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Sample records for actinic keratosis treatment

  1. Treatment considerations in actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, G

    2017-03-01

    The chronic skin condition actinic keratosis (AK) is characterized by the formation of keratotic lesions of variable thickness that are poorly delimited. AK occurs on areas of the skin that have had long-term exposure to the sun or UV radiation. Although AKs may regress, they usually persist and can progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Clinicians are unable to predict which AKs will progress; therefore, both clinically visible lesions and subclinical, non-visible (i.e. the entire area affected by AK/field cancerization) should be treated. AK treatment options include lesion-directed therapies that target specific AK lesions and field-directed therapies that target multiple clinical lesions and the underlying field damage. This article reviews currently available treatment options in AK, with a focus on patient-applied field therapies, and their suitability according to specific disease characteristics and patient needs. Choice of treatment in AK depends on lesion-, patient- and treatment-related factors and should be individualized. Considerations when choosing a therapy include site of application, treatment duration, surface area of application, tolerability profiles and implications on adherence. Field-directed therapies treat clinical and subclinical damage (i.e. the entire area affected by AK), achieve high rates of sustained clearance of AKs and may reduce the risk of progression to SCC. There is a clear need for field therapies with short duration of treatment and predictable, short-lived, mild local skin reactions that can be used over a large surface area. Therapies with shorter and simpler treatment courses are often associated with better adherence than treatments with longer courses. These may, therefore, represent more appropriate choices in patients for whom convenience and/or adherence are an issue. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. Topical Imiquimod in the Treatment of Conjunctival Actinic Keratosis.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Megan A; Giacometti, Joseph N; Servat, Javier; Materin, Miguel A; Levin, Flora

    Conjunctival actinic keratosis is rare and difficult to treat, as recurrences are common. Imiquimod, an immune response modulator, is currently Food and Drug Administration-approved for cutaneous actinic keratosis and superficial basal cell carcinomas. Emerging reports have shown it to be effective in treating some periocular and conjunctival lesions. The authors present a case of a 68-year-old white man with recurrent actinic keratosis involving the pretarsal conjunctiva, which was successfully treated with 5% topical imiquimod following previous failure with cryotherapy and interferon α-2b. The patient had ocular irritation that resolved on cessation of treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of conjunctival actinic keratosis being treated with and successfully eradicated by topical imiquimod.

  3. Retinoids for prevention and treatment of actinic keratosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ianhez, Mayra; Fleury, Luiz Fernando Fróes; Miot, Hélio Amante; Bagatin, Edileia

    2013-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common cause of dermatological consultations and it presents a strong association with squamous cell carcinoma. Many substances are used for treatment and prevention, such as retinoids. Nevertheless, many studies on retinoids emphasize their application in treating and preventing non melanoma skin cancers. In this article, we reviewed studies about systemic and topical retinoids used with immunocompetent patients and organ transplant recipients with actinic keratosis, as primary or secondary outcomes. The majority of these papers pointed to a reduction in actinic keratosis count after treatment with retinoids. However, studies need to be better-defined in order to address the lack of a standardized dose, the absence of control groups, the low number of patients and short follow-up periods. Blind, randomized and controlled clinical trials with adequate sample sizes, specifically focused on actinic keratosis, are needed to clarify the real benefit of topical and/or oral retinoids. Comparison of efficacy and safety between oral and topical retinoids in the prevention and treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers and actinic keratosis is an essential pre requisite to establish new strategies to control these conditions. PMID:24068130

  4. New Topical Treatment Options for Actinic Keratosis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Sibbring, Gillian C; Alarcon, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review compared the relative efficacy of 5-fluorouracil 0.5% in salicylic acid 10% (5-FU/SA), ingenol mebutate (IMB) and imiquimod 2.5%/3.75% (IMI) for actinic keratosis on the face, forehead or scalp. Only 11 publications, relating to 7 randomised controlled trials, met inclusion criteria and it was only possible to compare the effect of all 3 treatments on complete clinical clearance, and the effect of 5-FU/SA and IMB on actinic keratosis recurrence rate. Despite a higher vehicle response rate for 5-FU/SA, complete clinical clearance was higher than IMB and IMI (55.4, 42.2, and 25.0-30.6/34.0-35.6%, [corrected] respectively). 5-FU/SA was also associated with lower actinic keratosis recurrence rate than IMB at 12 months post-treatment (32.7 vs. 53.9%). Although qualitative assessment suggested a numerical advantage of 5-FU/SA over IMB and IMI in terms of complete clinical clearance and sustained clearance, clinical data from longer term trials, with comparable outcome measures, are required to corroborate these findings.

  5. Light emitting fabric for photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thecua, E.; Vicentini, C.; Vignion, A.-S.; Lecomte, F.; Deleporte, P.; Mortier, L.; Szeimies, R.-M.; Mordon, S.

    2017-02-01

    The integration of optical fibers into flexible textile structures, by using knitting or weaving processes can allow the development of flexible light sources. The paper aims to present a new technology: Light Emitting Fabrics (LEF), which can be used for example for PDT of Actinic Keratosis in Dermatology. The predetermined macro-bending of optical fibers, led to a homogeneous side emission of light over the entire surface of the fabric. Tests showed that additional curvatures when applying the LEF on non-planar surfaces had no impact on light delivery and proved that LEF can adapt to the human morphology. The ability of the LEF, coupled with a 635nm LASER source, to deliver a homogeneous light to lesions is currently assessed in a clinical trial for the treatment of AK of the scalp by PDT. The low irradiance and progressive activation of the photosensitizer ensure a pain reduction, compared to discomfort levels experienced by patients during a conventional PDT session.

  6. New and current preventive treatment options in actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Arenberger, P; Arenbergerova, M

    2017-09-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a characteristic skin lesion on skin areas of subjects with mainly phototype I and phototype II, or with specific genetic factors and who are exposed to prolonged ultraviolet radiation. AK may be considered a precursor of in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a type of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). However, it is still not possible to predict which AK lesions will develop into SCC. Early treatment of AK is therefore recommended. Despite the increasing number of patients with AK developing into SCC, to date, there is still no clear suggestion of therapeutic strategy for AK. Current treatment consists of a multitude of topical lesion-directed or field-directed therapies or a combination of both. Recently, orally administered nicotinamide has shown to significantly reduce rates of new NMSC and AK in high-risk patients. This study aims to provide an update on the most relevant information about AK and to provide an insight into current and new treatment options. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Liquid nitrogen for the treatment of actinic keratosis: a longitudinal assessment.

    PubMed

    Ianhez, Mayra; Miot, Hélio Amante; Bagatin, Edileia

    2014-08-01

    Cryosurgery with liquid nitrogen is one of the most used treatments for actinic keratosis. We aimed to study the effectiveness of two consecutive sessions of cryosurgery for actinic keratosis and investigate factors associated with its therapeutic success. Hence, we conducted a longitudinal study including 92 patients of both sexes, aged 50-75 years with 5-50 actinic keratosis on the face and forearms, who underwent cryosurgery and treatment with sunscreen SPF 30, at baseline and after 120 days. The lesions were counted in duplicate by the same examiner before the start of treatment and after 120 (N=92) and 300 days (N=33), represented by their medians and quartiles and compared using the generalized linear mixed effects model (negative binomial). Treatment behavior was investigated in relation to sex, age, education, skin type, smoking, sun exposure at work and the use of aspirin, anti-inflammatory and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. There was a significant reduction in the actinic keratosis count on the face and forearms (p<0.05). Our results confirmed the effectiveness of cryosurgery for actinic keratosis, with a 57% reduction in the number, and size of the lesions. Higher education levels (p=0.02) and less sun exposure at work (p=0.02) independently promoted a significant reduction in the actinic keratosis count. Different population groups showed characteristic responses to the treatment, which may be explained by the degree of adherence to the use of photoprotection. In two sessions, cryosurgery with liquid nitrogen reduced the actinic keratosis count. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Actinic keratosis among seafarers.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, M; Kuechmeister, B; Ohnemus, U; Baur, X; Moll, I

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of UV-induced actinic keratosis and further skin lesions. A newly developed questionnaire about lifetime UV radiation exposure was completed by 514 seafarers. An experienced dermatologist inspected the whole-body skin status of all participants. The questionnaire revealed a pre-employment UV radiation exposure in 104 seafarers, sunbed use in 26 subjects and a median work-related UV radiation exposure at sea of 20 years. The diagnosis of actinic keratoses was made in 94 seafarers and the clinical diagnosis of skin cancers in 48 seafarers (28 basal cell carcinoma, 11 squamous cell carcinoma, 9 malignant melanoma). After age standardisation according to a European reference population, the male European seafarers in this study had a 1.80-fold increased risk of actinic keratosis. Actinic keratoses [OR 1.03 (1.01-1.05)] and squamous cell carcinoma [OR 1.07 (1.01-1.13)] were related to the duration of seafaring time in years. A significant association was also found between actinic keratosis/squamous cell carcinoma and sunlight exposure during home leave [OR 1.67 (1.03-2.81) and OR 6.19 (1.18-32.40)]. Furthermore, the engine room personnel-especially the technical officers-were at higher risk of developing actinic keratosis. Due to the high prevalence of actinic keratosis especially among older seafarers with fair skin, with longer duration of seafaring employment at sea and with higher UV exposure during home leave, more intensive advice should be given on sun protection both at sea and ashore.

  9. Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz, C; Fonseca-Capdevila, E; García-Diez, A; Guillén-Barona, C; Belinchón-Romero, I; Redondo-Bellón, P; Moreno-Giménez, J C; Senán, R

    2014-05-01

    Current trends in our setting indicate that the prevalence of actinic keratosis and similar diseases will increase in coming years and impose a greater burden on health care resources. A long list of clinical features must be taken into account when approaching the treatment of actinic keratosis. Until recently, therapeutic approaches focused solely on ablative procedures and the treatment of individual lesions and did not take into account areas of field cancerization. Now that the therapeutic arsenal has grown, standardized criteria are needed to guide the optimal choice of treatment for each patient. The elaboration of evidence-based consensus recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of actinic keratosis generates knowledge that will help clinicians to deliver the highest level of care possible, standardizing decision-making processes and enhancing awareness among all the health professionals involved in the care pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. A consensus approach to improving patient adherence and persistence with topical treatment for actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Peris, Ketty; Guillen, Carlos; Cerio, Rino; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Foley, Peter; Sanches, José; Culshaw, Alex; Erntoft, Sandra; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is important in the treatment of actinic keratosis, but guidance for improving adherence/persistence during topical therapy is still lacking. To utilize expert consensus to generate a list of recommendations to improve real-world efficacy when prescribing topical therapy for actinic keratosis. An expert panel of eight dermatologists was convened to generate recommendations based on facilitated discussion and consensus generation using a modified Delphi session. The recommendations were ratified with the expert panel. Facilitated discussion generated 31 issues within five themes, which were prioritized using expert voting. Consensus was achieved on the importance of short and simple treatment regimens for maximizing patient compliance, physician awareness of the progression of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma, provision of appropriate patient information, and the use of effective communication strategies to educate physicians about actinic keratosis. Based on these key findings, eight recommendations were generated. The recommendations will assist physicians when prescribing topical actinic keratosis therapy. Further research should focus on the types of patient outcomes that are influenced by the characteristics of topical field therapy. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Dermatology.

  11. A consensus approach to improving patient adherence and persistence with topical treatment for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Peris, Ketty; Guillen, Carlos; Cerio, Rino; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Foley, Peter; Sanches, José; Culshaw, Alex; Erntoft, Sandra; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Topical therapy is important in the treatment of actinic keratosis, but guidance for improving adherence/persistence during topical therapy is still lacking. Objectives To utilize expert consensus to generate a list of recommendations to improve real-world efficacy when prescribing topical therapy for actinic keratosis. Methods An expert panel of eight dermatologists was convened to generate recommendations based on facilitated discussion and consensus generation using a modified Delphi session. The recommendations were ratified with the expert panel. Results Facilitated discussion generated 31 issues within five themes, which were prioritized using expert voting. Consensus was achieved on the importance of short and simple treatment regimens for maximizing patient compliance, physician awareness of the progression of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma, provision of appropriate patient information, and the use of effective communication strategies to educate physicians about actinic keratosis. Based on these key findings, eight recommendations were generated. Conclusions The recommendations will assist physicians when prescribing topical actinic keratosis therapy. Further research should focus on the types of patient outcomes that are influenced by the characteristics of topical field therapy. PMID:25865875

  12. Three-day Field Treatment with Ingenol Disoxate (LEO 43204) for Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Tyring, Stephen; Nahm, Walter K.; Østerdal, Marie Louise; Petersen, Astrid H.; Berman, Brian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ingenol disoxate gel using a once-daily, three-day field treatment regimen in patients with actinic keratosis. DESIGN: This was a Phase II, multicenter, open-label trial (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02305888). SETTING: The study was conducted in 20 trial sites in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Participants included patients with 5 to 20 clinically typical actinic keratosis lesions on the full face/chest (250cm2), scalp (25–250cm2), or the trunk/extremities (250cm2). MEASUREMENTS: We measured incidence of dose-limiting events based on local skin responses. Percentage reduction in actinic keratosis lesion count from baseline, complete clearance, and partial clearance (≥75%) of actinic keratosis lesions were assessed at Week 8. RESULTS: Nine of 63 (14.3%) patients in the face/chest group reported dose-limiting events; zero of 63 patients in the scalp group reported dose-limiting events; and 11 of 62 (17.7%) patients in the trunk/extremities group reported dose-limiting events. Mean composite local skin response scores peaked at Day 4, then rapidly declined, reaching or approaching baseline levels by Week 4. Less than five percent of patients reported severe adverse events; the most common treatment-related adverse events were application site pain and pruritus. The reduction in actinic keratosis lesion count was 78.9, 76.3, and 69.1 percent for the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. Complete clearance was achieved in 36.5, 39.7, and 22.6 percent of patients in the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. Partial clearance was achieved in 71.4, 65.1, and 50.0 percent of patients in the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: Ingenol disoxate demonstrated adverse events and local skin reaction profiles similar to results seen in trials evaluating shorter two-day regimens and was effective in patients with

  13. Comparison of the Treatment Guidelines for Actinic Keratosis: A Critical Appraisal and Review.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Patrick; Zhou, Stephanie; Bobotsis, Robert; Lynde, Charles

    There are currently several reputable guidelines on the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK) from groups in Canada, the United Kingdom, and Europe. These recommendations, based on evidence or expert consensus, offer clinicians a variety of treatment options for the different clinical presentations of AKs. Although the guidelines are similar in some regards, variations exist in treatment options, duration, and strength of recommendation. Some guidelines also lack input on specific therapies and certain types of AK, such as hypertrophic or thin presentations. The purpose of this article is to review and compare guidelines published by Canadian, UK, and European groups for the management of AKs in patients.

  14. Comparison of three light doses in the photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis using mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Tylcz, Jean-Baptiste; Vermandel, Maximilien; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for cancer therapy. Although high efficacy is demonstrated for PDT using standardized protocols in nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses, alternative light doses expected to increase efficiency, to reduce adverse effects or to expand the use of PDT, are still being evaluated and refined. We propose a comparison of the three most common light doses in the treatment of actinic keratosis with 5-aminolevulinic acid PDT through mathematical modeling. The proposed model is based on an iterative procedure that involves determination of the local fluence rate, updating of the local optical properties, and estimation of the local damage induced by the therapy. This model was applied on a simplified skin sample model including an actinic keratosis lesion, with three different light doses (red light dose, 37 J/cm2, 75 mW/cm2, 500 s blue light dose, 10 J/cm2, 10 mW/cm2, 1000 s and daylight dose, 9000 s). Results analysis shows that the three studied light doses, although all efficient, lead to variable local damage. Defining reference damage enables the nonoptimal parameters for the current light doses to be refined and the treatment to be more suitable.

  15. Managing actinic keratosis in primary care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Nicola; Tidman, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Actinic, or solar, keratosis is caused by chronic ultraviolet-induced damage to the epidermis. In the UK, 15-23% of individuals have actinic keratosis lesions. Risk factors include: advanced age; male gender; cumulative sun exposure or phototherapy; Fitzpatrick skin phototypes I-II; long-term immuno-suppression and genetic syndromes e.g. xeroderma pigmentosum and albinism. Actinic keratoses are regarded by some authorities as premalignant lesions that may transform into invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and by others as in situ SCC that may progress to an invasive stage. The risk of malignant change appears low; up to 0.5% per lesion per year. Up to 20-30% of lesions may spontaneously regress but in the absence of any reliable prognostic clinical indicators regarding malignant potential active treatment is considered appropriate. Actinic keratosis lesions may present as discrete hyperkeratotic papules, cutaneous horns, or more subtle flat lesions on sun-exposed areas of skin. The single most helpful diagnostic sign is an irregularly roughened surface texture: a sandpaper-like feel almost always indicates actinic damage. Dermatoscopy can be helpful in excluding signs of basal cell carcinoma when actinic keratosis is non-keratotic. It is always important to consider the possibility of SCC. The principal indication for referral to secondary care is the possibility of cutaneous malignancy. However, widespread and severe actinic damage in patients who are immunosuppressed is also a reason for referral.

  16. Management of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Actinic keratoses are common, often multiple, epidermal lesions found mainly on the sun-exposed skin of fair-skinned middle-aged and older people.(1) Over time, lesions may remain unchanged or may proliferate, regress, reappear or develop into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).(2) Detectable (spot) lesions are often associated with alteration of the surrounding skin (field) where subclinical lesions might be present.(2) Interventions may target individual or multiple lesions or a whole field.(2) Here, we update our previous review(3) on the prevention and treatment of actinic keratoses, focusing on the licensed treatments most commonly used in the UK and recommended in UK guidelines.

  17. Photodynamic therapy effective for the treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma in bullous pemphigoid patients.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Theresa N; de la Feld, Salma Faghri; Huang, Conway; Sami, Naveed

    2017-06-01

    Treating skin cancers and extensive actinic keratosis in patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP) can be challenging. Treatment options pose unique risks in these patients as surgical wounds can have delayed wound healing and photodynamic therapy (PDT) may exacerbate their blistering disease. We report the successful use of PDT to treat actinic keratosis and skin cancers in two patients with BP, both of whom had excellent response to PDT and tolerated treatment without any bullous disease flares. Carefully selected patients with skin cancers and stable, well controlled BP can be safely considered for treatment using PDT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In vivo Confocal Laser Microscopy for monitoring of actinic keratosis treatment: a comparison with histopathologic assessment after treatment with topical 5% 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, P; Maia, M; Rodrigues, S B; Lellis, R F; Hirata, S H

    2017-11-24

    Histological examination is the gold standard for actinic keratosis diagnosis; however, it is not always a feasible approach. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive technique that may be an alternative for monitoring actinic keratoses treatment response. Topical 5-fluorouracil is indicated for actinic keratosis multiple lesions and for field cancerization treatment. To assess the RCM accuracy, sensibility and specificity for actinic keratosis, considering as a gold standard the histopathological examination; as well as to evaluate the efficacy of 5% 5-fluorouracil treatment. This is a prospective study in actinic keratosis patients between August 2014 and November 2015. RCM analyses were performed in one randomly selected actinic keratosis lesion of the upper limbs by two independent observers before and after 5% 5-fluorouracil treatment. At the end of treatment and with clinical bleaching of treated lesions, histological examination was performed by two pathologists. A total of 50 lesions were enroled, and 40 lesions presented complete clinical bleaching after treatment and were included in the final analysis. Accuracy, sensibility and specificity means among observers were 83.8%, 84.6% and 83.3%, respectively. After 5-fluorouracil treatment, actinic keratosis was diagnosed in 45.0% (observer 1) and 32.5% (observer 2) of subjects according to RCM and in 32.5% of subjects according to histological examination. Considering RCM observers diagnosis, the concordance was substantial (k 0.637, P < 0.001). 5-fluorouracil led to a reduction in 55.0%-67.5% of actinic keratoses according to RCM analysis. This study allows to validate RCM as a non-invasive method capable of monitoring actinic keratosis therapeutic response to 5-fluorouracil, presenting efficacy comparable to histological examination. Additionally, the results suggest that 5-fluorouracil may be a satisfactory option for therapeutic control of this condition. © 2017 European Academy of

  19. Three-day Field Treatment with Ingenol Disoxate (LEO 43204) for Actinic Keratosis: A Phase II Trial.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Daniel M; Tyring, Stephen; Nahm, Walter K; Østerdal, Marie Louise; Petersen, Astrid H; Berman, Brian

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ingenol disoxate gel using a once-daily, three-day field treatment regimen in patients with actinic keratosis. DESIGN: This was a Phase II, multicenter, open-label trial (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02305888). SETTING: The study was conducted in 20 trial sites in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Participants included patients with 5 to 20 clinically typical actinic keratosis lesions on the full face/chest (250cm 2 ), scalp (25-250cm 2 ), or the trunk/extremities (250cm 2 ). MEASUREMENTS: We measured incidence of dose-limiting events based on local skin responses. Percentage reduction in actinic keratosis lesion count from baseline, complete clearance, and partial clearance (≥75%) of actinic keratosis lesions were assessed at Week 8. RESULTS: Nine of 63 (14.3%) patients in the face/chest group reported dose-limiting events; zero of 63 patients in the scalp group reported dose-limiting events; and 11 of 62 (17.7%) patients in the trunk/extremities group reported dose-limiting events. Mean composite local skin response scores peaked at Day 4, then rapidly declined, reaching or approaching baseline levels by Week 4. Less than five percent of patients reported severe adverse events; the most common treatment-related adverse events were application site pain and pruritus. The reduction in actinic keratosis lesion count was 78.9, 76.3, and 69.1 percent for the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. Complete clearance was achieved in 36.5, 39.7, and 22.6 percent of patients in the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. Partial clearance was achieved in 71.4, 65.1, and 50.0 percent of patients in the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: Ingenol disoxate demonstrated adverse events and local skin reaction profiles similar to results seen in trials evaluating shorter two-day regimens and was effective in patients

  20. A 12-Day Course of Imiquimod 5% for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis: Effectiveness and Local Reactions.

    PubMed

    Serra-Guillén, C; Nagore, E; Llombart, B; Sanmartín, O; Requena, C; Calomarde, L; Guillén, C

    2018-04-01

    Imiquimod is an excellent option for patients with actinic keratosis, although its use may be limited by the long course of treatment required (4 weeks) and the likelihood of local skin reactions. The objectives of the present study were to demonstrate the effectiveness of a 12-day course of imiquimod 5% for the treatment of actinic keratosis and to examine the association between treatment effectiveness and severity of local reactions. We included patients with at least 8 actinic keratoses treated with imiquimod 5% cream for 12 consecutive days. Local reactions were classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The statistical analysis of the association between local reactions and clinical response was based on the Pearson χ 2 test and the Spearman rank correlation test. Sixty-five patients completed the study. Complete response was recorded in 52.3% and partial response in 75.4%. We found a statistically significant association between severity of the local reaction and response to treatment in both the Pearson χ 2 test and the Spearman rank correlation test. A 12-day course of imiquimod 5% proved effective for the treatment of actinic keratosis. Severity of local reactions during treatment was correlated with clinical response. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Is imiquimod effective and safe for actinic keratosis?

    PubMed

    Walker, J Kendall; Koenig, Clint

    2003-03-01

    Imiquimod 5% cream, applied 3 times per week for 12 weeks, is effective for treatment of actinic keratosis. Severe erythema and other local reactions occurred in almost everyone receiving treatment, due to imiquimod's immune system-modulating effects. The 25 patients in the treatment group tolerated these adverse effects well. Despite these effects, imiquimod can be used as an alternative to traditional cryotherapy for the treatment of actinic keratosis among selected, motivated

  2. Clinical effect of imiquimod 5% cream in the treatment of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Andrea N; Shamuelova, Eleonora; Sherer, Daniel; Lou, Wendy; Singer, Giselle; Cervera, Christina; Lamba, Sumedha; Lebwohl, Mark G

    2002-10-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is the earliest clinical manifestation of squamous cell carcinoma. Metastatic SCC causes the majority of the 1300 to 2300 deaths attributed to nonmelanoma skin cancer in the United States each year. Recent studies have shown that intralesional administration of interferon can be used successfully in the treatment of AK. Imiquimod is an immune response modifier, currently approved for the treatment of genital warts. The topically applied immune response modifier acts by up-regulating interferon and other cytokines involved in the cell-mediated immune response at the site of application. The aim of this was to determine the efficacy and safety of imiquimod 5% cream for the treatment of AK. Twenty-two patients with AK lesions were treated with imiquimod 5% cream, initially at 3 times per week for 8 weeks, or until total clearance of lesions. Patients applied imiquimod to lesions on one side of the body and vehicle cream to the other side. A total of 17 patients who completed treatment were evaluated for number of lesions and adverse reactions before treatment and at weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8 after initiation of treatment. AK lesions were also assessed 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. A significant reduction in the average number of lesions per patient was observed for patients treated with imiquimod. The most frequent reactions to treatment were erythema, itching, and scabbing; however, all adverse events were mild to moderate. Imiquimod 5% cream may be a promising treatment for AK.

  3. Cost for the treatment of actinic keratosis on the rise in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Eshini; McGuigan, Sean; Sinclair, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To report the burden and cost of actinic keratosis (AK) treatment in Australia and to forecast the number of AK treatments and the associated costs to 2020. Design and setting: A retrospective study of data obtained from medicare Australia for AK treated by cryotherapy between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2012, by year and by state or territory. Results: The total number of AK cryotherapy treatments increased from 247,515 in 1994 to 643,622 in 2012, and we estimate that the number of treatments will increase to 831,952 (95% CI 676,919 to 986,987) by 2020. The total Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) benefits paid out for AK in 2012 was $19.6 million and we forecast that this will increase to $24.7 million by 2020 (without inflation). Conclusion: The number of AK cryotherapy treatments increased by 160% between 1994 and 2012. we forecast that the number of treatments will increase by 30% between 2012 and 2020. The rates of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and AK appear to be increasing at the same rate. During the period 2010 to 2015 AK is anticipated to increase by 17.8% which follows a similar trend to published data that forecasts an increase in NMSC treatments of 22.3%. PMID:25309734

  4. Ingenol mebutate in low amounts for the treatment of actinic keratosis in Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Joe, Hyun Jae; Oh, Byung Ho

    2017-01-01

    Ingenol mebutate (IM), a novel agent for field therapy of actinic keratosis (AK), has a drawback of inducing local skin reactions (LSRs), which may cause discomfort in patients. To reduce the LSRs, we tried the application of IM in low amounts. The purpose of this study was to review Korean patients with AK being treated with IM and evaluate the LSRs and therapeutic outcomes of low amounts of IM. We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with AK on the face. A total of 20 and 27 patients were treated by applying recommended amount of 18.8 mg/cm 2 and the lower amount of 10 mg/cm 2 , respectively. The mean composite LSR score for the low amount group (LAG; 12.18±3.29) was significantly lower than that for the recommended amount group (RAG; 15.45±2.70) ( P <0.01, independent sample t -test). The 2-month clearance rate calculated by the number of AKs before and after treatment in each patient was significantly higher for RAG (88.16%), compared with 75.56% for LAG ( P <0.001). Low amount of IM for the treatment of facial AK significantly reduced LSRs in Korean patients. Minimizing LSRs may allow for a secondary targeting treatment of IM for the residual lesions, depending on initial treatment outcomes.

  5. Laser-mediated Photodynamic Therapy: An Alternative Treatment for Actinic Keratosis?

    PubMed

    Kessels, Janneke P H M; Nelemans, Patty J; Mosterd, Klara; Kelleners-Smeets, Nicole W J; Krekels, Gertruud A M; Ostertag, Judith U

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with light emitting diode (LED) illumination is a frequently used treatment modality for actinic keratosis (AK) with excellent cosmetic outcome. A major disadvantage, however, is the high pain score. Pulsed dye laser (PDL) illumination has been suggested, but the long-term efficacy of this treatment is unknown. In this split-face study we prospectively treated 61 patients with AK, with both LED-PDT and PDL-PDT. The mean change in the number of lesions between the end of follow-up and start of therapy was -4.25 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) -5.07; -3.43) for LED-PDT and -3.88 (95% CI -4,76; -2.99) for PDL-PDT, with a non-significant difference (p = 0.258) of -0.46 (95% CI -1.28; 0.35). The percentage decrease from baseline in the total number of AK was 55.8% and 47.8%, respectively, at 12-month follow-up. Visual analogue scale pain score was lower after PDL (mean 2.64) compared with LED illumination (mean 6.47). These findings indicate that PDL-PDT is an effective alternative illumination source fo.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of Ingenol Mebutate Gel for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis in Greece.

    PubMed

    Athanasakis, Kostas; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Tarantilis, Filippos; Tsiantou, Vasiliki; Kontodimas, Stathis; Kyriopoulos, John

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of ingenol mebutate (IM) versus other topical alternatives for the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK). The analysis used a decision tree to calculate the clinical effects and costs of AK first-line treatments, IM (2-3 days), diclofenac 3% (for 8 or 12 weeks), imiquimod 5% (for 4 or 8 weeks), during a 24-month horizon, using discrete intervals of 6 months. A hypothetical cohort of immunocompetent adult patients with clinically confirmed AK on the face and scalp or trunk and extremities was considered. Clinical data on the relative efficacy were obtained from a network meta-analysis. Inputs concerning resource use derived from an expert panel. All costs were calculated from a Greek third-party payer perspective. IM 0.015% and 0.05% were both cost-effective compared with diclofenac and below a willingness-to-pay threshold of €30,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) (€199 and €167 per QALY, respectively). Comparing IM on the face and scalp AK lesions for 3 days versus imiquimod for 4 weeks resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €10,868 per QALY. IM was dominant during the 8-week imiquimod period. IM use on the trunk and extremities compared with diclofenac (8 or 12 weeks) led to incremental cost-effectiveness ratios estimated at €1584 and €1316 per QALY accordingly. Results remained robust to deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. From a social insurance perspective in Greece, IM 0.015% and IM 0.05% could be the most cost-effective first-line topical field treatment options in all cases for AK treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ingenol mebutate gel for actinic keratosis: the link between quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Matthias; Tu, John H; Knudsen, Kim Mark; Erntoft, Sandra; Larsson, Thomas; Hanke, C William

    2015-05-01

    Actinic keratosis therapy can elicit unsightly and painful local skin responses; assessment of treatment satisfaction and health-related quality of life (QoL) is important. Ingenol mebutate gel is a novel topical field therapy for actinic keratosis. Post-hoc analyses were performed based on patient-reported outcomes from phase-III trials (n = 1005) to assess the effects of ingenol mebutate on QoL and the relationship between both QoL and treatment satisfaction, and degree of lesion clearance. Patients received ingenol mebutate or vehicle for self-application to a 25-cm(2) contiguous area: 0.015% once daily for 3 consecutive days (face/scalp) or 0.05% once daily for 2 consecutive days (trunk/extremities). QoL (Skindex-16) and Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication data were recorded. Significant, positive associations between Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication score and degree of clearance were identified for patients in the face/scalp (effectiveness P < .0001 and global satisfaction P = .0002) and trunk/extremities (P < .0001 and P = .0014, respectively) groups. There was a significant association between Skindex-16 score and clearance for patients in the face/scalp group for change in symptoms (P = .0218), emotions (P = .0002), and overall Skindex-16 score (P = .0006) from baseline. Clinical trial population findings may not be generalizable to clinical practice. Ingenol mebutate significantly improved patients' QoL and treatment satisfaction. Improvements were associated with higher degrees of actinic keratosis lesion clearance. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Resource Utilization and Treatment Patterns in Patients with Actinic Keratosis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Asche, Carl V; Zografos, Panagiotis; Norlin, Jenny M; Urbanek, Bill; Mamay, Carl; Makin, Charles; Erntoft, Sandra; Chen, Chi-Chang; Hines, Dionne M; Mark Siegel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    To compare health care resource utilization and treatment patterns between patients with actinic keratosis (AK) treated with ingenol mebutate gel (IngMeb) and those treated with other field-directed AK therapies. A retrospective, propensity-score-matched, cohort study compared refill/repeat and adding-on/switching patterns and outpatient visits and prescriptions (health care resource utilization) over 6 months in patients receiving IngMeb versus those receiving imiquimod, 5-fluorouracil, diclofenac sodium, and methyl aminolevulinate or aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (MAL/ALA-PDT). The final sample analyzed included four matched treatment cohort pairs (IngMeb and comparator; n = 790-971 per treatment arm). Refill rates were similar except for imiquimod (15% vs. 9% for imiquimod and IngMeb, respectively; P < 0.05). MAL/ALA-PDT treatment repetition rates were higher than IngMeb refill rates (20% vs. 10%; P < 0.05). Topical agent add-on/switch rates were comparable. PDT had higher switch rates than did IngMeb (5% vs. 2%; P < 0.05). The IngMeb cohort had a significantly lower proportion of patients with at least one AK-related outpatient visit during the 6-month follow-up than did any other cohort: versus imiquimod (50% vs. 66%; P < 0.0001), versus 5-fluorouracil (50% vs. 69%; P < 0.0001), versus diclofenac sodium (51% vs. 56%; P = 0.034), and versus MAL/ALA-PDT (50% vs. 100%; P < 0.0001). There were significantly fewer AK-related prescriptions among patients receiving IngMeb than among patients in other cohorts. Results based on the first 6 months after treatment initiation suggested that most field-directed AK therapies had clinically comparable treatment patterns except imiquimod, which was associated with higher refill rates, and PDT, which was associated with significantly more frequent treatment sessions and higher switching rates. IngMeb was also associated with significantly fewer outpatient visits than were other field-directed therapies. Copyright

  9. Actinic Keratosis Pathogenesis Update and New Patents.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Melis, Marcello; Faina, Valentina; Romaniello, Federico; Didona, Dario; Cardone, Michele; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common premalignant skin lesion. Because of its increasing incidence, several efforts have been made to earlier detectection and to improve knowledge on photocarcinogenic pathways of keratinocytes. As a consequence, recently new discoveries have been done in this field. Starting from our previous review on actinic keratosis, we reviewed the literature focusing on pathogenesis and new patents in order to highlight the most recent progresses in diagnosis and therapeutic approach. Although several efforts have been done in the field of photodamaged skin, new upgrades in diagnosis and therapy are needed to detect superficial actinic keratosis earlier, to improve the disease free survival of patient and to better treat the field cancerization.

  10. Actinic keratosis: a cross-sectional study of disease characteristics and treatment patterns in Danish dermatology clinics.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, Andrés M; Egekvist, Henrik; Lorentzen, Henrik F; Philipsen, Peter A; Stausbøl-Grøn, Birgitte; Stender, Ida M; Haedersdal, Merete

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of actinic keratosis (AK) is increasing, and several treatment options are available. The aim of this study was to describe clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in patients with AK treated by Danish dermatologists. A multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional study was conducted. Three dermatology hospital departments and seven private dermatology clinics enrolled eligible AK patients consecutively during one week. A total of 312 patients were included. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was previously reported in 51.0% of patients and currently suspected in 9.4% of AK-affected anatomical regions. Lesions of AK were located primarily on the face (38.6%), scalp (12.8%), and hands (11.2%). Actinic keratosis commonly presented with multiple AK lesions (38.6%) and field cancerization (38.5%). The treatments used most frequently were cryotherapy (57.7%) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolevulinate (17.1%) and imiquimod (11.2%). The likelihood of receiving cryotherapy was higher for men (odds ratio [OR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-2.47) and increased with age (2.2% per year, 0.4-4.0%). PDT represented the most frequently applied treatment for severe actinic damage and was more likely to be prescribed to women (OR 4.08, 95% CI 2.22-7.47) and young patients (OR 0.97 per year, 95% CI 0.95-0.99). The prevalence of severe actinic damage (17.3% versus 9.6%) and intake of immunosuppressive medication (29.0 versus 2.0) were higher among hospital patients compared with those treated in private practices (P < 0.0001). The majority of AK patients in Danish dermatology clinics have a history of skin cancer, and NMSC is suspected in almost 10% of AK-affected regions. Cryotherapy is the most frequently used treatment overall, except in instances of severe actinic damage, in which PDT is the first-choice treatment. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Pharmacoeconomic Considerations in Treating Actinic Keratosis: An Update.

    PubMed

    Vale, Spencer M; Hill, Dane; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-02-01

    Actinic keratosis is one of the most common dermatological diagnoses worldwide, especially among the elderly, fair-skinned, and immunocompromised, and is associated with a risk of transformation to skin cancer. With actinic keratosis and skin cancer prevalence increasing as the aged population expands in the US, optimizing treatment strategies may produce cost savings for the healthcare system. Since the time of our last review in 2008, investigation of the economic considerations in treating actinic keratosis has advanced. To provide an update of treatment cost effectiveness and to review factors relating to the costs of care, we conducted a systematic review of pharmacoeconomic publications since December 2008. We identified 11 pharmacoeconomic studies, with one cost-of-treatment, five cost-effectiveness, and five cost-utility analyses. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was well tolerated and produced a favorable cosmetic outcome in most studies. Ingenol mebutate, the newest but most expensive topical field therapy, 5-fluorouracil, and PDT were the most cost-effective treatments in our review. Patient adherence to therapy and the management of adverse effects were significant contributors to treatment costs. In the US, treatment guidelines and formalized cost-effectiveness analyses for actinic keratosis are absent from the recent literature. Future pharmacoeconomic investigation will depend on up-to-date comparative efficacy data, as well as clarification of rates of, and management strategies for, adverse effects, therapeutic non-adherence, and lesion recurrence.

  12. Actinic Keratosis and Non-Invasive Diagnostic Techniques: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Casari, Alice; Chester, Johanna; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Actinic keratosis represents the earliest manifestation of non-melanoma skin cancer. Because of their risk of progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma, an earlier diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Their diagnosis sometimes could represent a challenge even for expert dermatologists. Dermoscopy, confocal laser microscopy and optical coherence tomography could help clinicians in diagnosis. PMID:29316678

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of 5-fluorouracil 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% in the treatment of actinic keratosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Diana; Puig-Peiró, Ruth; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Plazas, Maria Josep; Brosa, Max

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of 5-fluorouracil 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% (5-FU/SA) in the treatment of isolated hyperkeratotic actinic keratosis lesions in Spain. An analytical decision-making model was constructed to compare whether 5-FU/SA was a cost-effective option compared with cryotherapy from the perspective of the Spanish National Health System with a time horizon of 6 months. Costs were expressed in 2014 euros. The cost of patients with hyperkeratotic actinic keratosis treated with 5-FU/SA or cryotherapy was €266 and €285, respectively. 5-FU/SA was associated with higher rates of treatment success and, consequently, more quality-adjusted life years, than cryotherapy. Therefore, 5-FU/SA was the dominant treatment, as it was associated with a lower treatment cost and greater effectiveness than cryotherapy. Economically, 5-FU/SA was a dominant option compared with cryotherapy in the treatment of isolated hyperkeratotic actinic keratosis lesions in Spain.

  14. [Actinic keratosis: New concept and therapeutic update].

    PubMed

    Carmena-Ramón, Rafael; Mateu-Puchades, Almudena; Santos-Alarcón, Sergio; Lucas-Truyols, Sofía

    2017-10-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common reason for consultation in both Primary Care and Specialised Care. It is the third or fourth most common reason for consultation in dermatology, accounting for up to 5-6% of patients attended. It has also been observed that its prevalence has been increasing in the last 10years, compared to other dermatoses. This is also expected to continue to increase due to longer life expectancy, and by the changes in sun exposure habits since the middle of the last century. The aim of this article is to update the concepts of AK, cancerisation field and to present the currently available therapeutic tools. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  15. Spanish-Portuguese consensus statement on use of daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinate in the treatment of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Gilaberte, Y; Aguilar, M; Almagro, M; Correia, O; Guillén, C; Harto, A; Pérez-García, B; Pérez-Pérez, L; Redondo, P; Sánchez-Carpintero, I; Serra-Guillén, C; Valladares, L M

    2015-10-01

    Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new type of PDT that is as effective as conventional PDT in grade 1 and 2 actinic keratosis but with fewer adverse effects, resulting in greater efficiency. The climatic conditions in the Iberian Peninsula require an appropriately adapted consensus protocol. We describe a protocol for the treatment of grade 1 and 2 actinic keratosis with daylight-mediated PDT and methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) adapted to the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Spanish and Portuguese patients and the climatic conditions of both countries. Twelve dermatologists from different parts of Spain and Portugal with experience in the treatment of actinic keratosis with PDT convened to draft a consensus statement for daylight-mediated PDT with MAL in these countries. Based on a literature review and their own clinical experience, the group developed a recommended protocol. According to the recommendations adopted, patients with multiple grade 1 and 2 lesions, particularly those at risk of developing cancer, are candidates for this type of therapy. Daylight-mediated PDT can be administered throughout the year, although it is not indicated at temperatures below 10°C or at excessively high temperatures. Likewise, therapy should not be administered when it is raining, snowing, or foggy. The procedure is simple, requiring application of a sunscreen with a protection factor of at least 30 based exclusively on organic filters, appropriate preparation of the lesions, application of MAL without occlusion, and activation in daylight for 2hours. This consensus statement represents a practical and detailed guideline to achieve maximum effectiveness of daylight-mediated PDT with MAL in Spain and Portugal with minimal adverse effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Actinic Keratosis Field Assessment Scale for Grading Actinic Keratosis Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Dréno, Brigitte; Cerio, Rino; Dirschka, Thomas; Nart, Ignasi Figueras; Lear, John T; Peris, Ketty; de Casas, Andrés Ruiz; Kaleci, Shaniko; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2017-10-02

    Actinic keratosis (AK) lesions are surrounded by field cancerization (areas of subclinical, non-visible sun damage). Existing AK grading tools rely on AK counts, which are not reproducible. An Actinic Keratosis Field Assessment Scale (AK-FAS) for grading the severity of AK/field was developed. Standardized photographs of patients representing the full range of AK severity were collected. Six investigators independently rated each photograph according to 3 criteria: AK area (total skin area affected by AK lesions), hyperkeratosis and sun damage. Inter-rater reproducibility was good for all 3 criteria. Validation of the AK-FAS showed good reproducibility for AK area and hyperkeratosis, even for dermatologists untrained on use of the scale. In conclusion, the AK-FAS is objective, easy to use and implement, and reproducible. It incorporates assessment of the entire field affected by AK instead of relying on lesion counts. Use of the AK-FAS may standardize AK diagnosis, making it relevant to routine clinical practice.

  17. Oral acetylsalicylic acid and prevalence of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Juliano; Miot, Hélio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the influence of a regular oral use of acetylsalicylic acid in the prevalence of actinic keratosis. A case-control study with dermatologic outpatients above 50 years of age assessed between 2009 and 2011. Cases were defined as those who had been under regular use of oral acetylsalicylic acid for more than six consecutive months. The assessment focused on: age, sex, skin-type, tobacco smoking, use of medication, occurrence of individual or family skin cancer, and sunscreen and sun exposure habits. Actinic keratoses were counted in the medial region of the face and upper limbs. Counts were adjusted by co-variables based on a generalized linear model. A total of 74 cases and 216 controls were assessed. The median time of acetylsalicylic acid use was 36 months. Cases differed from controls as to the highest age, highest prevalence of use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and fewer keratosis on the face and on the upper limbs (p<0.05). The multivariate model showed that the use of acetylsalicylic acid was associated to lower counts of face actinic keratosis and upper-limb erythematous actinic keratosis (p<0.05), regardless of other risk factors. The regular use of oral acetylsalicylic acid for more than six months was associated to a lower prevalence of actinic keratosis, especially facial and erythematous ones.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Utility Analysis of Ingenol Mebutate Versus Diclofenac 3% and Imiquimod 5% in the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Elías, I; Ortega-Joaquín, N; de la Cueva, P; Del Pozo, L J; Moreno-Ramírez, D; Boada, A; Aguilar, M; Mirada, A; Mosquera, E; Gibbons, C; Oyagüez, I

    2016-01-01

    To perform a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of ingenol mebutate in the treatment of actinic keratosis in Spain. We used an adapted Markov model to simulate outcomes in a cohort of patients (mean age, 73 years) with actinic keratosis over a 5-year period. The comparators were diclofenac 3% and imiquimod 5%. The analysis was performed from the perspective of the Spanish National Health System based on direct costs (2015 retail price plus value added tax less the mandatory discount). A panel of experts estimated resources, taking unit costs from national databases. An annual discount rate of 3% was applied. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The effectiveness of ingenol mebutate-with 0.192 and 0.129 more clearances gained in treatments for face and scalp lesions and trunk and extremity lesions, respectively-was superior to diclofenac's. The total costs of treatment with ingenol mebutate were lower at € 551.50 (face and scalp) and € 622.27 (trunk and extremities) than the respective costs with diclofenac (€ 849.11 and € 844.93). The incremental cost-effectiveness and cost-utility ratios showed that ingenol mebutate was a dominant strategy vs diclofenac. Ingenol mebutate also proved to be more effective than imiquimod, based on 0.535 and 0.503 additional clearances, and total costs of € 551.50 and € 527.89 for the two drugs, respectively. The resulting incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was € 728.64 per clearance gained with ingenol mebutate vs imiquimod. Ingenol mebutate was a dominant treatment option vs diclofenac and was efficient vs imiquimod (i.e., more effective at a higher cost, achieving an incremental cost-utility ratio of<€30000/quality-adjusted life-years). Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the therapeutic results of actinic keratosis treated with topical 5% fluorouracil by reflectance confocal laser microscopy: preliminary study*

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Priscila; Maia, Marcus; Rodrigues, Sarita Bartholomei; Marta, Alessandra Cristina; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Topical treatment for actinic keratosis with 5% fluorouracil has a recurrence rate of 54% in 12 months of follow-up. This study analyzed thirteen actinic keratoses on the upper limbs through confocal microscopy, at the time of clinical diagnosis and after 4 weeks of treatment with fluorouracil. After the treatment was established and evidence of clinical cure was achieved, in two of the nine actinic keratoses, confocal microscopy enabled visualization of focal areas of atypical honeycomb pattern in the epidermis indicating therapeutic failure. Preliminary data suggest the use of confocal microscopy as a tool for diagnosis and therapeutic control of actinic keratosis. PMID:26131881

  20. Reduced degree of irritation during a second cycle of ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% for the treatment of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Jim On, Shelbi C; Haddican, Madelaine; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Singer, Giselle; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ingenol mebutate gel is a topical field treatment of actinic keratosis (AK). One of several proposed mechanisms of action for ingenol mebutate is induction of cell death in proliferating keratinocytes, suggesting a preferential action on AKs rather than healthy skin. Local skin reactions (LSRs) during 2 sequential 4-week cycles of AK treatment with ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% on the face or scalp were evaluated to test the hypothesis that reapplication of the study product would produce lower LSR scores than during the first treatment cycle. In this unblinded study, 20 participants with AKs on the face or scalp were treated with ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% once daily for 3 days in 2 sequential 4-week cycles. Composite LSR scores were evaluated during both cycles. The composite LSR score during the second cycle was found to be significantly lower than the first cycle (P=.0002). The proportion of participants who experienced LSRs in the second treatment cycle was less than the first cycle. Ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% may cumulatively reduce the burden of sun-damaged skin over 2 treatment cycles by targeting and removing transformed keratinocytes.

  1. Topical photodynamic therapy with methylaminolevulinate for the treatment of actinic keratosis and reduction of photodamage in organ transplant recipients: a case-series of 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Ariel; Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Nicklas, Claudia; de la Cruz, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTR) are at high risk of developing cutaneous neoplasms. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK) in OTR. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of PDT with methylaminolevulinate (MAL) in the treatment of facial AK in OTR. As a secondary objective, we wanted to evaluate the usefulness of topical PDT in the reduction of photodamage in OTR. A prospective, single center, single arm study was made. 16 OTR were included. Topical PDT was applied for 1 or 2 cycles depending on the patient's characteristics. An evaluation of AK was made at visits pre-treatment, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. Photodamage was measured with multispectral image technique (SkinCare). A complete response rate of 100% was achieved for AK in all patients; it persisted without change at 12 and 24 weeks of follow-up. 62.5% of patients improved their photodamage as measured by SkinCare®, but this result was not statistically significant (P = 0.12). All patients had high level of satisfaction at the end of the therapy. MAL-PDT is an effective therapy for the treatment of AK in OTRs. It can reduce photodamage in this group of patients, but these results were not statistically significant.

  2. Topical photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, S; Belloni Fortina, A; Rigotti, P; Rossi, B; Baldan, N; Alaibac, M; Marchini, F

    2007-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) show an increased risk of precancerous (mostly actinic keratosis [AK]) and cancerous (mostly squamous cell carcinomas [SCC] and basal cell carcinomas [BCC]) cutaneous lesions. Their frequency increases with time after transplantation. AKs seem to progress more often and faster to invasive SCC in OTRs compared with the general population. The steady increase of risk of cutaneous premalignancies and malignancies with time after transplantation is an alarming figure because the number of organ allograft recipients who live for many years after transplantion is rapidly growing. This points out the need to devote more resources to skin cancer prevention, detection, and management. Various therapies, including cryotherapy, topical 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, topical diclofenac, curettage, electrosurgery, carbon dioxide laser, and surgical excision, are available for AKs. However, most of these are limited by frequent relapses and the presence of multiple lesions over a wide area. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) represents an innovative therapeutic approach for nonsurgical treatment of cutaneous precancerous lesions and skin cancers. In this study we confirmed the usefulness of PDT in the treatment of AKs in OTRs, even in lesions relapsing or unresponsive to conventional treatment. We showed a complete response rate of 71%, after 2 treatments sessions that were 2 weeks apart. The response rate of scalp/facial lesions (72%) was higher compared with acral lesions (40%). Topical PDT could represent a useful therapeutic alternative for AKs in OTRs because large lesions can be treated with excellent cosmetic outcome.

  3. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy in the Short and Medium Term in the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Acne Vulgaris and Photoaging: Results from Four Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Carpio, PA; Alcolea-López, JM; Vélez, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical efficacy of methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL)-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) in the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), acne vulgaris (AV) and photoaging (PA), in the short and medium term. Subjects and methods: Four separate prospective studies were designed on patients with AK (n=25), BCC (n=20), AV (n=20) and PA (n=25). Two PDT protocols were applied, and different clinical efficacy criteria were established, including lesion count and size. Two semi-quantitative and four analogue visual scales were completed for the evaluation of results according to the therapist, the patient and two independent experts. Results: In the AK and BCC studies, full clinical remission was observed in 84.7% and 75.7% of lesions, respectively. In the AV study, the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions fell significantly (p<0.001, p<0.05). In the PA study a reduction in Dover scale scores (3.19 vs. 2.14, p<0.001) was proven. The percentages of satisfied or very satisfied patients were: AK=88%, BCC=90%, AV=89% and PA=80%. A year later, none of the AK or BCC lesions had reappeared, and the cases of AV and PA remained stable, with a tendency towards improvement. Conclusion: the MAL-PDT procedures used produced efficacious, safe and satisfactory results in KA, BCC, AV and PA in the short and medium term. PMID:24511190

  4. Online consensus conferences for clinical guidelines development - a survey among participants from the International Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ricardo N; Jacobs, Anja; Rosumeck, Stefanie; Nast, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Guideline development requires considerable time and financial resources. New technical devices such as software for online conferences may help to reduce time and financial efforts of guidelines development. The present survey may serve as an explorative pilot for a future study to determine the technical feasibility, acceptability and possible weaknesses of online consensus conferences for clinical guidelines development. An anonymous online survey was conducted among participants in the online consensus conference of the International League of Dermatological Societies (ILDS) Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis. The majority of participants reported no technical problems with the participation in the online consensus conference; one participant had substantial technical problems accountable to a regional telephone breakdown. The majority of participants would not have preferred a traditional face-to-face conference, and all participants rated online consensus conferences for international guidelines as absolutely acceptable. Rates of acceptance were particularly high among those participants with prior experience with consensus conferences. Certain aspects, particularly the possibilities of debating, were rated as possibly superior in face-to-face conferences by some participants. The data from the online survey indicate that online consensus conferences may be an appropriate alternative to traditional face-to-face consensus conferences, especially within the frame of international guidelines that would require high travel costs and time. Further research is necessary to confirm the data from this explorative pilot study. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evidence- and consensus-based (S3) Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis - International League of Dermatological Societies in cooperation with the European Dermatology Forum - Short version.

    PubMed

    Werner, R N; Stockfleth, E; Connolly, S M; Correia, O; Erdmann, R; Foley, P; Gupta, A K; Jacobs, A; Kerl, H; Lim, H W; Martin, G; Paquet, M; Pariser, D M; Rosumeck, S; Röwert-Huber, H-J; Sahota, A; Sangueza, O P; Shumack, S; Sporbeck, B; Swanson, N A; Torezan, L; Nast, A

    2015-11-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a frequent health condition attributable to chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Several treatment options are available and evidence based guidelines are missing. The goal of these evidence- and consensus-based guidelines was the development of treatment recommendations appropriate for different subgroups of patients presenting with AK. A secondary aim of these guidelines was the implementation of knowledge relating to the clinical background of AK, including consensus-based recommendations for the histopathological definition, diagnosis and the assessment of patients. The guidelines development followed a pre-defined and structured process. For the underlying systematic literature review of interventions for AK, the methodology suggested by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was adapted. All recommendations were consented during a consensus conference using a formal consensus methodology. Strength of recommendations was expressed based on the GRADE approach. If expert opinion without external evidence was incorporated into the reasoning for making a certain recommendation, the rationale was provided. The Guidelines underwent open public review and approval by the commissioning societies. Various interventions for the treatment of AK have been assessed for their efficacy. The consenting procedure led to a treatment algorithm as shown in the guidelines document. Based on expert consensus, the present guidelines present recommendations on the classification of patients, diagnosis and histopathological definition of AK. Details on the methods and results of the systematic literature review and guideline development process have been published separately. International guidelines are intended to be adapted to national or regional

  6. Imiquimod 5% cream for the treatment of actinic keratosis: results from two phase III, randomized, double-blind, parallel group, vehicle-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lebwohl, Mark; Dinehart, Scott; Whiting, David; Lee, Peter K; Tawfik, Naji; Jorizzo, Joseph; Lee, James H; Fox, Terry L

    2004-05-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the development and pathogenesis of actinic keratosis (AK). Imiquimod has been shown to stimulate the cutaneous immune response and be effective for the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers. Two phase III, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled studies evaluated the efficacy of imiquimod 5% cream compared with vehicle in the treatment of AK lesions on the face and balding scalp. A total of 436 participants at 24 centers in the United States and Canada were randomized to either imiquimod 5% or vehicle cream. Study cream was applied one time per day, 2 days per week for 16 weeks. Clearance of AK lesions was clinically assessed at an 8-week posttreatment visit. The complete clearance rate was 45.1% for the imiquimod group and 3.2% for the vehicle group. The difference in complete clearance rates (imiquimod minus vehicle) was 41.9% with a 95% confidence interval of 34.9% to 49%. The partial (> or =75%) clearance rate was 59.1% for the imiquimod group and 11.8% for the vehicle group. The difference in partial clearance rates (imiquimod minus vehicle) was 47.3% with a 95% confidence interval of 39.5% to 55.1%. The median percent reduction in AK lesions was 83.3% for the imiquimod group and 0% for the vehicle group. Local skin reactions were common. Severe erythema was reported by 17.7% of participants who received imiquimod and 2.3% of participants who received vehicle. Overall, imiquimod was very well tolerated. Imiquimod 5% cream used 2 times per week for 16 weeks is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for AK.

  7. A randomized comparative study of tolerance and satisfaction in the treatment of actinic keratosis of the face and scalp between 5% imiquimod cream and photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolaevulinate.

    PubMed

    Serra-Guillen, C; Nagore, E; Hueso, L; Llombart, B; Requena, C; Sanmartín, O; Botella-Estrada, R; Guillen, C

    2011-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and imiquimod are two excellent treatments for actinic keratosis but are often not well tolerated by patients. To ascertain which treatment is better tolerated and which produces greater patient satisfaction. A secondary objective was to determine the factors related to the patient's tolerance to each treatment. Patients with at least five actinic keratosis lesions on the face and scalp were selected. The patients were randomized to receive treatment with PDT with methyl aminolaevulinate or treatment with imiquimod. Tolerance, satisfaction and predisposition to repeat the treatment were evaluated. Most patients exhibited good or acceptable tolerance to both PDT and imiquimod treatment. There was a higher percentage of patients treated with PDT (93%) who were very satisfied compared with imiquimod (62%) (P=0·004). Most patients treated with either one of the two options would repeat the same treatment. No significant relationship was found between age, sex, working time exposed to the sun, phototype and hair colour and the tolerance to both treatments. Both PDT and imiquimod are treatments that are generally well tolerated. While both treatments provide a high level of satisfaction, PDT appears to be slightly superior in this regard. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Effectiveness of cross polarized light and fluorescence diagnosis for detection of sub-clinical and clinical actinic keratosis during imiquimod treatment.

    PubMed

    Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Gupta, Girish; Ortonne, Nicolas; Duteil, Luc; Queille, Catherine; Mallefet, Pascal

    2010-07-01

    During treatment of actinic keratosis (AK) lesions with imiquimod sub-clinical lesions often become visible. It is, however, unclear whether these sub-clinical lesions would be detectable beforehand. The aim of this pilot study was to compare two techniques, cross polarized light photography (CPL) and fluorescence diagnosis (FD) using methyllevulinic acid and illumination with Wood's lamp for their ability to detect sub-clinical lesions. These findings were also compared with biopsy results taken before and after treatment with imiquimod 5% cream or vehicle. Twelve patients with at least five clinically visible AK lesions in a single contiguous 20 cm(2) area on the head were recruited. Patient eligibility was determined at the screening visit, when they were randomized to treatment. The randomization was 3:1, active to vehicle (nine treated with imiquimod, three with vehicle cream) for a total duration of 24 weeks (six clinic visits). Patients were assessed for baseline AK lesion counts (clinical and sub-clinical) at the screening visit and final counts at week 20. The number of clinically observed AK lesions was significantly lower at week 12 and week 20 compared with baseline following imiquimod treatment versus vehicle. The number of counted lesions were significantly higher using the CPL method compared with clinical counting with imiquimod treatment at baseline (8.3 +/- 3.4 vs 5.8 +/- 1.3; P = 0.027) and week 20 (4.8 +/- 2.4 vs 3.0 +/- 1.7; P = 0.02) but not in the vehicle group. The FD lesion counting method did not show a significant increase in the number of detected lesions compared with clinical analysis in the imiquimod and placebo groups but when comparisons were performed using pooled data (treatments and visits combined) the results were significant. The number of sub-clinical and clinical AK lesions detected during treatment with imiquimod can be better demonstrated using the methods of CPL and FD, but statistical significance was reached only using

  9. A Network Meta-Analysis of the Relative Efficacy of Treatments for Actinic Keratosis of the Face or Scalp in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Vegter, Stefan; Tolley, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Background Several treatments are available for actinic keratosis (AK) on the face and scalp. Most treatment modalities were compared to placebo and therefore little is known on their relative efficacy. Objectives To compare the different treatments for mild to moderate AK on the face and scalp available in clinical practice in Europe. Methods A network meta-analysis (NMA) was performed on the outcome “complete patient clearance”. Ten treatment modalities were included: two 5-aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapies (ALA-PDT), applied as gel (BF-200 ALA) or patch; methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT); three modalities with imiquimod (IMI), applied as a 4-week or 16-week course with 5% imiquimod, or a 2–3 week course with 3.75% imiquimod; cryotherapy; diclofenac 3% in 2.5% hyaluronic acid; 0.5% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); and ingenol mebutate (IMB). The only data available for 5% 5-FU was from one small study and was determined to be too limited to be reliably included in the analysis. For BF-200 ALA and MAL-PDT, data from illumination with narrow-band lights were selected as these are typically used in clinical practice. The NMA was performed with a random-effects Bayesian model. Results 25 trials on 5,562 patients were included in the NMA. All active treatments were significantly better than placebo. BF-200 ALA showed the highest efficacy compared to placebo to achieve total patient clearance. BF-200 ALA had the highest probability to be the best treatment and the highest SUCRA score (64.8% and 92.1%), followed by IMI 5% 4 weeks (10.1% and 74.2%) and 5-FU 0.5% (7.2% and 66.8%). Conclusions This NMA showed that BF-200 ALA, using narrow-band lights, was the most efficacious treatment for mild to moderate AK on the face and scalp. This analysis is relevant for clinical decision making and health technology assessment, assisting the improved management of AK. PMID:24892649

  10. 5-ALA induced fluorescent image analysis of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Bae, Youngwoo; Choi, Eung-Ho; Jung, Byungjo

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyzed 5-ALA induced fluorescent images of actinic keratosis using digital fluorescent color and hyperspectral imaging modalities. UV-A was utilized to induce fluorescent images and actinic keratosis (AK) lesions were demarcated from surrounding the normal region with different methods. Eight subjects with AK lesion were participated in this study. In the hyperspectral imaging modality, spectral analysis method was utilized for hyperspectral cube image and AK lesions were demarcated from the normal region. Before image acquisition, we designated biopsy position for histopathology of AK lesion and surrounding normal region. Erythema index (E.I.) values on both regions were calculated from the spectral cube data. Image analysis of subjects resulted in two different groups: the first group with the higher fluorescence signal and E.I. on AK lesion than the normal region; the second group with lower fluorescence signal and without big difference in E.I. between two regions. In fluorescent color image analysis of facial AK, E.I. images were calculated on both normal and AK lesions and compared with the results of hyperspectral imaging modality. The results might indicate that the different intensity of fluorescence and E.I. among the subjects with AK might be interpreted as different phases of morphological and metabolic changes of AK lesions.

  11. Comparative study of trichloroacetic acid vs. photodynamic therapy with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid for actinic keratosis of the scalp.

    PubMed

    Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Cortelazzi, Chiara; Boccaletti, Valeria; Zucchi, Alfredo; Conti, Maria Luisa; Montanari, Paola; Feliciani, Claudio; Fabrizi, Giuseppe; Pagliarello, Calogero

    2015-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy with 5-methyl-aminolevulinate and photodynamic therapy with trichloroacetic acid 50% are the two techniques utilized in the management of actinic keratosis. This study was planned to compare the efficacy, adverse effects, recurrence and cosmetic outcome of these option therapies in patients with multiple actinic keratosis of the scalp. Thirteen patients with multiple actinic keratosis were treated with one of the two treatments on half of the scalp at baseline, while the other treatment was performed on the other half 15 days apart, randomly. Efficacy, adverse effects, cosmetic outcome and recurrence were recorded at follow-up visit at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Photodynamic therapy with 5 methyl-aminolevulinate was more effective than trichloroacetic acid although less tolerated by patients as it was more painful. Early adverse effects were almost the same even if trichloroacetic acid leads also to crust formation and to a worse cosmetic outcome characterized by hypopigmentation. Recurrence was lower in the area treated with photodynamic therapy. Trichloroacetic acid 50% is less effective than photodynamic therapy with 5 methyl-aminolevulinate in the treatment of multiple actinic keratosis of the scalp although better tolerated by patients. As this technique is less painful and less expensive than photodynamic therapy, we hypothesize and suggest that more sequential treatments could lead to better results. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Genomic instability in human actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Luciana Sanches; Neto, Cyro Festa; Sanches, José A; Ruiz, Itamar R G

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the repetitive DNA patterns of human actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinomas to determine the genetic alterations that are associated with malignant transformation. INTRODUCTION: Cancer cells are prone to genomic instability, which is often due to DNA polymerase slippage during the replication of repetitive DNA and to mutations in the DNA repair genes. The progression of benign actinic keratoses to malignant squamous cell carcinomas has been proposed by several authors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight actinic keratoses and 24 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), which were pair-matched to adjacent skin tissues and/or leucocytes, were studied. The presence of microsatellite instability (MSI) and the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosomes 6 and 9 were investigated using nine PCR primer pairs. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA patterns were also evaluated using eight primers. RESULTS: MSI was detected in two (D6S251, D9S50) of the eight actinic keratosis patients. Among the 8 patients who had squamous cell carcinoma-I and provided informative results, a single patient exhibited two LOH (D6S251, D9S287) and two instances of MSI (D9S180, D9S280). Two LOH and one example of MSI (D6S251) were detected in three out of the 10 patients with squamous cell carcinoma-II. Among the four patients with squamous cell carcinoma-III, one patient displayed three MSIs (D6S251, D6S252, and D9S180) and another patient exhibited an MSI (D9S280). The altered random amplified polymorphic DNA ranged from 70% actinic keratoses, 76% squamous cell carcinoma-I, and 90% squamous cell carcinoma-II, to 100% squamous cell carcinoma-III. DISCUSSION: The increased levels of alterations in the microsatellites, particularly in D6S251, and the random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints were statistically significant in squamous cell carcinomas, compared with actinic keratoses. CONCLUSION: The overall alterations that were observed in the repetitive DNA of actinic keratoses and

  13. Treatment Options for Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin biopsies: Shave biopsy : A sterile razor blade is used to “shave-off” the abnormal-looking ... the surface of the skin with a small blade. Electrodesiccation and curettage : The tumor is cut from ...

  14. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Didona, Dario; Scarno, Marco; Faina, Valentina; Gobello, Tommaso; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-07-11

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK), considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild-moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex(©) camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female) were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1-3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits of DL

  15. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Didona, Dario; Scarno, Marco; Faina, Valentina; Gobello, Tommaso; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK), considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild−moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex© camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female) were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1–3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits of DL

  16. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization measurement of telomere length in skin with/without sun exposure or actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Aida, Junko; Hatamochi, Atsushi; Hamasaki, Yoichiro; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Poon, Steven S; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Tomita, Ken-Ichiro; Hiraishi, Naoki; Kuroiwa, Mie; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sanada, Yukihiro; Kawano, Youichi; Arai, Tomio; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal and genomic instability due to telomere dysfunction is known to play an important role in carcinogenesis. To study telomere shortening in the epidermis surrounding actinic keratosis, we measured telomere lengths of basal, parabasal, and suprabasal cells in epidermis with actinic keratosis (actinic keratosis group, n = 18) and without actinic keratosis (sun-protected, n = 15, and sun-exposed, n = 13 groups) and in actinic keratosis itself as well as in dermal fibroblasts in the 3 groups, using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization. Among the 3 cell types, telomeres of basal cells were not always the longest, suggesting that tissue stem cells are not necessarily located among basal cells. Telomeres of basal cells in the sun-exposed group were shorter than those in the sun-protected group. Telomeres in the background of actinic keratosis and in actinic keratosis itself and those of fibroblasts in actinic keratosis were significantly shorter than those in the controls. Our findings demonstrate that sun exposure induces telomere shortening and that actinic keratosis arises from epidermis with shorter telomeres despite the absence of any histologic atypia. © 2014.

  17. Defining the actinic keratosis field: a literature review and discussion.

    PubMed

    Figueras Nart, I; Cerio, R; Dirschka, T; Dréno, B; Lear, J T; Pellacani, G; Peris, K; Ruiz de Casas, A

    2018-04-01

    Despite the chronic and increasingly prevalent nature of actinic keratosis (AK) and existing evidence supporting assessment of the entire cancerization field during clinical management, a standardized definition of the AK field to aid in the understanding and characterization of the disease is lacking. The objective of this review was to present and appraise the available evidence describing the AK cancerization field, with the aim of determining a precise definition of the AK field in terms of its molecular (including genetic and immunological), histological and clinical characteristics. Eight European dermatologists collaborated to conduct a review and expert appraisal of articles detailing the characteristics of the AK field. Articles published in English before August 2016 were identified using PubMed and independently selected for further assessment according to predefined preliminary inclusion and exclusion criteria. In addition, a retrospective audit of patients with AK was performed to define the AK field in clinical terms. A total of 32 review articles and 47 original research articles provided evidence of sun-induced molecular (including genetic and immunological) and histological skin changes in the sun-exposed area affected by AK. However, the available literature was deemed insufficient to inform a clinical definition of the AK field. During the retrospective audit, visible signs of sun damage in 40 patients with AK were assessed. Telangiectasia, atrophy and pigmentation disorders emerged as 'reliable or very reliable' indicators of AK field based on expert opinion, whereas 'sand paper' was deemed a 'moderately reliable' indicator. This literature review has revealed a significant gap of evidence to inform a clinical definition of the AK field. Therefore, the authors instead propose a clinical definition of field cancerization based on the identification of visible signs of sun damage that are reliable indicators of field cancerization based on expert

  18. Histopathological analysis of the therapeutic response to cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen in patients with multiple actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Câmara de; Trevisan, Flávia; Pinto, Clovis Antônio Lopes; Xavier, Célia Antônia; Pinto, Jaqueline Campoi Calvo Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are premalignant lesions of the skin caused by excessive sun exposure. Lesions may become mainly squamous cell carcinoma. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen is one of the main treatments. In order to evaluate the response of actinic keratosis to cryotherapy by histopathology, two lesions were selected in each of 14 patients with multiple actinic keratoses. In one lesion a biopsy was performed and in the other lesion a biopsy was performed after cryotherapy. Subsequently, both biopsies were compared histologically. Of the thirteen patients who completed the study, the best results were obtained in lesions undergoing cryotherapy concerning the atypia of keratinocytes, epithelial thickness and corneal layer and lymphocytic infiltrate. Despite the small number of patients, it was concluded that, if performed correctly, cryotherapy has high efficacy in the treatment of actinic keratoses.

  19. Variation in the Cost of Managing Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Tanner; Liu, Guodong; Leslie, Douglas L.; Miller, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Actinic keratosis (AK), a skin growth induced by ultraviolet light exposure, requires chronic management because a small proportion can progress into squamous cell skin cancer. Spending for AK management was more than $1 billion in 2004. Investigating geographic variation in AK spending presents an opportunity to decrease waste or recoup excess spending. Objective To evaluate geographic variation in health care cost for management of AKs and the association with patient-related and health-related factors. Design, Setting, and Participants This retrospective cohort study was performed using data from the MarketScan medical claims database of 488 324 continuously enrolled members with 2 or more claims for AK. Data from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2012, was used. Main Outcomes and Measures Annual costs of care were calculated for outpatient visits, AK destruction, and medications for AKs, and the total of these components. Costs were adjusted for inflation to 2014 US dollars. To display cost variation, we calculated the ratio of mean cost in the highest quintile (Q5) relative to the mean in the lowest quintile (Q1), or the Q5:Q1 ratio; Q5:Q1 ratios were adjusted based on age, sex, history of nonmelanoma skin cancer, US geographic region, and population density (metropolitan statistical area). Results Overall, data from 488 324 continuously enrolled members (mean [SD] age, 53.1 [7.5] years; 243 662 women) with 2 or more claims for AK were included. Overall, patients had 1 085 985 claims related to AK, and dermatologists accounted for 71.0% of claims. The 2-year total cost was $111.5 million, with $52.4 million in 2011 and $59.1 million in 2012. The unadjusted Q5:Q1 ratios for total annual cost per patient ranged from 9.49 to 15.10. Adjusted ratios ranged from 1.72 to 1.80. Conclusions and Relevance There is variation in AK management cost within and between regions. This is not fully explained by differences in patient characteristics such as

  20. Diclofenac Sodium 3% in Hyaluronic Acid 2.5% Gel Significantly Diminishes the Actinic Keratosis Area and Severity Index.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lutz; Gupta, Girish; Segert, Marc Hanno; Kost, Ricarda; Sternberg, Julia; Gambichler, Thilo; Stockfleth, Eggert; Dirschka, Thomas

    2018-05-23

    Actinic keratosis area and severity index (AKASI) is a new assessment tool to quantify the severity of actinic damage on the head. Thus far, it has not been evaluated in monitoring the efficacy of field-directed topical treatments in actinic keratosis (AK) in routine clinical practice. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine treatment outcomes by using AKASI 3 months after the initiation of topical application of diclofenac sodium 3% in hyaluronic acid 2.5% gel (DFS) in patients with AKs on the head. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with AKs who had AKASI scores prior to and after treatment with DFS. Of the 24 patients included, 20 (83.3%) showed an improvement in AKASI, 2 (8.3%) a stable AKASI, and 2 (8.3%) a worsening of AKASI after a median (interquartile range) follow-up period of 91.5 days (89.8-104.3). The median AKASI reduction was 31.4% (16.7-59.1). The Wilcoxon test showed significant differences (p = 0.0008) between baseline and posttreatment AKASI values. AKASI is an easy-to-use quantitative tool for assessing the treatment outcome of field-directed therapies. Field-directed therapies of AK should no longer be monitored by assessments based on lesion counts alone. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Optimizing management of actinic keratosis and photodamaged skin: utilizing a stepwise approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew D; Jorizzo, Joseph L

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of photodamaged skin and skin lesions of all degrees of severity, from actinic keratosis (AK) to skin cancers, has dramatically increased. Actinic keratoses are pathologic, reflecting damage of essential skin cell functions and potentially progressing to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The rate of progression is uncertain but may be as high as 10%. Because it is impossible to predict which AKs will progress to SCC, all lesions should be treated. Options include topical therapies, cryotherapy, curettage, and photodynamic therapy. Unfortunately, many individuals do not seek treatment or avoid it because of irritation, discomfort, and concern for scarring. Combining field-directed therapy and cryotherapy has been more effective than cryotherapy alone. Incorporating patient education with treatment may optimize outcomes. We propose a comprehensive 5-step approach for managing AK lesions and photodamaged skin that includes periodic clinical skin examinations; treating AK lesions with a combination of field- and lesion-directed therapy; and patient education regarding sun-protective measures and regular skin self-examinations.

  2. Differences in Disease-specific Quality of Life in Patients with Actinic Keratosis in Australia and Denmark.

    PubMed

    Miller, Iben Marie; Vinding, Gabrielle; Zarchi, Kian; Esmann, Solveig; Murrell, Dedee F; Jemec, Gregor B

    2016-04-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) negatively influences patient quality of life as measured by the disease-specific Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life (AKQoL) questionnaire. The quality of life in Australian patients was significantly less affected than in Danish patients. We hypothesize that general factors such as public awareness and cultural connotations of AK, may influence the impact of AK on quality of life (QoL).

  3. A randomized trial comparing simultaneous vs. sequential field treatment of actinic keratosis with ingenol mebutate on two separate areas of the head and body.

    PubMed

    Pellacani, G; Peris, K; Guillen, C; Clonier, F; Larsson, T; Venkata, R; Puig, S

    2015-11-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are precursors to invasive squamous cell carcinoma and can progress if untreated. Limited data support the use of ingenol mebutate to treat AKs on more than one area of the body simultaneously. To investigate safety, efficacy and treatment satisfaction when treating separate areas simultaneously or sequentially with different concentrations of ingenol mebutate gel. In this phase IIIb study (NCT01787383), patients with clinically visible, non-hyperkeratotic AKs on two separate treatment areas (face/scalp and trunk/extremities) were randomized to simultaneous or sequential treatment with ingenol mebutate gel (0.015% and 0.05%). Endpoints included composite local skin response (LSR) score 3 days after first application, complete AK clearance and percentage reduction in AKs at week 8. There were no statistically significant differences between simultaneous (n = 101) and sequential (n = 98) groups in composite LSR score (10.4 vs. 9.7), complete clearance (52.7% vs. 46.9%) or percentage reduction in AKs (83.4% vs. 79.1%). Mean composite LSR scores on face/scalp and trunk/extremities were similar for both groups. Adverse event (AE) incidence was comparable between groups, the most common treatment-related AEs being pruritus and pain at the application site. Treating AKs with ingenol mebutate simultaneously or sequentially gave similar results in terms of tolerability (LSR score, AEs) and efficacy (complete clearance). Therefore, the physician and patient can select the most convenient treatment regimen, with confidence in achieving a similar outcome. © 2015 LEO Pharma A/S. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. on behalf of European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Long-term (6 and 12 months) follow-up of two prospective, randomized, controlled phase III trials of photodynamic therapy with BF-200 ALA and methyl aminolaevulinate for the treatment of actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Dirschka, T; Radny, P; Dominicus, R; Mensing, H; Brüning, H; Jenne, L; Karl, L; Sebastian, M; Oster-Schmidt, C; Klövekorn, W; Reinhold, U; Tanner, M; Gröne, D; Deichmann, M; Simon, M; Hübinger, F; Hofbauer, G; Krähn-Senftleben, G; Borrosch, F; Reich, K; Berking, C; Wolf, P; Lehmann, P; Moers-Carpi, M; Hönigsmann, H; Wernicke-Panten, K; Hahn, S; Pabst, G; Voss, D; Foguet, M; Schmitz, B; Lübbert, H; Szeimies, R-M

    2013-01-01

    Background Two phase III trials of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with BF-200 ALA, a recently approved nanoemulsion formulation of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) demonstrated high clearance rates in mild-to-moderate actinic keratosis (AK). The comparison to a registered methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) cream demonstrated significantly superior total patient clearance rates. Objectives To evaluate long-term efficacy and safety of PDT for AK 6 and 12 months after the last PDT with BF-200 ALA, MAL or placebo. Methods The follow-up phase (FUP) was performed with patients of two phase III studies. Both studies compared BF-200 ALA with placebo, one of the studies additionally with MAL. Overall recurrence rates and various subgroups (light source, lesion severity, lesion location, complete responders after first PDT) were assessed 6 and 12 months after the last PDT. Results Recurrence rates were similar for BF-200 ALA and MAL, with a tendency to lower recurrence rates for BF-200 ALA. The proportion of patients who were fully cleared during PDT and remained completely clear for at least 12 months after PDT were 47% for BF-200 ALA (both studies) and 36% for MAL treatment. The subgroup that was illuminated with narrow wavelength LED lamps reached 69% and 53% for BF-200 ALA (both studies, respectively) and 41% for MAL. No safety concerns were reported. Conclusions The FUP data confirmed the high efficacy and safety of PDT with BF-200 ALA. The slightly lower recurrence rates after BF-200 ALA treatment compared with MAL treatment enhanced the better treatment outcome due to the significantly superior efficacy. PMID:23252768

  5. Long-term (6 and 12 months) follow-up of two prospective, randomized, controlled phase III trials of photodynamic therapy with BF-200 ALA and methyl aminolaevulinate for the treatment of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Dirschka, T; Radny, P; Dominicus, R; Mensing, H; Brüning, H; Jenne, L; Karl, L; Sebastian, M; Oster-Schmidt, C; Klövekorn, W; Reinhold, U; Tanner, M; Gröne, D; Deichmann, M; Simon, M; Hübinger, F; Hofbauer, G; Krähn-Senftleben, G; Borrosch, F; Reich, K; Berking, C; Wolf, P; Lehmann, P; Moers-Carpi, M; Hönigsmann, H; Wernicke-Panten, K; Hahn, S; Pabst, G; Voss, D; Foguet, M; Schmitz, B; Lübbert, H; Szeimies, R-M

    2013-04-01

    Two phase III trials of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with BF-200 ALA, a recently approved nanoemulsion formulation of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) demonstrated high clearance rates in mild-to-moderate actinic keratosis (AK). The comparison to a registered methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) cream demonstrated significantly superior total patient clearance rates. To evaluate long-term efficacy and safety of PDT for AK 6 and 12 months after the last PDT with BF-200 ALA, MAL or placebo. The follow-up phase (FUP) was performed with patients of two phase III studies. Both studies compared BF-200 ALA with placebo, one of the studies additionally with MAL. Overall recurrence rates and various subgroups (light source, lesion severity, lesion location, complete responders after first PDT) were assessed 6 and 12 months after the last PDT. Recurrence rates were similar for BF-200 ALA and MAL, with a tendency to lower recurrence rates for BF-200 ALA. The proportion of patients who were fully cleared during PDT and remained completely clear for at least 12 months after PDT were 47% for BF-200 ALA (both studies) and 36% for MAL treatment. The subgroup that was illuminated with narrow wavelength LED lamps reached 69% and 53% for BF-200 ALA (both studies, respectively) and 41% for MAL. No safety concerns were reported. The FUP data confirmed the high efficacy and safety of PDT with BF-200 ALA. The slightly lower recurrence rates after BF-200 ALA treatment compared with MAL treatment enhanced the better treatment outcome due to the significantly superior efficacy. © 2012 Biofrontera Bioscience GmbH BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Efficacy of iontophoresis-assisted ablative fractional laser photodynamic therapy with short incubation time for the treatment of actinic keratosis: 12-month follow-up results of a prospective, randomised, comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Song, Ki-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Iontophoresis is a transdermal drug-delivery technique that enhances the transport of ionic species across membranes and may have significant benefit for the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK) by ablative fractional laser-primed photodynamic therapy (AFL-PDT). The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy, recurrence rate, cosmetic outcome and safety of iontophoresis-assisted AFL-PDT with 2h of incubation vs. those of conventional AFL-PDT with 2- and 3-h incubation in patients with facial and scalp AK. Patients were randomly assigned to iontophoresis-assisted AFL-PDT with a 2-h incubation time (group A) and conventional AFL-PDT with a 2-h (group B) and 3-h (group C) incubation time. All patients underwent AFL-PDT, and group A patients were assigned to treatment with iontophoresis after methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) application. After 2 or 3h, MAL-applied lesions were irradiated using a red light. Patients were followed up at 1-week, 3 months and 12 months after treatment. Efficacy, cosmetic outcomes and adverse events were assessed. In total, 41 patients (160 AK lesions) completed the study and were evaluated. Efficacy was significantly higher in Group A (88.7%) than in Group B (73.2%); the efficacy of groups A and C (92.2%) at 3 months follow-up was comparable. The recurrence rates were not significantly different between the groups at 12 months (P=0.841). The three groups did not differ in terms of cosmetic outcomes and safety. Iontophoresis-assisted AFL-PDT showed higher efficacy than AFL-PDT with short incubation time. Iontophoresis may effectively reduce the incubation time in AFL-PDT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sebaceous carcinoma in association with actinic keratosis: A report of two cases with an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Misago, Noriyuki; Kuwashiro, Maki; Tsuruta, Noriko; Narisawa, Yutaka

    2015-06-01

    We report two cases of sebaceous carcinoma associated with actinic keratosis (AK) with an immunohistochemical study, which suggests the possibility that sebaceous carcinoma really does develop within AK. Case 1 had sebaceous carcinoma arising within the atrophic type AK and case 2 had sebaceous carcinoma associated with bowenoid AK in the periphery and some parts of the overlying epidermis of the lesion. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Adaptation and validation of the Spanish version of the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Longo Imedio, Isabel; Serra-Guillén, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    While there are questionnaires for evaluating the effects of skin cancer on patient quality of life, there are no specific questionnaires available in Spanish for evaluating quality of life in patients with actinic keratosis. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life (AKQoL) questionnaire into Spanish. The original questionnaire was translated into Spanish following the guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. Several measures of general reliability and validity were calculated, including Cronbach α for internal consistency and the Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient and a Bland-Altman plot for test-retest reliability. To test concurrent validity, we used the Pearson correlation coefficient to measure the correlation between AKQoL and Skindex-29 scores. The final version of the questionnaire was administered to 621 patients with actinic keratosis, who scored a mean (SD) of 5.25 (4.73) points (total possible score, 0-25). The Cronbach α reliability coefficient analysis was 0.84. The correlation between the mean (SD) score on the Skindex-29 (1.87 [4.07]) and on the AKQoL (1.97 [2.98] was 0.344 (P=.002, Spearman's rho), with a proportion of shared variance of 11.8%. The translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the original AKQoL produced a reliable, easily understandable questionnaire for evaluating the impact of actinic keratosis on the quality of life of patients in our setting. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased number of mast cells in the dermis in actinic keratosis lesions effectively treated with imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Satomi; Funasaka, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Shin-Ichi; Kawana, Seiji; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2017-08-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a cutaneous cancer in situ which develops as a result of excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV). Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 agonist imiquimod is a topical immune response modifier and is effective for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recently, the diagnostic role of the dermatoscope has been reported in the course of treatment of AK. In addition, mast cells are now considered to contribute to both the innate and adaptive immune systems in topical imiquimod therapy. We assessed the effect of imiquimod treatment by dermatoscopic and immunohistochemical findings in 14 patients with a total of 21 AK lesions. With the dermatoscope, though the mean erythema score was not significantly different between the cured lesions and the unresponsive lesions, the erythema/red pseudo-network ("strawberry") pattern was decreased significantly in the cured lesions. By immunohistochemistry, the number of Ki-67-positive proliferative cells in the epidermis was decreased and that of CD117-positive mast cells in the dermis was increased in the responding lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that the number of mast cells in the dermis was increased in AK lesions effectively treated with imiquimod. Our present result suggests that mast cells may contribute an antitumor effect in human skin treated with topical imiquimod. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Use of reflectance confocal microscopy to evaluate 5-fluorouracil 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% in the field-directed treatment of subclinical lesions of actinic keratosis: subanalysis of a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, M; Reinhold, U; Falqués, M; Rodriguez Azeredo, R; Stockfleth, E

    2018-03-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common skin disorder that can progress to invasive squamous-cell carcinoma. AK can present as clinical (visible) or subclinical (invisible) lesions within areas of chronic sun damage. The importance of treating subclinical AK is gaining support. We present a subanalysis of a previously published Phase III, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study (NCT02289768), to assess 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% treatment of subclinical AK lesions, based on reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). To determine the efficacy of 5-FU 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% as field-directed treatment for subclinical AK lesions using RCM. For inclusion in this subanalysis, patients had to have at least three subclinical AK lesions within a 25 cm 2 area of skin. Subclinical AK lesions were diagnosed according to the presence of three key RCM criteria: architectural disarray; keratinocyte atypia and pleomorphism at the basal, spinous and granular layer. Subclinical AK lesions were evaluated by RCM at baseline, after 4, 6 and 12 weeks of 5-FU 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% treatment or vehicle, and 8 weeks following the end of treatment. Twenty-seven patients were included: 17 [mean age = 72.2 years, standard deviation (SD) = 6.3] received 5-FU 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% treatment and 10 (mean age = 76.4 years, SD = 3.9) received vehicle. Eight weeks following the end of treatment, the mean number of subclinical lesions declined (from 3.0 at baseline) to 0.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.06-0.57) for the 5-FU 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% group and 1.6 (95% CI 0.52-2.68) in the vehicle group (reductions of 90% [95% CI 72.1-107.1] vs. 47% [95% CI 24.8-69.5], respectively; P = 0.005). The proportion of patients receiving 5-FU 0.5%/salicylic acid 10% showing complete clearance of three preselected subclinical AK lesions was numerically greater than in the vehicle group (69% vs. 40%, respectively; P = 0.183). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first randomized, vehicle

  11. Prevalence of actinic keratosis among dermatology outpatients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz, C; Plazas, M J; Sabaté, M; Palomino, R

    2016-10-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are common skin lesions associated with an increased risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma. Few studies in Europe have focused on AK prevalence. To determine the point prevalence of AKs in a dermatology outpatient population in Spain, to describe the clinical characteristics of these lesions and to characterise the profile of AK patients. Observational, cross-sectional, multicentre study conducted in 19 hospitals (dermatology outpatient services) around Spain. A total of 204 consecutive patients per hospital who were ≥45 years old were screened for the presence of AKs. 3877 patients were assessed and the overall AKs prevalence was 28.6%. Prevalence was significantly higher in men than women (38.4% vs. 20.8%, p<0.0001) and increased with age for both sexes (45.2% in 71-80 years). Scalp and ear lesion locations were significantly more frequent in men (51.9% vs. 2.7% and 16.9% vs. 2.4%, respectively, p<0.0001 both cases) and the cheek, nose and neckline in women (46.3% vs. 34.0% [p<0.0001], 43.0% vs. 24.8% [p<0.0001] and 5.3% vs. 1.8% [p=0.002]). Men showed a significantly higher frequency of ≥2 affected areas than women (42.7% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001). Among patients with AK lesions, only 65% confirmed that they were the reason for the visit to the clinic. Approximately a quarter of the dermatology outpatient population in Spain aged ≥45 years old have AKs, with the prevalence rate being highest in men and in older age groups. AK is underdiagnosed and a proactive strategy is needed for the diagnosis and early treatment of these lesions. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Dermoscopic clues to differentiate facial lentigo maligna from pigmented actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Lallas, A; Tschandl, P; Kyrgidis, A; Stolz, W; Rabinovitz, H; Cameron, A; Gourhant, J Y; Giacomel, J; Kittler, H; Muir, J; Argenziano, G; Hofmann-Wellenhof, R; Zalaudek, I

    2016-05-01

    Dermoscopy is limited in differentiating accurately between pigmented lentigo maligna (LM) and pigmented actinic keratosis (PAK). This might be related to the fact that most studies have focused on pigmented criteria only, without considering additional recognizable features. To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of established dermoscopic criteria for pigmented LM and PAK, but including in the evaluation features previously associated with nonpigmented facial actinic keratosis. Retrospectively enrolled cases of histopathologically diagnosed LM, PAK and solar lentigo/early seborrhoeic keratosis (SL/SK) were dermoscopically evaluated for the presence of predefined criteria. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed and receiver operating characteristic curves were used. The study sample consisted of 70 LMs, 56 PAKs and 18 SL/SKs. In a multivariate analysis, the most potent predictors of LM were grey rhomboids (sixfold increased probability of LM), nonevident follicles (fourfold) and intense pigmentation (twofold). In contrast, white circles, scales and red colour were significantly correlated with PAK, posing a 14-fold, eightfold and fourfold probability for PAK, respectively. The absence of evident follicles also represented a frequent LM criterion, characterizing 71% of LMs. White and evident follicles, scales and red colour represent significant diagnostic clues for PAK. Conversely, intense pigmentation and grey rhomboidal lines appear highly suggestive of LM. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. [Actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, keratoacanthoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin].

    PubMed

    Majores, M; Bierhoff, E

    2015-02-01

    Actinic (solar) keratosis is an intraepidermal squamous neoplasm of sun-damaged skin and by far the most frequent neoplastic skin lesion. A subdivison into three grades has been proposed with increasing acceptance not least because of the therapeutic consequences. The transition to invasive squamous cell carcinoma is reported in 5-10 % and with immunosuppression in 30 % of patients.Bowen's disease is a variant of squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the skin and the mucocutaneous junction. The differentiation from bowenoid papulosis as a lesion associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), actinic (solar) keratosis grade III, intraepidermal poroid lesions and in cases of clonal type from clonal seborrhoic keratosis and Paget's disease is very important.Keratoacanthoma is currently uniformly interpreted as a variant of highly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the skin with clinical and histomorphological characteristics. Clinically keratoacanthoma erupts rapidly and is capable of resolving spontaneously. Histologically, there is a characteristic growth pattern and various stages of regression. The final histomorphological diagnosis needs the entire specimen.Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is the second most common type of skin cancer following basal cell carcinoma. With respect to reccurrencies and risk of metastases the subtyping of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is very important. The classification system of the Union Internationale Contra le Cancer (UICC) is based solely on the anatomical spread and the classification system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) also considers so-called high-risk features in the staging between stages I and II.

  14. Physicians' opinions and clinical practice patterns for actinic keratosis management in Italy.

    PubMed

    Peris, K; Neri, L; Calzavara Pinton, P; Catricalà, C; Pellacani, G; Pimpinelli, N; Peserico, A

    2014-04-01

    We report dermatologists' opinions and clinical practice patterns about clinical factors driving decision making in the management of actinic keratosis (AK) in Italy. We carried out a cross-sectional survey among 33 Italian dermatologists. Physicians were asked to report their management choices in consecutive patients with AK seen at their practice within 2 weeks since study initiation. We collected patients' clinical and socio-demographic characteristics with a standardized data collection form and assessed physicians' opinions on AK management with a self-reported questionnaire. Six hundred fifty-seven patients with new, single AK lesions without evidence of photo-damaged skin in the surrounding areas, were predominantly treated with lesion-directed therapies (primarily cryotherapy). In contrast, physicians preferentially prescribed field-directed therapies to patients with multiple lesions and evidence of photo-damaged skin in AK surrounding areas. However we observed a wide variation in treatment choices and physicians' opinions on AK management. Dermatologists underlined the importance of fostering patients' adherence and minimize therapy side effects. Overall, our results show that current guidelines regarding management of AK are only partially integrated in dermatology practice. The active dissemination of up-to-date national guidelines might help harmonize clinical decision making in this complex and fast growing therapeutic area.

  15. Factors influencing response to ingenol mebutate therapy for actinic keratosis of face and scalp

    PubMed Central

    Skroza, Nevena; Proietti, Ilaria; Bernardini, Nicoletta; Balduzzi, Veronica; Mambrin, Alessandra; Marchesiello, Anna; Tolino, Ersilia; Zuber, Sara; La Torre, Giuseppe; Potenza, Concetta

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine factors independently influencing response to ingenol mebutate therapy and assess efficacy on clinical setting of non-hypertrophic non-hyperkeratotic actinic keratosis (AK). METHODS Consecutive patients affected by non-hypertrophic non-hyperkeratotic AKs of the face or scalp were enrolled to receive ingenol mebutate 0.015% gel on a selected skin area of 25 cm2 for 3 consecutive days. Local skin reactions were calculated at each follow up visit using a validated composite score. Efficacy was evaluated by the comparison of clinical and dermoscopic pictures before the treatment and at day 57, and classified as complete, partial and poor response. RESULTS A number of 130 patients were enrolled, of which 101 (77.7%) were treated on the face, while 29 (22.3%) on the scalp. The great majority of our study population (n = 119, 91.5%) reached at least a 75% clearance of AKs and, in particular, 58 patients (44.6%) achieved a complete response while 61 (46.9%) a partial one. Logistic backward multivariate analysis showed that facial localization, level of local skin reaction (LSR) at day 2, the highest LSR values and level of crusts at day 8 were factors independently associated with the achievement of a complete response. CONCLUSION Ingenol mebutate 0.015% gel, when properly applied, is more effective on the face than on the scalp and efficacy is directly associated to LSR score. PMID:29067277

  16. Treatment of Grade II and III Actinic Keratosis Lesions with a Film-Forming Medical Device Containing Sunscreen/Piroxicam 0.8% and a Retinoic Acid/Glycolic Gel: A Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Puviani, Mario; Milani, Massimo

    2018-05-31

    Lesion and field-targeted treatments of actinic keratosis (AK) are commonly indicated for grade I and II type lesions. Grade III lesions are in general more difficult to treat. A film-forming medical device containing piroxicam 0.8% and sunscreen (SPF 50+) (PS) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of grade I and II AK lesions. Topical and oral retinoids have been utilized in AK and non-melanoma skin cancers. Topical glycolic acid promotes keratolysis and stimulates collagen synthesis for repair and skin rejuvenation and could be useful in AK treatment strategies. A gel containing retinoid acid (0.02%) and glycolic acid (4%) (RC) is commercially available. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and local tolerability of a combined treatment approach with PS and RC in subjects with multiple grade II and III AK lesions. Twenty-two subjects (16 males and 6 females; mean age 68 years) with more than five AK lesions were enrolled after obtaining their informed consent in a 3-month trial. PS cream was applied twice daily every day and RC gel was applied twice daily for 2 consecutive days every week. The primary endpoint was the evolution of the AK mean number from baseline to the end of the trial. Secondary endpoints were the thickness of the target lesion (expressed in mm 3 ) and the erythema score (hemoglobin content), evaluated using a standardized computer-based image acquisition analysis system (Anthera 3D). At baseline, the mean (SD) lesion number was 7.7 (3) for grade II and 1.4 (1) for grade III AK. At the end of the study, a significant (P = 0.001) reduction was observed for both grade II (- 81%; from 7.7 to 1.5) and grade III (- 22%) lesions. Six grade III lesions out of 31 (20%), presented at baseline, completely disappeared at month 3. For grade III lesions, a significant mean thickness reduction of 51% was observed at month 3. The erythema score (all lesions) was reduced by 70%. Four patients out of 22 (18%) were

  17. Actinic keratosis modelling in mice: A translational study

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Cartron, Valérie; Cèbe, Patrick; Blanchet, Jean-Christophe; Sibaud, Vincent; Guilbaud, Nicolas; Audoly, Laurent; Lamant, Laurence; Kruczynski, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background Actinic keratoses (AK) are pre-malignant cutaneous lesions caused by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation. As AKs lesions are generally accepted to be the initial lesions in a disease continuum that progresses to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), AK lesions have to be treated. They are also the second most common reason for visits to the dermatologist. Several treatments are available but their efficacy still needs to be improved. The UV-B-induced KA lesion mouse model is used in preclinical studies to assess the efficacy of novel molecules, even though it is often more representative of advanced AK or SCC. Objectives Here we report on a translational study, comparing the various stages of AK development in humans and in the UV-B irradiated mouse model, as well as the optimization of photograph acquisition of AK lesions on mouse skin. Methods Human and mouse skin lesions were analysed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Mouse lesions were also assessed using a digital dermatoscope. Results An histological and phenotypic analysis, including p53, Ki67 and CD3 expression detection, performed on human and mouse AK lesions, shows that overall AK modelling in mice is relevant in the clinical situation. Some differences are observed, such as disorganization of keratinocytes of the basal layer and a number of atypical nuclei which are more numerous in human AK, whereas much more pronounced acanthosis is observed in skin lesion in mice. Thanks to this translational study, we are able to select appropriate experimental conditions for establishing either early or advanced stage AK or an SCC model. Furthermore, we optimized photograph acquisition of AK lesions on mouse skin by using a digital dermatoscope which is also used in clinics and allows reproducible photograph acquisition for further reliable assessment of mouse lesions. Use of this camera is illustrated through a pharmacological study assessing the activity of CARAC®. Conclusion These data

  18. Efficacy of ablative fractional laser-assisted photodynamic therapy with short-incubation time for the treatment of facial and scalp actinic keratosis: 12-month follow-up results of a randomized, prospective, comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, S H; Kim, K H; Song, K H

    2015-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) is an effective first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). Erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) ablative fractional laser-assisted MAL-PDT (AFL-PDT) has shown significant benefit for the treatment of AK. The objectives of this study were to compare the efficacy, recurrence rate, cosmetic outcome and safety between AFL-PDT with 2 and 3 h of incubation vs. Conventional MAL-PDT in patients with facial and scalp AK. This prospective randomized trial initially enrolled 440 facial and scalp AK lesions in 93 patients. Patients were randomly assigned to AFL-PDT with a 2-h incubation time (2h-AFL-PDT), 3h-AFL-PDT and 3h-MAL-PDT. All patients underwent one session of MAL-PDT using a red light-emitting diode lamp at 37 J/cm(2) , and AFL-PDT groups were assigned to pretreatment with Er:YAG AFL. Patients were followed up at 1 week, 3 months and 12 months post treatment. Efficacy, cosmetic outcomes and adverse events were assessed. Finally, 427 facial AK lesions in 88 patients were analysed in this study. Three months after the last treatment session, 3h-AFL-PDT (91.7%) was significantly more effective than 2h-AFL-PDT (76.8%) and 3h-MAL-PDT (65.6%, P < 0.001), and differences in efficacy remained significant at the 12-month follow-up. The recurrence rate was significantly lower for 3h-AFL-PDT (7.5%) than for 3h-MAL-PDT (22.1%) at 12 months (P = 0.002);however, no significant difference was found between 2h-AFL-PDT and 3h-MAL-PDT. No significant difference was found in cosmetic outcomes or safety between the three groups. We recommend 3h-AFL-PDT rather than classic MAL-PDT or short-incubation AFL-PDT for treating AK. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Quality of Life, Behaviour and Attitudes towards Actinic Keratosis in Spain: The PIQA Study.

    PubMed

    Longo, I; Serra-Guillén, C

    2018-05-01

    This study was aimed to examine patients' knowledge, behaviours and attitudes regarding actinic keratosis (AK) lesions and the impact of the disease on patients' quality of life (QoL). Observational study of patients with AK lesions in Spain. QoL was evaluated with the validated version of Spanish AKQoL questionnaire. Skin self-examination, sun-exposure, habits and attitudes towards AK's treatment were recorded using different questionnaires. The adherence was assessed by means of the Morisky-Green test. Among other variables, QoL and adherence to treatment were compared by using Pearson's χ 2 test and one-way ANOVA tests. Inferential analysis regarding such factors and length of treatment were also performed. A total of 1240 patients (73.6 [10.5] years old) were recruited. Overall, patients that showed higher levels of concern were also showed a higher impairment on QoL. AK had greater effects on women's QoL and those who performed skin self-examination, think that AK is a disease and/or believe that moisturizers can prevent skin aging (P<.05). Adherence and length of treatment were strongly related, since patients with treatments intended for <1week were more likely to show good adherence and complete remission of AK (Odds Ratio [95%CI]: 6.25 [4.55-8.33] and 2.63 [1.96-3.45]), respectively). Concerns due to AK are mainly related to sex and to the consideration of AK as a disease. More concerned patients tend to have lower QoL and good adherence to treatment. Short length of treatment was associated with better adherence and complete remission of AK lesions. Copyright © 2018 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of Actinic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mature skin is prone to bruising, resulting in a condition known as actinic purpura, characterized by unsightly ecchymosis and purple patches. Similar to other skin conditions, the incidence of actinic purpura increases with advancing age and occurs with equal frequency among men and women. The unsightly appearance of actinic purpura may be a source of emotional distress among the elderly. A new product has been formulated specifically for the treatment of actinic purpura. This product contains retinol, α-hydroxy acids, arnica oil, ceramides, niacinamide, and phytonadione, which effectively treat actinic purpura by improving local circulation, thickening the skin, and repairing the skin barrier. The objective of this paper is to review the beneficial properties of these ingredients and their respective roles in the treatment of actinic purpura. PMID:28979656

  1. Clinical forms of actinic keratosis and levels of dysplasia of the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Oshyvalova, Olena O; Kaliuzhna, Lydia D; Kropelnytskyi, Vladislav O

    Introduction: Actinic keratosis (AK) is precancerous skin lesion that occurs in the sun-exposedskin areas characterized by local intraepidermal dysplasia of different severity (KIN I, KIN II and KIN III). The aim of this research was to study distribution patterns and morphological features of AK histological types. Materials and Methods: The study included skin biopsy material from 68 patients with different clinical forms of AK. The diagnosis of AK was histologically confirmed in 100% of cases. Results: There were 63.21% of men and 36.8% of women among all patients with AK. The average age of patients was 73.3 ± 8.3.The most common clinico-histological forms of actinic keratosis were typical (41.2%), hypertrophic (16.2%), atrophic (14.7%) and pigmentary (11.7%), bowenoid (8.8%), acantholytic (7.4%). Among the rate of epidermal dysplasia there diagnosed cases of KIN І (50%), KIN ІІ (36.8%) and KIN III (13.2%). Conclusions: It was found a direct correlation between KIN I and typical and pigment forms of AK, KIN II and hypertrophic and bowenoid forms of AK.

  2. Photodynamic therapy in the management of actinic keratosis: Retrospective evaluation of outcome.

    PubMed

    Jerjes, Waseem; Hamdoon, Zaid; Abdulkareem, Ali A; Hopper, Colin

    2017-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive intervention used in the management of tissue disorders. In this retrospective study, a total of 62 patients with actinic keratosis (AKs) were treated with surface illumination PDT. Comparisons with the clinical features, rate of recurrence as well as malignant transformation and overall outcome were made. The medical records of 62 consecutive patients who presented with suspicious skin lesions and diagnosed with AKs were examined. These patients with 178 AKs lesions were treated with surface illumination methyl aminolevulinate-photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT). The 16% strength cream (MAL) was applied topically 3h prior to tissue illumination. A single-channel 628nm diode laser was used for illumination and light was delivered at 100J/cm 2 per site. These patients were followed-up for a mean of 7.4 years. Eight recurrences were reported after the first round of MAL-PDT, and two recurrences after the second round. Malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was noted in 2 patients only. The 3-year outcome resulted in 60 patients with complete response (CR), and this was maintained at the final outcome (last clinic review). Assessment of lesional outcome vs. response showed that 175/178 treated lesions had complete response (CR) at 3-year follow-up, which increased to 176/178 lesions at the last clinic follow-up. MAL-PDT offers an effective treatment for AKs lesions with excellent cosmetic outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Actinic keratosis-related signs predictive of squamous cell carcinoma in renal transplant recipients: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jiyad, Z; O'Rourke, P; Soyer, H P; Green, A C

    2017-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and intraepidermal carcinoma (IEC) commonly arise in actinically damaged skin. To identify clinical features of actinic change that correlate with an increased risk of SCC or IEC in the short-to-medium term as guidance for prioritizing field treatment. In a nested case-control study, cases were renal transplant recipients who developed an incident SCC or IEC within 18 months following baseline examination and photography. Controls without SCC or IEC were matched to cases on age, sex and duration of immunosuppression. Predefined skin sites on the head, neck and upper limbs were examined using baseline photographs to assess objectively the following features of actinic damage: presence of actinic keratosis (AK) patch (defined as AK > 1 cm 2 ), number of AK patches, number of AKs and area affected by AK. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using McNemar's test to identify differences in SCC/IEC risk combined and SCC risk alone between case and control skin sites. Thirty-nine cases were matched to 39 controls. Significant associations with the presence of an AK patch, number of AK patches, number of AKs and area affected by AKs were identified. The presence of an AK patch conferred an 18-fold increased risk of SCC (OR 18·00, 95% CI 2·84-750) and more than a sixfold increased risk of SCC/IEC combined (OR 6·60, 95% CI 2·56-21·66). AK patches are predictive of SCC/IEC development within 18 months. This can be used to guide site selection for field treatment in patients with widespread actinic damage. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Influence of Information Framing on Patient Decisions to Treat Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Katherine; Butt, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Importance Actinic keratosis (AK) is a skin growth induced by UV light exposure that requires long-term management because a small proportion of the disease can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. The influence of how clinicians frame or present information to patients may affect decision making about AK. Objective To evaluate the differences in patients’ decisions on whether to receive treatment for AK related to information presentation or choice framing. Design, Setting, and Participants A prospective survey study was performed from June 1 to July 31, 2016, in participants who were able to read English. Participants were recruited through the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Dermatology Clinic and an online survey site. The survey was conducted through an online portal. A total of 571 individuals were recruited. Regression analysis, correlation coefficient analysis, and test-retest validation were conducted. Main Outcomes and Measures The proportions of patients choosing to receive treatment for AK. Analyses were performed to adjust for age, sex, educational level, history of skin cancer, and history of AK. Results Of the 571 recruited participants, 539 (94.4%) returned completed surveys. The mean (SD) age of respondents was 42.9 (17.8) years; 306 (56.8%) were women. The decision to receive treatment for AK varied from 57.7% (n = 311) to 92.2% (n = 497) for the 5 scenarios presented in the questions (P < .001). The question that presented AK as a “precancer” had the highest proportion of participants who preferred treatment (497 [92.2%]). Two questions that presented the risk of AK as not progressing to cancer had the lowest proportion of individuals who chose treatment (311 [57.7%] and 328 [60.9%]). Participants from the clinic and from the online portal were significantly different in age (mean [SD] age, 56.1 [17.6] vs 33.3 [10.0] years), sex (145 [63.6%] vs 161 [51.8%] were females), educational level (40 [17.5%] vs 80 [25.7%] had completed

  5. Influence of Information Framing on Patient Decisions to Treat Actinic Keratosis.

    PubMed

    Berry, Katherine; Butt, Melissa; Kirby, Joslyn S

    2017-05-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a skin growth induced by UV light exposure that requires long-term management because a small proportion of the disease can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. The influence of how clinicians frame or present information to patients may affect decision making about AK. To evaluate the differences in patients' decisions on whether to receive treatment for AK related to information presentation or choice framing. A prospective survey study was performed from June 1 to July 31, 2016, in participants who were able to read English. Participants were recruited through the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Dermatology Clinic and an online survey site. The survey was conducted through an online portal. A total of 571 individuals were recruited. Regression analysis, correlation coefficient analysis, and test-retest validation were conducted. The proportions of patients choosing to receive treatment for AK. Analyses were performed to adjust for age, sex, educational level, history of skin cancer, and history of AK. Of the 571 recruited participants, 539 (94.4%) returned completed surveys. The mean (SD) age of respondents was 42.9 (17.8) years; 306 (56.8%) were women. The decision to receive treatment for AK varied from 57.7% (n = 311) to 92.2% (n = 497) for the 5 scenarios presented in the questions (P < .001). The question that presented AK as a "precancer" had the highest proportion of participants who preferred treatment (497 [92.2%]). Two questions that presented the risk of AK as not progressing to cancer had the lowest proportion of individuals who chose treatment (311 [57.7%] and 328 [60.9%]). Participants from the clinic and from the online portal were significantly different in age (mean [SD] age, 56.1 [17.6] vs 33.3 [10.0] years), sex (145 [63.6%] vs 161 [51.8%] were females), educational level (40 [17.5%] vs 80 [25.7%] had completed some graduate school), history of AK (46 [20.2%] vs 19 [6.1%] answered yes), and history of skin

  6. Dermoscopy of Pigmented Actinic Keratosis of the Face: A Study of 232 Cases.

    PubMed

    Kelati, A; Baybay, H; Moscarella, E; Argenziano, G; Gallouj, S; Mernissi, F Z

    2017-11-01

    The diagnosis of pigmented actinic keratosis (PAK) is often challenging because of overlapping features with lentigo maligna. To investigate dermoscopic patterns of PAK according to their different evolutionary stages, and to correlate the pattern with clinical characteristics of the patients. Descriptive and analytical study of 232 PAK. Dermoscopic patterns were divided into two categories: the follicule surroundings' abnormalities (FSA) and follicular keratosis' abnormalities (FKA). FSA and FKA dermoscopic patterns were related to male gender, except for star-like appearance, double white clods and dermoscopic horn (p≤0.04). Rhomboidal, annular granular pattern, gray halo, white circle and double clods were dermoscopic pattern significantly related to xeroderma pigmentosum's type of skin. Based on the evolutionary stages of PAK, the jelly sign was significantly related to thin patches of PAK. Central crusts and scales were related to thick plaques and the star-like appearance to hypertrophic PAK. The presence of 2 or more dermoscopic signs in both FSA and FKA was noticed in 99.1% of lesions. The dermoscopic diagnosis of PAK vary according to the evolutionary stages of the disease, this will increase the diagnosis accuracy, with therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... near surfaces that reflect light, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas painted white. Sunlight is more ... A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  8. The continued use of sunscreen prevents the development of actinic keratosis in aged Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Kayo; Furukawa, Fukumi; Uede, Mikiko; Mizuno, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the trigger for actinic keratosis (AK) mainly depends on UV exposure. We evaluated the effects of long-term use of sunscreen on the histopathological and dermoscopic changes of AK in aged patients. Eighteen months use of sunscreen produced no change in the number of actinic keratoses or the advancement of histological grade. Although a significant decrease was not observed in the number of positive cells of p53, Ki-67 and COX-2 of the subjects who used sunscreen for 18 months, the downward tendencies of these proteins were observed. The continued use of sunscreen decreased the number of CD31-positive vessels significantly using the Chalkley method, and a significant improvement in scaling and vessel dots was found by dermoscopic study. Moreover, a relationship was found in the amount of sunscreen use and the number of actinic keratoses. Considering these results, it was thought that application of sunscreen reduces the risk of advancement of AK to higher grade AK and squamous cell carcinoma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Swiss (German) Version of the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Meier, Larissa S; Schubert, Maria; Göksu, Yasemin; Esmann, Solveig; Vinding, Gabrielle R; Jemec, Gregor B E; Hofbauer, Günther F L

    2018-04-18

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a sun-induced skin lesion that may progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Recently, the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life questionnaire (AKQoL) was designed for patients with AK in Denmark as a specific quality of life instrument for AK patients. The objective of this study was to adapt the AKQoL for the German language region of Switzerland and to evaluate its psychometric properties (validity, reliability). Translation and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire were assessed by using the technique of cognitive interviewing. During the translation process, 34 patients with AK from the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, were interviewed in 3 sessions of cognitive interviewing. The translated questionnaire was then distributed together with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) to a second group of 113 patients for validation and reliability testing. Within this group, we measured the internal consistency by the Cronbach coefficient α and Spearman correlation coefficient between the AKQoL and the DLQI. The problems encountered during the translation process led to changes in 5 categories as described by Epstein: stylistic changes, change in breadth, change in actual meaning, change in frequency and time frame, change in intensity. We found a Cronbach α of 0.82, an acceptable internal consistency. The Spearman correlation coefficient between total scores of AKQoL and DLQI was 0.57. We culturally adapted and validated a Swiss (German) version of the AKQoL questionnaire applicable for the population of a university center in Switzerland to measure and monitor the quality of life in patients with AK. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. PDT and emerging therapies for Actinic Keratosis-A resource letter.

    PubMed

    Filho, José D Vollet; Andrade, Cintia T; Buzza, Hilde H; Blanco, Kate; Carbinatto, Fernanda; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Allison, Ron R

    2017-03-01

    Aktinic Keratosis is common and if left untreated may develop into life threatening squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore early intervention is the standard of care. While many treatments are available PDT continues to move to the for - front for this indication (Brito et al., 2016 [31]). Topical PS is commercially available that are able to reliably ablate these lesions. Innovative protocols including sunlight, large volume LED arrays and maneuvers to improve treatment parameters and cosmesis continue to make this a worldwide treatment of choice for AK. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CD40 Ligand Is Increased in Mast Cells in Psoriasis and Actinic Keratosis but Less So in Epithelial Skin Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Haimakainen, Salla; Kaukinen, Antti P; Suttle, Mireille-Maria; Pelkonen, Jukka; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2017-03-16

    The expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L) in mast cells was investigated in biopsies from lesional and non-lesional skin samples of patients with psoriasis, actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma using a sequential double-staining technique. The percentage of CD40L + mast cells was higher in the lesional than in the non-lesional skin (p < .003). Interestingly, this percentage was lower in both carcinomas than in psoriasis and actinic keratosis (p < .025). Cells immunopositive for CD40 receptor were increased in all lesion types but especially so in carcinomas. The results suggest a dysregulated anti-tumoral immune response by mast cell CD40L in skin carcinomas.

  12. Non-ablative fractional resurfacing in combination with topical tretinoin cream as a field treatment modality for multiple actinic keratosis: a pilot study and a review of other field treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Prens, Sebastiaan P; de Vries, Karin; Neumann, H A Martino; Prens, Errol P

    2013-06-01

    Actinic keratoses (AK) are premalignant lesions occurring mainly in sun-damaged skin. Current topical treatment options for AK and photo-damaged skin such as liquid nitrogen and electrosurgery are not suitable for field treatment. Otherwise, therapies suitable for field treatment bring along considerable patient discomfort. Non-ablative fractional resurfacing has emerged as a logical treatment option especially for field treatment of AK. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of fractional laser therapy for clearing AK and improving skin quality. To compare patient friendliness of the "fractional" therapy with those reported for other field treatment modalities. Ten patients with Fitzpatrick skin type I to III with multiple AK and extensive sun-damaged skin, received 5-10 sessions with a 4-week interval using a 1550 nm Erbium-Glass Fractionated laser (Sellas, Korea). Four weeks and 24 weeks after the last treatment the clinical results were evaluated by an independent physician. The mean degree of improvement, in terms of reduction in the number of AK and improvement of skin texture, was 54% on a 4 point PGA scale, and persisted for approximately 6 months. The biggest advantage of fractional laser treatment, besides the eradication of AK and a clear rejuvenation effect, is the absence of "downtime". Fractional non-ablative resurfacing induces significant reduction in the number of AK and improves the skin quality. Also all patients preferred fractional laser therapy above other AK treatment modalities.

  13. Increased expression of enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) differentiates squamous cell carcinoma from normal skin and actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiang; Wang, Hongbei; Heilman, Edward R; Walsh, Michael G; Haseeb, M A; Gupta, Raavi

    2014-01-01

    Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is a polycomb group protein that has been shown to be involved in the progression of multiple human cancers including melanoma. The expression of EZH2 in normal skin and in pre-malignant and malignant cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not been studied. We examined the expression of EZH2 in normal skin, actinic keratosis (AK), SCC in situ, well-differentiated (SCC-WD), moderately-differentiated (SCC-MD) and poorly-differentiated SCC (SCC-PD) to ascertain whether EZH2 expression differentiates these conditions. Immunohistochemical staining for EZH2 was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies and a tissue microarray containing normal skin, AK, SCC in situ, and SCC of different grades. In comparison to the normal skin, EZH2 expression in actinic keratosis was increased (p=0.03). Similarly, EZH2 expression in all of the neoplastic conditions studied (SCC in situ, SCC-WD, SCC-MD and SCC-PD) was greatly increased in comparison to both the normal skin and actinic keratosis (p≤0.001). EZH2 expression increases incrementally from normal skin to AK and further to SCC, suggesting a role for EZH2 in the progression and differentiation of SCC. EZH2 expression may be used as a diagnostic marker for differentiating SCC from AK or normal skin.

  14. A survey of office visits for actinic keratosis as reported by NAMCS, 1990-1999. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Cooper, Elizabeth A; Feldman, Steven R; Fleischer, Alan B

    2002-08-01

    Although actinic keratosis (AK) has been linked to the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), particularly squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), increased awareness regarding diagnosis and treatment may be an important component for reducing morbidity and even mortality from AK and NMSC. We used the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data from 1990 to 1999 to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of AKs among a wide variety of patients by physicians across the United States. To our knowledge, no widespread surveys of North American populations have been performed recently to determine the epidemiology of AK. AK was diagnosed in more than 47 million visits over the 10-year period surveyed and was found to occur in 14% of patients visiting dermatologists. The diagnosis of AK as determined by NAMCS does not reflect the true prevalence of AK because only patients seeking physician diagnosis were surveyed. This suggests that the actual number of patients in the United States with AK is much higher than 14%. Rates of AK diagnosis in the standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSAs) and non-standard metropolitan statistical areas (non-SMSAs) of the West states are higher than in other states, but geographic location may not be a direct risk factor for the development of AKs. Procedures were undertaken at 70% of visits where AK was the primary diagnosis. Destruction of lesions was the most frequently performed procedure found in the survey considering only the 1993 and 1994 NAMCS data. Biopsy was the second most frequently performed procedure.

  15. Photodamage: all signs lead to actinic keratosis and early squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jerry; Kok, Lai Fong; Byrne, Scott N; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is likely to drive the initiation and progression of skin cancer from actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma. Signs of photodamage occur at multiple steps. UV radiation damages many cellular constituents, including lipids, proteins and DNA, all of which are likely to contribute to UV-induced skin cancer. Two biological events culminating from photodamage are mutations in the genes critical to the control of cell division, differentiation and invasion and immunosuppression. DNA photodamage, if unrepaired prior to cell division, can result in the incorporation of an incorrect nucleotide into newly synthesised DNA. Mutations in critical genes contribute to carcinogenesis. Photodamage to proteins such as those involved in DNA repair or proteins or lipids involved in cellular signalling can interfere with this repair process and contribute to mutagenesis. Mutations in key genes, including TP53, BRM, PTCH1, and HRAS, contribute to skin carcinogenesis. UV also damages immunity. Photodamage to DNA and signalling lipids as well as other molecular changes are detrimental to the key cells that regulate immunity. Photodamaged dendritic cells and altered responses by mast cells lead to the activation of T and B regulatory cells that suppress immunity to the protein products of UV-mutated genes. This stops the immune response from its protective function of destroying mutated cells, enabling the transformed cells to progress to skin cancer. UV appears to play a pivotal role at each of these steps, and therefore, signs of photodamage point to the development of skin cancer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Dermal changes in superficial basal cell carcinoma, melanoma in situ and actinic keratosis and their implications

    PubMed Central

    Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia; Malhotra, Saurabh; Navarro, Raquel; Wu, Karen Nguyen; Shvartsbeyn, Marianna; Shengli, Chen; Gui, Jiang; Elston, Dirk M.

    2018-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has a characteristic stroma, but less is known about the dermal characteristics associated with melanoma in situ (MIS) and actinic keratosis (AK). Materials and methods Dermal changes were studied in 301 specimens of AK, BCC and MIS. Subsequently, blinded images of dermal changes from 90 randomly selected cases of those entities were used to assess the predictive value of the dermal changes. Agreement with the final diagnosis was calculated using kappa coefficient (κ). Results Fibromyxoid stroma was present in 82% of BCC cases; fibrous stroma was seen in 25% of BCC, 58% of MIS and 35.6% of AK specimens (p <0.05). A lichenoid inflammatory infiltrate was frequently associated with AK and a perifollicular infiltrate with periadnexal fibrosis with MIS. Blinded evaluation of images of the dermal changes associated with the tumors yielded the correct diagnosis in (54.4, 41.1 and 27.8%; average 41.2%) by the three appraisers. Coefficient of agreement in blinded imaged evaluation with the actual diagnosis was higher in the BCC and MIS compared with AK (κ = 0.37, p = 0.0001; κ = 0.2, p = 0.0005 and κ = −0.06, p = 0.84, respectively). Conclusion Dermal features may be helpful in predicting the correct diagnosis when tumor is not visible. PMID:24117926

  17. Dermatological Feasibility of Multimodal Facial Color Imaging Modality for Cross-Evaluation of Facial Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngwoo; Son, Taeyoon; Nelson, J. Stuart; Kim, Jae-Hong; Choi, Eung Ho; Jung, Byungjo

    2010-01-01

    Background/Purpose Digital color image analysis is currently considered as a routine procedure in dermatology. In our previous study, a multimodal facial color imaging modality (MFCIM), which provides a conventional, parallel- and cross-polarization, and fluorescent color image, was introduced for objective evaluation of various facial skin lesions. This study introduces a commercial version of MFCIM, DermaVision-PRO, for routine clinical use in dermatology and demonstrates its dermatological feasibility for cross-evaluation of skin lesions. Methods/Results Sample images of subjects with actinic keratosis or non-melanoma skin cancers were obtained at four different imaging modes. Various image analysis methods were applied to cross-evaluate the skin lesion and, finally, extract valuable diagnostic information. DermaVision-PRO is potentially a useful tool as an objective macroscopic imaging modality for quick prescreening and cross-evaluation of facial skin lesions. Conclusion DermaVision-PRO may be utilized as a useful tool for cross-evaluation of widely distributed facial skin lesions and an efficient database management of patient information. PMID:20923462

  18. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1, -2 and -3 in squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsukifuji, R; Tagawa, K; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H

    1999-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in extracellular matrix degradation associated with cancer invasion. An expression of MMP-1 (interstitial collagenase), MMP-2 (72-kDa type IV collagenase) and MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) was investigated in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its precancerous condition, actinic keratosis (AK), using in situ hybridization techniques. MMP-1 mRNA was detected in tumour cells and/or in stromal cells in all cases of SCC, four of six AKs adjacent to SCC and four of 16 AKs. MMP-2 and MMP-3 mRNAs were detected in SCC but not in AK. The expression of MMP-3 correlated to that of MMP-1 (P = 0.03) localized at the tumour mass and stroma of the invasive area, while MMP-2 mRNA was detected widely throughout the stroma independent of MMP-1 expression. Our results indicated that the expression of MMP-1, -2 and -3 showed different localization patterns, suggesting a unique role of each MMP in tumour progression. Moreover, MMP-1 expression could be an early event in the development of SCC, and AK demonstrating MMP-1 mRNA, might be in a more advanced dysplastic state, progressing to SCC. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362121

  19. Predisposing factors of actinic keratosis in a North-West German population.

    PubMed

    Hensen, Peter; Müller, Marcel L; Haschemi, Ramin; Ständer, Hartmut; Luger, Thomas A; Sunderkötter, Cord; Schiller, Meinhard

    2009-01-01

    The growing incident rates of skin cancer and their corresponding precursor lesions, e.g. actinic keratosis (AK), among Caucasians have become an important public health problem. A multicenter case-control study was conducted to identify the risk factors of AK of a prototypical Central European population. The study population comprised a total of 331 cases and 383 controls. Using multivariate analysis we identified ten independent variables predicting the AK risk. The five most crucial were age (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.08-1,14), gender (OR 3.92; 95% CI 2.42-6.36), history of previous skin malignancies (OR 6.47; 95% CI 3.21-13.03), pale skin phototype (OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.53-4.06), and sun exposure for occupational reasons (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.01-2.92). Additionally, sun exposure for recreational reasons, denial of the use of sunscreens, painful sunburn episodes before the age of 20, and a familial history of skin malignancies are also significant independent correlates of AK. Our epidemiological data suggest that constitutional susceptibility and sunlight exposure are equally involved in the onset of AK. Additional prophylactic and educational efforts should focus on increasing sun protection policies and educational programs especially aimed at outdoor workers, men, fair skinned individuals and patients with a history of previous skin malignancies. These measures should be able to reduce the excessive incidence rates of AK among Caucasians in Central Europe.

  20. Atopic dermatitis is not associated with actinic keratosis: cross-sectional results from the Rotterdam study.

    PubMed

    Hajdarbegovic, E; Blom, H; Verkouteren, J A C; Hofman, A; Hollestein, L M; Nijsten, T

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal barrier impairment and an altered immune system in atopic dermatitis (AD) may predispose to ultraviolet-induced DNA damage. To study the association between AD and actinic keratosis (AK) in a population-based cross-sectional study. AD was defined by modified criteria of the U.K. working party's diagnostic criteria. AKs were diagnosed by physicians during a full-body skin examination, and keratinocyte cancers were identified via linkage to the national pathology database. The results were analysed in adjusted multivariable and multinomial models. A lower proportion of subjects with AD had AKs than those without AD: 16% vs. 24%, P = 0·002; unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 0·60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·42-0·83; adjusted OR 0·74, 95% CI 0·51-1·05; fully adjusted OR 0·69, 95% CI 0·47-1·07. In a multinomial model patients with AD were less likely to have ≥ 10 AKs (adjusted OR 0·28, 95% CI 0·09-0·90). No effect of AD on basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma was found: adjusted OR 0·71, 95% CI 0·41-1·24 and adjusted OR 1·54, 95% CI 0·66-3·62, respectively. AD in community-dwelling patients is not associated with AK. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Ingenol mebutate gel treatment for actinic cheilitis: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Barrado Solís, Nerea; Molés Poveda, Paula; Lloret Ruiz, César; Pont Sanjuan, Virginia; Velasco Pastor, Manel; Quecedo Estébanez, Esther; Miquel Miquel, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) are premalignant lesions that have an increased risk of malignant transformation. Their treatment, therefore, is essential to prevent carcinogenesis. However, optimal therapy is not well established and different modalities yield variable results. Ingenol mebutate gel has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for topical treatment of actinic keratosis, with high clearance rates. On the basis of these findings, we report our experience with this drug for the treatment of AC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Quality of life and side effects in patients with actinic keratosis treated with ingenol mebutate: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jubert-Esteve, E; Del Pozo-Hernando, L J; Izquierdo-Herce, N; Bauzá-Alonso, A; Martín-Santiago, A; Jones-Caballero, M

    2015-10-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) lesions are in situ squamous cell carcinoma. These lesions have a low risk of progressing to invasive disease but significant impact on patients' quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to assess QoL and side effects in patients with AK receiving treatment with ingenol mebutate. This was a prospective, non-randomized pilot study carried out in Spain. The target population was adults with a clinical diagnosis of AK affecting any part of the body. Outcomes were assessed on the basis of a QoL questionnaire (Skindex-29), local skin response, the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM 1.4), and clinical response. A total of 19 patients were studied. Most of the participants were men (89.5%) and mean age was 76.2 years. After treatment with ingenol mebutate, significant improvement was observed in the Skindex-29 subscales relating to symptom severity (P=.041), the patients' emotional state (P=.026), and in the overall score (P=.014). Erythema, crusting, and flaking or scaling were the local skin responses with highest median score (2.0 in all 3 cases). Imiquimod 5% and ingenol mebutate achieved higher median scores for effectiveness and global satisfaction than any other previous treatments (as measured by TSQM 1.4). In the patients' assessment of convenience, ingenol mebutate had a higher median score than previous treatments. Over half of the patients (52.6%) had an improvement of at least 75% at month 3. QoL in patients with AK improves after treatment with ingenol mebutate. The presence of side effects did not affect QoL or patient satisfaction with treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Eyebrow hairs from actinic keratosis patients harbor the highest number of cutaneous human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infections seem to be associated with the onset of actinic keratosis (AK). This study compares the presence of cutaneous HPV types in eyebrow hairs to those in tissues of normal skin and skin lesions of 75 immunocompetent AK patients. Methods Biopsies from AK lesions, normal skin and plucked eyebrow hairs were collected from each patient. DNA from these specimens was tested for the presence of 28 cutaneous HPV (betaPV and gammaPV) by a PCR based method. Results The highest number of HPV prevalence was detected in 84% of the eyebrow hairs (63/75, median 6 types) compared to 47% of AK lesions (35/75, median 3 types) (p< 0.001) and 37% of normal skin (28/75, median 4 types) (p< 0.001), respectively. A total of 228 HPV infections were found in eyebrow hairs compared to only 92 HPV infections in AK and 69 in normal skin. In all three specimens HPV20, HPV23 and/or HPV37 were the most prevalent types. The highest number of multiple types of HPV positive specimens was found in 76% of the eyebrow hairs compared to 60% in AK and 57% in normal skin. The concordance of at least one HPV type in virus positive specimens was 81% (three specimens) and 88-93% of all three combinations with two specimens. Conclusions Thus, eyebrow hairs revealed the highest number of cutaneous HPV infections, are easy to collect and are an appropriate screening tool in order to identify a possible association of HPV and AK. PMID:23618013

  4. Optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of actinic keratosis-A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Friis, K B E; Themstrup, L; Jemec, G B E

    2017-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a real-time non-invasive imaging tool, introduced in dermatology in the late 1990s. OCT uses near-infrared light impulses to produce images which can be displayed in cross-sectional and en-face mode. The technique has been used to image skin diseases especially non-melanoma skin cancer including actinic keratosis (AK). Morphological characteristics of AK can be visualized in OCT images and can be used for diagnosis as well as disease monitoring. A systematic review of original papers on AK and OCT was performed on 31.03.16 and 24.10.16 in the major databases Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane and Svemed. Through database search and other sources, we identified 1366 titles of which 21 studies met the inclusion criteria and were used for further investigation. 16/16 Conventional OCT (cross-sectional images) studies described disruption of layers consistent with absence of normal layered architecture in the skin. Thickened epidermis was found in 14/16 studies and white (hyperreflective) streaks and dots were described in 11/16 studies. In High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) images disarranged epidermis (cross-sectional images) along with an atypical honeycomb pattern (en-face images) was found in 5/5 studies and well-demarcated dermo-epithelial junction (DEJ) (cross-sectional images) was described in 3/5 studies. Several morphological characteristics of AKs were identified using Conventional OCT and HD-OCT. It is suggested that these may be used in the diagnosis of AK. Additional validation is however required to establish consensus on the optimal diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of optical coherence tomography in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J; Themstrup, L; De Carvalho, N; Mogensen, M; Pellacani, G; Jemec, G B E

    2016-12-01

    Early diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is potentially possible using optical coherence tomography (OCT) which provides non-invasive, real-time images of skin with micrometre resolution and an imaging depth of up to 2mm. OCT technology for skin imaging has undergone significant developments, improving image quality substantially. The diagnostic accuracy of any method is influenced by continuous technological development making it necessary to regularly re-evaluate methods. The objective of this study is to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of OCT in basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and actinic keratosis (AK) as well as differentiating these lesions from normal skin. A study set consisting of 142 OCT images meeting selection criterea for image quality and diagnosis of AK, BCC and normal skin was presented uniformly to two groups of blinded observers: 5 dermatologists experienced in OCT-image interpretation and 5 dermatologists with no experience in OCT. During the presentation of the study set the observers filled out a standardized questionnaire regarding the OCT diagnosis. Images were captured using a commercially available OCT machine (Vivosight ® , Michelson Diagnostics, UK). Skilled OCT observers were able to diagnose BCC lesions with a sensitivity of 86% to 95% and a specificity of 81% to 98%. Skilled observers with at least one year of OCT-experience showed an overall higher diagnostic accuracy compared to inexperienced observers. The study shows an improved diagnostic accuracy of OCT in differentiating AK and BCC from healthy skin using state-of-the-art technology compared to earlier OCT technology, especially concerning BCC diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Eyebrow hairs from actinic keratosis patients harbor the highest number of cutaneous human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ines; Lehmann, Mandy D; Kogosov, Vlada; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2013-04-24

    Cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infections seem to be associated with the onset of actinic keratosis (AK). This study compares the presence of cutaneous HPV types in eyebrow hairs to those in tissues of normal skin and skin lesions of 75 immunocompetent AK patients. Biopsies from AK lesions, normal skin and plucked eyebrow hairs were collected from each patient. DNA from these specimens was tested for the presence of 28 cutaneous HPV (betaPV and gammaPV) by a PCR based method. The highest number of HPV prevalence was detected in 84% of the eyebrow hairs (63/75, median 6 types) compared to 47% of AK lesions (35/75, median 3 types) (p< 0.001) and 37% of normal skin (28/75, median 4 types) (p< 0.001), respectively. A total of 228 HPV infections were found in eyebrow hairs compared to only 92 HPV infections in AK and 69 in normal skin. In all three specimens HPV20, HPV23 and/or HPV37 were the most prevalent types. The highest number of multiple types of HPV positive specimens was found in 76% of the eyebrow hairs compared to 60% in AK and 57% in normal skin. The concordance of at least one HPV type in virus positive specimens was 81% (three specimens) and 88-93% of all three combinations with two specimens. Thus, eyebrow hairs revealed the highest number of cutaneous HPV infections, are easy to collect and are an appropriate screening tool in order to identify a possible association of HPV and AK.

  7. Using photodynamic therapy to estimate effectiveness of innovative combined diclofenac and tazaroten therapy of disseminated actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Osiecka, Beata J; Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Nockowski, Piotr; Lipinski, Artur; Sieja, Agnieszka; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and therapy of precancerous lesions and malignant tumors belong to the most challenging tasks in modern medicine. Photodynamic diagnosis can help diagnose both precancerous lesions and early carcinoma. Actinic keratosis (AK) is the most common precancerous lesion of the skin. The available data show a high effectiveness of diclofenac in treating multifocal AK. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who complained of multiple disseminated AK lesions predominantly on the lower limbs and trunk with a significant exacerbation within the last 6 months. Due to the spreading of disease and a high number of AK foci, as well as technical problems with visiting the hospital (PDT Laboratory), photodynamic therapy was not applied. The patient was treated for 2 months with a combination of local administration of 3% diclofenac and 0.1% tazaroten and 3% diclofenac only as a half side (left-right) comparison. The effects of therapy were later clinically evaluated and verified by means of photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) directly after therapy and at a follow-up examination 3 months later. The evaluation of treatment was blinded. Treatment with diclofenac only on the right side of the body resulted in clearing of 55% of all treated lesions, which increased to 60% three months after finishing therapy. On the left side of the body, where combined therapy (diclofenac 2 times daily on uneven dates and diclofenac once a day + tazaroten once a day on even dates) was used, 77.5% pathologic lesions disappeared, but this did not increase at follow up. The treatment of multifocal, disseminated AK is a difficult task and also burdensome for the patient due to side effects like scarring or burning and itching which occur during most therapies. Combined therapy with diclofenac and tazaroten supported by PDD may improve the effects of routine treatment of AK.

  8. The current role of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy within the continuum of actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim P; Peppelman, Malou; Hoogedoorn, Lisa; Van Erp, Piet E J; Gerritsen, Marie-Jeanne P

    2016-12-01

    Clinical differentiation between actinic keratosis (AK), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ, and invasive SCC and its variants may be difficult. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive technique for in vivo skin imaging. To explicate the diagnostic and monitoring use of RCM within the spectrum of AK and SCC, and evaluate the accuracy of RCM for these diagnoses relative to histopathology. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases. The quality was assessed using the STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Twenty-five eligible studies were included. Different diagnostic RCM features have been described for AK, actinic cheilitis (AC), erythroplasia of Queyrat, Bowen disease, invasive SCC, and keratoacanthoma (KA). The overall range of sensitivity and specificity of RCM for the diagnosis of SCC, AK, SCC in situ, and KA was 79-100% and 78-100%, respectively. The current literature describes the use of RCM for diagnosing AK, AC, erythroplasia of Queyrat, Bowen disease, invasive SCC, and KA, as well as for monitoring treatments of AK, with good accuracy. Unfortunately, studies with high methodological quality are lacking. Pre-treatment of hyperkeratotic lesions and uniform definitions of RCM features are required to simplify the differentiation between AKs, SCC in situ, and SCC and its variants in clinical practice.

  9. Treatment options for actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, William J; Downs, Michael R; Bedwell, Sondra A

    2007-09-01

    Actinic keratoses are rough, scaly lesions that commonly occur on sun-exposed areas of the skin. The prevalence of the condition increases with age. Actinic keratoses are thought to be carcinomas in situ, which can progress to squamous cell carcinomas. The decision to treat can be based on cosmetic reasons; symptom relief; or, most importantly, the prevention of malignancy and metastasis. Treatment options include ablative (destructive) therapies such as cryosurgery, curettage with electrosurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Topical therapies are used in patients with multiple lesions. Fluorouracil has been the traditional topical treatment for actinic keratoses, although imiquimod 5% cream and diclofenac 3% gel are effective alternative therapies. There are too few controlled trials comparing treatment modalities for physicians to make sound, evidence-based treatment decisions.

  10. Long-term use of a new topical formulation containing piroxicam 0.8% and sunscreen: efficacy and tolerability on actinic keratosis. A proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Babino, Graziella; Diluvio, Laura; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto; Di Prete, Monia; Chimenti, Sergio; Milani, Massimo; Campione, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 enzyme up-regulation is involved in the pathogenetic process of actinic keratosis (A.K.) and non-melanoma skin cancers. Diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (N.S.A.I.D.) drug, is used as topical treatment of A.K. Piroxicam is a N.S.A.I.D. characterized by a high COX-1 inhibition activity. We conducted an 18 month exploratory open-label study on A.K., to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a new topical formulation of piroxicam and sunscreen in A.K. Enrolled subjects applied a galenic formulation of piroxicam 0.8%, vehiculated in a topical product containing sun filters with high (50+) and broad spectrum (UVA) actions, twice a day for 6 months. Subjects were then followed up for additional 12 months. Thirty-eight subjects with a total of 69 A.K. lesions participated in the trial. The primary outcome was the evolution of the Actinic Keratosis Erythema Scale Atrophy (A.K.E.S.A) score assessing erythema, scale, and atrophy of a target A.K. lesion. Secondary outcomes were the percentage of treated lesions with complete (100%) or partial (≥75%) clearance and the evaluation skin tolerability. A.K.E.S.A. mean (S.D.) score at baseline was 7.5 (1.2). After 6 months of treatment, A.K.E.S.A. score decreased to 0.9 (1.1), a -88% reduction versus baseline. At the end of follow-up, A.K.E.S.A. score was 0.8 (1.2). A complete response was achieved in 38 of the 69 lesions (55%, 95% C.I.: 43% to 66%) and clearance was maintained 1 year post-treatment. A partial clearance was observed in 57 of 69 treated lesions (83%, 95% C.I.: 73% to 91%). Adverse events were limited to mild local irritation. Our experience suggests that 6 month topical piroxicam 0.8% is efficacious and well tolerated in A.K. Clinical efficacy is maintained 1 year post-treatment. The main limitation of our study is that it was an open label non-controlled trial. Future controlled trials are warranted in order to compare the efficacy and tolerability of this topical

  11. [Immunohistochemical study of the specific features of expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 in the photoaged skin, the foci of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E V; Snarskaya, E S; Zavalishina, L E; Tkachenko, S B

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) mediate the degradation of all types of collagens and other extracellular matrix components (elastin, proteoglycans, and laminin), their synthesis and accumulation play a key role in the hydrolysis of basement membrane. MMPs are involved in a wide range of proteolytic processes in the presence of different physiological and pathological changes, including inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. to study the specific features of MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression in different stages of skin photoaging, in the foci of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma by immunohistochemical examination. 12 samples of the healthy skin (6 samples of the eyelid skin with Glogau grade II photoaging; 6 ones of eyelid skin with Glogau grades III-IV photoaging) and biopsies from 8 foci of actinic keratosis and from 8 ones of basal cell carcinoma were examined. A positive reaction to MMPs was shown as different brown staining intensity in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes/tumor cells. MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression was recorded in 67% of the histological specimens of the Glogau grade III photoaged skin and in 100% of those of Glogau grade IV. In the foci of actinic keratosis, the expression of MMP-1 was observed in 62.5% of cases and that of MMP-9 was seen in 87.5%. In basal cell carcinoma, the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-9 was detected in all investigated samples. The immunomorphological findings are indicative of the important role of the level of MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression that is associated with the degree of progression of skin photoaging processes. Minimal MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression was recorded even in grades III-IV photoaging and in the foci of actinic keratosis. Intense MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression was detected in malignant skin epithelial neoplasms as different clinicomorphological types of basal cell carcinoma.

  12. Randomized, Controlled Trial of Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing Followed by Ultrashort Incubation Aminolevulinic Acid Blue Light Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis.

    PubMed

    Alexiades, Macrene

    2017-08-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment option for actinic keratosis (AK), and recently fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser was shown to improve outcomes; but studies of short incubation photosensitizer are lacking. Assess the efficacy of short incubation ALA followed by blue light PDT with and without previous fractional CO2 treatment for the treatment of AK. Randomized, paired split-design, controlled trial of fractional CO2 followed by ultrashort 15-minute versus 30-minute incubation ALA and blue light PDT for the treatment of AK on the face. The complete clearance rates (CRs) at 8 weeks after ALA PDT with and without FxCO2 at 30- and 15-minute ALA incubation times were 89.78% (+FxCO2) versus 71.20% CR (-FxCO2) at 30', and 86.38% (+FxCO2) versus 69.23% (-FxCO2) at 15' ALA incubation. All lesion improvements were statistically significant. This randomized, comparative paired group controlled clinical study demonstrates that ultrashort 15- and 30-minute incubation ALA PDTs are of limited efficacy for the treatment of AK. Pretreatment with fractional ablative resurfacing yields statistically significant greater AK clearance with ALA-PDT at ultrashort ALA incubations followed by blue light.

  13. Electrospun poly-l-lactide scaffold for the controlled and targeted delivery of a synthetically obtained Diclofenac prodrug to treat actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Germano; Bochicchio, Brigida; Pepe, Antonietta; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Hinderer, Svenja

    2017-04-01

    Actinic Keratosis' (AKs) are small skin lesions that are related to a prolonged sun-damage, which can develop into invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) when left untreated. Effective, specific and well tolerable therapies to cure AKs are still of great interest. Diclofenac (DCF) is the current gold standard for the local treatment of AKs in terms of costs, effectiveness, side effects and tolerability. In this work, an electrospun polylactic acid (PLA) scaffold loaded with a synthetic DCF prodrug was developed and characterized. Specifically, the prodrug was successfully synthetized by binding DCF to a glycine residue via solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and then incorporated in an electrospun PLA scaffold. The drug encapsulation was verified using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and its scaffold release was spectrophotometrically monitored and confirmed with MPM. The scaffold was further characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), tensile testing and contact angle measurements. Its biocompatibility was verified by performing a cell proliferation assay and compared to PLA scaffolds containing the same amount of DCF sodium salt (DCFONa). Finally, the effect of the electrospun scaffolds on human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) morphology and metabolism was investigated by combining MPM with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The obtained results suggest that the obtained scaffold could be suitable for the controlled and targeted delivery of the synthesized prodrug for the treatment of AKs. Electrospun scaffolds are of growing interest as materials for a controlled drug delivery. In this work, an electrospun polylactic acid scaffold containing a synthetically obtained Diclofenac prodrug is proposed as a novel substrate for the topical treatment of actinic keratosis. A controlled drug delivery targeted to the area of interest could enhance the efficacy of the therapy and favor the healing process. The prodrug was synthesized via solid phase

  14. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response.

  15. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response. PMID:24996661

  16. Colonisation of basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis by malignant melanoma in situ in a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum variant

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Louise J.; Husain, Ehab A.

    2012-01-01

    Although malignant melanoma (MM) and both basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and actinic keratosis (AK) are sun-induced lesions, the coexistence of these entities at the same anatomical site (collision tumour) is exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman with a known history of xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) who presented with 2 separate skin lesions over the middle and upper right forearm, respectively. The clinical impression was that of BCCs or squamous cell lesions. On histological examination, both specimens showed features of melanoma in situ (MIS). In the first lesion, MIS merged with and colonised a superficial and focally invasive BCC. In the second lesion, MIS merged with an AK. No separate invasive nests of malignant melanoma were seen in either specimen. The atypical melanocytes were highlighted by Melan-A and HMB-45 immunostaining, whereas the epithelial cells in both the BCC and AK stained with the pancytokeratin MNF-116. The patient had a previous history of multiple MMs and non-melanomatous skin cancers and finally developed widespread metastatic malignant melanoma, which proved fatal. The rare and interesting phenomenon of collision tumours may pose diagnostic difficulties. To our knowledge, this is the first reported simultaneous presentation of cytologically malignant collision tumours in a patient with XPV. PMID:24765446

  17. Evaluation of T-lymphocyte subpopulations in actinic keratosis, in situ and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Stravodimou, Aristea; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Papadaki, Helen; Mouzaki, Athanasia; Georgiou, Sophia; Melachrinou, Maria; Kourea, Eleni P

    2018-05-01

    Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) represent important regulators of carcinogenesis. Cutaneous invasive squamous cell carcinoma (inSCC) develops through precursor lesions, namely in situ squamous cell carcinoma (isSCC) and actinic keratosis (AK), representing a natural model of carcinogenesis. The study evaluates TIL subpopulations in inSCC and its precursors by comparing 2 semiquantitative scoring systems, and assesses the presence of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) in these lesions. Paraffin sections from 33 cases of AK, 19 isSCCs and 34 inSCCs with adjacent precursor lesions or normal skin (NS) were immunostained for CD3, CD4, CD8 and Foxp3. TIL subgroups were evaluated by the semiquantitative Klintrup-Mäkinen (K-M) score, and by a more detailed modification of this system. Treg counts were assessed by image analysis quantification. An increase of all TIL subpolulations from precursor lesions toward inSCC was shown by both scoring systems. Treg counts progressively increased from NS to AK and isSCC, but decreased in inSCC. Tregs were more numerous in pT2 and around indolent inSCCs compared to T1 and aggressive subtypes. T-cells and cytotoxic T-cells progressively increase in cutaneous squamous cell carcinogenesis, while Treg counts diminish in inSCC. The K-M score is an appropriate, easily applicable TIL scoring system in cutaneous inSCC. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Rosettes in actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma: distribution, association to other dermoscopic signs and description of the rosette pattern.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Masdemont, B; Polimón-Olabarrieta, I; Marinero-Escobedo, S; Gutiérrez-Pecharromán, A; Rodríguez-Lomba, E

    2018-01-01

    Rosettes, a dermoscopic structure characterized by four white points arranged as a 4-leaf clover, supports the dermoscopic diagnosis of actinic keratosis (AK) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The association of rosettes with other dermoscopic structures in AK or SCC and their distribution has not been analysed yet. We conducted a prospective study of patients with histologically proven AK or SCC who presented dermoscopic rosettes at initial evaluation. A total of 56 tumours were collected (94.6% AK and 5.4% SCC). Thirty-seven (66.1%) lesions were non-pigmented and 19 (33.9%) pigmented. The most common dermoscopic findings were erythema (53; 94.6%) and scale (42; 75%). White circles were present in 21 lesions (37.5%); pigmented pseudonetwork in 18 (32.1%) and multiple grey to brown dots and globules in 14 (25%). Rosettes were distributed focally in 9 (16.1%) and generalized in 47 (83.9%). The rosette pattern (rosettes as the main structure) was observed only in AK (19; 35.8%). The analysis was not blinded. The distinction between focal distribution (up to 3 rosettes) or generalized could be considered arbitrary. The rosette pattern identified in AK may be a specific pattern for AK. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Actinic keratosis and diabetes complications: A nationwide population-based study in South Korea (2009-2015).

    PubMed

    Lee, YoungBok; Lee, JiHyun; Choi, JinYoung; Yu, DongSoo; Han, KyungDo; Park, Yong-Gyu

    2017-11-29

    As the associations between actinic keratosis (AK) and diabetes complications in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have never been investigated, this study aimed to evaluate any such associations in patients with DM. This retrospective cohort study analyzed clinical data for DM patients aged>40 years who had undergone the health examination recommended by the South Korea National Health Insurance Program between 2009 and 2012 (n=2,056,580). All of these patients were classified according to the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and history of DVD; myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischaemic attacks. Newly diagnosed AK was identified using claims data from baseline to the date of diagnosis or 31 December 2015, whichever came first. Of the 2,056,580 patients with DM, 6404 (0.31%) developed AK. Those patients in the DR, ESRD and CVD groups were more likely to be diagnosed with AK (P<0.001, by log-rank test). After adjusting for age and gender, the risks for AK were significantly higher in the DR, ESRD and CVD groups: HR (95% CI): 1.29 (1.21-1.39), HR: 4.24 (3.28-5.47) and HR: 1.22 (1.13-1.31), respectively. This study has revealed that the incidence of AK is higher in diabetes patients with ocular, renal and cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A new, objective, quantitative scale for measuring local skin responses following topical actinic keratosis therapy with ingenol mebutate.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Robert; Marmur, Ellen; Anderson, Lawrence; Welburn, Peter; Katsamas, Janelle

    2014-12-01

    Local skin responses (LSRs) are the most common adverse effects of topical actinic keratosis (AK) therapy. There is currently no method available that allows objective characterization of LSRs. Here, the authors describe a new scale developed to quantitatively and objectively assess the six most common LSRs resulting from topical AK therapy with ingenol mebutate. The LSR grading scale was developed using a 0-4 numerical rating, with clinical descriptors and representative photographic images for each rating. Good inter-observer grading concordance was demonstrated in peer review during development of the tool. Data on the use of the scale are described from four phase III double-blind studies of ingenol mebutate (n = 1,005). LSRs peaked on days 4 (face/scalp) or 8 (trunk/extremities), with mean maximum composite LSR scores of 9.1 and 6.8, respectively, and a rapid return toward baseline by day 15 in most cases. Mean composite LSR score at day 57 was generally lower than at baseline. The LSR grading scale is an objective tool allowing practicing dermatologists to characterize and compare LSRs to existing and, potentially, future AK therapies.

  1. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: Case-based review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Federica; Peroni, Anna; Colato, Chiara; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-08-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a rare dermatological condition characterized by keratotic papules arranged in a parallel linear or reticular pattern and facial lesions resembling seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea. The clinical, histological and therapeutic information on 71 patients with KLC retrieved through a PubMed search plus one our new case were analyzed. KLC affects patients of all ages, with a modest male predominance. Pediatric cases represent about one quarter of patients. Diagnosis is usually delayed and histologically confirmed. All patients have thick, rough and scaly papules and plaques arranged in a linear or reticular pattern, on limbs (>80%) and trunk (about 60%). Face involvement is described in two-thirds of patients. Lesions are usually asymptomatic or mildly pruritic. Other manifestations, such as palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal involvement, ocular manifestations, nail dystrophy, are reported in 20-30% of patients. Children present more frequently alopecia. No controlled trials are available. Results from small case series or single case reports show that the best treatment options are phototherapy and systemic retinoids, alone or in combination, with nearly half of patients reaching complete remission. Systemic corticosteroids as well as antibiotics and antimalarials are not effective.

  2. Efficacy and safety of topical SR-T100 gel in treating actinic keratosis in Taiwan: A Phase III randomized double-blind vehicle-controlled parallel trial.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Chun; Wong, Tak-Wah; Lee, Chih-Hung; Hong, Chien-Hui; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lai, Feng-Jie; Lin, Shang-Hung; Chi, Ching-Chi; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Yen, Hsi; Wu, Chin-Han; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Lan, Cheng-Che E

    2018-06-01

    Currently available topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK) are associated with substantial side-effects. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical SR-T100 gel in treating AK. A multicenter, randomized, double-blinded phase III trial was conducted. Patients with at least two clinically visible AK were enrolled and a punch biopsy was performed on one of the AK to confirm the diagnosis. This study consisted of up to 16-week treatment and 8-week post-treatment periods. Medication was applied daily with occlusive dressing. 123 subjects were recruited and 113 were randomized. 76 subjects were in the SR-T100 and 37 in the vehicle arms. In SR-T100 and vehicle groups, 32.39% and 17.14% of subjects achieved complete clearance, respectively. For 75% partial clearance of lesions, 71.83% and 37.1% of subjects achieved this goal in SR-T100 and vehicle group, respectively. When comparing SR-T100 to vehicle, the odds ratio of complete clearance was 2.14 (p = 0.111), and odds ratio of partial clearance was 4.36 (p < 0.001). Severe local reactions were reported by only one subject using SR-T100. The imitation of the study was that not all the treated AK lesions were confirmed by histopathology. The diagnostic uncertainty may contribute to the high partial clearance rate in the vehicle group since the clinical-diagnosed AK showed higher clearance rate compared to histopathology-confirmed AK. The use of occlusive dressing was another possible explanation for high placebo effects. The results suggested that topical SR-T100 gel may be an effective and safe treatment for field therapy of AK. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of 10 efficient protocols for photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis: How relevant are effective light dose and local damage in predicting the complete response rate at 3 months?

    PubMed

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Baert, Gregory; Thecua, Elise; Lecomte, Fabienne; Vicentini, Claire; Abi-Rached, Henry; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2018-04-18

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an established treatment modality for various dermatological conditions, including actinic keratosis. In Europe, the approved protocols for photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis involve irradiation with either an Aktilite CL 128 lamp or daylight, whereas irradiation with the Blu-U illuminator is approved in the United States. Many other protocols using irradiation by a variety of light sources are also clinically efficient. This paper aims to compare 10 different protocols with clinically proven efficacy for photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis and the available spectral irradiance of the light source. Effective irradiance, effective light dose, and local damage are compared. We also investigate whether there is an association between the complete response rate at 3 months and the effective light dose or local damage. The effective irradiance, also referred to as protoporphyrin IX-weighted irradiance, is obtained by integrating the spectral irradiance weighted by the normalized absorption spectrum of protoporphyrin IX over the wavelength. Integrating the effective irradiance over the irradiation time yields the effective light dose, which is also known as the protoporphyrin IX-weighted light dose. Local damage, defined as the total cumulative singlet oxygen molecules produced during treatment, is estimated using mathematical modeling of the photodynamic therapy process. This modeling is based on an iterative procedure taking into account the spatial and temporal variations in the protoporphyrin IX absorption spectrum during treatment. The protocol for daylight photodynamic therapy on a clear sunny day, the protocol for daylight photodynamic therapy on an overcast day, the photodynamic therapy protocol for a white LED lamp for operating rooms and the photodynamic therapy protocol for the Blu-U illuminator perform better than the six other protocols-all involving red light illumination-in terms of both effective light dose and

  4. Protein expression of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP in actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Poswar, Fabiano; de Carvalho Fraga, Carlos Alberto; Gomes, Emisael Stênio Batista; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Souza, Linton Wallis Figueiredo; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Souza; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; de-Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena

    2015-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are 2 skin neoplasms with distinct potentials to invasion and metastasis. Actinic keratosis (AK) is a precursor lesion of SCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP in samples of BCC (n = 29), SCC (n = 12), and AK (n = 13). The ratio of positive cells to total cells was used to quantify the staining. Statistical significance was considered under the level P < .05. We found a higher expression of MMP-2 in tumor stroma and parenchyma of SCC as compared to BCC. The expression of this protein was also similar between SCC and its precursor actinic keratosis, and it was higher in the stroma of high-risk BCC when compared to low-risk BCC. MT1-MMP, which is an activator of MMP-2, was similarly expressed in all groups. Our results suggest that MMP-2 expression may contribute to the distinct invasive patterns seen in SCC and BCC. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Cytological diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis, using Papanicolaou and May-Grünwald-Giemsa stained cutaneous tissue smear.

    PubMed

    Christensen, E; Bofin, A; Gudmundsdóttir, I; Skogvoll, E

    2008-10-01

    Cytology may become the diagnostic method of choice with the advent of new non-invasive treatments for non-melanoma skin cancer, as the sampling technique for cytology entails little tissue disfiguration. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the diagnostic performance of scrape cytology using two different cytological staining techniques, and to evaluate additional touch imprint cytology, with that of histopathology of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and actinic keratosis (AK). We investigated 50 BCC and 28 AK histologically verified lesions, from 41 and 25 patients, respectively. Two separate skin scrape samples and one touch imprint sample were taken from each lesion. The smears were stained with Papanicolaou (Pap) or May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) stains. All cytological specimens were examined in random order by pathologists without knowledge of the histology. Cytodiagnostic results were compared with the histopathological report. Scrape cytodiagnosis agreed with histopathology in 48 (Pap) and 47 (MGG) of the 50 BCC cases, and in 26 of 28 (Pap) and 21 of 26 (MGG) AK cases, yielding sensitivities of 96%, 94%, 93% and 81%, respectively. No significant difference in sensitivity between the two staining methods was found but a trend towards higher Pap sensitivity for AK was noted (P = 0.10). Touch imprint cytology confirmed histopathology in 38 of the 77 cases of BCC and AK. Cytological diagnosis with either Pap or MGG stain for BCC and AK is reliable, and differentiates well between BCC and AK. Imprint cytology proved to be non-diagnostic in half of the examined cases.

  6. Clinical Response to Ingenol Mebutate in Patients With Actinic Keratoses.

    PubMed

    Batalla, A; Flórez, Á; Feal, C; Peón, G; Abalde, M T; Salgado-Boquete, L; de la Torre, C

    2015-12-01

    Cryotherapy is the most common treatment for actinic keratosis, but its effect is limited to individual lesions. Several topical drugs, however, are available that, in addition to treating individual actinic keratoses, target field cancerization and thereby act on subclinical lesions. Examples are 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, diclofenac, and ingenol mebutate. We report on 17 patients with actinic keratoses treated with ingenol mebutate and describe our findings on treatment effectiveness, adherence, and tolerance. Complete and partial response rates were 35% and 53%, respectively. Ninety-four percent of patients fully adhered to treatment and 18% developed severe local reactions. Ingenol mebutate is an effective treatment for actinic keratosis. Although it has a similar rate of local reactions to other treatments available for actinic keratosis, its short treatment regimen favors better adherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  7. Red light photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis using 37 J/cm2 : Fractionated irradiation with 12.3 mW/cm2 after 30 minutes incubation time compared to standard continuous irradiation with 75 mW/cm2 after 3 hours incubation time using a mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Baert, Gregory; Devos, Laura; Thecua, Elise; Vicentini, Claire; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2017-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for dermatological conditions. Although, the standard PDT protocol for the treatment of actinic keratoses in Europe has shown to be effective, treatment-associated pain is often observed in patients. Different modifications to this protocol attempted to decrease pain have been investigated. The decrease in fluence rate seems to be a promising solution. Moreover, it has been suggested that light fractionation significantly increases the efficacy of PDT. Based on a flexible light-emitting textile, the FLEXITHERALIGHT device specifically provides a fractionated illumination at a fluence rate more than six times lower than that of the standard protocol. In a recently completed clinical trial of PDT for the treatment of actinic keratosis, the non-inferiority of a protocol involving illumination with the FLEXITHERALIGHT device after a short incubation time and referred to as the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol has been assessed compared to the standard protocol. In this paper, we propose a comparison of the two above mentioned 635 nm red light protocols with 37 J/cm 2 in the PDT treatment of actinic keratosis: the standard protocol and the FLEXITHERALIGHT one through a mathematical modeling. This mathematical modeling, which slightly differs from the one we have already published, enables the local damage induced by the therapy to be estimated. The comparison performed in terms of the local damage induced by the therapy demonstrates that the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol with lower fluence rate, light fractionation and shorter incubation time is somewhat less efficient than the standard protocol. Nevertheless, from the clinical trial results, the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol results in non-inferior response rates compared to the standard protocol. This finding raises the question of whether the PDT local damage achieved by the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol (respectively, the standard protocol

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of 0.5% fluorouracil cream and 5% fluorouracil cream applied to each side of the face in patients with actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Loven, Keith; Stein, Linda; Furst, Katharine; Levy, Sharon

    2002-06-01

    A new 0.5% fluorouracil cream has been developed that provides an alternative to the more highly concentrated topical formulations of fluorouracil that are currently available. This was a comparison of the tolerability and efficacy of the 0.5% and 5% fluorouracil creams in the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK). During this single-blind, randomized study, patients with > or =6 AK lesions were treated for 4 weeks with the 0.5% (once daily) and 5% (twice daily) fluorouracil creams applied to opposite sides of the face. After the end of treatment, patients were followed for an additional 4 weeks. Efficacy variables included absolute and percent reductions in AK lesions from baseline and total clearance of AK lesions. A questionnaire was used to evaluate patients' treatment preferences. Tolerability was evaluated through continuous monitoring of adverse events. Treatment with 0.5% fluorouracil cream reduced the number of AK lesions from 11.3 at baseline to 2.5 at the end of the 4-week follow-up phase, compared with a reduction from 10.3 to 4.2 lesions after treatment with 5% fluorouracil cream. The reduction was significantly greater with the 0.5% cream compared with the 5% cream (P = 0.044). The 0.5% cream was as effective as the 5% cream in terms of the percent reduction in AK lesions from baseline (67% and 47%, respectively) and in achieving total clearance of AK lesions (both treatments, approximately 43% of patients). Both treatments were associated with similar degrees of investigator-rated irritation; however, patients preferred the 0.5% cream because they felt it was more tolerable (P = 0.003), easier to apply, and had a once-daily application schedule. Although all patients experienced facial irritation in association with both creams, fewer patients treated with the 0.5% cream reported symptoms of facial irritation. In this study, 0.5% fluorouracil cream once daily was at least as effective as 5% fluorouracil cream twice daily in terms of the percent

  9. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... growths on the skin caused by too much sun exposure). Diclofenac is in a class of medications ... plan to avoid exposure to real and artificial sunlight (sun lamps) and to wear protective clothing and ...

  10. Pharmacoeconomy of drugs used in the treatment of actinic keratoses

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, S; Torchia, V; Gliozzi, M; Bottoni, U; Del Duca, E; Muscoli, C

    2016-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) represents an emerging issue in the area of skin diseases which undergo high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recently, evidence has been accumulated that 3% diclofenac sodium and ingenol mubetate may efficiently counteract the development of progressive AK even if the pharmacoeconomic impact of such a treatment remains poorly defined. With the objective of assessing the efficacy of 3% diclofenac sodium versus ingenol mebutate, a comparative cost-efficacy analysis was performed between both pharmacological treatments. In the present analysis, data of efficacy of clinical studies were combined with information on the quality of life associated with AK lesions based on available literature data. Furthermore, the cost associated with the management of these lesions in Italy has been taken into account. To this purpose, we carried out a literature survey on the clinical and economic data among clinical reports available in Italy based on the assessment of related expenditure of public resources and their relationship with the subsequent health benefits. PMID:27207444

  11. Long-term Efficacy of Topical Fluorouracil Cream, 5%, for Treating Actinic Keratosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Hyemin; Hogan, Daniel; Eilers, David; Swetter, Susan M; Chen, Suephy C; Jacob, Sharon E; Warshaw, Erin M; Stricklin, George; Dellavalle, Robert P; Sidhu-Malik, Navjeet; Konnikov, Nellie; Werth, Victoria P; Keri, Jonette; Lew, Robert; Weinstock, Martin A

    2015-09-01

    Topical fluorouracil was demonstrated to be effective in reducing the number of actinic keratoses (AKs) for up to 6 months, but no randomized trials studied its long-term efficacy. To evaluate the long-term efficacy of a single course of fluorouracil cream, 5%, for AK treatment. The Veterans Affairs Keratinocyte Carcinoma Chemoprevention (VAKCC) trial was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with patients from dermatology clinics at 12 VA medical centers recruited from 2009 to 2011 and followed up until 2013. Our study population comprised 932 veterans with 2 or more keratinocyte carcinomas in the 5 years prior to enrollment. The mean follow-up duration was 2.6 years in both treatment and control groups. Participants applied either topical fluorouracil cream, 5% (n = 468), or vehicle control cream (n = 464) to the face and ears twice daily for up to 4 weeks. This study reports on AK counts and treatments, which were secondary outcomes of the VAKCC trial. Actinic keratoses on the face and ears were counted by study dermatologists at enrollment and at study visits every 6 months. The number of spot treatments for AKs on the face and ears at semiannual study visits and in between study visits was recorded. The number of AKs on the face and ears per participant was not different between the fluorouracil and control groups at randomization (11.1 vs 10.6, P > .10). After randomization, the fluorouracil group had fewer AKs compared with the control group at 6 months (3.0 vs 8.1, P < .001) and for the overall study duration (P < .001). The fluorouracil group also had higher complete AK clearance rates (38% vs 17% at 6 months) and fewer spot treatments at 6-month intervals, at study visits, and in between study visits during the trial (P < .01 for all). The fluorouracil group took longer to require the first spot AK treatment (6.2 months) compared with the control group (6.0 months) (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.60-0.79). The

  12. Photodynamic therapy is more effective than imiquimod for actinic keratosis in organ transplant recipients: a randomized intraindividual controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Halldin, C; Sandberg, C; Gonzalez, H; Wennberg, A M; Sørensen, S S; Wulf, H C; Haedersdal, M

    2018-04-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) in solid organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are difficult-to-treat premalignancies and comparison of topical therapies is therefore warranted. In an intraindividual study to compare the efficacy and safety of field treatment with methyl aminolaevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) and imiquimod (IMIQ) for AKs in OTRs. OTRs (n = 35) with 572 AKs (grade I-III) in two similar areas on the face, scalp, dorsal hands or forearms were included. All patients received one MAL-PDT and one IMIQ session (three applications per week for 4 weeks) in each study area according to randomization. Treatments were repeated after 2 months (IMIQ) and 3 months (PDT) in skin with incomplete AK response. Outcome measures were complete lesion response (CR), skin reactions, laboratory results and treatment preference. The majority of study areas received two treatment sessions (PDT n = 25 patients; IMIQ n = 29 patients). At 3 months after two treatments, skin treated with PDT achieved a higher rate of CR (AK I-III median 78%; range 50-100) compared with IMIQ-treated skin areas (median 61%, range 33-100; P < 0·001). Fewer emergent AKs were seen in PDT-treated skin vs. IMIQ-treated skin (0·7 vs. 1·5 AKs, P = 0·04). Patients developed more intense inflammatory skin reactions following PDT, which resolved more rapidly compared with IMIQ (median 10 days vs. 18 days, P < 0·01). Patient preference (P = 0·47) and cosmesis (P > 0·30) were similar for PDT and IMIQ. Compared with IMIQ, PDT treatment obtained a higher rate of AK clearance at 3-month follow-up and achieved shorter-lasting, but more intense, short-term skin reactions. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Treatment of pigmented keratosis pilaris in Asian patients with a novel Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangeun

    2011-06-01

    Treatment for most cases of keratosis pilaris requires simple reassurance and general skin care recommendations. Many Asian patients find lesions due to pigmented keratosis pilaris to be cosmetically unappealing. Treatment of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with low fluence is reported. To investigate the efficacy of a novel Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for the treatment of pigmented keratosis pilaris in Asian patients. Ten patients with pigmented keratosis pilaris underwent five weekly treatments using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (RevLite(®); HOYA ConBio(®), Freemont, CA, USA) at 1064 nm with a 6-mm spot size and a fluence of 5.9 J/cm(2). Photographic documentation was obtained at baseline and 2 months after the final treatment. Clinical improvement was achieved in all 10 patients with minimal adverse effects. For the treatment of keratosis pilaris, the use of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser can be helpful for improving cosmetic appearance as it can improve pigmentation.

  14. Dermatoscopic Findings of Seborrheic Keratosis in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Maria Luiza; Oliveira Lima, Cíntia Maria; Moura, Heloísa Helena; Ishida, Cleide; Campos-do-Carmo, Gabriella; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous melanoma may in some instances be confused with seborrheic keratosis, which is a very common neoplasia, more often mistaken for actinic keratosis and verruca vulgaris. Melanoma may clinically resemble seborrheic keratosis and should be considered as its possible clinical simulator. We report a case of melanoma with dermatoscopic characteristics of seborrheic keratosis and emphasize the importance of the dermatoscopy algorithm in differentiating between a melanocytic and a non-melanocytic lesion, of the excisional biopsy for the establishment of the diagnosis of cutaneous tumors, and of the histopathologic examination in all surgically removed samples.

  15. A randomized pilot comparative study of topical methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy versus imiquimod 5% versus sequential application of both therapies in immunocompetent patients with actinic keratosis: clinical and histologic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Nagore, Eduardo; Hueso, Luis; Traves, Victor; Messeguer, Francesc; Sanmartín, Onofre; Llombart, Beatriz; Requena, Celia; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Guillén, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and imiquimod are the treatments of choice for actinic keratosis (AK). As they have different mechanisms of action, it seems reasonable to assume that applying both treatments sequentially would be efficacious. We sought to determine which of these therapeutic modalities provides a better clinical and histologic response in patients with AK and whether sequential use of both was more efficacious than each separately. Patients were randomly assigned to one treatment group: group 1, PDT only; group 2, imiquimod only; or group 3, sequential use of PDT and imiquimod. The primary outcome measure was complete clinical response. Partial clinical response was defined as a reduction of more than 75% in the initial number of lesions. A complete clinicopathologic response was defined as lack of evidence of AK in the biopsy specimen. In all, 105 patients completed the study (group 1, 40 patients; group 2, 33 patients; group 3, 32 patients). Sequential application of PDT and imiquimod was more efficacious in all the outcome measures. More patients were satisfied with PDT than with the other two modalities (P = .003). No significant differences were observed among the 3 modalities and tolerance to treatment. Only one cycle of imiquimod was administered. The follow-up period was brief. Sequential application of PDT and imiquimod provides a significantly better clinical and histologic response in the treatment of AK than PDT or imiquimod monotherapy. It also produces less intense local reactions and better tolerance and satisfaction than imiquimod monotherapy. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Topical photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid in the treatment of actinic keratoses: a first clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrer, Sigrid; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Sauerwald, Angela; Landthaler, Michael

    1996-01-01

    In this first clinical study performed according to GCP- (good clinical practice) guidelines, efficacy, and tolerability of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were tested in the treatment of actinic keratoses. Ten patients (6 f, 4 m) with 36 lesions (19 located on hands and arms, 17 on the head) received ALA-PDT once. Five to six hours after occlusive application of ALA (water-in-oil-emulsion containing 10% ALA) irradiation was performed with an incoherent light source. Up to 3 months after treatment patients were monitored. A score evaluating infiltration and keratosis of treated actinic keratoses allowed us to estimate therapeutic efficacy. Compared to the initial score (100%) significantly lower score-sums were observed at the 28 day follow-up at both localizations (head: 15%; hand: 67%). Complete remission (score sum 0) resulted in 71% of actinic keratoses localized on the head. Except for slight pain and burning sensations during and after irradiation there were no notable side effects. This study proved good efficacy and tolerability of topical PDT in the treatment of actinic keratoses. Whether PDT is able to compete with established treatment modalities remains to be shown in further studies.

  17. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is usually associated with hair follicles, not acantholytic actinic keratosis, and is not “high risk”: Diagnosis, management, and clinical outcomes in a series of 115 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Toru; Kiuru, Maija; Konia, Thomas H.; Fung, Maxwell A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma (aSCC) is regarded as a high-risk variant of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Acantholytic actinic keratosis (aAK) has been regarded as a precursor risk factor for aSCC. However, supporting evidence is limited. Objective We sought to document clinical features, histologic features, management, and outcomes in a series of aSCC cases. Methods Definitions of aSCC, aAK, and aSCC arising in association with aAK were applied to a consecutive series of aSCC cases. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were obtained from electronic medical records. Results Of 115 aSCC cases (103 patients, mean age 71.8 years), actinic keratosis was present in 23% (27/115) but only 7.8% (9/115) exhibited associated aAK. Ten cases (10/115, 9%) fulfilled strict histologic criteria for follicular SCC as previously defined, but 50 of 115 (43%) of our aSCC cases exhibited predominant involvement of follicular epithelium rather than epidermis. Clinical outcome (median follow-up, 36 months) was available in 106 of 115 (92%). One patient experienced regional extension (parotid), and 1 patient experienced a local recurrence (nose). No disease-related metastases or deaths were documented. Limitations This was a single-institution retrospective study from the United States. Conclusions The presence of acantholysis in cutaneous SCC does not specifically confer aggressive behavior, a finding that may inform clinical practice guidelines. PMID:27889291

  18. [Photodynamic therapy for actinic cheilitis].

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Comunión, A; Arias, D; Miñano, R; Romero, A; Borbujo, J

    2009-12-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a subtype of actinic keratosis that mainly affects the lower lip and has a higher risk of malignant transformation. Its location on the labial mucosa influences the therapeutic approach. Vermilionectomy requires local or general anesthetic and is associated with a risk of an unsightly scar, and the treatment with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod lasts for several weeks and the inflammatory reaction can be very intense. A number of authors have used photodynamic therapy as an alternative to the usual treatments. We present 3 patients with histologically confirmed actinic cheilitis treated using photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinic acid as the photosensitizer and red light at 630 nm. The clinical response was good, with no recurrences after 3 to 6 months of follow-up. Our experience supports the use of photodynamic therapy as a good alternative for the treatment of actinic cheilitis.

  19. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is usually associated with hair follicles, not acantholytic actinic keratosis, and is not "high risk": Diagnosis, management, and clinical outcomes in a series of 115 cases.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Kiuru, Maija; Konia, Thomas H; Fung, Maxwell A

    2017-02-01

    Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma (aSCC) is regarded as a high-risk variant of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Acantholytic actinic keratosis (aAK) has been regarded as a precursor risk factor for aSCC. However, supporting evidence is limited. We sought to document clinical features, histologic features, management, and outcomes in a series of aSCC cases. Definitions of aSCC, aAK, and aSCC arising in association with aAK were applied to a consecutive series of aSCC cases. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were obtained from electronic medical records. Of 115 aSCC cases (103 patients, mean age 71.8 years), actinic keratosis was present in 23% (27/115) but only 7.8% (9/115) exhibited associated aAK. Ten cases (10/115, 9%) fulfilled strict histologic criteria for follicular SCC as previously defined, but 50 of 115 (43%) of our aSCC cases exhibited predominant involvement of follicular epithelium rather than epidermis. Clinical outcome (median follow-up, 36 months) was available in 106 of 115 (92%). One patient experienced regional extension (parotid), and 1 patient experienced a local recurrence (nose). No disease-related metastases or deaths were documented. This was a single-institution retrospective study from the United States. The presence of acantholysis in cutaneous SCC does not specifically confer aggressive behavior, a finding that may inform clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of actinic cheilitis with the Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Armenores, Paul; James, Craig L; Walker, Patrick C; Huilgol, Shyamala C

    2010-10-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a common condition with the potential to develop into squamous cell carcinoma. Current treatments have varying cure rates and complications. The role of the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser in the treatment of actinic cheilitis has not been widely published, despite offering theoretical advantages over current treatment modalities. To evaluate the outcome of a series of patients treated with the Er:YAG laser for actinic cheilitis. This was a retrospective, interventional, nonrandomized, sequential case series set in a tertiary referral, dermatologic surgery unit. Ninety-nine consecutive patients with actinic cheilitis treated with the Er:YAG laser between January 2001 and June 2008 underwent a case note review, of which 77 went on to a structured telephone interview. The main outcome measures were a subjective improvement in lip symptoms related to actinic cheilitis and objective improvement in the lips at routine follow-up. Mean time to interview follow-up was 65.7 months. Of those interviewed, 92.2% believed there had been an improvement in the cosmetic appearance of their lips; one hundred percent believed the function of their lips had improved or remained unchanged; and 84.8% remained completely disease free at the time of follow-up. The majority of patients (93.5%) were satisfied with the laser treatment. Scarring as a direct result of the laser occurred in 5.1% of patients. Retrospective nature of data collection; inability to interview all patients who underwent treatment. The Er:YAG laser is a successful modality for the treatment of actinic cheilitis with good functional and cosmetic results and only a small risk of long-term scarring. It should be considered as a first-line treatment for the disease. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of a film-forming medical device containing sunscreen (50+) and piroxicam 0.8% in actinic keratosis and field cancerization: a multicenter, assessor-blinded, 3 month trial.

    PubMed

    Puviani, Mario; Galloni, Chiara; Marchetti, Silvia; Sergio Pavone, Paolo; Lovati, Silvia; Pistone, Giuseppe; Caputo, Valentina; Tilotta, Giovanna; Scarcella, Giuseppe; Campione, Elena; Diluvio, Laura; Garofalo, Virginia; Bianchi, Luca; Milani, Massimo

    2017-07-01

    Sunscreen protection in subjects with actinic keratosis (AK) is highly recommended to prevent clinical evolution of this in situ skin cancer condition. Use of topical anti-cyclooxygenase drugs such as diclofenac and piroxicam reduces the number of lesions and improves the cancerization field. A film-forming medical device in a cream formulation containing organic and inorganic sun-filters (50+ SPF) and piroxicam 0.8% (ACTX) has shown in a pilot, single-center, open trial to reduce AK lesions improving the cancerization field. We evaluated in a multicenter, assessor-blinded, 3 month trial the efficacy of ACTX in AK. A total of 70 subjects with at least three AK lesions on the scalp or face were enrolled after written informed consent. Primary outcomes of the study were the clinical evolution of number of AK lesions on a target zone area and the evolution of dermoscopy features of the target lesion, assessing erythema, scaling, pigmentation, and follicular plug, using a 5 point score (from 0 to 4; maximum score: 16). Lesion count and dermoscopy score were evaluated in a blind fashion assessing digital color high definition coded images. A secondary outcome was the Investigator Global Score (IGS) of clinical evolution of the target area using a 7 point scale from -2 (significantly worse) to +4 (completely cured). IGS was evaluated in an open fashion. Subjects were instructed to apply the cream twice daily on the target area, using one finger-tip unit for the treatment of a 35 cm 2 area. All but one subject (40 men and 30 women, mean age 73 years) concluded the study period. At baseline the mean (±SD) number of AK lesions in the target area were 7.0 (5.9) with a median value of 5 and the dermoscopy score of the target lesion was 7.0 (2.3) with a median value of 7.0. ACTX treatment reduced AK lesions to 3.2 (2.9), (p = .0001; Wilcoxon Test), representing a 55% relative reduction. Dermoscopy score was reduced to 3.3 (2.6) (p = .0001) (a reduction of 53%). The

  2. Actikerall™ (5-Fluorouracil 0.5% and Salicylic Acid 10%) Topical Solution for Patient-directed Treatment of Actinic Keratoses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H P; Rivers, J K

    2016-05-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK), a common cutaneous lesion with the potential to transform into squamous cell carcinoma, has traditionally been treated with ablative and/or surgical procedures. Recently, a topical formulation combining 0.5% 5-fluorouracil with 10% salicylic acid (5-FU-SA) was introduced in Europe under the trade name Actikerall™ for the treatment of grade I/II AKs. In a single randomized phase III trial, 5-FU-SA was shown to be superior to diclofenac 3% gel in hyaluronic acid, as measured by the histological clearance of one defined lesion (72% vs. 59.1%) and by complete clinical clearance (55.4% vs. 32.0%). 5-FU-SA should be applied once daily to a total area of up to 25 cm(2), which may include the lesion(s) and a small area of surrounding skin (rim of healthy skin should not exceed 0.5 cm), for up to 12 weeks. The most common side effects are local inflammation and pruritus at the application site, and no serious adverse effects have been reported to date. Now commercially available in Canada, 5-FU-SA represents a patientapplied therapeutic option for the treatment of both overt and subclinical AKs.

  3. Anogenital giant seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Chokoeva, Anastasiya; Tchernev, Georgi; Heinig, Birgit; Schönlebe, Jacqueline

    2017-08-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) are very common benign epidermal tumors. Giant seborrheic keratosis (GSK) is a rare variant with clinical characteristics, which leads very often to misdiagnosis. A genital site of SK is very unusual clinical manifestation and although the cause is still unknown, current literature data point to a possible pathogenetic role of chronic friction and HPV infection. The rare genital localization makes Buschke-Löwenstein tumor and verrucous carcinoma important differential diagnoses. GSK may also show some clinical features of a melanoacanthoma, which makes cutaneous melanoma as another possible differential diagnosis. The clinical diagnosis of genital GSK is often a very difficult one, because the typical clinical features of GSK disappear and the most common dermoscopic features of GSK are usually not seen in the genital region lesions. The diagnosis of GSK of the anogenital area should be made only and always after the exact histological verification and variety of differential diagnosis should be carefully considered. The treatment of GSK is primary surgically. We present a rare case of GSK with concomitant HPV infection in the anogenital region of 72-year-old patient. Surgical approach was performed with excellent outcome.

  4. A case of keratosis lichenoid chronica.

    PubMed

    Baczewski, Natasha; Albano, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Keratosis lichenoid chronica is a rare dermatologic anomaly believed to be a variant of lichen planus. It presents as violaceous, nodular lesions usually on the dorsal aspects of the extremities and the trunk. The disease is refractory to treatment although psoralen ultraviolet A therapy and oral retinoids have been proven useful in some cases. Here we present the case of a 58-year-old male diagnosed with keratosis lichenoid chronica.

  5. Disrupting actin-myosin-actin connectivity in airway smooth muscle as a treatment for asthma?

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Tera L; Dowell, Maria L; Lakser, Oren J; Gerthoffer, William T; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Seow, Chun Y; Mitchell, Richard W; Solway, Julian

    2009-05-01

    Breathing is known to functionally antagonize bronchoconstriction caused by airway muscle contraction. During breathing, tidal lung inflation generates force fluctuations that are transmitted to the contracted airway muscle. In vitro, experimental application of force fluctuations to contracted airway smooth muscle strips causes them to relengthen. Such force fluctuation-induced relengthening (FFIR) likely represents the mechanism by which breathing antagonizes bronchoconstriction. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that regulate FFIR of contracted airway muscle could suggest novel therapeutic interventions to increase FFIR, and so to enhance the beneficial effects of breathing in suppressing bronchoconstriction. Here we propose that the connectivity between actin filaments in contracting airway myocytes is a key determinant of FFIR, and suggest that disrupting actin-myosin-actin connectivity by interfering with actin polymerization or with myosin polymerization merits further evaluation as a potential novel approach for preventing prolonged bronchoconstriction in asthma.

  6. Keratosis pilaris

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 118. ... appendages. In: Patterson JW, ed. Weedon's Skin Pathology . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 15.

  7. Seborrheic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seborrheic kertosis. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann WR, Berth-Jones J, Coulson I, eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 220. Review Date 10/24/2016 Updated by: David L. Swanson, MD, Vice Chair ...

  8. Psoriasiform Keratosis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; de Sousa, Brena Andrade; do Nascimento, Carla do Socorro Silva; Moutinho, Ana Thais Machado; de Miranda, Mario Fernando Ribeiro; Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasiform Keratosis is a rare clinic entity. The etiopathogenesis remains unknown and the disease is characterized by a solitary, scaly or keratotic papule, or plaque mainly located on the extremities. Histopathological features closely resemble those of psoriasis. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting a solitary and asymptomatic keratotic plaque, located on the back of the left leg, unresponsive to topical corticosteroids. We performed an excisional biopsy and histopathology was consistent with psoriasiform keratosis. PMID:24770510

  9. Psoriasiform keratosis - case report.

    PubMed

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; Sousa, Brena Andrade de; Nascimento, Carla do Socorro Silva do; Moutinho, Ana Thais Machado; Miranda, Mario Fernando Ribeiro de; Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasiform Keratosis is a rare clinic entity. The etiopathogenesis remains unknown and the disease is characterized by a solitary, scaly or keratotic papule, or plaque mainly located on the extremities. Histopathological features closely resemble those of psoriasis. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting a solitary and asymptomatic keratotic plaque, located on the back of the left leg, unresponsive to topical corticosteroids. We performed an excisional biopsy and histopathology was consistent with psoriasiform keratosis.

  10. Efficacy of ablative fractional laser-assisted photodynamic therapy for the treatment of actinic cheilitis: 12-month follow-up results of a prospective, randomized, comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, S H; Kim, K H; Song, K-H

    2015-07-01

    Early identification and treatment of actinic cheilitis (AC) is recommended. Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive therapeutic option for AC, PDT for AC does not result in the same satisfactory outcomes as in actinic keratosis (AK). The aim of our study was to compare efficacy, recurrence rate, cosmetic outcome and safety between erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet ablative fractional laser-assisted methyl aminolaevulinate-PDT (Er:YAG AFL MAL-PDT) and standard MAL-PDT. Thirty-three patients with histologically confirmed AC randomly received either one session of Er:YAG AFL MAL-PDT or two sessions of MAL-PDT. In the MAL-PDT group, the second session of MAL-PDT was administered 7 days later. Patients were followed up at 1 week and 3 and 12 months, and biopsies were taken from all patients at 3 and 12 months after the last treatment session. At the final 12-month follow-up, cosmetic outcomes were assessed. Adverse events were assessed at week 1 of the treatment phase and every subsequent follow-up visit. In the per-protocol (PP) population, Er:YAG AFL MAL-PDT was significantly more effective (92% complete response rate) than MAL-PDT (59%; P = 0.040) at the 3-month follow-up, and differences in efficacy remained significant at the 12-month follow-up (85% in Er:YAG AFL MAL-PDT and 29% in MAL-PDT). The recurrence rate was significantly lower for Er:YAG AFL MAL-PDT (8%) than for MAL-PDT (50%) group at 12 months (P = 0.029). No significant difference in cosmetic outcome or safety was observed between Er:YAG AFL MAL-PDT and MAL-PDT. Ablative fractional laser pretreatment has significant benefit for the treatment of AC with PDT. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. The challenge of diagnosing seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, A; Chen, J; Yang, C; Ding, Y; Zeng, Q; Tan, L

    2018-05-24

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common skin tumors seen by dermatologists. It should be differentiated with many diseases, especially skin tumors. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been applied for evaluation of SK. There are a few studies that describe the RCM of SK. The aim of the study was to find the challenge of diagnosing seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy. A total of 390 patients with a clinical suspicious diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis were enrolled in this study, and lesions from each patient were imaged with RCM. Thirty-seven of these patients performed a biopsy in order to be given a histological diagnosis. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of RCM diagnosis and histological diagnosis, and then found the RCM characteristics of biopsy-proven lesions. According to RCM images, 258 of 390 (66.2%) patients were diagnosed with SK, 97 of 390 (24.9%) patients could not be diagnosed by the dermatologist according to RCM. Of all 37 biopsied lesions, 23 were SK, 6 were actinic keratosis, 2 were basal cell carcinoma, and 2 were squamous cell carcinoma. It is challenge to diagnose seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy. It may due to the variable clinical and RCM appearances of SK, and limited depth of RCM. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Arsenical keratosis treated by dermatome shaving].

    PubMed

    Kjerkegaard, Ulrik Knap; Heje, Jens Martin; Vestergaard, Christian; Stausbøl-Grøn, Birgitte; Stolle, Lars Bjørn

    2014-05-05

    Cutaneous malignancy in association with arsenic exposure is a rare but well-documented phenomenon. Signs of chronic arsenic exposure are very rare in Denmark today. However, arsenic was used in the medical treatment of psoriasis vulgaris up till the 1980's and several patients suffer from this arsenic treatment today. This case report shows that arsenical keratosis can be treated by dermatome shaving, a superficial destructive therapy.

  13. [Retrospective, descriptive, observational study of treatment of multiple actinic keratoses with topical methyl aminolevulinate and red light: results in clinical practice and correlation with fluorescence imaging].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guarino, M; Harto, A; Sánchez-Ronco, M; Pérez-García, B; Marquet, A; Jaén, P

    2008-12-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is one of the most common skin diseases seen in clinical practice. In the last 5 years, several studies assessing the efficacy of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of multiple AKs have been published. We aimed to assess the clinical outcomes of photodynamic therapy in patients with multiple AKs and the correlation of those outcomes with fluorescence imaging. In this retrospective, descriptive, observational study of 57 patients treated in our hospital with photodynamic therapy for multiple AKs, we recorded age, sex, and lesion site (face, scalp, and dorsum of the hands). All patients were treated in the same way: methyl aminolevulinic acid (Metvix) was applied for 3 hours and the skin then irradiated with red light at 630 nm, 37 J/cm(2), for 7.5 minutes (Aktilite). The response, remission duration, tolerance, number of sessions, and fluorescence images were recorded by site. The chi(2) test was used to assess between-site differences and the correlation between fluorescence imaging and clinical response. The greatest improvements were obtained for facial lesions; these required fewer sessions and remission lasted longer than lesions at other sites. The treatment was best tolerated on the dorsum of the hands. The fluorescence area and the reduction in intensity on applying treatment were found to be strongly and significantly correlated with the extent of clinical response. Overall, the outcomes of treatment of multiple AKs with photodynamic therapy are better for the face than for the scalp and dorsum of the hands. Fluorescence imaging may be an effective tool for predicting response to treatment.

  14. Evaluation of the efficacy of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Yuri N; Torezan, Luis Antonio; Lourenço, Silvia Vanessa; Neto, Cyro Festa

    2017-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a lip intraepithelial neoplasia, whose cells present alterations similar to those presented by invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). To conduct clinical and laboratory evaluation by histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the efficacy of actinic cheilitis treatment using photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) and noncoherent red light. Patients with actinic cheilitis detected by histopathological examination were submitted to two sessions of photodynamic therapy with a two-week interval between them. They were examined immediately after the sessions, four, six, and twelve weeks after beginning treatment when a new biopsy was carried out. Clinical histopathological and immunohistochemical parameters were evaluated before and after treatment. Of the 23 patients who underwent biopsy, 16 completed two photodynamic therapy sessions and the material of one patient was insufficient for immunohistochemistry. Complete clinical response was achieved in 62.5% (10 of 16 patients) and 37.5% still remained with clinical evidence of AC. In spite of this, no case of cure by histopathological analysis was found. There was no significant statistical change among the values of Ki-67, survivin, and p53 observed before and after treatment. Photodynamic therapy, as carried out in this trial, was not an efficacious therapeutic option for treating patients with actinic cheilitis included in this sample. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Combination of 595-nm pulsed dye laser, long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion treatment for keratosis pilaris: retrospective analysis of 26 Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Choi, Min Ju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Chung, Won Soon; Kim, Young Koo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2013-06-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) has beenpresented as small keratotic follicular papules with or without surrounding erythema. Various treatments with laser or light therapy have been used for the management of KP with various clinical outcomes. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy and safety of a combination therapy for KP. A total of 29 anatomical sites with KP in 26 patients were treated using a 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) with nonpurpuragenic fluences, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion. Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing preand posttreatment clinical photographs and patient satisfaction rates. Evaluation of the clinical results three months after the treatments showed that 12 of the 29 anatomical sites (41.4%) demonstrated Grade 3 clinical improvement, ten (34.5%) had Grade 2 clinical improvement, four (13.8%) showed Grade 1 improvement, and three (10.3%) showed Grade 4 improvement. We observed that KP lesions improved not only in erythema and skin texture, but also in brownish dyschromias. Potential adverse events were not observed, except prolonged posttherapy scaling. Our observations demonstrate that combination therapy using a 595-nm PDL, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion can have a positive therapeutic effect on KP.

  16. Laser abrasion for cosmetic and medical treatment of facial actinic damage

    SciTech Connect

    David, L.M.; Lask, G.P.; Glassberg, E.

    1989-06-01

    Previous studies have shown the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser to be effective in the treatment of actinic cheilitis. After CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion, normal skin and marked cosmetic improvement of the lip were noted. In our study, twenty-three patients were treated with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasions for cosmetic improvement of facial lines and actinic changes. Pre- and postoperative histopathologic examinations were made on two patients. Preoperative examination of specimens from actinically damaged skin showed atypical keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, with overlying dense compact orthokeratosis and parakeratosis. Abundant solar elastosis was seen in the papillary dermis.more » Postoperative histologic specimens showed a normal-appearing epidermis with fibrosis in the papillary dermis and minimal solar elastosis (about four weeks after laser treatment). At present, various modalities are available for the regeneration of the aged skin, including chemical peels and dermabrasion. Significantly fewer complications were noted with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion than with these methods. Thus, CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion can be useful in the cosmetic and medical treatment of the aged skin. Marked clinical and histologic improvement has been demonstrated.« less

  17. Topical treatment of actinic keratoses with low-dose 5-fluorouracil in combination with salicylic acid--pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schlaak, Max; Simon, Jan C

    2010-03-01

    Actinic keratoses (AK) are carcinomas in situ and can progress to invasive squamous cell carcinomas. Treatment of actinic keratoses can be achieved by physical ablation, chemotherapeutic agents, immunomodulators or photodynamic therapy. We conducted a proof of concept study with 15 patients. Overall 66 actinic keratoses were treated with 5-FU (0.5%) and salicylic acid (10%) for 4 weeks (3 times per week). After 12 weeks complete response of 47 AK (77%), partial response of 13 AK (21%) and non-response of 1 AK (2%) were achieved. Treatment was well tolerated and efficient.

  18. Keratosis pilaris on the cheek (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Keratosis pilaris occurs most commonly during childhood and produces small, rough spots. called papules, that are typically ... especially during winter months, makes the condition worse. Keratosis pilaris tends to be inherited and may be ...

  19. Dysplastic nevus associated with seborrheic keratosis*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Michalany, Nilceo Schwery; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Hirata, Sergio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis is a common skin lesion which may coincidentally be associated melanocytic nevi. The authors describe a case of dysplastic nevus associated with seborrheic keratosis and discuss the clinical, dermoscopic, and histological findings of this association. They also discuss the association between seborrheic keratosis and other benign and malignant tumours. PMID:24626665

  20. Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans and acne keloidalis nuchae.

    PubMed

    Goh, Michelle S Y; Magee, Jill; Chong, Alvin H

    2005-11-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a 10-year history of scarring alopecia on the vertex of the scalp associated with follicular crusting and pustule formation, and a papular eruption on the posterior neck. Additionally, there was keratosis pilaris on the cheeks, eyebrows and thighs. Histology from the vertex showed scarring with a mixed perifollicular inflammatory infiltrate and foci of acute suppurative folliculitis. With clinical correlation, the diagnosis of keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans and concurrent acne keloidalis nuchae was made. The association of keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans with acne keloidalis nuchae has not previously been described. The patient responded to treatment with oral isotretinoin 20 mg (0.25 mg/kg) daily for 12 months.

  1. Treatment of actinic cheilitis by photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid and blue light activation.

    PubMed

    Zaiac, Martin; Clement, Annabelle

    2011-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC), a common disorder of the lower lip, should be treated early to prevent progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) activated by blue light for the treatment of AC. Fifteen patients with clinically evident or biopsy-proven AC received two treatments with ALA PDT with blue light activation. Treatments were spaced three to five weeks apart. Most patients achieved 65% to 75% clearance three to five weeks after the first treatment and all achieved more than 75% clearance one month after the second treatment. Three patients achieved complete clearance. Pain and burning during irradiation were absent or mild. All patients said they would repeat the procedure. ALA PDT with 417 nm blue light is a promising option for the treatment of AC of the lower lip.

  2. Interventions for actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Paquet, Maryse; Villanueva, Elmer; Brintnell, William

    2012-12-12

    Actinic keratoses are a skin disease caused by long-term sun exposure, and their lesions have the potential to develop into squamous cell carcinoma. Treatments for actinic keratoses are sought for cosmetic reasons, for the relief of associated symptoms, or for the prevention of skin cancer development. Detectable lesions are often associated with alteration of the surrounding skin (field) where subclinical lesions might be present. The interventions available for the treatment of actinic keratoses include individual lesion-based (e.g. cryotherapy) or field-directed (e.g. topical) treatments. These might vary in terms of efficacy, safety, and cosmetic outcomes. To assess the effects of topical, oral, mechanical, and chemical interventions for actinic keratosis. We searched the following databases up to March 2011: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2010), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched trials registers, conference proceedings, and grey literature sources. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the treatment of actinic keratoses with either placebo, vehicle, or another active therapy. At least two authors independently abstracted data, which included adverse events, and assessed the quality of evidence. We performed meta-analysis to calculate a weighted treatment effect across trials, and we expressed the results as risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes (e.g. participant complete clearance rates), and mean difference (MD) and 95% CI for continuous outcomes (e.g. mean reduction in lesion counts). We included 83 RCTs in this review, with a total of 10,036 participants. The RCTs covered 18 topical treatments, 1 oral treatment, 2 mechanical interventions, and 3 chemical interventions, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). Most of the studies lacked descriptions of some methodological details, such as the generation of the randomisation

  3. Melanoma in-situ arising in seborrheic keratosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Repertinger, Susan; Wang, Jeff; Adickes, Edward; Sarma, Deba P

    2008-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis is a very common benign skin tumor in man. Melanoma is rare but is the most dreaded of all malignant skin tumors. A melanoma arising in a seborrheic keratosis is distinctly rare. We are reporting such a case occurring in an 86-year-old man. Case presentation An-86-year-old male with a history of multiple actinic keratoses and seborrheic keratoses of the head and trunk presented with a mid-back skin lesion. The lesion was poorly circumscribed, flat, and gray, with a pink-tan, well-circumscribed scaly nodule within it. The biopsied lesion was composed of the usual features of hyperkeratotic seborrheic keratosis, but with focal atypical melanocytic proliferation with nesting along the dermal-epidermal junction. We interpreted this lesion as a melanoma in-situ arising within a seborrheic keratosis. Conclusion It is not uncommon for many physicians to remove a typical seborrheic keratosis without a confirmatory microscopic confirmation. We urge that all such lesions be examined by the pathologist to avoid missing another concomitant malignant lesion such as melanoma which needs adequate resection and close follow-up. PMID:18947402

  4. Management of actinic cheilitis using ingenol mebutate gel: A report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ángeles; Batalla, Ana; de la Torre, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) can precede the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the lip, a location with high risk of invasiveness and metastasis. We communicate the good results that we obtained when treating seven patients suffering from AC with ingenol mebutate (IM) 0,015% concentration gel on three consecutive days. Three patients achieved complete clearance and four significant improvement. IM is a topical field treatment approved for actinic keratosis. To our knowledge, reported experience in the management of AC with IM is very limited. Local skin responses grade 3 were the main adverse event observed and they resolved in all patients without specific therapy within 1 to 2 weeks. IM is characterized by its rapid clinical effect, its favorable safety profile and its dosing period of only 3 days, shorter than with other field therapies. All these facts make it an attractive new therapy for AC, with need for further study.

  5. Daylight photodynamic therapy with methyl-aminolevulinate for the treatment of actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Fai, Dario; Romanello, Eugenio; Brumana, Marta Benedetta; Fai, Carlotta; Vena, Gino Antonio; Cassano, Nicoletta; Piaserico, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a common premalignant condition that requires an effective treatment to reduce the risk of malignant transformation. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been recently added to the armamentarium available for AC treatment. Daylight PDT (D-PDT) is a novel PDT modality in which the activation of the topical photosensitizer is induced by the exposure to natural daylight instead of artificial light sources without preliminary occlusion. This simplified procedure was found to be more tolerated as compared to conventional PDT. We report our preliminary experience on the use of D-PDT using methyl-aminolevulinate cream in 10 patients with refractory AC of the lower lip. Patients received two consecutive D-PDT sessions with an interval of 7-14 days. At 3 months after therapy, a complete response was observed in seven patients, with sustained results in five patients over an observational period of 6-12 months. Treatment was well tolerated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Automated Detection of Actinic Keratoses in Clinical Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Hames, Samuel C.; Sinnya, Sudipta; Tan, Jean-Marie; Morze, Conrad; Sahebian, Azadeh; Soyer, H. Peter; Prow, Tarl W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of actinic keratosis is known to have intra- and inter-observer variability, and there is currently no non-invasive and objective measure to diagnose these lesions. Objective The aim of this pilot study was to determine if automatically detecting and circumscribing actinic keratoses in clinical photographs is feasible. Methods Photographs of the face and dorsal forearms were acquired in 20 volunteers from two groups: the first with at least on actinic keratosis present on the face and each arm, the second with no actinic keratoses. The photographs were automatically analysed using colour space transforms and morphological features to detect erythema. The automated output was compared with a senior consultant dermatologist’s assessment of the photographs, including the intra-observer variability. Performance was assessed by the correlation between total lesions detected by automated method and dermatologist, and whether the individual lesions detected were in the same location as the dermatologist identified lesions. Additionally, the ability to limit false positives was assessed by automatic assessment of the photographs from the no actinic keratosis group in comparison to the high actinic keratosis group. Results The correlation between the automatic and dermatologist counts was 0.62 on the face and 0.51 on the arms, compared to the dermatologist’s intra-observer variation of 0.83 and 0.93 for the same. Sensitivity of automatic detection was 39.5% on the face, 53.1% on the arms. Positive predictive values were 13.9% on the face and 39.8% on the arms. Significantly more lesions (p<0.0001) were detected in the high actinic keratosis group compared to the no actinic keratosis group. Conclusions The proposed method was inferior to assessment by the dermatologist in terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value. However, this pilot study used only a single simple feature and was still able to achieve sensitivity of detection of 53

  7. Expression of lumican in hidroacanthoma simplex and clonal-type seborrheic keratosis as a potent differential diagnostic marker.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ryoko; Ansai, Shin-Ichi; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Matsuda, Yoko; Naito, Zenya; Kawana, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    Lumican, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, regulates the assembly and diameter of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix of various tissues. The lumican expression correlates with pathological conditions and the growth and metastasis of various malignancies. In cutaneous neoplasms, the lumican expression is lower in advanced-stage malignant melanomas that invade the dermis than in early-stage melanomas. Furthermore, we have recently reported that the expression pattern of lumican is different from that of actinic keratosis and the Bowen disease. Lumican is positive in the poroid cells of intraepidermal sweat ducts; therefore, we examined the expression patterns of lumican in acanthotic-type seborrheic keratosis and Pinkus-type poroma followed by clonal-type seborrheic keratosis and hidroacanthoma simplex. The neoplastic cells of acanthotic-type seborrheic keratosis exhibited positive immunostaining in only 1 of 31 cases (3.23%), whereas the poroid cells of Pinkus-type poroma exhibited positive immunoreactivity in 26 of 28 patients (92.8%). In the hidroacanthoma simplex cases, lumican was expressed in poroid cells forming intraepidermal nests in 22 of 28 patients (78.6%), whereas the neoplastic cells in most cases of clonal-type seborrheic keratosis were negative for lumican. In some seborrheic keratosis cases that were positive for lumican in neoplastic cells, lumican was observed in squamoid cells but not in basaloid cells. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the immunoreactivity of lumican in seborrheic keratosis and in basaloid cells. These findings suggest that lumican is a potent differential diagnostic marker that distinguishes hidroacanthoma simplex from clonal-type seborrheic keratosis.

  8. Number of Langerhans cells is decreased in premalignant keratosis and skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Z; Filip, A; Shevchuk, V; Kashuba, E

    2014-03-01

    It was shown earlier that a number of CD207 positive Langerhans cells was lower in basal cell carcinomas than in the normal epidermis. Moreover, benign skin lesions presented a higher number of Langerhans cells when they were compared to malignant tumors. To count Langerhans cells, assessing expression levels of CD1A and CD207 markers in actinic keratosis, basal and squamous cell carcinomas, compared with the normal skin. Comparison of Langerhans cells might give a valuable prognostic marker for skin cancer. Immunohistochemistry and methods of statistics were used. Expression of CD1A and CD207 markers was assessed in tumor samples of actinic keratosis, cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas, in comparison with the normal skin. In each cohort there were 40 patients (and 11 healthy individuals). We have shown that the number of Langerhans cells is considerably lower in cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas, compared with their number in the normal skin (p < 0.0001). CD1A expression correlated with CD207 expression only in the control group. There was no correlation in actinic keratosis, basal and squamous cell carcinoma. This may suggest an alteration of Langerhans cells phenotype in skin neoplastic diseases, making the number of Langerhans cells a valuable prognostic factor for skin tumors.

  9. Breastfeeding keratosis: this frictional keratosis of newborns may mimic thrush.

    PubMed

    Kiat-Amnuay, Sudarat; Bouquot, Jerry

    2013-09-01

    We report the first example, to our knowledge, of a frictional keratosis from exuberant sucking in a breastfeeding infant. A 2-month-old girl was referred for evaluation of a well-demarcated, nonsloughing white keratotic plaque of the lower lip mucosa, just inside the vermilion border. The plaque had a slightly irregular surface, had no surrounding erythema, and was the only such plaque in the mouth. It had been present for at least 3 weeks and had been unsuccessfully treated by her pediatrician via oral Mycostatin (nystatin). Her parents sought a second opinion when the infant was prescribed a full course of oral Diflucan (fluconazole). A cytopathology smear (Papanicolaou test) revealed abundant mature keratinocytes with no evidence of Candida. The mother admitted that the infant "worked hard" at sucking during breastfeeding and continued sucking long after feeding. The parents were unaware of any other habit or potential irritation of the lips. After 3 months of age the infant's sucking pattern became more "normal" and the keratosis disappeared; it did not recur during 3 years of follow-up. We propose the term "breastfeeding keratosis" for this entity.

  10. Manual resurfacing and trichloroacetic acid for the treatment of patients with widespread actinic damage. Clinical and histologic observations.

    PubMed

    Cooley, J E; Casey, D L; Kauffman, C L

    1997-05-01

    A facial resurfacing regimen combining manual abrasion of the skin and 25% trichloroacetic acid has been reported to produce excellent results, but the histologic depth of injury produced by this technique has not been studied. To describe our experience with this technique treating patients with extensive actinic damage and to determine the histologic depth of injury produced. We treated 40 patients using manual resurfacing and trichloroacetic acid, primarily for widespread actinic keratoses. Resurfacing tools included silicone carbide sandpaper, drywall screen, electrocautery tip cleaners, abrasive pads, scalpel blades, and curettes. Four patients underwent sequential biopsies to evaluate the depth of wounding using this technique. Manual resurfacing combined with trichloroacetic acid consistently produced excellent cosmetic results and nearly complete eradication of actinic keratoses. Histologically, treated areas showed replacement of the dermal elastotic band by newly formed collagen, a significantly deeper level of wounding than the Jessner's/35% trichloroacetic acid peel. There was no evidence for foreign body granulomas clinically or histologically as a result of the abrasive materials. The deeper level of this peel explains the improved cosmetic outcome and greater eradication of actinic keratoses. This treatment is particularly well suited for patients with extensive photodamage and widespread actinic keratoses.

  11. Diclofenac in hyaluronic acid gel: an alternative treatment for actinic cheilitis

    PubMed Central

    LIMA, Giana da Silveira; da SILVA, Gabriela Ferrari; GOMES, Ana Paula Neutzling; de ARAÚJO, Lenita Maria Aver; SALUM, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Objective Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a precancerous lesion of the lip vermillion caused by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet light. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 3% diclofenac in 2.5% hyaluronic acid gel in the treatment of AC. Methods Thirty-four patients with chronic AC were treated twice a day with topical diclofenac during a period of 30 to 180 days. The individuals were followed up every 15 days by means of clinical examination and digital photographic documentation. Results Of the 27 patients that completed the study, 12 (44%) showed complete remission of the whitish plaques and exfoliative areas, and 15 (56%) had partial remission of the clinical picture of cheilitis. The latter group was submitted to excision of the leukoplakic areas which diagnosis varied from mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia. Conclusion The results suggest a promising role for diclofenac in hyaluronic acid gel in the treatment of AC. This treatment has the advantages of not being invasive and showing few side effects. PMID:21085813

  12. Papular, profuse, and precocious keratosis pilaris.

    PubMed

    Castela, Emeline; Chiaverini, Christine; Boralevi, Franck; Hugues, Rosalind; Lacour, Jean Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a frequent and benign condition in children characterized by the presence of rough, follicular papules and varying degrees of erythema. Different variants have been described, including simple KP and red KP. Between September 2007 and October 2010, 11 children with profuse and precocious KP seen at the department of pediatric dermatology were included. They defined an underemphasized clinical variant of childhood KP: the papular, profuse, and precocious KP characterized by early age of onset (<18 mos), extensive involvement of the limbs and cheeks, and papular nature of lesions. No clinical association has been found. The main complication was episodes of folliculitis. Diagnosis was delayed for all patients. Treatment is difficult, but association between emollient and keratolytic agents can provide some help. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Light and laser treatment modalities for disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aird, Gregory A; Sitenga, Jenna L; Nguyen, Austin Huy; Vaudreuil, Adam; Huerter, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is poorly standardized. The present review seeks to comprehensively discuss the potential for laser and light modalities in the treatment of DSAP. A systematic review of light and laser treatment modalities was conducted to include 26 cases of patients with DSAP. Systematic review resulted in 14 articles to be included. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) overall was the least successful treatment modality, with clinical improvement seen in a minority of patients (MAL-PDT: N = 9 patients, 33.3% showed improvement; ALA-PDT: N = 3 patients, 0% improvement; hypericin-PDT: N = 2 patients, 0% improvement) after numerous post-procedural side effects of hyperpigmentation, inflammation, erythema, and discomfort. Overall, in the available reports, PDT demonstrates poor outcomes with greater incidence of side effects. The response rates of DSAP lesions treated with lasers were as follows: (Q-switched ruby lasers: N = 2, 100%; CO 2 laser: N = 1, 100%; PDT and CO 2 combination therapy: N = 2, 0-50%; erbium and neodymium YAG lasers: N = 2, 100%; fractional 1927-nm thulium fiber lasers: N = 2, 100%; Grenz rays: N = 1, 100%; and fractional photothermolysis: N = 2, 100%). The side effects of laser therapy were minimal and included mild erythema, slight hyperpigmentation, and moderate edema. Laser therapy is a promising treatment option for DSAP with an excellent side effect profile. However, higher power studies are required to determine optimal guidelines for laser treatment of DSAP.

  14. Switching From Conventional Photodynamic Therapy to Daylight Photodynamic Therapy For Actinic Keratoses: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Velázquez, A; Redondo, P

    2017-05-01

    Actinic keratosis is a precursor lesion to the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. Conventional photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be effective, but the procedure is time-consuming, can be very painful, and requires infrastructure. These shortcomings led to the emergence of daylight PDT. To obtain a global estimate of efficacy, we undertook a systematic literature review and performed a meta-analysis of the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of daylight PDT as compared to conventional PDT in the treatment of actinic keratosis and/or field cancerization. The conclusion is that the difference in efficacy is clinically negligible (global estimate of the mean response rate difference, -3.69%; 95% CI, -6.54% to -0.84%). The adverse effects of daylight PDT are mild and localized (79% of patients report no discomfort), and patients report less pain (P<.001). Daylight PDT gives good to excellent cosmetic results in more than 90% of patients, and patient satisfaction is greater (P<.001). Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. GIANT PEDUNCULATED SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS OF PENIS

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Jagdeep S; Thakur, Anamika; Chauhan, C G S; Diwana, Vijay K; Chauhan, D C

    2008-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis of the penis is a rare entity. It has been mistaken as genital warts and differentiation is only made on histopathology. We are reporting a case presenting as multiple giant polypoidal lesions on the penile skin for the last 20 years. Seborrheic keratosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pedunculated lesions of the penis. The histopathology after shave excision will be diagnostic. PMID:19967020

  16. A Case of Lymphomatoid Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Jee; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Song, Kye Yong

    2010-01-01

    Lymphomatoid keratosis (LK) is considered to be a rare variant of cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, with epidermotropism. We herein report a case of LK which developed on the abdomen of an elderly Korean woman. A 60-year-old woman presented with a 10-year history of a pruritic, solitary, brown to black plaque on the abdomen. Histopathologically, the specimen showed hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, acanthosis and Pautrier's micro-abscess in the epidermis, and a lichenoid infiltration of lymphocytes in the dermis, which expressed both B cell and T cell lineage on the immune-histochemical staining. Based on these clinical and histopathological findings, our case was diagnosed as LK. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of LK in the Korean dermatologic literature. PMID:20548920

  17. Actinous enigma or enigmatic actin

    PubMed Central

    Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2014-01-01

    Being the most abundant protein of the eukaryotic cell, actin continues to keep its secrets for more than 60 years. Everything about this protein, its structure, functions, and folding, is mysteriously counterintuitive, and this review represents an attempt to solve some of the riddles and conundrums commonly found in the field of actin research. In fact, actin is a promiscuous binder with a wide spectrum of biological activities. It can exist in at least three structural forms, globular, fibrillar, and inactive (G-, F-, and I-actin, respectively). G-actin represents a thermodynamically instable, quasi-stationary state, which is formed in vivo as a result of the energy-intensive, complex posttranslational folding events controlled and driven by cellular folding machinery. The G-actin structure is dependent on the ATP and Mg2+ binding (which in vitro is typically substituted by Ca2+) and protein is easily converted to the I-actin by the removal of metal ions and by action of various denaturing agents (pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants). I-actin cannot be converted back to the G-form. Foldable and “natively folded” forms of actin are always involved in interactions either with the specific protein partners, such as Hsp70 chaperone, prefoldin, and the CCT chaperonin during the actin folding in vivo or with Mg2+ and ATP as it takes place in the G-form. We emphasize that the solutions for the mysteries of actin multifunctionality, multistructurality, and trapped unfolding can be found in the quasi-stationary nature of this enigmatic protein, which clearly possesses many features attributed to both globular and intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:28232879

  18. Actinic cheilitis: aesthetic and functional comparative evaluation of vermilionectomy using the classic and W-plasty techniques.

    PubMed

    Rossoe, Ed Wilson Tsuneo; Tebcherani, Antonio José; Sittart, José Alexandre; Pires, Mario Cezar

    2011-01-01

    Chronic actinic cheilitis is actinic keratosis located on the vermilion border. Treatment is essential because of the potential for malignant transformation. To evaluate the aesthetic and functional results of vermilionectomy using the classic and W-plasty techniques in actinic cheilitis. In the classic technique, the scar is linear and in the W-plasty one, it is a broken line. 32 patients with clinical and histopathological diagnosis of actinic cheilitis were treated. Out of the 32 patients, 15 underwent the W-plasty technique and 17 underwent the classic one. We evaluated parameters such as scar retraction and functional changes. A statistically significant association between the technique used and scar retraction was found, which was positive when using the classic technique (p = 0.01 with Yates' correction). The odds ratio was calculated at 11.25, i.e., there was a greater chance of retraction in patients undergoing the classic technique. Both techniques revealed no functional changes. We evaluated postoperative complications such as the presence of crusts, dry lips, paresthesia, and suture dehiscence. There was no statistically significant association between complications and the technique used (p = 0.69). We concluded that vermilionectomy using the W-plasty technique shows better cosmetic results and similar complication rates.

  19. Non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of actinic cheilitis with reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, M; González, S; Lange-Asschenfeldt, B; Roewert-Huber, J; Sterry, W; Stockfleth, E; Astner, S

    2011-03-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) represents the equivalent of actinic keratosis on the lip. Various treatment modalities are available and the efficacy of diclofenac in hyaluronic acid has recently been described. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive imaging technique which has recently been applied for the diagnosis of actinic keratoses. Herein, we describe the applicability of RCM for the diagnosis of AC and for monitoring of treatment response of AC to diclofenac in hyaluronic acid. Ten Caucasian patients with clinical suspicion for AC were included in this study. To obtain a non-invasive diagnosis, RCM was performed at baseline, followed by biopsy and respective confocal-histopathological correlation. Six patients with a histological diagnosis of AC were treated with diclofenac in hyaluronic acid, whereby monitoring was performed by RCM. Reflectance confocal microscopy was able to correctly identify 6/7 cases of AC and 3/3 cases of benign lesions. The most important RCM criteria for diagnosis of AC were cellular atypia at the stratum spinosum and granulosum with atypical honeycomb pattern. One patient with AC was misclassified as inflammatory cheilitis by RCM as it showed marked inflammatory response and lacked clear signs of cellular atypia on RCM imaging. Following topical treatment with diclofenac gel, 5/6 patients (83%) showed a good treatment response with regression of dysplasia on consecutive RCM examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a promising tool for the non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of actinic cheilitis. However, marked inflammation represents a potential diagnostic pitfall. In this regard, biopsy should be performed in doubtful cases. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Treatment of Ras-induced cancers by the F-actin cappers tensin and chaetoglobosin K, in combination with the caspase-1 inhibitor N1445.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, A; Cutler, H; Lo, S H; Chen, L B; Maruta, H

    1999-01-01

    -induced apoptosis is at least in part caused by CK-induced inhibition of the kinase PKB/AKT. However, a specific ICE/caspase-1 inhibitor called N1445 completely abolished the CK-induced apoptosis by reactivating PKB, but without affecting the CK-induced suppression of Ras transformation. Like the F-actin cross-linking drug MKT-077, the F-actin capping drug CK may be useful for the treatment of Ras-associated cancers if it is combined with the ICE inhibitor N1445, which abolishes the side effect of CK. Our observations that two distinct F-actin capping molecules (i.e., tensin and CK) suppress Ras-induced malignant phenotype strongly suggest, if not prove, that capping of actin filaments at the plus-ends alone is sufficient to block one of the Ras signaling pathways essential for its oncogenicity. This notion is compatible with the fact that Ras induces the uncapping of actin filaments at the plus-ends through the Rac/PIP2 pathway.

  1. Italian guidelines and therapeutic algorithm for actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Rossi, R; Calzavara-Pinton, P G; Giannetti, A; Peserico, A; Santucci, M; Vena, G A; Lotti, T

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of actinic keratosis (AK) continues to rise among white people throughout the world and it is necessary to increase the level of attention paid to it from a diagnostic and a preventive point of view. Today, AK must be considered an in situ squamous cell carcinoma and as such, must be managed using one of the available approved therapeutic alternatives. However, when multiple AKs develop on severely photodamaged skin, the treatment of the lesion together with that of the field of cancerization is part of an optimal strategy that aims not only to solve alterations clinically evident but also those in the surrounding skin field cancerization, that most likely hosts genetic alterations and is the site of initial gradual replacement of normal cells with tumoral cells. This paper reports the most recent evidences from a careful review of the literature's key articles of the treatment of AKs and suggests guidelines for the clinicians. The guidelines indicated by the authors have also been based on practical evaluations and their own clinical experience. The present conclusions may be modified by new findings in the field of oncologic research.

  2. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial Actins.

    PubMed

    Izoré, Thierry; van den Ent, Fusinita

    2017-01-01

    A diverse set of protein polymers, structurally related to actin filaments contributes to the organization of bacterial cells as cytomotive or cytoskeletal filaments. This chapter describes actin homologs encoded by bacterial chromosomes. MamK filaments, unique to magnetotactic bacteria, help establishing magnetic biological compasses by interacting with magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are intracellular membrane invaginations containing biomineralized crystals of iron oxide that are positioned by MamK along the long-axis of the cell. FtsA is widespread across bacteria and it is one of the earliest components of the divisome to arrive at midcell, where it anchors the cell division machinery to the membrane. FtsA binds directly to FtsZ filaments and to the membrane through its C-terminus. FtsA shows altered domain architecture when compared to the canonical actin fold. FtsA's subdomain 1C replaces subdomain 1B of other members of the actin family and is located on the opposite side of the molecule. Nevertheless, when FtsA assembles into protofilaments, the protofilament structure is preserved, as subdomain 1C replaces subdomain IB of the following subunit in a canonical actin filament. MreB has an essential role in shape-maintenance of most rod-shaped bacteria. Unusually, MreB filaments assemble from two protofilaments in a flat and antiparallel arrangement. This non-polar architecture implies that both MreB filament ends are structurally identical. MreB filaments bind directly to membranes where they interact with both cytosolic and membrane proteins, thereby forming a key component of the elongasome. MreB filaments in cells are short and dynamic, moving around the long axis of rod-shaped cells, sensing curvature of the membrane and being implicated in peptidoglycan synthesis.

  4. Seborrheic Keratosis of the Conjunctiva: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Bae, Hyoung Won; Lee, Kwang Kil; Kim, Tae Im

    2009-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis is a benign epithelial neoplasia that occurs mainly in the skin of the eyelids and face. We describe a case of seborrheic keratosis of the conjunctiva confirmed by histopathology. A 72-year-old man presented with a recurrent conjunctival mass involving the nasal side of his right eye. Clinically, a diagnosis of conjunctival papilloma was made, and a mass excision was performed. The histopathological analysis evidenced a conjunctival-covering epithelium with papillomatous changes and irregular acanthosis, at the expense of a proliferation of basaloid cells. In addition, the lesion exhibited multiple pseudohorn cysts containing keratin. With the above findings, a diagnosis of conjunctival seborrheic keratosis was established. The occurrence of seborrheic keratosis on the conjunctiva is rare. In this case, seborrheic keratosis was confirmed by pathologic report despite its similar appearance with papilloma. Seborrheic keratosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of conjunctival lesions. PMID:20046694

  5. Topical Colchicine Gel versus Diclofenac Sodium Gel for the Treatment of Actinic Keratoses: A Randomized, Double-Blind Study.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Gita; Elahipoor, Azam; Iraji, Fariba; Behfar, Shadi; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Actinic keratoses (AKs), a premalignant skin lesion, are a common lesion in fair skin. Although destructive treatment remains the gold standard for AKs, medical therapies may be preferable due to the comfort and reliability .This study aims to compare the effects of topical 1% colchicine gel and 3% diclofenac sodium gel in AKs. Materials and Methods. In this randomized double-blind study, 70 lesions were selected. Patients were randomized before receiving either 1% colchicine gel or 3% diclofenac sodium cream twice a day for 6 weeks. Patients were evaluated in terms of their lesion size, treatment complications, and recurrence at 7, 30, 60, and 120 days after treatment. Results. The mean of changes in the size was significant in both groups both before and after treatment (<0.001). The mean lesion size before treatment and at 30, 60, and 120 days was not different between the two groups (p > 0.05). No case of erythema was seen in the colchicine group, while erythema was seen in 22.9% (eight cases) of patients in the diclofenac sodium group (p = 0.005). Conclusions. 1% colchicine gel was a safe and effective medication with fewer side effects and lack of recurrence of the lesion.

  6. Methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy for the treatment of actinic cheilitis: a retrospective evaluation of 29 patients.

    PubMed

    Fai, D; Romano, I; Cassano, N; Vena, G A

    2012-02-01

    Multiple treatment modalities have been proposed for actinic cheilitis (AC), and topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has recently been included among these modalities. We report our experience with PDT using methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) in AC. We performed a retrospective analysis of 29 patients who had undergone MAL-PDT for treatment of AC: 4 patients received one single session and 25 patients two consecutive weekly sessions. At 3 months, 21 patients (72%) obtained a complete clinical response, which was sustained over a follow-up period of 6-36 months (mean, 20 months) in 20 patients. Cosmetic outcome was generally rated as good or very good. Transient local adverse events related to the procedure were common and mild to moderate in the majority of cases. Our preliminary experience suggests that MAL-PDT may be considered a valid modality for the treatment of AC, although long-term follow-up studies in large patient series are required to obtain precise data about clinical and histological recurrences.

  7. Nuclear Functions of Actin

    PubMed Central

    Visa, Neus; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2010-01-01

    Actin participates in several essential processes in the cell nucleus. Even though the presence of actin in the nucleus was proposed more than 30 years ago, nuclear processes that require actin have been only recently identified. Actin is part of chromatin remodeling complexes; it is associated with the transcription machineries; it becomes incorporated into newly synthesized ribonucleoproteins; and it influences long-range chromatin organization. As in the cytoplasm, nuclear actin works in conjunction with different types of actin-binding proteins that regulate actin function and bridge interactions between actin and other nuclear components. PMID:20452941

  8. Daylight methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy versus ingenol mebutate for the treatment of actinic keratoses: an intraindividual comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Giovanni; Fai, Dario; Fai, Carlotta; Mavilia, Luciano; Mercuri, Santo R

    2016-05-01

    Daylight-photodynamic therapy (D-PDT) and ingenol mebutate (IM) are novel therapies directed to actinic keratoses (AK). The purpose of our study was to compare effectiveness, tolerability, cosmetic outcome and patient preference of D-PDT versus IM in the treatment of grade I and II AK. Twenty-seven patients with AK on the face or scalp were enrolled. Each patient received, in a 25 cm(2) target area, D-PDT on right side and IM on left side. Overall 323 AK were treated. Both target areas achieved complete response in 40.47% of the cases and average AK clearance rate was similar for D-PDT and IM (p=0.74). In D-PDT areas mean grade II AK clearance rate was lower compared with that of grade I AK (p=0.015). In IM areas grade I and II AK average clearance rates were similar (p=0.28). At week 1 and month 1, mean local skin responses (LSR) score were higher in areas treated with IM. IM areas showed more severe pain and cosmetic sequelae. D-PDT had similar effectiveness to IM, even if IM demonstrated higher grade II AK clearance rate. Tolerability profile was superior for D-PDT in terms of LSR and pain. D-PDT was more cosmetically acceptable. Patients preferred D-PDT to IM in most cases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Follicular keratosis of the chin treated with 1.24R-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ointment.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Makoto; Takeda, Kiminobu; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinya; Ishizaki, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In follicular keratosis of the chin, keratotic follicular papules occur on the chin and jaw due to localized prolonged pressure and friction on the naked skin. We present one patient with this disorder. The dermatoscopic examination revealed many well-demarcated yellow spindle bodies in the patchy lesion. Therapy with 1.24R-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ointment was effective during the treatment but had no residual positive effect.

  10. Clinical study of a retinoic acid-loaded microneedle patch for seborrheic keratosis or senile lentigo.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Sachiko; Otsuka, Risa; Iioka, Hiroshi; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Asada, Hideo; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2017-01-01

    Pigmented lesions such as of seborrheic keratosis and senile lentigo, which are commonly seen on skin of people>50years of age, are considered unattractive and disfiguring because of their negative psychological impact. Drug therapy using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is an attractive option for self-treatment at home. We have developed an ATRA-loaded microneedle patch (ATRA-MN) and confirmed the pharmacological effects of ATRA-MN application in mice. Here, we describe a clinical study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ATRA-MN in subjects with seborrheic keratosis or senile lentigo. ATRA-MN was applied to the lesion site of each subject for 6h once per week for 4weeks. The skin irritation reaction was scored to assess adverse reactions and blood tests were performed to evaluate the presence of systemic adverse reactions. To assess the treatment effect using ATRA-MN, the desquamation and whitening ability of the investigational skin was observed. Desquamation of the stratum corneum was observed following four ATRA-MN applications at 1-week intervals, but ATRA-MN applications did not induce severe local or systemic adverse effects. These results showed that ATRA-MN treatment is promising as a safe and effective therapy for seborrheic keratosis and senile lentigo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Alveolar ridge keratosis - a retrospective clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alveolar ridge keratosis (ARK) is a distinct, benign clinicopathological entity, characterized by a hyperkeratotic plaque or patch that occurs on the alveolar edentulous ridge or on the retromolar trigone, considered to be caused by chronic frictional trauma. The aim of this retrospective study is to present the clinicopathological features of 23 consecutive cases of ARK. Material and methods The 23 biopsy samples of ARK were selected and pathological features were revised (keratosis, acanthosis, surface architecture, and inflammation). Factors such as the patient’s gender, age, anatomical location, tobacco and alcohol use were analyzed. Results Sixteen out of the 23 cases studied were men and 7 women with a mean age of 55.05 (age ranged from 17 to 88 years). Thirteen cases had a history of tobacco habit, amongst whom, 4 also presented alcohol consumption. All the cases presented only unilateral lesions. Nineteen cases involved the retromolar trigone while 4 cases involved edentulous alveolar ridges. When observed microscopically, the lesions were mainly characterized by moderate to important hyperorthokeratosis. Inflammation was scanty or absent. In four of the cases, the presence of melanin pigment in the superficial corium or in the cytoplasm of macrophages was detected. None of the cases showed any features of dysplasia. Conclusion Our results reveal that ARK is a benign lesion. However, the high prevalence of smokers amongst the patients might suggest that some potentially malignant disorders such as tobacco associated leukoplakia may clinically mimic ARK. PMID:23587097

  12. Two cases of seborrheic keratosis with basal clear cells.

    PubMed

    Anan, Takashi; Fukumoto, Takaya; Kimura, Tetsunori

    2017-03-01

    Seborrheic keratosis with basal clear cells (SKBCC) is an extremely rare histopathological variant of seborrheic keratosis that has histological similarities to melanoma in situ. We herein report two cases of SKBCC and provide the first description of the dermoscopic features of this condition, in addition to the histopathological findings. Both of the two lesions showed typical histological architectures of seborrheic keratosis with rows or focal clusters of monomorphic clear cells with abundant pale cytoplasm and small round nucleus in the basal layer. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that most clear cells were positive for high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE12) in a peripheral pattern but were negative tor Melan-A. Dermoscopy revealed typical features of ordinary seborrheic keratosis, while unfortunately did not reflect the presence of basal clear cells. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. Lights, camera, actin.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Peter A; Wen, Kuo-Kuang

    2005-10-01

    Actin participates in many important biological processes. Currently, intensive investigation is being carried out in a number of laboratories concerning the function of actin in these processes and the molecular basis of its functions. We present a glimpse into four of these areas: actin-like proteins in bacterial cells, actin in the eukaryotic nucleus, the conformational plasticity of the actin filament, and finally, Arp2/3-dependent regulation of actin filament branching and creation of new filament barbed ends. IUBMB Life, 57: 683-687, 2005.

  14. Regulatory T cells in the actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Gasparoto, Thaís Helena; de Souza Malaspina, Tatiana Salles; Damante, José Humberto; de Mello, Edgard Franco; Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Cavassani, Karen Angélica; da Silva, João Santana; Campanelli, Ana Paula

    2014-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) is an oral potentially malignant lesion which is the counterpart of actinic keratosis of the skin and has potential to develop into squamous cell carcinoma. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a critical role in modulating the antitumor immune responses. The presence of regulatory T cells in potentially malignant lesions has not been described. We chose investigate the involvement of regulatory T cells in potentially malignant lesions. The frequency, phenotype, and activity of CD4+CD25+ T cells isolated from blood and lesion of AC patients were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Data were compared with samples from healthy subjects. The frequency and suppressor activity of circulating CD4+CD25+ T cells was similar in AC patients and control subjects. However, the frequencies of IL-10-positive Tregs were higher in AC patients, and these cells inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and increased interleukin (IL)-10 productions in co-cultures. Furthermore, CD4+CD25+ T cells accumulate in AC lesions. Lesions-derived regulatory T cells suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, high levels of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and low IFN-γ were detected in the potentially malignant lesions. Therefore, our data show that Tregs accumulate in AC lesions, and these cells could be suppressing immune responses in a potentially malignant microenvironment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratoses: A Randomized Prospective Non-sponsored Cost-effectiveness Study of Daylight-mediated Treatment Compared with Light-emitting Diode Treatment.

    PubMed

    Neittaanmäki-Perttu, Noora; Grönroos, Mari; Karppinen, Toni; Snellman, Erna; Rissanen, Pekka

    2016-02-01

    Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is considered as effective as conventional PDT using artificial light (light-emitting diode (LED)-PDT) for treatment of actinic keratoses (AK). This randomized prospective non-sponsored study assessed the cost-effectiveness of DL-PDT compared with LED-PDT. Seventy patients with 210 AKs were randomized to DL-PDT or LED-PDT groups. Effectiveness was assessed at 6 months. The costs included societal costs and private costs, including the time patients spent in treatment. Results are presented as incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). The total costs per patient were significantly lower for DL-PDT (€132) compared with LED-PDT (€170), giving a cost saving of €38 (p = 0.022). The estimated probabilities for patients' complete response were 0.429 for DL-PDT and 0.686 for LED-PDT; a difference in probability of being healed of 0.257. ICER showed a monetary gain of €147 per unit of effectiveness lost. DL-PDT is less costly and less effective than LED-PDT. In terms of cost-effectiveness analysis, DL-PDT provides lower value for money compared with LED-PDT.

  16. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising within Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Yurdakul, Cüneyt; Güçer, Hasan; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumour development within a seborrheic keratosis (SK) is extremely rare. Though the most commonly developed malignant tumour is the basal cell carcinoma (BCC), other tumour types have also been reported in literature. Herein, we will report a superficial type BCC case developed within SK localized in hairy skin of a 78-year-old female patient. In immunohistochemical evaluation, diffuse positive staining with CK19 and over-expression in p53 compared with non-neoplastic areas were determined in neoplastic basaloid islands. It is always not easy to differentiate especially superficial type BCC cases from non-neoplastic epithelium of SK with histopathological evaluation. As far as this reason we believe that in difficult differentiation of these 2 lesions, in order to show the differentiation in basal epithelium, immunohistochemical evaluation may be helpful. PMID:25177624

  17. Lichenoid keratosis is frequently misdiagnosed as basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maor, D; Ondhia, C; Yu, L L; Chan, J J

    2017-08-01

    Lichenoid keratosis (LK), also known as benign lichenoid keratosis or lichen planus-like keratosis, is a solitary, pink to red-brown scaly plaque representing a host immunological response to a variety of precursor lesions. LK is often misdiagnosed as a dermatological malignancy owing to its clinical resemblance to basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or Bowen disease. We performed a retrospective analysis of the pathology records of a series of LK lesions with reference to the demographic features and accuracy of clinical diagnosis. The pathology records from 2008 to 2009 of 263 consecutive patients with a histological diagnosis of LK from a specialized skin laboratory were retrieved. Data relating to clinical diagnosis, age, sex, anatomical location, time of year of presentation and any coexistent pathological lesions adjacent to the LK were recorded. Mean age at presentation was 64 years (range 34-96), and 58% of patients were female. The most common anatomical site was the chest/anterior torso, followed by the back and legs. The most common coexisting lesion was solar keratosis at 14%, followed by seborrhoeic keratosis (SK) at 7.8%. The correct clinical diagnosis of LK was made in 29.5% of cases. The most common clinical diagnosis was BCC (47%), while SK was the preferred diagnosis in 18%. A clinical diagnosis was not given in 5.5% of cases. In conclusion, it appears that LK is frequently misdiagnosed, with misdiagnosis occurring in > 70% of cases in this study. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. [Increased glucose uptake by seborrheic keratosis on PET scan].

    PubMed

    Merklen-Djafri, C; Truntzer, P; Hassler, S; Cribier, B

    2017-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an examination based upon the uptake of a radioactive tracer by hypermetabolic cells. It is primarily used in tandem with tomodensitometry (PET-TDM) for cancer staging because of its high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of metastases. However, unusually high uptake may occur with benign tumours, including skin tumours. Herein, we report an extremely rare case of pathological uptake levels resulting from seborrhoeic keratosis. A 55-year-old male patient with oesophageal squamous-cell carcinoma was referred to us following the discovery of an area of high marker uptake following PET-TDM and corresponding to a pigmented skin lesion. No other areas of suspect high uptake were seen. The lesion was surgically excised and histological examination indicated seborrhoeic keratosis. The histological appearance was that of standard seborrhoeic keratosis without any notable mitotic activity. PET-TDM is an examination that enables diagnosis of malignancy. However, rare cases have been described of increased marker uptake by benign cutaneous tumours such as histiocytofibroma, pilomatricoma and condyloma. To date, there have only been only very few cases of increased uptake due to seborrhoeic keratosis. This extremely unusual case of increased glucose uptake in PET-TDM due to seborrhoeic keratosis confirms that the hypermetabolic activity detected by this examination is not necessarily synonymous with malignancy and that confirmation by clinical and histological findings is essential. The reasons for increased metabolic activity within such benign tumours are not known. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Erbium laser resurfacing for actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L

    2013-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a precancerous condition characterized by grayish-whitish area(s) of discoloration on the mucosal lip, often blunting the demarcation between mucosa and cutaneous lip. Actinic cheilitis is considered to be an early part of the spectrum of squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma specifically of the lip has a high rate of recurrence and metastasis through the oral cavity leading to a poor overall survival. Risk factors for the development of actinic cheilitis include chronic solar irradiation, increasing age, male gender, light skin complexion, immunosuppression, and possibly tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment options include topical pharmacotherapy (eg, fluorouracil, imiquimod) or procedural interventions (eg, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, surgical vermillionectomy, laser resurfacing), each with their known advantages and disadvantages. There is little consensus as to which treatment options offer the most clinical utility given the paucity of comparative clinical data. In my practice, laser resurfacing has become an important tool for the treatment of actinic cheilitis owing to its ease of use and overall safety, tolerability, and cosmetic acceptability. Herein the use of erbium laser resurfacing is described for three actinic cheilitis presentations for which I find it particularly useful: clinically prominent actinic cheilitis, biopsy-proven actinic cheilitis, and treatment of the entire lip following complete tumor excision of squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with a 2940-nm erbium laser (Sciton Profile Contour Tunable Resurfacing Laser [TRL], Sciton, Inc., Palo Alto, CA).

  20. Keratosis Pilaris Revisited: Is It More Than Just a Follicular Keratosis?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mary; Khopkar, Uday Sharadchandra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Keratosis pilaris (KP) is characterized by keratinous plugs in the follicular orifices and varying degrees of perifollicular erythema. The most accepted theory of its pathogenesis proposes defective keratinization of the follicular epithelium resulting in a keratotic infundibular plug. We decided to test this hypothesis by doing dermoscopy of patients diagnosed clinically as keratosis pilaris. Materials and Methods: Patients with a clinical diagnosis of KP seen between September 2011 and December 2011 were included in the study. A clinical history was obtained and examination and dermoscopic evaluation were performed on the lesions of KP. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 6-38 years. Sixteen patients had history of atopy. Nine had concomitant ichthyosis vulgaris. All the 25 patients were found to have coiled hair shafts within the affected follicular infundibula. The hair shafts were extracted with the help of a sterile needle and were found to retain their coiled nature. Perifollicular erythema was seen in 11 patients; perifollicular scaling in 9. Conclusion: Based on our observations and previously documented histological data of KP, we infer that KP may not be a disorder of keratinization, but caused by the circular hair shaft which ruptures the follicular epithelium leading to inflammation and abnormal follicular keratinization. PMID:23766609

  1. Intraepidermal proliferation of Merkel cells within a seborrheic keratosis: Merkel cell carcinoma in situ or Merkel cell hyperplasia?

    PubMed

    McFalls, Jeanne; Okon, Lauren; Cannon, Sarah; Lee, Jason B

    2017-05-01

    Intradepidermal proliferation of Merkel cells without any dermal component has been interpreted as either a hyperplastic process secondary to chronic ultraviolet radiation or a neoplastic process, namely Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) in situ. The recent criteria that have been proffered to diagnose MCC in situ, unfortunately, are identical to those that have been applied to Merkel cell hyperplasia in the past, posing a diagnostic quandary when faced with an intraepidermal proliferation of Merkel cells. Most previously reported cases of MCC in situ have occurred within associated epithelial lesion that includes solar (actinic) keratosis and squamous-cell carcinoma in situ. Similarly, Merkel cell hyperplasia has been reported to occur in association with a variety of epithelial lesions as well as on chronically sun-damaged skin. Herein, a case of an intraepidermal proliferation of Merkel cells within a seborrheic keratosis is presented accompanied by a discussion on whether the proliferation represents another case of Merkel cell carcinoma in situ or an incidental hyperplastic process on chronically sun-damaged skin. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dermoscopy-pathology relationship in seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Akane

    2017-05-01

    Making a definitive diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis (SK) can be challenging for the naked eye due to its wide variation in clinical features. Fortunately, however, most cases of SK exhibit the typical dermoscopic findings of fissures and ridges, hairpin vessels with white halo, comedo-like openings, and milia-like cysts, all of which are helpful to distinguish SK from melanoma, melanocytic nevus, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and other skin tumors. Histopathologically, these dermoscopic characteristics correspond to papillomatous surface of the epidermis, enlarged capillaries of the dermal papillae, pseudohorn cysts in the epidermis opened to the surface of the lesion and intraepidermal cysts, respectively. Clinicians should bear in mind that the clonal type of SK dermoscopically mimics melanoma and BCC by the presence of globule-like structures, while regressing SK exhibits a granular pattern that is similar to the peppering found in melanoma. Furthermore, milia-like cysts alone are insufficient for a conclusive diagnosis of SK because melanoma in rare cases displays cysts along with other SK-like dermoscopic findings. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Differentiating regressed melanoma from regressed lichenoid keratosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Aegean H; Shulman, Kenneth J; Lee, Bonnie A

    2017-04-01

    Distinguishing regressed lichen planus-like keratosis (LPLK) from regressed melanoma can be difficult on histopathologic examination, potentially resulting in mismanagement of patients. We aimed to identify histopathologic features by which regressed melanoma can be differentiated from regressed LPLK. Twenty actively inflamed LPLK, 12 LPLK with regression and 15 melanomas with regression were compared and evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining as well as Melan-A, microphthalmia transcription factor (MiTF) and cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) immunostaining. (1) A total of 40% of regressed melanomas showed complete or near complete loss of melanocytes within the epidermis with Melan-A and MiTF immunostaining, while 8% of regressed LPLK exhibited this finding. (2) Necrotic keratinocytes were seen in the epidermis in 33% regressed melanomas as opposed to all of the regressed LPLK. (3) A dense infiltrate of melanophages in the papillary dermis was seen in 40% of regressed melanomas, a feature not seen in regressed LPLK. In summary, our findings suggest that a complete or near complete loss of melanocytes within the epidermis strongly favors a regressed melanoma over a regressed LPLK. In addition, necrotic epidermal keratinocytes and the presence of a dense band-like distribution of dermal melanophages can be helpful in differentiating these lesions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Actinic cheilitis in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; McKay, C; Faulkner, C

    2010-06-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially premalignant condition involving predominantly the vermilion of the lower lip. The aim of the current paper was to review the clinical presentation of actinic cheilitis and demonstrate the development of management plans using a series of cases. These are designed to provide immediate treatment where required but also to address the medium and long-term requirements of the patient. The authors suggest that the clinical examination of lips and the assessment of actinic cheilitis and other lip pathology become a regular part of the routine soft tissue examination undertaken as a part of the periodic examination of dental patients. Early recognition of actinic cheilitis can allow the development of strategies for individual patients that prevent progression. These are based on past sun exposure, future lifestyle changes and the daily use of emollient sunscreens, broad-brimmed hats and avoidance of sun exposure during the middle of the day. This is a service that is not undertaken as a matter of routine in general medical practice as patients are not seen with the regularity of dental patients and generally not under the ideal examination conditions available in the dental surgery.

  5. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: proposal of a concept.

    PubMed

    Böer, Almut

    2006-06-01

    It has been a subject of controversy whether keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a distinctive inflammatory disease of the skin or whether it represents a manifestation of another well-known disease, such as lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, or lichen simplex chronicus. In search of clear criteria for diagnosis of KLC the entire literature pertinent to the subject was studied and findings clinical and histopathologic as they were telegraphed in them were compared with a patient of my own experience. Review of the literature reveals more than 60 patients in whom the diagnosis of KLC was made. Three categories emerge based on whether the findings presented in a particular article (1) do not permit any diagnosis to be rendered; (2) do allow a diagnosis specific to be made, such as of lichen simplex, lichen planus, or lupus erythematosus; or (3) do not correspond to any disease well defined, such as lichen simplex, lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, but seem to show attributes morphologic, clinically and histopathologically, that are repeatable. Patients diagnosed as having KLC obviously represent a potpourri of different diseases, the most common of them being lichen simplex chronicus, lichen planus, and lupus erythematosus. Fewer than 25 patients reported on, however, presented themselves with lesions very similar to one another clinically, namely, an eruption that involved the face in a manner reminiscent of seborrheic dermatitis and with tiny papules on the trunk and extremities, which assumed linear and reticulate shapes by way of confluence of lesions. Individual papules were infundibulocentric and acrosyringocentric. Findings histopathologic were those of a lichenoid interface dermatitis affiliated with numerous necrotic keratocytes and covered by parakeratosis housing neutrophils in staggered fashion. These patients seem to have an authentic and distinctive condition that is exceedingly rare. In conclusion, the diagnosis of KLC should be made only for

  6. Clinical and Histopathological Investigation of Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common epidermal tumors of the skin. However, only a few large-scale clinicohistopathological investigations have been conducted on SK or on the possible correlation between histopathological SK subtype and location. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and histopathological features of a relatively large number of cases of diagnosed SK. Methods Two hundred and seventy-one pathology slides of skin tissue from patients with clinically diagnosed SK and 206 cases of biopsy-proven SK were analyzed. The biopsy-proven cases of SK were assessed for histopathological subclassification. The demographic, clinical, and histopathological data of the patients were collected for analysis of associated factors. Results The most frequent histopathological subtype was the acanthotic type, followed by mixed, hyperkeratotic, melanoacanthoma, clonal, irritated, and adenoid types; an unexpectedly high percentage (9.2%) of the melanoacanthoma variant was observed. The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites than in sun-protected sites (p=0.028). Premalignant and malignant entities together represented almost one-quarter (24.2%) of the clinicopathological mismatch cases (i.e., mismatch between the clinical and histopathological diagnoses). Regarding the location of SK development, the frequency of mismatch for the sun-exposed areas was significantly higher than that for sun-protected areas (p=0.043). Conclusion The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites. Biopsy sampling should be performed for lesions situated in sun-exposed areas to exclude other premalignant or malignant diseases. PMID:27081260

  7. The yeast actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mithilesh; Huang, Junqi; Balasubramanian, Mohan K

    2014-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a complex network of dynamic polymers, which plays an important role in various fundamental cellular processes, including maintenance of cell shape, polarity, cell division, cell migration, endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and mechanosensation. Precise spatiotemporal assembly and disassembly of actin structures is regulated by the coordinated activity of about 100 highly conserved accessory proteins, which nucleate, elongate, cross-link, and sever actin filaments. Both in vivo studies in a wide range of organisms from yeast to metazoans and in vitro studies of purified proteins have helped shape the current understanding of actin dynamics and function. Molecular genetics, genome-wide functional analysis, sophisticated real-time imaging, and ultrastructural studies in concert with biochemical analysis have made yeast an attractive model to understand the actin cytoskeleton, its molecular dynamics, and physiological function. Studies of the yeast actin cytoskeleton have contributed substantially in defining the universal mechanism regulating actin assembly and disassembly in eukaryotes. Here, we review some of the important insights generated by the study of actin cytoskeleton in two important yeast models the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical characteristics of keratosis obturans and external auditory canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Jung, Young Hoon; Oh, Jeong-Hoon

    2015-02-01

    Keratosis obturans (KO) and external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC) have been considered separate entities. While the disorders are distinct, they share many overlapping characteristics, making a correct diagnosis difficult. In the present study, we compared their clinical characteristics and radiological features to clarify the diagnostic criteria. Retrospective case series. Academic medical center. The clinical data of 23 cases of EACC and KO were retrospectively reviewed. The following clinical characteristics were compared between the 2 groups: sex, age, onset of symptoms, follow-up period, audiometric results, and imaging findings on temporal bone computed tomography including bilaterality, location, and the presence of extension to adjacent tissue. The mean age of the EACC group was significantly older than that of the KO group. All of the cases of EACC occurred unilaterally, and bilateral occurrences of KO were observed in 4 of 9 cases. All of the lesions in the KO group were circumferential, and no lesion in the EACC group invaded the superior canal wall. No significant differences in symptoms, such as acute otalgia, otorrhea, and hearing loss, were noted between the 2 groups. The incidence of conductive hearing impairment more than 10 dB was higher in the KO group than in the EACC group. Thus, KO and EACC are 2 distinct disease entities that share common features in clinical characteristics except for predominant age and bilaterality. Conservative treatment with meticulous cleaning of the lesion was successful in most cases with a long-term follow-up. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  9. A case of new onset keratosis pilaris after discontinuation of erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Okereke, Uchenna R; Colozza, Sara; Cohen, David E

    2014-11-01

    Keratosis pilaris and keratosis pilaris-like eruptions have been reported in association with RAF inhibitors sorafenib and vemurafenib. We describe herein what is to our knowledge the first reported case of new onset keratosis pilaris after discontinuation of EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. A 60 year-old female with stage IV lung cancer was treated with erlotinib (100 mg/d). The patient elected to discontinue erlotinib after four years secondary to adverse systemic reactions. However, five months later small, monomorphic, rough, folliculocentric papules with surrounding mild erythema characteristic of keratosis pilaris were noted on upper back and arms. This serves as the first documented case of new onset keratosis pilaris in a patient after discontinuation of erlotinib. We report the present case to show the possible association of keratosis pilaris with not only RAF inhibitors, but also the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Further investigation will determine whether this is a class effect with other systemic EGFR inhibitors.

  10. Actin cable dynamics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Pon, Liza A.

    2002-01-01

    Actin cables, bundles of actin filaments that align along the long axis of budding yeast, are crucial for establishment of cell polarity. We fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) to actin binding protein 140 (Abp140p) and visualized actin cable dynamics in living yeast. We detected two populations of actin cables: (i) bud-associated cables, which extend from the bud along the mother-bud axis, and (ii) randomly oriented cables, which are relatively short. Time-lapse imaging of Abp140p–GFP revealed an apparent increase in the length of bud-associated actin cables. Analysis of movement of Abp140p–GFP fiduciary marks on bud-associated cables and fluorescence loss in photobleaching experiments revealed that this apparent elongation occurs by assembly of new material at the end of the cable within the bud and movement of the opposite end of the cable toward the tip of the mother cell distal to the bud. The rate of extension of the tip of an elongating actin cable is 0.29 ± 0.08 μm/s. Latrunculin A (Lat-A) treatment completely blocked this process. We also observed movement of randomly oriented cables around the cortex of cells at a rate of 0.59 ± 0.14 μm/s. Mild treatment with Lat-A did not affect the velocity of movement of randomly oriented cables. However, Lat-A treatment did increase the number of randomly oriented, motile cables per cell. Our observations suggest that establishment of bud-associated actin cables during the cell cycle is accomplished not by realignment of existing cables but by assembly of new cables within the bud or bud neck, followed by elongation. PMID:11805329

  11. Topical methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy using red light-emitting diode light for treatment of multiple actinic keratoses: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Pariser, David; Loss, Robert; Jarratt, Michael; Abramovits, William; Spencer, James; Geronemus, Roy; Bailin, Philip; Bruce, Suzanne

    2008-10-01

    The use of light-emitting diode light offers practical advantages in photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) for management of actinic keratoses (AK). We sought to evaluate the efficacy of MAL PDT using red light-emitting diode light. We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, randomized study. A total of 49 patients with 363 AK lesions had 16.8% MAL cream applied under occlusion for 3 hours, and 47 patients with 360 AK lesions had vehicle cream similarly applied. The lesions were then illuminated (630 nm, light dose 37 J/cm2) with repeated treatment 1 week later. Complete lesion and patient (all lesions showing complete response) response rates were evaluated 3 months after last treatment. MAL PDT was superior (P<.0001) to vehicle PDT with respect to lesion complete response (86.2% vs 52.2%, odds ratio 6.9 [95% confidence interval 4.7-10.3]) and patient complete response (59.2% vs 14.9%, odds ratio 13.2 [95% confidence interval 4.1-43.1]). The study population may not be representative of all patients with AK. MAL PDT using red light-emitting diode light is an appropriate treatment alternative for multiple AK lesions.

  12. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  13. Actin-induced dimerization of palladin promotes actin-bundling

    PubMed Central

    Vattepu, Ravi; Yadav, Rahul; Beck, Moriah R

    2015-01-01

    A subset of actin binding proteins is able to form crosslinks between two or more actin filaments, thus producing structures of parallel or networked bundles. These actin crosslinking proteins interact with actin through either bivalent binding or dimerization. We recently identified two binding sites within the actin binding domain of palladin, an actin crosslinking protein that plays an important role in normal cell adhesion and motility during wound healing and embryonic development. In this study, we show that actin induces dimerization of palladin. Furthermore, the extent of dimerization reflects earlier comparisons of actin binding and bundling between different domains of palladin. On the basis of these results we hypothesized that actin binding may promote a conformational change that results in dimerization of palladin, which in turn may drive the crosslinking of actin filaments. The proximal distance between two actin binding sites on crosslinking proteins determines the ultrastructural properties of the filament network, therefore we also explored interdomain interactions using a combination of chemical crosslinking experiments and actin cosedimentation assays. Limited proteolysis data reveals that palladin is less susceptible to enzyme digestion after actin binding. Our results suggest that domain movements in palladin are necessary for interactions with actin and are induced by interactions with actin filaments. Accordingly, we put forth a model linking the structural changes to functional dynamics. PMID:25307943

  14. Actinic comedonal plaque.

    PubMed

    Eastern, J S; Martin, S

    1980-12-01

    Solitary plaques developed on the sun-exposed and damaged skin of five elderly, fair-skinned individuals. The lesions, erythematous to bluish confluent nodules and plaques with a cribriform appearance and comedone-like structures, presented a distinctive histologic picture of dilated, keratin-filled follicles within a matrix of amorphous, damaged collagen. We believe these cases demonstrate a distinct entity within the realm of actinic dermatoses, for which the name "actinic comedonal plaque" seems appropriate.

  15. Two-Step Irradiance Treatment Can Achieve Excellent Pain Control During Red Light 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratoses.

    PubMed

    Paragh, Gyorgy; Zeitouni, Nathalie C

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the ability of two-step irradiance to maintain pain control during red light 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) photodynamic therapy (PDT) for actinic keratoses (AK) and assess factors influencing pain. PDT provides excellent clinical and cosmetic results in the treatment AK and early basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Widespread use of PDT is limited, in part, by pain. A two-step irradiance method for PDT has previously been shown to significantly reduce PDT-associated pain during the treatment of BCC, but the ability of this method to limit pain during the treatment of AKs has not been reported. We performed a retrospective chart review to assess the level of pain during AK treatment by red light PDT (n = 99). Natural density filter was used to reduce the irradiance of the light source and initially 10 J/cm 2 dose was delivered at 35 mW/cm 2 and then, 65 J/cm 2 dose was delivered at 70 mW/cm 2 . Pain level was measured using a 10-point visual analog scale at three points during the procedure. Pain was low to moderate in most patients (mean ± standard error of the mean pain score: 2.35 ± 0.19). Higher pain was seen midprocedure versus at the beginning (p < 0.0001) and at the end (p = 0.003) of PDT. There was no significant difference in pain perception between genders and different treatment areas. Our results provide evidence that red light ALA PDT of AKs is very well tolerated with the two-step irradiance protocol.

  16. Inverted follicular keratosis: dermoscopic and reflectance confocal microscopic features.

    PubMed

    Armengot-Carbo, M; Abrego, A; Gonzalez, T; Alarcon, I; Alos, L; Carrera, C; Malvehy, J; Puig, S

    2013-01-01

    Inverted follicular keratosis (IFK) is a rare benign tumor which usually appears as a firm papule on the face. The diagnosis is generally made by histopathology because the clinical appearance is difficult to differentiate from other lesions. Dermoscopic features of IFK have not been established to date. Herein we describe the dermoscopic findings of 4 cases of IFK. Radial peripheral hairpin vessels surrounded by a whitish halo arranged around a central white-yellowish amorphous area were observed in 3 cases, and glomerular vessels were present in the central area of one of them. The fourth case also presented a central white amorphous area but showed arborizing vessels. Reflectance confocal microscopy (available in 1 case) revealed a broadened honeycomb pattern, epidermal projections and hairpin and glomerular vessels. To our knowledge this is the first case series describing the dermoscopic features of inverted follicular keratosis and the first confocal microscopy description of this entity.

  17. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Actin Turnover-Mediated Gravity Response in Maize Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano; Barlow, Peter W; Volkmann, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be linked to gravity sensing in plants but the mechanistic understanding of these processes remains unknown. We have performed detailed pharmacological analyses of the role of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in gravibending of maize (Zea mays) root apices. Depolymerization of actin filaments with two drugs having different mode of their actions, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B, stimulated root gravibending. By contrast, drug-induced stimulation of actin polymerization and inhibition of actin turnover, using two different agents phalloidin and jasplakinolide, compromised the root gravibending. Importantly, all these actin drugs inhibited root growth to similar extents suggesting that high actin turnover is essential for the gravity-related growth responses rather than for the general growth process. Both latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments inhibited root growth but restored gravibending of the decapped root apices, indicating that there is a strong potential for effective actin-mediated gravity sensing outside the cap. This elusive gravity sensing outside the root cap is dependent not only on the high rate of actin turnover but also on weakening of myosin activities, as general inhibition of myosin ATPases induced stimulation of gravibending of the decapped root apices. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the actin turnover-mediated gravity sensing outside the root cap. PMID:19521476

  19. Arsenic-related Bowen's disease, palmar keratosis, and skin cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cöl, M; Cöl, C; Soran, A; Sayli, B S; Oztürk, S

    1999-01-01

    Chronic arsenical intoxication can still be found in environmental and industrial settings. Symptoms of chronic arsenic intoxication include general pigmentation or focal "raindrop" pigmentation of the skin and the appearance of hyperkeratosis of the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. In addition to arsenic-related skin diseases including keratosis, Bowen's disease, basal-cell-carcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma, there is also an increased risk of some internal malignancies. Arsenic-related diseases are common in areas of the world where the drinking water has a high arsenic content. In this paper, we describe a 35-year-old male patient who had arsenic-related keratosis, squamous-cell carcinoma in the palmar area of his left hand, and Bowen's disease on his left thigh. The patient worked in a borax mine for 15 years, so he was exposed to arsenic in drinking water, airborne arsenic in his workplace, and had direct contact. The patient was treated for 11 months for arsenic-related keratosis until an axillary lymph node metastasis occurred; the lesion was excised and diagnosed to be malignant. Bowen's disease was detected when the patient was being treated for cancer. No other malignancy was found. The patient is still receiving regular follow-up care. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10417369

  20. Pharmacokinetics and safety of imiquimod 5% cream in the treatment of actinic keratoses of the face, scalp, or hands and arms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lester I; Skinner, Shari L; Marbury, Thomas C; Owens, Mary L; Kurup, Sarala; McKane, Scott; Greene, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    The safety and efficacy of imiquimod 5% cream is being evaluated for the treatment of dysplastic lesions of the epidermis (actinic keratoses, AK). The objective of this clinical study was to describe the pharmacokinetics and safety of topical imiquimod during multiple dosing of AK subjects. A total of 58 adult subjects with 5 to 20 AK lesions at the treatment site applied imiquimod cream three times per week for up to 16 weeks as follows: 12 males and 11 females applied 12.5 mg imiquimod to the face; 11 males applied 25 mg to the entire balding area of the scalp; and 12 males and 12 females applied 75 mg to both hands and forearms. Pharmacokinetics and safety were assessed after the first and last doses, as well as biweekly. Imiquimod and its metabolites were measured in the serum and urine using sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methods. Less than 0.6% of the applied doses was recovered in the urine of all subjects. Serum imiquimod levels were low, reflecting minimal dermal absorption, and increased with dose, although not proportionally. Peak levels at the end of dosing were 0.1, 0.2, and 1.6 ng/ml for the face, scalp, and hands/arms groups, respectively. A two- to fourfold accumulation was seen at the end of dosing. Local application site reactions were the most common adverse event, reported by approximately 50% of the subjects in each treatment group. The small number of systemic adverse events, including 'flu-like symptoms, were mostly mild and did not show a dose response. Thus, minimal systemic absorption and good safety margins for topical imiquimod were seen in AK subjects with doses as high as 75 mg three times per week for 16 weeks.

  1. Actin in Mung Bean Mitochondria and Implications for Its Function[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yih-Shan; Cheng, Ning; Hsiao, Lin-June; Annamalai, Arunachalam; Jauh, Guang-Yuh; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Dai, Hwa; Chiang, Kwen-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Here, a large fraction of plant mitochondrial actin was found to be resistant to protease and high-salt treatments, suggesting it was protected by mitochondrial membranes. A portion of this actin became sensitive to protease or high-salt treatment after removal of the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that some actin is located inside the mitochondrial outer membrane. The import of an actin–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein into the mitochondria in a transgenic plant, actin:GFP, was visualized in living cells and demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses. Polymerized actin was found in mitochondria of actin:GFP plants and in mung bean (Vigna radiata). Notably, actin associated with mitochondria purified from early-developing cotyledons during seed germination was sensitive to high-salt and protease treatments. With cotyledon ageing, mitochondrial actin became more resistant to both treatments. The progressive import of actin into cotyledon mitochondria appeared to occur in concert with the conversion of quiescent mitochondria into active forms during seed germination. The binding of actin to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was demonstrated by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Porin and ADP/ATP carrier proteins were also found in mtDNA-protein complexes. Treatment with an actin depolymerization reagent reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and triggered the release of cytochrome C. The potential function of mitochondrial actin and a possible actin import pathway are discussed. PMID:21984697

  2. Role of linoleic acid in arsenical palmar keratosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tarafder S; Misbahuddin, Mir

    2016-03-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure can lead to palmoplantar keratosis. In the stratum corneum of skin, linoleic acid is of the utmost importance to the inflammation, keratinization, and regeneration processes. The aims of this study were: (i) to present quantitative information on the linoleic acid fraction of intercorneocyte lipids, and (ii) to elucidate the role of linoleic acid in the pathophysiology of arsenical keratosis. Lipid extracts were collected from keratotic lesions in seven patients, seven arsenic-exposed subjects, and seven non-exposed control subjects. Linoleic acid levels of the specimens were estimated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). There was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in mean ± standard error (SE) linoleic acid levels in arsenical keratosis patients (palm: 25.66 ± 4.95 μg/cm(2); dorsum: 28.25 ± 6.20 μg/cm(2)) compared with arsenic-exposed (palm: 2.75 ± 0.85 μg/cm(2); dorsum: 1.96 ± 0.64 μg/cm(2)) and non-exposed (palm: 1.52 ± 0.61 μg/cm(2); dorsum: 1.28 ± 0.39 μg/cm(2)) control subjects. There was no significant difference (P = 0.556) in linoleic acid concentration in the non-affected skin of the dorsum of the hand (28.25 ± 6.20 μg/cm(2)) compared with that in the palmar sites (25.66 ± 4.95 μg/cm(2)) in the patient group. The change in linoleic acid levels in the arsenic-exposed control group did not differ from that in non-exposed controls (P = 1.000). Linoleic acid concentration is elevated in arsenical keratosis; this finding warrants further investigation to ascertain whether linoleic acid plays a direct role in the pathophysiology of arsenical keratosis. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  3. Actin, actin-binding proteins, and actin-related proteins in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kristó, Ildikó; Bajusz, Izabella; Bajusz, Csaba; Borkúti, Péter; Vilmos, Péter

    2016-04-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has significantly broadened our view about the role actin plays in the life of the cell and added novel aspects to actin research. One of these new aspects is the discovery of the existence of nuclear actin which became evident only recently. Nuclear activities including transcriptional activation in the case of all three RNA polymerases, editing and nuclear export of mRNAs, and chromatin remodeling all depend on actin. It also became clear that there is a fine-tuned equilibrium between cytoplasmic and nuclear actin pools and that this balance is ensured by an export-import system dedicated to actin. After over half a century of research on conventional actin and its organizing partners in the cytoplasm, it was also an unexpected finding that the nucleus contains more than 30 actin-binding proteins and new classes of actin-related proteins which are not able to form filaments but had evolved nuclear-specific functions. The actin-binding and actin-related proteins in the nucleus have been linked to RNA transcription and processing, nuclear transport, and chromatin remodeling. In this paper, we attempt to provide an overview of the wide range of information that is now available about actin, actin-binding, and actin-related proteins in the nucleus.

  4. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Banigan, Edward J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disk. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young’s modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility. PMID:24225232

  5. Bowenoid transformation in seborrheic keratosis: A retrospective analysis of 429 patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Parvin; Adibi, Neda; Nematollahi, Pardis; Heidarpour, Mitra; Eftekhari, Mehdi; Siadat, Amir Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic keratosis is a common, benign skin tumor. Numerous reports have shown its possibility of malignant transformation. This study was designed to demonstrate the occurrence of concomitant seborrheic keratosis and skin cancers. Materials and Methods: Data was retrospectively reviewed from all patients with a diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis in pathology department of Alzahra Hospital and a private pathology laboratory in Isfahan, Iran over a 4-year period. We classified all demographic data and associated dysplasia or Bowen's disease and analyzed them by student-t or chi-square tests. Results: From all 429 specimens, 5 (1.2%) were found to be associated with Bowen's disease and one (0.2%) with mild dysplasia in squamous epithelium. All cases arose within the clinically, atypical seborrheic keratosis. More men were affected with lesions alone and with malignancy (230/423 (54.4%) and 5/6 (83.3%), respectively) compared to women. The average age of patients suffering from lesions with and without associated malignancy was 57 and 54 years, respectively. The common site of lesion alone was head and neck but lesions with malignancy involved lower extremities. The two lesions were significantly different in site of occurrence (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Generally, although the association between seborrheic keratosis and skin malignancy appears to be accidental, it must always be in mind. Therefore, histopathologic examination of all seborrheic keratosis should be considered, especially when seborrheic keratosis has atypical clinical manifestations. PMID:23267371

  6. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  7. Mutational analysis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and verrucal keratosis in patients taking BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Anforth, Rachael; Tembe, Varsha; Blumetti, Tatiana; Fernandez-Peñas, Pablo

    2012-09-01

    B-RAF inhibitors (BRAFi) have been shown to improve rates of overall and progression-free survival in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma positive for the BRAF V600E mutation. However, the main drawback is the development of verrucal keratosis (hyperkeratotic papules with verruca-like characteristics with benign histological findings) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cuSCC). We have found upstream mutations in RAS as well as PIK3CA in both verrucal keratosis and cuSCC. This suggests that verrucal keratosis is an early clinical presentation of cuSCC in patients on BRAFi. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Association between melanocytic neoplasms and seborrheic keratosis: more than a coincidental collision?

    PubMed Central

    DeFazio, Jennifer; Zalaudek, Iris; Busam, Klaus J.; Cota, Carlo; Marghoob, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations and an expanding knowledge of cell-to-cell communication have led us to speculate that the finding of a melanocytic nevus in conjunction with a seborrheic keratosis is more than a coincidental collision of two lesions. Here we present five cases demonstrating dermoscopic features of both melanocytic lesions and seborrheic keratoses with corresponding histology. Four cases demonstrate dermoscopic features of a melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratosis, and the final case a melanoma arising in association with a seborrheic keratosis. PMID:23785597

  9. Actin turnover maintains actin filament homeostasis during cytokinetic ring contraction

    PubMed Central

    Palani, Saravanan; Sommese, Ruth; Kamnev, Anton; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinesis in many eukaryotes involves a tension-generating actomyosin-based contractile ring. Many components of actomyosin rings turn over during contraction, although the significance of this turnover has remained enigmatic. Here, using Schizosaccharomyces japonicus, we investigate the role of turnover of actin and myosin II in its contraction. Actomyosin ring components self-organize into ∼1-µm-spaced clusters instead of undergoing full-ring contraction in the absence of continuous actin polymerization. This effect is reversed when actin filaments are stabilized. We tested the idea that the function of turnover is to ensure actin filament homeostasis in a synthetic system, in which we abolished turnover by fixing rings in cell ghosts with formaldehyde. We found that these rings contracted fully upon exogenous addition of a vertebrate myosin. We conclude that actin turnover is required to maintain actin filament homeostasis during ring contraction and that the requirement for turnover can be bypassed if homeostasis is achieved artificially. PMID:28655757

  10. Alveolar ridge keratosis--a retrospective clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Bellato, Lorenzo; Martinelli-Kläy, Carla P; Martinelli, Celso R; Lombardi, Tommaso

    2013-04-16

    Alveolar ridge keratosis (ARK) is a distinct, benign clinicopathological entity, characterized by a hyperkeratotic plaque or patch that occurs on the alveolar edentulous ridge or on the retromolar trigone, considered to be caused by chronic frictional trauma. The aim of this retrospective study is to present the clinicopathological features of 23 consecutive cases of ARK. The 23 biopsy samples of ARK were selected and pathological features were revised (keratosis, acanthosis, surface architecture, and inflammation). Factors such as the patient's gender, age, anatomical location, tobacco and alcohol use were analyzed. Sixteen out of the 23 cases studied were men and 7 women with a mean age of 55.05 (age ranged from 17 to 88 years). Thirteen cases had a history of tobacco habit, amongst whom, 4 also presented alcohol consumption. All the cases presented only unilateral lesions. Nineteen cases involved the retromolar trigone while 4 cases involved edentulous alveolar ridges. When observed microscopically, the lesions were mainly characterized by moderate to important hyperorthokeratosis. Inflammation was scanty or absent. In four of the cases, the presence of melanin pigment in the superficial corium or in the cytoplasm of macrophages was detected. None of the cases showed any features of dysplasia. Our results reveal that ARK is a benign lesion. However, the high prevalence of smokers amongst the patients might suggest that some potentially malignant disorders such as tobacco associated leukoplakia may clinically mimic ARK.

  11. Actinic prurigo of the lip: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Ana MO; Ferrari, Thiago M; Werneck, Juliana T; Junior, Arley Silva; Cunha, Karin S; Dias, Eliane P

    2014-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is a photodermatosis that can affect the skin, conjunctiva and lips. It is caused by an abnormal reaction to sunlight and is more common in high-altitude living people, mainly in indigenous descendants. The diagnosis of actinic prurigo can be challenging, mainly when lip lesions are the only manifestation, which is not a common clinical presentation. The aim of this article is to report two cases of actinic prurigo showing only lip lesions. The patients were Afro-American and were unaware of possible Indian ancestry. Clinical exam, photographs, videoroscopy examination and biopsy were performed, and the diagnosis of actinic prurigo was established. Topical corticosteroid and lip balm with ultraviolet protection were prescribed with excellent results. The relevance of this report is to show that although some patients may not demonstrate the classical clinical presentation of actinic prurigo, the associated clinical and histological exams are determinants for the correct diagnosis and successful treatment of this disease. PMID:25133153

  12. Dermoscopic Clues for Diagnosing Melanomas That Resemble Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Sonia; Aguilera, Paula; Scalvenzi, Massimiliano; Longo, Caterina; Barreiro, Alicia; Broganelli, Paolo; Cavicchini, Stefano; Llambrich, Alex; Zaballos, Pedro; Thomas, Luc; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Zalaudek, Iris

    2017-01-01

    Importance Melanomas that clinically mimic seborrheic keratosis (SK) can delay diagnosis and adequate treatment. However, little is known about the value of dermoscopy in recognizing these difficult-to-diagnose melanomas. Objective To describe the dermoscopic features of SK-like melanomas to understand their clinical morphology. Design, Setting, and Participants This observational retrospective study used 134 clinical and dermoscopic images of histopathologically proven melanomas in 134 patients treated in 9 skin cancer centers in Spain, France, Italy, and Austria. Without knowledge that the definite diagnosis for all the lesions was melanoma, 2 dermoscopy-trained observers evaluated the clinical descriptions and 48 dermoscopic features (including all melanocytic and nonmelanocytic criteria) of all 134 images and classified each dermoscopically as SK or not SK. The total dermoscopy score and the 7-point checklist score were assessed. Images of the lesions and patient data were collected from July 15, 2013, through July 31, 2014. Main Outcomes and Measures Frequencies of specific morphologic patterns of (clinically and dermoscopically) SK-like melanomas, patient demographics, and interobserver agreement of criteria were evaluated. Results Of the 134 cases collected from 72 men and 61 women, all of whom were white and who had a mean (SD) age of 55.6 (17.5) years, 110 (82.1%) revealed dermoscopic features suggestive of melanoma, including pigment network (74 [55.2%]), blue-white veil (72 [53.7%]), globules and dots (68 [50.7%]), pseudopods or streaks (47 [35.1%]), and blue-black sign (43 [32.3%]). The remaining 24 cases (17.9%) were considered likely SKs, even by dermoscopy. Overall, lesions showed a scaly and hyperkeratotic surface (45 [33.6%]), yellowish keratin (42 [31.3%]), comedo-like openings (41 [30.5%]), and milia-like cysts (30 [22.4%]). The entire sample achieved a mean (SD) total dermoscopy score of 4.7 (1.6) and a 7-point checklist score of 4.4 (2

  13. Glutathione depletion triggers actin cytoskeleton changes via actin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zepeta-Flores, Nahum; Valverde, Mahara; Lopez-Saavedra, Alejandro; Rojas, Emilio

    2018-06-04

    The importance of glutathione (GSH) in alternative cellular roles to the canonically proposed, were analyzed in a model unable to synthesize GSH. Gene expression analysis shows that the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton pathway is strongly impacted by the absence of GSH. To test this hypothesis, we evaluate the effect of GSH depletion via buthionine sulfoximine (5 and 12.5 mM) in human neuroblastoma MSN cells. In the present study, 70% of GSH reduction did not induce reactive oxygen species, lipoperoxidation, or cytotoxicity, which enabled us to evaluate the effect of glutathione in the absence of oxidative stress. The cells with decreasing GSH levels acquired morphology changes that depended on the actin cytoskeleton and not on tubulin. We evaluated the expression of three actin-binding proteins: thymosin β4, profilin and gelsolin, showing a reduced expression, both at gene and protein levels at 24 hours of treatment; however, this suppression disappears after 48 hours of treatment. These changes were sufficient to trigger the co-localization of the three proteins towards cytoplasmic projections. Our data confirm that a decrease in GSH in the absence of oxidative stress can transiently inhibit the actin binding proteins and that this stimulus is sufficient to induce changes in cellular morphology via the actin cytoskeleton.

  14. Actin filaments as tension sensors.

    PubMed

    Galkin, Vitold E; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H

    2012-02-07

    The field of mechanobiology has witnessed an explosive growth over the past several years as interest has greatly increased in understanding how mechanical forces are transduced by cells and how cells migrate, adhere and generate traction. Actin, a highly abundant and anomalously conserved protein, plays a large role in forming the dynamic cytoskeleton that is so essential for cell form, motility and mechanosensitivity. While the actin filament (F-actin) has been viewed as dynamic in terms of polymerization and depolymerization, new results suggest that F-actin itself may function as a highly dynamic tension sensor. This property may help explain the unusual conservation of actin's sequence, as well as shed further light on actin's essential role in structures from sarcomeres to stress fibers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Claudins 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 in solar keratosis and squamocellular carcinoma of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Hintsala, Hanna-Riikka; Siponen, Maria; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Karihtala, Peeter; Soini, Ylermi

    2013-01-01

    Claudins are tight junction proteins regulating the paracellular permeability of cell layers. We investigated the expression of claudins 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 in a sample set consisting of a total of 93 cases representing normal skin, actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin. There were several changes found in claudin expression. Claudin 1 appeared to be progressively decreased in solar keratosis and skin squamous cell carcinomas compared to normal skin while expression of claudin 2 was increased. With claudins 3 and 5 occasional immunoreactivity was found in squamous cell carcinomas. Claudins 4 and 7 were variably expressed in skin neoplasia compared to normal skin. According to the results expression of claudins 1 and 2 change in parallel with the severity of the epidermal preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions thus probably influencing the disturbed epithelial polarity characteristic of these lesions. Claudin 1 under- and claudin 2 overexpression also lead to a leakier epithelial barrier function of the skin with a resulting damage to skin epithelial resistance. Other claudins investigated in this study did not show progressive changes even though occasional overexpression of them was found in skin squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24294371

  16. Effective photodynamic therapy of actinic keratoses on the head and face with a novel, self-adhesive 5-aminolaevulinic acid patch.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Axel; Popp, Georg; Stockfleth, Eggert; Meyer, Karl-Gustav; Imberger, Dirk; Mohr, Peter; Itschert, Götz; Kaufmann, Roland; Neuber, Karsten; Frambach, Yvonne; Gollnick, Harald; Brunnert, Marcus; Stocker, Marcus; Ortland, Christoph; Karrer, Sigrid

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is increasingly used for the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK). To investigate both the efficacy of different application times and the safety of a novel patch (PD P 506 A) containing aminolaevulinic acid in the PDT of mild to moderate AK. Applications of PD P 506 A for 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h were compared in a multicentre, randomized, blinded-observer, parallel-group study. After patch removal, study lesions were illuminated with red light (lambda(em) approximately 630 nm; 37 J/cm(2)). Study lesions were not pretreated (e.g. by curettage) prior to PDT. Efficacy was evaluated 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. Safety and tolerability were determined through laboratory analyses and documentation of both local reactions and adverse events. A total of 149 patients were initially enrolled. Of these, 140 patients (520 lesions) completed the study according to protocol. Eight weeks after treatment, 86% of the AK lesions (74% of the patients) treated with 4-h patch application showed complete clearance. The complete clearance rates of lesions (patients) for the 2-, 1- and 0.5-h treatment arms were 73% (47%), 72% (50%) and 51% (24%), respectively. Statistically, the 4-h application was identified as the 'best treatment'. Patients with clearance seemed to experience local reactions to a greater extent than patients without clearance. Local reactions to study treatments did not exceed the expected range. The results of this first clinical efficacy study suggest excellent therapeutic outcomes with a single PD P 506 A PDT with a 4-h application.

  17. Low-dose 5-fluorouracil in combination with salicylic acid for the treatment of actinic keratoses on the hands and/or forearms - results of a non-interventional study.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, U; Hadshiew, I; Melzer, A; Prechtl, A

    2017-03-01

    As an in situ carcinoma, actinic keratoses should be treated early. Previous studies on the efficacy of a low-dose 0.5% 5-fluorouracil solution in combination with 10% salicylic acid (low-dose 5-FU/SA) are mostly related to lesions appearing on the head and face. In contrast, actinic keratoses (AK) lesions of the upper extremities are considered to be difficult to treat. The efficacy of low-dose 5-FU/SA in the treatment of actinic keratoses on the hands and/or forearms was studied for the first time in this non-interventional study (NIS) under practical conditions in a large patient population. In addition to the clinical course during therapy and a follow-up period, the length of application and adherence were documented. As part of this NIS, 649 patients with AK were treated at 207 centres with low-dose 5-FU/SA. The data of the study were recorded at baseline, optionally during an intermediate examination, at the end of therapy and during a final assessment. The average number of AK lesions decreased during the entire observation period by 92%. Side-effects were documented only rarely in the form of local skin reactions (2%). The attending physicians assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of the therapy as being predominantly very good or good (in each case ≥90%). AK lesions on the hands and/or forearms were effectively treated with low-dose 5-FU/SA under routine conditions in dermatological practice and the treatment was well tolerated. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Nucleation of actin polymerization by gelsolin.

    PubMed

    Ditsch, A; Wegner, A

    1994-08-15

    The time-course of assembly of actin with gelsolin was measured by the fluorescence increase of a fluorescent label covalently linked to actin. The actin concentrations ranged from values far below the critical concentration to values above the critical concentration of the pointed ends of actin filaments. If the concentration of actin was in the range of the critical monomer concentration (0.64 microM), the time-course of the concentration of actin assembled with gelsolin revealed a sigmoidal shape. At higher actin concentrations the time-course of association of actin with gelsolin approximated an exponential curve. The measured time-courses of assembly were quantitatively interpreted by kinetic rate equations. A poor fit was obtained if two actin molecules were assumed to bind to gelsolin to form a 1:2 gelsolin-actin complex and subsequently further actin molecules were assumed to polymerize onto the 1:2 gelsolin-actin complex toward the pointed end. A considerably better agreement between calculated and measured time-courses was achieved if additional creation of actin filaments by fast fragmentation of newly formed actin filaments by not yet consumed gelsolin was assumed to occur. This suggests that both polymerization of actin onto gelsolin and fragmentation of actin filaments contribute to formation of new actin filaments by gelsolin. Furthermore it could be demonstrated that below the critical monomer concentration appreciable amounts of actin are incorporated into gelsolin-actin oligomers.

  19. Merkel cell carcinoma with seborrheic keratosis: A unique association.

    PubMed

    Anand, Murthy S; Krishnamurthy, Shantha; Ravindranath, Suvarna; Ranganathan, Jyothi

    2018-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, clinically aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin; MCC is 40 times less common as compared to melanoma. The most frequently reported sites have been the head and neck, extremities, and trunk. Potential mimics include malignant melanoma, lymphoma, or metastatic small cell (neuroendocrine) carcinomas. Histopathology of MCC resembles small cell carcinoma both morphologically and on IHC. The possible cell of origin was proposed as the Merkel cell, which functions as a mechanoreceptor. It has a high chance of local recurrence, regional and distant spread. In recent times, Merkel cell polyomavirus has been implicated as the causative agent for this tumor. The same agent has a reported etiologic association with other skin lesions, including seborrheic keratosis.

  20. Actinic Prurigo in Scandinavian Adolescent Successfully Treated with Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Sitek, Jan C.

    2017-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A. PMID:29142659

  1. Actinic Prurigo in Scandinavian Adolescent Successfully Treated with Cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Jan C

    2017-03-13

    Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A.

  2. Keratosis pilaris and prevalence of acne vulgaris: a cross-sectional study*

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; de Lima, Brunno Zeni; de Souza, Monique Carolina Meira do Rosário; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acne vulgaris has an important genetic predisposition, as well as keratosis pilaris. Clinical observations suggest that patients with keratosis pilaris have less frequent or less severe acne breakouts; however, we found no studies on this regard OBJECTIVE To determine if the presence of keratosis pilaris is associated with lower prevalence and severity of acne. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted with dermatology outpatients aged between 14 and 35 years. We evaluated history and clinical grade of acne, demographic variables, history of atopy, smoking, and use of hormonal contraceptives. Two groups were defined by the presence or absence of moderate to severe keratosis pilaris on the arms and were compared by bivariate analysis and by conditional multiple logistic regression. RESULTS We included 158 patients (66% women), with a median age of 23±11 years. Twenty-six percent of them had keratosis pilaris, which was associated with a history of atopy (odds ratio [OR]=2.80 [1.36 to 5.75]; p<0.01). Acne was present in 66% of subjects, and was related to family history of acne (OR=5.75 [2.47 to 13.37]; p<0.01). In bivariate and multivariate analysis, the group with keratosis pilaris had a less frequent history of acne (OR=0.32 [0.14 to 0.70]; p<0.01). CONCLUSION The presence of moderate to severe keratosis pilaris on the arms was associated with lower prevalence of acne vulgaris and lower severity of facial lesions in adolescents and young adults. PMID:24626653

  3. Clinical and histopathologic study of benign lichenoid keratosis on the face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Su; Park, Eun Joo; Kwon, In Ho; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kim, Kwang Joong

    2013-10-01

    Benign lichenoid keratosis is a cutaneous entity that consists of a nonpruritic papule or slightly indurated plaque that is histologically characterized by a band-like inflammatory infiltrate with interface involvement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and histopathologic features of benign lichenoid keratosis localized on the face. Fourteen benign lichenoid keratosis patients diagnosed clinically and histopathologically in our clinic during the 10-year period from 2002 to 2012 were studied. Thirteen female and 1 male patients were included. The mean age at diagnosis was 46.5 years. The color of most of the lesions was brown (10 cases, 71%). The cheek was the most commonly involved area (10 cases, 71%). All of the lesions were single. There were 9 (64%) flat lesion cases and 5 (36%) raised lesion cases. Most patients denied having any symptoms; 3 had mild pruritus. The histopathological findings indicated that all the cases exhibited lichenoid inflammatory infiltrate obscuring the dermal-epidermal junction and vacuolar alteration of basal cell layer. The lesions showed focal parakeratosis (79%), melanophages (79%), hyperkeratosis (71%), and necrotic keratinocytes (71%). Solar elastosis (50%) and acanthosis (43%) were also seen frequently. Diagnosis of benign lichenoid keratosis should be made by a combination of clinical manifestations and histopathological findings. In particular, benign lichenoid keratosis should be considered if a middle-aged patient presents a solitary asymptomatic brown lesion on the face. We think benign lichenoid keratosis may be a specific disorder rather than the inflammatory stage of regressing solar lentigines, large cell acanthoma or reticulated seborrheic keratosis.

  4. Keratosis pilaris and prevalence of acne vulgaris: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; Lima, Brunno Zeni de; Souza, Monique Carolina Meira do Rosário de; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris has an important genetic predisposition, as well as keratosis pilaris. Clinical observations suggest that patients with keratosis pilaris have less frequent or less severe acne breakouts; however, we found no studies on this regard To determine if the presence of keratosis pilaris is associated with lower prevalence and severity of acne. A cross-sectional study was conducted with dermatology outpatients aged between 14 and 35 years. We evaluated history and clinical grade of acne, demographic variables, history of atopy, smoking, and use of hormonal contraceptives. Two groups were defined by the presence or absence of moderate to severe keratosis pilaris on the arms and were compared by bivariate analysis and by conditional multiple logistic regression. We included 158 patients (66% women), with a median age of 23 ± 11 years. Twenty-six percent of them had keratosis pilaris, which was associated with a history of atopy (odds ratio [OR]=2.80 [1.36 to 5.75]; p<0.01). Acne was present in 66% of subjects, and was related to family history of acne (OR=5.75 [2.47 to 13.37]; p<0.01). In bivariate and multivariate analysis, the group with keratosis pilaris had a less frequent history of acne (OR=0.32 [0.14 to 0.70]; p<0.01). The presence of moderate to severe keratosis pilaris on the arms was associated with lower prevalence of acne vulgaris and lower severity of facial lesions in adolescents and young adults.

  5. Role of actin in auxin transport and transduction of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Basu, S.; Brady, S.; Muday, G.

    Transport of the plant hormone auxin is polar and the direction of the hormone movement appears to be controlled by asymmetric distribution of auxin transport protein complexes. Changes in the direction of auxin transport are believed to drive asymmetric growth in response to changes in the gravity vector. To test the possibility that asymmetric distribution of the auxin transport protein complex is mediated by attachment to the actin cytoskeleton, a variety of experimental approaches have been used. The most direct demonstration of the role of the actin cytoskeleton in localization of the protein complex is the ability of one protein in this complex to bind to affinity columns containing actin filaments. Additionally, treatments of plant tissues with drugs that fragment the actin c toskeleton reducey polar transport. In order to explore this actin interaction and the affect of gravity on auxin transport and developmental polarity, embryos of the brown alga, Fucus have been examined. Fucus zygotes are initially symmetrical, but develop asymmetry in response to environmental gradients, with light gradients being the best- characterized signal. Gravity will polarize these embryos and gravity-induced polarity is randomized by clinorotation. Auxin transport also appears necessary for environmental controls of polarity, since auxin efflux inhibitors perturb both photo- and gravity-polarization at a very discrete temporal window within six hours after fertilization. The actin cytoskeleton has previously been shown to reorganize after fertilization of Fucus embryos leading to formation of an actin patch at the site of polar outgrowth. These actin patches still form in Fucus embryos treated with auxin efflux inhibitors, yet the position of these patches is randomized. Together, these results suggest that there are connections between the actin cytoskeleton, auxin transport, and gravity oriented growth and development. (Supported by NASA Grant: NAG2-1203)

  6. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  7. Maleimidobenzoyl-G-actin: Structural properties and interaction with skeletal myosin subfragment-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bettache, N.; Bertrand, R.; Kassab, R.

    1990-09-25

    The authors have investigated various structural and interaction properties of maleimidobenzoyl-G-actin (MBS-actin), a new, internally cross-linked G-actin derivative that does not exhibit, at moderate protein concentration, the salt-and myosin subfragment 1 (S-1)--induced polymerizations of G-actin and reacts reversibly and covalently in solution with S-1 at or near the F-actin binding region of the heavy chain. The far-ultraviolet CD spectrum and {alpha}-helix content of the MBS-actin were identical with those displayed by native G-actin. {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} measurements showed the same content of tightly bound Ca{sup 2+} in MBS-actin as in G-actin and the EDTA treatment of the modified protein promotedmore » the same red shift of the intrinsic fluorescence spectrum as observed with native G-actin. Incubation of concentrated MBS-actin solutions with 100 mM KCl+5 mM MgCl{sub 2} led to the polymerization of the actin derivative when the critical monomer concentration reached 1.6mg/mL, at 25{degree}C, pH 8.0. The MBS-F-actin formed activated the Mg{sup 2+}-ATPase of S-1 to the same extent as native F-actin. The MBS-G-actin exhibited a DNase I inhibitor activity very close to that found with native G-actin and was to be at all affected by its specific covalent conjugation to S-1. This finding led them to isolate, for the first time, by gel filtration, a ternary complex comprising DNase I tightly bound to MBS-actin cross-linked to the S-1 heavy chain, demonstrating that S-1 and DNase I bind at distinct sites on G-actin. Collectively, the data illustrate further the nativeness of the MBS-G-actin and its potential use in solution studies of the actin-myosin head interactions.« less

  8. External auditory canal cholesteatoma and keratosis obturans: the role of imaging in preventing facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    McCoul, Edward D; Hanson, Matthew B

    2011-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to compare the clinical characteristics of external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC) with those of a similar entity, keratosis obturans (KO). We also sought to identify those aspects of each disease that may lead to complications. We identified 6 patients in each group. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of bony erosion and the proximity of disease to vital structures. All 6 patients in the EACC group had their diagnosis confirmed by computed tomography (CT), which demonstrated widening of the bony external auditory canal; 4 of these patients had critical erosion of bone adjacent to the facial nerve. Of the 6 patients with KO, only 2 had undergone CT, and neither exhibited any significant bony erosion or expansion; 1 of them developed osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and adjacent temporomandibular joint. Another patient manifested KO as part of a dermatophytid reaction. The essential component of treatment in all cases of EACC was microscopic debridement of the ear canal. We conclude that EACC may produce significant erosion of bone with exposure of vital structures, including the facial nerve. Because of the clinical similarity of EACC to KO, misdiagnosis is possible. Temporal bone imaging should be obtained prior to attempts at debridement of suspected EACC. Increased awareness of these uncommon conditions is warranted to prompt appropriate investigation and prevent iatrogenic complications such as facial nerve injury.

  9. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  10. Formaldehyde fixation is detrimental to actin cables in glucose-depleted S. cerevisiae cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasicova, Pavla; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Haskova, Danusa; Novakova, Lenka; Malcova, Ivana; Breitenbach, Michael; Hasek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments form cortical patches and emanating cables in fermenting cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This pattern has been shown to be depolarized in glucose-depleted cells after formaldehyde fixation and staining with rhodamine-tagged phalloidin. Loss of actin cables in mother cells was remarkable. Here we extend our knowledge on actin in live glucose-depleted cells co-expressing the marker of actin patches (Abp1-RFP) with the marker of actin cables (Abp140-GFP). Glucose depletion resulted in appearance of actin patches also in mother cells. However, even after 80 min of glucose deprivation these cells showed a clear network of actin cables labeled with Abp140-GFP in contrast to previously published data. In live cells with a mitochondrial dysfunction (rho0 cells), glucose depletion resulted in almost immediate appearance of Abp140-GFP foci partially overlapping with Abp1-RFP patches in mother cells. Residual actin cables were clustered in patch-associated bundles. A similar overlapping “patchy” pattern of both actin markers was observed upon treatment of glucose-deprived rho+ cells with FCCP (the inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation) and upon treatment with formaldehyde. While the formaldehyde-targeted process stays unknown, our results indicate that published data on yeast actin cytoskeleton obtained from glucose-depleted cells after fixation should be considered with caution. PMID:28357356

  11. Nagashima-type palmoplantar keratosis in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Guolong; Ni, Cheng; Cheng, Ruhong; Liang, Jianying; Li, Ming; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Nagashima-type palmoplantar keratosis (NPPK) is an autosomal recessive form of palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK), which is caused by mutations in the SERPINB7 gene. NPPK has only been reported in Japanese and Chinese populations. The present study was conducted on 12 unrelated Chinese patients who were clinically predicted to suffer from NPPK. Mutation screening was performed by direct sequencing of the entire coding regions of SERPINB7, SLURP1, AQP5, CSTA, KRT1 and KRT9 genes. Direct sequencing of SERPINB7 revealed five homozygous founder mutations (c.796C>T) and four compound heterozygous mutations in nine patients, including one novel mutation (c.122_127delTGGTCC). Nine out of the 12 patients were diagnosed with NPPK due to SERPINB7 pathogenic mutations, and the results expanded the known mutation spectrum of NPPK. Taking the other seven reported Chinese patients, who had been definitively diagnosed with NPPK by genetic testing, into account, the present study further demonstrated that NPPK is a common entity in Mainland China, and c.796C>T is the most prevalent mutation and exerts a founder effect. Furthermore, the NPPK cases described in the current study presented a consistently mild phenotype, as compared with the degrees of phenotypic variability associated with other types of relatively severe PPK, including Mal de Meleda and Olmsted syndrome. PMID:27666198

  12. Dermoscopy of inverted follicular keratosis: study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Llambrich, A; Zaballos, P; Taberner, R; Terrasa, F; Bañuls, J; Pizarro, A; Malvehy, J; Puig, S

    2016-07-01

    Inverted follicular keratosis (IFK) is an uncommon benign tumour of the follicular infundibulum, which is often misdiagnosed clinically as other keratinizing tumours, and commonly diagnosed correctly by histopathology. There are few reports about the dermoscopic findings of this lesion. To evaluate the dermoscopic features of IFK. The dermoscopic structures and patterns in digital dermoscopic images of 12 histopathologically confirmed cases of IFK collected from 5 hospitals in Spain were evaluated. A keratoacanthoma (KA)-like pattern composed of central keratin surrounded by hairpin vessels in a radial arrangement was the most common pattern in IFK (58.3%). The second most common pattern was composed of a yellowish-white amorphous central area surrounded by vascular structures in a radial arrangement (33.3%). The remaining case showed a pattern composed of a yellowish-white amorphous central area with milky red globules. Vascular structures were present in all cases, with a monomorphic pattern in seven cases and a polymorphic pattern in five, mainly with radial arrangement. Arborizing vessels, linear irregular vessels, corkscrew vessels and milky red globules were present in some cases. We describe the two main patterns of IFK. Lesions with a KA-like pattern are clinically and dermoscopically undistinguishable from KA and squamous cell carcinoma. Cases with a polymorphic vascular pattern could be confused with malignant tumours, including basal cell carcinoma and amelanotic melanoma. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Tobacco Arp3 is localized to actin-nucleating sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Jan; Fišerová, Jindřiška; Fischer, Lukáš; Nick, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The polarity of actin is a central determinant of intracellular transport in plant cells. To visualize actin polarity in living plant cells, the tobacco homologue of the actin-related protein 3 (ARP3) was cloned and a fusion with the red fluorescent protein (RFP) was generated. Upon transient expression of these fusions in the tobacco cell line BY-2 (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2), punctate structures were observed near the nuclear envelope and in the cortical plasma. These dots could be shown to decorate actin filaments by expressing RFP–ARP3 in a marker line, where actin was tagged by GFP (green fluorescent protein)–FABD (fimbrin actin-binding domain 2). When actin filaments were disrupted by latrunculin B or by prolonged cold treatment, and subsequently allowed to recover, the actin filaments reformed from the RFP–ARP3 structures, that therefore represented actin nucleation sites. The intracellular distribution of these sites was followed during the formation of pluricellular files, and it was observed that the density of RFP–ARP3 increased in the apex of the polarized, terminal cells of a file, whereas it was equally distributed in the central cells of a file. These findings are interpreted in terms of position-dependent differences of actin organization. PMID:19129161

  14. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Brian D.; Shams, Hengameh; Horst, Travis A.; Basu, Saurav; Rape, Andrew D.; Wang, Yu-Li; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Islam, Mohammad F.; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2012-01-01

    With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics. PMID:24955540

  15. Overexpression of Amyloid Precursor Protein Promotes the Onset of Seborrhoeic Keratosis and is Related to Skin Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanying; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Leiwei; Zhou, Wenming; Liu, Zhi; Li, Shijun; Lu, Hongguang

    2018-02-28

    Seborrhoeic keratosis is an age-related skin disease. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age-related Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the expression characteristics of APP in seborrhoeic keratosis tissues (n = 50), and explore whether the production of APP is related to the onset of seborrhoeic keratosis and skin ageing, including ultraviolet (UV)-induced ageing, as observed in normal skin (n = 79). The results of immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR showed that APP and its downstream products (i.e. amyloid-β42) were more highly expressed in seborrhoeic keratosis than in paired adjacent normal skin tissues. In contrast, the expression of its key secretase (i.e. β-secretase1) was generally low. Furthermore, APP expression was higher in UV-exposed than non-exposed skin sites, and expression in the older age group (61-85 years) was greater than that in the younger age group (41-60 years) in seborrhoeic keratosis tissues (p<0.05). APP expression correlated positively with age in epidermis (p<0.05), but not in dermis. These findings suggest that overexpression of APP may promote the onset of seborrhoeic keratosis and is a marker of skin ageing and UV damage. Further research will elucidate whether therapeutic mitigation of increased levels of APP in the skin might delay the onset of seborrhoeic keratosis and skin ageing.

  16. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  17. Nuclear positioning by actin cables and perinuclear actin

    PubMed Central

    Huelsmann, Sven; Brown, Nicholas H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear positioning is an important process during development and homeostasis. Depending on the affected tissue, mislocalized nuclei can alter cellular processes such as polarization, differentiation, or migration and lead ultimately to diseases. Many cells actively control the position of their nucleus using their cytoskeleton and motor proteins. We have recently shown that during Drosophila oogenesis, nurse cells employ cytoplasmic actin cables in association with perinuclear actin to position their nucleus. Here, we briefly summarize our work and discuss why nuclear positioning in nurse cells is specialized but the molecular mechanisms are likely to be more generally used. PMID:24905988

  18. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  19. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, S; Brady, S R; Kovar, D R; Staiger, C J; Clark, G B; Roux, S J; Muday, G K

    2000-10-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  20. Actin Engine in Immunological Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Piragyte, Indre

    2012-01-01

    T cell activation and function require physical contact with antigen presenting cells at a specialized junctional structure known as the immunological synapse. Once formed, the immunological synapse leads to sustained T cell receptor-mediated signalling and stabilized adhesion. High resolution microscopy indeed had a great impact in understanding the function and dynamic structure of immunological synapse. Trends of recent research are now moving towards understanding the mechanical part of immune system, expanding our knowledge in mechanosensitivity, force generation, and biophysics of cell-cell interaction. Actin cytoskeleton plays inevitable role in adaptive immune system, allowing it to bear dynamic and precise characteristics at the same time. The regulation of mechanical engine seems very complicated and overlapping, but it enables cells to be very sensitive to external signals such as surface rigidity. In this review, we focus on actin regulators and how immune cells regulate dynamic actin rearrangement process to drive the formation of immunological synapse. PMID:22916042

  1. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  2. Profilin-Dependent Nucleation and Assembly of Actin Filaments Controls Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingyan; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments in plant cells are incredibly dynamic; they undergo incessant remodeling and assembly or disassembly within seconds. These dynamic events are choreographed by a plethora of actin-binding proteins, but the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we dissect the contribution of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PROFILIN1 (PRF1), a conserved actin monomer-binding protein, to actin organization and single filament dynamics during axial cell expansion of living epidermal cells. We found that reduced PRF1 levels enhanced cell and organ growth. Surprisingly, we observed that the overall frequency of nucleation events in prf1 mutants was dramatically decreased and that a subpopulation of actin filaments that assemble at high rates was reduced. To test whether profilin cooperates with plant formin proteins to execute actin nucleation and rapid filament elongation in cells, we used a pharmacological approach. Here, we used Small Molecule Inhibitor of Formin FH2 (SMIFH2), after validating its mode of action on a plant formin in vitro, and observed a reduced nucleation frequency of actin filaments in live cells. Treatment of wild-type epidermal cells with SMIFH2 mimicked the phenotype of prf1 mutants, and the nucleation frequency in prf1-2 mutant was completely insensitive to these treatments. Our data provide compelling evidence that PRF1 coordinates the stochastic dynamic properties of actin filaments by modulating formin-mediated actin nucleation and assembly during plant cell expansion. PMID:26574597

  3. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Groen, Christopher M.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5–9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved. PMID:27535426

  4. [Keratosis palmoplantaris maculosa seu papulosa (Davies-Colley) simulating multiple cornua cutanea].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, D; Stücker, M; Hoffmann, K; Bacharach-Buhles, M; Altmeyer, P

    1997-08-01

    Patient with extensive keratosis palmoplantaris maculosa seu papulosa (Davies-Colley) presented with multiple cutaneous horns. The clinical picture, the histology, the electro microscopic examination, the negative tumor screening and the viral classification in the tissue allowed the differentiation from other palmoplantar keratoses. The patient was treated successfully using a combination of acitretin with physical and chemical measures.

  5. Enhanced gravitropism of roots with a disrupted cap actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Guichuan; Mohamalawari, Deepti R.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2003-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be a major player in plant gravitropism. However, understanding the role of actin in this process is far from complete. To address this problem, we conducted an analysis of the effect of Latrunculin B (Lat B), a potent actin-disrupting drug, on root gravitropism using various parameters that included detailed curvature kinetics, estimation of gravitropic sensitivity, and monitoring of curvature development after extended clinorotation. Lat B treatment resulted in a promotion of root curvature after a 90 degrees reorientation in three plant species tested. More significantly, the sensitivity of maize (Zea mays) roots to gravity was enhanced after actin disruption, as determined from a comparison of presentation time of Lat B-treated versus untreated roots. A short 10-min gravistimulus followed by extended rotation on a 1-rpm clinostat resulted in extensive gravitropic responses, manifested as curvature that often exceeded 90 degrees. Application of Lat B to the cap or elongation zone of maize roots resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which was confined to the area of localized Lat B application. Only roots with Lat B applied to the cap displayed the strong curvature responses after extended clinorotation. Our study demonstrates that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton in the cap leads to the persistence of a signal established by a previous gravistimulus. Therefore, actin could function in root gravitropism by providing a mechanism to regulate the proliferation of a gravitropic signal originating from the cap to allow the root to attain its correct orientation or set point angle.

  6. Steady-state nuclear actin levels are determined by export competent actin pool.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Huet, Guillaume; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2013-10-01

    A number of studies in the last decade have irrevocably promoted actin into a fully fledged member of the nuclear compartment, where it, among other crucial tasks, facilitates transcription and chromatin remodeling. Changes in nuclear actin levels have been linked to different cellular processes: decreased nuclear actin to quiescence and increased nuclear actin to differentiation. Importin 9 and exportin 6 transport factors are responsible for the continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of actin, but the mechanisms, which result in modulated actin levels, have not been characterized. We find that in cells growing under normal growth conditions, the levels of nuclear actin vary considerably from cell to cell. To understand the basis for this, we have extensively quantified several cellular parameters while at the same time recording the import and export rates of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged actin. Surprisingly, our dataset shows that the ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity, but not nuclear shape, size, cytoplasm size, or their ratio, correlates negatively with both import and export rate of actin. This suggests that high-nuclear actin content is maintained by both diminished import and export. The high nuclear actin containing cells still show high mobility of actin, but it is not export competent, suggesting increased binding of actin to nuclear complexes. Creation of such export incompetent actin pool would ensure enough actin is retained in the nucleus and make it available for the various nuclear functions described for actin. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Case for diagnosis. Actinic prurigo.

    PubMed

    Daldon, Patricia Erica Christofoletti; Pascini, Mirella; Correa, Mariane

    2010-01-01

    A 13-year-old black boy had pruritic papular and nodular lesions on his forearms associated to edema of the lower lip, photophobia, conjunctivitis and pterygium. Skin biopsy of the lower lip revealed acanthosis, spongiosis with dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration composed by lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils consistent with actinic prurigo. Lesions improved considerably with the use of thalidomide 100mg/ day.

  8. Glycosylated and nonglycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor differently modifies actin polymerization in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zucca, A; Brizzi, S; Riccioni, R; Azzarà, A; Ghimenti, M; Carulli, G

    2006-01-01

    Several neutrophil functions can be modified by rhG-CSF administration. Neutrophil morphology changes in the course of treatment with Filgrastim (nonglycosylated rhG-CSF), along with impairment of chemotaxis. Both morphology and chemotaxis are not affected by treatment with Lenograstim (glycosylated rhG-CSF). Thus, we evaluated actin polymerization in neutrophils induced by treatment with the two forms of rhG-CSF. In fact, actin polymerization is crucial for neutrophil motility. We evaluated twelve healthy subjects undergoing peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) mobilization for allogeneic transplantation to HLA-identical siblings. Neutrophils were isolated by peripheral venous blood before and after administration of either Filgrastim (six PBSC donors) or Lenograstim (six PBSC donors). Actin polymerization was investigated by a flow cytometric assay, using FITC-phalloidin as a specific probe for F-actin, and two parameters were measured: spontaneous actin polymerization in resting neutrophils; fMLP-stimulated actin polymerization. Results were expressed as relative F-actin content. Fifteen blood donors were studied as a control group. Filgrastim administration induced an increased relative F-actin content in resting neutrophils; however, no further actin polymerization was observed after fMLP stimulation. Neutrophils from subjects treated with Lenograstim showed a normal behaviour in terms of both spontaneous and stimulated actin polymerization. Glycosylated and nonglycosylated rhG-CSF differently affect actin polymerization in newly generated neutrophils. Such effects may explain some previous findings concerning both morphology and chemotactic properties and may be due to different effects of the two forms of rhG-CSF on proteins involved in neutrophil motility regulation.

  9. Proteomic profiling reveals candidate markers for arsenic-induced skin keratosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiling; Hu, Qin; Tian, Jijing; Yan, Li; Jing, Chuanyong; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Bao, Wenjun; Rice, Robert H; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-11-01

    Proteomics technology is an attractive biomarker candidate discovery tool that can be applied to study large sets of biological molecules. To identify novel biomarkers and molecular targets in arsenic-induced skin lesions, we have determined the protein profile of arsenic-affected human epidermal stratum corneum by shotgun proteomics. Samples of palm and foot sole from healthy subjects were analyzed, demonstrating similar protein patterns in palm and sole. Samples were collected from the palms of subjects with arsenic keratosis (lesional and adjacent non-lesional samples) and arsenic-exposed subjects without lesions (normal). Samples from non-exposed healthy individuals served as controls. We found that three proteins in arsenic-exposed lesional epidermis were consistently distinguishably expressed from the unaffected epidermis. One of these proteins, the cadherin-like transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein 1 (DSG1) was suppressed. Down-regulation of DSG1 may lead to reduced cell-cell adhesion, resulting in abnormal epidermal differentiation. The expression of keratin 6c (KRT6C) and fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5) were significantly increased. FABP5 is an intracellular lipid chaperone that plays an essential role in fatty acid metabolism in human skin. This raises a possibility that overexpression of FABP5 may affect the proliferation or differentiation of keratinocytes by altering lipid metabolism. KRT6C is a constituent of the cytoskeleton that maintains epidermal integrity and cohesion. Abnormal expression of KRT6C may affect its structural role in the epidermis. Our findings suggest an important approach for future studies of arsenic-mediated toxicity and skin cancer, where certain proteins may represent useful biomarkers of early diagnoses in high-risk populations and hopefully new treatment targets. Further studies are required to understand the biological role of these markers in skin pathogenesis from arsenic exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  10. F-actin distribution and function during sexual development in Eimeria maxima.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To determine the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in macrogametocyte growth and oocyst wall formation, freshly purified macrogametocytes and oocysts were stained with Oregon Green 514 conjugated phalloidin to visualize F-actin microfilaments, while Evans blue staining was used to detect type 1 wall forming bodies (WFB1s) and the outer oocyst wall. The double-labelled parasites were then analysed at various stages of sexual development using three-dimensional confocal microscopy. The results showed F-actin filaments were distributed throughout the entire cytoplasm of mature Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes forming a web-like meshwork of actin filaments linking the type 1 WFBs together into structures resembling 'beads on a string'. At the early stages of oocyst wall formation, F-actin localization changed in alignment with the egg-shaped morphology of the forming oocysts with F-actin microfilaments making direct contact with the WFB1s. In tissue oocysts, the labelled actin cytoskeleton was situated underneath the forming outer layer of the oocyst wall. Treatment of macrogametocytes in vitro with the actin depolymerizing agents, Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin, led to a reduction in the numbers of mature WFB1s in the cytoplasm of the developing macrogametocytes, indicating that the actin plays an important role in WFB1 transport and oocyst wall formation in E. maxima.

  11. TWISTED DWARF1 Mediates the Action of Auxin Transport Inhibitors on Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Aurelien; Zwiewka, Marta; Sovero, Valpuri; Ge, Pei; Aryal, Bibek; Hao, Pengchao; Linnert, Miriam; Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias; Michel, Max; Weiergräber, Oliver H.; Pollmann, Stephan; Azzarello, Elisa; Fukao, Yoichiro; Hoffmann, Céline; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and architecture is regulated by the polar distribution of the hormone auxin. Polarity and flexibility of this process is provided by constant cycling of auxin transporter vesicles along actin filaments, coordinated by a positive auxin-actin feedback loop. Both polar auxin transport and vesicle cycling are inhibited by synthetic auxin transport inhibitors, such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), counteracting the effect of auxin; however, underlying targets and mechanisms are unclear. Using NMR, we map the NPA binding surface on the Arabidopsis thaliana ABCB chaperone TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1). We identify ACTIN7 as a relevant, although likely indirect, TWD1 interactor, and show TWD1-dependent regulation of actin filament organization and dynamics and that TWD1 is required for NPA-mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The TWD1-ACTIN7 axis controls plasma membrane presence of efflux transporters, and as a consequence act7 and twd1 share developmental and physiological phenotypes indicative of defects in auxin transport. These can be phenocopied by NPA treatment or by chemical actin (de)stabilization. We provide evidence that TWD1 determines downstream locations of auxin efflux transporters by adjusting actin filament debundling and dynamizing processes and mediating NPA action on the latter. This function appears to be evolutionary conserved since TWD1 expression in budding yeast alters actin polarization and cell polarity and provides NPA sensitivity. PMID:27053424

  12. Actin Interacting Protein1 and Actin Depolymerizing Factor Drive Rapid Actin Dynamics in Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Robert C.; Pattavina, Kelli A.; Tüzel, Erkan; Vidali, Luis; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    The remodeling of actin networks is required for a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, several actin binding proteins have been implicated in remodeling cortical actin filaments (F-actin). However, the extent to which these proteins support F-actin dynamics in planta has not been tested. Using reverse genetics, complementation analyses, and cell biological approaches, we assessed the in vivo function of two actin turnover proteins: actin interacting protein1 (AIP1) and actin depolymerizing factor (ADF). We report that AIP1 is a single-copy gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens. AIP1 knockout plants are viable but have reduced expansion of tip-growing cells. AIP1 is diffusely cytosolic and functions in a common genetic pathway with ADF to promote tip growth. Specifically, ADF can partially compensate for loss of AIP1, and AIP1 requires ADF for function. Consistent with a role in actin remodeling, AIP1 knockout lines accumulate F-actin bundles, have fewer dynamic ends, and have reduced severing frequency. Importantly, we demonstrate that AIP1 promotes and ADF is essential for cortical F-actin dynamics. PMID:22003077

  13. Cryotherapy - skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy; Actinic keratosis - cryotherapy; Solar keratosis - cryotherapy ... warts Destroy precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses or solar keratoses) In rare cases, cryotherapy is used to ...

  14. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  15. Actin Filament Polymerization Regulates Gliding Motility by Apicomplexan ParasitesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, D.M.; Håkansson, S.; Hu, K.; Roos, D.; Sibley, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Host cell entry by Toxoplasma gondii depends critically on actin filaments in the parasite, yet paradoxically, its actin is almost exclusively monomeric. In contrast to the absence of stable filaments in conventional samples, rapid-freeze electron microscopy revealed that actin filaments were formed beneath the plasma membrane of gliding parasites. To investigate the role of actin filaments in motility, we treated parasites with the filament-stabilizing drug jasplakinolide (JAS) and monitored the distribution of actin in live and fixed cells using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-actin. JAS treatment caused YFP-actin to redistribute to the apical and posterior ends, where filaments formed a spiral pattern subtending the plasma membrane. Although previous studies have suggested that JAS induces rigor, videomicroscopy demonstrated that JAS treatment increased the rate of parasite gliding by approximately threefold, indicating that filaments are rate limiting for motility. However, JAS also frequently reversed the normal direction of motility, disrupting forward migration and cell entry. Consistent with this alteration, subcortical filaments in JAS-treated parasites occurred in tangled plaques as opposed to the straight, roughly parallel orientation observed in control cells. These studies reveal that precisely controlled polymerization of actin filaments imparts the correct timing, duration, and directionality of gliding motility in the Apicomplexa. PMID:12589042

  16. Ingenol Mebutate for Recalcitrant Chronic Actinic Cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Evangelia; Masouyé, Isabelle; Mühlstädt, Michael; Laffitte, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a healthy 76-year-old man with a whitish, hyperkeratotic lesion of the lower lip diagnosed as actinic cheilitis (AC) previously treated with classic red light photodynamic therapy 5 years ago. Initial treatment with 5% imiquimod cream - also with intensified application - failed. After 2 cycles thrice daily, consecutive applications of 150 μg/g ingenol mebutate gel at 3 weeks' interval, the lesions cleared completely. Surprisingly, no pustular or crusting reaction or other side effect occurred contrary to expectation. Remission was stable for 10 months, when recurrence occurred. Ingenol mebutate proved to be a feasible and safe treatment in this otherwise refractory case of AC. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Actin Bodies in Yeast Quiescent Cells: An Immediately Available Actin Reserve?

    PubMed Central

    Pinson, Benoît; Salin, Bénédicte; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells spend most of their life in a quiescent state, poised to respond to specific signals to proliferate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into and exit from quiescence are dependent only on the availability of nutrients in the environment. The transition from quiescence to proliferation requires not only drastic metabolic changes but also a complete remodeling of various cellular structures. Here, we describe an actin cytoskeleton organization specific of the yeast quiescent state. When cells cease to divide, actin is reorganized into structures that we named “actin bodies.” We show that actin bodies contain F-actin and several actin-binding proteins such as fimbrin and capping protein. Furthermore, by contrast to actin patches or cables, actin bodies are mostly immobile, and we could not detect any actin filament turnover. Finally, we show that upon cells refeeding, actin bodies rapidly disappear and actin cables and patches can be assembled in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. This led us to propose that actin bodies are a reserve of actin that can be immediately mobilized for actin cables and patches formation upon reentry into a proliferation cycle. PMID:16914523

  18. In vitro and in vivo evidence for actin association of the naphthylphthalamic acid-binding protein from zucchini hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. H.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Dixon, M. W.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA)-binding protein is part of the auxin efflux carrier, the protein complex that controls polar auxin transport in plant tissues. This study tested the hypothesis that the NPA-binding protein (NBP) is associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vitro and that an intact actin cytoskeleton is required for polar auxin transport in vivo. Cytoskeletal polymerization was altered in extracts of zucchini hypocotyls with reagents that stabilized either the polymeric or monomeric forms of actin or tubulin. Phalloidin treatment altered actin polymerization, as demonstrated by immunoblot analyses following native and denaturing electrophoresis. Phalloidin increased both filamentous actin (F-actin) and NPA-binding activity, while cytochalasin D and Tris decreased both F-actin and NPA-binding activity in cytoskeletal pellets. The microtubule stabilizing drug taxol increased pelletable tubulin, but did not alter either the amount of pelletable actin or NPA-binding activity. Treatment of etiolated zucchini hypocotyls with cytochalasin D decreased the amount of auxin transport and its regulation by NPA. These experimental results are consistent with an in vitro actin cytoskeletal association of the NPA-binding protein and with the requirement of an intact actin cytoskeleton for maximal polar auxin transport in vivo.

  19. Vasoactive amines modulate actin cables (stress fibers) and surface area in cultured bovine endothelium.

    PubMed

    Welles, S L; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1985-06-01

    Cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells were fixed and stained with NBD-phallicidin and quantitated with a digital image analyzer for changes in actin cables and surface area. Serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), dopamine and histamine (all at 10(-4)M concentrations) were tested for their ability to induce cytoskeletal changes. Only 5-HT and NE increased actin cables significantly (p less than 0.01), 80.7% and 97.9%, respectively. Dopamine and histamine treated cells showed a 67.4% and 80.8% decrease in actin cables respectively (p less than 0.01). Stimulated increases of actin cables by 5-HT were inhibited by Ketanserin, and propranolol inhibited NE stimulation of actin cables. Treatment of cells with these blockers alone also decreased actin cables below control values (p less than 0.01). Pretreatment of cells with diphenhydramine, but not cimetidine, inhibited histamine-induced decreases in actin cables. Stimulation of surface area by 5-HT and NE was also observed, with 40.8% and 80.7% increases respectively, when compared with controls (p less than 0.01). The increases in actin cables were associated with a lack of ruffled edges that are indicative of motile cells. In contrast, induced decreases in actin cables resulted in cells with ruffled edges. Exogenous 5-HT and NE have been shown to prevent the increased permeability visible as extravasation of red blood cells from postcapillary venules in thrombocytopenic animals. The present data suggest that 5-HT and NE may be involved in maintaining the endothelial barrier function by a receptor-mediated stimulation of actin cables. Also, histamine-induced decreases in actin cables may be correlated with the amine's action in vivo as a mediator of increased inflammatory permeability.

  20. Mesoscopic model of actin-based propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this 'in silico' actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation.

  1. The association between osteoporotic hip fractures and actinic lesions as a biomarker for cumulative sun exposure in older people-a retrospective case-control study in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Perroud, H A; Dagatti, M S; Amigot, B; Levit, G P; Tomat, M F; Morosano, M E; Masoni, A M; Pezzotto, S M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between the presence of actinic lesions (solar keratosis and non-melanoma skin cancer) and osteoporotic hip fractures in older patients. Both pathologies are common conditions in this age group. Since cumulative sun exposure is difficult to quantify, the presence of actinic lesions can be used to indirectly analyze the association between ultraviolet radiation and osteoporotic hip fractures. This was an observational case-control study. We reviewed the centralized medical records of patients with hip fracture (cases, n = 51) and patients with other diseases hospitalized in the same institution and period (controls, n = 59). The mean age of the patients was 80 ± 8.3 years (range 50-103 years). Differences in maternal hip fracture history were found between cases and controls (14.8 and 8 %, respectively; p = 0.047). Falls history in the past year was higher in cases than in controls (p < 0.0001). Actinic lesions were observed in 32.7 % of patients (prevalence rate 23.5 % in cases, 40.7 % in controls; p = 0.04). When considering patients with actinic lesions, controls have a higher FRAX score compared with cases. Although sun exposure is recommended for bone health, it represents a risk factor for actinic lesions. The presence of actinic lesions may indicate a lower osteoporotic hip fracture risk. A balance between adequate lifetime sun exposure and protection against its adverse effects is required for each patient, in the context of geographic location.

  2. Differentiation of seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, nevi and melanoma by RGB autofluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lihachev, Alexey; Lihacova, Ilze; Plorina, Emilija V.; Lange, Marta; Derjabo, Alexander; Spigulis, Janis

    2018-01-01

    A clinical trial on the autofluorescence imaging of skin lesions comprising 16 dermatologically confirmed pigmented nevi, 15 seborrheic keratosis, 2 dysplastic nevi, histologically confirmed 17 basal cell carcinomas and 1 melanoma was performed. The autofluorescence spatial properties of the skin lesions were acquired by smartphone RGB camera under 405 nm LED excitation. The diagnostic criterion is based on the calculation of the mean autofluorescence intensity of the examined lesion in the spectral range of 515 nm–700 nm. The proposed methodology is able to differentiate seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, pigmented nevi and melanoma. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method was estimated as being close to 100%. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications are discussed in this article. PMID:29675324

  3. Differentiation of seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, nevi and melanoma by RGB autofluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Lihachev, Alexey; Lihacova, Ilze; Plorina, Emilija V; Lange, Marta; Derjabo, Alexander; Spigulis, Janis

    2018-04-01

    A clinical trial on the autofluorescence imaging of skin lesions comprising 16 dermatologically confirmed pigmented nevi, 15 seborrheic keratosis, 2 dysplastic nevi, histologically confirmed 17 basal cell carcinomas and 1 melanoma was performed. The autofluorescence spatial properties of the skin lesions were acquired by smartphone RGB camera under 405 nm LED excitation. The diagnostic criterion is based on the calculation of the mean autofluorescence intensity of the examined lesion in the spectral range of 515 nm-700 nm. The proposed methodology is able to differentiate seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, pigmented nevi and melanoma. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method was estimated as being close to 100%. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications are discussed in this article.

  4. Microscopically proven cure of actinic cheilitis by CO/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a premalignant condition of the lip frequently seen in individuals with chronic sun exposure. Various surgical and ablative therapies have been employed, but microscopic outcome has not been well documented. In this study CO/sub 2/ laser ablation was performed on 16 patients with actinic cheilitis that involved 50% or greater of the lower lip. Pre- and post-treatment biopsies were performed to assess results of therapy. After treatment all 16 patients showed microscopic clearing of atypical cells and disorderly maturation characteristic of actinic cheilitis. One patient had clinical recurrence at 14 months, which was retreated with laser.

  5. Changes in actin dynamics are involved in salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Jindřiška; Janda, Martin; Fišer, Radovan; Sašek, Vladimír; Kocourková, Daniela; Burketová, Lenka; Dušková, Jiřina; Martinec, Jan; Valentová, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics are one of the crucial players in many physiological as well as non-physiological processes in plant cells. Positioning of actin filament arrays is necessary for successful establishment of primary lines of defense toward pathogen attack, depolymerization leads very often to the enhanced susceptibility to the invading pathogen. On the other hand it was also shown that the disruption of actin cytoskeleton leads to the induction of defense response leading to the expression of PATHOGENESIS RELATED proteins (PR). In this study we show that pharmacological actin depolymerization leads to the specific induction of genes in salicylic acid pathway but not that involved in jasmonic acid signaling. Life imaging of leafs of Arabidopsis thaliana with GFP-tagged fimbrin (GFP-fABD2) treated with 1 mM salicylic acid revealed rapid disruption of actin filaments resembling the pattern viewed after treatment with 200 nM latrunculin B. The effect of salicylic acid on actin filament fragmentation was prevented by exogenous addition of phosphatidic acid, which binds to the capping protein and thus promotes actin polymerization. The quantitative evaluation of actin filament dynamics is also presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Actin dynamics involved in gravity perception in Arabidopsis inflorescense stem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Masao; Nakamura, Moritaka; Morita, Miyo T.

    The amyloplasts sedimentation in the endodermal cells is important for gravity perception in Arabidopsis shoot. Our previous study suggests that SGR5(SHOOT GRAVITROPISM 5) and SGR9 are synergistically involved in regulation of amyloplast movement in these cells, and shows that sgr5 sgr9 double mutant completely loses gravitropic response. SGR5 encodes putative transcription factor and SGR9 encodes a ring finger containing protein, which surrounds amyloplasts. It has been reported that amyloplasts are surrounded by actin microfilaments (MFs), and that treatment with actin polymerization inhibitor enhances gravitropic organ curvature. However, not only the molecular link between amyolplasts and MFs, but also regulatory role of MFs in gravitropic response is still unclear. Here, we found that treatment with actin polymerization inhibitor restored gravitropic response of sgr5 sgr9 double mutant stems. The result suggests that abnormal amyloplasts movement in the double mutant could result from inhibition of MFs depolymerization, leading to abnormal gravitropism. We are investigating whether SGR5 and SGR9 are involved in amyloplasts movement by regulating actin remodeling in gravity perceptive cells.

  7. Solar keratosis, pterygium, and squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Clear, A S; Chirambo, M C; Hutt, M S

    1979-01-01

    The histological features of 234 conjunctival biopsies from Africans in Malawi have been re-examined. The appearances of solar keratosis, pinguecula, and pterygium are presented as part of a continuous spectrum of the same pathological process and aetiology, which may lead to carcinomatous change. The results are discussed with regard to the specific geographical distribution of such lesions found by other workers, with particular emphasis on ultraviolet radiation as the main aetiological factor. Images PMID:427069

  8. Keratosis reduces sensitivity of anal cytology in detecting anal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    ElNaggar, Adam C; Santoso, Joseph T; Xie, Huiwen Bill

    2012-02-01

    To identify factors that may contribute to poor sensitivity of anal cytology in contrast to the sensitivity of anoscopy in heterosexual women. We analyzed 324 patients with biopsy confirmed diagnosis of genital intraepithelial neoplasia (either vulva, vaginal, or cervical) from 2006 to 2011 who underwent both anal cytology and anoscopy. Cytology, anoscopy, and biopsy results were recorded. Biopsy specimens underwent independent analysis for quality of specimen. Also, biopsy specimens were analyzed for characteristics that may contribute to correlation, or lack thereof, between anal cytology and anoscopic directed biopsy. 133 (41%) patients had abnormal anoscopy and underwent directed biopsy. 120 patients with normal anal cytology had anoscopy directed biopsies, resulting in 58 cases of AIN (sensitivity 9.4%; 0.039-0.199). This cohort was noted to have extensive keratosis covering the entire dysplastic anal lesion. 18 patients yielded abnormal anal cytology. Of these patients, 13 had anoscopic directed biopsies revealing 6 with AIN and absent keratosis (specificity 88.6%; 0.78-0.95). The κ statistic for anal cytology and anoscopy was -0.0213 (95% CI=-0.128-0.086). Keratosis reduces the sensitivity of anal cytology. Furthermore, anal cytology poorly correlates with anoscopy in the detection of AIN (κ statistic=-0.0213). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracapsular tonsillectomy for keratosis pharyngeous: A pilot study of postoperative recovery and surgical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gaudreau, Philip A; Gessler, Eric M

    2017-09-01

    Our objective was to perform a pilot study comparing intracapsular radiofrequency ablation tonsillectomy with subcapsular tonsillectomy in adult patients with keratosis pharyngeous. Patients diagnosed with keratosis pharyngeous between December 2010 and February 2013 were randomized to undergo either intracapsular or subcapsular tonsillectomy using radiofrequency ablation. Postoperative pain scores and amount of pain medication taken were recorded for 2 weeks. A 6-month follow-up questionnaire was used to assess efficacy of the procedure. Twenty-two patients completed the initial 2-week questionnaire. Eighteen completed the 6-month follow-up questionnaire. The amount of pain medication consumed on postoperative days 8 (p = 0.0293), 9 (p = 0.0146), and 10 (p = 0.035) was significantly less in the intracapsular group. Risk of recurrence of tonsilloliths was significantly greater at the 6-month follow-up in the intracapsular cohort (p = 0.0291). Based on these findings, in patients undergoing tonsillectomy for keratosis pharyngeous, intracapsular radiofrequency ablation tonsillectomy may result in decreased pain medication consumption compared with subcapsular tonsillectomy. Intracapsular tonsillectomy, however, resulted in a higher rate of recurrence of tonsilloliths. The benefit of decreased pain medication may be offset by the greater likelihood for symptoms to recur. Larger studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  10. OPC-compounds prevent oxidant-induced carbonylation and depolymerization of the F-actin cytoskeleton and intestinal barrier hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Banan, A; Fitzpatrick, L; Zhang, Y; Keshavarzian, A

    2001-02-01

    Rebamipide (OPC-12759), a quinolone derivative, and OPC-6535, a thiazol-carboxylic acid derivative, are compounds with ability to protect gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal integrity against reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM). The underlying mechanism of OPC-mediated protection remains poorly understood. It is now established that ROM can injure the mucosa by disruption of the cytoskeletal network, a key component of mucosal barrier integrity. We, therefore, investigated whether OPC compounds prevent the oxidation, disassembly, and instability of the cytoskeletal protein actin and, in turn, protect intestinal barrier function against ROM. Human intestinal (Caco-2) cell monolayers were pretreated with OPC (-12759 or -6535) prior to incubation with ROM (H2O2) or HOCl). Effects on cell integrity (ethidium homodimer-1), epithelial barrier function (fluorescein sulfonic acid clearance), and actin cytoskeletal integrity (high-resolution laser confocal) were then determined. Cells were also processed for quantitative immunoblotting of G- and F-actin to measure oxidation (carbonylation) and disassembly of actin. In monolayers exposed to ROM, preincubation with OPC compounds prevented actin oxidation, decreased depolymerized G-actin, and enhanced the stable F-actin. Concomitantly, OPC agents abolished both actin cytoskeletal disruption and monolayer barrier dysfunction. Data suggest for the first time that OPC drugs prevent oxidation of actin and lead to the protection of actin cytoskeleton and intestinal barrier integrity against oxidant insult. Accordingly, these compounds may be used as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of a variety of oxidative inflammatory intestinal disorders with an abnormal mucosal barrier such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. Fluorescence Guided PDT for Optimization of Skin Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Kate; Moriyama, Lilian; Inada, Natalia; Kurachi, Cristina; Salvio, Ana; Leite, Everson; Menezes, Priscila; Bagnato, Vanderlei

    2015-04-01

    The photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an alternative technique that can be indicated for superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), Bowen’s disease and actinic keratosis with high efficiency. The objective of this study is to present the importance of fluorescence imaging for PDT guidance and monitoring in real time. Confirming that the lesion is well prepared and the photosensitizer shows a homogenous distribution, the outcome after few PDT sessions will be positive and the recurrence should be lower. Our proposition in this study is use the widefield fluorescence imaging to evaluate the PDT protocol in situ and in real time for each lesion. This evaluation procedure is performed in two steps: first with the monitoring of the production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced by methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), an derivative of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and second with the detection of PpIX photobleaching after illumination. The fluorescence images provide information correlated with distinct clinical features and with the treatment outcome. Eight BCC lesions are presented and discussed in this study. Different fluorescence patterns of PpIX production and photobleaching could be correlated with the treatment response. The presented results show the potential of using widefield fluorescence imaging as a guidance tool to customized PDT.

  12. Filopodia-like Actin Cables Position Nuclei in Association with Perinuclear Actin in Drosophila Nurse Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cells contract, actin cables associate laterally with the nuclei, in some cases inducing nuclear turning so that actin cables become partially wound around the nuclei. Our data suggest that a perinuclear actin meshwork connects actin cables to nuclei via actin-crosslinking proteins such as the filamin Cheerio. We provide a revised model for how actin structures position nuclei in nurse cells, employing evolutionary conserved machinery. PMID:24091012

  13. A multicenter, randomized, vehicle-controlled phase 2 study of blue light photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid HCl 20% topical solution for the treatment of actinic keratoses on the upper extremities: the effect of occlusion during the drug incubation period.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, George J; Huang, Eugene Y; Jarratt, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of actinic keratoses (AKs) of the face and scalp. A recent small study has suggested that ALA-PDT can be effective for AKs of the dorsal hands/forearms. However, studies designed to provide sufficient statistical power to test this hypothesis are lacking in the literature. To determine and compare the safety and efficacy of blue light ALA-PDT vs blue light placebo vehicle (VEH) in the treatment of AKs of the upper extremities and to evaluate the effect of occlusion after application of ALA vs VEH. ALA or VEH was applied to both dorsal hands/forearms for the 3-hour incubation period before blue light treatment (10 J/ cm2). One extremity of each subject was covered with occlusive dressing during the incubation period. Treatment was repeated at week 8 if any AK lesions remained. The median AK lesion clearance rate at week 12 was 88.7% for extremities treated with occluded ALA (ALA+OCC), 70.0% for extremities treated with nonoccluded ALA, 16.7% for extremities treated with occluded VEH (VEH+OCC), and 5.6% for extremities treated with nonoccluded VEH (P<.0001). ALA+OCC resulted in a significantly higher clearance rate compared with the nonoccluded extremity at weeks 8 (P=.0006) and 12 (P=.0029). Thirty-four percent (12/35) of extremities treated with ALA+OCC had complete clearance of lesions at week 12 compared with 0% (0/35) of extremities treated with VEH+OCC (P=.0002). The safety pro!le in this study is consistent with previously reported side effects of the therapy. Blue light ALA-PDT following a 3-hour incubation appears efficacious for AK clearance of the upper extremities. Incubation using an occlusive dressing significantly increases the efficacy of the procedure and also increases the incidence and severity of some acute inflammatory side effects of PDT.

  14. Co-transcriptional nuclear actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a key player for nuclear structure and function regulating both chromosome organization and gene activity. In the cell nucleus actin interacts with many different proteins. Among these proteins several studies have identified classical nuclear factors involved in chromatin structure and function, transcription and RNA processing as well as proteins that are normally involved in controlling the actin cytoskeleton. These discoveries have raised the possibility that nuclear actin performs its multi task activities through tight interactions with different sets of proteins. This high degree of promiscuity in the spectrum of protein-to-protein interactions correlates well with the conformational plasticity of actin and the ability to undergo regulated changes in its polymerization states. Several of the factors involved in controlling head-to-tail actin polymerization have been shown to be in the nucleus where they seem to regulate gene activity. By focusing on the multiple tasks performed by actin and actin-binding proteins, possible models of how actin dynamics controls the different phases of the RNA polymerase II transcription cycle are being identified. PMID:23138849

  15. Geometrical Determinants of Neuronal Actin Waves.

    PubMed

    Tomba, Caterina; Braïni, Céline; Bugnicourt, Ghislain; Cohen, Floriane; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Gov, Nir S; Villard, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons produce in their early stages of growth propagative, actin-rich dynamical structures called actin waves. The directional motion of actin waves from the soma to the tip of neuronal extensions has been associated with net forward growth, and ultimately with the specification of neurites into axon and dendrites. Here, geometrical cues are used to control actin wave dynamics by constraining neurons on adhesive stripes of various widths. A key observable, the average time between the production of consecutive actin waves, or mean inter-wave interval (IWI), was identified. It scales with the neurite width, and more precisely with the width of the proximal segment close to the soma. In addition, the IWI is independent of the total number of neurites. These two results suggest a mechanistic model of actin wave production, by which the material conveyed by actin waves is assembled in the soma until it reaches the threshold leading to the initiation and propagation of a new actin wave. Based on these observations, we formulate a predictive theoretical description of actin wave-driven neuronal growth and polarization, which consistently accounts for different sets of experiments.

  16. Geometrical Determinants of Neuronal Actin Waves

    PubMed Central

    Tomba, Caterina; Braïni, Céline; Bugnicourt, Ghislain; Cohen, Floriane; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Gov, Nir S.; Villard, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons produce in their early stages of growth propagative, actin-rich dynamical structures called actin waves. The directional motion of actin waves from the soma to the tip of neuronal extensions has been associated with net forward growth, and ultimately with the specification of neurites into axon and dendrites. Here, geometrical cues are used to control actin wave dynamics by constraining neurons on adhesive stripes of various widths. A key observable, the average time between the production of consecutive actin waves, or mean inter-wave interval (IWI), was identified. It scales with the neurite width, and more precisely with the width of the proximal segment close to the soma. In addition, the IWI is independent of the total number of neurites. These two results suggest a mechanistic model of actin wave production, by which the material conveyed by actin waves is assembled in the soma until it reaches the threshold leading to the initiation and propagation of a new actin wave. Based on these observations, we formulate a predictive theoretical description of actin wave-driven neuronal growth and polarization, which consistently accounts for different sets of experiments. PMID:28424590

  17. Bioinformatics study of the mangrove actin genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basyuni, M.; Wasilah, M.; Sumardi

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the bioinformatics methods to analyze eight actin genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, subcellular localization, similarity, and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of eight mangroves showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of eight mangrove actin genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure for BgActl, KcActl, RsActl, and A. corniculatum Act. In contrast to this observation, the remaining actin genes were random coil > extended chain structure > a helix. This study, therefore, shown the prediction of secondary structure was performed for necessary structural information. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide or mitochondrial target were too small, indicated that no chloroplast or mitochondrial transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove actin genes. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove actin genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove actin gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Three groups of mangrove actin genes were formed, the first group contains B. gymnorrhiza BgAct and R. stylosa RsActl. The second cluster which consists of 5 actin genes the largest group, and the last branch consist of one gene, B. sexagula Act. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant actin genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  18. Cofilin Changes the Twist of F-Actin: Implications for Actin Filament Dynamics and Cellular Function

    PubMed Central

    McGough, Amy; Pope, Brian; Chiu, Wah; Weeds, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Cofilin is an actin depolymerizing protein found widely distributed in animals and plants. We have used electron cryomicroscopy and helical reconstruction to identify its binding site on actin filaments. Cofilin binds filamentous (F)-actin cooperatively by bridging two longitudinally associated actin subunits. The binding site is centered axially at subdomain 2 of the lower actin subunit and radially at the cleft between subdomains 1 and 3 of the upper actin subunit. Our work has revealed a totally unexpected (and unique) property of cofilin, namely, its ability to change filament twist. As a consequence of this change in twist, filaments decorated with cofilin have much shorter ‘actin crossovers' (∼75% of those normally observed in F-actin structures). Although their binding sites are distinct, cofilin and phalloidin do not bind simultaneously to F-actin. This is the first demonstration of a protein that excludes another actin-binding molecule by changing filament twist. Alteration of F-actin structure by cofilin/ADF appears to be a novel mechanism through which the actin cytoskeleton may be regulated or remodeled. PMID:9265645

  19. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Lovander, Kaylee E.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools – Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin – for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling

  20. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike [Raleigh, NC; Huber, Steven C [Savoy, IL; Larabell, Carolyn A [Berkeley, CA

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  1. Microscopy basics and the study of actin-actin-binding protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, Maggie S; Macnaughtan, Megan A

    2013-12-15

    Actin is a multifunctional eukaryotic protein with a globular monomer form that polymerizes into a thin, linear microfilament in cells. Through interactions with various actin-binding proteins (ABPs), actin plays an active role in many cellular processes, such as cell motility and structure. Microscopy techniques are powerful tools for determining the role and mechanism of actin-ABP interactions in these processes. In this article, we describe the basic concepts of fluorescent speckle microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cryoelectron microscopy and review recent studies that utilize these techniques to visualize the binding of actin with ABPs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Live cell imaging of actin dynamics in dexamethasone-treated porcine trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Tomokazu; Inoue, Toshihiro; Inoue-Mochita, Miyuki; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells is important for controlling outflow of the aqueous humor. In some reports, dexamethasone (DEX) increased the aqueous humor outflow resistance and induced unusual actin structures, such as cross-linked actin networks (CLAN), in TM cells. However, the functions and dynamics of CLAN in TM cells are not completely known, partly because actin stress fibers have been observed only in fixed cells. We conducted live-cell imaging of the actin dynamics in TM cells with or without DEX treatment. An actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion construct with a modified insect virus was transfected into porcine TM cells. Time-lapse imaging of live TM cells treated with 25 μM Y-27632 and 100 nM DEX was performed using an inverted fluorescence microscope. Fluorescent images were recorded every 15 s for 30 min after Y-27632 treatment or every 30 min for 72 h after DEX treatment. The GFP-actin was expressed in 22.7 ± 10.9% of the transfected TM cells. In live TM cells, many actin stress fibers were observed before the Y-27632 treatment. Y-27632 changed the cell shape and decreased stress fibers in a time-dependent manner. In fixed cells, CLAN-like structures were seen in 26.5 ± 1.7% of the actin-GFP expressed PTM cells treated with DEX for 72 h. In live imaging, there was 28% CLAN-like structure formation at 72 h after DEX treatment, and the lifetime of CLAN-like structures increased after DEX treatment. The DEX-treated cells with CLAN-like structures showed less migration than DEX-treated cells without CLAN-like structures. Furthermore, the control cells (without DEX treatment) with CLAN-like structures also showed less migration than the control cells without CLAN-like structures. These results suggested that CLAN-like structure formation was correlated with cell migration in TM cells. Live cell imaging of the actin cytoskeleton provides valuable information on the actin dynamics in TM

  3. Surface-induced polymerization of actin.

    PubMed Central

    Renault, A; Lenne, P F; Zakri, C; Aradian, A; Vénien-Bryan, C; Amblard, F

    1999-01-01

    Living cells contain a very large amount of membrane surface area, which potentially influences the direction, the kinetics, and the localization of biochemical reactions. This paper quantitatively evaluates the possibility that a lipid monolayer can adsorb actin from a nonpolymerizing solution, induce its polymerization, and form a 2D network of individual actin filaments, in conditions that forbid bulk polymerization. G- and F-actin solutions were studied beneath saturated Langmuir monolayers containing phosphatidylcholine (PC, neutral) and stearylamine (SA, a positively charged surfactant) at PC:SA = 3:1 molar ratio. Ellipsometry, tensiometry, shear elastic measurements, electron microscopy, and dark-field light microscopy were used to characterize the adsorption kinetics and the interfacial polymerization of actin. In all cases studied, actin follows a monoexponential reaction-limited adsorption with similar time constants (approximately 10(3) s). At a longer time scale the shear elasticity of the monomeric actin adsorbate increases only in the presence of lipids, to a 2D shear elastic modulus of mu approximately 30 mN/m, indicating the formation of a structure coupled to the monolayer. Electron microscopy shows the formation of a 2D network of actin filaments at the PC:SA surface, and several arguments strongly suggest that this network is indeed causing the observed elasticity. Adsorption of F-actin to PC:SA leads more quickly to a slightly more rigid interface with a modulus of mu approximately 50 mN/m. PMID:10049338

  4. Actin dynamics in Amoeba proteus motility.

    PubMed

    Pomorski, P; Krzemiński, P; Wasik, A; Wierzbicka, K; Barańska, J; Kłopocka, W

    2007-01-01

    We studied the distribution of the endogenous Arp2/3 complex in Amoeba proteus and visualised the ratio of filamentous (F-actin) to total actin in living cells. The presented results show that in the highly motile Amoeba proteus, Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin polymerisation is involved in the formation of the branching network of the contractile layer, adhesive structures, and perinuclear cytoskeleton. The aggregation of the Arp2/3 complex in the cortical network, with the exception of the uroid and advancing fronts, and the spatial orientation of microfilaments at the leading edge suggest that actin polymerisation in this area is not sufficient to provide the driving force for membrane displacement. The examined proteins were enriched in the pinocytotic pseudopodia and the perinuclear cytoskeleton in pinocytotic amoebae. In migrating amoebae, the course of changes in F-actin concentration corresponded with the distribution of tension in the cell cortex. The maximum level of F-actin in migrating amoebae was observed in the middle-posterior region and in the front of retracting pseudopodia. Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin polymerisation did not seem to influence F-actin concentration. The strongly condensed state of the microfilament system could be attributed to strong isometric contraction of the cortical layer accompanied by its retraction from distal cell regions. Isotonic contraction was limited to the uroid.

  5. Actin motility: formin a SCAry tail.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Art; Way, Michael

    2011-01-11

    A new biochemical analysis has revealed that the Rickettsia bacterial protein Sca2--recently shown to be essential for virulence and actin-dependent motility--assembles actin filaments using a mechanism that functionally resembles the processive elongation tactics used by formins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular architecture of the Spire-actin nucleus and its implication for actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Tomasz; Gallinger, Julia; Ducka, Anna M; Ikonen, Teemu P; Wohlhoefler, Michael; Schmoller, Kurt M; Bausch, Andreas R; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Huber, Robert; Holak, Tad A

    2011-12-06

    The Spire protein is a multifunctional regulator of actin assembly. We studied the structures and properties of Spire-actin complexes by X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and actin polymerization assays. We show that Spire-actin complexes in solution assume a unique, longitudinal-like shape, in which Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 domains (WH2), in an extended configuration, line up actins along the long axis of the core of the Spire-actin particle. In the complex, the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain is positioned at the side of the first N-terminal Spire-actin module. In addition, we find that preformed, isolated Spire-actin complexes are very efficient nucleators of polymerization and afterward dissociate from the growing filament. However, under certain conditions, all Spire constructs--even a single WH2 repeat--sequester actin and disrupt existing filaments. This molecular and structural mechanism of actin polymerization by Spire should apply to other actin-binding proteins that contain WH2 domains in tandem.

  7. Molecular architecture of the Spire–actin nucleus and its implication for actin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sitar, Tomasz; Gallinger, Julia; Ducka, Anna M.; Ikonen, Teemu P.; Wohlhoefler, Michael; Schmoller, Kurt M.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Noegel, Angelika A.; Schleicher, Michael; Huber, Robert; Holak, Tad A.

    2011-01-01

    The Spire protein is a multifunctional regulator of actin assembly. We studied the structures and properties of Spire–actin complexes by X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and actin polymerization assays. We show that Spire–actin complexes in solution assume a unique, longitudinal-like shape, in which Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 domains (WH2), in an extended configuration, line up actins along the long axis of the core of the Spire–actin particle. In the complex, the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain is positioned at the side of the first N-terminal Spire–actin module. In addition, we find that preformed, isolated Spire–actin complexes are very efficient nucleators of polymerization and afterward dissociate from the growing filament. However, under certain conditions, all Spire constructs—even a single WH2 repeat—sequester actin and disrupt existing filaments. This molecular and structural mechanism of actin polymerization by Spire should apply to other actin-binding proteins that contain WH2 domains in tandem. PMID:22106272

  8. Actin expression in some Platyhelminthe species.

    PubMed

    Fagotti, A; Panara, F; Di Rosa, I; Simoncelli, F; Gabbiani, G; Pascolini, R

    1994-10-01

    Actin expression in some Platyhelminthe species was demonstrated by western-blotting and immunocytochemical analysis using two distinct anti-actin antibodies: the anti-total actin that reacts against all actin isoforms of higher vertebrates and the anti-alpha SM-1 that recognizes the alpha-smooth muscle (alpha SM) isotype of endothermic vertebrates (Skalli et al., 1986). Western-blotting experiments showed that all species tested, including some free-living Platyhelminthes (Tricladida and Rhabdocoela) and the parasitic Fasciola hepatica, were stained by anti-total actin antibody while only Dugesidae and Dendrocoelidae showed a positive immunoreactivity against anti-alpha SM-1. These results were confirmed by cytochemical immunolocalization using both avidin biotin conjugated peroxidase reaction on paraffin sections, and immunogold staining on Lowicryl 4KM embedded specimens. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of Platyhelminthes phylogeny.

  9. Treatment of Bowen Disease With Photodynamic Therapy and the Advantages of Sequential Topical Imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Victoria-Martínez, A M; Martínez-Leborans, L; Ortiz-Salvador, J M; Pérez-Ferriols, A

    2017-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be useful and effective in the treatment of actinic keratosis, Bowen disease, and basal cell carcinoma. We present a series of 13 Bowen disease lesions treated using PDT. Complete responses were achieved in 11 (84%) of the lesions after 3 months of treatment; at 18 months, complete responses were seen in 9 (70%) of the lesions. Patients who presented a partial response or recurrence were treated with topical 5% imiquimod and achieved complete responses. The lesions that presented partial response or recurrence were the largest lesions, between 3 and 5cm in diameter. PDT in monotherapy or combined sequentially with imiquimod is an excellent and well-tolerated therapeutic option for Bowen disease. The treatment has few adverse effects and shows satisfactory results, particularly in multiple large lesions in areas of difficult surgical reconstruction or in elderly patients with a high surgical risk. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Induction of HoxB Transcription by Retinoic Acid Requires Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Ferrai, Carmelo; Naum-Onganía, Gabriela; Longobardi, Elena; Palazzolo, Martina; Disanza, Andrea; Diaz, Victor M.; Crippa, Massimo P.; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    We have analyzed the role of actin polymerization in retinoic acid (RA)-induced HoxB transcription, which is mediated by the HoxB regulator Prep1. RA induction of the HoxB genes can be prevented by the inhibition of actin polymerization. Importantly, inhibition of actin polymerization specifically affects the transcription of inducible Hox genes, but not that of their transcriptional regulators, the RARs, nor of constitutively expressed, nor of actively transcribed Hox genes. RA treatment induces the recruitment to the HoxB2 gene enhancer of a complex composed of “elongating” RNAPII, Prep1, β-actin, and N-WASP as well as the accessory splicing components p54Nrb and PSF. We show that inhibition of actin polymerization prevents such recruitment. We conclude that inducible Hox genes are selectively sensitive to the inhibition of actin polymerization and that actin polymerization is required for the assembly of a transcription complex on the regulatory region of the Hox genes. PMID:19477923

  11. Induction of HoxB transcription by retinoic acid requires actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ferrai, Carmelo; Naum-Onganía, Gabriela; Longobardi, Elena; Palazzolo, Martina; Disanza, Andrea; Diaz, Victor M; Crippa, Massimo P; Scita, Giorgio; Blasi, Francesco

    2009-08-01

    We have analyzed the role of actin polymerization in retinoic acid (RA)-induced HoxB transcription, which is mediated by the HoxB regulator Prep1. RA induction of the HoxB genes can be prevented by the inhibition of actin polymerization. Importantly, inhibition of actin polymerization specifically affects the transcription of inducible Hox genes, but not that of their transcriptional regulators, the RARs, nor of constitutively expressed, nor of actively transcribed Hox genes. RA treatment induces the recruitment to the HoxB2 gene enhancer of a complex composed of "elongating" RNAPII, Prep1, beta-actin, and N-WASP as well as the accessory splicing components p54Nrb and PSF. We show that inhibition of actin polymerization prevents such recruitment. We conclude that inducible Hox genes are selectively sensitive to the inhibition of actin polymerization and that actin polymerization is required for the assembly of a transcription complex on the regulatory region of the Hox genes.

  12. Laminin-111 and the Level of Nuclear Actin Regulate Epithelial Quiescence via Exportin-6.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Ana Paula Zen Petisco; Spencer, Virginia A; Mori, Hidetoshi; Carvalho, Hernandes F; Bissell, Mina J; Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre

    2017-06-06

    Nuclear actin (N-actin) is known to participate in the regulation of gene expression. We showed previously that N-actin levels mediate the growth and quiescence of mouse epithelial cells in response to laminin-111 (LN1), a component of the mammary basement membrane (BM). We know that BM is defective in malignant cells, and we show here that it is the LN1/N-actin pathway that is aberrant in human breast cancer cells, leading to continuous growth. Photobleaching assays revealed that N-actin exit in nonmalignant cells begins as early as 30 min after LN1 treatment. LN1 attenuates the PI3K pathway leading to upregulation of exportin-6 (XPO6) activity and shuttles actin out of the nucleus. Silencing XPO6 prevents quiescence. Malignant cells are impervious to LN1 signaling. These results shed light on the crucial role of LN1 in quiescence and differentiation and how defects in the LN1/PI3K/XPO6/N-actin axis explain the loss of tissue homeostasis and growth control that contributes to malignant progression. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrity of the actin cytoskeleton of host macrophages is essential for Leishmania donovani infection.

    PubMed

    Roy, Saptarshi; Kumar, G Aditya; Jafurulla, Md; Mandal, Chitra; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2014-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. The molecular mechanism involved in internalization of Leishmania is poorly understood. The entry of Leishmania involves interaction with the plasma membrane of host cells. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of host membrane cholesterol in the binding and internalization of L. donovani into macrophages. In the present work, we explored the role of the host actin cytoskeleton in leishmanial infection. We observed a dose-dependent reduction in the attachment of Leishmania promastigotes to host macrophages upon destabilization of the actin cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D. This is accompanied by a concomitant reduction in the intracellular amastigote load. We utilized a recently developed high resolution microscopy-based method to quantitate cellular F-actin content upon treatment with cytochalasin D. A striking feature of our results is that binding of Leishmania promastigotes and intracellular amastigote load show close correlation with cellular F-actin level. Importantly, the binding of Escherichia coli remained invariant upon actin destabilization of host cells, thereby implying specific involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in Leishmania infection. To the best of our knowledge, these novel results constitute the first comprehensive demonstration on the specific role of the host actin cytoskeleton in Leishmania infection. Our results could be significant in developing future therapeutic strategies to tackle leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Changes in actin structural transitions associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Spakowicz, Daniel; Thomas, David D

    2008-11-11

    We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect changes in actin structural dynamics associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction. Contractility of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers was inhibited by treatment with 50 mM H 2O 2, which induced oxidative modifications in the myosin head and in actin, as previously reported. Using proteins purified from oxidized and unoxidized muscle, we used TPA to measure the effects of weakly (+ATP) and strongly (no ATP) bound myosin heads (S1) on the microsecond dynamics of actin labeled at Cys374 with erythrosine iodoacetamide. Oxidative modification of S1 had no effect on actin dynamics in the absence of ATP (strong binding complex), but restricted the dynamics in the presence of ATP (weakly bound complex). In contrast, oxidative modification of actin did not have a significant effect on the weak-to-strong transitions. Thus, we concluded that (1) the effects of oxidation on the dynamics of actin in the actomyosin complex are predominantly determined by oxidation-induced changes in S1, and (2) changes in weak-to-strong structural transitions in actin and myosin are coupled to each other and are associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contractility.

  15. Changes in actin structural transitions associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Spakowicz, Daniel; Thomas, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect changes in actin structural dynamics associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction. Contractility of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers was inhibited by treatment with 50 mM H2O2, which induced oxidative modifications in the myosin head and in actin, as previously reported. Using proteins purified from oxidized and unoxidized muscle, we used TPA to measure the effects of weakly (+ATP) and strongly (no ATP) bound myosin heads (S1) on the microsecond dynamics of actin labeled at Cys374 with erythrosine iodoacetamide. Oxidative modification of S1 had no effect on actin dynamics in the absence of ATP (strong binding complex), but restricted the dynamics in the presence of ATP (weakly bound complex). In contrast, oxidative modification of actin did not have a significant effect on the weak-to-strong transitions. Thus, we concluded that (1) the effects of oxidation on the dynamics of actin in the actomyosin complex are predominantly determined by oxidation-induced changes in S1, and (2) changes in weak-to-strong structural transitions in actin and myosin are coupled to each other and are associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contractility. PMID:18855423

  16. Fluid Shear Stress-Induced JNK Activity Leads to Actin Remodeling for Cell Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Brotzman, Hannah; Ghadiali, Samir; Lowe-Krentz, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Fluid shear stress (FSS) exerted on endothelial cell surfaces induces actin cytoskeleton remodeling through mechanotransduction. This study was designed to determine whether FSS activates Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), to examine the spatial and temporal distribution of active JNK relative to the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial cells exposed to different FSS conditions, and to evaluate the effects of active JNK on actin realignment. Exposure to 15 and 20 dyn/cm2 FSS induced higher activity levels of JNK than the lower 2 and 4 dyn/cm2 flow conditions. At the higher FSS treatments, JNK activity increased with increasing exposure time, peaking 30 minutes after flow onset with an 8-fold activity increase compared to cells in static culture. FSS-induced phospho-JNK co-localized with actin filaments at cell peripheries, as well as with stress fibers. Pharmacologically blocking JNK activity altered FSS-induced actin structure and distribution as a response to FSS. Our results indicate that FSS-induced actin remodeling occurs in three phases, and that JNK plays a role in at least one, suggesting that this kinase activity is involved in mechanotransduction from the apical surface to the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial cells. PMID:20626006

  17. AtFH1 formin mutation affects actin filament and microtubule dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Amparo; Žársky, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell growth and morphogenesis depend on remodelling of both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. AtFH1 (At5g25500), the main housekeeping Arabidopsis formin, is targeted to membranes and known to nucleate and bundle actin. The effect of mutations in AtFH1 on root development and cytoskeletal dynamics was examined. Consistent with primarily actin-related formin function, fh1 mutants showed increased sensitivity to the actin polymerization inhibitor latrunculin B (LatB). LatB-treated mutants had thicker, shorter roots than wild-type plants. Reduced cell elongation and morphological abnormalities were observed in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Fluorescently tagged cytoskeletal markers were used to follow cytoskeletal dynamics in wild-type and mutant plants using confocal microscopy and VAEM (variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy). Mutants exhibited more abundant but less dynamic F-actin bundles and more dynamic microtubules than wild-type seedlings. Treatment of wild-type seedlings with a formin inhibitor, SMIFH2, mimicked the root growth and cell expansion phenotypes and cytoskeletal structure alterations observed in fh1 mutants. The results suggest that besides direct effects on actin organization, the in vivo role of AtFH1 also includes modulation of microtubule dynamics, possibly mediated by actin-microtubule cross-talk.

  18. Quantitative Kinetic Study of the Actin-Bundling Protein L-Plastin and of Its Impact on Actin Turn-Over

    PubMed Central

    Al Tanoury, Ziad; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Halavatyi, Aliaksandr; Hoffmann, Céline; Moes, Michèle; Hadzic, Ermin; Catillon, Marie; Yatskou, Mikalai; Friederich, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    Background Initially detected in leukocytes and cancer cells derived from solid tissues, L-plastin/fimbrin belongs to a large family of actin crosslinkers and is considered as a marker for many cancers. Phosphorylation of L-plastin on residue Ser5 increases its F-actin binding activity and is required for L-plastin-mediated cell invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the kinetics of L-plastin and the impact of L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation on L-plastin dynamics and actin turn-over in live cells, simian Vero cells were transfected with GFP-coupled WT-L-plastin, Ser5 substitution variants (S5/A, S5/E) or actin and analyzed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). FRAP data were explored by mathematical modeling to estimate steady-state reaction parameters. We demonstrate that in Vero cell focal adhesions L-plastin undergoes rapid cycles of association/dissociation following a two-binding-state model. Phosphorylation of L-plastin increased its association rates by two-fold, whereas dissociation rates were unaffected. Importantly, L-plastin affected actin turn-over by decreasing the actin dissociation rate by four-fold, increasing thereby the amount of F-actin in the focal adhesions, all these effects being promoted by Ser5 phosphorylation. In MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment induced L-plastin translocation to de novo actin polymerization sites in ruffling membranes and spike-like structures and highly increased its Ser5 phosphorylation. Both inhibition studies and siRNA knock-down of PKC isozymes pointed to the involvement of the novel PKC-δ isozyme in the PMA-elicited signaling pathway leading to L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the L-plastin contribution to actin dynamics regulation was substantiated by its association with a protein complex comprising cortactin, which is known to be involved in this process. Conclusions/Significance Altogether these findings quantitatively

  19. Systemic retinoids for the chemoprevention of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and verrucal keratosis in a cohort of patients on BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Anforth, R; Blumetti, T C M P; Clements, A; Kefford, R; Long, G V; Fernandez-Peñas, P

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of metastatic melanoma has changed greatly with the development of inhibitors targeted at the mutated BRAF kinase present in up to 50% of metastatic melanoma cases. These agents, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, have been shown to increase median survival. Unfortunately, they have also been associated with the development of verrucal keratosis (VK) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC). These lesions require surgical excision, and when a large number of these lesions need to be treated, it can significantly affect the patient's quality of life. To determine if acitretin is suitable as a chemopreventative agent against the development of verrucal keratosis and cuSCC, in patients on BRAF inhibitors. Patients treated with a BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib or dabrafenib, for stage IV metastatic melanoma, who had undergone more than five surgical excisions to remove lesions suggestive of cuSCC, were offered the opportunity to commence acitretin as a chemopreventative agent. Patients were evaluated every 4 weeks. Clinical and histological data were collected. Eight patients, who had a total of 24 cuSCC removed, were included in the study. After commencement of acitretin, only five cuSCC were excised from two patients. The most significant reduction was in a patient who had developed 13 cuSCC over 10 months and only two cuSCC 3 months after commencing acitretin. No modifications in the dose of the BRAF inhibitor were made as a result of cuSCC in any of these patients. Acitretin should be considered as a chemopreventative agent for VK and cuSCC in patients taking BRAF inhibitors, before considering dosage reductions. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutations in benign lichenoid keratosis.

    PubMed

    Groesser, L; Herschberger, E; Landthaler, M; Hafner, C

    2012-04-01

    Benign lichenoid keratoses (BLKs) are solitary skin lesions which have been proposed to represent a regressive form of pre-existent epidermal tumours such as solar lentigo or seborrhoeic keratosis. However, the genetic basis of BLK is unknown. FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutations have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of seborrhoeic keratosis and solar lentigo. We thus investigated whether these mutations are also present in BLK. After manual microdissection and DNA isolation, 52 BLKs were screened for FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS hotspot mutations using SNaPshot(®) multiplex assays. We identified 6/52 (12%) FGFR3 mutations, 10/52 (19%) PIK3CA mutations, 6/52 (12%) HRAS mutations and 2/52 (4%) KRAS mutations. FGFR3 and RAS mutations were mutually exclusive. One BLK showed a simultaneous PIK3CA and HRAS mutation. In nine BLKs with a mutation, nonlesional control tissue from the epidermal margin and the dermal lymphocytic infiltrate were wild-type, indicating that these mutations are somatic. To demonstrate that these findings are specific, 10 samples of lichen planus were analysed without evidence for FGFR3, PIK3CA or RAS mutations. Our results indicate that FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutations are present in approximately 50% of BLKs. These findings support the concept on the molecular genetic level that at least a proportion of BLKs represents regressive variants resulting from former benign epidermal tumours such as seborrhoeic keratosis and solar lentigo. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  1. Resistance of Actin to Cleavage during Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qizhong; Wei, Tie; Lees-Miller, Susan; Alnemri, Emad; Watters, Dianne; Lavin, Martin F.

    1997-01-01

    A small number of cellular proteins present in the nucleus, cytosol, and membrane fraction are specifically cleaved by the interleukin-1β -converting enzyme (ICE)-like family of proteases during apoptosis. Previous results have demonstrated that one of these, the cytoskeletal protein actin, is degraded in rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells upon serum withdrawal. Extracts from etoposide-treated U937 cells are also capable of cleaving actin. It was assumed that cleavage of actin represented a general phenomenon, and a mechanism coordinating proteolytic, endonucleolytic, and morphological aspects of apoptosis was proposed. We demonstrate here that actin is resistant to degradation in several different human cells induced to undergo apoptosis in response to a variety of stimuli, including Fas ligation, serum withdrawal, cytotoxic T-cell killing, and DNA damage. On the other hand, cell-free extracts from these cells and the ICE-like protease CPP32 were capable of cleaving actin in vitro. We conclude that while actin contains cleavage sites for ICE-like proteases, it is not degraded in vivo in human cells either because of lack of access of these proteases to actin or due to the presence of other factors that prevent degradation.

  2. Kinetics of Binding of Caldesmon to Actin*

    PubMed Central

    Chalovich, Joseph M.; Chen, Yi-der; Dudek, Ronald; Luo, Hai

    2005-01-01

    The time course of interaction of caldesmon with actin may be monitored by fluorescence changes that occur upon the binding of 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl))-labeled caldesmon to actin or to acrylodan actin. The concentration dependence of the observed rate of caldesmon-actin binding was analyzed to a first approximation as a single-step reaction using a Monte Carlo simulation. The derived association and dissociation rates were 107 m−1 s−1 and 18.2 s−1, respectively. Smooth muscle tropomyosin enhances the binding of caldesmon to actin, and this was found to be due to a reduction in the rate of dissociation to 6.3 s −1. There is no evidence from this study for a different mechanism of binding in the presence of tropomyosin. The fluorescence changes that occurred with the binding of 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl))-labeled caldesmon to actin or actin-tropomyosin were reversed by the addition of myosin subfragment 1 as predicted by a competitive binding mechanism. PMID:7730374

  3. The Dynamic Actin Cytoskeleton in Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dale D

    2018-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction requires both myosin activation and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Actin cytoskeletal reorganization facilitates smooth muscle contraction by promoting force transmission between the contractile unit and the extracellular matrix (ECM), and by enhancing intercellular mechanical transduction. Myosin may be viewed to serve as an "engine" for smooth muscle contraction whereas the actin cytoskeleton may function as a "transmission system" in smooth muscle. The actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle also undergoes restructuring upon activation with growth factors or the ECM, which controls smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. Abnormal smooth muscle contraction, cell proliferation, and motility contribute to the development of vascular and pulmonary diseases. A number of actin-regulatory proteins including protein kinases have been discovered to orchestrate actin dynamics in smooth muscle. In particular, Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) is an important molecule that controls actin dynamics, contraction, growth, and motility in smooth muscle. Moreover, c-Abl coordinates the regulation of blood pressure and contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness and vascular/airway remodeling in vivo. Thus, c-Abl may be a novel pharmacological target for the development of new therapy to treat smooth muscle diseases such as hypertension and asthma. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The application of 5-aminolevulinic acid in the treatment of precancerous lesions, skin cancer, and a new approach to the control of therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulas, Zbigniew; Bereś-Pawlik, Elżbieta; Bieniek, Andrzej; Matusiak, Łukasz

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our work was to determine a therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Twenty five patients with the Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma (superficial, nodular) were examined. They were treated with photosensitizer - aminolevulinic acid (metabolized in protoporphyrin IX), and the new red light source built of high-power diodes. A new method, based on numerical analysis of fluorescence imaging of tissues, was proposed as a way for controlling therapy.

  5. Autofluorescence of seborrheic keratosis (warts) and of tissue surrounding malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Wolfgang; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard; Bohle, Rainer M.; Dreyer, Thomas

    1997-12-01

    Autofluorescence measurements on human tissue have revealed a decrease in intensity in malignant tumors and an increase in the healthy region adjacent to the tumor. This latter event might serve as a protective wall against the invasive tumor cells. The composition of this wall is still unknown. Antioxidants such as NADH might be involved. In the case of seborrheic keratosis (wart), the intensity is increased in the pigmented spots. Care must be taken, therefore, when warts are attached to malignant tumors. The resulting value is, then, not indicative for the condition of the system.

  6. Coordination of Actin- and Microtubule-Based Cytoskeletons Supports Transport of Spermatids and Residual Bodies/Phagosomes During Spermatogenesis in the Rat Testis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Elizabeth I.; Lee, Will M.

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell transport across the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesis requires the intricate coordination of cell junctions, signaling proteins, and both actin- and microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeletons. Although the involvement of cytoskeletons in germ cell transport has been suggested, the precise mechanism(s) remains elusive. Based on growing evidence that actin and MT interactions underlie fundamental cellular processes, such as cell motility, it is unlikely that actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons work independently to regulate germ cell transport in the testis. Using rats treated with adjudin, a potential male contraceptive that disrupts spermatid adhesion and transport in the testis, as a study model, we show herein that actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons are both necessary for transport of spermatids and residual bodies/phagosomes across the seminiferous epithelium in adult rat testes. Analysis of intratubular expression of F-actin and tubulin revealed disruption of both actin and MT networks, concomitant with misdirected spermatids and phagosomes in rats treated with adjudin. Actin regulatory proteins, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 and actin-related protein 3, were mislocalized and down-regulated at the actin-rich anchoring junction between germ and Sertoli cells (apical ectoplasmic specialization) after adjudin treatment. Nonreceptor tyrosine kinase p-FAK-Tyr407, known to regulate F-actin nucleation via actin-related protein 3, was also mislocalized and down-regulated at the apical ectoplasmic specialization, corroborating the observation of actin cytoskeleton disruption. Additionally, spatiotemporal expression of MT regulatory protein end-binding protein 1, shown to be involved in MT-actin cross talk herein, was also disrupted after adjudin treatment. In summary, spermatid/phagosome transport across the epithelium during spermatogenesis requires the coordination between actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons. PMID:26894662

  7. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  8. Actin-based propulsion of a microswimmer.

    PubMed

    Leshansky, A M

    2006-07-01

    A simple hydrodynamic model of actin-based propulsion of microparticles in dilute cell-free cytoplasmic extracts is presented. Under the basic assumption that actin polymerization at the particle surface acts as a force dipole, pushing apart the load and the free (nonanchored) actin tail, the propulsive velocity of the microparticle is determined as a function of the tail length, porosity, and particle shape. The anticipated velocities of the cargo displacement and the rearward motion of the tail are in good agreement with recently reported results of biomimetic experiments. A more detailed analysis of the particle-tail hydrodynamic interaction is presented and compared to the prediction of the simplified model.

  9. Plant actin cytoskeleton re-modeling by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Engler, Janice de Almeida; Rodiuc, Natalia; Smertenko, Andrei; Abad, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The cytoskeleton is an important component of the plant's defense mechanism against the attack of pathogenic organisms. Plants however, are defenseless against parasitic root-knot and cyst nematodes and respond to the invasion by the development of a special feeding site that supplies the parasite with nutrients required for the completion of its life cycle. Recent studies of nematode invasion under treatment with cytoskeletal drugs and in mutant plants where normal functions of the cytoskeleton have been affected, demonstrate the importance of the cytoskeleton in the establishment of a feeding site and successful nematode reproduction. It appears that in the case of microfilaments, nematodes hijack the intracellular machinery that regulates actin dynamics and modulate the organization and properties of the actin filament network. Intervening with this process reduces the nematode infection efficiency and inhibits its life cycle. This discovery uncovers a new pathway that can be exploited for the protection of plants against nematodes.

  10. Photodynamic therapy for actinic cheilitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yazdani Abyaneh, Mohammad-Ali; Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre; Griffith, Robert D; Nouri, Keyvan

    2015-02-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a premalignant lesion of the lips that can progress to squamous cell carcinoma and metastasize. Actinic cheilitis is difficult to treat because surgical treatments have significant adverse effects whereas less invasive procedures have uncertain efficacy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may offer a noninvasive yet effective treatment option for AC. To systematically review the safety and efficacy of PDT for AC. The terms "photodynamic," "actinic," "solar," "cheilitis," and "cheilosis" were used in combinations to search the PubMed database. Studies were considered for inclusion based on eligibility criteria, and specific data were extracted from all studies. The authors identified 15 eligible case series encompassing a total of 242 treated subjects. Among studies that evaluated subjects for complete clinical response, 139 of 223 subjects (62%) showed complete response at final follow-ups ranging from 3 to 30 months. Among studies that evaluated subjects for histological outcome, 57 of 121 subjects (47%) demonstrated histological cure at final follow-ups ranging from 1.5 to 18 months. Cosmetic outcomes were good to excellent in the majority of subjects, and adverse events were well tolerated. Photodynamic therapy is safe and has the potential to clinically and histologically treat AC, with a need for future randomized controlled trials.

  11. Recent advances in the prevention and treatment of skin cancer using photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baozhong; He, Yu-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive procedure that involves a photosensitizing drug and its subsequent activation by light to produce reactive oxygen species that specifically destroy target cells. Recently, PDT has been widely used in treating non-melanoma skin malignancies, the most common cancer in the USA, with superior cosmetic outcomes compared with conventional therapies. The topical ‘photosensitizers’ commonly used are 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and its esterified derivative methyl 5-aminolevulinate, which are precursors of the endogenous photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX. After treatment with ALA or methyl 5-aminolevulinate, protoporphyrin IX preferentially accumulates in the lesion area of various skin diseases, which allows not only PDT treatment but also fluorescence diagnosis with ALA-induced porphyrins. Susceptible lesions include various forms of non-melanoma skin cancer such as actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The most recent and promising developments in PDT include the discovery of new photosensitizers, the exploitation of new drug delivery systems and the combination of other modalities, which will all contribute to increasing PDT therapeutic efficacy and improving outcome. This article summarizes the main principles of PDT and its current clinical use in the management of non-melanoma skin cancers, as well as recent developments and possible future research directions. PMID:21080805

  12. Computational model of polarized actin cables and cytokinetic actin ring formation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haosu; Bidone, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast actin cables and contractile ring are important for polarized growth and division, revealing basic aspects of cytoskeletal function. To study these formin-nucleated structures, we built a 3D computational model with actin filaments represented as beads connected by springs. Polymerization by formins at the bud tip and bud neck, crosslinking, severing, and myosin pulling, are included. Parameter values were estimated from prior experiments. The model generates actin cable structures and dynamics similar to those of wild type and formin deletion mutant cells. Simulations with increased polymerization rate result in long, wavy cables. Simulated pulling by type V myosin stretches actin cables. Increasing the affinity of actin filaments for the bud neck together with reduced myosin V pulling promotes the formation of a bundle of antiparallel filaments at the bud neck, which we suggest as a model for the assembly of actin filaments to the contractile ring. PMID:26538307

  13. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in oat roots: association with the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Hua; Crain, Richard C

    2009-10-01

    Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activities are involved in mediating plant cell responses to environmental stimuli. Two variants of PI-PLC have been partially purified from the roots of oat seedlings; one cytosolic and one particulate. Although the cytosolic enzyme was significantly purified, the activity still co-migrated with a number of other proteins on heparin HPLC and also on size-exclusion chromatography. The partially purified PI-PLC was tested by Western blotting, and we found that actin and actin-binding proteins, profilin and tropomyosin, co-purified with cytosolic phospholipase C. After a non-ionic detergent (Triton X-100) treatment, PI-PLC activities still remained with the actin cytoskeleton. The effects of phalloidin and F-buffer confirmed this association; these conditions, which favor actin polymerization, decreased the release of PI-PLC from the cytoskeleton. The treatments of latrunculin and G-buffer, the conditions that favor actin depolymerization, increased the release of PI-PLC from the cytoskeleton. These results suggest that oat PI-PLC associates with the actin cytoskeleton.

  14. Myopodin is an F-actin bundling protein with multiple independent actin-binding regions.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Anja; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Bezerra, Eduardo; Orfanos, Zacharias; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; van der Ven, Peter F M; Kirfel, Gregor; Fürst, Dieter O

    2013-02-01

    The assembly of striated muscle myofibrils is a multistep process in which a variety of proteins is involved. One of the first and most important steps in myofibrillogenesis is the arrangement of thin myofilaments into ordered I-Z-I brushes, requiring the coordinated activity of numerous actin binding proteins. The early expression of myopodin prior to sarcomeric α-actinin, as well as its binding to actin, α-actinin and filamin indicate an important role for this protein in actin cytoskeleton remodelling with the precise function of myopodin in this process yet remaining to be resolved. While myopodin was previously described as a protein capable of cross-linking actin filaments into thick bundles upon transient transfections, it has remained unclear whether myopodin alone is capable of bundling actin, or if additional proteins are involved. We have therefore investigated the in vitro actin binding properties of myopodin. High speed cosedimentation assays with skeletal muscle actin confirmed direct binding of myopodin to F-actin and showed that this interaction is mediated by at least two independent actin binding sites, found in all myopodin isoforms identified to date. Furthermore, low-speed cosedimentation assays revealed that not only full length myopodin, but also the fragment containing only the second binding site, bundles microfilaments in the absence of accessory proteins. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that this bundling activity resembled that of α-actinin. Biochemical experiments revealed that bundling was not achieved by myopodin's ability to dimerize, indicating the presence of two individual F-actin binding sites within the second binding segment. Thus full length myopodin contains at least three F-actin binding sites. These data provide further understanding of the mechanisms by which myopodin contributes to actin reorganization during myofibril assembly.

  15. Actin dynamics at focal adhesions: a common endpoint and putative therapeutic target for proteinuric kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Sever, Sanja; Schiffer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    Proteinuria encompasses diverse causes including both genetic diseases and acquired forms such as diabetic and hypertensive nephropathy. The basis of proteinuria is a disturbance in size selectivity of the glomerular filtration barrier, which largely depends on the podocyte: a terminally differentiated epithelial cell type covering the outer surface of the glomerulus. Compromised podocyte structure is one of the earliest signs of glomerular injury. The phenotype of diverse animal models and podocyte cell culture firmly established the essential role of the actin cytoskeleton in maintaining functional podocyte structure. Podocyte foot processes, actin-based membrane extensions, contain 2 molecularly distinct "hubs" that control actin dynamics: a slit diaphragm and focal adhesions. Although loss of foot processes encompasses disassembly of slit diaphragm multiprotein complexes, as long as cells are attached to the glomerular basement membrane, focal adhesions will be the sites in which stress due to filtration flow is counteracted by forces generated by the actin network in foot processes. Numerous studies within last 20 years have identified actin binding and regulatory proteins as well as integrins as essential components of signaling and actin dynamics at focal adhesions in podocytes, suggesting that some of them may become novel, druggable targets for proteinuric kidney diseases. Here we review evidence supporting the idea that current treatments for chronic kidney diseases beneficially and directly target the podocyte actin cytoskeleton associated with focal adhesions and suggest that therapeutic reagents that target the focal adhesion-regulated actin cytoskeleton in foot processes have potential to modernize treatments for chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  17. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ligia Cristina Kalb; Pinho, Rosana Elisa Gonçalves Gonçalves; Lima, Carla Vanessa de Paula; Fragoso, Stênio Perdigão; Soares, Maurilio José

    2013-01-01

    Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major), insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis) and plants (Phytomonas serpens). A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids. PMID:23903980

  18. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  19. How actin network dynamics control the onset of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Kawska, Agnieszka; Carvalho, Kévin; Manzi, John; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Blanchoin, Laurent; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Sykes, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    Cells use their dynamic actin network to control their mechanics and motility. These networks are made of branched actin filaments generated by the Arp2/3 complex. Here we study under which conditions the microscopic organization of branched actin networks builds up a sufficient stress to trigger sustained motility. In our experimental setup, dynamic actin networks or “gels” are grown on a hard bead in a controlled minimal protein system containing actin monomers, profilin, the Arp2/3 complex and capping protein. We vary protein concentrations and follow experimentally and through simulations the shape and mechanical properties of the actin gel growing around beads. Actin gel morphology is controlled by elementary steps including “primer” contact, growth of the network, entanglement, mechanical interaction and force production. We show that varying the biochemical orchestration of these steps can lead to the loss of network cohesion and the lack of effective force production. We propose a predictive phase diagram of actin gel fate as a function of protein concentrations. This work unveils how, in growing actin networks, a tight biochemical and physical coupling smoothens initial primer-caused heterogeneities and governs force buildup and cell motility. PMID:22908255

  20. The role of immunosuppression in squamous cell carcinomas arising in seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Conic, Ruzica Z; Napekoski, Karl; Schuetz, Heidi; Piliang, Melissa; Bergfeld, Wilma; Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Natasha

    2017-06-01

    Seborrheic keratoses (SK) are common skin neoplasms considered to be benign. Reports of associated squamous cell carcinoma arising within seborrheic keratosis (SCC-SK) have been described. To describe the histopathologic characteristics of SCC-SK and identify predisposing factors in formation of these rare lesions. There were 162 cases of SCC-SK in a span of a decade (2003-2014). All of the histopathologic specimens and medical records were reviewed. Data from these patients were compared to a control group with seborrheic keratosis who were matched by age, sex, and location of lesion from the same time period (n = 162). SCC-SK has the classic histopathologic features of SK, such as hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, papillomatosis, and pseudohorn cysts. The areas of squamous cell carcinoma were characterized by areas of squamous dysplasia (100%), hypogranulosis (79.6%), squamous eddies (79.6%), solar elastosis (80.9%), and brown pigmentation (59.9%). Patients with a history of immunosuppression had an increased risk for developing SCC-SK (19% vs 3%; P < .01), particularly when inhibition was transplant-associated (10% vs 0%; P < .01). This was a single center, retrospective study. SCC-SK occurs more often in elderly men with a history of immunosuppression associated with organ transplants. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. From Cytoskeleton to Gene Expression: Actin in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Viita, Tiina; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2017-01-01

    Although most people still associate actin mainly with the cytoskeleton, several lines of evidence, with the earliest studies dating back to decades ago, have emphasized the importance of actin also inside the cell nucleus. Actin has been linked to many gene expression processes from gene activation to chromatin remodeling, but also to maintenance of genomic integrity and intranuclear movement of chromosomes and chromosomal loci. Recent advances in visualizing different forms and dynamic properties of nuclear actin have clearly advanced our understanding of the basic concepts by which actin operates in the nucleus. In this chapter we address the different breakthroughs in nuclear actin studies, as well as discuss the regulation nuclear actin and the importance of nuclear actin dynamics in relation to its different nuclear functions. Our aim is to highlight the fact that actin should be considered as an essential component of the cell nucleus, and its nuclear actions should be taken into account also in experiments on cytoplasmic actin networks.

  2. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  3. Drosophila Spire is an actin nucleation factor.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Margot E; Heuser, John E; Kerkhoff, Eugen; Mullins, R Dyche

    2005-01-27

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for many cellular functions including shape determination, intracellular transport and locomotion. Previous work has identified two factors--the Arp2/3 complex and the formin family of proteins--that nucleate new actin filaments via different mechanisms. Here we show that the Drosophila protein Spire represents a third class of actin nucleation factor. In vitro, Spire nucleates new filaments at a rate that is similar to that of the formin family of proteins but slower than in the activated Arp2/3 complex, and it remains associated with the slow-growing pointed end of the new filament. Spire contains a cluster of four WASP homology 2 (WH2) domains, each of which binds an actin monomer. Maximal nucleation activity requires all four WH2 domains along with an additional actin-binding motif, conserved among Spire proteins. Spire itself is conserved among metazoans and, together with the formin Cappuccino, is required for axis specification in oocytes and embryos, suggesting that multiple actin nucleation factors collaborate to construct essential cytoskeletal structures.

  4. Actin filament curvature biases branching direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evan; Risca, Viviana; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Chia, Jia-Jun; Geissler, Phillip; Fletcher, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Actin filaments are key components of the cellular machinery, vital for a wide range of processes ranging from cell motility to endocytosis. Actin filaments can branch, and essential in this process is a protein complex known as the Arp2/3 complex, which nucleate new ``daughter'' filaments from pre-existing ``mother'' filaments by attaching itself to the mother filament. Though much progress has been made in understanding the Arp2/3-actin junction, some very interesting questions remain. In particular, F-actin is a dynamic polymer that undergoes a wide range of fluctuations. Prior studies of the Arp2/3-actin junction provides a very static notion of Arp2/3 binding. The question we ask is how differently does the Arp2/3 complex interact with a straight filament compared to a bent filament? In this study, we used Monte Carlo simulations of a surface-tethered worm-like chain to explore possible mechanisms underlying the experimental observation that there exists preferential branch formation by the Arp2/3 complex on the convex face of a curved filament. We show that a fluctuation gating model in which Arp2/3 binding to the actin filament is dependent upon a rare high-local-curvature shape fluctuation of the filament is consistent with the experimental data.

  5. Actin Polymerization Is Essential for Pollen Tube GrowthV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vidali, Luis; McKenna, Sylvester T.; Hepler, Peter K.

    2001-01-01

    Actin microfilaments, which are prominent in pollen tubes, have been implicated in the growth process; however, their mechanism of action is not well understood. In the present work we have used profilin and DNAse I injections, as well as latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments, under quantitatively controlled conditions, to perturb actin microfilament structure and assembly in an attempt to answer this question. We found that a ∼50% increase in the total profilin pool was necessary to half-maximally inhibit pollen tube growth, whereas a ∼100% increase was necessary for half-maximal inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming. DNAse I showed a similar inhibitory activity but with a threefold more pronounced effect on growth than streaming. Latrunculin B, at only 1–4 nM in the growth medium, has a similar proportion of inhibition of growth over streaming to that of profilin. The fact that tip growth is more sensitive than streaming to the inhibitory substances and that there is no correlation between streaming and growth rates suggests that tip growth requires actin assembly in a process independent of cytoplasmic streaming. PMID:11514633

  6. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  7. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in root hair development.

    PubMed

    Pei, Weike; Du, Fei; Zhang, Yi; He, Tian; Ren, Haiyun

    2012-05-01

    The development of root hair includes four stages: bulge site selection, bulge formation, tip growth, and maturation. The actin cytoskeleton is involved in all of these stages and is organized into distinct arrangements in the different stages. In addition to the actin configuration, actin isoforms also play distinct roles in the different stages. The actin cytoskeleton is regulated by actin-binding proteins, such as formin, Arp2/3 complex, profilin, actin depolymerizing factor, and villin. Some upstream signals, i.e. calcium, phospholipids, and small GTPase regulate the activity of these actin-binding proteins to produce the proper actin configuration. We constructed a working model on how the actin cytoskeleton is controlled by actin-binding proteins and upstream signaling in root hair development based on the current literature: at the tip of hairs, actin polymerization appears to be facilitated by Arp2/3 complex that is activated by small GTPase, and profilin that is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Meanwhile, actin depolymerization and turnover are likely mediated by villin and actin depolymerizing factor, which are stimulated by calcium. At the shank, actin cables are produced by formin and villin. Under the complicated interaction, the actin cytoskeleton is controlled spatially and temporally during root hair development. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton results in the promotion of gravitropism in inflorescence stems and hypocotyls of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kiss, John Z.

    2002-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is hypothesized to play a major role in gravity perception and transduction mechanisms in roots of plants. To determine whether actin microfilaments (MFs) are involved in these processes in stem-like organs, we studied gravitropism in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems and hypocotyls. Localization studies using Alexa Fluor-phalloidin in conjugation with confocal microscopy demonstrated a longitudinally and transversely oriented actin MF network in endodermal cells of stems and hypocotyls. Latrunculin B (Lat-B) treatment of hypocotyls caused depolymerization of actin MFs in endodermal cells and a significant reduction of hypocotyl growth rates. Actin MFs in Lat-B-treated inflorescence stems also were disrupted, but growth rates were not affected. Despite disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in these two organs, Lat-B-treated stems and hypocotyls exhibited a promotion of gravitropic curvature in response to reorientation. In contrast, Lat-B reduced gravitropic curvature in roots but also reduced the growth rate. Thus, in contrast to prevailing hypotheses, our results suggest that actin MFs are not a necessary component of gravitropism in inflorescence stems and hypocotyls. Furthermore, this is the first study to demonstrate a prominent actin MF network in endodermal cells in the putative gravity-perceiving cells in stems.

  9. Disruption of the Actin Cytoskeleton Results in the Promotion of Gravitropism in Inflorescence Stems and Hypocotyls of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kiss, John Z.

    2002-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is hypothesized to play a major role in gravity perception and transduction mechanisms in roots of plants. To determine whether actin microfilaments (MFs) are involved in these processes in stem-like organs, we studied gravitropism in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems and hypocotyls. Localization studies using Alexa Fluor-phalloidin in conjugation with confocal microscopy demonstrated a longitudinally and transversely oriented actin MF network in endodermal cells of stems and hypocotyls. Latrunculin B (Lat-B) treatment of hypocotyls caused depolymerization of actin MFs in endodermal cells and a significant reduction of hypocotyl growth rates. Actin MFs in Lat-B-treated inflorescence stems also were disrupted, but growth rates were not affected. Despite disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in these two organs, Lat-B-treated stems and hypocotyls exhibited a promotion of gravitropic curvature in response to reorientation. In contrast, Lat-B reduced gravitropic curvature in roots but also reduced the growth rate. Thus, in contrast to prevailing hypotheses, our results suggest that actin MFs are not a necessary component of gravitropism in inflorescence stems and hypocotyls. Furthermore, this is the first study to demonstrate a prominent actin MF network in endodermal cells in the putative gravity-perceiving cells in stems. PMID:11842170

  10. Arp2/3 complex inhibition radically alters lamellipodial actin architecture, suspended cell shape, and the cell spreading process

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Yeterian, Mesrob; Weeks, Richard M.; Medrano, Angela E.; Brown, Briana L.; Geist, Heather L.; Pais, Mollyann D.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Shuster, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have investigated the dendritic actin cytoskeleton of the cell edge's lamellipodial (LP) region by experimentally decreasing the activity of the actin filament nucleator and branch former, the Arp2/3 complex. Here we extend these studies via pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex in sea urchin coelomocytes, cells that possess an unusually broad LP region and display correspondingly exaggerated centripetal flow. Using light and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that Arp2/3 complex inhibition via the drug CK666 dramatically altered LP actin architecture, slowed centripetal flow, drove a lamellipodial-to-filopodial shape change in suspended cells, and induced a novel actin structural organization during cell spreading. A general feature of the CK666 phenotype in coelomocytes was transverse actin arcs, and arc generation was arrested by a formin inhibitor. We also demonstrate that CK666 treatment produces actin arcs in other cells with broad LP regions, namely fish keratocytes and Drosophila S2 cells. We hypothesize that the actin arcs made visible by Arp2/3 complex inhibition in coelomocytes may represent an exaggerated manifestation of the elongate mother filaments that could possibly serve as the scaffold for the production of the dendritic actin network. PMID:25568343

  11. Actin dynamics regulate immediate PAR-2-dependent responses to acute epidermal permeability barrier abrogation.

    PubMed

    Roelandt, Truus; Heughebaert, Carol; Verween, Gunther; Giddelo, Christina; Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Devos, Daniel; Crumrine, Debra; Roseeuw, Diane; Elias, Peter M; Hachem, Jean-Pierre

    2011-02-01

    Lamellar body (LB) secretion and terminal differentiation of stratum granulosum (SG) cells are signaled by both protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) and caveolin-1 (cav-1). To address the early dynamics of LB secretion, we examined cytoskeletal remodeling of keratinocytes in 3 mouse models following acute barrier abrogation: hairless mice, PAR-2 knockout (-/-) and cav-1 -/-. Under basal conditions, globular (G)-actin accumulates in SG cells cytosol, while filamentous (F)-actin is restricted to peri-membrane domains. Barrier abrogation induces the apical movement of F-actin and the retreat of the SG-G-actin front, paralleled by upstream cytoskeletal kinases activation. This phenomenon was both enhanced by PAR-2 agonist, and inhibited by cytochalasin-D and in PAR-2 knockout mice. We found that plasma membrane conformational changes causing LB secretion are controlled by PAR-2-dependent cytoskeletal rearrangements. We next addressed the interaction dynamics between cytoskeleton and plasma membrane following PAR-2-induced actin stress fiber formation in both cav-1 -/- and wildtype cells. Actin stress fiber formation is increased in cav-1 -/- cells prior to and following PAR-2 agonist peptide-treatment, while absence of cav-1 inhibits E-cadherin-mediated cell-to-cell adhesion. PAR-2 drives cytoskeletal/plasma membrane dynamics that regulate early LB secretion following barrier abrogation, stress fiber formation and keratinocyte adhesion. Copyright © 2010 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. AtFH1 formin mutation affects actin filament and microtubule dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Cvrčková, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell growth and morphogenesis depend on remodelling of both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. AtFH1 (At5g25500), the main housekeeping Arabidopsis formin, is targeted to membranes and known to nucleate and bundle actin. The effect of mutations in AtFH1 on root development and cytoskeletal dynamics was examined. Consistent with primarily actin-related formin function, fh1 mutants showed increased sensitivity to the actin polymerization inhibitor latrunculin B (LatB). LatB-treated mutants had thicker, shorter roots than wild-type plants. Reduced cell elongation and morphological abnormalities were observed in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Fluorescently tagged cytoskeletal markers were used to follow cytoskeletal dynamics in wild-type and mutant plants using confocal microscopy and VAEM (variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy). Mutants exhibited more abundant but less dynamic F-actin bundles and more dynamic microtubules than wild-type seedlings. Treatment of wild-type seedlings with a formin inhibitor, SMIFH2, mimicked the root growth and cell expansion phenotypes and cytoskeletal structure alterations observed in fh1 mutants. The results suggest that besides direct effects on actin organization, the in vivo role of AtFH1 also includes modulation of microtubule dynamics, possibly mediated by actin–microtubule cross-talk. PMID:23202131

  13. Rho-GTPase effector ROCK phosphorylates cofilin in actin-meditated cytokinesis during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xing; Liu, Jun; Dai, Xiao-Xin; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-02-01

    During oocyte meiosis, a spindle forms in the central cytoplasm and migrates to the cortex. Subsequently, the oocyte extrudes a small body and forms a highly polarized egg; this process is regulated primarily by actin. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is involved in various cellular functions, such as stress fiber formation, cell migration, tumor cell invasion, and cell motility. In this study, we investigated possible roles for ROCK in mouse oocyte meiosis. ROCK was localized around spindles after germinal vesicle breakdown and was colocalized with cytoplasmic actin and mitochondria. Disrupting ROCK activity by RNAi or an inhibitor resulted in cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion failure. Time-lapse microscopy showed that this may have been due to spindle migration and cytokinesis defects, as chromosomes segregated but failed to extrude a polar body and then realigned. Actin expression at oocyte membranes and in cytoplasm was significantly decreased after these treatments. Actin caps were also disrupted, which was confirmed by a failure to form cortical granule-free domains. The mitochondrial distribution was also disrupted, which indicated that mitochondria were involved in the ROCK-mediated actin assembly. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Cofilin, a downstream molecule of ROCK, decreased after disrupting ROCK activity. Thus, our results indicated that a ROCK-Cofilin-actin pathway regulated meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during mouse oocyte maturation.

  14. Phosphoinositides Regulate Membrane-dependent Actin Assembly by Latex Bead Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Defacque, Hélène; Bos, Evelyne; Garvalov, Boyan; Barret, Cécile; Roy, Christian; Mangeat, Paul; Shin, Hye-Won; Rybin, Vladimir; Griffiths, Gareth

    2002-01-01

    Actin assembly on membrane surfaces is an elusive process in which several phosphoinositides (PIPs) have been implicated. We have reconstituted actin assembly using a defined membrane surface, the latex bead phagosome (LBP), and shown that the PI(4,5)P2-binding proteins ezrin and/or moesin were essential for this process (Defacque et al., 2000b). Here, we provide several lines of evidence that both preexisting and newly synthesized PI(4,5)P2, and probably PI(4)P, are essential for phagosomal actin assembly; only these PIPs were routinely synthesized from ATP during in vitro actin assembly. Treatment of LBP with phospholipase C or with adenosine, an inhibitor of type II PI 4-kinase, as well as preincubation with anti-PI(4)P or anti-PI(4,5)P2 antibodies all inhibited this process. Incorporation of extra PI(4)P or PI(4,5)P2 into the LBP membrane led to a fivefold increase in the number of phagosomes that assemble actin. An ezrin mutant mutated in the PI(4,5)P2-binding sites was less efficient in binding to LBPs and in reconstituting actin assembly than wild-type ezrin. Our data show that PI 4- and PI 5-kinase, and under some conditions also PI 3-kinase, activities are present on LBPs and can be activated by ATP, even in the absence of GTP or cytosolic components. However, PI 3-kinase activity is not required for actin assembly, because the process was not affected by PI 3-kinase inhibitors. We suggest that the ezrin-dependent actin assembly on the LBP membrane may require active turnover of D4 and D5 PIPs on the organelle membrane. PMID:11950931

  15. The Plant Actin Cytoskeleton Responds to Signals from Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L.; Shimono, Masaki; Li, Jiejie

    2013-04-04

    Plants are constantly exposed to a large and diverse array of microbes; however, most plants are immune to the majority of potential invaders and susceptible to only a small subset of pathogens. The cytoskeleton comprises a dynamic intracellular framework that responds rapidly to biotic stresses and supports numerous fundamental cellular processes including vesicle trafficking, endocytosis and the spatial distribution of organelles and protein complexes. For years, the actin cytoskeleton has been assumed to play a role in plant innate immunity against fungi and oomycetes, based largely on static images and pharmacological studies. To date, however, there is little evidence thatmore » the host-cell actin cytoskeleton participates in responses to phytopathogenic bacteria. Here, we quantified the spatiotemporal changes in host-cell cytoskeletal architecture during the immune response to pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Two distinct changes to host cytoskeletal arrays were observed that correspond to distinct phases of plant-bacterial interactions i.e. the perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) during pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and perturbations by effector proteins during effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS). We demonstrate that an immediate increase in actin filament abundance is a conserved and novel component of PTI. Notably, treatment of leaves with a MAMP peptide mimic was sufficient to elicit a rapid change in actin organization in epidermal cells, and this actin response required the host-cell MAMP receptor kinase complex, including FLS2, BAK1 and BIK1. Finally, we found that actin polymerization is necessary for the increase in actin filament density and that blocking this increase with the actin-disrupting drug latrunculin B leads to enhanced susceptibility of host plants to pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria.« less

  16. Sensory role of actin in auxin-dependent responses of tobacco BY-2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Polar auxin transport depends on the polar localization of auxin-efflux carriers. The cycling of these carriers between cell interior and plasma membrane depends on actin. The dynamic of actin not only affects auxin transport, but also changes the auxin-responsiveness. To study the potential link between auxin responsiveness and actin dynamics, we investigated developmental responses of the non-transformed BY-2 (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow 2) cell line and the transgenic BY-2 strain GF11 (stably transformed BY-2 cells with a GFP-fimbrin actin-binding domain 2 construct). The developmental process was divided into three distinct stages: cell cycling, cell elongation and file disintegration. Several phenotypes were measured to monitor the cellular responses to different concentrations of exogenous natural auxin (Indole-3-acetic acid, IAA). We found that auxin stimulated and prolonged the mitotic activity, and delayed the exit from the proliferation phase. However, both responses were suppressed in the GF11 line. At the stationary phase of the cultivation cycle, auxin strongly accelerated the cell file disintegration. Interestingly, it was not suppressed but progressed to a more complete disintegration in the GF11 line. During the cultivation cycle, we also followed the organization of actin in the GF11 line and did not detect any significant difference in actin organization from untreated control or exogenous IAA treatment. Therefore, our findings indicate that the specific differences observed in the GF11 line must be linked with a function of actin that is not structural. It means that there is a sensory role of actin for auxin signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of hypothermia on synaptic actin cytoskeletal changes induced by perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Javier; Romero, Juan; Holubiec, Mariana; Barreto, George; González, Janneth; Saint-Martin, Madeleine; Blanco, Eduardo; Carlos Cavicchia, Juan; Castilla, Rocío; Capani, Francisco

    2014-05-14

    Cerebral hypoxia-ischemia damages synaptic proteins, resulting in cytoskeletal alterations, protein aggregation and neuronal death. In the previous works, we have shown neuronal and synaptic changes in rat neostriatum subjected to hypoxia that leads to ubi-protein accumulation. Recently, we also showed that, changes in F-actin organization could be related to early alterations induced by hypoxia in the Central Nervous System. However, little is known about effective treatment to diminish the damage. The main aim of this work is to study the effects of birth hypothermia on the actin cytoskeleton of neostriatal post-synaptic densities (PSD) in 60 days olds rats by immunohistochemistry, photooxidation and western blot. We used 2 different protocols of hypothermia: (a) intrahypoxic hypothermia at 15°C and (b) post-hypoxia hypothermia at 32°C. Consistent with previous data at 30 days, staining with phalloidin-Alexa(488) followed by confocal microscopy analysis showed an increase of F-actin fluorescent staining in the neostriatum of hypoxic animals. Correlative photooxidation electron microscopy confirmed these observations showing an increment in the number of mushroom-shaped F-actin staining spines in neostriatal excitatory synapses in rats subjected to hypoxia. In addition, western blot revealed β-actin increase in PSDs in hypoxic animals. The optic relative density measurement showed a significant difference between controls and hypoxic animals. When hypoxia was induced under hypothermic conditions, the changes observed in actin cytoskeleton were blocked. Post-hypoxic hypothermia showed similar answer but actin cytoskeleton modifications were not totally reverted as we observed at 15°C. These data suggest that the decrease of the body temperature decreases the actin modifications in dendritic spines preventing the neuronal death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Actin-related protein 2/3 complex-based actin polymerization is critical for male fertility.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Kwon, W S; Rahman, M S; Yoon, S J; Park, Y J; Pang, M G

    2015-09-01

    The actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex is critical for regulation of actin polymerization, which is associated with sperm motility and capacitation status. However, the function of the Arp2/3 complex in male fertility has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the role of the Arp2/3 complex in different processes in spermatozoa and its consequences on fertilization and early embryonic development. In this in vitro study, mouse spermatozoa were incubated with different concentrations (10, 100, and 500 μm) of CK-636, an Arp2/3 complex antagonist. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex by high concentrations (100 and 500 μm) of CK-636 induced hyper-activated motility and acrosomal reaction, whereas intracellular calcium and tyrosine phosphorylation levels in spermatozoa were inhibited. Moreover, exposure of spermatozoa to the highest concentration of CK-636 reduced fertilization and embryo development. Interestingly, fertilization was significantly increased after treatment with 100 μm CK-636, whereas embryonic development was significantly decreased. Therefore, we conclude that the Arp2/3 complex plays a decisive role in regulation of sperm function and male fertility via actin polymerization. We anticipate that the Arp2/3 complex may have clinical application as marker for male fertility and male contraceptive targeting. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  19. Actin assembly factors regulate the gelation kinetics and architecture of F-actin networks.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Tobias T; Oakes, Patrick W; Sees, Jennifer; Kovar, David R; Gardel, Margaret L

    2013-04-16

    Dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is required for diverse cellular processes. Proteins regulating the assembly kinetics of the cytoskeletal biopolymer F-actin are known to impact the architecture of actin cytoskeletal networks in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that changes to actin assembly kinetics with physiologically relevant proteins profilin and formin (mDia1 and Cdc12) have dramatic consequences on the architecture and gelation kinetics of otherwise biochemically identical cross-linked F-actin networks. Reduced F-actin nucleation rates promote the formation of a sparse network of thick bundles, whereas increased nucleation rates result in a denser network of thinner bundles. Changes to F-actin elongation rates also have marked consequences. At low elongation rates, gelation ceases and a solution of rigid bundles is formed. By contrast, rapid filament elongation accelerates dynamic arrest and promotes gelation with minimal F-actin density. These results are consistent with a recently developed model of how kinetic constraints regulate network architecture and underscore how molecular control of polymer assembly is exploited to modulate cytoskeletal architecture and material properties. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Actin Assembly Factors Regulate the Gelation Kinetics and Architecture of F-actin Networks

    PubMed Central

    Falzone, Tobias T.; Oakes, Patrick W.; Sees, Jennifer; Kovar, David R.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is required for diverse cellular processes. Proteins regulating the assembly kinetics of the cytoskeletal biopolymer F-actin are known to impact the architecture of actin cytoskeletal networks in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that changes to actin assembly kinetics with physiologically relevant proteins profilin and formin (mDia1 and Cdc12) have dramatic consequences on the architecture and gelation kinetics of otherwise biochemically identical cross-linked F-actin networks. Reduced F-actin nucleation rates promote the formation of a sparse network of thick bundles, whereas increased nucleation rates result in a denser network of thinner bundles. Changes to F-actin elongation rates also have marked consequences. At low elongation rates, gelation ceases and a solution of rigid bundles is formed. By contrast, rapid filament elongation accelerates dynamic arrest and promotes gelation with minimal F-actin density. These results are consistent with a recently developed model of how kinetic constraints regulate network architecture and underscore how molecular control of polymer assembly is exploited to modulate cytoskeletal architecture and material properties. PMID:23601318

  1. Topical PDT in the Treatment of Benign Skin Diseases: Principles and New Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miri; Jung, Haw Young; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-09-25

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light energy, and molecular oxygen to cause cell damage. Cells exposed to the photosensitizer are susceptible to destruction upon light absorption because excitation of the photosensitizing agents leads to the production of reactive oxygen species and, subsequently, direct cytotoxicity. Using the intrinsic cellular heme biosynthetic pathway, topical PDT selectively targets abnormal cells, while preserving normal surrounding tissues. This selective cytotoxic effect is the basis for the use of PDT in antitumor treatment. Clinically, PDT is a widely used therapeutic regimen for oncologic skin conditions such as actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and basal cell carcinoma. PDT has been shown, under certain circumstances, to stimulate the immune system and produce antibacterial, and/or regenerative effects while protecting cell viability. Thus, it may be useful for treating benign skin conditions. An increasing number of studies support the idea that PDT may be effective for treating acne vulgaris and several other inflammatory/infective skin diseases, including psoriasis, rosacea, viral warts, and aging-related changes. This review provides an overview of the clinical investigations of PDT and discusses each of the essential aspects of the sequence: its mechanism of action, common photosensitizers, light sources, and clinical applications in dermatology. Of the numerous clinical trials of PDT in dermatology, this review focuses on those studies that have reported remarkable therapeutic benefits following topical PDT for benign skin conditions such as acne vulgaris, viral warts, and photorejuvenation without causing severe side effects.

  2. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Tian, Xia; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl), a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:23727244

  3. Oligomerization of coronin: Implication on actin filament length in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rashmi; Prasadareddy Kajuluri, Lova; Pathak, Neelam; Gupta, Chhitar M; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A

    2015-12-01

    Coronin proteins bind with actin filaments and participate in regulation of actin-dependent processes. These proteins contain a coiled-coil domain at their C-terminus, which is responsible for their dimeric or trimeric forms. However, the functional significance of these oligomeric configurations in organizing the actin cytoskeleton is obscure. Here, we report that the Leishmania coronin exists in a higher oligomeric form through its coiled-coil domain, the truncation of which ablates the ability of Leishmania coronin to assist actin-filament formation. F-actin co-sedimentation assay using purified proteins shows that the coiled-coil domain does not interact with actin-filaments and its absence does not abrogate actin-coronin interaction. Furthermore, it was shown that unlike other coronins, Leishmania coronin interacts with actin-filaments through its unique region. These results provided important insights into the role of coronin oligomerization in modulating actin-network. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Structure of the Rigor Actin-Tropomyosin-Myosin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Müller, Mirco; Penczek, Pawel A.; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Raunser, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of myosin with actin filaments is the central feature of muscle contraction and cargo movement along actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. Myosin converts the chemical energy stored in ATP into force and movement along actin filaments. Myosin binding to actin induces conformational changes that are coupled to the nucleotide-binding pocket and amplified by a specialized region of the motor domain for efficient force generation. Tropomyosin plays a key role in regulating the productive interaction between myosins and actin. Here, we report the 8 Å resolution structure of the actin-tropomyosin-myosin complex determined by cryo electron microscopy. The pseudo-atomic model of the complex obtained from fitting crystal structures into the map defines the large actin-myosin-tropomyosin interface and the molecular interactions between the proteins in detail and allows us to propose a structural model for tropomyosin dependent myosin binding to actin and actin-induced nucleotide release from myosin. PMID:22817895

  5. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A new F-actin structure in fungi: actin ring formation around the cell nucleus of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kopecká, Marie; Kawamoto, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    The F-actin cytoskeleton of Cryptococcus neoformans is known to comprise actin cables, cortical patches and cytokinetic ring. Here, we describe a new F-actin structure in fungi, a perinuclear F-actin collar ring around the cell nucleus, by fluorescent microscopic imaging of rhodamine phalloidin-stained F-actin. Perinuclear F-actin rings form in Cryptococcus neoformans treated with the microtubule inhibitor Nocodazole or with the drug solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or grown in yeast extract peptone dextrose (YEPD) medium, but they are absent in cells treated with Latrunculin A. Perinuclear F-actin rings may function as 'funicular cabin' for the cell nucleus, and actin cables as intracellular 'funicular' suspending nucleus in the central position in the cell and moving nucleus along the polarity axis along actin cables.

  7. Actin cytoskeleton and exocytosis in rat melanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Helana H; Popoff, Michel R; Zorec, Robert

    2000-01-01

    We monitored secretory activity of single rat melanotrophs by the patch-clamp membrane capacitance measurements (C m ). Secretory activity was stimulated by cytosol dialysis with a patch-pipette solution containing 1μM [Ca 2+ ] i . Actin cytoskeleton was disaggregated by pretreating cells with Clostridium spiroforme toxin, which specifically ADP-ribosylates cellular actin. The extent of cytoskeleton disaggregation was monitored by phalloidin immunostaining. The maximal rate of secretion increases two folds in toxin-treated cells in comparison to controls, whereas the extent of calcium-induced secretory response was similar to that obtained in the non-treated cells. The results show that the subcortical actin network attenuates the rate of secretory activity, which we interpret to reflect a barrier function of cytoskeleton for exocytosis.

  8. Actin cytoskeleton and exocytosis in rat melanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, H H; Popoff, M R; Zorec, R

    2000-01-01

    We monitored secretory activity of single rat melanotrophs by the patch-clamp membrane capacitance measurements (Cm). Secretory activity was stimulated by cytosol dialysis with a patch-pipette solution containing 1 microM [Ca2+]i. Actin cytoskeleton was disaggregated by pretreating cells with Clostridium spiroforme toxin, which specifically ADP-ribosylates cellular actin. The extent of cytoskeleton disaggregation was monitored by phalloidin immunostaining. The maximal rate of secretion increases two folds in toxin-treated cells in comparison to controls, whereas the extent of calcium-induced secretory response was similar to that obtained in the non-treated cells. The results show that the subcortical actin network attenuates the rate of secretory activity, which we interpret to reflect a barrier function of cytoskeleton for exocytosis.

  9. Actin Out: Regulation of the Synaptic Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Erin F.; Soderling, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    The small size of dendritic spines belies the elaborate role they play in excitatory synaptic transmission and ultimately complex behaviors. The cytoskeletal architecture of the spine is predominately composed of actin filaments. These filaments, which at first glance might appear simple, are also surprisingly complex. They dynamically assemble into different structures and serve as a platform for orchestrating the elaborate responses of the spine during spinogenesis and experience-dependent plasticity. Multiple mutations associated with human neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders involve genes that encode regulators of the synaptic cytoskeleton. A major, unresolved question is how the disruption of specific actin filament structures leads to the onset and progression of complex synaptic and behavioral phenotypes. This review will cover established and emerging mechanisms of actin cytoskeletal remodeling and how this influences specific aspects of spine biology that are implicated in disease. PMID:26453304

  10. Spontaneous actin dynamics in contractile rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten; Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Riveline, Daniel

    Networks of polymerizing actin filaments are known to be capable to self-organize into a variety of structures. For example, spontaneous actin polymerization waves have been observed in living cells in a number of circumstances, notably, in crawling neutrophils and slime molds. During later stages of cell division, they can also spontaneously form a contractile ring that will eventually cleave the cell into two daughter cells. We present a framework for describing networks of polymerizing actin filaments, where assembly is regulated by various proteins. It can also include the effects of molecular motors. We show that the molecular processes driven by these proteins can generate various structures that have been observed in contractile rings of fission yeast and mammalian cells. We discuss a possible functional role of each of these patterns. The work was supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherche, France, (ANR-10-LABX-0030-INRT) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB1027.

  11. Apoptosis in the areas of squamous differentiation of irritated seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Pesce, C; Scalora, S

    2000-03-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) consists of a localized proliferation of basaloid keratinocytes, often accompanied by hyperkeratosis and hyperpigmentation. In irritated SK, these features are associated with areas of squamous differentiation with larger keratinocytes and squamous cell eddies. This work is concerned with the evaluation of apoptosis, as demonstrated by the TUNEL method, in the different varieties of SK. Apoptosis was highly expressed in the areas of squamous differentiation of irritated SK, but only mildly increased in the other varieties of SK. These data support the hypothesis that apoptosis has a role in the squamous differentiation of irritated SK. In consideration also of previous data showing that irritated SK is associated with downregulation of EGF-R expression and 125I-EGF binding, we postulate that the morphologic features of irritated SK could correspond to an involution phase of the disease, characterized by altered cell balance with inadequate cell renewal and increased cell loss.

  12. The Bacterial Actin MamK

    PubMed Central

    Ozyamak, Ertan; Kollman, Justin; Agard, David A.; Komeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    It is now recognized that actin-like proteins are widespread in bacteria and, in contrast to eukaryotic actins, are highly diverse in sequence and function. The bacterial actin, MamK, represents a clade, primarily found in magnetotactic bacteria, that is involved in the proper organization of subcellular organelles, termed magnetosomes. We have previously shown that MamK from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 (AMB-1) forms dynamic filaments in vivo. To gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie MamK dynamics and function, we have now studied the in vitro properties of MamK. We demonstrate that MamK is an ATPase that, in the presence of ATP, assembles rapidly into filaments that disassemble once ATP is depleted. The mutation of a conserved active site residue (E143A) abolishes ATPase activity of MamK but not its ability to form filaments. Filament disassembly depends on both ATPase activity and potassium levels, the latter of which results in the organization of MamK filaments into bundles. These data are consistent with observations indicating that accessory factors are required to promote filament disassembly and for spatial organization of filaments in vivo. We also used cryo-electron microscopy to obtain a high resolution structure of MamK filaments. MamK adopts a two-stranded helical filament architecture, but unlike eukaryotic actin and other actin-like filaments, subunits in MamK strands are unstaggered giving rise to a unique filament architecture. Beyond extending our knowledge of the properties and function of MamK in magnetotactic bacteria, this study emphasizes the functional and structural diversity of bacterial actins in general. PMID:23204522

  13. Nucleotide-dependent conformational states of actin

    PubMed Central

    Pfaendtner, Jim; Branduardi, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Pollard, Thomas D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the state of the bound nucleotide (ATP, ADP-Pi, or ADP) on the conformational free-energy landscape of actin is investigated. Nucleotide-dependent folding of the DNase-I binding (DB) loop in monomeric actin and the actin trimer is carried out using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) calculations accelerated with a multiscale implementation of the metadynamics algorithm. Additionally, an investigation of the opening and closing of the actin nucleotide binding cleft is performed. Nucleotide-dependent free-energy profiles for all of these conformational changes are calculated within the framework of metadynamics. We find that in ADP-bound monomer, the folded and unfolded states of the DB loop have similar relative free-energy. This result helps explain the experimental difficulty in obtaining an ordered crystal structure for this region of monomeric actin. However, we find that in the ADP-bound actin trimer, the folded DB loop is stable and in a free-energy minimum. It is also demonstrated that the nucleotide binding cleft favors a closed conformation for the bound nucleotide in the ATP and ADP-Pi states, whereas the ADP state favors an open confirmation, both in the monomer and trimer. These results suggest a mechanism of allosteric interactions between the nucleotide binding cleft and the DB loop. This behavior is confirmed by an additional simulation that shows the folding free-energy as a function of the nucleotide cleft width, which demonstrates that the barrier for folding changes significantly depending on the value of the cleft width. PMID:19620726

  14. Cytoskeletal actin dynamics shape a ramifying actin network underpinning immunological synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Marco; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Chang, Veronica T.; Colin-York, Huw; Clausen, Mathias P.; Felce, James H.; Galiani, Silvia; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Santos, Ana M.; Heddleston, John M.; Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Waithe, Dominic; de la Serna, Jorge Bernardino; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Liu, Tsung-li; Chew, Teng-Leong; Betzig, Eric; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian

    2017-01-01

    T cell activation and especially trafficking of T cell receptor microclusters during immunological synapse formation are widely thought to rely on cytoskeletal remodeling. However, important details on the involvement of actin in the latter transport processes are missing. Using a suite of advanced optical microscopes to analyze resting and activated T cells, we show that, following contact formation with activating surfaces, these cells sequentially rearrange their cortical actin across the entire cell, creating a previously unreported ramifying actin network above the immunological synapse. This network shows all the characteristics of an inward-growing transportation network and its dynamics correlating with T cell receptor rearrangements. This actin reorganization is accompanied by an increase in the nanoscale actin meshwork size and the dynamic adjustment of the turnover times and filament lengths of two differently sized filamentous actin populations, wherein formin-mediated long actin filaments support a very flat and stiff contact at the immunological synapse interface. The initiation of immunological synapse formation, as highlighted by calcium release, requires markedly little contact with activating surfaces and no cytoskeletal rearrangements. Our work suggests that incipient signaling in T cells initiates global cytoskeletal rearrangements across the whole cell, including a stiffening process for possibly mechanically supporting contact formation at the immunological synapse interface as well as a central ramified transportation network apparently directed at the consolidation of the contact and the delivery of effector functions. PMID:28691087

  15. Actin-binding proteins sensitively mediate F-actin bundle stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.; Bathe, Mark; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2006-09-01

    Bundles of filamentous actin (F-actin) form primary structural components of a broad range of cytoskeletal processes including filopodia, sensory hair cell bristles and microvilli. Actin-binding proteins (ABPs) allow the cell to tailor the dimensions and mechanical properties of the bundles to suit specific biological functions. Therefore, it is important to obtain quantitative knowledge on the effect of ABPs on the mechanical properties of F-actin bundles. Here we measure the bending stiffness of F-actin bundles crosslinked by three ABPs that are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. We observe distinct regimes of bundle bending stiffness that differ by orders of magnitude depending on ABP type, concentration and bundle size. The behaviour observed experimentally is reproduced quantitatively by a molecular-based mechanical model in which ABP shearing competes with F-actin extension/compression. Our results shed new light on the biomechanical function of ABPs and demonstrate how single-molecule properties determine mesoscopic behaviour. The bending mechanics of F-actin fibre bundles are general and have implications for cytoskeletal mechanics and for the rational design of functional materials.

  16. Non-Straub type actin from molluscan catch muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Shelud'ko, Nikolay S., E-mail: sheludko@stl.ru; Girich, Ulyana V.; Lazarev, Stanislav S.

    We have developed a method of obtaining natural actin from smooth muscles of the bivalves on the example of the Crenomytilus grayanus catch muscle. The muscles were previously rigorized to prevent a loss of thin filaments during homogenization and washings. Thin filaments were isolated with a low ionic strength solution in the presence of ATP and sodium pyrophosphate. Surface proteins of thin filaments-tropomyosin, troponin, calponin and some minor actin-binding proteins-were dissociated from actin filaments by increasing the ionic strength to 0.6 M KCL. Natural fibrillar actin obtained in that way depolymerizes easily in low ionic strength solutions commonly used for themore » extraction of Straub-type actin from acetone powder. Purification of natural actin was carried out by the polymerization–depolymerization cycle. The content of inactivated actin remaining in the supernatant is much less than at a similar purification of Straub-type actin. A comparative investigation was performed between the natural mussel actin and the Straub-type rabbit skeletal actin in terms of the key properties of actin: polymerization, activation of Mg-ATPase activity of myosin, and the electron-microscopic structure of actin polymers. -- Highlights: •We developed method of repolymerizable invertebrate smooth muscle actin obtaining. •Our method does not involve use of denaturating agents, which could modify proteins. •Viscosity and polymerization rate of actin, gained that way, is similar to Straub one. •Electron microscopy showed that repolymerized mussel actin is similar to Straub one. •Repolymerized mussel actin has greater ATPase activating capacity, than Straub actin.« less

  17. Actin Age Orchestrates Myosin-5 and Myosin-6 Runlengths

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Santos, Alicja; Kovar, David R.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike a static and immobile skeleton, the actin cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network of filamentous actin (F-actin) polymers that continuously turn over. In addition to generating mechanical forces and sensing mechanical deformation, dynamic F-actin networks serve as cellular tracks for myosin motor traffic. However, much of our mechanistic understanding of processive myosins comes from in vitro studies where motility was studied on pre-assembled and artificially stabilized, static F-actin tracks. In this work, we examine the role of actin dynamics in single-molecule myosin motility using assembling F-actin and the two highly processive motors, myosin-5 and myosin-6. These two myosins have distinct functions in the cell and travel in opposite directions along actin filaments [1–3]. Myosin-5 walks towards the barbed ends of F-actin, traveling to sites of actin polymerization at the cell periphery [4]. Myosin-6 walks towards the pointed end of F-actin [5], traveling towards the cell center along older segments of the actin filament. We find that myosin-5 takes 1.3 to 1.5-fold longer runs on ADP•Pi (young) F-actin, while myosin-6 takes 1.7 to 3.6-fold longer runs along ADP (old) F-actin. These results suggest that conformational differences between ADP•Pi and ADP F-actin tailor these myosins to walk farther toward their preferred actin filament end. Taken together, these experiments define a new mechanism by which myosin traffic may sort to different F-actin networks depending on filament age. PMID:26190073

  18. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-02

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins.

  19. A Continuum Model of Actin Waves in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Khamviwath, Varunyu; Hu, Jifeng; Othmer, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Actin waves are complex dynamical patterns of the dendritic network of filamentous actin in eukaryotes. We developed a model of actin waves in PTEN-deficient Dictyostelium discoideum by deriving an approximation of the dynamics of discrete actin filaments and combining it with a signaling pathway that controls filament branching. This signaling pathway, together with the actin network, contains a positive feedback loop that drives the actin waves. Our model predicts the structure, composition, and dynamics of waves that are consistent with existing experimental evidence, as well as the biochemical dependence on various protein partners. Simulation suggests that actin waves are initiated when local actin network activity, caused by an independent process, exceeds a certain threshold. Moreover, diffusion of proteins that form a positive feedback loop with the actin network alone is sufficient for propagation of actin waves at the observed speed of . Decay of the wave back can be caused by scarcity of network components, and the shape of actin waves is highly dependent on the filament disassembly rate. The model allows retraction of actin waves and captures formation of new wave fronts in broken waves. Our results demonstrate that a delicate balance between a positive feedback, filament disassembly, and local availability of network components is essential for the complex dynamics of actin waves. PMID:23741312

  20. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  1. Actin and microtubule networks contribute differently to cell response for small and large strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubitschke, H.; Schnauss, J.; Nnetu, K. D.; Warmt, E.; Stange, R.; Kaes, J.

    2017-09-01

    Cytoskeletal filaments provide cells with mechanical stability and organization. The main key players are actin filaments and microtubules governing a cell’s response to mechanical stimuli. We investigated the specific influences of these crucial components by deforming MCF-7 epithelial cells at small (≤5% deformation) and large strains (>5% deformation). To understand specific contributions of actin filaments and microtubules, we systematically studied cellular responses after treatment with cytoskeleton influencing drugs. Quantification with the microfluidic optical stretcher allowed capturing the relative deformation and relaxation of cells under different conditions. We separated distinctive deformational and relaxational contributions to cell mechanics for actin and microtubule networks for two orders of magnitude of drug dosages. Disrupting actin filaments via latrunculin A, for instance, revealed a strain-independent softening. Stabilizing these filaments by treatment with jasplakinolide yielded cell softening for small strains but showed no significant change at large strains. In contrast, cells treated with nocodazole to disrupt microtubules displayed a softening at large strains but remained unchanged at small strains. Stabilizing microtubules within the cells via paclitaxel revealed no significant changes for deformations at small strains, but concentration-dependent impact at large strains. This suggests that for suspended cells, the actin cortex is probed at small strains, while at larger strains; the whole cell is probed with a significant contribution from the microtubules.

  2. Tumor-Preferential Induction of Immune Responses and Epidermal Cell Death in Actinic Keratoses by Ingenol Mebutate

    PubMed Central

    Zibert, John R.; Schön, Margarete; Hald, Andreas; Hansen, Maria H.; Litman, Thomas; Schön, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and strong clinical efficacy of the first-in-class, ingenol mebutate, against actinic keratosis (AK) has resulted in its recent approval. We conducted the first comprehensive analysis of the cellular and molecular mode of action of topical ingenol mebutate 0.05% gel in both AK and uninvolved skin of 26 patients in a phase I, single-center, open-label, within-patient comparison. As early as 1 day after application, ingenol mebutate induced profound epidermal cell death, along with a strong infiltrate of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Endothelial ICAM-1 activation became evident after 2 days. The reaction pattern was significantly more pronounced in AK compared with uninvolved skin, suggesting a tumor-preferential mode of action. Extensive molecular analyses and transcriptomic profiling of mRNAs and microRNAs demonstrated alterations in gene clusters functionally associated with epidermal development, inflammation, innate immunity, and response to wounding. Ingenol mebutate reveals a unique mode of action linking directly to anti-tumoral effects. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01387711 PMID:27612149

  3. A systems-biology approach to yeast actin cables.

    PubMed

    Drake, Tyler; Yusuf, Eddy; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    We focus on actin cables in yeast as a model system for understanding cytoskeletal organization and the workings of actin itself. In particular, we highlight quantitative approaches on the kinetics of actin-cable assembly and methods of measuring their morphology by image analysis. Actin cables described by these studies can span greater lengths than a thousand end-to-end actin-monomers. Because of this difference in length scales, control of the actin-cable system constitutes a junction between short-range interactions - among actin-monomers and nucleating, polymerization-facilitating, side-binding, severing, and cross-linking proteins - and the emergence of cell-scale physical form as embodied by the actin cables themselves.

  4. A Systems-Biology Approach to Yeast Actin Cables

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Tyler; Yusuf, Eddy; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    We focus on actin cables in yeast as a model system for understanding cytoskeletal organization and the workings of actin itself. In particular, we highlight quantitative approaches on the kinetics of actin cable assembly and methods of measuring their morphology by image analysis. Actin cables described by these studies can span greater lengths than a thousand end-to-end actin monomers. Because of this difference in length scales, control of the actin-cable system constitutes a junction between short-range interactions—among actin monomers and nucleating, polymerization-facilitating, side-binding, severing, and cross-linking proteins—and the emergence of cell-scale physical form as embodied by the actin cables themselves. PMID:22161338

  5. Affimer proteins for F-actin: novel affinity reagents that label F-actin in live and fixed cells.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Anna; Hughes, Ruth; Tiede, Christian; Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R; Knight, Peter J; Tomlinson, Darren; Peckham, Michelle

    2018-04-26

    Imaging the actin cytoskeleton in cells uses a wide range of approaches. Typically, a fluorescent derivative of the small cyclic peptide phalloidin is used to image F-actin in fixed cells. Lifeact and F-tractin are popular for imaging the cytoskeleton in live cells. Here we characterised novel affinity reagents called Affimers that specifically bind to F-actin in vitro to determine if they are suitable alternatives as eGFP-fusion proteins, to label actin in live cells, or for labeling F-actin in fixed cells. In vitro experiments showed that 3 out of the 4 Affimers (Affimers 6, 14 and 24) tested bind tightly to purified F-actin, and appear to have overlapping binding sites. As eGFP-fusion proteins, the same 3 Affimers label F-actin in live cells. FRAP experiments suggest that eGFP-Affimer 6 behaves most similarly to F-tractin and Lifeact. However, it does not colocalise with mCherry-actin in dynamic ruffles, and may preferentially bind stable actin filaments. All 4 Affimers label F-actin in methanol fixed cells, while only Affimer 14 labels F-actin after paraformaldehyde fixation. eGFP-Affimer 6 has potential for use in selectively imaging the stable actin cytoskeleton in live cells, while all 4 Affimers are strong alternatives to phalloidin for labelling F-actin in fixed cells.

  6. Interactions between G-actin and myosin subfragment 1: immunochemical probing of the NH2-terminal segment on actin.

    PubMed

    DasGupta, G; White, J; Cheung, P; Reisler, E

    1990-09-11

    The role of the N-terminal segment of actin in myosin-induced polymerization of G-actin was studied by using peptide antibodies directed against the first seven N-terminal residues of alpha-skeletal actin. Light scattering, fluorescence, and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the Fab fragments of these antibodies inhibited the polymerization of G-actin by myosin subfragment 1 (S-1) by inhibiting the binding of these proteins to each other. Fluorescence measurements using actin labeled with pyrenyliodoacetamide revealed that Fab inhibited the initial step in the binding of S-1 to G-actin. It is deduced from these results and from other literature data that the initial contact between G-actin and S-1 involves residues 1-7 on actin and residues 633-642 on the S-1 heavy chain. This interaction appears to be of major importance for the binding of S-1 and G-actin. The presence of additional myosin contact sites on G-actin was indicated by concentration-dependent recovery of S-1 binding to G-actin without displacement of Fab. The reduced Fab inhibition of S-1 binding to polymerizing and polymerized actin is consistent with the tightening of acto-S-1 binding at these sites or the creation of new sites upon formation of F-actin.

  7. Interactions of histatin-3 and histatin-5 with actin.

    PubMed

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Bachrach, Gilad; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-03-06

    Histatins are histidine rich polypeptides produced in the parotid and submandibular gland and secreted into the saliva. Histatin-3 and -5 are the most important polycationic histatins. They possess antimicrobial activity against fungi such as Candida albicans. Histatin-5 has a higher antifungal activity than histatin-3 while histatin-3 is mostly involved in wound healing in the oral cavity. We found that these histatins, like other polycationic peptides and proteins, such as LL-37, lysozyme and histones, interact with extracellular actin. Histatin-3 and -5 polymerize globular actin (G-actin) to filamentous actin (F-actin) and bundle F-actin filaments. Both actin polymerization and bundling by histatins is pH sensitive due to the high histidine content of histatins. In spite of the equal number of net positive charges and histidine residues in histatin-3 and -5, less histatin-3 is needed than histatin-5 for polymerization and bundling of actin. The efficiency of actin polymerization and bundling by histatins greatly increases with decreasing pH. Histatin-3 and -5 induced actin bundles are dissociated by 100 and 50 mM NaCl, respectively. The relatively low NaCl concentration required to dissociate histatin-induced bundles implies that the actin-histatin filaments bind to each other mainly by electrostatic forces. The binding of histatin-3 to F-actin is stronger than that of histatin-5 showing that hydrophobic forces have also some role in histatin-3- actin interaction. Histatins affect the fluorescence of probes attached to the D-loop of G-actin indicating histatin induced changes in actin structure. Transglutaminase cross-links histatins to actin. Competition and limited proteolysis experiments indicate that the main histatin cross-linking site on actin is glutamine-49 on the D-loop of actin. Both histatin-3 and -5 interacts with actin, however, histatin 3 binds stronger to actin and affects actin structure at lower concentration than histatin-5 due to the extra 8

  8. Damage effects of protoporphyrin IX - sonodynamic therapy on the cytoskeletal F-actin of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Liu, Quanhong; Tang, Wei; Wang, Xiaobing; Wang, Pan; Gong, Liyan; Wang, Yuan

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we report evidence of the damage effects of sonodynamic therapy (SDT) on a novel intracellular target, cytoskeletal F-actin, that has great importance for cancer treatment. Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells suspended in PBS were exposed to ultrasound at 1.34 MHz for up to 60s in the presence and absence of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). To evaluate the polymeric state and distribution of actin filaments (AF) we employed FITC-Phalloidin staining. The percentage of cells with intact AF was decreased with 10-80 microM PPIX after ultrasonic exposure, while only few cells with disturbed F-actin were observed with 80 microM PPIX alone. The fluorescence intensity of FITC-Phalloidin labeled cells was detected by flow cytometry. The morphological changes of EAC cells were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The nuclei were stained with Hoechst 33258 to determine apoptosis. Cytoskeletal F-actin and cell morphological changes were dependent on the time after SDT. Some cells suffered deformations of plasma membrane as blebs that reacted positively to FITC-Phalloidin at 2h after SDT treatment. Many of the cells showed the typically apoptotic chromatin fragmentation. The alterations were more significant 4h later. Our results showed that cytoskeletal F-actin might represent an important target for the SDT treatment and the observed effect on F-actin and the subsequent bleb formation mainly due to apoptosis formation due to the treatment.

  9. Role of cortactin in dynamic actin remodeling events in gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Navratil, Amy M; Dozier, Melissa G; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Clay, Colin M; Roberson, Mark S

    2014-02-01

    GnRH induces marked activation of the actin cytoskeleton in gonadotropes; however, the physiological consequences and cellular mechanisms responsible have yet to be fully elucidated. The current studies focus on the actin scaffolding protein cortactin. Using the gonadotrope-derived αT3-1 cell line, we found that cortactin is phosphorylated at Y(421), S(405), and S(418) in a time-dependent manner in response to the GnRH agonist buserelin (GnRHa). GnRHa induced translocation of cortactin to the leading edge of the plasma membrane where it colocalizes with actin and actin-related protein 3 (Arp3). Incubation of αT3-1 cells with the c-src inhibitor phosphoprotein phosphatase 1, blocked tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin, reduced cortactin association with Arp3, and blunted actin reorganization in response to GnRHa. Additionally, we used RNA silencing strategies to knock down cortactin in αT3-1 cells. Knockdown of cortactin blocked the ability of αT3-1 cells to generate filopodia, lamellipodia, and membrane ruffles in response to GnRHa. We show that lamellipodia and filopodia are capable of LHβ mobilization in primary pituitary culture after GnRHa treatment, and disruption of these structures using jasplakinolide reduces LH secretion. Collectively, our findings suggest that after GnRHa activation, src activity leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin, which facilitates its association with Arp3 to engage the actin cytoskeleton. The reorganization of actin by cortactin potentially underlies GnRHa-induced secretory events within αT3-1 cells.

  10. Load Adaptation of Lamellipodial Actin Networks.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan; Szep, Gregory; Nemethova, Maria; de Vries, Ingrid; Lieber, Arnon D; Winkler, Christoph; Kruse, Karsten; Small, J Victor; Schmeiser, Christian; Keren, Kinneret; Hauschild, Robert; Sixt, Michael

    2017-09-21

    Actin filaments polymerizing against membranes power endocytosis, vesicular traffic, and cell motility. In vitro reconstitution studies suggest that the structure and the dynamics of actin networks respond to mechanical forces. We demonstrate that lamellipodial actin of migrating cells responds to mechanical load when membrane tension is modulated. In a steady state, migrating cell filaments assume the canonical dendritic geometry, defined by Arp2/3-generated 70° branch points. Increased tension triggers a dense network with a broadened range of angles, whereas decreased tension causes a shift to a sparse configuration dominated by filaments growing perpendicularly to the plasma membrane. We show that these responses emerge from the geometry of branched actin: when load per filament decreases, elongation speed increases and perpendicular filaments gradually outcompete others because they polymerize the shortest distance to the membrane, where they are protected from capping. This network-intrinsic geometrical adaptation mechanism tunes protrusive force in response to mechanical load. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Curvature and torsion in growing actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2008-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia rickettsii move within a host cell by polymerizing a comet-tail of actin fibers that ultimately pushes the cell forward. This dense network of cross-linked actin polymers typically exhibits a striking curvature that causes bacteria to move in gently looping paths. Theoretically, tail curvature has been linked to details of motility by considering force and torque balances from a finite number of polymerizing filaments. Here we track beads coated with a prokaryotic activator of actin polymerization in three dimensions to directly quantify the curvature and torsion of bead motility paths. We find that bead paths are more likely to have low rather than high curvature at any given time. Furthermore, path curvature changes very slowly in time, with an autocorrelation decay time of 200 s. Paths with a small radius of curvature, therefore, remain so for an extended period resulting in loops when confined to two dimensions. When allowed to explore a three-dimensional (3D) space, path loops are less evident. Finally, we quantify the torsion in the bead paths and show that beads do not exhibit a significant left- or right-handed bias to their motion in 3D. These results suggest that paths of actin-propelled objects may be attributed to slow changes in curvature, possibly associated with filament debranching, rather than a fixed torque.

  12. A Mechanistic Model of the Actin Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bindschadler, M.; Osborn, E. A.; Dewey, C. F.; McGrath, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    We have derived a broad, deterministic model of the steady-state actin cycle that includes its major regulatory mechanisms. Ours is the first model to solve the complete nucleotide profile within filaments, a feature that determines the dynamics and geometry of actin networks at the leading edges of motile cells, and one that has challenged investigators developing models to interpret steady-state experiments. We arrived at the nucleotide profile through analytic and numerical approaches that completely agree. Our model reproduces behaviors seen in numerous experiments with purified proteins, but allows a detailed inspection of the concentrations and fluxes that might exist in these experiments. These inspections provide new insight into the mechanisms that determine the rate of actin filament treadmilling. Specifically, we find that mechanisms for enhancing Pi release from the ADP·Pi intermediate on filaments, for increasing the off rate of ADP-bound subunits at pointed ends, and the multiple, simultaneous functions of profilin, make unique and essential contributions to increased treadmilling. In combination, these mechanisms have a theoretical capacity to increase treadmilling to levels limited only by the amount of available actin. This limitation arises because as the cycle becomes more dynamic, it tends toward the unpolymerized state. PMID:15111391

  13. Molecular cloning of actin genes in Trichomonas vaginalis and phylogeny inferred from actin sequences.

    PubMed

    Bricheux, G; Brugerolle, G

    1997-08-01

    The parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis is known to contain the ubiquitous and highly conserved protein actin. A genomic library and a cDNA library have been screened to identify and clone the actin gene(s) of T. vaginalis. The nucleotide sequence of one gene and its flanking regions have been determined. The open reading frame encodes a protein of 376 amino acids. The sequence is not interrupted by any introns and the promoter could be represented by a 10 bp motif close to a consensus motif also found upstream of most sequenced T. vaginalis genes. The five different clones isolated from the cDNA library have similar sequences and encode three actin proteins differing only by one or two amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis of 31 actin sequences by distance matrix and parsimony methods, using centractin as outgroup, gives congruent trees with Parabasala branching above Diplomonadida.

  14. The nature of the globular- to fibrous-actin transition.

    PubMed

    Oda, Toshiro; Iwasa, Mitsusada; Aihara, Tomoki; Maéda, Yuichiro; Narita, Akihiro

    2009-01-22

    Actin plays crucial parts in cell motility through a dynamic process driven by polymerization and depolymerization, that is, the globular (G) to fibrous (F) actin transition. Although our knowledge about the actin-based cellular functions and the molecules that regulate the G- to F-actin transition is growing, the structural aspects of the transition remain enigmatic. We created a model of F-actin using X-ray fibre diffraction intensities obtained from well oriented sols of rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin to 3.3 A in the radial direction and 5.6 A along the equator. Here we show that the G- to F-actin conformational transition is a simple relative rotation of the two major domains by about 20 degrees. As a result of the domain rotation, the actin molecule in the filament is flat. The flat form is essential for the formation of stable, helical F-actin. Our F-actin structure model provides the basis for understanding actin polymerization as well as its molecular interactions with actin-binding proteins.

  15. Actin polymerization in neutrophils from donors of peripheral blood stem cells: divergent effects of glycosylated and nonglycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Giovanni; Mattii, Letizia; Azzarà, Antonio; Brizzi, Stefania; Galimberti, Sara; Zucca, Alessandra; Benedetti, Edoardo; Petrini, Mario

    2006-05-01

    Neutrophil functions can be modified by Recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) treatment, with divergent effects on phagocytosis, motility, bactericidal activity, and surface molecule expression. Neutrophil morphology is modified by treatment with filgrastim (the nonglycosylated form of rhG-CSF), while it is not affected by lenograstim (the glycosylated type of rhG-CSF). Little information is available about actin polymerization in neutrophils from subjects treated with the two types of rhG-CSF. In the current paper we evaluated two groups of donors of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) for allogeneic transplantation. Ten subjects were treated with filgrastim and 10 with lenograstim to mobilize PBSC; 15 blood donors were evaluated as a control group. Actin polymerization (both spontaneous and fMLP-stimulated) was studied by a flow cytometric assay. A microscopic fluorescent assay was also carried out to evaluate F-actin distribution in neutrophils. We found that filgrastim induced an increased F-actin content in resting neutrophils, along with morphologic evidence for increased actin polymerization distributed principally at the cell membrane and frequently polarized in focal areas; in addition, fMLP was not able to induce further actin polymerization. On the contrary, treatment with lenograstim was associated with F-actin content, distribution, and polymerization kinetics indistinguishable from those displayed by control neutrophils. Such experimental results show that filgrastim and lenograstim display divergent effects also on neutrophil actin polymerization and provide further explanation for previous experimental findings. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Contractile actin cables induced by Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin depend on the histone acetylation machinery.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Stefani, Caroline; Doye, Anne; Acosta, Maria I; Visvikis, Orane; Yevick, Hannah G; Buchrieser, Carmen; Mettouchi, Amel; Bassereau, Patricia; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    It remains a challenge to decode the molecular basis of the long-term actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that are governed by the reprogramming of gene expression. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT) inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, thereby modulating gene expression, with major consequences for actin cytoskeleton organization and the loss of endothelial barrier function. Using a laser ablation approach, we characterized the contractile and tensile mechanical properties of LT-induced stress fibers. These actin cables resist pulling forces that are transmitted at cell-matrix interfaces and at cell-cell discontinuous adherens junctions. We report that treating the cells with trichostatin A (TSA), a broad range inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), or with MS-275, which targets HDAC1, 2 and 3, induces stress fibers. LT decreased the cellular levels of HDAC1, 2 and 3 and reduced the global HDAC activity in the nucleus. Both the LT and TSA treatments induced Rnd3 expression, which is required for the LT-mediated induction of actin stress fibers. Furthermore, we reveal that treating the LT-intoxicated cells with garcinol, an inhibitor of histone acetyl-transferases (HATs), disrupts the stress fibers and limits the monolayer barrier dysfunctions. These data demonstrate the importance of modulating the flux of protein acetylation in order to control actin cytoskeleton organization and the endothelial cell monolayer barrier. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Chronophin activation is necessary in Doxorubicin-induced actin cytoskeleton alteration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Park, Jeen Woo; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Dong-Seok; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Choi, Sooyoung; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2017-06-01

    Although doxorubicin (Dox)-induced oxidative stress is known to be associated with cytotoxicity, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Genotoxic stress not only generates free radicals, but also affects actin cytoskeleton stability. We showed that Dox-induced RhoA signaling stimulated actin cytoskeleton alterations, resulting in central stress fiber disruption at early time points and cell periphery cortical actin formation at a later stage, in HeLa cells. Interestingly, activation of a cofilin phosphatase, chronophin (CIN), was initially evoked by Dox-induced RhoA signaling, resulting in a rapid phosphorylated cofilin turnover leading to actin cytoskeleton remodeling. In addition, a novel interaction between CIN and 14-3-3ζ was detected in the absence of Dox treatment. We demonstrated that CIN activity is quite contrary to 14-3-3ζ binding, and the interaction leads to enhanced phosphorylated cofilin levels. Therefore, initial CIN activation regulation could be critical in Dox-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling through RhoA/cofilin signaling. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(6): 335-340].

  18. Creatine kinase and alpha-actin mRNA levels decrease in diabetic rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, B.; Barrieux, A.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with cardiac atrophy and isoenzyme redistribution. To determine if tissue specific changes occur in mRNAs coding for ..cap alpha..-actin and creatine kinase (CK), they performed RNA blot analysis. Total ventricular RNA from control (C) and 4 wk old diabetic (D) rats were hybridized with /sup 32/P cDNA probes for ..cap alpha..-actin and CK. A tissue independent cDNA probe, CHOA was also used. Signal intensity was quantified by photodensitometry. D CK mRNA was 47 +/- 16% lower in D vs C. Insulin increases CK mRNA by 20% at 1.5 hs, and completely reverses the deficit after 4more » wks. D ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA is 66 +/- 18% lower in D vs C. Insulin normalized ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA by 5 hs. CHOA mRNA is unchanged in D vs C, but D + insulin CHOA mRNA is 30 +/- 2% lower than C. In rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy, muscle specific CK and ..cap alpha..-actin mRNAs are decreased. Insulin treatment reverses these changes.« less

  19. An epidermal plakin that integrates actin and microtubule networks at cellular junctions.

    PubMed

    Karakesisoglou, I; Yang, Y; Fuchs, E

    2000-04-03

    Plakins are cytoskeletal linker proteins initially thought to interact exclusively with intermediate filaments (IFs), but recently were found to associate additionally with actin and microtubule networks. Here, we report on ACF7, a mammalian orthologue of the Drosophila kakapo plakin genetically involved in epidermal-muscle adhesion and neuromuscular junctions. While ACF7/kakapo is divergent from other plakins in its IF-binding domain, it has at least one actin (K(d) = 0.35 microM) and one microtubule (K(d) approximately 6 microM) binding domain. Similar to its fly counterpart, ACF7 is expressed in the epidermis. In well spread epidermal keratinocytes, ACF7 discontinuously decorates the cytoskeleton at the cell periphery, including microtubules (MTs) and actin filaments (AFs) that are aligned in parallel converging at focal contacts. Upon calcium induction of intercellular adhesion, ACF7 and the cytoskeleton reorganize at cell-cell borders but with different kinetics from adherens junctions and desmosomes. Treatments with cytoskeletal depolymerizing drugs reveal that ACF7's cytoskeletal association is dependent upon the microtubule network, but ACF7 also appears to stabilize actin at sites where microtubules and microfilaments meet. We posit that ACF7 may function in microtubule dynamics to facilitate actin-microtubule interactions at the cell periphery and to couple the microtubule network to cellular junctions. These attributes provide a clear explanation for the kakapo mutant phenotype in flies.

  20. Differentiation-dependent rearrangements of actin filaments and microtubules hinder apical endocytosis in urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tratnjek, Larisa; Romih, Rok; Kreft, Mateja Erdani

    2017-08-01

    During differentiation, superficial urothelial cells (UCs) of the urinary bladder form the apical surface, which is almost entirely covered by urothelial plaques containing densely packed uroplakin particles. These urothelial plaques are the main structural components of the blood-urine permeability barrier in the urinary bladder. We have shown previously that endocytosis from the apical plasma membrane decreases during urothelial cell differentiation. Here, we investigated the role of actin filament and microtubule rearrangements in apical endocytosis of differentiating UCs cells using hyperplastic and normoplastic porcine urothelial models. Partially differentiated normal porcine UCs contained actin filaments in the subapical cytoplasm, while microtubules had a net-like appearance. In highly differentiated UCs, actin filaments mostly disappeared from the subapical cytoplasm and microtubules remained as a thin layer close to the apical plasma membrane. Inhibition of actin filament formation with cytochalasin-D in partially differentiated UCs caused a decrease in apical endocytosis. Depolymerisation of microtubules with nocodazole did not prevent endocytosis of the endocytotic marker WGA into the subapical cytoplasm; however, it abolished WGA transport to endolysosomal compartments in the central cytoplasm. Cytochalasin-D or nocodazole treatment did not significantly change apical endocytosis in highly differentiated UCs. In conclusion, we showed that the physiological differentiation-dependent or chemically induced redistribution and reorganization of actin filaments and microtubules impair apical endocytosis in UCs. Importantly, reduced apical endocytosis due to cytoskeletal rearrangements in highly differentiated UCs, together with the formation of rigid urothelial plaques, reinforces the barrier function of the urothelium.

  1. Actin filaments regulate the adhesion between the plasma membrane and the cell wall of tobacco guard cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Ren, Jing-Jing; Kong, Lan-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Ling

    2018-01-01

    During the opening and closing of stomata, guard cells undergo rapid and reversible changes in their volume and shape, which affects the adhesion of the plasma membrane (PM) to the cell wall (CW). The dynamics of actin filaments in guard cells are involved in stomatal movement by regulating structural changes and intracellular signaling. However, it is unclear whether actin dynamics regulate the adhesion of the PM to the CW. In this study, we investigated the relationship between actin dynamics and PM-CW adhesion by the hyperosmotic-induced plasmolysis of tobacco guard cells. We found that actin filaments in guard cells were depolymerized during mannitol-induced plasmolysis. The inhibition of actin dynamics by treatment with latrunculin B or jasplakinolide and the disruption of the adhesion between the PM and the CW by treatment with RGDS peptide (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) enhanced guard cell plasmolysis. However, treatment with latrunculin B alleviated the RGDS peptide-induced plasmolysis and endocytosis. Our results reveal that the actin depolymerization is involved in the regulation of the PW-CW adhesion during hyperosmotic-induced plasmolysis in tobacco guard cells.

  2. Selective Blockade of Cytoskeletal Actin Remodeling Reduces Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Sergio; Yang, Ru; Chaqour, Brahim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The efficacy of the peptide Ac-EEED on reducing cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in vivo was examined. Methods. The peptide chimera containing the Ac-EEED sequence was chemically linked to the N terminus of the XMTM delivery peptide from the Erns viral surface protein. Ac-EEED or scrambled control peptide (SCRAM) was added to cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts, and adhesion, growth, and matrix production was assessed. Ac-EEED or SCRAM was injected into the vitreous of mice undergoing laser rupture of Bruch's membrane to induce CNV and lesion volume, neovascularization and lesion fibrosis were assessed. Results. Ac-EEED–induced changes in the morphology of the actin cytoskeleton by inhibiting polymerization of G-actin and disrupting the formation of stress fibers. Pretreatment with Ac-EEED resulted in endothelial cells becoming less responsive to the mitogenic and pro-adhesive effects of VEGF. Ac-EEED treatment in fibroblasts reduced TGF-β–induced fibrosis as assessed by decreased levels of connective tissue growth factor, cysteine-rich 61, collagen I (COL1A2), and collagen III (COL3A1). CNV lesion size and fibrosis were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by up to 60%. Conclusions. In vitro studies showed that Ac-EEED affects a broad range of mechanical properties associated with cytoskeletal actin to reduce growth factor effects. The utilization of Ac-EEED in vivo may offer a novel therapeutic strategy by both suppressed neovessel growth and curtailing fibrosis typically associated with the involutional stage of CNV. PMID:21178140

  3. Diverse roles of actin in C. elegans early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Velarde, Nathalie; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Piano, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Background The actin cytoskeleton plays critical roles in early development in Caenorhabditis elegans. To further understand the complex roles of actin in early embryogenesis we use RNAi and in vivo imaging of filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. Results Using RNAi, we found processes that are differentially sensitive to levels of actin during early embryogenesis. Mild actin depletion shows defects in cortical ruffling, pseudocleavage, and establishment of polarity, while more severe depletion shows defects in polar body extrusion, cytokinesis, chromosome segregation, and eventually, egg production. These defects indicate that actin is required for proper oocyte development, fertilization, and a wide range of important events during early embryogenesis, including proper chromosome segregation. In vivo visualization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton shows dynamics that parallel but are distinct from the previously described myosin dynamics. Two distinct types of actin organization are observed at the cortex. During asymmetric polarization to the anterior, or the establishment phase (Phase I), actin forms a meshwork of microfilaments and focal accumulations throughout the cortex, while during the anterior maintenance phase (Phase II) it undergoes a morphological transition to asymmetrically localized puncta. The proper asymmetric redistribution is dependent on the PAR proteins, while both asymmetric redistribution and morphological transitions are dependent upon PFN-1 and NMY-2. Just before cytokinesis, actin disappears from most of the cortex and is only found around the presumptive cytokinetic furrow. Finally, we describe dynamic actin-enriched comets in the early embryo. Conclusion During early C. elegans embryogenesis actin plays more roles and its organization is more dynamic than previously described. Morphological transitions of F-actin, from meshwork to puncta, as well as asymmetric redistribution, are regulated by the PAR proteins. Results from this study

  4. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, D. A.; Zsuppan, G.; Allen, N. S.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling.

  5. Actinic Cheilitis: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Neil Hamilton; Khammissa, Razia; Meyerov, Robin; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2011-01-01

    In actinic cheilitis, the current view is that the keratinocytes have undergone transformation forming a field of epithelium with the potential for neoplastic transformation. Clinical features include diffuse and poorly demarcated atrophic, erosive or keratotic plaques that may affect some parts of, or the entire vermilion border. Fair-complexioned people, those with albinism and people with eversion of the lip are all subject to actinic cheilitis. Prophylactic measures against all forms of sunlight-induced lesions must include limitation of exposure to the sun during peak sunlight hours, the use of appropriate protective clothing, and the use of a sunscreen cream. In this article, a case of albinism is used to illustrate the nature of actinic cheilitis, its clinical features and its treatment. PMID:21228959

  6. Role of gelsolin interaction with actin in regulation and creation of actin nuclei in chemotactic peptide activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, J D; Guerrero, T; Howard, T H

    1992-01-01

    In vitro Ca++ activates gelsolin to sever F-actin and form a gelsolin-actin (GA) complex at the+end of F-actin that is not dissociated by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) but is separated by EGTA+PIP/PIP2. The gelsolin blocks the+end on the actin filament, but the-end of the filament can still initiate actin polymerization. In thrombin activated platelets, evidence suggests that severing of F-actin by gelsolin increases GA complex, creates one-end actin nucleus and one cryptic+end actin nucleus per cut, and then dissociates to yield free+ends to nucleate rapid actin assembly. We examined the role of F-actin severing in creation and regulation of nuclei and polymerization in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). At 2-s intervals after formyl peptide (FMLP) activation of endotoxin free (ETF) PMNs, change in GA complex was correlated with change in+end actin nuclei,-end actin nuclei, and F-actin content. GA complex was quantitated by electrophoretograms of proteins absorbed by antigelsolin from cells lysed in 10 mM EGTA,+end actin nuclei as cytochalasin (CD) sensitive and-end actin nuclei as CD insensitive increases in G-pyrenyl actin polymerization rates induced by the same PMNs, and F-actin content by NBDphallacidin binding to fixed cells. Thirty three percent of gelsolin was in GA complex in basal ETF PMNs; from 2-6 s, GA complexes dissociate (low = 15% at 10 s) and sequentially+end nuclei and F-actin content and then-end nuclei increase to a maximum at 10 s. At > s GA complex increase toward basal and + end nuclei and F-actin content returned toward basal. These kinetic data show gelsolin regulates availability of + end nuclei and actin polymerization in FMLP. However, absence of an initial increase in GA complex or - end nucleating activity shows FMLP activation does not cause gelsolin to sever F- or to bind G-actin to create cryptic + end nuclei in PMNs; the results suggest the + nucleus formation is gelsolin

  7. Role of gelsolin interaction with actin in regulation and creation of actin nuclei in chemotactic peptide activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Deaton, J D; Guerrero, T; Howard, T H

    1992-12-01

    In vitro Ca++ activates gelsolin to sever F-actin and form a gelsolin-actin (GA) complex at the+end of F-actin that is not dissociated by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) but is separated by EGTA+PIP/PIP2. The gelsolin blocks the+end on the actin filament, but the-end of the filament can still initiate actin polymerization. In thrombin activated platelets, evidence suggests that severing of F-actin by gelsolin increases GA complex, creates one-end actin nucleus and one cryptic+end actin nucleus per cut, and then dissociates to yield free+ends to nucleate rapid actin assembly. We examined the role of F-actin severing in creation and regulation of nuclei and polymerization in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). At 2-s intervals after formyl peptide (FMLP) activation of endotoxin free (ETF) PMNs, change in GA complex was correlated with change in+end actin nuclei,-end actin nuclei, and F-actin content. GA complex was quantitated by electrophoretograms of proteins absorbed by antigelsolin from cells lysed in 10 mM EGTA,+end actin nuclei as cytochalasin (CD) sensitive and-end actin nuclei as CD insensitive increases in G-pyrenyl actin polymerization rates induced by the same PMNs, and F-actin content by NBDphallacidin binding to fixed cells. Thirty three percent of gelsolin was in GA complex in basal ETF PMNs; from 2-6 s, GA complexes dissociate (low = 15% at 10 s) and sequentially+end nuclei and F-actin content and then-end nuclei increase to a maximum at 10 s. At > s GA complex increase toward basal and + end nuclei and F-actin content returned toward basal. These kinetic data show gelsolin regulates availability of + end nuclei and actin polymerization in FMLP. However, absence of an initial increase in GA complex or - end nucleating activity shows FMLP activation does not cause gelsolin to sever F- or to bind G-actin to create cryptic + end nuclei in PMNs; the results suggest the + nucleus formation is gelsolin

  8. Soft Listeria: actin-based propulsion of liquid drops.

    PubMed

    Boukellal, Hakim; Campás, Otger; Joanny, Jean-François; Prost, Jacques; Sykes, Cécile

    2004-06-01

    We study the motion of oil drops propelled by actin polymerization in cell extracts. Drops deform and acquire a pearlike shape under the action of the elastic stresses exerted by the actin comet, a tail of cross-linked actin filaments. We solve this free boundary problem and calculate the drop shape taking into account the elasticity of the actin gel and the variation of the polymerization velocity with normal stress. The pressure balance on the liquid drop imposes a zero propulsive force if gradients in surface tension or internal pressure are not taken into account. Quantitative parameters of actin polymerization are obtained by fitting theory to experiment.

  9. Geometrical and Mechanical Properties Control Actin Filament Organization

    PubMed Central

    Ennomani, Hajer; Théry, Manuel; Nedelec, Francois; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The different actin structures governing eukaryotic cell shape and movement are not only determined by the properties of the actin filaments and associated proteins, but also by geometrical constraints. We recently demonstrated that limiting nucleation to specific regions was sufficient to obtain actin networks with different organization. To further investigate how spatially constrained actin nucleation determines the emergent actin organization, we performed detailed simulations of the actin filament system using Cytosim. We first calibrated the steric interaction between filaments, by matching, in simulations and experiments, the bundled actin organization observed with a rectangular bar of nucleating factor. We then studied the overall organization of actin filaments generated by more complex pattern geometries used experimentally. We found that the fraction of parallel versus antiparallel bundles is determined by the mechanical properties of actin filament or bundles and the efficiency of nucleation. Thus nucleation geometry, actin filaments local interactions, bundle rigidity, and nucleation efficiency are the key parameters controlling the emergent actin architecture. We finally simulated more complex nucleation patterns and performed the corresponding experiments to confirm the predictive capabilities of the model. PMID:26016478

  10. Tropomyosin inhibits ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shoichiro; Ono, Kanako

    2002-03-18

    Tropomyosin binds to actin filaments and is implicated in stabilization of actin cytoskeleton. We examined biochemical and cell biological properties of Caenorhabditis elegans tropomyosin (CeTM) and obtained evidence that CeTM is antagonistic to ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament dynamics. We purified CeTM, actin, and UNC-60B (a muscle-specific ADF/cofilin isoform), all of which are derived from C. elegans, and showed that CeTM and UNC-60B bound to F-actin in a mutually exclusive manner. CeTM inhibited UNC-60B-induced actin depolymerization and enhancement of actin polymerization. Within isolated native thin filaments, actin and CeTM were detected as major components, whereas UNC-60B was present at a trace amount. Purified UNC-60B was unable to interact with the native thin filaments unless CeTM and other associated proteins were removed by high-salt extraction. Purified CeTM was sufficient to restore the resistance of the salt-extracted filaments from UNC-60B. In muscle cells, CeTM and UNC-60B were localized in different patterns. Suppression of CeTM by RNA interference resulted in disorganized actin filaments and paralyzed worms in wild-type background. However, in an ADF/cofilin mutant background, suppression of CeTM did not worsen actin organization and worm motility. These results suggest that tropomyosin is a physiological inhibitor of ADF/cofilin-dependent actin dynamics.

  11. Mechanism of Cdc42-induced Actin Polymerization in Neutrophil Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zigmond, Sally H.; Joyce, Michael; Yang, Changsong; Brown, Kevin; Huang, Minzhou; Pring, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Cdc42, activated with GTPγS, induces actin polymerization in supernatants of lysed neutrophils. This polymerization, like that induced by agonists, requires elongation at filament barbed ends. To determine if creation of free barbed ends was sufficient to induce actin polymerization, free barbed ends in the form of spectrin-actin seeds or sheared F-actin filaments were added to cell supernatants. Neither induced polymerization. Furthermore, the presence of spectrin-actin seeds did not increase the rate of Cdc42-induced polymerization, suggesting that the presence of Cdc42 did not facilitate polymerization from spectrin-actin seeds such as might have been the case if Cdc42 inhibited capping or released G-actin from a sequestered pool. Electron microscopy revealed that Cdc42-induced filaments elongated rapidly, achieving a mean length greater than 1 μm in 15 s. The mean length of filaments formed from spectrin-actin seeds was <0.4 μm. Had spectrin-actin seeds elongated at comparable rates before they were capped, they would have induced longer filaments. There was little change in mean length of Cdc42-induced filaments between 15 s and 5 min, suggesting that the increase in F-actin over this time was due to an increase in filament number. These data suggest that Cdc42 induction of actin polymerization requires both creation of free barbed ends and facilitated elongation at these ends. PMID:9722612

  12. Mechanism of Cdc42-induced actin polymerization in neutrophil extracts.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, S H; Joyce, M; Yang, C; Brown, K; Huang, M; Pring, M

    1998-08-24

    Cdc42, activated with GTPgammaS, induces actin polymerization in supernatants of lysed neutrophils. This polymerization, like that induced by agonists, requires elongation at filament barbed ends. To determine if creation of free barbed ends was sufficient to induce actin polymerization, free barbed ends in the form of spectrin-actin seeds or sheared F-actin filaments were added to cell supernatants. Neither induced polymerization. Furthermore, the presence of spectrin-actin seeds did not increase the rate of Cdc42-induced polymerization, suggesting that the presence of Cdc42 did not facilitate polymerization from spectrin-actin seeds such as might have been the case if Cdc42 inhibited capping or released G-actin from a sequestered pool. Electron microscopy revealed that Cdc42-induced filaments elongated rapidly, achieving a mean length greater than 1 micron in 15 s. The mean length of filaments formed from spectrin-actin seeds was <0.4 micron. Had spectrin-actin seeds elongated at comparable rates before they were capped, they would have induced longer filaments. There was little change in mean length of Cdc42-induced filaments between 15 s and 5 min, suggesting that the increase in F-actin over this time was due to an increase in filament number. These data suggest that Cdc42 induction of actin polymerization requires both creation of free barbed ends and facilitated elongation at these ends.

  13. A Second Las17 Monomeric Actin-Binding Motif Functions in Arp2/3-Dependent Actin Polymerization During Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Daniel; Tolsma, Thomas O.; Farrell, Kristen B.; Aradi, Al; Di Pietro, Santiago M.

    2018-01-01

    During clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), actin assembly provides force to drive vesicle internalization. Members of the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family play a fundamental role stimulating actin assembly. WASP family proteins contain a WH2 motif that binds globular actin (G-actin) and a central-acidic motif that binds the Arp2/3 complex, thus promoting the formation of branched actin filaments. Yeast WASP (Las17) is the strongest of five factors promoting Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization during CME. It was suggested that this strong activity may be caused by a putative second G-actin-binding motif in Las17. Here, we describe the in vitro and in vivo characterization of such Las17 G-actin-binding motif (LGM) and its dependence on a group of conserved arginine residues. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, GST-pulldown, fluorescence polarization and pyrene-actin polymerization assays, we show that LGM binds G-actin and is necessary for normal Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization in vitro. Live-cell fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrate that LGM is required for normal dynamics of actin polymerization during CME. Further, LGM is necessary for normal dynamics of endocytic machinery components that are recruited at early, intermediate and late stages of endocytosis, as well as for optimal endocytosis of native CME cargo. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments show that LGM has relatively lower potency compared to the previously known Las17 G-actin-binding motif, WH2. These results establish a second G-actin-binding motif in Las17 and advance our knowledge on the mechanism of actin assembly during CME. PMID:25615019

  14. Three’s company: The fission yeast actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, David R.; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    How the actin cytoskeleton assembles into different structures to drive diverse cellular processes is a fundamental cell biological question. In addition to orchestrating the appropriate combination of regulators and actin-binding proteins, different actin-based structures must insulate themselves from one another to maintain specificity within a crowded cytoplasm. Actin specification is particularly vexing in complex eukaryotes where a multitude of protein isoforms and actin structures operate within the same cell. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe possesses a single actin isoform that functions in three distinct structures throughout the cell cycle. In this review, we explore recent studies in fission yeast that help unravel how different actin structures operate in cells. PMID:21145239

  15. The unusual dynamics of parasite actin result from isodesmic polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Skillman, Kristen M.; Ma, Christopher I.; Fremont, Daved H.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Cooper, John A.; Sept, David; Sibley, L. David

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that parasite actins are short and inherently unstable, despite being required for motility. Here, we re-examine the polymerization properties of actin in Toxoplasma gondii (TgACTI), unexpectedly finding that it exhibits isodesmic polymerization in contrast to the conventional nucleation-elongation process of all previously studied actins from both eukaryotes and bacteria. TgACTI polymerization kinetics lacks both a lag phase and critical concentration, normally characteristic of actins. Unique among actins, the kinetics of assembly can be fit with a single set of rate constants for all subunit interactions, without need for separate nucleation and elongation rates. This isodesmic model accurately predicts the assembly, disassembly, and the size distribution of TgACTI filaments in vitro, providing a mechanistic explanation for actin dynamics in vivo. Our findings expand the repertoire of mechanisms by which actin polymerization is governed and offer clues about the evolution of self-assembling, stabilized protein polymers. PMID:23921463

  16. Actin-interacting Protein 1 Promotes Disassembly of Actin-depolymerizing Factor/Cofilin-bound Actin Filaments in a pH-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-03-04

    Actin-interacting protein 1 (AIP1) is a conserved WD repeat protein that promotes disassembly of actin filaments when actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is present. Although AIP1 is known to be essential for a number of cellular events involving dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, the regulatory mechanism of the function of AIP1 is unknown. In this study, we report that two AIP1 isoforms from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, known as UNC-78 and AIPL-1, are pH-sensitive in enhancement of actin filament disassembly. Both AIP1 isoforms only weakly enhance disassembly of ADF/cofilin-bound actin filaments at an acidic pH but show stronger disassembly activity at neutral and basic pH values. However, a severing-defective mutant of UNC-78 shows pH-insensitive binding to ADF/cofilin-decorated actin filaments, suggesting that the process of filament severing or disassembly, but not filament binding, is pH-dependent. His-60 of AIP1 is located near the predicted binding surface for the ADF/cofilin-actin complex, and an H60K mutation of AIP1 partially impairs its pH sensitivity, suggesting that His-60 is involved in the pH sensor for AIP1. These biochemical results suggest that pH-dependent changes in AIP1 activity might be a novel regulatory mechanism of actin filament dynamics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. F-actin and G-actin binding are uncoupled by mutation of conserved tyrosine residues in maize actin depolymerizing factor (ZmADF)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Weeds, Alan G.; Khan, Safina; Hussey, Patrick J.

    1997-01-01

    Actin depolymerizing factors (ADF) are stimulus responsive actin cytoskeleton modulating proteins. They bind both monomeric actin (G-actin) and filamentous actin (F-actin) and, under certain conditions, F-actin binding is followed by filament severing. In this paper, using mutant maize ADF3 proteins, we demonstrate that the maize ADF3 binding of F-actin can be spatially distinguished from that of G-actin. One mutant, zmadf3–1, in which Tyr-103 and Ala-104 (equivalent to destrin Tyr-117 and Ala-118) have been replaced by phenylalanine and glycine, respectively, binds more weakly to both G-actin and F-actin compared with maize ADF3. A second mutant, zmadf3–2, in which both Tyr-67 and Tyr-70 are replaced by phenylalanine, shows an affinity for G-actin similar to maize ADF3, but F-actin binding is abolished. The two tyrosines, Tyr-67 and Tyr-70, are in the equivalent position to Tyr-82 and Tyr-85 of destrin, respectively. Using the tertiary structure of destrin, yeast cofilin, and Acanthamoeba actophorin, we discuss the implications of removing the aromatic hydroxyls of Tyr-82 and Tyr-85 (i.e., the effect of substituting phenylalanine for tyrosine) and conclude that Tyr-82 plays a critical role in stabilizing the tertiary structure that is essential for F-actin binding. We propose that this tertiary structure is maintained as a result of a hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl of Tyr-82 and the carbonyl of Tyr-117, which is located in the long α-helix; amino acid components of this helix (Leu-111 to Phe-128) have been implicated in G-actin and F-actin binding. The structures of human destrin and yeast cofilin indicate a hydrogen distance of 2.61 and 2.77 Å, respectively, with corresponding bond angles of 99.5° and 113°, close to the optimum for a strong hydrogen bond. PMID:9275236

  18. Distinct Functional Interactions between Actin Isoforms and Nonsarcomeric Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mirco; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Chizhov, Igor; Claus, Peter; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Taft, Manuel H.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments. PMID:23923011

  19. Mast cell desensitization inhibits calcium flux and aberrantly remodels actin

    PubMed Central

    Ang, W.X. Gladys; Church, Alison M.; Kulis, Mike; Choi, Hae Woong; Burks, A. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Rush desensitization (DS) is a widely used and effective clinical strategy for the rapid inhibition of IgE-mediated anaphylactic responses. However, the cellular targets and underlying mechanisms behind this process remain unclear. Recent studies have implicated mast cells (MCs) as the primary target cells for DS. Here, we developed a murine model of passive anaphylaxis with demonstrated MC involvement and an in vitro assay to evaluate the effect of DS on MCs. In contrast with previous reports, we determined that functional IgE remains on the cell surface of desensitized MCs following DS. Despite notable reductions in MC degranulation following DS, the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI was still capable of transducing signals in desensitized MCs. Additionally, we found that displacement of the actin cytoskeleton and its continued association with FcεRI impede the capacity of desensitized MCs to evoke the calcium response that is essential for MC degranulation. Together, these findings suggest that reduced degranulation responses in desensitized MCs arise from aberrant actin remodeling, providing insights that may lead to improvement of DS treatments for anaphylactic responses. PMID:27669462

  20. PI(3,5)P2 controls endosomal branched actin dynamics by regulating cortactin–actin interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Nan Hyung; Qi, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Branched actin critically contributes to membrane trafficking by regulating membrane curvature, dynamics, fission, and transport. However, how actin dynamics are controlled at membranes is poorly understood. Here, we identify the branched actin regulator cortactin as a direct binding partner of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) and demonstrate that their interaction promotes turnover of late endosomal actin. In vitro biochemical studies indicated that cortactin binds PI(3,5)P2 via its actin filament-binding region. Furthermore, PI(3,5)P2 competed with actin filaments for binding to cortactin, thereby antagonizing cortactin activity. These findings suggest that PI(3,5)P2 formation on endosomes may remove cortactin from endosome-associated branched actin. Indeed, inhibition of PI(3,5)P2 production led to cortactin accumulation and actin stabilization on Rab7+ endosomes. Conversely, inhibition of Arp2/3 complex activity greatly reduced cortactin localization to late endosomes. Knockdown of cortactin reversed PI(3,5)P2-inhibitor–induced actin accumulation and stabilization on endosomes. These data suggest a model in which PI(3,5)P2 binding removes cortactin from late endosomal branched actin networks and thereby promotes net actin turnover. PMID:26323691

  1. Novel roles for actin in mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Anna L.; Gurel, Pinar S.; Higgs, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial dynamics, including fusion, fission and translocation, are crucial to cellular homeostasis, with roles in cellular polarity, stress response and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission has received particular attention, owing to links with several neurodegenerative diseases. A central player in fission is the cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1, which oligomerizes at the fission site and hydrolyzes GTP to drive membrane ingression. Drp1 recruitment to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) is a key regulatory event, which appears to require a pre-constriction step in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion interact extensively, a process termed ERMD (ER-associated mitochondrial division). It is unclear how ER–mitochondrial contact generates the force required for pre-constriction or why pre-constriction leads to Drp1 recruitment. Recent results, however, show that ERMD might be an actin-based process in mammals that requires the ER-associated formin INF2 upstream of Drp1, and that myosin II and other actin-binding proteins might be involved. In this Commentary, we present a mechanistic model for mitochondrial fission in which actin and myosin contribute in two ways; firstly, by supplying the force for pre-constriction and secondly, by serving as a coincidence detector for Drp1 binding. In addition, we discuss the possibility that multiple fission mechanisms exist in mammals. PMID:25217628

  2. Characterization of actin filament deformation in response to actively driven microspheres propagated through entangled actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Tobias; Blair, Savanna; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2014-03-01

    The semi-flexible biopolymer actin is a ubiquitous component of nearly all biological organisms, playing an important role in many biological processes such as cell structure and motility, cancer invasion and metastasis, muscle contraction, and cell signaling. Concentrated actin networks possess unique viscoelastic properties that have been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, much is still unknown regarding the correlation of the applied stress on the network to the induced filament strain at the molecular level. Here, we use dual optical traps alongside fluorescence microscopy to carry out active microrheology measurements that link mechanical stress to structural response at the micron scale. Specifically, we actively drive microspheres through entangled actin networks while simultaneously measuring the force the surrounding filaments exert on the sphere and visualizing the deformation and subsequent relaxation of fluorescent labeled filaments within the network. These measurements, which provide much needed insight into the link between stress and strain in actin networks, are critical for clarifying our theoretical understanding of the complex viscoelastic behavior exhibited in actin networks.

  3. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin.

  4. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1–actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1–actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson–Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  5. Actin Depolymerizing Factor (ADF/Cofilin) Enhances the Rate of Filament Turnover: Implication in Actin-based Motility

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Marie-France; Laurent, Valérie; Santolini, Jérôme; Melki, Ronald; Didry, Dominique; Xia, Gui-Xian; Hong, Yan; Chua, Nam-Hai; Pantaloni, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins of the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family are thought to control actin-based motile processes. ADF1 from Arabidopsis thaliana appears to be a good model that is functionally similar to other members of the family. The function of ADF in actin dynamics has been examined using a combination of physical–chemical methods and actin-based motility assays, under physiological ionic conditions and at pH 7.8. ADF binds the ADPbound forms of G- or F-actin with an affinity two orders of magnitude higher than the ATP- or ADP-Pi– bound forms. A major property of ADF is its ability to enhance the in vitro turnover rate (treadmilling) of actin filaments to a value comparable to that observed in vivo in motile lamellipodia. ADF increases the rate of propulsion of Listeria monocytogenes in highly diluted, ADF-limited platelet extracts and shortens the actin tails. These effects are mediated by the participation of ADF in actin filament assembly, which results in a change in the kinetic parameters at the two ends of the actin filament. The kinetic effects of ADF are end specific and cannot be accounted for by filament severing. The main functionally relevant effect is a 25-fold increase in the rate of actin dissociation from the pointed ends, while the rate of dissociation from the barbed ends is unchanged. This large increase in the rate-limiting step of the monomer-polymer cycle at steady state is responsible for the increase in the rate of actin-based motile processes. In conclusion, the function of ADF is not to sequester G-actin. ADF uses ATP hydrolysis in actin assembly to enhance filament dynamics. PMID:9087445

  6. Oblique metatarsal osteotomy for intractable plantar keratosis: 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Idusuyi, O B; Kitaoka, H B; Patzer, G L

    1998-06-01

    Twenty patients (14 women and 6 men) (23 feet) had a single oblique osteotomy operation of the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th metatarsal without fixation during an 8-year period. The mean age was 46 years (range, 21-64 years). Each patient had a painful intractable plantar keratosis preoperatively. The average follow-up was 10 years (range, 3-14 years). Postoperatively, reoperation was performed in four feet because of painful callosities. For 13 of the 19 feet that did not have reoperation, patients were limited in footwear or required a shoe insert. Overall results were good for 10 feet, fair for 7 feet, and poor for 6 feet. The only complication was a deep infection that occurred in one foot (good result). Nonunion occurred in one foot and delayed union in one. The average decrease in metatarsal length after osteotomy was 6+/-6 mm. The single oblique lesser metatarsal osteotomy may be successful, but one half of the patients continued to have some degree of pain and most patients had limitations in footwear. Overall results were disappointing, and patients who are offered this procedure should be advised of its limitations.

  7. Sebaceous Gland, Hair Shaft, and Epidermal Barrier Abnormalities in Keratosis Pilaris with and without Filaggrin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Robert; Sugarman, Jeffrey L.; Crumrine, Debra; Hupe, Melanie; Mauro, Theodora M.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Brandner, Johanna M.; Hennies, Hans-Christian; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Although keratosis pilaris (KP) is common, its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. KP is associated clinically with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis and molecular genetically with filaggrin-null mutations. In 20 KP patients and 20 matched controls, we assessed the filaggrin and claudin 1 genotypes, the phenotypes by dermatoscopy, and the morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy. Thirty-five percent of KP patients displayed filaggrin mutations, demonstrating that filaggrin mutations only partially account for the KP phenotype. Major histologic and dermatoscopic findings of KP were hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis, mild T helper cell type 1-dominant lymphocytic inflammation, plugging of follicular orifices, striking absence of sebaceous glands, and hair shaft abnormalities in KP lesions but not in unaffected skin sites. Changes in barrier function and abnormal paracellular permeability were found in both interfollicular and follicular stratum corneum of lesional KP, which correlated ultrastructurally with impaired extracellular lamellar bilayer maturation and organization. All these features were independent of filaggrin genotype. Moreover, ultrastructure of corneodesmosomes and tight junctions appeared normal, immunohistochemistry for claudin 1 showed no reduction in protein amounts, and molecular analysis of claudin 1 was unremarkable. Our findings suggest that absence of sebaceous glands is an early step in KP pathogenesis, resulting in downstream hair shaft and epithelial barrier abnormalities. PMID:25660180

  8. A comparison of patterns of disease extension in keratosis obturans and external auditory canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Shinnabe, Akihiro; Hara, Mariko; Hasegawa, Masayo; Matsuzawa, Shingo; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the different pathways of progression to the middle ear in keratosis obturans (KO) and external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC). Retrospective case review. Referral hospital otolaryngology department. Patients with KO or EACC and middle ear disease who underwent surgical management were included. Four ears of 4 patients (mean age, 41.25 yr) were the KO group, and 5 ears of 4 patients (mean age, 49.5 yr) were the EACC group. Intraoperative findings of the middle ear cavity were investigated in KO and EACC groups. In the KO group, 3 patients had a perforated tympanic membrane and cholesteatoma in the tympanic cavity. The other patient had preoperative right facial palsy. Removal of the keratin plug revealed an adherent tympanic membrane. In intraoperative findings, the tympanic segment of the fallopian canal was found to be eroded because of inflammation. No case initially progressed to the mastoid cavity. Four patients had external auditory canal cholesteatoma with middle ear disease. In EACC group, all patients had initial progression to the mastoid cavity. KO tends to progress initially to the tympanic cavity via a diseased tympanic membrane. EACC tends to progress to the mastoid cavity via destruction of the posterior bony canal. This is the first report to investigate differences in pathway of progression to the middle ear cavity in these 2 diseases.

  9. Metallothionein-3 modulates the amyloid β endocytosis of astrocytes through its effects on actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Jeong; Seo, Bo-Ra; Koh, Jae-Young

    2015-12-04

    Astrocytes may play important roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by clearing extracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) through endocytosis and degradation. We recently showed that metallothionein 3 (Mt3), a zinc-binding metallothionein that is enriched in the central nervous system, contributes to actin polymerization in astrocytes. Because actin is likely involved in the endocytosis of Aβ, we investigated the possible role of Mt3 in Aβ endocytosis by cortical astrocytes in this study. To assess the route of Aβ uptake, we exposed cultured astrocytes to fluorescently labeled Aβ1-40 or Aβ1-42 together with chloropromazine (CP) or methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD), inhibitors of clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis, respectively. CP treatment almost completely blocked Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 endocytosis, whereas exposure to MβCD had no significant effect. Actin disruption with cytochalasin D (CytD) or latrunculin B also completely blocked Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 endocytosis. Because the absence of Mt3 also results in actin disruption, we examined Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 uptake and expression in Mt3 (-/-) astrocytes. Compared with wild-type (WT) cells, Mt3 (-/-) cells exhibited markedly reduced Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 endocytosis and expression of Aβ1-42 monomers and oligomers. A similar reduction was observed in CytD-treated WT cells. Finally, actin disruption and Mt3 knockout each increased the overall levels of clathrin and the associated protein phosphatidylinositol-binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) in astrocytes. Our results suggest that the absence of Mt3 reduces Aβ uptake in astrocytes through an abnormality in actin polymerization. In light of evidence that Mt3 is downregulated in AD, our findings indicate that this mechanism may contribute to the extracellular accumulation of Aβ in this disease.

  10. Selective, retrieval-independent disruption of methamphetamine-associated memory by actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Young, Erica J; Aceti, Massimiliano; Griggs, Erica M; Fuchs, Rita A; Zigmond, Zachary; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A

    2014-01-15

    Memories associated with drugs of abuse, such as methamphetamine (METH), increase relapse vulnerability to substance use disorder. There is a growing consensus that memory is supported by structural and functional plasticity driven by F-actin polymerization in postsynaptic dendritic spines at excitatory synapses. However, the mechanisms responsible for the long-term maintenance of memories, after consolidation has occurred, are largely unknown. Conditioned place preference (n = 112) and context-induced reinstatement of self-administration (n = 19) were used to assess the role of F-actin polymerization and myosin II, a molecular motor that drives memory-promoting dendritic spine actin polymerization, in the maintenance of METH-associated memories and related structural plasticity. Memories formed through association with METH but not associations with foot shock or food reward were disrupted by a highly-specific actin cycling inhibitor when infused into the amygdala during the postconsolidation maintenance phase. This selective effect of depolymerization on METH-associated memory was immediate, persistent, and did not depend upon retrieval or strength of the association. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II also resulted in a disruption of METH-associated memory. Thus, drug-associated memories seem to be actively maintained by a unique form of cycling F-actin driven by myosin II. This finding provides a potential therapeutic approach for the selective treatment of unwanted memories associated with psychiatric disorders that is both selective and does not rely on retrieval of the memory. The results further suggest that memory maintenance depends upon the preservation of polymerized actin. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. F-Actin Dynamics in Neurospora crassa ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Berepiki, Adokiye; Lichius, Alexander; Shoji, Jun-Ya; Tilsner, Jens; Read, Nick D.

    2010-01-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of Lifeact for the investigation of actin dynamics in Neurospora crassa and also represents the first report of simultaneous live-cell imaging of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in filamentous fungi. Lifeact is a 17-amino-acid peptide derived from the nonessential Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp140p. Fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (TagRFP), Lifeact allowed live-cell imaging of actin patches, cables, and rings in N. crassa without interfering with cellular functions. Actin cables and patches localized to sites of active growth during the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in germ tubes and conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs). Recurrent phases of formation and retrograde movement of complex arrays of actin cables were observed at growing tips of germ tubes and CATs. Two populations of actin patches exhibiting slow and fast movement were distinguished, and rapid (1.2 μm/s) saltatory transport of patches along cables was observed. Actin cables accumulated and subsequently condensed into actin rings associated with septum formation. F-actin organization was markedly different in the tip regions of mature hyphae and in germ tubes. Only mature hyphae displayed a subapical collar of actin patches and a concentration of F-actin within the core of the Spitzenkörper. Coexpression of Lifeact-TagRFP and β-tubulin–GFP revealed distinct but interrelated localization patterns of F-actin and microtubules during the initiation and maintenance of tip growth. PMID:20139238

  12. Characterization of biomechanical properties of cells through dielectrophoresis-based cell stretching and actin cytoskeleton modeling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Guohua; Li, Ying; Chu, Henry K; Wang, Kaiqun; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun; Sun, Dong

    2017-04-04

    Cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network that helps to maintain the rigidity of a cell, and the mechanical properties of a cell are closely related to many cellular functions. This paper presents a new method to probe and characterize cell mechanical properties through dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based cell stretching manipulation and actin cytoskeleton modeling. Leukemia NB4 cells were used as cell line, and changes in their biological properties were examined after chemotherapy treatment with doxorubicin (DOX). DEP-integrated microfluidic chip was utilized as a low-cost and efficient tool to study the deformability of cells. DEP forces used in cell stretching were first evaluated through computer simulation, and the results were compared with modeling equations and with the results of optical stretching (OT) experiments. Structural parameters were then extracted by fitting the experimental data into the actin cytoskeleton model, and the underlying mechanical properties of the cells were subsequently characterized. The DEP forces generated under different voltage inputs were calculated and the results from different approaches demonstrate good approximations to the force estimation. Both DEP and OT stretching experiments confirmed that DOX-treated NB4 cells were stiffer than the untreated cells. The structural parameters extracted from the model and the confocal images indicated significant change in actin network after DOX treatment. The proposed DEP method combined with actin cytoskeleton modeling is a simple engineering tool to characterize the mechanical properties of cells.

  13. Actin dynamics mediates the changes of calcium level during the pulvinus movement of Mimosa pudica

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Heng; Xu, Qiangyi

    2008-01-01

    The bending movement of the pulvinus of Mimosa pudica is caused by a rapid change in volume of the abaxial motor cells, in response to various environmental stimuli. We investigated the relationship between the actin cytoskeleton and changes in the level of calcium during rapid contractile movement of the motor cells that was induced by electrical stimulation. The bending of the pulvinus was retarded by treatments with actin-affecting reagents and calcium channel inhibitors. The actin filaments in the motor cells were fragmented in response to electrical stimulation. Further investigations were performed using protoplasts from the motor cells of M. pudica pulvini. Calcium-channel inhibitors and EGTA had an inhibitory effect on contractile movement of the protoplasts. The level of calcium increased and became concentrated in the tannin vacuole after electrical stimulation. Ruthenium Red inhibited the increase in the level of calcium in the tannin vacuole and the contractile movement of the protoplasts. However, treatment with latrunculin A abolished the inhibitory effect of Ruthenium Red. Phalloidin inhibited the contractile movement and the increase in the level of calcium in the protoplasts. Our study demonstrates that depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton in pulvinus motor cells in response to electrical signals results in increased levels of calcium. PMID:19513198

  14. IL-2 induces a WAVE2-dependent pathway for actin reorganization that enables WASp-independent human NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S; Roy-Ghanta, Sumita; Mace, Emily M; Maru, Saumya; Rak, Gregory D; Sanborn, Keri B; Fasth, Anders; Saltzman, Rushani; Paisley, Allison; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Pandey, Rahul

    2011-04-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a primary immunodeficiency associated with an increased susceptibility to herpesvirus infection and hematologic malignancy as well as a deficiency of NK cell function. It is caused by defective WAS protein (WASp). WASp facilitates filamentous actin (F-actin) branching and is required for F-actin accumulation at the NK cell immunological synapse and NK cell cytotoxicity ex vivo. Importantly, the function of WASp-deficient NK cells can be restored in vitro after exposure to IL-2, but the mechanisms underlying this remain unknown. Using a WASp inhibitor as well as cells from patients with WAS, we have defined a direct effect of IL-2 signaling upon F-actin that is independent of WASp function. We found that IL-2 treatment of a patient with WAS enhanced the cytotoxicity of their NK cells and the F-actin content at the immunological synapses formed by their NK cells. IL-2 stimulation of NK cells in vitro activated the WASp homolog WAVE2, which was required for inducing WASp-independent NK cell function, but not for baseline activity. Thus, WAVE2 and WASp define parallel pathways to F-actin reorganization and function in human NK cells; although WAVE2 was not required for NK cell innate function, it was accessible through adaptive immunity via IL-2. These results demonstrate how overlapping cytoskeletal activities can utilize immunologically distinct pathways to achieve synonymous immune function.

  15. IL-2 induces a WAVE2-dependent pathway for actin reorganization that enables WASp-independent human NK cell function

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Roy-Ghanta, Sumita; Mace, Emily M.; Maru, Saumya; Rak, Gregory D.; Sanborn, Keri B.; Fasth, Anders; Saltzman, Rushani; Paisley, Allison; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Pandey, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a primary immunodeficiency associated with an increased susceptibility to herpesvirus infection and hematologic malignancy as well as a deficiency of NK cell function. It is caused by defective WAS protein (WASp). WASp facilitates filamentous actin (F-actin) branching and is required for F-actin accumulation at the NK cell immunological synapse and NK cell cytotoxicity ex vivo. Importantly, the function of WASp-deficient NK cells can be restored in vitro after exposure to IL-2, but the mechanisms underlying this remain unknown. Using a WASp inhibitor as well as cells from patients with WAS, we have defined a direct effect of IL-2 signaling upon F-actin that is independent of WASp function. We found that IL-2 treatment of a patient with WAS enhanced the cytotoxicity of their NK cells and the F-actin content at the immunological synapses formed by their NK cells. IL-2 stimulation of NK cells in vitro activated the WASp homolog WAVE2, which was required for inducing WASp-independent NK cell function, but not for baseline activity. Thus, WAVE2 and WASp define parallel pathways to F-actin reorganization and function in human NK cells; although WAVE2 was not required for NK cell innate function, it was accessible through adaptive immunity via IL-2. These results demonstrate how overlapping cytoskeletal activities can utilize immunologically distinct pathways to achieve synonymous immune function. PMID:21383498

  16. Letrozole regulates actin cytoskeleton polymerization dynamics in a SRC-1 dependent manner in the hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yangang; Yu, Yanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; He, Li; Qiu, Linli; Zhao, Jikai; Liu, Mengying; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2017-03-01

    In the hippocampus, local estrogens (E 2 ) derived from testosterone that is catalyzed by aromatase play important roles in the regulation of hippocampal neural plasticity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The actin cytoskeleton contributes greatly to hippocampal synaptic plasticity; however, whether it is regulated by local E 2 and the related mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this study, we first examined the postnatal developmental profiles of hippocampal aromatase and specific proteins responsible for actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Then we used aromatase inhibitor letrozole (LET) to block local E 2 synthesis and examined the changes of these proteins and steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), the predominant coactivator for steroid nuclear receptors. Finally, SRC-1 specific RNA interference was used to examine the effects of SRC-1 on the expression of these actin remodeling proteins. The results showed a V-type profile for aromatase and increased profiles for actin cytoskeleton proteins in both male and female hippocampus without obvious sex differences. LET treatment dramatically decreased the F-actin/G-actin ratio, the expression of Rictor, phospho-AKT (ser473), Profilin-1, phospho-Cofilin (Ser3), and SRC-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro studies demonstrated that LET induced downregulation of these proteins could be reversed by E 2 , and E 2 induced increase of these proteins were significantly suppressed by SRC-1 shRNA interference. These results for the first time clearly demonstrated that local E 2 inhibition could induce aberrant actin polymerization; they also showed an important role of SRC-1 in the mediation of local E 2 action on hippocampal synaptic plasticity by regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identifying the dynamics of actin and tubulin polymerization in iPSCs and in iPSC-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Magliocca, Valentina; Petrini, Stefania; Franchin, Tiziana; Borghi, Rossella; Niceforo, Alessia; Abbaszadeh, Zeinab; Bertini, Enrico; Compagnucci, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The development of the nervous system requires cytoskeleton-mediated processes coordinating self-renewal, migration, and differentiation of neurons. It is not surprising that many neurodevelopmental problems and neurodegenerative disorders are caused by deficiencies in cytoskeleton-related genes. For this reason, we focus on the cytoskeletal dynamics in proliferating iPSCs and in iPSC-derived neurons to better characterize the underpinnings of cytoskeletal organization looking at actin and tubulin repolymerization studies using the cell permeable probes SiR-Actin and SiR-Tubulin. During neurogenesis, each neuron extends an axon in a complex and changing environment to reach its final target. The dynamic behavior of the growth cone and its capacity to respond to multiple spatial information allows it to find its correct target. We decided to characterize various parameters of the actin filaments and microtubules. Our results suggest that a rapid re-organization of the cytoskeleton occurs 45 minutes after treatments with de-polymerizing agents in iPSCs and 60 minutes in iPSC-derived neurons in both actin filaments and microtubules. The quantitative data confirm that the actin filaments have a primary role in the re-organization of the cytoskeleton soon after de-polymerization, while microtubules have a major function following cytoskeletal stabilization. In conclusion, we investigate the possibility that de-polymerization of the actin filaments may have an impact on microtubules organization and that de-polymerization of the microtubules may affect the stability of the actin filaments. Our results suggest that a reciprocal influence of the actin filaments occurs over the microtubules and vice versa in both in iPSCs and iPSC-derived neurons. PMID:29340040

  18. Nuclear positioning by actin cables and perinuclear actin: Special and general?

    PubMed

    Huelsmann, Sven; Brown, Nicholas H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear positioning is an important process during development and homeostasis. Depending on the affected tissue, mislocalized nuclei can alter cellular processes such as polarization, differentiation, or migration and lead ultimately to diseases. Many cells actively control the position of their nucleus using their cytoskeleton and motor proteins. We have recently shown that during Drosophila oogenesis, nurse cells employ cytoplasmic actin cables in association with perinuclear actin to position their nucleus. Here, we briefly summarize our work and discuss why nuclear positioning in nurse cells is specialized but the molecular mechanisms are likely to be more generally used.

  19. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in “ventral F-actin waves” that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These “adhesive F-actin waves” require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. PMID:22069459

  20. Bacterial subversion of host actin dynamics at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Carabeo, Rey

    2011-10-01

    Invasion of non-phagocytic cells by a number of bacterial pathogens involves the subversion of the actin cytoskeletal remodelling machinery to produce actin-rich cell surface projections designed to engulf the bacteria. The signalling that occurs to induce these actin-rich structures has considerable overlap among a diverse group of bacteria. The molecular organization within these structures act in concert to internalize the invading pathogen. This dynamic process could be subdivided into three acts - actin recruitment, engulfment, and finally, actin disassembly/internalization. This review will present the current state of knowledge of the molecular processes involved in each stage of bacterial invasion, and provide a perspective that highlights the temporal and spatial control of actin remodelling that occurs during bacterial invasion. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Liquid behavior of cross-linked actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Kimberly L; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Witten, Thomas A; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Gardel, Margaret L

    2017-02-28

    The actin cytoskeleton is a critical regulator of cytoplasmic architecture and mechanics, essential in a myriad of physiological processes. Here we demonstrate a liquid phase of actin filaments in the presence of the physiological cross-linker, filamin. Filamin condenses short actin filaments into spindle-shaped droplets, or tactoids, with shape dynamics consistent with a continuum model of anisotropic liquids. We find that cross-linker density controls the droplet shape and deformation timescales, consistent with a variable interfacial tension and viscosity. Near the liquid-solid transition, cross-linked actin bundles show behaviors reminiscent of fluid threads, including capillary instabilities and contraction. These data reveal a liquid droplet phase of actin, demixed from the surrounding solution and dominated by interfacial tension. These results suggest a mechanism to control organization, morphology, and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton.

  2. Cations Modulate Actin Bundle Mechanics, Assembly Dynamics, and Structure.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Nicholas; Zheng, Tianyu; Rivera-Jacquez, Hector J; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Hyun, Jaekyung; Balaeff, Alexander; Huo, Qun; Kang, Hyeran

    2018-04-12

    Actin bundles are key factors in the mechanical support and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. High concentrations of multivalent counterions promote bundle formation through electrostatic attraction between actin filaments that are negatively charged polyelectrolytes. In this study, we evaluate how physiologically relevant divalent cations affect the mechanical, dynamic, and structural properties of actin bundles. Using a combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering, we demonstrate that divalent cations modulate bundle stiffness, length distribution, and lateral growth. Molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atom model of the actin bundle reveal specific actin residues coordinate cation-binding sites that promote the bundle formation. Our work suggests that specific cation interactions may play a fundamental role in the assembly, structure, and mechanical properties of actin bundles.

  3. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Orion D.; Servant, Guy; Welch, Matthew D.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Sedat, John W.; Bourne, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients. PMID:10559877

  4. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Weiner, O D; Servant, G; Welch, M D; Mitchison, T J; Sedat, J W; Bourne, H R

    1999-06-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients.

  5. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  6. Measurement and Analysis of in vitro Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, Lynda K.; Rosen, Michael K.; Padrick, Shae B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of actin underlies force generation in numerous cellular processes. While actin polymerization can occur spontaneously, cells maintain control over this important process by preventing actin filament nucleation and then allowing stimulated polymerization and elongation by several regulated factors. Actin polymerization, regulated nucleation and controlled elongation activities can be reconstituted in vitro, and used to probe the signaling cascades cells use to control when and where actin polymerization occurs. Introducing a pyrene fluorophore allows detection of filament formation by an increase in pyrene fluorescence. This method has been used for many years and continues to be broadly used, owing to its simplicity and flexibility. Here we describe how to perform and analyze these in vitro actin polymerization assays, with an emphasis on extracting useful descriptive parameters from kinetic data. PMID:23868594

  7. Actin filaments-A target for redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carlos; Terman, Jonathan R; González-Billault, Christian; Ahmed, Giasuddin

    2016-10-01

    Actin and its ability to polymerize into dynamic filaments is critical for the form and function of cells throughout the body. While multiple proteins have been characterized as affecting actin dynamics through noncovalent means, actin and its protein regulators are also susceptible to covalent modifications of their amino acid residues. In this regard, oxidation-reduction (Redox) intermediates have emerged as key modulators of the actin cytoskeleton with multiple different effects on cellular form and function. Here, we review work implicating Redox intermediates in post-translationally altering actin and discuss what is known regarding how these alterations affect the properties of actin. We also focus on two of the best characterized enzymatic sources of these Redox intermediates-the NADPH oxidase NOX and the flavoprotein monooxygenase MICAL-and detail how they have both been identified as altering actin, but share little similarity and employ different means to regulate actin dynamics. Finally, we discuss the role of these enzymes and redox signaling in regulating the actin cytoskeleton in vivo and highlight their importance for neuronal form and function in health and disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surfing pathogens and the lessons learned for actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, F; Way, M

    2001-01-01

    A number of unrelated bacterial species as well as vaccinia virus (ab)use the process of actin polymerization to facilitate and enhance their infection cycle. Studies into the mechanism by which these pathogens hijack and control the actin cytoskeleton have provided many interesting insights into the regulation of actin polymerization in migrating cells. This review focuses on what we have learnt from the actin-based motilities of Listeria, Shigella and vaccinia and discusses what we would still like to learn from our nasty friends, including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Rickettsia

  9. Filamentous actin organization in the unfertilized sea urchin egg cortex.

    PubMed

    Henson, J H; Begg, D A

    1988-06-01

    We have investigated the organization of filamentous actin in the cortex of unfertilized eggs of the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus. Rhodamine phalloidin and anti-actin immunofluorescent staining of isolated cortices reveal a punctate pattern of fluorescent sources. Comparison of this pattern with SEM images of microvillar morphology and distribution indicates that filamentous actin in the cortex is predominantly localized in the microvilli. Thin-section TEM and quick-freeze deep-etch ultrastructure of isolated cortices demonstrates that this microvillar-associated actin is in a novel organizational state composed of very short filaments arranged in a tight network and that these filament networks form mounds that extend beyond the plane of the plasma membrane. Actin filaments within the networks do not exhibit free ends and make end-on attachments with the membrane only within the region of the evaginating microvilli. Myosin S-1 dissociable crosslinks, 2-3 nm in diameter, are observed between network filaments and between network filaments and the membrane. A second population of long, individual actin filaments is observed in close lateral association with the plasma membrane and frequently complexes with the microvillar actin networks. The filamentous actin of the unfertilized egg cortex may participate in establishing the mechanical properties of the egg surface and may function in nucleating the assembly of cortical actin following fertilization.

  10. Traveling waves in actin dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jun; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Much of current understanding of cell motility arose from studying steady treadmilling of actin arrays. Recently, there have been a growing number of observations of a more complex, non-steady, actin behavior, including self-organized waves. It is becoming clear that these waves result from activation and inhibition feedbacks in actin dynamics acting on different scales, but the exact molecular nature of these feedbacks and respective roles of biomechanics and biochemistry are still unclear. Here, we review recent advances achieved in experimental and theoretical studies of actin waves and discuss mechanisms and physiological significance of wavy protrusions. PMID:22985541

  11. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV∆ defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7–Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces. PMID:23051734

  12. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G

    2012-12-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7-Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces.

  13. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  14. Actin filaments – a target for redox regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carlos; Terman, Jonathan R.; González-Billault, Christian; Ahmed, Giasuddin

    2016-01-01

    Actin and its ability to polymerize into dynamic filaments is critical for the form and function of cells throughout the body. While multiple proteins have been characterized as affecting actin dynamics through non-covalent means, actin and its protein regulators are also susceptible to covalent modifications of their amino acid residues. In this regard, oxidation-reduction (Redox) intermediates have emerged as key modulators of the actin cytoskeleton with multiple different effects on cellular form and function. Here, we review work implicating Redox intermediates in post-translationally altering actin and discuss what is known regarding how these alterations affect the properties of actin. We also focus on two of the best characterized enzymatic sources of these Redox intermediates – the NADPH oxidase NOX and the flavoprotein monooxygenase MICAL – and detail how they have both been identified as altering actin, but share little similarity and employ different means to regulate actin dynamics. Finally, we discuss the role of these enzymes and redox signaling in regulating the actin cytoskeleton in vivo and highlight their importance for neuronal form and function in health and disease. PMID:27309342

  15. Characterization of actin filament severing by actophorin from Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Actophorin is an abundant 15-kD actinbinding protein from Acanthamoeba that is thought to form a nonpolymerizable complex with actin monomers and also to reduce the viscosity of polymerized actin by severing filaments (Cooper et al., 1986. J. Biol. Chem. 261:477-485). Homologous proteins have been identified in sea urchin, chicken, and mammalian tissues. Chemical crosslinking produces a 1:1 covalent complex of actin and actophorin. Actophorin and profilin compete for crosslinking to actin monomers. The influence of actophorin on the steady-state actin polymer concentration gave a Kd of 0.2 microM for the complex of actophorin with actin monomers. Several new lines of evidence, including assays for actin filament ends by elongation rate and depolymerization rate, show that actophorin severs actin filaments both at steady state and during spontaneous polymerization. This is confirmed by direct observation in the light microscope and by showing that the effects of actophorin on the low shear visc