetry breaking are still unclear. Here we introduce a reconstituted system that self-organizes into dynamic actin cortices at the inner interface of water-in-oil emulsions. This artificial system undergoes spontaneous symmetry breaking, driven by myosin-induced cortical actin flows, which appears remarkably similar to the initial polarization of the embryo in many species. Our in vitro model system recapitulates the rich dynamics of actin cortices in vivo, revealing the basic biophysical and biochemical requirements for cortex formation and symmetry breaking. Moreover, this synthetic system paves the way for further exploration of artificial cells towards the realization of minimal model systems that can move and divide. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01433.001 PMID:24843007

  13. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  14. Non-Straub type actin from molluscan catch muscle.

    PubMed

    Shelud'ko, Nikolay S; Girich, Ulyana V; Lazarev, Stanislav S; Vyatchin, Ilya G

    2016-05-27

    We have developed a method of obtaining natural actin from smooth muscles of the bivalves on the example of the Сrenomytilus grayanus catch muscle. The muscles were previously rigorized to prevent a loss of thin filaments during homogenization and washings. Thin filaments were isolated with a low ionic strength solution in the presence of ATP and sodium pyrophosphate. Surface proteins of thin filaments-tropomyosin, troponin, calponin and some minor actin-binding proteins-were dissociated from actin filaments by increasing the ionic strength to 0.6 M KCL. Natural fibrillar actin obtained in that way depolymerizes easily in low ionic strength solutions commonly used for the extraction of Straub-type actin from acetone powder. Purification of natural actin was carried out by the polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The content of inactivated actin remaining in the supernatant is much less than at a similar purification of Straub-type actin. A comparative investigation was performed between the natural mussel actin and the Straub-type rabbit skeletal actin in terms of the key properties of actin: polymerization, activation of Mg-ATPase activity of myosin, and the electron-microscopic structure of actin polymers. PMID:27120462

  15. Transformation of actin-encapsulating liposomes induced by cytochalasin D.

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, H; Kinosita, K

    1994-01-01

    Liposomes encapsulating actin filaments were prepared by swelling at 0 degrees C lipid film consisting of a mixture of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin (equal amounts by weight) in 100 microM rabbit skeletal muscle actin and 0.5 mM CaCl2 followed by polymerization of actin at 30 degrees C. Liposomes initially assumed either disk or dumbbell shape, but when cytochalasin D was added to the medium surrounding the liposomes, they were found to become spindle shaped. Liposomes containing bovine serum albumin that were given cytochalasin D and actin-containing liposomes that were given dimethylformamide, the solvent for cytochalasin D, did not transform. These results indicated actin-cytochalasin interaction is involved in the transformation process. Falling-ball viscometry and sedimentation analysis of actin solution indicated that cytochalasin cleaved actin filaments and caused depolymerization. The observation of polarized fluorescence of encapsulated actin labeled with acrylodan indicated that the actin filaments in the transformed liposomes aligned along the long axis of the liposomes. Because the actin filaments in the disk- or dumbbell-shaped liposomes formed bundles running along the liposome contour, the transformation was likely to be accompanied by the change in the actin filament arrangement in the liposomes, which was induced by actin-cytochalasin interaction. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7948706

  16. Actin cytoskeleton demonstration in Trichomonas vaginalis and in other trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    1996-01-01

    The flagellate form of Trichomonas vaginalis (T v) transforms to amoeboid cells upon adherence to converslips. They grow and their nuclei divide without undergoing cytokinesis, yielding giant cells and a monolayer of T v F-actin was demonstrated in Trichomonas vaginalis by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin and an anti-actin mAb which labelled the cytoplasm of both the flagellate and amoeboid forms. Comparative electrophoresis and immunoblotting established that the actin band has the same 42 kDa as muscle actin, but 2-D electrophoresis resolved the actin band into four spots; the two major spots observed were superimposable with major muscle actin isoforms. Electron microscopy demonstrated an ectoplasmic microfibrillar layer along the adhesion zone of amoeboid T v adhering to coverslips. Immunogold staining, using anti-actin monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that this layer was mainly composed of actin microfilaments. A comparative immunoblotting study comprising seven trichomonad species showed that all trichomonads studied expressed actin. The mAb Sigma A-4700 specific for an epitope on the actin C-terminal sequence labelled only actin of Trichomonas vaginalis, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. Trichomitus batrachorum and Hypotrichomonas acosta, but not the actin of Tritrichomonas foetus, Tritrichomonas augusta and Monocercomonas sp. This discrimination between a 'trichomonas branch' and a 'tritrichomonas branch' is congruent with inferred sequence phylogeny from SSu rRNA and with classical phylogeny of trichomonads. PMID:9175265

  17. CRP2, a new invadopodia actin bundling factor critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dieterle, Monika; Moreau, Flora; Al Absi, Antoun; Steinmetz, André; Oudin, Anaïs; Berchem, Guy; Janji, Bassam; Thomas, Clément

    2016-01-01

    A critical process underlying cancer metastasis is the acquisition by tumor cells of an invasive phenotype. At the subcellular level, invasion is facilitated by actin-rich protrusions termed invadopodia, which direct extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Here, we report the identification of a new cytoskeletal component of breast cancer cell invadopodia, namely cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2). We found that CRP2 was not or only weakly expressed in epithelial breast cancer cells whereas it was up-regulated in mesenchymal/invasive breast cancer cells. In addition, high expression of the CRP2 encoding gene CSRP2 was associated with significantly increased risk of metastasis in basal-like breast cancer patients. CRP2 knockdown significantly reduced the invasive potential of aggressive breast cancer cells, whereas it did not impair 2D cell migration. In keeping with this, CRP2-depleted breast cancer cells exhibited a reduced capacity to promote ECM degradation, and to secrete and express MMP-9, a matrix metalloproteinase repeatedly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In turn, ectopic expression of CRP2 in weakly invasive cells was sufficient to stimulate cell invasion. Both GFP-fused and endogenous CRP2 localized to the extended actin core of invadopodia, a structure primarily made of actin bundles. Purified recombinant CRP2 autonomously crosslinked actin filaments into thick bundles, suggesting that CRP2 contributes to the formation/maintenance of the actin core. Finally, CRP2 depletion significantly reduced the incidence of lung metastatic lesions in two xenograft mouse models of breast cancer. Collectively, our data identify CRP2 as a new cytoskeletal component of invadopodia that critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26883198

  18. Tailor-Made Ezrin Actin Binding Domain to Probe Its Interaction with Actin In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Rohini; Köster, Darius; Kalme, Sheetal; Mayor, Satyajit; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction) of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well. PMID:25860910

  19. FMNL3 FH2-actin structure gives insight into formin-mediated actin nucleation and elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Morgan E; Heimsath, Ernest G; Gauvin, Timothy J; Higgs, Henry N; Kull, F Jon

    2012-12-09

    Formins are actin-assembly factors that act in a variety of actin-based processes. The conserved formin homology 2 (FH2) domain promotes filament nucleation and influences elongation through interaction with the barbed end. FMNL3 is a formin that induces assembly of filopodia but whose FH2 domain is a poor nucleator. The 3.4-Å structure of a mouse FMNL3 FH2 dimer in complex with tetramethylrhodamine-actin uncovers details of formin-regulated actin elongation. We observe distinct FH2 actin-binding regions; interactions in the knob and coiled-coil subdomains are necessary for actin binding, whereas those in the lasso-post interface are important for the stepping mechanism. Biochemical and cellular experiments test the importance of individual residues for function. This structure provides details for FH2-mediated filament elongation by processive capping and supports a model in which C-terminal non-FH2 residues of FMNL3 are required to stabilize the filament nucleus.

  20. VASP is a processive actin polymerase that requires monomeric actin for barbed end association

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D.

    2010-01-01

    Ena/VASP proteins regulate the actin cytoskeleton during cell migration and morphogenesis and promote assembly of both filopodial and lamellipodial actin networks. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying their cellular functions we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to visualize VASP tetramers interacting with static and growing actin filaments in vitro. We observed multiple filament binding modes: (1) static side binding, (2) side binding with one-dimensional diffusion, and (3) processive barbed end tracking. Actin monomers antagonize side binding but promote high affinity (Kd = 9 nM) barbed end attachment. In low ionic strength buffers, VASP tetramers are weakly processive (Koff = 0.69 s−1) polymerases that deliver multiple actin monomers per barbed end–binding event and effectively antagonize filament capping. In higher ionic strength buffers, VASP requires profilin for effective polymerase and anti-capping activity. Based on our observations, we propose a mechanism that accounts for all three binding modes and provides a model for how VASP promotes actin filament assembly. PMID:21041447

  1. Neutrophil actin dysfunction is a genetic disorder associated with partial impairment of neutrophil actin assembly in three family members.

    PubMed Central

    Southwick, F S; Dabiri, G A; Stossel, T P

    1988-01-01

    A male infant with a severe neutrophil motility disorder and poorly polymerizable actin in PMN extracts was reported over a decade ago to have neutrophil actin dysfunction (NAD) (1974. N. Engl. J. Med. 291:1093-1099). Polymerized actin (F-actin) content of fixed and permeabilized intact neutrophils from the father, mother, and sister of the NAD index case have been measured using nitrobenzoxadiazole-phallacidin, a fluorescent compound which binds specifically to actin filaments. F-actin content of unstimulated PMN from all three family members was significantly lower than unstimulated control PMN (mean 23.6 +/- 0.4 SEM fluorescent units vs. 32.6 +/- 0.6 for controls). After stimulation with the chemotactic peptide FMLP, maximal F-actin content of NAD family member PMN was below that of controls (52.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 72.6 +/- 1.8). F-actin content of detergent insoluble cytoskeletons after stimulation with FMLP was also significantly lower in PMN from NAD family members as compared with controls (21 +/- 6% vs. 73 +/- 8%). PMN extracts from the father and mother, when treated with 0.6 M KCl, polymerized half as much actin as controls. Whereas diisopropylfluorophosphate treatment of normal PMN decreased actin polymerizability in cell extracts, this treatment increased the assembly of actin in parental PMN extract. Addition of purified actin to NAD extracts failed to reveal an abnormal actin polymerization inhibitory activity, and no obvious structural defect in actin purified from the father's PMNs was noted by HPLC and two dimensional thin layer chromatography of tryptic digests. The present studies of actin assembly in intact PMNs confirm that NAD is associated with a true defect in PMN actin assembly and is a genetic disorder that is recessively inherited. Images PMID:3183050

  2. Structure of a Bud6/Actin Complex Reveals a Novel WH2-like Actin Monomer Recruitment Motif.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunyoung; Graziano, Brian R; Zheng, Wei; Garabedian, Mikael; Goode, Bruce L; Eck, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    In budding yeast, the actin-binding protein Bud6 cooperates with formins Bni1 and Bnr1 to catalyze the assembly of actin filaments. The nucleation-enhancing activity of Bud6 requires both a "core" domain that binds to the formin and a "flank" domain that binds monomeric actin. Here, we describe the structure of the Bud6 flank domain in complex with actin. Two helices in Bud6(flank) interact with actin; one binds in a groove at the barbed end of the actin monomer in a manner closely resembling the helix of WH2 domains, a motif found in many actin nucleation factors. The second helix rises along the face of actin. Mutational analysis verifies the importance of these Bud6-actin contacts for nucleation-enhancing activity. The Bud6 binding site on actin overlaps with that of the formin FH2 domain and is also incompatible with inter-subunit contacts in F-actin, suggesting that Bud6 interacts only transiently with actin monomers during filament nucleation. PMID:26118535

  3. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, D. A.; Zsuppan, G.; Allen, N. S.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling.

  4. Exploring the Stability Limits of Actin and Its Suprastructures

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher; Erlkamp, Mirko; Ecken, Julian von der; Raunser, Stefan; Winter, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Actin is the main component of the microfilament system in eukaryotic cells and can be found in distinct morphological states. Global (G)-actin is able to assemble into highly organized, supramolecular cellular structures known as filamentous (F)-actin and bundled (B)-actin. To evaluate the structure and stability of G-, F-, and B-actin over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, laser confocal scanning microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our analysis was designed to provide new (to our knowledge) insights into the stabilizing forces of actin self-assembly and to reveal the stability of the actin polymorphs, including in conditions encountered in extreme environments. In addition, we sought to explain the limited pressure stability of actin self-assembly observed in vivo. G-actin is not only the least temperature-stable but also the least pressure-stable actin species. Under abyssal conditions, where temperatures as low as 1–4°C and pressures up to 1 kbar are reached, G-actin is hardly stable. However, the supramolecular assemblies of actin are stable enough to withstand the extreme conditions usually encountered on Earth. Beyond ∼3–4 kbar, filamentous structures disassemble, and beyond ∼4 kbar, complete dissociation of F-actin structures is observed. Between ∼1 and 2 kbar, some disordering of actin assemblies commences, in agreement with in vivo observations. The limited pressure stability of the monomeric building block seems to be responsible for the suppression of actin assembly in the kbar pressure range. PMID:25517163

  5. Orthogonal (transverse) arrangements of actin in endothelia and fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Adam; Aitchison, Gregor; Tsapikouni, Theodora

    2006-01-01

    Though actin filaments running across the cell (transverse actin) have been occasionally reported for epithelial cells in groups and for cells growing on fibres, there has been no report heretofore of transverse actin in cells grown on planar substrata. This paper describes evidence in support of this possibility derived from actin staining, polarization microscopy and force measurements. The paper introduces two new methods for detecting the orientation and activity of contractile elements in cells. The orthogonal actin is most obvious in cells grown on groove ridge structures, but can be detected in cells grown on flat surfaces. PMID:17015307

  6. Antibody against the Carboxyl Terminus of Intimin α Reduces Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Tissue Culture Cells and Subsequent Induction of Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Humberto M.; Teel, Louise D.; Kokai-Kun, John F.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    2005-01-01

    The C-terminal third of intimin binds to its translocated receptor (Tir) to promote attaching and effacing lesion formation during infection with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). We observed that the adherence of EPEC strains to HEp-2 cells was reduced and that actin polymerization was blocked by antibody raised against the C-terminal third of intimin α. PMID:15784601

  7. Geometrical and Mechanical Properties Control Actin Filament Organization

    PubMed Central

    Ennomani, Hajer; Théry, Manuel; Nedelec, Francois; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The different actin structures governing eukaryotic cell shape and movement are not only determined by the properties of the actin filaments and associated proteins, but also by geometrical constraints. We recently demonstrated that limiting nucleation to specific regions was sufficient to obtain actin networks with different organization. To further investigate how spatially constrained actin nucleation determines the emergent actin organization, we performed detailed simulations of the actin filament system using Cytosim. We first calibrated the steric interaction between filaments, by matching, in simulations and experiments, the bundled actin organization observed with a rectangular bar of nucleating factor. We then studied the overall organization of actin filaments generated by more complex pattern geometries used experimentally. We found that the fraction of parallel versus antiparallel bundles is determined by the mechanical properties of actin filament or bundles and the efficiency of nucleation. Thus nucleation geometry, actin filaments local interactions, bundle rigidity, and nucleation efficiency are the key parameters controlling the emergent actin architecture. We finally simulated more complex nucleation patterns and performed the corresponding experiments to confirm the predictive capabilities of the model. PMID:26016478

  8. Cytoplasmic Actin: Purification and Single Molecule Assembly Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D.; Zuchero, J. Bradley; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential to all eukaryotic cells. In addition to playing important structural roles, assembly of actin into filaments powers diverse cellular processes, including cell motility, cytokinesis, and endocytosis. Actin polymerization is tightly regulated by its numerous cofactors, which control spatial and temporal assembly of actin as well as the physical properties of these filaments. Development of an in vitro model of actin polymerization from purified components has allowed for great advances in determining the effects of these proteins on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we describe how to use the pyrene actin assembly assay to determine the effect of a protein on the kinetics of actin assembly, either directly or as mediated by proteins such as nucleation or capping factors. Secondly, we show how fluorescently labeled phalloidin can be used to visualize the filaments that are created in vitro to give insight into how proteins regulate actin filament structure. Finally, we describe a method for visualizing dynamic assembly and disassembly of single actin filaments and fluorescently labeled actin binding proteins using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. PMID:23868587

  9. A complex gene superfamily encodes actin in petunia.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, W V; Meagher, R B

    1987-01-01

    We have shown by several independent criteria that actin is encoded by a very large and complex superfamily of genes in Petunia. Several cDNA and genomic probes encoding actins from diverse organisms (Dictyostelium, Drosophila, chicken and soybean) hybridize to hundreds of restriction fragments in the petunia genome. Actin-hybridizing sequences were isolated from a petunia genomic library at a rate of at least 200 per genome equivalent. Twenty randomly selected actin-hybridizing clones were characterized in more detail. DNA sequence data from four representative and highly divergent clones, PAc2, PAc3, PAc4 and PAc7, demonstrate that these actin-like sequences are related to functional actin genes. Intron positions typical of other known plant actin genes are conserved in these clones. Four of six clones analyzed (PAc1, PAc2, PAc3, PAc4) hybridize to leaf mRNA of the same size (1.7 kb) as that reported for other plant actin mRNAs and to a slightly smaller mRNA species (1.5 kb). Five distinct subfamilies of actin-related genes were characterized which varied in size from a few members to several dozen members. It is clear from our data that other actin gene subfamilies must also exist within the genome. Possible mechanisms of actin gene amplification and genome turnover are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3428258

  10. Nuclear F-actin formation and reorganization upon cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  11. Distributed actin turnover in the lamellipodium and FRAP kinetics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew B; Kiuchi, Tai; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Studies of actin dynamics at the leading edge of motile cells with single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy have shown a broad distribution of EGFP-actin speckle lifetimes and indicated actin polymerization and depolymerization over an extended region. Other experiments using FRAP with the same EGFP-actin as a probe have suggested, by contrast, that polymerization occurs exclusively at the leading edge. We performed FRAP experiments on XTC cells to compare SiMS to FRAP on the same cell type. We used speckle statistics obtained by SiMS to model the steady-state distribution and kinetics of actin in the lamellipodium. We demonstrate that a model with a single diffuse actin species is in good agreement with FRAP experiments. A model including two species of diffuse actin provides an even better agreement. The second species consists of slowly diffusing oligomers that associate to the F-actin network throughout the lamellipodium or break up into monomers after a characteristic time. Our work motivates studies to test the presence and composition of slowly diffusing actin species that may contribute to local remodeling of the actin network and increase the amount of soluble actin. PMID:23332077

  12. Bundling actin filaments from membranes: some novel players

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Clément

    2012-01-01

    Progress in live-cell imaging of the cytoskeleton has significantly extended our knowledge about the organization and dynamics of actin filaments near the plasma membrane of plant cells. Noticeably, two populations of filamentous structures can be distinguished. On the one hand, fine actin filaments which exhibit an extremely dynamic behavior basically characterized by fast polymerization and prolific severing events, a process referred to as actin stochastic dynamics. On the other hand, thick actin bundles which are composed of several filaments and which are comparatively more stable although they constantly remodel as well. There is evidence that the actin cytoskeleton plays critical roles in trafficking and signaling at both the cell cortex and organelle periphery but the exact contribution of actin bundles remains unclear. A common view is that actin bundles provide the long-distance tracks used by myosin motors to deliver their cargo to growing regions and accordingly play a particularly important role in cell polarization. However, several studies support that actin bundles are more than simple passive highways and display multiple and dynamic roles in the regulation of many processes, such as cell elongation, polar auxin transport, stomatal and chloroplast movement, and defense against pathogens. The list of identified plant actin-bundling proteins is ever expanding, supporting that plant cells shape structurally and functionally different actin bundles. Here I review the most recently characterized actin-bundling proteins, with a particular focus on those potentially relevant to membrane trafficking and/or signaling. PMID:22936939

  13. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Lehman, William

    2016-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1) tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2) low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation. PMID:26798831

  14. The Structural Basis of Actin Organization by Vinculin and Metavinculin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Laura Y; Thompson, Peter M; Lee, Hyunna T; Pershad, Mihir; Campbell, Sharon L; Alushin, Gregory M

    2016-01-16

    Vinculin is an essential adhesion protein that links membrane-bound integrin and cadherin receptors through their intracellular binding partners to filamentous actin, facilitating mechanotransduction. Here we present an 8.5-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction and pseudo-atomic model of the vinculin tail (Vt) domain bound to F-actin. Upon actin engagement, the N-terminal "strap" and helix 1 are displaced from the Vt helical bundle to mediate actin bundling. We find that an analogous conformational change also occurs in the H1' helix of the tail domain of metavinculin (MVt) upon actin binding, a muscle-specific splice isoform that suppresses actin bundling by Vt. These data support a model in which metavinculin tunes the actin bundling activity of vinculin in a tissue-specific manner, providing a mechanistic framework for understanding metavinculin mutations associated with hereditary cardiomyopathies. PMID:26493222

  15. The Potential Roles of Actin in The Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, actin’s presence in the nucleus has been demonstrated. Actin is a key protein necessary for different nuclear processes. Although actin is well known for its functional role in dynamic behavior of the cytoskeleton, emerging studies are now highlighting new roles for actin. At the present time there is no doubt about the presence of actin in the nucleus. A number of studies have uncovered the functional involvement of actin in nuclear processes. Actin as one of the nuclear components has its own structured and functional rules, such as nuclear matrix association, chromatin remodeling, transcription by RNA polymerases I, II, III and mRNA processing. In this historical review, we attempt to provide an overview of our current understanding of the functions of actin in the nucleus. PMID:25870830

  16. Regulation of cellular actin architecture by S100A10.

    PubMed

    Jung, M Juliane; Murzik, Ulrike; Wehder, Liane; Hemmerich, Peter; Melle, Christian

    2010-04-15

    Actin structures are involved in several biological processes and the disruption of actin polymerisation induces impaired motility of eukaryotic cells. Different factors are involved in regulation and maintenance of the cytoskeletal actin architecture. Here we show that S100A10 participates in the particular organisation of actin filaments. Down-regulation of S100A10 by specific siRNA triggered a disorganisation of filamentous actin structures without a reduction of the total cellular actin concentration. In contrast, the formation of cytoskeleton structures containing tubulin was unhindered in S100A10 depleted cells. Interestingly, the cellular distribution of annexin A2, an interaction partner of S100A10, was unaffected in S100A10 depleted cells. Cells lacking S100A10 showed an impaired migration activity and were unable to close a scratched wound. Our data provide first insights of S100A10 function as a regulator of the filamentous actin network. PMID:20100475

  17. Wnt Signalling Promotes Actin Dynamics during Axon Remodelling through the Actin-Binding Protein Eps8

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    Upon arrival at their synaptic targets, axons slow down their growth and extensively remodel before the assembly of presynaptic boutons. Wnt proteins are target-derived secreted factors that promote axonal remodelling and synaptic assembly. In the developing spinal cord, Wnts secreted by motor neurons promote axonal remodelling of NT-3 responsive dorsal root ganglia neurons. Axon remodelling induced by Wnts is characterised by growth cone pausing and enlargement, processes that depend on the re-organisation of microtubules. However, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt3a regulates the actin cytoskeleton by rapidly inducing F-actin accumulation in growth cones from rodent DRG neurons through the scaffold protein Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1) and the serine-threonine kinase Gsk3β. Importantly, these changes in actin cytoskeleton occurs before enlargement of the growth cones is evident. Time-lapse imaging shows that Wnt3a increases lamellar protrusion and filopodia velocity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of actin assembly demonstrates that Wnt3a increases actin dynamics. Through a yeast-two hybrid screen, we identified the actin-binding protein Eps8 as a direct interactor of Dvl1, a scaffold protein crucial for the Wnt signalling pathway. Gain of function of Eps8 mimics Wnt-mediated axon remodelling, whereas Eps8 silencing blocks the axon remodelling activity of Wnt3a. Importantly, blockade of the Dvl1-Eps8 interaction completely abolishes Wnt3a-mediated axonal remodelling. These findings demonstrate a novel role for Wnt-Dvl1 signalling through Eps8 in the regulation of axonal remodeling. PMID:26252776

  18. Distinct Functional Interactions between Actin Isoforms and Nonsarcomeric Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mirco; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Chizhov, Igor; Claus, Peter; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Taft, Manuel H.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments. PMID:23923011

  19. Isolation and characterization of six different chicken actin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, K S; Zimmer, W E; Bergsma, D J; Dodgson, J B; Schwartz, R J

    1984-01-01

    Genes representing six different actin isoforms were isolated from a chicken genomic library. Cloned actin cDNAs as well as tissue-specific mRNAs enriched in different actin species were used as hybridization probes to group individual actin genomic clones by their relative thermal stability. Restriction maps showed that these actin genes were derived from separate and nonoverlapping regions of genomic DNA. Of the six isolated genes, five included sequences from both the 5' and 3' ends of the actin-coding area. Amino acid sequence analysis from both the NH2- and COOH-terminal regions provided for the unequivocal identification of these genes. The striated isoforms were represented by the isolated alpha-skeletal, alpha-cardiac, and alpha-smooth muscle actin genes. The nonmuscle isoforms included the beta-cytoplasmic actin gene and an actin gene fragment which lacked the 5' coding and flanking sequence; presumably, this region of DNA was removed from this gene during construction of the genomic library. Unexpectedly, a third nonmuscle chicken actin gene was found which resembled the amphibian type 5 actin isoform (J. Vandekerckhove, W. W. Franke, and K. Weber, J. Mol. Biol., 152:413-426). This nonmuscle actin type has not been previously detected in warm-blooded vertebrates. We showed that interspersed, repeated DNA sequences closely flanked the alpha-skeletal, alpha-cardiac, beta-, and type 5-like actin genes. The repeated DNA sequences which surround the alpha-skeletal actin-coding regions were not related to repetitious DNA located on the other actin genes. Analysis of genomic DNA blots showed that the chicken actin multigene family was represented by 8 to 10 separate coding loci. The six isolated actin genes corresponded to 7 of 11 genomic EcoRI fragments. Only the alpha-smooth muscle actin gene was shown to be split by an EcoRI site. Thus, in the chicken genome each actin isoform appeared to be encoded by a single gene. Images PMID:6513927

  20. Actinic keratoses: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Fenske, Neil Alan; Spencer, James; Adam, Friedman

    2010-05-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are cutaneous neoplasms composed of proliferations of cytologically aberrant, epidermal keratinocytes caused by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Combining the evidence that AKs are the second most common reason for visits to the dermatologist and it is generally believed that they should be treated, it is no surprise that the direct cost of the management of actinic keratoses in the United States (U.S.) is exceedingly high. There are currently numerous treatment modalities with more on the way as there is a demand for formulating newer, cheaper, less painful and less invasive means. The future of AK treatment involves both the continued investigation of current novel therapies, as well as the development of new treatment modalities. PMID:20518359

  1. Actin-mediated motion of meiotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Koszul, R.; Kim, K. P.; Prentiss, M.; Kleckner, N.; Kameoka, S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Chromosome movement is prominent during meiosis. Here, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we elucidate the basis for dynamic mid-prophase chromosome movement in budding yeast. Diverse finding reveal a process in which, at the pachytene stage, individual telomere/nuclear envelope (NE) ensembles attach passively to, and then move in concert with, nucleus-hugging actin cables that are continuous with the global cytoskeletal actin network. Other chromosomes move in concert with lead chromosome(s). The same process, in modulated form, explains the zygotene "bouquet" configuration in which, immediately preceding pachytene, chromosome ends colocalize dynamically in a restricted region of the NE. Mechanical properties of the system and biological roles of mid-prophase movement for meiosis, including recombination, are discussed. PMID:18585353

  2. Regulation of actin nucleation and autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Amanda S; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-eating, whereby cytosolic constituents are enclosed by a double-membrane vesicle before delivery to the lysosome for degradation. This is an important process which allows for recycling of nutrients and cellular components and thus plays a critical role in normal cellular homeostasis as well as cell survival during stresses such as starvation or hypoxia. A large number of proteins regulate various stages of autophagy in a complex and still incompletely understood series of events. In this review, we will discuss recent studies which provide a growing body of evidence that actin dynamics and proteins that influence actin nucleation play an important role in the regulation of autophagosome formation and maturation. PMID:27147468

  3. Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis improved with fractional 1927-nm laser treatments.

    PubMed

    Ross, Nicholas A; Rosenbaum, Lara E; Saedi, Nazanin; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is an inherited disorder of keratinization readily diagnosed through clinical and histologic examination. While generally benign in nature, the lesions can have profound psychosocial implications for patients. Although no cure exists, a number of treatment modalities, from topical medications to laser and light devices, have been reported with variable success. The authors report two cases of DSAP treated with the 1927-nm thulium fiber fractional laser along with a review of the treatment literature for DSAP. This therapy is convenient and safe with nearly no downtime or morbidity associated with pigment or textural changes. PMID:26820042

  4. Caffeine relaxes smooth muscle through actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Tazzeo, Tracy; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Khasnis, Mukta D; Eto, Masumi; Janssen, Luke J

    2012-08-15

    Caffeine is sometimes used in cell physiological studies to release internally stored Ca(2+). We obtained evidence that caffeine may also act through a different mechanism that has not been previously described and sought to examine this in greater detail. We ruled out a role for phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, since the effect was 1) not reversed by inhibiting PKA or adenylate cyclase; 2) not exacerbated by inhibiting PDE4; and 3) not mimicked by submillimolar caffeine nor theophylline, both of which are sufficient to inhibit PDE. Although caffeine is an agonist of bitter taste receptors, which in turn mediate bronchodilation, its relaxant effect was not mimicked by quinine. After permeabilizing the membrane using β-escin and depleting the internal Ca(2+) store using A23187, we found that 10 mM caffeine reversed tone evoked by direct application of Ca(2+), suggesting it functionally antagonizes the contractile apparatus. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we found that caffeine did not affect phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by MLC kinase, actin-filament motility catalyzed by MLC kinase, phosphorylation of CPI-17 by either protein kinase C or RhoA kinase, nor the activity of MLC-phosphatase. However, we did obtain evidence that caffeine decreased actin filament binding to phosphorylated myosin heads and increased the ratio of globular to filamentous actin in precontracted tissues. We conclude that, in addition to its other non-RyR targets, caffeine also interferes with actin function (decreased binding by myosin, possibly with depolymerization), an effect that should be borne in mind in studies using caffeine to probe excitation-contraction coupling in smooth muscle. PMID:22683573

  5. Arabidopsis CROLIN1, a Novel Plant Actin-binding Protein, Functions in Cross-linking and Stabilizing Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Honglei; Li, Jisheng; Zhu, Jingen; Fan, Tingting; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yuelong; Wang, Jiaojiao; Ren, Haiyun; Xiang, Yun; An, Lizhe

    2013-01-01

    Higher order actin filament structures are necessary for cytoplasmic streaming, organelle movement, and other physiological processes. However, the mechanism by which the higher order cytoskeleton is formed in plants remains unknown. In this study, we identified a novel actin-cross-linking protein family (named CROLIN) that is well conserved only in the plant kingdom. There are six isovariants of CROLIN in the Arabidopsis genome, with CROLIN1 specifically expressed in pollen. In vitro biochemical analyses showed that CROLIN1 is a novel actin-cross-linking protein with binding and stabilizing activities. Remarkably, CROLIN1 can cross-link actin bundles into actin networks. CROLIN1 loss of function induces pollen germination and pollen tube growth hypersensitive to latrunculin B. All of these results demonstrate that CROLIN1 may play an important role in stabilizing and remodeling actin filaments by binding to and cross-linking actin filaments. PMID:24072702

  6. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06585.001 PMID:26295568

  7. Characterization of actin filament deformation in response to actively driven microspheres propagated through entangled actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Tobias; Blair, Savanna; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2014-03-01

    The semi-flexible biopolymer actin is a ubiquitous component of nearly all biological organisms, playing an important role in many biological processes such as cell structure and motility, cancer invasion and metastasis, muscle contraction, and cell signaling. Concentrated actin networks possess unique viscoelastic properties that have been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, much is still unknown regarding the correlation of the applied stress on the network to the induced filament strain at the molecular level. Here, we use dual optical traps alongside fluorescence microscopy to carry out active microrheology measurements that link mechanical stress to structural response at the micron scale. Specifically, we actively drive microspheres through entangled actin networks while simultaneously measuring the force the surrounding filaments exert on the sphere and visualizing the deformation and subsequent relaxation of fluorescent labeled filaments within the network. These measurements, which provide much needed insight into the link between stress and strain in actin networks, are critical for clarifying our theoretical understanding of the complex viscoelastic behavior exhibited in actin networks.

  8. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Benanti, Erin L.; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, while their close relative B. thailandensis is nonpathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. PMID:25860613

  9. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1–actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1–actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson–Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  10. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  11. Gelsolin mediates calcium-dependent disassembly of Listeria actin tails

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Laura; Arnaudeau, Serge; Gibson, Bruce; Li, Wei; Krause, Ryoko; Hao, Binghua; Bamburg, James R.; Lew, Daniel P.; Demaurex, Nicolas; Southwick, Frederick

    2005-01-01

    The role of intracellular Ca2+ in the regulation of actin filament assembly and disassembly has not been clearly defined. We show that reduction of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) to <40 nM in Listeria monocytogenes-infected, EGFP–actin-transfected Madin–Darby canine kidney cells results in a 3-fold lengthening of actin filament tails. This increase in tail length is the consequence of marked slowing of the actin filament disassembly rate, without a significant change in assembly rate. The Ca2+-sensitive actin-severing protein gelsolin concentrates in the Listeria rocket tails at normal resting [Ca2+]i and disassociates from the tails when [Ca2+]i is lowered. Reduction in [Ca2+]i also blocks the severing activity of gelsolin, but not actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin microinjected into Listeria-infected cells. In Xenopus extracts, Listeria tail lengths are also calcium-sensitive, markedly shortening on addition of calcium. Immunodepletion of gelsolin, but not Xenopus ADF/cofilin, eliminates calcium-sensitive actin-filament shortening. Listeria tail length is also calcium-insensitive in gelsolin-null mouse embryo fibroblasts. We conclude that gelsolin is the primary Ca2+-sensitive actin filament recycling protein in the cell and is capable of enhancing Listeria actin tail disassembly at normal resting [Ca2+]i (145 nM). These experiments illustrate the unique and complementary functions of gelsolin and ADF/cofilin in the recycling of actin filaments. PMID:15671163

  12. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26784007

  13. Excitable actin dynamics in lamellipodial protrusion and retraction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gillian L; Petroccia, Heather M; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2012-04-01

    Many animal cells initiate crawling by protruding lamellipodia, consisting of a dense network of actin filaments, at their leading edge. We imaged XTC cells that exhibit flat lamellipodia on poly-L-lysine-coated coverslips. Using active contours, we tracked the leading edge and measured the total amount of F-actin by summing the pixel intensities within a 5-μm band. We observed protrusion and retraction with period 130-200 s and local wavelike features. Positive (negative) velocities correlated with minimum (maximum) integrated actin concentration. Approximately constant retrograde flow indicated that protrusions and retractions were driven by fluctuations of the actin polymerization rate. We present a model of these actin dynamics as an excitable system in which a diffusive, autocatalytic activator causes actin polymerization; F-actin accumulation in turn inhibits further activator accumulation. Simulations of the model reproduced the pattern of actin polymerization seen in experiments. To explore the model's assumption of an autocatalytic activation mechanism, we imaged cells expressing markers for both F-actin and the p21 subunit of the Arp2/3 complex. We found that integrated Arp2/3-complex concentrations spike several seconds before spikes of F-actin concentration. This suggests that the Arp2/3 complex participates in an activation mechanism that includes additional diffuse components. Response of cells to stimulation by fetal calf serum could be reproduced by the model, further supporting the proposed dynamical picture. PMID:22500749

  14. Sequence and comparative genomic analysis of actin-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jean; Oma, Yukako; Vallar, Laurent; Friederich, Evelyne; Poch, Olivier; Winsor, Barbara

    2005-12-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are key players in cytoskeleton activities and nuclear functions. Two complexes, ARP2/3 and ARP1/11, also known as dynactin, are implicated in actin dynamics and in microtubule-based trafficking, respectively. ARP4 to ARP9 are components of many chromatin-modulating complexes. Conventional actins and ARPs codefine a large family of homologous proteins, the actin superfamily, with a tertiary structure known as the actin fold. Because ARPs and actin share high sequence conservation, clear family definition requires distinct features to easily and systematically identify each subfamily. In this study we performed an in depth sequence and comparative genomic analysis of ARP subfamilies. A high-quality multiple alignment of approximately 700 complete protein sequences homologous to actin, including 148 ARP sequences, allowed us to extend the ARP classification to new organisms. Sequence alignments revealed conserved residues, motifs, and inserted sequence signatures to define each ARP subfamily. These discriminative characteristics allowed us to develop ARPAnno (http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/ARPAnno), a new web server dedicated to the annotation of ARP sequences. Analyses of sequence conservation among actins and ARPs highlight part of the actin fold and suggest interactions between ARPs and actin-binding proteins. Finally, analysis of ARP distribution across eukaryotic phyla emphasizes the central importance of nuclear ARPs, particularly the multifunctional ARP4. PMID:16195354

  15. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C.; Sale, Winfield S.; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Since actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here, we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation, and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor suggesting actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length. PMID:25155506

  16. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C; Sale, Winfield S; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-09-01

    Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Because actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor, suggesting that actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length. PMID:25155506

  17. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. PMID:26240174

  18. Actin Turnover-Mediated Gravity Response in Maize Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano; Barlow, Peter W; Volkmann, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be linked to gravity sensing in plants but the mechanistic understanding of these processes remains unknown. We have performed detailed pharmacological analyses of the role of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in gravibending of maize (Zea mays) root apices. Depolymerization of actin filaments with two drugs having different mode of their actions, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B, stimulated root gravibending. By contrast, drug-induced stimulation of actin polymerization and inhibition of actin turnover, using two different agents phalloidin and jasplakinolide, compromised the root gravibending. Importantly, all these actin drugs inhibited root growth to similar extents suggesting that high actin turnover is essential for the gravity-related growth responses rather than for the general growth process. Both latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments inhibited root growth but restored gravibending of the decapped root apices, indicating that there is a strong potential for effective actin-mediated gravity sensing outside the cap. This elusive gravity sensing outside the root cap is dependent not only on the high rate of actin turnover but also on weakening of myosin activities, as general inhibition of myosin ATPases induced stimulation of gravibending of the decapped root apices. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the actin turnover-mediated gravity sensing outside the root cap. PMID:19521476

  19. Clinicopathological profile and management of 161 cases of actinic cheilitis*

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Maria Luiza Diniz de Sousa; da Silva Júnior, Francisco Leonardo; Lima, Kenio Costa; de Oliveira, Patrícia Teixeira; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a potentially malignant disorder of the lip caused by chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the clinical, demographic, morphological and therapeutic management in AC cases data associating to the histopathological grading. METHODS Demographic, clinical and management data of 161 patients with AC were analyzed. In biopsied cases, two calibrated examiners performed histopathological grading by binary system. RESULTS There was a prevalence of males (79.5%), aged 40 years or older (77.5%), light-skinned (85.7%), experiencing occupational exposure to sunlight (80.3%), with AC presenting clinically as white lesions (33.6%). Conservative treatment was adopted in 78 cases and biopsy in 83 cases (60.2% graded as low-risk AC). There were no significant associations between histopathological grading and gender (p= 0.509), age (p=0.416), ethnicity (p=0.388), occupational exposure to sunlight (p=1.000) or clinical presentation (p=0.803). CONCLUSION This study reinforces the hypothesis that demographic and clinical characteristics of AC are not related to histopathological grading. Advice on protection from sun exposure should be encouraged to avoid progression of AC and invasive therapies. PMID:26375219

  20. Dissociation of F-actin induced by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C R; Amaral Júnior, J A; Abrahamsohn, P; Verjovski-Almeida, S

    1992-11-01

    F-actin purified from rabbit skeletal muscle undergoes reversible dissociation when subjected to hydrostatic pressures up to 240 MPa. Dissociation and reversibility were detected by the following procedures: fluorescence spectral changes observed under pressure, when either intrinsic tryptophan or pyrenyl emission of N-(1-pyrenyl)iodoacetamide-labeled actin were monitored; electron microscopy of samples fixed under pressure; size-exclusion HPLC of pressurized actin. The effect of pressure upon F-actin that had been polymerized in the presence of either Mg2+, Ca2+ or K+ was studied. The standard volume changes for the association of actin subunits, calculated from pressure/dissociation curves were 74 +/- 14 ml/mol for Mg-F-actin, 79 +/- 12 ml/mol for Ca-F-actin and 328 +/- 63 ml/mol for K-F-actin, indicating that actin subunits are packed differently in the polymer depending on which cation is present. All pressure/dissociation data could be fitted by a model for dissociation of a dimer, which suggests that in the F-actin filament there is a predominant intersubunit interaction interface, most likely the head-to-tail intrastrand interaction between two subunits which repeats itself along the polymer. A tenfold change in total protein concentration from 20 micrograms to 200 micrograms/ml Mg-F-actin did not cause a change in the pressure required for half-maximal dissociation. This indicates a heterogeneity of free energy of association among actin monomers in the Mg-F-actin polymer, suggesting that, in addition to the predominant intersubunit interaction, the disordered interactions in the filament significantly contribute to the heterogeneity of microenvironments in the interface between the subunits. PMID:1425683

  1. Fibroblast-mediated contraction in actinically exposed and actinically protected aging skin

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.W.; Morykwas, M.J.; Wheatley, M.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The changes in skin morphology over time are a consequence of both chronologic aging and the accumulation of environmental exposure. Through observation, we know that actinic radiation intensifies the apparent aging of skin. We have investigated the effects of aging and actinic radiation on the ability of fibroblasts to contract collagen-fibroblast lattices. Preauricular and postauricular skin samples were obtained from eight patients aged 49 to 74 undergoing rhytidectomy. The samples were kept separate, and the fibroblasts were grown in culture. Lattices constructed with preauricular fibroblasts consistently contracted more than lattices containing postauricular fibroblasts. The difference in amount of contraction in 7 days between sites was greatest for the younger patients and decreased linearly as donor age increased (r = -0.96). This difference may be due to preauricular fibroblasts losing their ability to contract a lattice as aging skin is exposed to more actinic radiation.

  2. Structure of the F-actin-tropomyosin complex.

    PubMed

    von der Ecken, Julian; Müller, Mirco; Lehman, William; Manstein, Dietmar J; Penczek, Pawel A; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) is the major protein of muscle thin filaments, and actin microfilaments are the main component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Mutations in different actin isoforms lead to early-onset autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, and multiple variations of myopathies. In striated muscle fibres, the binding of myosin motors to actin filaments is mainly regulated by tropomyosin and troponin. Tropomyosin also binds to F-actin in smooth muscle and in non-muscle cells and stabilizes and regulates the filaments there in the absence of troponin. Although crystal structures for monomeric actin (G-actin) are available, a high-resolution structure of F-actin is still missing, hampering our understanding of how disease-causing mutations affect the function of thin muscle filaments and microfilaments. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of F-actin at a resolution of 3.7 Å in complex with tropomyosin at a resolution of 6.5 Å, determined by electron cryomicroscopy. The structure reveals that the D-loop is ordered and acts as a central region for hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that stabilize the F-actin filament. We clearly identify map density corresponding to ADP and Mg(2+) and explain the possible effect of prominent disease-causing mutants. A comparison of F-actin with G-actin reveals the conformational changes during filament formation and identifies the D-loop as their key mediator. We also confirm that negatively charged tropomyosin interacts with a positively charged groove on F-actin. Comparison of the position of tropomyosin in F-actin-tropomyosin with its position in our previously determined F-actin-tropomyosin-myosin structure reveals a myosin-induced transition of tropomyosin. Our results allow us to understand the role of individual mutations in the genesis of actin- and tropomyosin-related diseases and will serve as a strong foundation for the targeted

  3. Actin depolymerisation and crosslinking join forces with myosin II to contract actin coats on fused secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Miklavc, Pika; Ehinger, Konstantin; Sultan, Ayesha; Felder, Tatiana; Paul, Patrick; Gottschalk, Kay-Eberhard; Frick, Manfred

    2015-03-15

    In many secretory cells actin and myosin are specifically recruited to the surface of secretory granules following their fusion with the plasma membrane. Actomyosin-dependent compression of fused granules is essential to promote active extrusion of cargo. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms regulating actin coat formation and contraction. Here, we provide a detailed kinetic analysis of the molecules regulating actin coat contraction on fused lamellar bodies in primary alveolar type II cells. We demonstrate that ROCK1 and myosin light chain kinase 1 (MLCK1, also known as MYLK) translocate to fused lamellar bodies and activate myosin II on actin coats. However, myosin II activity is not sufficient for efficient actin coat contraction. In addition, cofilin-1 and α-actinin translocate to actin coats. ROCK1-dependent regulated actin depolymerisation by cofilin-1 in cooperation with actin crosslinking by α-actinin is essential for complete coat contraction. In summary, our data suggest a complementary role for regulated actin depolymerisation and crosslinking, and myosin II activity, to contract actin coats and drive secretion. PMID:25637593

  4. Actin-Dynamics in Plant Cells: The Function of Actin-Perturbing Substances: Jasplakinolide, Chondramides, Phalloidin, Cytochalasins, and Latrunculins.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Blaas, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the most common F-actin-perturbing substances that are used to study actin dynamics in living plant cells in studies on morphogenesis, motility, organelle movement, or when apoptosis has to be induced. These substances can be divided into two major subclasses: F-actin-stabilizing and -polymerizing substances like jasplakinolide and chondramides and F-actin-severing compounds like chytochalasins and latrunculins. Jasplakinolide was originally isolated form a marine sponge, and can now be synthesized and has become commercially available, which is responsible for its wide distribution as membrane-permeable F-actin-stabilizing and -polymerizing agent, which may even have anticancer activities. Cytochalasins, derived from fungi, show an F-actin-severing function and many derivatives are commercially available (A, B, C, D, E, H, J), also making it a widely used compound for F-actin disruption. The same can be stated for latrunculins (A, B), derived from red sea sponges; however the mode of action is different by binding to G-actin and inhibiting incorporation into the filament. In the case of swinholide a stable complex with actin dimers is formed resulting also in severing of F-actin. For influencing F-actin dynamics in plant cells only membrane permeable drugs are useful in a broad range. We however introduce also the phallotoxins and synthetic derivatives, as they are widely used to visualize F-actin in fixed cells. A particular uptake mechanism has been shown for hepatocytes, but has also been described in siphonal giant algae. In the present chapter the focus is set on F-actin dynamics in plant cells where alterations in cytoplasmic streaming can be particularly well studied; however methods by fluorescence applications including phalloidin and antibody staining as well as immunofluorescence-localization of the inhibitor drugs are given. PMID:26498789

  5. Actin-Dynamics in Plant Cells: The Function of Actin Perturbing Substances Jasplakinolide, Chondramides, Phalloidin, Cytochalasins, and Latrunculins

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Blaas, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will give an overview of the most common F-actin perturbing substances, that are used to study actin dynamics in living plant cells in studies on morphogenesis, motility, organelle movement or when apoptosis has to be induced. These substances can be divided into two major subclasses – F-actin stabilizing and polymerizing substances like jasplakinolide, chondramides and F-actin severing compounds like chytochalasins and latrunculins. Jasplakinolide was originally isolated form a marine sponge, and can now be synthesized and has become commercially available, which is responsible for its wide distribution as membrane permeable F-actin stabilizing and polymerizing agent, which may even have anti-cancer activities. Cytochalasins, derived from fungi show an F-actin severing function and many derivatives are commercially available (A, B, C, D, E, H, J), also making it a widely used compound for F-actin disruption. The same can be stated for latrunculins (A, B), derived from red sea sponges, however the mode of action is different by binding to G-actin and inhibiting incorporation into the filament. In the case of swinholide a stable complex with actin dimers is formed resulting also in severing of F-actin. For influencing F-actin dynamics in plant cells only membrane permeable drugs are useful in a broad range. We however introduce also the phallotoxins and synthetic derivatives, as they are widely used to visualize F-actin in fixed cells. A particular uptake mechanism has been shown for hepatocytes, but has also been described in siphonal giant algae. In the present chapter the focus is set on F-actin dynamics in plant cells where alterations in cytoplasmic streaming can be particularly well studied; however methods by fluorescence applications including phalloidin- and antibody staining as well as immunofluorescence-localization of the inhibitor drugs are given. PMID:26498789

  6. Various forms of tobacco usage and its associated oral mucosal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tatapudi, Ramesh; Sudhakara-Reddy, Reddy; Alapati, Satish; Pavani, Kotha; Sai-Praveen, Kotu-Nagavenkata

    2016-01-01

    Background To study the various forms of tobacco usage and its associated oral mucosal lesions among the patients attending Vishnu Dental College Bhimavaram. Material and Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in a total of 450 patients who were divided into three groups based upon type of tobacco use, as Group-1 Reverse smoking, Group-2 Conventional smoking, Group-3 Smokeless tobacco group and each group consists of 150 subjects. Results Reverse smoking was observed to be more prevalent among old females with smoker’s palate and carcinomatous lesions being the most common. Conventional smoking was observed more in male patients with maximum occurrence of leukoplakia and tobacco associated melanosis. Smokeless tobacco habit was predominantly seen in younger males. Habit specific lesions like tobacco pouch keratosis, Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF), Quid induced lichenoid reaction were noticed in smokeless tobacco habit group except for erythroplakia which was noticed only in conventional smoking group and it was not significant statistically. Conclusions In the present study it was found that the usage of reverse smoking habit was most commonly seen in females and this habit is practiced in and surrounding areas of Bhimavaram with more occurrence of carcinoma compared to conventional smoking and smokeless tobacco. Key words:Tobacco, reverse smoking, conventional smoking, smokeless tobacco, carcinoma. PMID:27034758

  7. The enteropathogenic E. coli effector EspH promotes actin pedestal formation and elongation via WASP-interacting protein (WIP)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alexander R. C.; Raymond, Benoit; Collins, James W.; Crepin, Valerie F.; Frankel, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Summary Enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) are diarrheagenic pathogens that colonize the gut mucosa via attaching-and-effacing lesion formation. EPEC and EHEC utilize a type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins that subvert host cell signalling to sustain colonization and multiplication. EspH, a T3SS effector that modulates actin dynamics, was implicated in the elongation of the EHEC actin pedestals. In this study we found that EspH is necessary for both efficient pedestal formation and pedestal elongation during EPEC infection. We report that EspH induces actin polymerization at the bacterial attachment sites independently of the Tir tyrosine residues Y474 and Y454, which are implicated in binding Nck and IRSp53/ITRKS respectively. Moreover, EspH promotes recruitment of neural Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and the Arp2/3 complex to the bacterial attachment site, in a mechanism involving the C-terminus of Tir and the WH1 domain of N-WASP. Dominant negative of WASP-interacting protein (WIP), which binds the N-WASP WH1 domain, diminished EspH-mediated actin polymerization. This study implicates WIP in EPEC-mediated actin polymerization and pedestal elongation and represents the first instance whereby N-WASP is efficiently recruited to the EPEC attachment sites independently of the Tir:Nck and Tir:IRTKS/IRSp53 pathways. Our study reveals the intricacies of Tir and EspH-mediated actin signalling pathways that comprise of distinct, convergent and synergistic signalling cascades. PMID:22372637

  8. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  9. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Orion D.; Servant, Guy; Welch, Matthew D.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Sedat, John W.; Bourne, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients. PMID:10559877

  10. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  11. A nanobody targeting the F-actin capping protein CapG restrains breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Aberrant turnover of the actin cytoskeleton is intimately associated with cancer cell migration and invasion. Frequently however, evidence is circumstantial, and a reliable assessment of the therapeutic significance of a gene product is offset by lack of inhibitors that target biologic properties of a protein, as most conventional drugs do, instead of the corresponding gene. Proteomic studies have demonstrated overexpression of CapG, a constituent of the actin cytoskeleton, in breast cancer. Indirect evidence suggests that CapG is involved in tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. In this study, we used llama-derived CapG single-domain antibodies or nanobodies in a breast cancer metastasis model to address whether inhibition of CapG activity holds therapeutic merit. Methods We raised single-domain antibodies (nanobodies) against human CapG and used these as intrabodies (immunomodulation) after lentiviral transduction of breast cancer cells. Functional characterization of nanobodies was performed to identify which biochemical properties of CapG are perturbed. Orthotopic and tail vein in vivo models of metastasis in nude mice were used to assess cancer cell spreading. Results With G-actin and F-actin binding assays, we identified a CapG nanobody that binds with nanomolar affinity to the first CapG domain. Consequently, CapG interaction with actin monomers or actin filaments is blocked. Intracellular delocalization experiments demonstrated that the nanobody interacts with CapG in the cytoplasmic environment. Expression of the nanobody in breast cancer cells restrained cell migration and Matrigel invasion. Notably, the nanobody prevented formation of lung metastatic lesions in orthotopic xenograft and tail-vein models of metastasis in immunodeficient mice. We showed that CapG nanobodies can be delivered into cancer cells by using bacteria harboring a type III protein secretion system (T3SS). Conclusions CapG inhibition strongly reduces breast cancer

  12. Electrophoresis and orientation of F-actin in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Borejdo, J; Ortega, H

    1989-01-01

    F-Actin was electrophoresed on agarose gels. In the presence of 2 mM MgCl2 and above pH 8.5 F-actin entered 1% agarose; when the electric field was 2.1 V/cm and the pH was 8.8, F-actin migrated through a gel as a single band at a rate of 2.5 mm/h. Labeling of actin with fluorophores did not affect its rate of migration, but an increase in ionic strength slowed it down. After the electrophoresis actin was able to bind phalloidin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) and it activated Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity of HMM. The mobility of F-actin increased with the rise in pH. Acto-S-1 complex was also able to migrate in agarose at basic pH, but at a lower rate than F-actin alone. The orientation of fluorescein labeled F-actin and of fluorescein labeled S-1 which formed rigor bonds with F-actin was measured during the electrophoresis by the fluorescence detected linear dichroism method. The former showed little orientation, probably because the dye was mobile on the surface of actin, but we were able to measure the orientation of the absorption dipole of the dye bound to S-1 which was attached to F-actin, and found that it assumed an orientation largely parallel to the direction of the electric field. These results show that actin can migrate in agarose gels in the F form and that it is oriented during the electrophoresis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:2528384

  13. Measuring F-actin properties in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Mikko; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, numerous studies have demonstrated that the actin cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in the control of dendritic spine shape. Synaptic stimulation rapidly changes the actin dynamics and many actin regulators have been shown to play roles in neuron functionality. Accordingly, defects in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons have been implicated in memory disorders. Due to the small size of spines, it is difficult to detect changes in the actin structures in dendritic spines by conventional light microscopy imaging. Instead, to know how tightly actin filaments are bundled together, and how fast the filaments turnover, we need to use advanced microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PAGFP) fluorescence decay and fluorescence anisotropy. Fluorescence anisotropy, which measures the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two GFP fluorophores, has been proposed as a method to measure the level of actin polymerization. Here, we propose a novel idea that fluorescence anisotropy could be more suitable to study the level of actin filament bundling instead of actin polymerization. We validate the method in U2OS cell line where the actin structures can be clearly distinguished and apply to analyze how actin filament organization in dendritic spines changes during neuronal maturation. In addition to fluorescence anisotropy validation, we take a critical look at the properties and limitations of FRAP and PAGFP fluorescence decay methods and offer our proposals for the analysis methods for these approaches. These three methods complement each other, each providing additional information about actin dynamics and organization in dendritic spines. PMID:25140131

  14. Ca2+-calmodulin regulates fesselin-induced actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Mechthild; Chalovich, Joseph M

    2004-11-01

    Fesselin is a proline-rich actin-binding protein that was isolated from avian smooth muscle. Fesselin bundles actin and accelerates actin polymerization by facilitating nucleation. We now show that this polymerization of actin can be regulated by Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Fesselin was shown to bind to immobilized calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). The fesselin-calmodulin interaction was confirmed by a Ca(2+)-dependent increase in 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (MIANS) fluorescence upon addition of fesselin to MIANS-labeled wheat germ calmodulin. The affinity was estimated to be approximately 10(9) M(-1). The affinity of Ca(2+)-calmodulin to the fesselin F-actin complex was approximately 10(8) M(-1). Calmodulin binding to fesselin appeared to be functionally significant. In the presence of fesselin and calmodulin, the polymerization of actin was Ca(2+)-dependent. Ca(2+)-free calmodulin either had no effect or enhanced the ability of fesselin to accelerate actin polymerization. Ca(2+)-calmodulin not only reversed the stimulatory effect of fesselin but reduced the rate of polymerization below that observed in the absence of fesselin. While Ca(2+)-calmodulin had a large effect on the interaction of fesselin with G-actin, the effect on F-actin was small. Neither the binding of fesselin to F-actin nor the subsequent bundling of F-actin was greatly affected by Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Fesselin may function as an actin-polymerizing factor that is regulated by Ca(2+) levels. PMID:15504050

  15. Oral mucosal lesions in elderly dental patients in Sana’a, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Jamaei, Aisha Ahmed; Al-Sufyani, Ghadah A.; Tarakji, Bassel; Shugaa-Addin, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: With aging, the oral mucosa becomes more susceptible to external stimuli. The aims of this study were to obtain baseline data on the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OMLs) in a population of elderly Yemeni patients and to investigate differences in the presentation of these findings in relation to age, gender, education level, and the wearing of dentures. Patients and Methods: The prevalence of OMLs was assessed by clinical examination of a sample of 310 elderly Yemeni patients aged 60 years and older. A single examiner performed detailed oral examinations of the oral cavity according to international criteria and the World Health Organization codes. Results: The overall prevalence of OMLs was 77.1%, with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between men (80.3%) and women (69.6%). The prevalence rate of OMLs indicated a significant decrease with advancing age. The most frequently observed lesions were fissured tongue (34.2%), benign tumors (17.1%), hairy tongue (16.5%), and qat-induced white lesions (12.6%). Hairy tongue, qat-induced white lesions, and shammah keratosis were associated with men (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, and P < 0.05, respectively), whereas geographic tongue was associated with women (P < 0.05). The presence of one or more lesions was significantly associated with low education level (P < 0.05). Certain OMLs showed a significant association with smoking and qat chewing (P < 0.05). No association was found between the occurrence of OMLs and denture wearing (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The present study has shown a high prevalence of oral lesions among Yemeni elders. PMID:25984462

  16. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    PubMed

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  17. Mechanoaccumulative Elements of the Mammalian Actin Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Schiffhauer, Eric S; Luo, Tianzhi; Mohan, Krithika; Srivastava, Vasudha; Qian, Xuyu; Griffis, Eric R; Iglesias, Pablo A; Robinson, Douglas N

    2016-06-01

    To change shape, divide, form junctions, and migrate, cells reorganize their cytoskeletons in response to changing mechanical environments [1-4]. Actin cytoskeletal elements, including myosin II motors and actin crosslinkers, structurally remodel and activate signaling pathways in response to imposed stresses [5-9]. Recent studies demonstrate the importance of force-dependent structural rearrangement of α-catenin in adherens junctions [10] and vinculin's molecular clutch mechanism in focal adhesions [11]. However, the complete landscape of cytoskeletal mechanoresponsive proteins and the mechanisms by which these elements sense and respond to force remain to be elucidated. To find mechanosensitive elements in mammalian cells, we examined protein relocalization in response to controlled external stresses applied to individual cells. Here, we show that non-muscle myosin II, α-actinin, and filamin accumulate to mechanically stressed regions in cells from diverse lineages. Using reaction-diffusion models for force-sensitive binding, we successfully predicted which mammalian α-actinin and filamin paralogs would be mechanoaccumulative. Furthermore, a "Goldilocks zone" must exist for each protein where the actin-binding affinity must be optimal for accumulation. In addition, we leveraged genetic mutants to gain a molecular understanding of the mechanisms of α-actinin and filamin catch-bonding behavior. Two distinct modes of mechanoaccumulation can be observed: a fast, diffusion-based accumulation and a slower, myosin II-dependent cortical flow phase that acts on proteins with specific binding lifetimes. Finally, we uncovered cell-type- and cell-cycle-stage-specific control of the mechanosensation of myosin IIB, but not myosin IIA or IIC. Overall, these mechanoaccumulative mechanisms drive the cell's response to physical perturbation during proper tissue development and disease. PMID:27185555

  18. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  19. Visualization of actin filaments and monomers in somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Belin, Brittany J; Cimini, Beth A; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Mullins, R Dyche

    2013-04-01

    In addition to its long-studied presence in the cytoplasm, actin is also found in the nuclei of eukaryotic cells. The function and form (monomer, filament, or noncanonical oligomer) of nuclear actin are hotly debated, and its localization and dynamics are largely unknown. To determine the distribution of nuclear actin in live somatic cells and evaluate its potential functions, we constructed and validated fluorescent nuclear actin probes. Monomeric actin probes concentrate in nuclear speckles, suggesting an interaction of monomers with RNA-processing factors. Filamentous actin probes recognize discrete structures with submicron lengths that are excluded from chromatin-rich regions. In time-lapse movies, these actin filament structures exhibit one of two types of mobility: 1) diffusive, with an average diffusion coefficient of 0.06-0.08 μm(2)/s, or (2) subdiffusive, with a mobility coefficient of 0.015 μm(2)/s. Individual filament trajectories exhibit features of particles moving within a viscoelastic mesh. The small size of nuclear actin filaments is inconsistent with a role in micron-scale intranuclear transport, and their localization suggests that they do not participate directly in chromatin-based processes. Our results instead suggest that actin filaments form part of a large, viscoelastic structure in the nucleoplasm and may act as scaffolds that help organize nuclear contents. PMID:23447706

  20. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  1. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV∆ defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7–Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces. PMID:23051734

  2. Structure and Mechanics of Actin Cortex Contained in Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limozin, Laurent; Roth, Alexander; Sackmann, Erich

    2003-03-01

    We designed giant phospholipid vesicles containing actin filaments as an elementary mechanical cell model. G-actin is polymerized inside the vesicles through ionophore-mediated Mg++ entry and the filaments are bound electrostatically to the membrane through lipids with amino-polyethyleneglycol (PEG) headgroups forming a shell beneath the membrane. The density of this cortex is varied by changing the initial actin concentration. A magnetic micrometric bead attached on the top of a sedimented vesicle is pulled vertically while horizontal and vertical displacements of the bead are simulatenously tracked by microscopy. Linear response allows to determine the bending and shear moduli of the actin-membrane complexe.

  3. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value. PMID:24739159

  4. Myosin motors fragment and compact membrane-bound actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Sven K; Petrasek, Zdenek; Heinemann, Fabian; Schwille, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Cell cortex remodeling during cell division is a result of myofilament-driven contractility of the cortical membrane-bound actin meshwork. Little is known about the interaction between individual myofilaments and membrane-bound actin filaments. Here we reconstituted a minimal actin cortex to directly visualize the action of individual myofilaments on membrane-bound actin filaments using TIRF microscopy. We show that synthetic myofilaments fragment and compact membrane-bound actin while processively moving along actin filaments. We propose a mechanism by which tension builds up between the ends of myofilaments, resulting in compressive stress exerted to single actin filaments, causing their buckling and breakage. Modeling of this mechanism revealed that sufficient force (∼20 pN) can be generated by single myofilaments to buckle and break actin filaments. This mechanism of filament fragmentation and compaction may contribute to actin turnover and cortex reorganization during cytokinesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00116.001 PMID:23326639

  5. An unconventional form of actin in protozoan hemoflagellate, Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Prabodh; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mitra, Kalyan; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Gupta, Chhitar M

    2008-08-15

    Leishmania actin was cloned, overexpressed in baculovirus-insect cell system, and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein polymerized optimally in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP, but differed from conventional actins in its following properties: (i) it did not polymerize in the presence of Mg2+ alone, (ii) it polymerized in a restricted range of pH 7.0-8.5, (iii) its critical concentration for polymerization was found to be 3-4-fold lower than of muscle actin, (iv) it predominantly formed bundles rather than single filaments at pH 8.0, (v) it displayed considerably higher ATPase activity during polymerization, (vi) it did not inhibit DNase-I activity, and (vii) it did not bind the F-actin-binding toxin phalloidin or the actin polymerization disrupting agent Latrunculin B. Computational and molecular modeling studies revealed that the observed unconventional behavior of Leishmania actin is related to the diverged amino acid stretches in its sequence, which may lead to changes in the overall charge distribution on its solvent-exposed surface, ATP binding cleft, Mg2+ binding sites, and the hydrophobic loop that is involved in monomer-monomer interactions. Phylogenetically, it is related to ciliate actins, but to the best of our knowledge, no other actin with such unconventional properties has been reported to date. It is therefore suggested that actin in Leishmania may serve as a novel target for design of new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:18539603

  6. VASP Governs Actin Dynamics by Modulating Filament Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Trichet, Léa; Campàs, Otger; Sykes, Cécile; Plastino, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Actin filament dynamics at the cell membrane are important for cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions and the protrusion of the leading edge. Since actin filaments must be connected to the cell membrane to exert forces but must also detach from the membrane to allow it to move and evolve, the balance between actin filament tethering and detachment at adhesion sites and the leading edge is key for cell shape changes and motility. How this fine tuning is performed in cells remains an open question, but possible candidates are the Drosophila enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP) family of proteins, which localize to dynamic actin structures in the cell. Here we study VASP-mediated actin-related proteins 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex-dependent actin dynamics using a substrate that mimics the fluid properties of the cell membrane: an oil-water interface. We show evidence that polymerization activators undergo diffusion and convection on the fluid surface, due to continual attachment and detachment to the actin network. These dynamics are enhanced in the presence of VASP, and we observe cycles of catastrophic detachment of the actin network from the surface, resulting in stop-and-go motion. These results point to a role for VASP in the modulation of filament anchoring, with implications for actin dynamics at cell adhesions and at the leading edge of the cell. PMID:17098798

  7. Solubilization of native actin monomers from human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Tilley, L; Dwyer, M; Ralston, G B

    1986-01-01

    Up to 50% of the actin in erythrocyte membranes can be solubilized at low ionic strength in a form capable of inhibiting DNAse I, in the presence of 0.4 mM ATP and 0.05 mM calcium. In the absence of calcium and ATP, actin is released but is apparently rapidly denatured. Solubilization of G-actin increases with temperature up to 37 degrees C. At higher temperatures, actin is released rapidly but quickly loses its ability to inhibit DNAse I. PMID:3789986

  8. Electrostatics control actin filament nucleation and elongation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L; Lamb, Don C; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-04-26

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  9. Helical buckling of actin inside filopodia generates traction

    PubMed Central

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells can interact with their surroundings via filopodia, which are membrane protrusions that extend beyond the cell body. Filopodia are essential during dynamic cellular processes like motility, invasion, and cell–cell communication. Filopodia contain cross-linked actin filaments, attached to the surrounding cell membrane via protein linkers such as integrins. These actin filaments are thought to play a pivotal role in force transduction, bending, and rotation. We investigated whether, and how, actin within filopodia is responsible for filopodia dynamics by conducting simultaneous force spectroscopy and confocal imaging of F-actin in membrane protrusions. The actin shaft was observed to periodically undergo helical coiling and rotational motion, which occurred simultaneously with retrograde movement of actin inside the filopodium. The cells were found to retract beads attached to the filopodial tip, and retraction was found to correlate with rotation and coiling of the actin shaft. These results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism by which a cell can use rotation of the filopodial actin shaft to induce coiling and hence axial shortening of the filopodial actin bundle. PMID:25535347

  10. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G

    2012-12-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7-Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces. PMID:23051734

  11. Listeria monocytogenes Spreads within the Brain by Actin-Based Intra-Axonal Migration

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Diana; Rupp, Sebastian; Gaschen, Véronique; Stoffel, Michael H.; Frey, Joachim; Vandevelde, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes rhombencephalitis is a severe progressive disease despite a swift intrathecal immune response. Based on previous observations, we hypothesized that the disease progresses by intra-axonal spread within the central nervous system. To test this hypothesis, neuroanatomical mapping of lesions, immunofluorescence analysis, and electron microscopy were performed on brains of ruminants with naturally occurring rhombencephalitis. In addition, infection assays were performed in bovine brain cell cultures. Mapping of lesions revealed a consistent pattern with a preferential affection of certain nuclear areas and white matter tracts, indicating that Listeria monocytogenes spreads intra-axonally within the brain along interneuronal connections. These results were supported by immunofluorescence and ultrastructural data localizing Listeria monocytogenes inside axons and dendrites associated with networks of fibrillary structures consistent with actin tails. In vitro infection assays confirmed that bacteria were moving within axon-like processes by employing their actin tail machinery. Remarkably, in vivo, neutrophils invaded the axonal space and the axon itself, apparently by moving between split myelin lamellae of intact myelin sheaths. This intra-axonal invasion of neutrophils was associated with various stages of axonal degeneration and bacterial phagocytosis. Paradoxically, the ensuing adaxonal microabscesses appeared to provide new bacterial replication sites, thus supporting further bacterial spread. In conclusion, intra-axonal bacterial migration and possibly also the innate immune response play an important role in the intracerebral spread of the agent and hence the progression of listeric rhombencephalitis. PMID:25824833

  12. Listeria monocytogenes spreads within the brain by actin-based intra-axonal migration.

    PubMed

    Henke, Diana; Rupp, Sebastian; Gaschen, Véronique; Stoffel, Michael H; Frey, Joachim; Vandevelde, Marc; Oevermann, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes rhombencephalitis is a severe progressive disease despite a swift intrathecal immune response. Based on previous observations, we hypothesized that the disease progresses by intra-axonal spread within the central nervous system. To test this hypothesis, neuroanatomical mapping of lesions, immunofluorescence analysis, and electron microscopy were performed on brains of ruminants with naturally occurring rhombencephalitis. In addition, infection assays were performed in bovine brain cell cultures. Mapping of lesions revealed a consistent pattern with a preferential affection of certain nuclear areas and white matter tracts, indicating that Listeria monocytogenes spreads intra-axonally within the brain along interneuronal connections. These results were supported by immunofluorescence and ultrastructural data localizing Listeria monocytogenes inside axons and dendrites associated with networks of fibrillary structures consistent with actin tails. In vitro infection assays confirmed that bacteria were moving within axon-like processes by employing their actin tail machinery. Remarkably, in vivo, neutrophils invaded the axonal space and the axon itself, apparently by moving between split myelin lamellae of intact myelin sheaths. This intra-axonal invasion of neutrophils was associated with various stages of axonal degeneration and bacterial phagocytosis. Paradoxically, the ensuing adaxonal microabscesses appeared to provide new bacterial replication sites, thus supporting further bacterial spread. In conclusion, intra-axonal bacterial migration and possibly also the innate immune response play an important role in the intracerebral spread of the agent and hence the progression of listeric rhombencephalitis. PMID:25824833

  13. A Mechanism for Actin Filament Severing by Malaria Parasite Actin Depolymerizing Factor 1 via a Low Affinity Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wilson; Webb, Andrew I.; Olshina, Maya A.; Infusini, Giuseppe; Tan, Yan Hong; Hanssen, Eric; Catimel, Bruno; Suarez, Cristian; Condron, Melanie; Angrisano, Fiona; NebI, Thomas; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2014-01-01

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilins are essential regulators of actin turnover in eukaryotic cells. These multifunctional proteins facilitate both stabilization and severing of filamentous (F)-actin in a concentration-dependent manner. At high concentrations ADF/cofilins bind stably to F-actin longitudinally between two adjacent actin protomers forming what is called a decorative interaction. Low densities of ADF/cofilins, in contrast, result in the optimal severing of the filament. To date, how these two contrasting modalities are achieved by the same protein remains uncertain. Here, we define the proximate amino acids between the actin filament and the malaria parasite ADF/cofilin, PfADF1 from Plasmodium falciparum. PfADF1 is unique among ADF/cofilins in being able to sever F-actin but do so without stable filament binding. Using chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) combined with structure reconstruction we describe a previously overlooked binding interface on the actin filament targeted by PfADF1. This site is distinct from the known binding site that defines decoration. Furthermore, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of single actin filaments confirms that this novel low affinity site is required for F-actin severing. Exploring beyond malaria parasites, selective blocking of the decoration site with human cofilin (HsCOF1) using cytochalasin D increases its severing rate. HsCOF1 may therefore also use a decoration-independent site for filament severing. Thus our data suggest that a second, low affinity actin-binding site may be universally used by ADF/cofilins for actin filament severing. PMID:24371134

  14. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  15. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  16. Actin turnover-dependent fast dissociation of capping protein in the dendritic nucleation actin network: evidence of frequent filament severing.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Takushi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Hertzog, Maud; Fujita, Akiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Scita, Giorgio; Watanabe, Naoki

    2006-12-18

    Actin forms the dendritic nucleation network and undergoes rapid polymerization-depolymerization cycles in lamellipodia. To elucidate the mechanism of actin disassembly, we characterized molecular kinetics of the major filament end-binding proteins Arp2/3 complex and capping protein (CP) using single-molecule speckle microscopy. We have determined the dissociation rates of Arp2/3 and CP as 0.048 and 0.58 s(-1), respectively, in lamellipodia of live XTC fibroblasts. This CP dissociation rate is three orders of magnitude faster than in vitro. CP dissociates slower from actin stress fibers than from the lamellipodial actin network, suggesting that CP dissociation correlates with actin filament dynamics. We found that jasplakinolide, an actin depolymerization inhibitor, rapidly blocked the fast CP dissociation in cells. Consistently, the coexpression of LIM kinase prolonged CP speckle lifetime in lamellipodia. These results suggest that cofilin-mediated actin disassembly triggers CP dissociation from actin filaments. We predict that filament severing and end-to-end annealing might take place fairly frequently in the dendritic nucleation actin arrays. PMID:17178911

  17. Differential Actin-regulatory Activities of Tropomodulin1 and Tropomodulin3 with Diverse Tropomyosin and Actin Isoforms*

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Gokhin, David S.; Sui, Zhenhua; Bergeron, Sarah E.; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropomodulins (Tmods) are F-actin pointed end capping proteins that interact with tropomyosins (TMs) and cap TM-coated filaments with higher affinity than TM-free filaments. Here, we tested whether differences in recognition of TM or actin isoforms by Tmod1 and Tmod3 contribute to the distinct cellular functions of these Tmods. We found that Tmod3 bound ∼5-fold more weakly than Tmod1 to α/βTM, TM5b, and TM5NM1. However, surprisingly, Tmod3 was as effective as Tmod1 at capping pointed ends of skeletal muscle α-actin (αsk-actin) filaments coated with α/βTM, TM5b, or TM5NM1. Tmod3 only capped TM-coated αsk-actin filaments more weakly than Tmod1 in the presence of recombinant αTM2, which is unacetylated at its NH2 terminus, binds F-actin weakly, and has a disabled Tmod-binding site. Moreover, both Tmod1 and Tmod3 were similarly effective at capping pointed ends of platelet β/cytoplasmic γ (γcyto)-actin filaments coated with TM5NM1. In the absence of TMs, both Tmod1 and Tmod3 had similarly weak abilities to nucleate β/γcyto-actin filament assembly, but only Tmod3 could sequester cytoplasmic β- and γcyto-actin (but not αsk-actin) monomers and prevent polymerization under physiological conditions. Thus, differences in TM binding by Tmod1 and Tmod3 do not appear to regulate the abilities of these Tmods to cap TM-αsk-actin or TM-β/γcyto-actin pointed ends and, thus, are unlikely to determine selective co-assembly of Tmod, TM, and actin isoforms in different cell types and cytoskeletal structures. The ability of Tmod3 to sequester β- and γcyto-actin (but not αsk-actin) monomers in the absence of TMs suggests a novel function for Tmod3 in regulating actin remodeling or turnover in cells. PMID:24644292

  18. Vaccination with recombinant actin from scab mites and evaluation of its protective efficacy against Psoroptes cuniculi infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Tang, Q; Zhang, R; Jise, Q; Ren, Y; Nong, X; Wu, X; Gu, X; Wang, S; Peng, X; Lai, S; Yang, G

    2013-02-01

    The mite Psoroptes cuniculi is globally widespread and has a serious impact on commercial rabbit breeding. Current treatment methods are based on chemotherapy. Because of the disadvantages of these methods, alternative measures are required, and vaccination is one of the most promising strategies. Here, we cloned and expressed the recombinant P. cuniculi actin gene (rPc-act). Antiserum levels against rPc-act in rabbits were used to locate actin distribution in mite sections. Challenge trials were carried out to evaluate the immunity protection of rPc-act in rabbits, with antibody levels determined by ELISA. Sequence analysis of this gene fragment showed 89·26% and 84·91% identity to Sarcoptes scabiei and Mayetiola destructor sequences, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed rPc-act to locate widely throughout the mites, especially in feet and muscle tissues. Recombinant P. cuniculi actin with QuliA adjuvant was used to immunize six rabbits. Each animal was challenge-infested with 25-50 adult mites. Although IgE levels showed no significant difference to controls, IgG levels were significantly higher, and clinical development showed no significantly different severity of lesions in vaccinated rabbits than in the controls. This study showed that rPc-act is a muscular isotype actin and has no clinical protective efficacy against P. cuniculi. PMID:23078134

  19. Evidence That an Unconventional Actin Can Provide Essential F-Actin Function and That a Surveillance System Monitors F-Actin Integrity in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Masayuki; Pringle, John R; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-03-01

    Actin is one of the most conserved eukaryotic proteins. It is thought to have multiple essential cellular roles and to function primarily or exclusively as filaments ("F-actin"). Chlamydomonas has been an enigma, because a null mutation (ida5-1) in its single gene for conventional actin does not affect growth. A highly divergent actin gene, NAP1, is upregulated in ida5-1 cells, but it has been unclear whether NAP1 can form filaments or provide actin function. Here, we used the actin-depolymerizing drug latrunculin B (LatB), the F-actin-specific probe Lifeact-Venus, and genetic and molecular methods to resolve these issues. LatB-treated wild-type cells continue to proliferate; they initially lose Lifeact-stained structures but recover them concomitant with upregulation of NAP1. Thirty-nine LatB-sensitive mutants fell into four genes (NAP1 and LAT1-LAT3) in which we identified the causative mutations using a novel combinatorial pool-sequencing strategy. LAT1-LAT3 are required for NAP1 upregulation upon LatB treatment, and ectopic expression of NAP1 largely rescues the LatB sensitivity of the lat1-lat3 mutants, suggesting that the LAT gene products comprise a regulatory hierarchy with NAP1 expression as the major functional output. Selection of LatB-resistant revertants of a nap1 mutant yielded dominant IDA5 mutations that presumably render F-IDA5 resistant to LatB, and nap1 and lat mutations are synthetically lethal with ida5-1 in the absence of LatB. We conclude that both IDA5 and the divergent NAP1 can form filaments and redundantly provide essential F-actin functions and that a novel surveillance system, probably responding to a loss of F-actin, triggers NAP1 expression and perhaps other compensatory responses. PMID:26715672

  20. Statistical Properties of Echosignal Obtained from Human Dermis In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrzkowska, Hanna; Litniewski, Jerzy; Nowicki, Andrzej; Szymańska, Elżbieta

    The paper presents the classification of the healthy skin and the skin lesions (basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis), basing on the statistical parameters of the envelope of ultrasonic echoes. The envelope was modeled using Rayleigh and non-Rayleigh (K-distribution) statistics. Furthermore, the characteristic parameter of the K-distribution, the effective number of scatterers was investigated. Also the attenuation coefficient was used for the skin lesion assessment.

  1. Actin Foci Adhesion of D. discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Paneru, Govind

    2014-03-01

    Amoeboid migration is a fast (10 μm min-1) integrin-independent mode of migration that is important with D. discoideum, leukocytes, and breast cancer cells. It is poorly understood, but depends on the establishment of adhesive contacts to the substrate where the cell transmits traction forces. In pre-aggregative D. discoideum, a model system for learning about amoeboid migration, these adhesive contacts are discrete complexes that are known as actin-foci. They have an area of ~ 0.5 μm2 and a lifetime of ~ 20 s. This talk will present measurements of the adhesive character of actin foci that have been obtained using a submicron force transducer that was designed for this purpose. Results on the rupture stresses and lifetimes of individual acting foci under nano-newton level forces will be described in the context of a general theory for cellular adhesion. This theory depends on, essentially, three cellular properties: the membrane-medium surface tension, the number density of adhesion receptors in the membrane, and the receptor-substrate potential energy surface. Therefore, the use of the transducer to determine the surface tension will be presented, as well.

  2. Encoding Mechano-Memories in Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucard, Louis; Majumdar, Sayantan; Levine, Alex; Gardel, Margaret

    The ability of cells to sense and adapt to external mechanical stimuli is vital to many of its biological functions. A critical question is therefore to understand how mechanosensory mechanisms arise in living matter, with implications in both cell biology and smart materials design. Experimental work has demonstrated that the mechanical properties of semiflexible actin networks in Eukaryotic cells can be modulated (either transiently or irreversibly) via the application of external forces. Previous work has also shown with a combination of numerical simulations and analytic calculations shows that the broken rotational symmetry of the filament orientational distribution in semiflexible networks leads to dramatic changes in the mechanical response. Here we demonstrate with a combination of numerical and analytic calculations that the observed long-lived mechano-memory in the actin networks arise from changes in the nematic order of the constituent filaments. These stress-induced changes in network topology relax slowly under zero stress and can be observed through changes in the nonlinear mechanics. Our results provide a strategy for designing a novel class of materials and demonstrate a new putative mechanism of mechanical sensing in eukaryotic cells.

  3. Force Transmission in the Actin Cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    The ability of cells to sense and generate mechanical forces is essential to numerous aspects of their physiology, including adhesion, migration, division and differentiation. To a large degree, cellular tension is regulated by the transmission of myosin II-generated forces through the filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton. While transmission of myosin-generated stresses from the molecular to cellular length scale is well understood in the context of highly organized sarcomeres found in striated muscle, non-muscle and smooth muscle cells contain a wide variety of bundles and networks lacking sarcomeric organization. I will describe the in vitro and in vivo approaches we use to study force transmission in such disordered actomyosin assemblies. Our in vivo results are showing that highly organized stress fibers contribute surprisingly little to the overall extent of cellular tension as compared to disordered actomyosin meshworks. Our in vitro results are demonstrating the mechanisms of symmetry breaking in disordered actomyosin bundles that facilitate the formation of contractile bundles with well-defined ``contractile elements.'' These results provide insight into the self-organization of actomyosin cytoskeleton in non-muscle cells that regulate and maintain cellular tension.

  4. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  5. How cofilin severs an actin filament.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2009-05-15

    The actin regulatory protein, cofilin, promotes actin assembly dynamics by severing filaments and increasing the number of ends from which subunits add and dissociate. Recent studies provide biophysical descriptions of cooperative filament interactions in energetic, mechanical and structural terms. A one-dimensional Ising model with nearest-neighbor interactions permits thermodynamic analysis of cooperative binding and indicates that one or a few cofilin molecules can sever a filament. Binding and cooperative interactions are entropically driven. A significant fraction of the binding free energy results from the linked dissociation of filament-associated ions (polyelectrolyte effect), which modulate filament structure, stability and mechanics. The remaining binding free energy and essentially all of the cooperative free energy arise from the enhanced conformational dynamics of the cofilactin complex. Filament mechanics are modulated by cofilin such that cofilin-saturated filaments are approximately 10- to 20-fold more compliant in bending and twisting than bare filaments. Cofilin activity is well described by models in which discontinuities in topology, mechanics and conformational dynamics generate stress concentration and promote fracture at junctions of bare and decorated segments, analogous to the grain boundary fracture of crystalline materials and the thermally driven formation of shear transformation zones in colloidal glass. PMID:20700473

  6. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  7. Drebrin inhibits cofilin-induced severing of F-actin.

    PubMed

    Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2014-08-01

    Molecular cross-talk between neuronal drebrin A and cofilin is believed to be a part of the activity-dependent cytoskeleton-modulating pathway in dendritic spines. Impairments in this pathway are implicated also in synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, epilepsy, and normal aging. However, up to now the molecular interplay between cofilin and drebrin has not been elucidated. TIRF microscopy and solution experiments revealed that full length drebrin A or its actin binding core (Drb1-300) inhibits, but do not abolish cofilin-induced severing of actin filaments. Cosedimentation experiments showed that F-actin can be fully occupied with combination of these two proteins. The dependence of cofilin binding on fractional saturation of actin filaments with drebrin suggests direct competition between these two proteins for F-actin binding. This implies that cofilin and drebrin can either overcome or reverse the allosteric changes in F-actin induced by the competitor's binding. The ability of cofilin to displace drebrin from actin filaments is pH dependent and is facilitated at acidic pH (6.8). Pre-steady state kinetic experiments reveal that both binding and dissociation of drebrin to/from actin filaments is faster than that reported for cooperative binding of cofilin. We found, that drebrin displacement by cofilin is greatly inhibited when actin severing is abolished, which might be linked to the cooperativity of drebrin binding to actin filaments. Our results contribute to molecular understanding of the competitive interactions of drebrin and cofilin with actin filaments. PMID:25047716

  8. Targeting the actin cytoskeleton: selective antitumor action via trapping PKCɛ.

    PubMed

    Foerster, F; Braig, S; Moser, C; Kubisch, R; Busse, J; Wagner, E; Schmoeckel, E; Mayr, D; Schmitt, S; Huettel, S; Zischka, H; Mueller, R; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the actin cytoskeleton (CSK) of cancer cells offers a valuable strategy in cancer therapy. There are a number of natural compounds that interfere with the actin CSK, but the mode of their cytotoxic action and, moreover, their tumor-specific mechanisms are quite elusive. We used the myxobacterial compound Chondramide as a tool to first elucidate the mechanisms of cytotoxicity of actin targeting in breast cancer cells (MCF7, MDA-MB-231). Chondramide inhibits cellular actin filament dynamics shown by a fluorescence-based analysis (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)) and leads to apoptosis characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure, release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and finally activation of caspases. Chondramide enhances the occurrence of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) by affecting known MPT modulators: Hexokinase II bound to the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) translocated from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the cytosol and the proapoptotic protein Bad were recruited to the mitochondria. Importantly, protein kinase C-ɛ (PKCɛ), a prosurvival kinase possessing an actin-binding site and known to regulate the hexokinase/VDAC interaction as well as Bad phosphorylation was identified as the link between actin CSK and apoptosis induction. PKCɛ, which was found overexpressed in breast cancer cells, accumulated in actin bundles induced by Chondramide and lost its activity. Our second goal was to characterize the potential tumor-specific action of actin-binding agents. As the nontumor breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A in fact shows resistance to Chondramide-induced apoptosis and notably express low level of PKCɛ, we suggest that trapping PKCɛ via Chondramide-induced actin hyperpolymerization displays tumor cell specificity. Our work provides a link between targeting the ubiquitously occurring actin CSK and selective inhibition of pro-tumorigenic PKCɛ, thus setting the stage for actin-stabilizing agents as

  9. Targeting the actin cytoskeleton: selective antitumor action via trapping PKCɛ

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, F; Braig, S; Moser, C; Kubisch, R; Busse, J; Wagner, E; Schmoeckel, E; Mayr, D; Schmitt, S; Huettel, S; Zischka, H; Mueller, R; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the actin cytoskeleton (CSK) of cancer cells offers a valuable strategy in cancer therapy. There are a number of natural compounds that interfere with the actin CSK, but the mode of their cytotoxic action and, moreover, their tumor-specific mechanisms are quite elusive. We used the myxobacterial compound Chondramide as a tool to first elucidate the mechanisms of cytotoxicity of actin targeting in breast cancer cells (MCF7, MDA-MB-231). Chondramide inhibits cellular actin filament dynamics shown by a fluorescence-based analysis (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)) and leads to apoptosis characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure, release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and finally activation of caspases. Chondramide enhances the occurrence of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) by affecting known MPT modulators: Hexokinase II bound to the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) translocated from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the cytosol and the proapoptotic protein Bad were recruited to the mitochondria. Importantly, protein kinase C-ɛ (PKCɛ), a prosurvival kinase possessing an actin-binding site and known to regulate the hexokinase/VDAC interaction as well as Bad phosphorylation was identified as the link between actin CSK and apoptosis induction. PKCɛ, which was found overexpressed in breast cancer cells, accumulated in actin bundles induced by Chondramide and lost its activity. Our second goal was to characterize the potential tumor-specific action of actin-binding agents. As the nontumor breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A in fact shows resistance to Chondramide-induced apoptosis and notably express low level of PKCɛ, we suggest that trapping PKCɛ via Chondramide-induced actin hyperpolymerization displays tumor cell specificity. Our work provides a link between targeting the ubiquitously occurring actin CSK and selective inhibition of pro-tumorigenic PKCɛ, thus setting the stage for actin-stabilizing agents as

  10. Mechanics of composite actin networks: in vitro and cellular perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Actin filaments and associated actin binding proteins play an essential role in governing the mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells. Even though cells have multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that exist simultaneously to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of the cellular cytoskeleton, how these proteins work together to determine the properties of actin networks is not well understood. The ABP, palladin, is essential for the integrity of cell morphology and movement during development. Palladin coexists with alpha-actinin in stress fibers and focal adhesions and binds to both actin and alpha-actinin. To obtain insight into how mutually interacting actin crosslinking proteins modulate the properties of actin networks, we have characterized the micro-structure and mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with palladin and alpha-actinin. Our studies on composite networks of alpha-actinin/palladin/actin show that palladin and alpha-actinin synergistically determine network viscoelasticity. We have further examined the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing. Traction force microscopy revealed that TAFs are sensitive to substrate stiffness as they generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells, and also inhibited the ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in the actin organization and adhesion dynamics of palladin knock down cells. Perturbation experiments also suggest altered myosin activity in palladin KD cells. Our results suggest that the actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis.

  11. The relationship of arsenic levels in drinking water and the prevalence rate of skin lesions in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Tondel, M; Rahman, M; Magnuson, A; Chowdhury, I A; Faruquee, M H; Ahmad, S A

    1999-01-01

    To determine the relationship of arsenic-associated skin lesions and degree of arsenic exposure, a cross-sectional study was conducted in Bangladesh, where a large part of the population is exposed through drinking water. Four villages in Bangladesh were identified as mainly dependent on wells contaminated with arsenic. We interviewed and examined 1,481 subjects [Greater/equal to] 30 years of age in these villages. A total of 430 subjects had skin lesions (keratosis, hyperpigmentation, or hypopigmentation). Individual exposure assessment could only be estimated by present levels and in terms of a dose index, i.e., arsenic levels divided by individual body weight. Arsenic water concentrations ranged from 10 to 2,040 microg/L, and the crude overall prevalence rate for skin lesions was 29/100. After age adjustment to the world population the prevalence rate was 30. 1/100 and 26.5/100 for males and females, respectively. There was a significant trend for the prevalence rate both in relation to exposure levels and to dose index (p < 0.05), regardless of sex. This study shows a higher prevalence rate of arsenic skin lesions in males than females, with clear dose-response relationship. The overall high prevalence rate in the studied villages is an alarming sign of arsenic exposure and requires an urgent remedy. PMID:10464073

  12. Yeast studies reveal moonlighting functions of the ancient actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Chernova, Tatiana A; Gogoi, Neeku M; Pillai, Indu V; Chernoff, Yury O; Munn, Alan L

    2014-08-01

    Classic functions of the actin cytoskeleton include control of cell size and shape and the internal organization of cells. These functions are manifest in cellular processes of fundamental importance throughout biology such as the generation of cell polarity, cell migration, cell adhesion, and cell division. However, studies in the unicellular model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) are giving insights into other functions in which the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. These include endocytosis, control of protein translation, and determination of protein 3-dimensional shape (especially conversion of normal cellular proteins into prions). Here, we present a concise overview of these new "moonlighting" roles for the actin cytoskeleton and how some of these roles might lie at the heart of important molecular switches. This is an exciting time for researchers interested in the actin cytoskeleton. We show here how studies of actin are leading us into many new and exciting realms at the interface of genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology. While many of the pioneering studies have been conducted using yeast, the conservation of the actin cytoskeleton and its component proteins throughout eukaryotes suggests that these new roles for the actin cytoskeleton may not be restricted to yeast cells but rather may reflect new roles for the actin cytoskeleton of all eukaryotes. PMID:25138357

  13. Yeast studies reveal moonlighting functions of the ancient actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Chernova, Tatiana A.; Gogoi, Neeku M.; Pillai, Indu V.; Chernoff, Yury O.; Munn, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    Classic functions of the actin cytoskeleton include control of cell size and shape and the internal organisation of cells. These functions are manifest in cellular processes of fundamental importance throughout biology such as the generation of cell polarity, cell migration, cell adhesion and cell division. However, studies in the unicellular model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) are giving insights into other functions in which the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. These include endocytosis, control of protein translation and determination of protein 3-dimensional shape (especially conversion of normal cellular proteins into prions). Here we present a concise overview of these new "moonlighting" roles for the actin cytoskeleton and how some of these roles might lie at the heart of important molecular switches. This is an exciting time for researchers interested in the actin cytoskeleton. We show here how studies of actin are leading us into many new and exciting realms at the interface of genetics, biochemistry and cell biology. While many of the pioneering studies have been conducted using yeast, the conservation of the actin cytoskeleton and its component proteins throughout eukaryotes suggests that these new roles for the actin cytoskeleton may not be restricted to yeast cells but rather may reflect new roles for the actin cytoskeleton of all eukaryotes. PMID:25138357

  14. Deafness and espin-actin self-organization in stereocilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Espins are F-actin-bundling proteins associated with large parallel actin bundles found in hair cell stereocilia in the ear, as well as brush border microvilli and Sertoli cell junctions. We examine actin bundle structures formed by different wild-type espin isoforms, fragments, and naturally-occurring human espin mutants linked to deafness and/or vestibular dysfunction. The espin-actin bundle structure consisted of a hexagonal arrangement of parallel actin filaments in a non-native twist state. We delineate the structural consequences caused by mutations in espin's actin-bundling module. For espin mutation with a severely damaged actin-bundling module, which are implicated in deafness in mice and humans, oriented nematic-like actin filament structures, which strongly impinges on bundle mechanical stiffness. Finally, we examine what makes espin different, via a comparative study of bundles formed by espin and those formed by fascin, a prototypical bundling protein found in functionally different regions of the cell, such as filopodia.

  15. Filament assembly by Spire: key residues and concerted actin binding.

    PubMed

    Rasson, Amy S; Bois, Justin S; Pham, Duy Stephen L; Yoo, Haneul; Quinlan, Margot E

    2015-02-27

    The most recently identified class of actin nucleators, WASp homology domain 2 (WH2) nucleators, use tandem repeats of monomeric actin-binding WH2 domains to facilitate actin nucleation. WH2 domains are involved in a wide variety of actin regulatory activities. Structurally, they are expected to clash with interprotomer contacts within the actin filament. Thus, the discovery of their role in nucleation was surprising. Here we use Drosophila Spire (Spir) as a model system to investigate both how tandem WH2 domains can nucleate actin and what differentiates nucleating WH2-containing proteins from their non-nucleating counterparts. We found that the third WH2 domain in Spir (Spir-C or SC) plays a unique role. In the context of a short nucleation construct (containing only two WH2 domains), placement of SC in the N-terminal position was required for the most potent nucleation. We found that the native organization of the WH2 domains with respect to each other is necessary for binding to actin with positive cooperativity. We identified two residues within SC that are critical for its activity. Using this information, we were able to convert a weak synthetic nucleator into one with activity equal to a native Spir construct. Lastly, we found evidence that SC binds actin filaments, in addition to monomers. PMID:25234086

  16. Actin dynamics and the evolution of the memory trace.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Jerry W

    2015-09-24

    The goal of this essay is to link the regulation of actin dynamics to the idea that the synaptic changes that support long-term potentiation and memory evolve in temporally overlapping stages-generation, stabilization, and consolidation. Different cellular/molecular processes operate at each stage to change the spine cytoarchitecture and, in doing so, alter its function. Calcium-dependent processes that degrade the actin cytoskeleton network promote a rapid insertion of AMPA receptors into the post synaptic density, which increases a spine's capacity to express a potentiated response to glutamate. Other post-translation events then begin to stabilize and expand the actin cytoskeleton by increasing the filament actin content of the spine and reorganizing it to be resistant to depolymerizing events. Disrupting actin polymerization during this stabilization period is a terminal event-the actin cytoskeleton shrinks and potentiated synapses de-potentiate and memories are lost. Late-arriving, new proteins may consolidate changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, to do so requires a stabilized actin cytoskeleton. The now enlarged spine has properties that enable it to capture other newly transcribed mRNAs or their protein products and thus enable the synaptic changes that support LTP and memory to be consolidated and maintained. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25498985

  17. Filament Assembly by Spire: Key Residues and Concerted Actin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rasson, Amy S.; Bois, Justin S.; Pham, Duy Stephen L.; Yoo, Haneul; Quinlan, Margot E.

    2014-01-01

    The most recently identified class of actin nucleators, WASp Homology domain 2 (WH2) – nucleators, use tandem repeats of monomeric actin-binding WH2 domains to facilitate actin nucleation. WH2 domains are involved in a wide variety of actin regulatory activities. Structurally, they are expected to clash with interprotomer contacts within the actin filament. Thus, the discovery of their role in nucleation was surprising. Here we use Drosophila Spire (Spir) as a model system to investigate both how tandem WH2 domains can nucleate actin and what differentiates nucleating WH2-containing proteins from their non-nucleating counterparts. We found that the third WH2 domain in Spir (Spir-C or Sc), plays a unique role. In the context of a short nucleation construct (containing only two WH2 domains), placement of Sc in the N-terminal position was required for the most potent nucleation. We found that the native organization of the WH2 domains with respect to each other is necessary for binding to actin with positive cooperativity. We identified two residues within Sc that are critical for its activity. Using this information we were able to convert a weak synthetic nucleator into one with activity equal to a native Spir construct. Lastly, we found evidence that Sc binds actin filaments, in addition to monomers. PMID:25234086

  18. Actin-based spindle positioning: new insights from female gametes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Terret, Marie-Émilie; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2014-02-01

    Asymmetric divisions are essential in metazoan development, where they promote the emergence of cell lineages. The mitotic spindle has astral microtubules that contact the cortex, which act as a sensor of cell geometry and as an integrator to orient cell division. Recent advances in live imaging revealed novel pools and roles of F-actin in somatic cells and in oocytes. In somatic cells, cytoplasmic F-actin is involved in spindle architecture and positioning. In starfish and mouse oocytes, newly discovered meshes of F-actin control chromosome gathering and spindle positioning. Because oocytes lack centrosomes and astral microtubules, F-actin networks are key players in the positioning of spindles by transmitting forces over long distances. Oocytes also achieve highly asymmetric divisions, and thus are excellent models to study the roles of these newly discovered F-actin networks in spindle positioning. Moreover, recent studies in mammalian oocytes provide a further understanding of the organisation of F-actin networks and their biophysical properties. In this Commentary, we present examples of the role of F-actin in spindle positioning and asymmetric divisions, with an emphasis on the most up-to-date studies from mammalian oocytes. We also address specific technical issues in the field, namely live imaging of F-actin networks and stress the need for interdisciplinary approaches. PMID:24413163

  19. Actin Interacts with Dengue Virus 2 and 4 Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jitoboam, Kunlakanya; Phaonakrop, Narumon; Libsittikul, Sirikwan; Thepparit, Chutima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) remains a significant public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. The DENV envelope (E) protein is the major antigenic determinant and the protein that mediates receptor binding and endosomal fusion. In contrast to some other DENV proteins, relatively few cellular interacting proteins have been identified. To address this issue a co-immuoprecipitation strategy was employed. The predominant co-immunoprecipitating proteins identified were actin and actin related proteins, however the results suggested that actin was the only bona fide interacting partner. Actin was shown to interact with the E protein of DENV 2 and 4, and the interaction between actin and DENV E protein was shown to occur in a truncated DENV consisting of only domains I and II. Actin was shown to decrease during infection, but this was not associated with a decrease in gene transcription. Actin-related proteins also showed a decrease in expression during infection that was not transcriptionally regulated. Cytoskeletal reorganization was not observed during infection, suggesting that the interaction between actin and E protein has a cell type specific component. PMID:27010925

  20. Lateral Membrane Diffusion Modulated by a Minimal Actin Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Fabian; Vogel, Sven K.; Schwille, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion of lipids and proteins within the cell membrane is essential for numerous membrane-dependent processes including signaling and molecular interactions. It is assumed that the membrane-associated cytoskeleton modulates lateral diffusion. Here, we use a minimal actin cortex to directly study proposed effects of an actin meshwork on the diffusion in a well-defined system. The lateral diffusion of a lipid and a protein probe at varying densities of membrane-bound actin was characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A clear correlation of actin density and reduction in mobility was observed for both the lipid and the protein probe. At high actin densities, the effect on the protein probe was ∼3.5-fold stronger compared to the lipid. Moreover, addition of myosin filaments, which contract the actin mesh, allowed switching between fast and slow diffusion in the minimal system. Spot variation FCS was in accordance with a model of fast microscopic diffusion and slower macroscopic diffusion. Complementing Monte Carlo simulations support the analysis of the experimental FCS data. Our results suggest a stronger interaction of the actin mesh with the larger protein probe compared to the lipid. This might point toward a mechanism where cortical actin controls membrane diffusion in a strong size-dependent manner. PMID:23561523

  1. Building an artificial actin cortex on microscopic pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, R; Roos, W H

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells obtain their morphology and mechanical strength from the cytoskeleton and in particular from the cross-linked actin network that branches throughout the whole cell. This actin cortex lies like a quasi-two-dimensional (2D) biopolymer network just below the cell membrane, to which it is attached. In the quest for building an artificial cell, one needs to make a biomimetic model of the actin cortex and combine this in a bottom-up approach with other "synthetic" components. Here, we describe a reconstitution method for such an artificial actin cortex, which is freely suspended on top of a regular array of pillars. By this immobilization method, the actin network is only attached to a surface at discrete points and can fluctuate freely in between. By discussing the method to make the micropillars and the way to reconstitute a quasi-2D actin network on top, we show how one can study an isolated, reconstituted part of a cell. This allows the study of fundamental interaction mechanisms of actin networks, providing handles to design a functional actin cortex in an artificial cell. PMID:25997345

  2. Bending Flexibility of Actin Filaments during Motor-Induced Sliding

    PubMed Central

    Vikhorev, Petr G.; Vikhoreva, Natalia N.; Månsson, Alf

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction and other forms of cell motility occur as a result of cyclic interactions between myosin molecules and actin filaments. Force generation is generally attributed to ATP-driven structural changes in myosin, whereas a passive role is ascribed to actin. However, some results challenge this view, predicting structural changes in actin during motor activity, e.g., when the actin filaments slide on a myosin-coated surface in vitro. Here, we analyzed statistical properties of the sliding filament paths, allowing us to detect changes of this type. It is interesting to note that evidence for substantial structural changes that led to increased bending flexibility of the filaments was found in phalloidin-stabilized, but not in phalloidin-free, actin filaments. The results are in accordance with the idea that a high-flexibility structural state of actin is a prerequisite for force production, but not the idea that a low-to-high flexibility transition of the actin filament should be an important component of the force-generating step per se. Finally, our data challenge the general view that phalloidin-stabilized filaments behave as native actin filaments in their interaction with myosin. This has important implications, since phalloidin stabilization is a routine procedure in most studies of actomyosin function. PMID:18835897

  3. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1–393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using “hot-spot” p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  4. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1-393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using "hot-spot" p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  5. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  6. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  7. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are

  8. Actin network disassembly powers dissemination of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Talman, Arthur M; Chong, Ryan; Chia, Jonathan; Svitkina, Tatyana; Agaisse, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens hijack the actin assembly machinery and display intracellular motility in the cytosol of infected cells. At the cell cortex, intracellular motility leads to bacterial dissemination through formation of plasma membrane protrusions that resolve into vacuoles in adjacent cells. Here, we uncover a crucial role for actin network disassembly in dissemination of Listeria monocytogenes. We found that defects in the disassembly machinery decreased the rate of actin tail turnover but did not affect the velocity of the bacteria in the cytosol. By contrast, defects in the disassembly machinery had a dramatic impact on bacterial dissemination. Our results suggest a model of L. monocytogenes dissemination in which the disassembly machinery, through local recycling of the actin network in protrusions, fuels continuous actin assembly at the bacterial pole and concurrently exhausts cytoskeleton components from the network distal to the bacterium, which enables membrane apposition and resolution of protrusions into vacuoles. PMID:24155331

  9. Actin-associated Proteins in the Pathogenesis of Podocyte Injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang-Fang; Chen, Shan; Su, Hua; Meng, Xian-Fang; Zhang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes have a complex cellular architecture with interdigitating processes maintained by a precise organization of actin filaments. The actin-based foot processes of podocytes and the interposed slit diaphragm form the final barrier to proteinuria. The function of podocytes is largely based on the maintenance of the normal foot process structure with actin cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal dynamics play important roles during normal podocyte development, in maintenance of the healthy glomerular filtration barrier, and in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. In this review, we focused on recent findings on the mechanisms of organization and reorganization of these actin-related molecules in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury and potential therapeutics targeting the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in podocytopathies. PMID:24396279

  10. Villin Severing Activity Enhances Actin-based Motility In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Revenu, Céline; Courtois, Matthieu; Michelot, Alphée; Sykes, Cécile; Louvard, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Villin, an actin-binding protein associated with the actin bundles that support microvilli, bundles, caps, nucleates, and severs actin in a calcium-dependant manner in vitro. We hypothesized that the severing activity of villin is responsible for its reported role in enhancing cell plasticity and motility. To test this hypothesis, we chose a loss of function strategy and introduced mutations in villin based on sequence comparison with CapG. By pyrene-actin assays, we demonstrate that this mutant has a strongly reduced severing activity, whereas nucleation and capping remain unaffected. The bundling activity and the morphogenic effects of villin in cells are also preserved in this mutant. We thus succeeded in dissociating the severing from the three other activities of villin. The contribution of villin severing to actin dynamics is analyzed in vivo through the actin-based movement of the intracellular bacteria Shigella flexneri in cells expressing villin and its severing variant. The severing mutations abolish the gain of velocity induced by villin. To further analyze this effect, we reconstituted an in vitro actin-based bead movement in which the usual capping protein is replaced by either the wild type or the severing mutant of villin. Confirming the in vivo results, villin-severing activity enhances the velocity of beads by more than two-fold and reduces the density of actin in the comets. We propose a model in which, by severing actin filaments and capping their barbed ends, villin increases the concentration of actin monomers available for polymerization, a mechanism that might be paralleled in vivo when an enterocyte undergoes an epithelio-mesenchymal transition. PMID:17182858

  11. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases local actin concentration, which leads to an enhanced activities of actin filaments' nucleation. Our model analysis matches the experimental results and lends support to an important but undervalued hypothesis proposed by Carlier and

  12. Measuring Actin Flow in 3D Cell Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Actin dynamics is important in determining cell shape, tension, and migration. Methods such as fluorescent speckle microscopy and spatial temporal image correlation spectroscopy have been used to capture high-resolution actin turnover dynamics within cells in two dimensions. However, these methods are not directly applicable in 3D due to lower resolution and poor contrast. Here, we propose to capture actin flow in 3D with high spatial-temporal resolution by combining nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation and fluctuation spectroscopy techniques. To measure the actin flow along cell protrusions in cell expressing actin-eGFP cultured in a type I collagen matrix, the laser was orbited around the protrusion and its trajectory was modulated in a clover-shaped pattern perpendicularly to the protrusion. Orbits were also alternated at two positions closely spaced along the protrusion axis. The pair cross-correlation function was applied to the fluorescence fluctuation from these two positions to capture the flow of actin. Measurements done on nonmoving cellular protrusion tips showed no pair-correlation at two orbital positions indicating a lack of flow of F-actin bundles. However, in some protrusions, the pair-correlation approach revealed directional flow of F-actin bundles near the protrusion surface with flow rates in the range of ∼1 μm/min, comparable to results in two dimensions using fluorescent speckle microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the actin flow rate is related to the distance to the protrusion tip. We also observed collagen deformation by concomitantly detecting collagen fibers with reflectance detection during these actin motions. The implementation of the nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation method with a cloverleaf-shaped trajectory in conjunction with the pair cross-correlation function method provides a quantitative way of capturing dynamic flows and organization of proteins during cell migration in 3D in conditions of

  13. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Wann, A.K.T.; Thompson, C.L.; Hassen, A.; Wang, W.; Knight, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. Methods The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88orpk). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. Results IFT88orpk cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88orpk cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88orpk cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88orpk cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88orpk cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. PMID:26493329

  14. Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin networks constrain myosin II function in driving retrograde actin flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Pollard, Thomas D; Forscher, Paul

    2012-06-25

    The Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments to generate networks at the leading edge of motile cells. Nonmuscle myosin II produces contractile forces involved in driving actin network translocation. We inhibited the Arp2/3 complex and/or myosin II with small molecules to investigate their respective functions in neuronal growth cone actin dynamics. Inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex with CK666 reduced barbed end actin assembly site density at the leading edge, disrupted actin veils, and resulted in veil retraction. Strikingly, retrograde actin flow rates increased with Arp2/3 complex inhibition; however, when myosin II activity was blocked, Arp2/3 complex inhibition now resulted in slowing of retrograde actin flow and veils no longer retracted. Retrograde flow rate increases induced by Arp2/3 complex inhibition were independent of Rho kinase activity. These results provide evidence that, although the Arp2/3 complex and myosin II are spatially segregated, actin networks assembled by the Arp2/3 complex can restrict myosin II-dependent contractility with consequent effects on growth cone motility. PMID:22711700

  15. A dynamic formin-dependent deep F-actin network in axons

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Archan; Tang, Yong; Wang, Lina; Ladt, Kelsey; Loi, Jonathan; Dargent, Bénédicte; Leterrier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Although actin at neuronal growth cones is well-studied, much less is known about actin organization and dynamics along axon shafts and presynaptic boutons. Using probes that selectively label filamentous-actin (F-actin), we found focal “actin hotspots” along axons—spaced ∼3–4 µm apart—where actin undergoes continuous assembly/disassembly. These foci are a nidus for vigorous actin polymerization, generating long filaments spurting bidirectionally along axons—a phenomenon we call “actin trails.” Super-resolution microscopy reveals intra-axonal deep actin filaments in addition to the subplasmalemmal “actin rings” described recently. F-actin hotspots colocalize with stationary axonal endosomes, and blocking vesicle transport diminishes the actin trails, suggesting mechanistic links between vesicles and F-actin kinetics. Actin trails are formin—but not Arp2/3—dependent and help enrich actin at presynaptic boutons. Finally, formin inhibition dramatically disrupts synaptic recycling. Collectively, available data suggest a two-tier F-actin organization in axons, with stable “actin rings” providing mechanical support to the plasma membrane and dynamic "actin trails" generating a flexible cytoskeletal network with putative physiological roles. PMID:26216902

  16. Capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments by a high-affinity profilin-actin complex.

    PubMed

    DiNubile, M J; Huang, S

    1997-01-01

    Profilin, a ubiquitous 12 to 15-kDa protein, serves many functions, including sequestering monomeric actin, accelerating nucleotide exchange on actin monomers, decreasing the critical concentration of the barbed end of actin filaments, and promoting actin polymerization when barbed ends are free. Most previous studies have focused on profilin itself rather than its complex with actin. A high-affinity profilin-actin complex (here called profilactin) can be isolated from a poly-(L)-proline (PLP) column by sequential elution with 3 M and 7 M urea. Profilactin inhibited the elongation rate of pyrenyl-G-actin from filament seeds in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Much greater inhibition of elongation was observed with spectrin-F-actin than gelsolin-F-actin seeds, suggesting that the major effect of profilactin was due to capping the barbed ends of actin filaments. Its dissociation constant for binding to filament ends was 0.3 microM; the on- and off-rate constants were estimated to be 1.7 x 10(3) M-1 s-1 and 4.5 x 10(-4) s-1, respectively. Purified profilin (obtained by repetitive applications to a PLP column and assessed by silver-stained polyacylamide gels) did not slow the elongation rate of pyrenyl-G-actin from filament seeds. Capping protein could not be detected by Western blotting in the profilactin preparation, but low concentrations of gelsolin did contaminate our preparation. However, prolonged incubation with either calcium or EGTA did not affect capping activity, implying that contaminating gelsolin-actin complexes were not primarily responsible for the observed capping activity. Reapplication of the profilactin preparation to PLP-coupled Sepharose removed both profilin and actin and concurrently eliminated its capping activity. Profilactin that was reapplied to uncoupled Sepharose retained its capping activity. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) was the most potent phosphoinositol in reducing the capping activity of profilactin

  17. Triggering Actin Comets Versus Membrane Ruffles: Distinctive Effects of Phosphoinositides on Actin Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Tasuku; Falkenburger, Björn H.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    A limited set of phosphoinositide membrane lipids regulate diverse cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. We developed two techniques based on rapamycin-induced protein dimerization to rapidly change the concentration of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. First, we increased PI(4,5)P2 synthesis from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] using a membrane recruitable form of PI(4)P 5-kinase, and found that COS-7, HeLa, and HEK293 cells formed bundles of motile actin filaments known as actin comets. In contrast, a second technique that increased the concentration of PI(4,5)P2 without consuming PI(4)P induced membrane ruffles. These distinct phenotypes were mediated by dynamin-mediated vesicular trafficking and mutually inhibitory crosstalk between the small guanosine triphosphatases Rac and RhoA. Our results indicate that the effect of PI(4,5)P2 on actin reorganization depends on the abundance of other phosphoinositides, such as PI(4)P. Thus, combinatorial regulation of phosphoinositide concentrations may contribute to the diversity of phosphoinositide functions. PMID:22169478

  18. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  19. Noninfectious penile lesions.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Sea, Jason; Thompson, Ian M; Elston, Dirk M

    2010-01-15

    Family physicians commonly diagnose and manage penile cutaneous lesions. Noninfectious lesions may be classified as inflammatory and papulosquamous (e.g., psoriasis, lichen sclerosus, angiokeratomas, lichen nitidus, lichen planus), or as neoplastic (e.g., carcinoma in situ, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). The clinical presentation and appearance of the lesions guide the diagnosis. Psoriasis presents as red or salmon-colored plaques with overlying scales, often with systemic lesions. Lichen sclerosus presents as a phimotic, hypopigmented prepuce or glans penis with a cellophane-like texture. Angiokeratomas are typically asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, red or blue papules, whereas lichen nitidus usually produces asymptomatic pinhead-sized, hypopigmented papules. The lesions of lichen planus are pruritic, violaceous, polygonal papules that are typically systemic. Carcinoma in situ should be suspected if the patient has velvety red or keratotic plaques of the glans penis or prepuce, whereas invasive squamous cell carcinoma presents as a painless lump, ulcer, or fungating irregular mass. Some benign lesions, such as psoriasis and lichen planus, can mimic carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy is indicated if the diagnosis is in doubt or neoplasm cannot be excluded. The management of benign penile lesions usually involves observation or topical corticosteroids; however, neoplastic lesions generally require surgery. PMID:20082512

  20. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  1. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  2. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  3. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  4. The ADF/cofilin family: actin-remodeling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maciver, Sutherland K; Hussey, Patrick J

    2002-01-01

    The ADF/cofilins are a family of actin-binding proteins expressed in all eukaryotic cells so far examined. Members of this family remodel the actin cytoskeleton, for example during cytokinesis, when the actin-rich contractile ring shrinks as it contracts through the interaction of ADF/cofilins with both monomeric and filamentous actin. The depolymerizing activity is twofold: ADF/cofilins sever actin filaments and also increase the rate at which monomers leave the filament's pointed end. The three-dimensional structure of ADF/cofilins is similar to a fold in members of the gelsolin family of actin-binding proteins in which this fold is typically repeated three or six times; although both families bind polyphosphoinositide lipids and actin in a pH-dependent manner, they share no obvious sequence similarity. Plants and animals have multiple ADF/cofilin genes, belonging in vertebrates to two types, ADF and cofilins. Other eukaryotes (such as yeast, Acanthamoeba and slime moulds) have a single ADF/cofilin gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the ADF/cofilins reveals that, with few exceptions, their relationships reflect conventional views of the relationships between the major groups of organisms. PMID:12049672

  5. Quantitative fluorescent speckle microscopy (QFSM) to measure actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Michelle C; Besson, Sebastien; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2012-10-01

    Quantitative fluorescent speckle microscopy (QFSM) is a live-cell imaging method to analyze the dynamics of macromolecular assemblies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its greatest successes were in the analysis of actin filament and adhesion dynamics in the context of cell migration and microtubule dynamics in interphase and the meiotic/mitotic spindle. Here, focus is on the former application to illustrate the procedures of FSM imaging and the computational image processing that extracts quantitative information from these experiments. QFSM is advantageous over other methods because it measures the movement and turnover kinetics of the actin filament (F-actin) network in living cells across the entire field of view. Experiments begin with the microinjection of fluorophore-labeled actin into cells, which generate a low ratio of fluorescently labeled to endogenously unlabeled actin monomers. Spinning disk confocal or wide-field imaging then visualizes fluorophore clusters (two to eight actin monomers) within the assembled F-actin network as speckles. QFSM software identifies and computationally tracks and utilizes the location, appearance, and disappearance of speckles to derive network flows and maps of the rate of filament assembly and disassembly. PMID:23042526

  6. The centrosome is an actin-organizing center

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Francesca; Gaillard, Jérémie; Guérin, Christophe; Couté, Yohann; Sillibourne, James; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and actin filaments are the two main cytoskeleton networks supporting intracellular architecture and cell polarity. The centrosome nucleates and anchors microtubules and is therefore considered to be the main microtubule-organizing center. However, recurring, yet unexplained, observations have pointed towards a connection between the centrosome and actin filaments. Here we have used isolated centrosomes to demonstrate that the centrosome can directly promote actin filament assembly. A cloud of centrosome-associated actin filaments could be identified in living cells as well. Actin-filament nucleation at the centrosome was mediated by the nucleation promoting factor WASH in combination with the Arp2/3 complex. Pericentriolar material 1 (PCM1) appeared to modulate the centrosomal actin network by regulating Arp2/3 complex and WASH recruitment to the centrosome. Hence our results reveal an additional facet of the centrosome as an intracellular organizer and provide mechanistic insights into how the centrosome can function as an actin filament-organizing center. PMID:26655833

  7. Simulation of the effect of confinement in actin ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli Koudehi, Maral; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Haosu Tang Team; Dimitrios Vavylonis Team

    Actin filaments are vital for different network structures in living cells. During cytokinesis, they form a contractile ring containing myosin motor proteins and actin filament cross-linkers to separate one cell into two cells. Recent experimental studies have quantified the bundle, ring, and network structures that form when actin filaments polymerize in confined environments in vitro, in the presence of varying concentrations of cross-linkers. In this study, we performed numerical simulations to investigate the effect of actin spherical confinement and cross-linking in ring formation. We used a spring-bead model and Brownian dynamics to simulate semiflexible actin filaments that polymerize in a confining sphere with a rate proportional to the monomer concentration. Applying the model for different size of the confining spheres shows that the probability of ring formation decreases by increasing the radius (at fixed initial monomer concentration), in agreement with prior experimental data. We describe the effect of persistence length, orientation-dependent cross-linking, and initial actin monomer concentration. Simulations show that equilibrium configurations can be reached through zipping and unzipping of actin filaments in bundles and transient ring formation.

  8. Actin filaments in normal dermis and during wound healing.

    PubMed Central

    Doillon, C. J.; Hembry, R. M.; Ehrlich, H. P.; Burke, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    During wound healing, it has been suggested, modified fibroblasts rich in actin filaments are responsible for wound contraction. With the use of specific fluorescent probe (NBD-phallacidin), the distribution of actin filaments are compared in normal dermis and in several wound contraction models, including open and burn wounds and full and thin-thickness skin autografts. Fibroblasts of normal dermis are slightly stained with NBD-phallacidin. Fibroblasts with actin filaments are increased in autografts, particularly at Days 15 and 21 after grafting, and are prominent in open and burn wounds. The wound contraction rate is not directly related to the presence of actin-staining fibroblasts. After stabilization of the contraction of open or burn wounds, fibroblasts rich in actin filaments remain. The superficial layer of full-thickness skin graft contains a similar actin distribution without concomitant contraction. It is concluded that the distribution of actin-rich fibroblasts corresponds morphologically to previous areas of necrosis or injury. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3544851

  9. Symmetry breaking in actin gels - Implications for cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Peyla, Philippe; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2007-03-01

    The physical origin of cell motility is not fully understood. Recently minimal model systems have shown, that polymerizing actin itself can produce a motile force, without the help of motor proteins. Pathogens like Shigella or Listeria use actin to propel themselves forward in their host cell. The same process can be mimicked with polystyrene beads covered with the activating protein ActA, which reside in a solution containing actin monomers. ActA induces the growth of an actin gel at the bead surface. Initially the gel grows symmetrically around the bead until a critical size is reached. Subsequently one observes a symmetry breaking and the gel starts to grow asymmetrically around the bead developing a tail of actin at one side. This symmetry breaking is accompanied by a directed movement of the bead, with the actin tail trailing behind the bead. Force generation relies on the combination of two properties: growth and elasticity of the actin gel. We study this phenomenon theoretically within the framework of a linear elasticity theory and linear flux-force relationships for the evolution of an elastic gel around a hard sphere. Conditions for a parity symmetry breaking are identified analytically and illustrated numerically with the help of a phasefield model.

  10. Self-organizing actin waves as planar phagocytic cup structures

    PubMed Central

    Ecke, Mary; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Gerwig, Silke; Engel, Ulrike; Maddera, Lucinda; Clarke, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Actin waves that travel on the planar membrane of a substrate-attached cell underscore the capability of the actin system to assemble into dynamic structures by the recruitment of proteins from the cytoplasm. The waves have no fixed shape, can reverse their direction of propagation and can fuse or divide. Actin waves separate two phases of the plasma membrane that are distinguished by their lipid composition. The area circumscribed by a wave resembles in its phosphoinositide content the interior of a phagocytic cup, leading us to explore the possibility that actin waves are in-plane phagocytic structures generated without the localized stimulus of an attached particle. Consistent with this view, wave-forming cells were found to exhibit a high propensity for taking up particles. Cells fed rod-shaped particles produced elongated phagocytic cups that displayed a zonal pattern that reflected in detail the actin and lipid pattern of free-running actin waves. Neutrophils and macrophages are known to spread on surfaces decorated with immune complexes, a process that has been interpreted as “frustrated” phagocytosis. We suggest that actin waves enable a phagocyte to scan a surface for particles that might be engulfed. PMID:19855162

  11. Actin Dynamics in Growth Cone Motility and Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Timothy M.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Motile growth cones lead growing axons through developing tissues to synaptic targets. These behaviors depend on the organization and dynamics of actin filaments that fill the growth cone leading margin (peripheral (P-) domain). Actin filament organization in growth cones is regulated by actin-binding proteins that control all aspects of filament assembly, turnover, interactions with other filaments and cytoplasmic components, and participation in producing mechanical forces. Actin filament polymerization drives protrusion of sensory filopodia and lamellipodia, and actin filament connections to the plasma membrane link the filament network to adhesive contacts of filopodia and lamellipodia with other surfaces. These contacts stabilize protrusions and transduce mechanical forces generated by actomyosin activity into traction that pulls an elongating axon along the path towards its target. Adhesive ligands and extrinsic guidance cues bind growth cone receptors and trigger signaling activities involving Rho GTPases, kinases, phosphatases, cyclic nucleotides and [Ca++] fluxes. These signals regulate actin binding proteins to locally modulate actin polymerization, interactions and force transduction to steer the growth cone leading margin towards the sources of attractive cues and away from repellent guidance cues. PMID:24164353

  12. Nuclear Actin Extends, with No Contraction in Sight

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru; Aebi, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    Within the past two years, actin has been implicated in eukaryotic gene transcription by all three classes of RNA polymerase. Moreover, within just the past year, actin has been identified as a constituent of filaments attached to the nuclear pore complexes and extending into the nucleus. This review summarizes these and other very recent advances in the nuclear actin field and emphasizes the key present issues. On the one hand, we are confronted with a body of evidence for a role of actin in gene transcription but with no known structural basis; on the other hand, there is now evidence for polymeric actin—not likely in the classical F-actin conformation—in the nuclear periphery with no known function. In addition, numerous proteins that interact with either G- or F-actin are increasingly being detected in the nucleus, suggesting that both monomeric and oligomeric or polymeric forms of actin are at play and raising the possibility that the equilibrium between them, perhaps differentially regulated at various intranuclear sites, may be a major determinant of nuclear function. PMID:16148048

  13. Steric Effects Induce Geometric Remodeling of Actin Bundles in Filopodia.

    PubMed

    Dobramysl, Ulrich; Papoian, Garegin A; Erban, Radek

    2016-05-10

    Filopodia are ubiquitous fingerlike protrusions, spawned by many eukaryotic cells, to probe and interact with their environments. Polymerization dynamics of actin filaments, comprising the structural core of filopodia, largely determine their instantaneous lengths and overall lifetimes. The polymerization reactions at the filopodial tip require transport of G-actin, which enter the filopodial tube from the filopodial base and diffuse toward the filament barbed ends near the tip. Actin filaments are mechanically coupled into a tight bundle by cross-linker proteins. Interestingly, many of these proteins are relatively short, restricting the free diffusion of cytosolic G-actin throughout the bundle and, in particular, its penetration into the bundle core. To investigate the effect of steric restrictions on G-actin diffusion by the porous structure of filopodial actin filament bundle, we used a particle-based stochastic simulation approach. We discovered that excluded volume interactions result in partial and then full collapse of central filaments in the bundle, leading to a hollowed-out structure. The latter may further collapse radially due to the activity of cross-linking proteins, hence producing conical-shaped filament bundles. Interestingly, electron microscopy experiments on mature filopodia indeed frequently reveal actin bundles that are narrow at the tip and wider at the base. Overall, our work demonstrates that excluded volume effects in the context of reaction-diffusion processes in porous networks may lead to unexpected geometric growth patterns and complicated, history-dependent dynamics of intermediate metastable configurations. PMID:27166814

  14. Cofilin-2 controls actin filament length in muscle sarcomeres

    PubMed Central

    Kremneva, Elena; Makkonen, Maarit H.; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Gateva, Gergana; Michelot, Alphee; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY ADF/cofilins drive cytoskeletal dynamics by promoting the disassembly of ‘aged’ ADP-actin filaments. Mammals express several ADF/cofilin isoforms, but their specific biochemical activities and cellular functions have not been studied in detail. Here we demonstrate that the muscle-specific isoform cofilin-2 promotes actin filament disassembly in sarcomeres to control the precise length of thin filaments in the contractile apparatus. In contrast to other isoforms, cofilin-2 efficiently binds and disassembles both ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin filaments. We mapped surface-exposed cofilin-2-specific residues required for ATP-actin binding and propose that these residues function as an ‘actin nucleotide-state sensor’ among ADF/cofilins. The results suggest that cofilin-2 evolved specific biochemical and cellular properties allowing it to control actin dynamics in sarcomeres, where filament pointed ends may contain a mixture of ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin subunits. Our findings also offer a rationale for why cofilin-2 mutations in humans lead to myopathies. PMID:25373779

  15. Concentration profiles of actin-binding molecules in lamellipodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Motile cells form lamellipodia in the direction of motion, which are flat membrane protrusions containing an actin filament network. The network flows rearward relative to the leading edge of the lamellipodium due to actin polymerization at the front. Thus, actin binding molecules are subject to transport towards the rear of the cell in the bound state and diffuse freely in the unbound state. We analyze this reaction-diffusion-advection process with respect to the concentration profiles of these species and provide an analytic approximation for them. Network flow may cause a depletion zone of actin binding molecules close to the leading edge. The existence of such zone depends on the free molecule concentration in the cell body, on the ratio of the diffusion length to the distance bound molecules travel rearward with the flow before dissociating, and the ratio of the diffusion length to the width of the region with network flow and actin binding. Our calculations suggest the existence of depletion zones for the F-actin cross-linkers filamin and α-actinin in fish keratocytes (and other cell types), which is in line with the small elastic moduli of the F-actin network close to the leading edge found in measurements of the force motile cells are able to exert.

  16. mDia1 and formins: screw cap of the actin filament

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Formin homology proteins (formins) are actin nucleation factors which remain bound to the growing barbed end and processively elongate actin filament (F-actin). Recently, we have demonstrated that a mammalian formin mDia1 rotates along the long-pitch helix of F-actin during processive elongation (helical rotation) by single-molecule fluorescence polarization. We have also shown processive depolymerization of mDia1-bound F-actin during which helical rotation was visualized. In the cell where F-actins are highly cross-linked, formins should rotate during filament elongation. Therefore, when formins are tightly anchored to cellular structures, formins may not elongate F-actin. Adversely, helical rotation of formins might affect the twist of F-actin. Formins could thus control actin elongation and regulate stability of cellular actin filaments through helical rotation. On the other hand, ADP-actin elongation at the mDia1-bound barbed end turned out to become decelerated by profilin, in marked contrast to its remarkably positive effect on mDia1-mediated ATP-actin elongation. This deceleration is caused by enhancement of the off-rate of ADP-actin. While mDia1 and profilin enhance the ADP-actin off-rate, they do not apparently increase the ADP-actin on-rate at the barbed end. These results imply that G-actin-bound ATP and its hydrolysis may be part of the acceleration mechanism of formin-mediated actin elongation.

  17. Gcn1 and Actin Binding to Yih1

    PubMed Central

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Barbosa, João A. R. G.; Moraes, Maria Carolina S.; Martins, Rafael M.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Castilho, Beatriz A.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast Yih1 protein and its mammalian ortholog IMPACT, abundant in neurons, are inhibitors of Gcn2, a kinase involved in amino acid homeostasis, stress response, and memory formation. Like Gcn2, Yih1/IMPACT harbors an N-terminal RWD domain that mediates binding to the Gcn2 activator Gcn1. Yih1 competes with Gcn2 for Gcn1 binding, thus inhibiting Gcn2. Yih1 also binds G-actin. Here, we show that Yih1-actin interaction is independent of Gcn1 and that Yih1-Gcn1 binding does not require actin. The Yih1 RWD (residues 1–132) was sufficient for Gcn2 inhibition and Gcn1 binding, but not for actin binding, showing that actin binding is dispensable for inhibiting Gcn2. Actin binding required Yih1 residues 68–258, encompassing part of the RWD and the C-terminal “ancient domain”; however, residues Asp-102 and Glu-106 in helix3 of the RWD were essential for Gcn1 binding and Gcn2 inhibition but dispensable for actin binding. Thus, the Gcn1- and actin-binding sites overlap in the RWD but have distinct binding determinants. Unexpectedly, Yih1 segment 68–258 was defective for inhibiting Gcn2 even though it binds Gcn1 at higher levels than does full-length Yih1. This and other results suggest that Yih1 binds with different requirements to distinct populations of Gcn1 molecules, and its ability to disrupt Gcn1-Gcn2 complexes is dependent on a complete RWD and hindered by actin binding. Modeling of the ancient domain on the bacterial protein YigZ showed peculiarities to the eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages, suggesting binding sites for conserved cellular components. Our results support a role for Yih1 in a cross-talk between the cytoskeleton and translation. PMID:21239490

  18. Role of actin in auxin transport and transduction of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Basu, S.; Brady, S.; Muday, G.

    Transport of the plant hormone auxin is polar and the direction of the hormone movement appears to be controlled by asymmetric distribution of auxin transport protein complexes. Changes in the direction of auxin transport are believed to drive asymmetric growth in response to changes in the gravity vector. To test the possibility that asymmetric distribution of the auxin transport protein complex is mediated by attachment to the actin cytoskeleton, a variety of experimental approaches have been used. The most direct demonstration of the role of the actin cytoskeleton in localization of the protein complex is the ability of one protein in this complex to bind to affinity columns containing actin filaments. Additionally, treatments of plant tissues with drugs that fragment the actin c toskeleton reducey polar transport. In order to explore this actin interaction and the affect of gravity on auxin transport and developmental polarity, embryos of the brown alga, Fucus have been examined. Fucus zygotes are initially symmetrical, but develop asymmetry in response to environmental gradients, with light gradients being the best- characterized signal. Gravity will polarize these embryos and gravity-induced polarity is randomized by clinorotation. Auxin transport also appears necessary for environmental controls of polarity, since auxin efflux inhibitors perturb both photo- and gravity-polarization at a very discrete temporal window within six hours after fertilization. The actin cytoskeleton has previously been shown to reorganize after fertilization of Fucus embryos leading to formation of an actin patch at the site of polar outgrowth. These actin patches still form in Fucus embryos treated with auxin efflux inhibitors, yet the position of these patches is randomized. Together, these results suggest that there are connections between the actin cytoskeleton, auxin transport, and gravity oriented growth and development. (Supported by NASA Grant: NAG2-1203)

  19. Pathogenic microbes manipulate cofilin activity to subvert actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Kitazato, Kaio; Wang, Yifei; He, Zhendan

    2016-09-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins are key players in controlling the temporal and spatial extent of actin dynamics, which is crucial for mediating host-pathogen interactions. Pathogenic microbes have evolved molecular mechanisms to manipulate cofilin activity to subvert the actin cytoskeletal system in host cells, promoting their internalization into the target cells, modifying the replication niche and facilitating their intracellular and intercellular dissemination. The study of how these pathogens exploit cofilin pathways is crucial for understanding infectious disease and providing potential targets for drug therapies. PMID:25853495

  20. A Nucleator Arms Race: Cellular Control of Actin Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Campellone, Kenneth G.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    For more than a decade the Arp2/3 complex, a handful of nucleation-promoting factors, and formins were the only molecules known to directly nucleate actin filament formation de novo. However, the past several years have brought a surge in the discovery of mammalian proteins with roles in actin nucleation and dynamics. Newly recognized nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASH, WHAMM, and JMY stimulate Arp2/3 complex activity at distinct cellular locations. Formin nucleators with additional biochemical and cellular activities have also been uncovered. Finally, the Spire, Cordon-bleu, and Leiomodin nucleators have revealed new ways of overcoming the kinetic barriers to actin polymerization. PMID:20237478

  1. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles. PMID:6529588

  2. Interactions Between DNA and Actin in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Hee; Sanders, Lori; Angelini, Thomas; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid which has a high concentration of DNA and F-actin, two anionic biological polyelectrolytes. In this work, we study the interactions between DNA and actin in an aqueous environment over a wide range of polyelectrolyte lengths and salt levels, using synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering(SAXS) and confocal microscopy. Perliminary results indicate the existence of a compressed phase of nematic F-actin in the presence of DNA. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  3. Staining Fission Yeast Filamentous Actin with Fluorescent Phalloidin Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe filamentous (F)-actin cytoskeleton drives cell growth, morphogenesis, endocytosis, and cytokinesis. The protocol described here reveals the distribution of F-actin in fixed cells through the use of fluorescently conjugated phalloidin. Simultaneous staining of cell wall landmarks (with calcofluor) and chromatin (with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, or DAPI) makes this rapid staining procedure highly effective for staging cell cycle progression, monitoring morphogenetic abnormalities, and assessing the impact of environmental and genetic changes on the integrity of the F-actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27250943

  4. Actin-binding protein G (AbpG) participates in modulating the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Chi; Wang, Liang-Chen; Pang, Te-Ling; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is involved in various physiological and pathogenic events, and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The simple eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum displays chemotactic locomotion in stages of its life cycle. By characterizing a Dictyostelium mutant defective in chemotactic responses, we identified a novel actin-binding protein serving to modulate cell migration and named it actin-binding protein G (AbpG); this 971–amino acid (aa) protein contains an N-terminal type 2 calponin homology (CH2) domain followed by two large coiled-coil regions. In chemoattractant gradients, abpG− cells display normal directional persistence but migrate significantly more slowly than wild-type cells; expressing Flag-AbpG in mutant cells eliminates the motility defect. AbpG is enriched in cortical/lamellipodial regions and colocalizes well with F-actin; aa 401–600 and aa 501–550 fragments of AbpG show the same distribution as full-length AbpG. The aa 501–550 region of AbpG, which is essential for AbpG to localize to lamellipodia and to rescue the phenotype of abpG− cells, is sufficient for binding to F-actin and represents a novel actin-binding protein domain. Compared with wild-type cells, abpG− cells have significantly higher F-actin levels. Collectively our results suggest that AbpG may participate in modulating actin dynamics to optimize cell locomotion. PMID:25609090

  5. Electrostatic Interactions Between the Bni1p Formin FH2 Domain and Actin Influence Actin Filament Nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joseph L.; Courtemanche, Naomi; Parton, Daniel L.; McCullagh, Martin; Pollard, Thomas D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Formins catalyze nucleation and growth of actin filaments. Here we study the structure and interactions of actin with the FH2 domain of budding yeast formin Bni1p. We built an all-atom model of the formin dimer on an Oda actin filament 7-mer and studied structural relaxation and inter-protein interactions by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations produced a refined model for the FH2 dimer associated with the barbed end of the filament and revealed electrostatic interactions between the formin knob and actin target-binding cleft. Mutations of two formin residues contributing to these interactions (R1423N, K1467L or both) reduced the interaction energies between the proteins, and in coarse-grained simulations the formin lost more inter-protein contacts with an actin dimer than with an actin 7-mer. Biochemical experiments confirmed a strong influence of these mutations on Bni1p-mediated actin filament nucleation, but not elongation, suggesting that different interactions contribute to these two functions of formins. PMID:25482541

  6. Actin-binding protein G (AbpG) participates in modulating the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Chi; Wang, Liang-Chen; Pang, Te-Ling; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2015-03-15

    Cell migration is involved in various physiological and pathogenic events, and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The simple eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum displays chemotactic locomotion in stages of its life cycle. By characterizing a Dictyostelium mutant defective in chemotactic responses, we identified a novel actin-binding protein serving to modulate cell migration and named it actin-binding protein G (AbpG); this 971-amino acid (aa) protein contains an N-terminal type 2 calponin homology (CH2) domain followed by two large coiled-coil regions. In chemoattractant gradients, abpG(-) cells display normal directional persistence but migrate significantly more slowly than wild-type cells; expressing Flag-AbpG in mutant cells eliminates the motility defect. AbpG is enriched in cortical/lamellipodial regions and colocalizes well with F-actin; aa 401-600 and aa 501-550 fragments of AbpG show the same distribution as full-length AbpG. The aa 501-550 region of AbpG, which is essential for AbpG to localize to lamellipodia and to rescue the phenotype of abpG(-) cells, is sufficient for binding to F-actin and represents a novel actin-binding protein domain. Compared with wild-type cells, abpG(-) cells have significantly higher F-actin levels. Collectively our results suggest that AbpG may participate in modulating actin dynamics to optimize cell locomotion. PMID:25609090

  7. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  8. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  9. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  10. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  11. Hypervascular liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Maturen, Katherine E; Tye, Grace A; Liu, Yueyi I; Parti, Naveen N; Desser, Terry S

    2009-10-01

    Hypervascular hepatocellular lesions include both benign and malignant etiologies. In the benign category, focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma are typically hypervascular. In addition, some regenerative nodules in cirrhosis may be hypervascular. Malignant hypervascular primary hepatocellular lesions include hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar carcinoma, and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Vascular liver lesions often appear hypervascular because they tend to follow the enhancement of the blood pool; these include hemangiomas, arteriovenous malformations, angiosarcomas, and peliosis. While most gastrointestinal malignancies that metastasize to the liver will appear hypovascular on arterial and portal-venous phase imaging, certain cancers such as metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors) tend to produce hypervascular metastases due to the greater recruitment of arterial blood supply. Finally, rare hepatic lesions such as glomus tumor and inflammatory pseudotumor may have a hypervascular appearance. PMID:19842564

  12. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  13. The Structure and Function of Bacterial Actin Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Gitai, Zemer

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, the appreciation and understanding of how bacterial cells can be organized in both space and time have been revolutionized by the identification and characterization of multiple bacterial homologs of the eukaryotic actin cytoskeleton. Some of these bacterial actins, such as the plasmid-borne ParM protein, have highly specialized functions, whereas other bacterial actins, such as the chromosomally encoded MreB protein, have been implicated in a wide array of cellular activities. In this review we cover our current understanding of the structure, assembly, function, and regulation of bacterial actins. We focus on ParM as a well-understood reductionist model and on MreB as a central organizer of multiple aspects of bacterial cell biology. We also discuss the outstanding puzzles in the field and possible directions where this fast-developing area may progress in the future. PMID:20630996

  14. Cortactin Branches Out: Roles in Regulating Protrusive Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, Amanda Gatesman; Weed, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 1990’s, cortactin has emerged as a key signaling protein in many cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, endocytosis, and tumor invasion. While the list of cellular functions influenced by cortactin grows, the ability of cortactin to interact with and alter the cortical actin network is central to its role in regulating these processes. Recently, several advances have been made in our understanding of the interaction between actin and cortactin, providing insight into how these two proteins work together to provide a framework for normal and altered cellular function. This review examines how regulation of cortactin through post-translational modifications and interactions with multiple binding partners elicits changes in cortical actin cytoskeletal organization, impacting the regulation and formation of actin-rich motility structures. PMID:18615630

  15. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berghoefer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H.; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-09-25

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  16. Curved trajectories of actin-based motility in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2012-05-01

    Recent experiments have reported fascinating geometrical trajectories for actin-based motility of bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and functionalized beads. To understand the physical mechanism for these trajectories, we constructed a phenomenological model to study the motion of an actin-propelled disk in two dimensions. In our model, the force and actin density on the surface of the disk are influenced by the translation and rotation of the disk, which in turn is induced by the asymmetric distributions of those densities. We show that this feedback can destabilize a straight trajectory, leading to circular, S-shape and other geometrical trajectories observed in the experiments through bifurcations in the distributions of the force and actin density. The relation between our model and the models for self-propelled deformable particles is emphasized and discussed.

  17. Direct interaction of beta-dystroglycan with F-actin.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Ju; Spence, Heather J; Cameron, Jacqueline M; Jess, Thomas; Ilsley, Jane L; Winder, Steven J

    2003-01-01

    Dystroglycans are essential transmembrane adhesion receptors for laminin. Alpha-dystroglycan is a highly glycosylated extracellular protein that interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix and the transmembrane region of beta-dystroglycan. Beta-dystroglycan, via its cytoplasmic tail, interacts with dystrophin and utrophin and also with the actin cytoskeleton. As a part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex of muscles, dystroglycan is also important in maintaining sarcolemmal integrity. Mutations in dystrophin that lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy also lead to a loss of dystroglycan from the sarcolemma, and chimaeric mice lacking muscle dystroglycan exhibit a severe muscular dystrophy phenotype. Using yeast two-hybrid analysis and biochemical and cell biological studies, we show, in the present study, that the cytoplasmic tail of beta-dystroglycan interacts directly with F-actin and, furthermore, that it bundles actin filaments and induces an aberrant actin phenotype when overexpressed in cells. PMID:12892561

  18. Mechanism of Actin Network Attachment to Moving Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Co, Carl; Wong, Derek T.; Gierke, Sarah; Chang, Vicky; Taunton, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Summary Actin filament networks exert protrusive and attachment forces on membranes and thereby drive membrane deformation and movement. Here, we show that N-WASP WH2 domains play a previously unanticipated role in vesicle movement by transiently attaching actin filament barbed ends to the membrane. To dissect the attachment mechanism, we reconstituted the propulsive motility of lipid-coated glass beads using purified soluble proteins. N-WASP WH2 mutants assembled actin comet tails and initiated movement, but the comet tails catastrophically detached from the membrane. When presented on the surface of a lipid-coated bead, WH2 domains were sufficient to maintain comet tail attachment. In v-Src-transformed fibroblasts, N-WASP WH2 mutants were severely defective in the formation of circular podosome arrays. In addition to creating an attachment force, interactions between WH2 domains and barbed ends may locally amplify signals for dendritic actin nucleation. PMID:17350575

  19. Differential requirements for actin during yeast and mammalian endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Soheil; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2009-08-01

    Key features of clathrin-mediated endocytosis have been conserved across evolution. However, endocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is completely dependent on a functional actin cytoskeleton, whereas actin appears to be less critical in mammalian cell endocytosis. We reveal that the fundamental requirement for actin in the early stages of yeast endocytosis is to provide a strong framework to support the force generation needed to direct the invaginating plasma membrane into the cell against turgor pressure. By providing osmotic support, pressure differences across the plasma membrane were removed and this reduced the requirement for actin-bundling proteins in normal endocytosis. Conversely, increased turgor pressure in specific yeast mutants correlated with a decreased rate of endocytic patch invagination. PMID:19597484

  20. Stable high capacity, F-actin affinity column

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, E.J.; Wang, Y.L.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Branton, D.; Taylor, D.L.

    1982-11-10

    A high capacity F-actin affinity matrix is constructed by binding fluorescyl-actin to rabbit anti-fluorescein IgG that is covalently bound to Sepharose 4B. When stabilized with phalloidin, the actin remains associated with the Sepharose beads during repeated washes, activates the ATPase activity of myosin subfragment 1, and specifically binds /sup 125/I-heavy meromyosin and /sup 125/I-tropomyosin. The associations between the F-actin-binding proteins are monitored both by affinity chromatography and by a rapid, low speed sedimentation assay. Anti-fluorescein IgG-Sepharose should be generally useful as a matrix for the immobilization of proteins containing accessible, covalently bound fluorescein groups.

  1. Interactions between plant endomembrane systems and the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane trafficking, organelle movement, and morphogenesis in plant cells are mainly controlled by the actin cytoskeleton. Not all proteins that regulate the cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics in animal systems have functional homologs in plants, especially for those proteins that form the bridge between the cytoskeleton and membrane; the membrane-actin adaptors. Their nature and function is only just beginning to be elucidated and this field has been greatly enhanced by the recent identification of the NETWORKED (NET) proteins, which act as membrane-actin adaptors. In this review, we will summarize the role of the actin cytoskeleton and its regulatory proteins in their interaction with endomembrane compartments and where they potentially act as platforms for cell signaling and the coordination of other subcellular events. PMID:26106403

  2. Actin nucleation by WH2 domains at the autophagosome.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Amanda S; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process whereby cytosolic components and organelles are degraded to recycle key cellular materials. It is a constitutive process required for proper tissue homoeostasis but can be rapidly regulated by a variety of stimuli (for example, nutrient starvation and chemotherapeutic agents). JMY is a DNA damage-responsive p53 cofactor and actin nucleator important for cell survival and motility. Here we show that JMY regulates autophagy through its actin nucleation activity. JMY contains an LC3-interacting region, which is necessary to target JMY to the autophagosome where it enhances the autophagy maturation process. In autophagosomes, the integrity of the WH2 domains allows JMY to promote actin nucleation, which is required for efficient autophagosome formation. Thus our results establish a direct role for actin nucleation mediated by WH2 domain proteins that reside at the autophagosome. PMID:26223951

  3. Actin nucleation by WH2 domains at the autophagosome

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, Amanda S.; La Thangue, Nicholas B.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process whereby cytosolic components and organelles are degraded to recycle key cellular materials. It is a constitutive process required for proper tissue homoeostasis but can be rapidly regulated by a variety of stimuli (for example, nutrient starvation and chemotherapeutic agents). JMY is a DNA damage-responsive p53 cofactor and actin nucleator important for cell survival and motility. Here we show that JMY regulates autophagy through its actin nucleation activity. JMY contains an LC3-interacting region, which is necessary to target JMY to the autophagosome where it enhances the autophagy maturation process. In autophagosomes, the integrity of the WH2 domains allows JMY to promote actin nucleation, which is required for efficient autophagosome formation. Thus our results establish a direct role for actin nucleation mediated by WH2 domain proteins that reside at the autophagosome. PMID:26223951

  4. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length. PMID:26040560

  5. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length.

  6. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  7. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  8. The role of actin networks in cellular mechanosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azatov, Mikheil

    Physical processes play an important role in many biological phenomena, such as wound healing, organ development, and tumor metastasis. During these processes, cells constantly interact with and adapt to their environment by exerting forces to mechanically probe the features of their surroundings and generating appropriate biochemical responses. The mechanisms underlying how cells sense the physical properties of their environment are not well understood. In this thesis, I present my studies to investigate cellular responses to the stiffness and topography of the environment. In order to sense the physical properties of their environment, cells dynamically reorganize the structure of their actin cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of biopolymers, altering the shape and spatial distribution of protein assemblies. Several observations suggest that proteins that crosslink actin filaments may play an important role in cellular mechanosensitivity. Palladin is an actin-crosslinking protein that is found in the lamellar actin network, stress fibers and focal adhesions, cellular structures that are critical for mechanosensing of the physical environment. By virtue of its close interactions with these structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of actin crosslinkers in general, and palladin in particular, in cellular force generation and mechanosensing is not well known. I have investigated the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. I have shown that the expression levels of palladin modulate the forces exerted by cells and their ability to sense substrate stiffness. Perturbation experiments also suggest that palladin levels in cells altered myosin motor activity. These results suggest that the actin crosslinkers, such as palladin, and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant

  9. Petrous Apex Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in treating 69 patients over the past 6 years with pathologic processes involving the petrous apex. These included 25 (36%) primary petrous apex lesions, 40 (58%) lesions that involved the petrous apex by direct invasion from an adjacent region, and four (6%) lesions that were the result of metastatic spread from a distant site. Although lesions of the petrous apex are uncommon, they may present significant morbidity to the patient. The symptoms elicited by these lesions are usually vague and nonlocalizing in the early stages but may progress to include multiple cranial neuropathies. Successful results are contingent on early diagnosis, which requires a high index of suspicion and use of appropriate imaging modalities. Thorough preoperative assessment with use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and carotid arteriography is essential to plan the surgical approach. We present this collection of patients in order to aid in the further preoperative characterization of the differences in primary and secondary lesions of the petrous apex. PMID:17170919

  10. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  11. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gomibuchi, Yuki; Uyeda, Taro Q.P.; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  12. Length regulation of mechanosensitive stereocilia depends on very slow actin dynamics and filament-severing proteins.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Praveena; Chatterton, Paul; Ikeda, Akihiro; Ikeda, Sakae; Corey, David P; Ervasti, James M; Perrin, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    Auditory sensory hair cells depend on stereocilia with precisely regulated lengths to detect sound. Since stereocilia are primarily composed of crosslinked, parallel actin filaments, regulated actin dynamics are essential for controlling stereocilia length. Here we assessed stereocilia actin turnover by monitoring incorporation of inducibly expressed β-actin-GFP in adult mouse hair cells in vivo and by directly measuring β-actin-GFP turnover in explants. Stereocilia actin incorporation is remarkably slow and restricted to filament barbed ends in a small tip compartment, with minimal accumulation in the rest of the actin core. Shorter rows of stereocilia, which have mechanically gated ion channels, show more variable actin turnover than the tallest stereocilia, which lack channels. Finally, the proteins ADF and AIP1, which both mediate actin filament severing, contribute to stereocilia length maintenance. Altogether, the data support a model whereby stereocilia actin cores are largely static, with dynamic regulation at the tips to maintain a critical length. PMID:25897778

  13. Activity of a gelsolin-like actin modulator in rat skeletal muscle under protein catabolic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Haese, J; Rutschmann, M; Dahlmann, B; Hinssen, H

    1987-01-01

    A gelsolin-like actin-modulating protein was isolated from rat skeletal muscle and characterized with respect to its interaction with actin. The protein, with a molecular mass of approx. 85 kDa, forms a stoichiometric complex with two actin molecules and is activated by micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. It effectively severs actin filaments and promotes nucleation of actin polymerization. The activity of this protein is detectable already in crude extracts by its capability to reduce the steady state viscosity of actin. Actin-modulating activities were determined in muscle extracts of rats kept under protein catabolic conditions, i.e. as generated by corticosterone treatment and starvation. In both cases we found a marked increase of modulator activity. The possibility is discussed that the increased activity of actin modulator indicates a fragmentation of actin filaments prior to the proteolytic degradation of actin. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3435453

  14. Course 6: Physics of Composite Cell Membrane and Actin Based Cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, E.; Bausch, A. R.; Vonna, L.

    1 Architecture of composite cell membranes 1.1 The lipid/protein bilayer is a multicomponent smectic phase with mosaic like architecture 1.2 The spectrin/actin cytoskeleton as hyperelastic cell stabilizer 1.3 The actin cortex: Architecture and function 2 Physics of the actin based cytoskeleton 2.1 Actin is a living semiflexible polymer 2.2 Actin network as viscoelastic body 2.3 Correlation between macroscopic viscoelasticity and molecular 3 Heterogeneous actin gels in cells and biological function 3.1 Manipulation of actin gels 3.2 Control of organization and function of actin cortex by cell signalling 4 Micromechanics and microrheometry of cells 5 Activation of endothelial cells: On the possibility of formation of stress fibers as phase transition of actin-network triggered by cell signalling pathways 6 On cells as adaptive viscoplastic bodies 7 Controll of cellular protrusions controlled by actin/myosin cortex

  15. A Case of Linear Porokeratosis Superimposed on Disseminated Superficial Actinic Porokeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Löhrer, Rebecca; Neumann-Acikel, Aysegül; Eming, Rüdiger; Hartmann, Karin; Rasokat, Heinrich; Krieg, Thomas; Happle, Rudolf; Eming, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    We present a female patient with linear porokeratosis of her right arm since childhood. At the age of 67 years she additionally developed disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) involving both lower legs. This uncommon coexistence of two different types of porokeratosis fulfils the clinical criteria of a type 2 segmental manifestation of an autosomal dominant skin disorder, being superimposed on the ordinary nonsegmental lesions and reflecting loss of heterozygosity that occurred at an early developmental stage. In DSAP molecular evidence of this concept is so far lacking, but such proof has already been provided in several other autosomal dominant skin disorders. Molecular analysis of cases of type 2 segmental involvement may help elucidate the genetic defect causing DSAP. PMID:21399730

  16. Actin kinetics shapes cortical network structure and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Marco; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Moeendarbary, Emad; Charras, Guillaume; Kruse, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The actin cortex of animal cells is the main determinant of cellular mechanics. The continuous turnover of cortical actin filaments enables cells to quickly respond to stimuli. Recent work has shown that most of the cortical actin is generated by only two actin nucleators, the Arp2/3 complex and the formin Diaph1. However, our understanding of their interplay, their kinetics, and the length distribution of the filaments that they nucleate within living cells is poor. Such knowledge is necessary for a thorough comprehension of cellular processes and cell mechanics from basic polymer physics principles. We determined cortical assembly rates in living cells by using single-molecule fluorescence imaging in combination with stochastic simulations. We find that formin-nucleated filaments are, on average, 10 times longer than Arp2/3-nucleated filaments. Although formin-generated filaments represent less than 10% of all actin filaments, mechanical measurements indicate that they are important determinants of cortical elasticity. Tuning the activity of actin nucleators to alter filament length distribution may thus be a mechanism allowing cells to adjust their macroscopic mechanical properties to their physiological needs. PMID:27152338

  17. In Vivo Imaging and Characterization of Actin Microridges

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Pui-ying; Mangos, Steve; Green, Julie M.; Reiser, Jochen; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Actin microridges form labyrinth like patterns on superficial epithelial cells across animal species. This highly organized assembly has been implicated in mucus retention and in the mechanical structure of mucosal surfaces, however the mechanisms that regulate actin microridges remain largely unknown. Here we characterize the composition and dynamics of actin microridges on the surface of zebrafish larvae using live imaging. Microridges contain phospho-tyrosine, cortactin and VASP, but not focal adhesion kinase. Time-lapse imaging reveals dynamic changes in the length and branching of microridges in intact animals. Transient perturbation of the microridge pattern occurs before cell division with rapid re-assembly during and after cytokinesis. Microridge assembly is maintained with constitutive activation of Rho or inhibition of myosin II activity. However, expression of dominant negative RhoA or Rac alters microridge organization, with an increase in distance between microridges. Latrunculin A treatment and photoconversion experiments suggest that the F-actin filaments are actively treadmilling in microridges. Accordingly, inhibition of Arp2/3 or PI3K signaling impairs microridge structure and length. Taken together, actin microridges in zebrafish represent a tractable in vivo model to probe pattern formation and dissect Arp2/3-mediated actin dynamics in vivo. PMID:25629723

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Composite Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret; Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul; Weitz, D. A.

    2003-03-01

    There exits a family of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) and each protein has a distinct function for bundling, networking, gelating, capping, or simply binding to actin. Whether actin serves as a structural or motile component, its mechanical properties are determined by its degree and kinds of association with different ABPs and these properties are often closely related to its functional needs. For instance, in a cell actin is highly crosslinked with multiple ABPs (fimbrin, alpha-actinin, etc.) to generate thrust and strength for locomotion. In the acrosomal reaction of horseshoe crab sperm, actin exists as a bundle of preassembled filaments crosslinked with scruin to form a rigid structure to penetrate into an egg without yielding. We study the effects three different ABPs (scruin,fimbrin and alpha-actinin) have on the rheology and microstructure of actin networks using multiparticle tracking, imaging, and bulk rheology. From these experiments we can deduce how an evolving microstructure affects the bulk rheological properties and the role different concentrations and kinds of ABPs have in these changes.

  19. Probing polymerization forces by using actin-propelled lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita; Chabot, Jeffrey R.; Andreeva, Albina; Samadani, Azadeh; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2003-04-01

    Actin polymerization provides a powerful propulsion force for numerous types of cell motility. Although tremendous progress has been made in identifying the biochemical components necessary for actin-based motility, the precise biophysical mechanisms of force generation remain unclear. To probe the polymerization forces quantitatively, we introduce an experimental system in which lipid vesicles coated with the Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor ActA are propelled by actin polymerization. The polymerization forces cause significant deformations of the vesicle. We have used these deformations to obtain a spatially resolved measure of the forces exerted on the membrane using a model based on the competition between osmotic pressure and membrane stretching. Our results indicate that actin exerts retractile or propulsive forces depending on the local membrane curvature and that the membrane is strongly bound to the actin gel. These results are consistent with the observed dynamics. After a slow elongation of the vesicle from a spherical shape, the strong bonds between the actin gel and the membrane rupture if the retractile forces exceed a critical value, leading to a rapid release of the vesicle's trailing edge.

  20. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Memory Formation in Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Lamprecht, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    The central, lateral and basolateral amygdala (BLA) nuclei are essential for the formation of long-term memories including emotional and drug-related memories. Studying cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory in amygdala may lead to better understanding of how memory is formed and of fear and addiction-related disorders. A challenge is to identify molecules activated by learning that subserve cellular changes needed for memory formation and maintenance in amygdala. Recent studies show that activation of synaptic receptors during fear and drug-related learning leads to alteration in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and structure in amygdala. Such changes in actin cytoskeleton in amygdala are essential for fear and drug-related memories formation. Moreover, the actin cytoskeleton subserves, after learning, changes in neuronal morphogenesis and glutamate receptors trafficking in amygdala. These cellular events are involved in fear and drug-related memories formation. Actin polymerization is also needed for the maintenance of drug-associated memories in amygdala. Thus, the actin cytoskeleton is a key mediator between receptor activation during learning and cellular changes subserving long-term memory (LTM) in amygdala. The actin cytoskeleton may serve as a target for pharmacological treatment of fear memory associated with fear and anxiety disorders and drug addiction to prevent the debilitating consequences of these diseases. PMID:27065800

  1. Single Filaments to Reveal the Multiple Flavors of Actin.

    PubMed

    Jégou, Antoine; Romet-Lemonne, Guillaume

    2016-05-24

    A number of key cell processes rely on specific assemblies of actin filaments, which are all constructed from nearly identical building blocks: the abundant and extremely conserved actin protein. A central question in the field is to understand how different filament networks can coexist and be regulated. Discoveries in science are often related to technical advances. Here, we focus on the ongoing single filament revolution and discuss how these techniques have greatly contributed to our understanding of actin assembly. In particular, we highlight how they have refined our understanding of the many protein-based regulatory mechanisms that modulate actin assembly. It is now becoming apparent that other factors give filaments a specific identity that determines which proteins will bind to them. We argue that single filament techniques will play an essential role in the coming years as we try to understand the many ways actin filaments can take different flavors and unveil how these flavors modulate the action of regulatory proteins. We discuss different factors known to make actin filaments distinguishable by regulatory proteins and speculate on their possible consequences. PMID:27224479

  2. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  3. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  4. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Memory Formation in Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    The central, lateral and basolateral amygdala (BLA) nuclei are essential for the formation of long-term memories including emotional and drug-related memories. Studying cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory in amygdala may lead to better understanding of how memory is formed and of fear and addiction-related disorders. A challenge is to identify molecules activated by learning that subserve cellular changes needed for memory formation and maintenance in amygdala. Recent studies show that activation of synaptic receptors during fear and drug-related learning leads to alteration in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and structure in amygdala. Such changes in actin cytoskeleton in amygdala are essential for fear and drug-related memories formation. Moreover, the actin cytoskeleton subserves, after learning, changes in neuronal morphogenesis and glutamate receptors trafficking in amygdala. These cellular events are involved in fear and drug-related memories formation. Actin polymerization is also needed for the maintenance of drug-associated memories in amygdala. Thus, the actin cytoskeleton is a key mediator between receptor activation during learning and cellular changes subserving long-term memory (LTM) in amygdala. The actin cytoskeleton may serve as a target for pharmacological treatment of fear memory associated with fear and anxiety disorders and drug addiction to prevent the debilitating consequences of these diseases. PMID:27065800

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9, myofibroblasts and Ki-67 in actinic cheilitis and lip squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Bianca C; Scotti, Fernanda M; Vieira, Daniella S C; Biz, Michelle T; Castro, Renata G; Modolo, Filipe

    2015-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), myofibroblasts (MFs) and epithelial proliferation have key roles in neoplastic progression. In this study immunoexpression of MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9, presence of MFs and the epithelial proliferation index were investigated in actinic cheilitis (AC), lip squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and mucocele (MUC). Thirty cases of AC, thirty cases of LSCC and twenty cases of MUC were selected for immunohistochemical investigation of the proteins MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Ki-67. The MMP-1 expression in the epithelial component was higher in the AC than the MUC and LSCC. In the connective tissue, the expression was higher in the LSCC. MMP-2 showed lower epithelial and stromal immunostaining in the LSCC when compared to the AC and MUC. The epithelial staining for MMP-9 was higher in the AC when compared to the LSCC. However, in the connective tissue, the expression was lower in the AC compared to other lesions. The cell proliferation rate was increased in proportion to the severity of dysplasia in the AC, while in the LSCC it was higher in well-differentiated lesions compared to moderately differentiated. There were no statistically significant differences in number of MFs present in the lesions studied. The results suggest that MMPs could affect the biological behaviour of ACs and LSCCs inasmuch as they could participate in the development and progression from premalignant lesions to malignant lesions. PMID:26515234

  6. Competition for actin between two distinct F-actin networks defines a bistable switch for cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Alexis J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J; Bui, Duyen A; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype after relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. Under low-contractility regimes, epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner owing to the emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally 'locks' actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high-contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  7. Cloning and characterization of an actin gene of Chlamys farreri and the phylogenetic analysis of mollusk actins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongming; Mai, Kangsen; Liufu, Zhiguo; Xu, Wei

    2007-07-01

    An actingene (CfACTI) was cloned by using RT-PCR, 3’ and 5’RACE from hemocytes of the sea scallop Chlamys farreri. The full length of the transcript is 1 535 bp, which contains a long 3’ un-translated region of 436bp and 59bp of a 5’ un-translated sequence. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 376 amino acids. Sequence comparisons indicated that CfACTI is more closely related to vertebrate cytoplasmic actins than muscle types. Phylogenetic analysis showed that molluscan actins could be generally divided into two categories: muscle and cytoplasmic, although both are similar to vertebrate cytoplasmic actins. It was also inferred that different isotypes existed in muscle or cytoplasma in mollusks. The genomic sequence of CfACTI was cloned and sequenced. Only one intron was detected: it was located between codons 42 and 43 and different from vertebrate actin genes.

  8. To be or not to be assembled: progressing into nuclear actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Robert; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2013-11-01

    The paradigm states that cytoplasmic actin operates as filaments and nuclear actin is mainly monomeric, acting as a scaffold in transcription complexes. However, why should a powerful function of actin, namely polymerization, not be used in the nucleus? Recent progress in the field forces us to rethink this issue, as many actin filament assembly proteins have been linked to nuclear functions and new experimental approaches have provided the first direct visualizations of polymerized nuclear actin. PMID:24088744

  9. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes®: potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Trapasso, Elena; Cilurzo, Felisa; Fresta, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Topical application of anticancer drugs for the treatment of malignancies represents a new challenge in dermatology, potentially being an alternative therapeutic approach for the efficacious treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, that is, actinic keratoses, and malignant lesions of the skin caused by ultraviolet radiation. Anti-proliferative and antimitotic drugs, including many of the taxanes, are currently under investigation for the treatment of cutaneous malignant transformation of actinic keratoses, particularly the squamous cell carcinoma. Paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® are proposed as topical drug delivery systems for the treatment of this pathology due to their suitable physicochemical characteristics and enhanced skin penetration ability for deep dermal delivery. Our in vitro data show that the skin application of paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® improved the permeation of paclitaxel in a stratum corneum-epidermis membrane model and increased its anti-proliferative activity in a squamous cell carcinoma model as compared to the free drug. The results obtained encouraged the use of the paclitaxel-loaded ethosomes® as the formulation for the potential treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, a malignant transformation of actinic keratoses. PMID:22414731

  10. F-actin dismantling through a redox-driven synergy between Mical and cofilin.

    PubMed

    Grintsevich, Elena E; Yesilyurt, Hunkar Gizem; Rich, Shannon K; Hung, Ruei-Jiun; Terman, Jonathan R; Reisler, Emil

    2016-08-01

    Numerous cellular functions depend on actin filament (F-actin) disassembly. The best-characterized disassembly proteins, the ADF (actin-depolymerizing factor)/cofilins (encoded by the twinstar gene in Drosophila), sever filaments and recycle monomers to promote actin assembly. Cofilin is also a relatively weak actin disassembler, posing questions about mechanisms of cellular F-actin destabilization. Here we uncover a key link to targeted F-actin disassembly by finding that F-actin is efficiently dismantled through a post-translational-mediated synergism between cofilin and the actin-oxidizing enzyme Mical. We find that Mical-mediated oxidation of actin improves cofilin binding to filaments, where their combined effect dramatically accelerates F-actin disassembly compared with either effector alone. This synergism is also necessary and sufficient for F-actin disassembly in vivo, magnifying the effects of both Mical and cofilin on cellular remodelling, axon guidance and Semaphorin-Plexin repulsion. Mical and cofilin, therefore, form a redox-dependent synergistic pair that promotes F-actin instability by rapidly dismantling F-actin and generating post-translationally modified actin that has altered assembly properties. PMID:27454820

  11. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. PMID:23190411

  12. Dynamic Localization of G-actin During Membrane Protrusion in Neuronal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Wai; Vitriol, Eric A.; Shim, Sangwoo; Wise, Ariel L.; Velayutham, Radhi P.; Zheng, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Actin-based cell motility is fundamental for the development, function, and malignant events of eukaryotic organisms. During neural development, axonal growth cones depend on rapid assembly and disassembly of actin filaments (F-actin) for their guided extension to specific targets for wiring. Monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is the building block for F-actin but is not considered to play a direct role in spatiotemporal control of actin dynamics in cell motility. Results Here we report that a pool of G-actin dynamically localizes to the leading edge of growth cones and neuroblastoma cells to spatially elevate the G-/F-actin ratio that drives membrane protrusion and cell movement. Loss of G-actin localization leads to the cessation and retraction of membrane protrusions. Moreover, G-actin localization occurs asymmetrically in growth cones during attractive turning. Finally, we identify the actin monomer binding proteins profilin and thymosin β4 as key molecules that localize actin monomers to the leading edge of lamellipodia for their motility. Conclusions Our results suggest that dynamic localization of G-actin provides a novel mechanism to regulate the spatiotemporal actin dynamics underlying membrane protrusion in cell locomotion and growth cone chemotaxis. PMID:23746641

  13. Multilayer defects nucleated by substrate pits: a comparison of actinic inspection and non-actinic inspection techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Goldberg, K; Kearney, P; Rekawa, S; LaFontaine, B; Wood, O; Taylor, J S; Han, H

    2006-10-02

    The production of defect-free mask blanks remains a key challenge for EUV lithography. Mask-blank inspection tools must be able to accurately detect all critical defects while simultaneously having the minimum possible false-positive detection rate. We have recently observed and here report the identification of bump-type buried substrate defects, that were below the detection limit of a non-actinic (i.e. non-EUV) in inspection tool. Presently, the occurrence inspection of pit-type defects, their printability, and their detectability with actinic techniques and non-actinic commercial tools, has become a significant concern. We believe that the most successful strategy for the development of effective non-actinic mask inspection tools will involve the careful cross-correlation with actinic inspection and lithographic printing. In this way, the true efficacy of prototype inspection tools now under development can be studied quantitatively against relevant benchmarks. To this end we have developed a dual-mode actinic mask inspection system capable of scanning mask blanks for defects (with simultaneous EUV bright-field and dark-field detection) and imaging those same defects with a zoneplate microscope that matches or exceeds the resolution of EUV steppers.

  14. Ha-VP39 binding to actin and the influence of F-actin on assembly of progeny virions.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Ge, G; Qi, Y

    2004-11-01

    We present evidence that actin is necessary for the successful assembly of HaNPV virions. Purified nucleocapsid protein Ha-VP39 of Heliothis armigera nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HaNPV) was found to be able to bind to actin in vitro without assistance, as demonstrated by Western blot and isothermal titration calorimeter. DeltaH and binding constants (K) detected by isothermal titration calorimeter strongly suggested that Ha-VP39 first binds actin to seed the formation of hexamer complex of actin, and the hexamers then link to each other to form filaments, and the filaments finally twist into cable structures. The proliferation of HaNPV was completely inhibited in Hz-AM1 cells cultivated in the medium containing 0.5 microg/ml cytochalasin D (CD) to prevent polymerization of actin, while its yield was reduced to 10(-4) in the presence of 0.1 microg/ml CD. Actin concentration and the viral DNA synthesis were not significantly affected by CD even though the progeny virions assembled in the CD treated cells were morphologically different from normal ones and resulted in fewer plaques in plaque assay. PMID:15503206

  15. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  16. Modulation of the interaction between G-actin and thymosin beta 4 by the ATP/ADP ratio: possible implication in the regulation of actin dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, M F; Jean, C; Rieger, K J; Lenfant, M; Pantaloni, D

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of G-actin with thymosin beta 4 (T beta 4), the major G-actin-sequestering protein in motile and proliferating cells, has been analyzed in vitro. T beta 4 is found to have a 50-fold higher affinity for MgATP-actin than for MgADP-actin. These results imply that in resting platelets and neutrophils, actin is sequestered by T beta 4 as MgATP-G-actin. Kinetic experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that this ATP/ADP dependence of T beta 4 affinity for G-actin can generate a mechanism of desequestration of G-actin by ADP, in the presence of physiological concentrations of T beta 4 (approximately 0.1 mM). The desequestration of G-actin by ADP is kinetically enhanced by profilin, which accelerates the dissociation of ATP from G-actin. Whether a local drop in the ATP/ADP ratio can allow local, transient desequestration and polymerization of actin either close to the plasma membrane, following platelet or neutrophil stimulation, or behind the Listeria bacterium in the host cell, while the surrounding cytoplasm contains sequestered ATP-G-actin, is an open issue raised by the present work. PMID:8506348

  17. Modulation of actin structure and function by phosphorylation of Tyr-53 and profilin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Kyuwon; Liu, Xiong; Ferron, Francois; Shu, Shi; Korn, Edward D.; Dominguez, Roberto

    2008-08-27

    On starvation, Dictyostelium cells aggregate to form multicellular fruiting bodies containing spores that germinate when transferred to nutrient-rich medium. This developmental cycle correlates with the extent of actin phosphorylation at Tyr-53 (pY53-actin), which is low in vegetative cells but high in viable mature spores. Here we describe high-resolution crystal structures of pY53-actin and unphosphorylated actin in complexes with gelsolin segment 1 and profilin. In the structure of pY53-actin, the phosphate group on Tyr-53 makes hydrogen-bonding interactions with residues of the DNase I-binding loop (D-loop) of actin, resulting in a more stable conformation of the D-loop than in the unphosphorylated structures. A more rigidly folded D-loop may explain some of the previously described properties of pY53-actin, including its increased critical concentration for polymerization, reduced rates of nucleation and pointed end elongation, and weak affinity for DNase I. We show here that phosphorylation of Tyr-53 inhibits subtilisin cleavage of the D-loop and reduces the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. The structure of profilin-Dictyostelium-actin is strikingly similar to previously determined structures of profilin-{beta}-actin and profilin-{alpha}-actin. By comparing this representative set of profilin-actin structures with other structures of actin, we highlight the effects of profilin on the actin conformation. In the profilin-actin complexes, subdomains 1 and 3 of actin close around profilin, producing a 4.7 deg. rotation of the two major domains of actin relative to each other. As a result, the nucleotide cleft becomes moderately more open in the profilin-actin complex, probably explaining the stimulation of nucleotide exchange on actin by profilin.

  18. Mutant Profilin Suppresses Mutant Actin-dependent Mitochondrial Phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Stokasimov, Ema; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-profilin interface, Ala167 of the actin barbed end W-loop and His372 near the C terminus form a clamp around a profilin segment containing residue Arg81 and Tyr79. Modeling suggests that altering steric packing in this interface regulates actin activity. An actin A167E mutation could increase interface crowding and alter actin regulation, and A167E does cause growth defects and mitochondrial dysfunction. We assessed whether a profilin Y79S mutation with its decreased mass could compensate for actin A167E crowding and rescue the mutant phenotype. Y79S profilin alone caused no growth defect in WT actin cells under standard conditions in rich medium and rescued the mitochondrial phenotype resulting from both the A167E and H372R actin mutations in vivo consistent with our model. Rescue did not result from effects of profilin on actin nucleotide exchange or direct effects of profilin on actin polymerization. Polymerization of A167E actin was less stimulated by formin Bni1 FH1-FH2 fragment than was WT actin. Addition of WT profilin to mixtures of A167E actin and formin fragment significantly altered polymerization kinetics from hyperbolic to a decidedly more sigmoidal behavior. Substitution of Y79S profilin in this system produced A167E behavior nearly identical to that of WT actin. A167E actin caused more dynamic actin cable behavior in vivo than observed with WT actin. Introduction of Y79S restored cable movement to a more normal phenotype. Our studies implicate the importance of the actin-profilin interface for formin-dependent actin and point to the involvement of formin and profilin in the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and function. PMID:21956104

  19. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds) express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1) sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA) and α-cardiac (α-CAA), 2) smooth muscle actins (SMAs), α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3) cytoplasmic actins (CYAs), β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an actin isoform (α-SMA) was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986) . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS). In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes. PMID:27335638

  20. Enhanced gravitropism of roots with a disrupted cap actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Guichuan; Mohamalawari, Deepti R.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2003-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be a major player in plant gravitropism. However, understanding the role of actin in this process is far from complete. To address this problem, we conducted an analysis of the effect of Latrunculin B (Lat B), a potent actin-disrupting drug, on root gravitropism using various parameters that included detailed curvature kinetics, estimation of gravitropic sensitivity, and monitoring of curvature development after extended clinorotation. Lat B treatment resulted in a promotion of root curvature after a 90 degrees reorientation in three plant species tested. More significantly, the sensitivity of maize (Zea mays) roots to gravity was enhanced after actin disruption, as determined from a comparison of presentation time of Lat B-treated versus untreated roots. A short 10-min gravistimulus followed by extended rotation on a 1-rpm clinostat resulted in extensive gravitropic responses, manifested as curvature that often exceeded 90 degrees. Application of Lat B to the cap or elongation zone of maize roots resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which was confined to the area of localized Lat B application. Only roots with Lat B applied to the cap displayed the strong curvature responses after extended clinorotation. Our study demonstrates that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton in the cap leads to the persistence of a signal established by a previous gravistimulus. Therefore, actin could function in root gravitropism by providing a mechanism to regulate the proliferation of a gravitropic signal originating from the cap to allow the root to attain its correct orientation or set point angle.

  1. Actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement modulates proton-induced uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Nadav; Korenstein, Rafi

    2013-04-15

    Recently it has been shown that elevating proton concentration at the cell surface stimulates the formation of membrane invaginations and vesicles accompanied by an enhanced uptake of macromolecules. While the initial induction of inward membrane curvature was rationalized in terms of proton-based increase of charge asymmetry across the membrane, the mechanisms underlying vesicle formation and its scission are still unknown. In light of the critical role of actin in vesicle formation during endocytosis, the present study addresses the involvement of cytoskeletal actin in proton-induced uptake (PIU). The uptake of dextran-FITC is used as a measure for the factual fraction of inward invaginations that undergo scission from the cell's plasma membrane. Our findings show that the rate of PIU in suspended cells is constant, whereas the rate of PIU in adherent cells is gradually increased in time, saturating at the level possessed by suspended cells. This is consistent with pH induced gradual degradation of stress-fibers in adherent cells. Wortmannin and calyculin-A are able to elevate PIU by 25% in adherent cells but not in suspended cells, while cytochalasin-D, rapamycin and latrunculin-A elevate PIU both in adherent and suspended cells. However, extensive actin depolymerization by high concentrations of latrunculin-A is able to inhibit PIU. We conclude that proton-induced membrane vesiculation is restricted by the actin structural resistance to the plasma membrane bending. Nevertheless, a certain degree of cortical actin restructuring is required for the completion of the scission process. - Highlights: ► Acidification of cells' exterior enhances uptake of macromolecules by the cells. ► Disruption of actin stress fibers leads to enhancement of proton induced uptake. ► Extensive depolymerization of cellular actin attenuates proton-induced uptake.

  2. Mechanics of Biomimetic Liposomes Encapsulating an Actin Shell.

    PubMed

    Guevorkian, Karine; Manzi, John; Pontani, Léa-Lætitia; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-12-15

    Cell-shape changes are insured by a thin, dynamic, cortical layer of cytoskeleton underneath the plasma membrane. How this thin cortical structure impacts the mechanical properties of the whole cell is not fully understood. Here, we study the mechanics of liposomes or giant unilamellar vesicles, when a biomimetic actin cortex is grown at the inner layer of the lipid membrane via actin-nucleation-promoting factors. Using a hydrodynamic tube-pulling technique, we show that tube dynamics is clearly affected by the presence of an actin shell anchored to the lipid bilayer. The same force pulls much shorter tubes in the presence of the actin shell compared to bare membranes. However, in both cases, we observe that the dynamics of tube extrusion has two distinct features characteristic of viscoelastic materials: rapid elastic elongation, followed by a slower elongation phase at a constant rate. We interpret the initial elastic regime by an increase of membrane tension due to the loss of lipids into the tube. Tube length is considerably shorter for cortex liposomes at comparable pulling forces, resulting in a higher spring constant. The presence of the actin shell seems to restrict lipid mobility, as is observed in the corral effect in cells. The viscous regime for bare liposomes corresponds to a leakout of the internal liquid at constant membrane tension. The presence of the actin shell leads to a larger friction coefficient. As the tube is pulled from a patchy surface, membrane tension increases locally, leading to a Marangoni flow of lipids. As a conclusion, the presence of an actin shell is revealed by its action that alters membrane mechanics. PMID:26682806

  3. Optogenetics to target actin-mediated synaptic loss in Alzheimer's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Atena; DeFea, Kathryn; Ethell, Iryna

    2013-03-01

    Numerous studies in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) animal models show that overproduction of Aβ peptides and their oligomerization can distort dendrites, damage synapses, and decrease the number of dendritic spines and synapses. Aβ may trigger synapse loss by modulating activity of actin-regulating proteins, such as Rac1 and cofilin. Indeed, Aβ1-42 oligomers can activate actin severing protein cofilin through calcineurin-mediated activation of phosphatase slingshot and inhibit an opposing pathway that suppresses cofilin phosphorylation through Rac-mediated activation of LIMK1. Excessive activation of actin-severing protein cofilin triggers the formation of a non-dynamic actin bundles, called rods that are found in AD brains and cause loss of synapses. Hence, regulation of these actin-regulating proteins in dendritic spines could potentially provide useful tools for preventing the synapse/spine loss associated with earlier stages of AD neuropathology. However, lack of spatiotemporal control over their activity is a key limitation. Recently, optogenetic advancements have provided researchers with convenient light-activating proteins such as photoactivatable Rac (PARac). Here, we transfected cultured primary hippocampal neurons and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells with a PARac/ mCherry-containing plasmid and the mCherry-positive cells were identified and imaged using an inverted fluorescence microscope. Rac1 activation was achieved by irradiation with blue light (480nm) and live changes in dendritic spine morphology were observed using mCherry (587nm). Rac activation was confirmed by immunostaining for phosphorylated form of effector proteinP21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and reorganization of actin. Thus, our studies confirm the feasibility of using the PA-Rac construct to trigger actin re-organization in the dendritic spines.

  4. Oral mucosal lesions and their association with sociodemographic, behavioral, and health status factors.

    PubMed

    Gheno, José Nicolau; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Munerato, Maria Cristina; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Sant'ana Filho, Manoel; Weissheimer, Camila; Carrard, Vinicius Coelho; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of oral mucosal lesions and their associations with sociodemographic, health, and behavioral factors in a southern Brazilian population. Information was collected from participants (n = 801) using a structured questionnaire during an oral cancer screening campaign held at an agribusiness show in southern Brazil in 2009. Data were described using frequency distributions or means and standard deviations. Associations between independent variables and outcomes were assessed using the Chi-squared test. A total of 465 lesions were detected (actinic cheilitis: n = 204, 25.5%; candidiasis: n = 50, 6.2%; fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia: n = 42, 5.2%; ulceration, n = 33, 4.1%; hemangioma: n = 14, 1.7%; leukoplakia: n = 11, 1.4%). Candidiasis, actinic cheilitis, and fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia were associated significantly with literacy. Actinic cheilitis was also associated significantly with sun exposure and hat use, and leukoplakia was associated with smoking. The high frequency of oral mucosal lesions observed highlights the importance of education about risk factors. Additionally, training of health professionals, mainly those from public health services, in the use of preventive and community education strategies is needed. PMID:26247518

  5. Direct interaction of Cucurbitacin E isolated from Alsomitra macrocarpa to actin filament

    PubMed Central

    Momma, Keiko; Masuzawa, Yuko; Nakai, Naomi; Chujo, Moeko; Murakami, Akira; Kioka, Noriyuki; Kiyama, Yasunori; Akita, Toru

    2007-01-01

    A methanol extract of Alsomitra macrocarpa leaves and branches induced a marked alteration of cell morphology in a human stellate cell line (LX-2). Similar morphologic alterations were observed in several other cell lines. Active compound was purified from the extract and determined to be cucurbitacin E (Cuc E). It has been known that Cuc E causes marked disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, supporting our observation, but how Cuc E altered the actin cytoskeleton has not been elucidated. By using the standard fluorescence assay using copolymerization and depolymerization of native and pyrene labelled actin, this study revealed that Cuc E interacted directly with actin consequently stabilizing the polymerized actin. When NIH-3T3 cells exogenously expressing YFP-labeled actin were treated with Cuc E, firstly the aggregation of globular actin and secondly the aggregation of actin including disrupted fibrous actin in the cells was observed. PMID:19002839

  6. Fission yeast IQGAP arranges actin filaments into the cytokinetic contractile ring.

    PubMed

    Takaine, Masak; Numata, Osamu; Nakano, Kentaro

    2009-10-21

    The contractile ring (CR) consists of bundled actin filaments and myosin II; however, the actin-bundling factor remains elusive. We show that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe IQGAP Rng2 is involved in the generation of CR F-actin and required for its arrangement into a ring. An N-terminal fragment of Rng2 is necessary for the function of Rng2 and is localized to CR F-actin. In vitro the fragment promotes actin polymerization and forms linear arrays of F-actin, which are resistant to the depolymerization induced by the actin-depolymerizing factor Adf1. Our findings indicate that Rng2 is involved in the generation of CR F-actin and simultaneously bundles the filaments and regulates its dynamics by counteracting the effects of Adf1, thus enabling the reconstruction of CR F-actin bundles, which provides an insight into the physical properties of the building blocks that comprise the CR. PMID:19713940

  7. Actin Turnover Is Required for Myosin-Dependent Mitochondrial Movements in Arabidopsis Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Maozhong; Beck, Martina; Müller, Jens; Chen, Tong; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Feng; Wang, Qinli; Wang, Yuqing; Baluška, František; Logan, David C.; Šamaj, Jozef; Lin, Jinxing

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that plant mitochondrial movements are myosin-based along actin filaments, which undergo continuous turnover by the exchange of actin subunits from existing filaments. Although earlier studies revealed that actin filament dynamics are essential for many functions of the actin cytoskeleton, there are little data connecting actin dynamics and mitochondrial movements. Methodology/Principal Findings We addressed the role of actin filament dynamics in the control of mitochondrial movements by treating cells with various pharmaceuticals that affect actin filament assembly and disassembly. Confocal microscopy of Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs expressing GFP-FABD2 as an actin filament reporter showed that mitochondrial distribution was in agreement with the arrangement of actin filaments in root hairs at different developmental stages. Analyses of mitochondrial trajectories and instantaneous velocities immediately following pharmacological perturbation of the cytoskeleton using variable-angle evanescent wave microscopy and/or spinning disk confocal microscopy revealed that mitochondrial velocities were regulated by myosin activity and actin filament dynamics. Furthermore, simultaneous visualization of mitochondria and actin filaments suggested that mitochondrial positioning might involve depolymerization of actin filaments on the surface of mitochondria. Conclusions/Significance Base on these results we propose a mechanism for the regulation of mitochondrial speed of movements, positioning, and direction of movements that combines the coordinated activity of myosin and the rate of actin turnover, together with microtubule dynamics, which directs the positioning of actin polymerization events. PMID:19536333

  8. The Actin Nucleator Cobl Is Controlled by Calcium and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Natja; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Actin nucleation triggers the formation of new actin filaments and has the power to shape cells but requires tight control in order to bring about proper morphologies. The regulation of the members of the novel class of WASP Homology 2 (WH2) domain-based actin nucleators, however, thus far has largely remained elusive. Our study reveals signal cascades and mechanisms regulating Cordon-Bleu (Cobl). Cobl plays some, albeit not fully understood, role in early arborization of neurons and nucleates actin by a mechanism that requires a combination of all three of its actin monomer–binding WH2 domains. Our experiments reveal that Cobl is regulated by Ca2+ and multiple, direct associations of the Ca2+ sensor Calmodulin (CaM). Overexpression analyses and rescue experiments of Cobl loss-of-function phenotypes with Cobl mutants in primary neurons and in tissue slices demonstrated the importance of CaM binding for Cobl’s functions. Cobl-induced dendritic branch initiation was preceded by Ca2+ signals and coincided with local F-actin and CaM accumulations. CaM inhibitor studies showed that Cobl-mediated branching is strictly dependent on CaM activity. Mechanistic studies revealed that Ca2+/CaM modulates Cobl’s actin binding properties and furthermore promotes Cobl’s previously identified interactions with the membrane-shaping F-BAR protein syndapin I, which accumulated with Cobl at nascent dendritic protrusion sites. The findings of our study demonstrate a direct regulation of an actin nucleator by Ca2+/CaM and reveal that the Ca2+/CaM-controlled molecular mechanisms we discovered are crucial for Cobl’s cellular functions. By unveiling the means of Cobl regulation and the mechanisms, by which Ca2+/CaM signals directly converge on a cellular effector promoting actin filament formation, our work furthermore sheds light on how local Ca2+ signals steer and power branch initiation during early arborization of nerve cells—a key process in neuronal network formation. PMID

  9. Interactions between the yeast SM22 homologue Scp1 and actin demonstrate the importance of actin bundling in endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Dana M; Aghamohammadzadeh, Soheil; Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I; Allwood, Ellen G; Winder, Steve J; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2008-05-30

    The yeast SM22 homologue Scp1 has previously been shown to act as an actin-bundling protein in vitro. In cells, Scp1 localizes to the cortical actin patches that form as part of the invagination process during endocytosis, and its function overlaps with that of the well characterized yeast fimbrin homologue Sac6p. In this work we have used live cell imaging to demonstrate the importance of key residues in the Scp1 actin interface. We have defined two actin binding domains within Scp1 that allow the protein to both bind and bundle actin without the need for dimerization. Green fluorescent protein-tagged mutants of Scp1 also indicate that actin localization does not require the putative phosphorylation site Ser-185 to be functional. Deletion of SCP1 has few discernable effects on cell growth and morphology. However, we reveal that scp1 deletion is compensated for by up-regulation of Sac6. Furthermore, Scp1 levels are increased in the absence of sac6. The presence of compensatory pathways to up-regulate Sac6 or Scp1 levels in the absence of the other suggest that maintenance of sufficient bundling activity is critical within the cell. Analysis of cortical patch assembly and movement during endocytosis reveals a previously undetected role for Scp1 in movement of patches away from the plasma membrane. Additionally, we observe a dramatic increase in patch lifetime in a strain lacking both sac6 and scp1, demonstrating the central role played by actin-bundling proteins in the endocytic process. PMID:18400761

  10. Differential regulation of actin microfilaments by human MICAL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Rohn, Jennifer L.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster MICAL protein is essential for the neuronal growth cone machinery that functions through plexin- and semaphorin-mediated axonal signaling. Drosophila MICAL is also involved in regulating myofilament organization and synaptic structures, and serves as an actin disassembly factor downstream of plexin-mediated axonal repulsion. In mammalian cells there are three known isoforms, MICAL1, MICAL2 and MICAL3, as well as the MICAL-like proteins MICAL-L1 and MICAL-L2, but little is known of their function, and information comes almost exclusively from neural cells. In this study we show that in non-neural cells human MICALs are required for normal actin organization, and all three MICALs regulate actin stress fibers. Moreover, we provide evidence that the generation of reactive oxygen species by MICAL proteins is crucial for their actin-regulatory function. However, although MICAL1 is auto-inhibited by its C-terminal coiled-coil region, MICAL2 remains constitutively active and affects stress fibers. These data suggest differential but complementary roles for MICAL1 and MICAL2 in actin microfilament regulation. PMID:22331357

  11. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Kirkbride, Kellye C; Grega-Larson, Nathan E; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J; Weaver, Alissa M

    2016-07-18

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  12. 3D Actin Network Centerline Extraction with Multiple Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and actin cables. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we propose a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy. Quantitative evaluation of the method using synthetic images shows that for images with SNR above 5.0, the average vertex error measured by the distance between our result and ground truth is 1 voxel, and the average Hausdorff distance is below 10 voxels. PMID:24316442

  13. State transitions of actin cortices in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tzer Han; Keren, Kinneret; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Most animal cells are enveloped by a thin layer of actin cortex which governs the cell mechanics. A functional cortex must be rigid to provide mechanical support while being flexible to allow for rapid restructuring events such as cell division. To satisfy these requirements, the actin cortex is highly dynamic with fast actin turnover and myosin-driven contractility. The regulatory mechanism responsible for the transition between a mechanically stable state and a restructuring state is not well understood. Here, we develop a technique to map the dynamics of reconstituted actin cortices in emulsion droplets using IR fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). By increasing crosslinker concentration, we find that a homogeneous cortex transitions to an intermediate state with broken rotational symmetry and a globally contractile state which further breaks translational symmetry. We apply this new dynamic mapping technique to cortices of live starfish oocytes in various developmental stages. To identify the regulatory mechanism for steady state transitions, we subject the oocytes to actin and myosin disrupting drugs.

  14. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  15. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  16. GMFβ controls branched actin content and lamellipodial retraction in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Elizabeth M.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; King, Samantha J.; Johnson, Heath E.; Haugh, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    The lamellipodium is an important structure for cell migration containing branched actin nucleated via the Arp2/3 complex. The formation of branched actin is relatively well studied, but less is known about its disassembly and how this influences migration. GMF is implicated in both Arp2/3 debranching and inhibition of Arp2/3 activation. Modulation of GMFβ, a ubiquitous GMF isoform, by depletion or overexpression resulted in changes in lamellipodial dynamics, branched actin content, and migration. Acute pharmacological inhibition of Arp2/3 by CK-666, coupled to quantitative live-cell imaging of the complex, showed that depletion of GMFβ decreased the rate of branched actin disassembly. These data, along with mutagenesis studies, suggest that debranching (not inhibition of Arp2/3 activation) is a primary activity of GMFβ in vivo. Furthermore, depletion or overexpression of GMFβ disrupted the ability of cells to directionally migrate to a gradient of fibronectin (haptotaxis). These data suggest that debranching by GMFβ plays an important role in branched actin regulation, lamellipodial dynamics, and directional migration. PMID:26101216

  17. Multiple roles for the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Milberg, Oleg; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis is the main mechanism utilized by specialized secretory cells to deliver molecules to the cell surface by virtue of membranous containers (i.e. secretory vesicles). The process involves a series of highly coordinated and sequential steps, which include the biogenesis of the vesicles, their delivery to the cell periphery, their fusion with the plasma membrane and the release of their content into the extracellular space. Each of these steps is regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the involvement of actin and its associated molecules during each of the exocytic steps in vertebrates, and suggest that the overall role of the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis is linked to the architecture and the physiology of the secretory cells under examination. Specifically, in neurons, neuroendocrine, endocrine, and hematopoietic cells, which contain small secretory vesicles that undergo rapid exocytosis (on the order of milliseconds), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in pre-fusion events, where it acts primarily as a functional barrier and facilitates docking. In exocrine and other secretory cells, which contain large secretory vesicles that undergo slow exocytosis (seconds to minutes), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in post-fusion events, where it regulates the dynamics of the fusion pore, facilitates the integration of the vesicles into the plasma membrane, provides structural support, and promotes the expulsion of large cargo molecules. PMID:22986507

  18. MICAL-Family Proteins: Complex Regulators of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecules interacting with CasL (MICAL) family members participate in a multitude of activities, including axonal growth cone repulsion, membrane trafficking, apoptosis, and bristle development in flies. An interesting feature of MICAL proteins is the presence of an N-terminal flavo-mono-oxygenase domain. This mono-oxygenase domain generates redox potential with which MICALs can either oxidize proteins or produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Actin is one such protein that is affected by MICAL function, leading to dramatic cytoskeletal rearrangements. This review describes the MICAL-family members, and discusses their mechanisms of actin-binding and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Recent Advances: Recent studies show that MICALs directly induce oxidation of actin molecules, leading to actin depolymerization. ROS production by MICALs also causes oxidation of collapsin response mediator protein-2, a microtubule assembly promoter, which subsequently undergoes phosphorylation. Critical Issues: MICAL proteins oxidize proteins through two mechanisms: either directly by oxidizing methionine residues or indirectly via the production of ROS. It remains unclear whether MICAL proteins employ both mechanisms or whether the activity of MICAL-family proteins might vary with different substrates. Future Directions: The identification of additional substrates oxidized by MICAL will shed new light on MICAL protein function. Additional directions include expanding studies toward the MICAL-like homologs that lack flavin adenine dinucleotide domains and oxidation activity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2059–2073. PMID:23834433

  19. Disruption of actin impedes transmitter release in snake motor terminals

    PubMed Central

    Cole, John C; Villa, Brian R S; Wilkinson, Robert S

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of actin in vertebrate nerve terminals, nerve-muscle preparations from garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) were treated with the actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. Immunostaining revealed that actin filaments within presynaptic motor terminal boutons were disrupted by the drug.In preparations loaded with the optical probe FM1-43, destaining was reduced by latrunculin treatment, suggesting that transmitter release was partially blocked.Latrunculin treatment did not influence the amplitude or time course of spontaneous miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs). Similarly, endplate potentials (EPPs) evoked at low frequency were comparable in control and latrunculin-treated curarized preparations.Brief tetanic stimulation of the muscle nerve (25 Hz, 90 s) depressed EPP amplitudes in both control and latrunculin-treated preparations. After tetanus, EPPs elicited at 0.2 Hz in control preparations recovered rapidly (0–5 min) and completely (usually potentiating to above pre-tetanus levels; 130 ± 11%, mean ±s.e.m.). In contrast, EPPs evoked in latrunculin-treated preparations recovered slowly (8–10 min) and incompletely (84 ± 8%).The influence of latrunculin on post-tetanic EPPs depended on its concentration in the bath (KD= 3.1 μm) and on time of incubation.These observations argue that actin filaments facilitate transmitter release rather than impede it. Specifically, actin may facilitate mobilization of vesicles towards the releasable pools. PMID:10856113

  20. Actin Filaments Regulate Exocytosis at the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Marie; Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2016-01-20

    Exocytosis at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse is achieved through the functional coupling between calcium channels and glutamate-filled synaptic vesicles. Using membrane capacitance measurements, we investigated whether the actin network regulates the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles at the mouse auditory hair cell. Our results suggest that actin network disruption increases exocytosis and that actin filaments may spatially organize a subfraction of synaptic vesicles with respect to the calcium channels. Significance statement: Inner hair cells (IHCs), the auditory sensory cells of the cochlea, release glutamate onto the afferent auditory nerve fibers to encode sound stimulation. To achieve this task, the IHC relies on the recruitment of glutamate-filled vesicles that can be located in close vicinity to the calcium channels or more remotely from them. The molecular determinants responsible for organizing these vesicle pools are not fully identified. Using pharmacological tools in combination with membrane capacitance measurements, we show that actin filament disruption increases exocytosis in IHCs and that actin filaments most likely position a fraction of vesicles away from the calcium channels. PMID:26791198

  1. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  2. Talin can crosslink actin filaments into both networks and bundles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Robson, R M; Schmidt, J M; Stromer, M H

    1996-01-17

    The talin-actin interaction was examined by using negative staining and cosedimentation assays. At pH 6.4 and low ionic strength, talin extensively crosslinked actin filaments into both networks and bundles. The bundles consist of parallel actin filaments with a center-to-center distance of 13 nm, and talin crossbridges spaced at 36-nm intervals along the bundles. As pH was increased stepwise from 6.4 to 7.3, talin's bundling activity was decreased first, then its networking activity. Qualitatively similar results were obtained at pH 6.4 by increasing ionic strength. Chemical crosslinking indicated talin was present as a dimer from pH 6.4 to 7.3, with or without added KC1. The results show that talin can interact directly with actin filaments by formation of actin filament networks and bundles, with the bundles more sensitive to dissolution by increase in pH or ionic strength. PMID:8561791

  3. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine. PMID:26881098

  4. Calponin 3 regulates actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in trophoblastic cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Yukinao; Yamazaki, Natsuko; Kumasawa, Keiichi; Daimon, Etsuko; Tajiri, Michiko; Okada, Yuka; Ikawa, Masahito; Wada, Yoshinao

    2010-11-15

    Cell-cell fusion is an intriguing differentiation process, essential for placental development and maturation. A proteomic approach identified a cytoplasmic protein, calponin 3 (CNN3), related to the fusion of BeWo choriocarcinoma cells. CNN3 was expressed in cytotrophoblasts in human placenta. CNN3 gene knockdown promoted actin cytoskeletal rearrangement and syncytium formation in BeWo cells, suggesting CNN3 to be a negative regulator of trophoblast fusion. Indeed, CNN3 depletion promoted BeWo cell fusion. CNN3 at the cytoplasmic face of cytoskeleton was dislocated from F-actin with forskolin treatment and diffused into the cytoplasm in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Phosphorylation sites were located at Ser293/296 in the C-terminal region, and deletion of this region or site-specific disruption of Ser293/296 suppressed syncytium formation. These CNN3 mutants were colocalized with F-actin and remained there after forskolin treatment, suggesting that dissociation of CNN3 from F-actin is modulated by the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal region unique to CNN3 in the CNN family proteins. The mutant missing these phosphorylation sites displayed a dominant negative effect on cell fusion, while replacement of Ser293/296 with aspartic acid enhanced syncytium formation. These results indicated that CNN3 regulates actin cytoskeleton rearrangement which is required for the plasma membranes of trophoblasts to become fusion competent. PMID:20861310

  5. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine. PMID:26881098

  6. Emerging roles of actin cytoskeleton regulating enzymes in drug addiction: Actin or reactin’?

    PubMed Central

    Rothenfluh, Adrian; Cowan, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons rely on their cytoskeleton to give them shape and stability, and on cytoskeletal dynamics for growth and synaptic plasticity. Because drug addiction is increasingly seen as the inappropriate learning of strongly reinforcing stimuli, the role of the cytoskeleton in shaping drug memories has been of increasing interest in recent years. Does the cytoskeleton have an active role in shaping these memories, and to what extent do alterations in the cytoskeleton reflect the acute actions of drug exposure, or homeostatic reactions to the chronic exposure to drugs of abuse? Here we will review recent advances in understanding the role of the cytoskeleton in the development of drug addiction, with a focus on actin filaments, as they have been studied in greater detail. PMID:23428655

  7. Iron, copper, and zinc concentrations in normal skin and in various nonmalignant and malignant lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Gorodetsky, R.; Sheskin, J.; Weinreb, A.

    1986-09-01

    The concentrations of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and iron (Fe) in the skin have been noninvasively determined in vivo by diagnostic x-ray spectrometry. The skin of healthy controls was divided into two major groups based upon the distribution of the concentrations of these elements. In the face and upper neck, the following wet weight concentrations were recorded: Fe, 14.2 +/- 3.3 ppm; Cu, 1.3 +/- 0.3 ppm; and Zn, 6.7 +/- 1.1 ppm. In the chest, abdomen, arm, axilla, and lower neck, the concentrations of these elements were as follows: Fe, 10.2 +/- 2.5 ppm; Cu, 0.8 +/- 0.3 ppm; and Zn, 4.5 +/- 1.7 ppm. In most lesions of solar dermatitis, solar keratosis, basal and squamous cell carcinomas, variable elevations of Zn and Fe (up to significant levels) were recorded in most of the contralateral, apparently uninvolved skin. In the majority of pigmented nevi and malignant melanomas, the levels of Fe and Zn were elevated. In some of these, the Cu concentration also was increased.

  8. Chronic actinic dermatitis/actinic reticuloid: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of 37 cases.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Michael; Deonizio, Janyana; Martinez-Escala, M Estela; Gerami, Pedram; Guitart, Joan

    2014-11-01

    Chronic actinic dermatitis/actinic reticuloid (CAD/AR) is an eczematous hypersensitivity reaction to ultraviolet rays that can vary from mild eczematous cases to AR, the most severe cases which may resemble cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Diagnosis is based on clinical, histopathologic, and photobiologic features. In this study, we characterize the histopathologic and immunohistochemical features of 40 biopsies from 37 patients with established CAD. The cohort included 30 men and 7 women, ranging in age from 38 to 84 years (median, 62 years) and with a median duration of symptoms at presentation of 3 years (range, 1 to 40 years). All patients presented with erythematous lichenified plaques on sun-exposed areas. Severe cases (12/37) had extension to non-exposed areas. Positive photo-testing (20/20) and patch-testing (10/10) results, and cases with a high peripheral blood eosinophila (7/24) and HIV positivity (4/37) were noted. Skin biopsies demonstrated eczematous features including parakeratosis, acanthosis, spongiosis, and prominent dermal fibroplasia. Dermal dendrocytes were prominent in all cases with frequent multinucleated giant cells positive for factor XIIIa and S100 protein. Most cases displayed a brisk lymphocytic infiltrate with subtle exocytosis, atypical lymphocytes, and increased numbers of Langerhans cells, eosinophils, and plasma cells. There was a predominance of CD8 T cells within the epidermis (20/25) and a low CD4:CD8 ratio was noted in 20 of 25 cases. T-cell clonality studies were negative in 10 of 10 cases. CAD/AR may be difficult to distinguish from eczematous variants of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Important clues to differentiate both conditions include the identification of prominent dermal dendrocytes with multinucleated giant cells, eosinophils, plasma cells, and a low CD4:CD8 ratio. PMID:25238449

  9. Genital lesions following bestiality.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Shenoi, S D; Kumar, K B; Sharma, P V

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution. PMID:20877040

  10. Health burden of skin lesions at low arsenic exposure through groundwater in Pakistan. Is river the source?

    SciTech Connect

    Fatmi, Zafar; Azam, Iqbal; Ahmed, Faiza; Kazi, Ambreen; Gill, Albert Bruce; Kadir, Muhmmad Masood; Ahmed, Mubashir; Ara, Naseem; Janjua, Naveed Zafar

    2009-07-15

    A significant proportion of groundwater in south Asia is contaminated with arsenic. Pakistan has low levels of arsenic in groundwater compared with China, Bangladesh and India. A representative multi-stage cluster survey conducted among 3874 persons {>=}15 years of age to determine the prevalence of arsenic skin lesions, its relation with arsenic levels and cumulative arsenic dose in drinking water in a rural district (population: 1.82 million) in Pakistan. Spot-urine arsenic levels were compared among individuals with and without arsenic skin lesions. In addition, the relation of age, body mass index, smoking status with arsenic skin lesions was determined. The geographical distribution of the skin lesions and arsenic-contaminated wells in the district were ascertained using global positioning system. The total arsenic, inorganic and organic forms, in water and spot-urine samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The prevalence of skin lesions of arsenic was estimated for complex survey design, using surveyfreq and surveylogistic options of SAS 9.1 software.The prevalence of definitive cases i.e. hyperkeratosis of both palms and soles, was 3.4 per 1000 and suspected cases i.e. any sign of arsenic skin lesions (melanosis and/or keratosis), were 13.0 per 1000 among {>=}15-year-old persons in the district. Cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) was calculated from levels of arsenic in water and duration of use of current drinking water source. Prevalence of skin lesions increases with cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) in drinking water and arsenic levels in urine. Skin lesions were 2.5-fold among individuals with BMI <18.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Geographically, more arsenic-contaminated wells and skin lesions were alongside Indus River, suggests a strong link between arsenic contamination of groundwater with proximity to river.This is the first reported epidemiological and clinical evidence of arsenic skin lesions due to groundwater in Pakistan. Further

  11. Formation of cofilin-actin rods following cucurbitacin-B-induced actin aggregation depends on Slingshot homolog 1-mediated cofilin hyperactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ting; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; Xu, Li-Hui; Zha, Qing-Bing; He, Xian-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cucurbitacin B (CuB), as well as other cucurbitacins, damages the actin cytoskeleton in a variety of cell types. However, the underlying mechanism of such an effect is not well understood. In this study, we showed that CuB rapidly induced actin aggregation followed by actin rod formation in melanoma cells. Cofilin, a critical regulator of actin dynamics, was dramatically dephosphorylated (i.e., activated) upon CuB treatment. Notably, the activated cofilin subsequently formed rod-like aggregates, which were highly colocalized with actin rods, indicating the formation of cofilin-actin rods. Cofilin knockdown significantly suppressed rod formation but did not prevent actin aggregation. Furthermore, knockdown of the cofilin phosphatase Slingshot homolog 1 (SSH1), but not chronophin (CIN), alleviated CuB-induced cofilin hyperactivation and cofilin-actin rod formation. The activity of Rho kinase and LIM kinase, two upstream regulators of cofilin activation, was downregulated after cofilin hyperactivation. Pretreatment with a thiol-containing reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, but not other ROS inhibitors without thiol groups, suppressed CuB-induced actin aggregation, cofilin hyperactivation and cofilin-actin rod formation, suggesting that thiol oxidation might be involved in these processes. Taken together, our results demonstrated that CuB-induced formation of cofilin-actin rods was mediated by SSH1-dependent but CIN-independent cofilin hyperactivation. PMID:23695982

  12. Beta-actin variant is necessary for Enterovirus 71 replication.

    PubMed

    Lui, Yan Long Edmund; Lin, Zhiyang; Lee, Jia Jun; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Poh, Chit Laa; Tan, Eng Lee

    2013-04-19

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the main etiological agents of the Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) and has been known to cause fatal neurological complications such as herpangina, aseptic meningitis, poliomyelitis-like paralysis and encephalitis. EV71 is endemic in the Asia-Pacific region and causes occasional epidemics. In order to better understand EV71 infection, we compared the proteome between EV71-susceptible and EV71-resistant human Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line. We found significant differences in the β-actin variants between the EV71-susceptible RD cells and EV71-resistant RD cells, suggesting that β-actin, in association with other proteins such as annexin 2 is required in vesicular transport of EV71. This finding further support our previous study that actin potentially plays a role in pathogenesis and the establishment of the disease in HFMD. PMID:23535377

  13. Actin nucleation at the centrosome controls lymphocyte polarity

    PubMed Central

    Obino, Dorian; Farina, Francesca; Malbec, Odile; Sáez, Pablo J.; Maurin, Mathieu; Gaillard, Jérémie; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Gautreau, Alexis; Yuseff, Maria-Isabel; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is required for the functional specialization of many cell types including lymphocytes. A hallmark of cell polarity is the reorientation of the centrosome that allows repositioning of organelles and vesicles in an asymmetric fashion. The mechanisms underlying centrosome polarization are not fully understood. Here we found that in resting lymphocytes, centrosome-associated Arp2/3 locally nucleates F-actin, which is needed for centrosome tethering to the nucleus via the LINC complex. Upon lymphocyte activation, Arp2/3 is partially depleted from the centrosome as a result of its recruitment to the immune synapse. This leads to a reduction in F-actin nucleation at the centrosome and thereby allows its detachment from the nucleus and polarization to the synapse. Therefore, F-actin nucleation at the centrosome—regulated by the availability of the Arp2/3 complex—determines its capacity to polarize in response to external stimuli. PMID:26987298

  14. In vitro studies of actin filament and network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, R Dyche; Hansen, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Now that many genomes have been sequenced, a central concern of cell biology is to understand how the proteins they encode work together to create living matter. In vitro studies form an essential part of this program because understanding cellular functions of biological molecules often requires isolating them and reconstituting their activities. In particular, many elements of the actin cytoskeleton were first discovered by biochemical methods and their cellular functions deduced from in vitro experiments. We highlight recent advances that have come from in vitro studies, beginning with studies of actin filaments, and ending with multi-component reconstitutions of complex actin-based processes, including force-generation and cell spreading. We describe both scientific results and the technical innovations that made them possible. PMID:23267766

  15. Spiral actin-polymerization waves can generate amoeboidal cell crawling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Kruse, K.

    2014-05-01

    Amoeboidal cell crawling on solid substrates is characterized by protrusions that seemingly appear randomly along the cell periphery and drive the cell forward. For many cell types, it is known that the protrusions result from polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, little is known about how the formation of protrusions is triggered and whether the appearance of subsequent protrusions is coordinated. Recently, the spontaneous formation of actin-polymerization waves was observed. These waves have been proposed to orchestrate the cytoskeletal dynamics during cell crawling. Here, we study the impact of cytoskeletal polymerization waves on cell migration using a phase-field approach. In addition to directionally moving cells, we find states reminiscent of amoeboidal cell crawling. In this framework, new protrusions are seen to emerge from a nucleation process, generating spiral actin waves in the cell interior. Nucleation of new spirals does not require noise, but occurs in a state that is apparently displaying spatio-temporal chaos.

  16. Actin nucleation at the centrosome controls lymphocyte polarity.

    PubMed

    Obino, Dorian; Farina, Francesca; Malbec, Odile; Sáez, Pablo J; Maurin, Mathieu; Gaillard, Jérémie; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Gautreau, Alexis; Yuseff, Maria-Isabel; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is required for the functional specialization of many cell types including lymphocytes. A hallmark of cell polarity is the reorientation of the centrosome that allows repositioning of organelles and vesicles in an asymmetric fashion. The mechanisms underlying centrosome polarization are not fully understood. Here we found that in resting lymphocytes, centrosome-associated Arp2/3 locally nucleates F-actin, which is needed for centrosome tethering to the nucleus via the LINC complex. Upon lymphocyte activation, Arp2/3 is partially depleted from the centrosome as a result of its recruitment to the immune synapse. This leads to a reduction in F-actin nucleation at the centrosome and thereby allows its detachment from the nucleus and polarization to the synapse. Therefore, F-actin nucleation at the centrosome-regulated by the availability of the Arp2/3 complex-determines its capacity to polarize in response to external stimuli. PMID:26987298

  17. Formation of actin networks in microfluidic concentration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikova, Natalja; Herren, Florian; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; Pfohl, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The physical properties of cytoskeletal networks are contributors in a number of mechanical responses of cells including cellular deformation and locomotion, and are crucial for the proper action of living cells. Local chemical gradients modulate cytoskeletal functionality including the interactions of the cytoskeleton with other cellular components. Actin is a major constituent of the cytoskeleton. Introducing a microfluidic-based platform, we explored the impact of concentration gradients on the formation and structural properties of actin networks. Microfluidics-controlled flow-free steady state experimental conditions allow for the generation of chemical gradients of different profiles, such as linear or step-like. We discovered specific features of actin networks emerging in defined gradients. In particular, we analyzed the effects of spatial conditions on network properties, bending rigidities of network links, and the network elasticity.

  18. Actin Skeletons at the Membrane as Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis; Dalhaimer, Paul; Levine, Alex; Lubensky, Tom

    2002-03-01

    Actin filaments crosslinked by proteins such as spectrin form plasma membrane networks in a number of cell-types, including the red blood cell and the outer hair cell of the inner ear. Actin filaments are stiff compared to spectrin and can be considered hard rods. We statistically simulate network phase behavior at finite temperature by Monte Carlo methods, and explore the effects of spectrin and actin length as well as isotropic and shear stresses. Relative lengths required for a zero pressure nematic phase are determined, for exmaple, and indicate structural requirements for obtaining a 2D anisotropic elastomer. Emerging studies of network elasticity examine the anisotropic state and begin to probe the relevance of hyper-soft modes to hearing.

  19. Calcium-actin waves and oscillations of cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Veksler, Alex; Gov, Nir S

    2009-09-16

    We propose a mechanism for the formation of membrane oscillations and traveling waves, which arise due to the coupling between the actin cytoskeleton and the calcium flux through the membrane. In our model, the fluid cell membrane has a mobile but constant population of proteins with a convex spontaneous curvature, which act as nucleators of actin polymerization and adhesion. Such a continuum model couples the forces of cell-substrate adhesion, actin polymerization, membrane curvature, and the flux of calcium through the membrane. Linear stability analysis shows that sufficiently strong coupling among the calcium, membrane, and protein dynamics may induce robust traveling waves on the membrane. This result was checked for a reduced feedback scheme and is compared to the results without the effects of calcium, where permanent phase separation without waves or oscillations is obtained. The model results are compared to the published observations of calcium waves in cell membranes, and a number of testable predictions are proposed. PMID:19751660

  20. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  1. Reconstitution of Actin-based Motility by Vasodilator-stimulated Phosphoprotein (VASP) Depends on the Recruitment of F-actin Seeds from the Solution Produced by Cofilin*

    PubMed Central

    Siton, Orit; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is active in many filopodium-based and cytoskeleton reorganization processes. It is not fully understood how VASP directly functions in actin-based motility and how regulatory proteins affect its function. Here, we combine bead motility assay and single filament experiments. In the presence of a bundling component, actin bundles that grow from the surface of WT-VASP-coated beads induced movement of the beads. VASP promotes actin-based movement alone, in the absence of other actin nucleators. We propose that at physiological salt conditions VASP nucleation activity is too weak to promote motility and bundle formation. Rather, VASP recruits F-actin seeds from the solution and promotes their elongation. Cofilin has a crucial role in the nucleation of these F-actin seeds, notably under conditions of unfavorable spontaneous actin nucleation. We explored the role of multiple VASP variants. We found that the VASP-F-actin binding domain is required for the recruitment of F-actin seeds from the solution. We also found that the interaction of profilin-actin complexes with the VASP-proline-rich domain and the binding of the VASP-F-actin binding domain to the side of growing filaments is critical for transforming actin polymerization into motion. At the single filament level, profilin mediates both filament elongation rate and VASP anti-capping activity. Binding of profilin-actin complexes increases the polymerization efficiency by VASP but decreases its efficiency as an anti-capper; binding of free profilin creates the opposite effect. Finally, we found that an additional component such as methylcellulose or fascin is required for actin bundle formation and motility mediated by VASP. PMID:25246528

  2. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  3. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  4. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging.

    PubMed

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  5. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  6. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  7. Structure and transcription of the actin gene of Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Amar, M.F.; Pays, A.; Tebabi, P.; Dero, B.; Seebeck, T.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E.

    1988-05-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the actin gene is present in a cluster of two, three, or four tandemly linked copies, depending on the strain. Each cluster seems to exist in two allelic versions, as suggested by the polymorphism of both gene number and restriction fragment length in the DNA from cloned trypanosomes. The amplification of the gene copy number probably occurs through unequal sister chromatic exchange. The chromosomes harboring the actin genes belong to the large size class. The coding sequence was 1,128 nucleotides long and showed 60 to 70% homology to other eucaryotic actin genes. Surprisingly, this homology seemed weaker with Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma mega, or Leishmania acting-specific sequences. The mRNA was around 1.6 kilobases long and was synthesized at the same level in bloodstream and procyclic forms of the parasite. Large RNA precursors, up to 7.7 kilobases, were found in a pattern identical in strains containing either two or three gene copies. Probing of the flanking regions of the gene with either steady-state or in vitro transcripts, as well as S1 nuclease protection and primer extension experiments, allowed mapping of the 3' splice site of the actin mRNA, 38 nucleotides upstream from the translation initiation codon. A variably sized poly(dT) tract was found about 30 base pairs ahead of the splice site. The largest detected actin mRNA precursor seemed to give rise to at least two additional stable mRNAs. The RNA polymerase transcribing the actin gene exhibited the same sensitivity to inhibition by ..cap alpha..-amanitin as that transcribing both the spliced leader and the bulk of polyadenylated mRNAs.

  8. Actomyosin contractility spatiotemporally regulates actin network dynamics in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Okeyo, Kennedy Omondi; Adachi, Taiji; Sunaga, Junko; Hojo, Masaki

    2009-11-13

    Coupling interactions among mechanical and biochemical factors are important for the realization of various cellular processes that determine cell migration. Although F-actin network dynamics has been the focus of many studies, it is not yet clear how mechanical forces generated by actomyosin contractility spatiotemporally regulate this fundamental aspect of cell migration. In this study, using a combination of fluorescent speckle microscopy and particle imaging velocimetry techniques, we perturbed the actomyosin system and examined quantitatively the consequence of actomyosin contractility on F-actin network flow and deformation in the lamellipodia of actively migrating fish keratocytes. F-actin flow fields were characterized by retrograde flow at the front and anterograde flow at the back of the lamellipodia, and the two flows merged to form a convergence zone of reduced flow intensity. Interestingly, activating or inhibiting actomyosin contractility altered network flow intensity and convergence, suggesting that network dynamics is directly regulated by actomyosin contractility. Moreover, quantitative analysis of F-actin network deformation revealed that the deformation was significantly negative and predominant in the direction of cell migration. Furthermore, perturbation experiments revealed that the deformation was a function of actomyosin contractility. Based on these results, we suggest that the actin cytoskeletal structure is a mechanically self-regulating system, and we propose an elaborate pathway for the spatiotemporal self-regulation of the actin cytoskeletal structure during cell migration. In the proposed pathway, mechanical forces generated by actomyosin interactions are considered central to the realization of the various mechanochemical processes that determine cell motility. PMID:19665125

  9. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. {yields} Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. {yields} The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  10. Fluorescent labelling of the actin cytoskeleton in plants using a cameloid antibody

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Certain members of the Camelidae family produce a special type of antibody with only one heavy chain. The antigen binding domains are the smallest functional fragments of these heavy-chain only antibodies and as a consequence have been termed nanobodies. Discovery of these nanobodies has allowed the development of a number of therapeutic proteins and tools. In this study a class of nanobodies fused to fluorescent proteins (chromobodies), and therefore allowing antigen-binding and visualisation by fluorescence, have been used. Such chromobodies can be expressed in living cells and used as genetically encoded immunocytochemical markers. Results Here a modified version of the commercially available Actin-Chromobody® as a novel tool for visualising actin dynamics in tobacco leaf cells was tested. The actin-chromobody binds to actin in a specific manner. Treatment with latrunculin B, a drug which disrupts the actin cytoskeleton through inhibition of polymerisation results in loss of fluorescence after less than 30 min but this can be rapidly restored by washing out latrunculin B and thereby allowing the actin filaments to repolymerise. To test the effect of the actin-chromobody on actin dynamics and compare it to one of the conventional labelling probes, Lifeact, the effect of both probes on Golgi movement was studied as the motility of Golgi bodies is largely dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. With the actin-chromobody expressed in cells, Golgi body movement was slowed down but the manner of movement rather than speed was affected less than with Lifeact. Conclusions The actin-chromobody technique presented in this study provides a novel option for in vivo labelling of the actin cytoskeleton in comparison to conventionally used probes that are based on actin binding proteins. The actin-chromobody is particularly beneficial to study actin dynamics in plant cells as it does label actin without impairing dynamic movement and polymerisation of the actin

  11. Mechanical stimulation induces formin-dependent assembly of a perinuclear actin rim

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaowei; Li, Qingsen; Mogilner, Alex; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    Cells constantly sense and respond to mechanical signals by reorganizing their actin cytoskeleton. Although a number of studies have explored the effects of mechanical stimuli on actin dynamics, the immediate response of actin after force application has not been studied. We designed a method to monitor the spatiotemporal reorganization of actin after cell stimulation by local force application. We found that force could induce transient actin accumulation in the perinuclear region within ∼2 min. This actin reorganization was triggered by an intracellular Ca2+ burst induced by force application. Treatment with the calcium ionophore A23187 recapitulated the force-induced perinuclear actin remodeling. Blocking of actin polymerization abolished this process. Overexpression of Klarsicht, ANC-1, Syne Homology (KASH) domain to displace nesprins from the nuclear envelope did not abolish Ca2+-dependent perinuclear actin assembly. However, the endoplasmic reticulum- and nuclear membrane-associated inverted formin-2 (INF2), a potent actin polymerization activator (mutations of which are associated with several genetic diseases), was found to be important for perinuclear actin assembly. The perinuclear actin rim structure colocalized with INF2 on stimulation, and INF2 depletion resulted in attenuation of the rim formation. Our study suggests that cells can respond rapidly to external force by remodeling perinuclear actin in a unique Ca2+- and INF2-dependent manner. PMID:25941386

  12. How capping protein enhances actin filament growth and nucleation on biomimetic beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe; Carlsson, Anders E.

    2015-12-01

    Capping protein (CP), which caps the growing ends of actin filaments, accelerates actin-based motility. Recent experiments on biomimetic beads have shown that CP also enhances the rate of actin filament nucleation. Proposed explanations for these phenomena include (i) the actin funneling hypothesis (AFH), in which the presence of CP increases the free-actin concentration, and (ii) the monomer gating model, in which CP binding to actin filament barbed ends makes more monomers available for filament nucleation. To establish how CP increases the rates of filament elongation and nucleation on biomimetic beads, we perform a quantitative modeling analysis of actin polymerization, using rate equations that include actin filament nucleation, polymerization and capping, as modified by monomer depletion near the surface of the bead. With one adjustable parameter, our simulation results match previously measured time courses of polymerized actin and filament number. The results support a version of the AFH where CP increases the local actin monomer concentration at the bead surface, but leaves the global free-actin concentration nearly constant. Because the rate of filament nucleation increases with the monomer concentration, the increased local monomer concentration enhances actin filament nucleation. We derive a closed-form formula for the characteristic CP concentration where the local free-actin concentration reaches half the bulk value, and find it to be comparable to the global Arp2/3 complex concentration. We also propose an experimental protocol for distinguishing branching nucleation of filaments from spontaneous nucleation.