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Sample records for actinide iv ions

  1. In vitro removal of actinide (IV) ions

    DOEpatents

    Weitl, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1982-01-01

    A compound of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X is hydrogen or a conventional electron-withdrawing group, particularly --SO.sub.3 H or a salt thereof; n is 2, 3, or 4; m is 2, 3, or 4; and p is 2 or 3. The present compounds are useful as specific sequestering agents for actinide (IV) ions. Also described is a method for the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamidation of azaalkanes.

  2. Actinide-ion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X; Jue, Jan-fong; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2015-01-13

    An apparatus for the real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide-ion concentrations. A working electrolyte is positioned within the interior of a container. The working electrolyte is separated from a reference electrolyte by a separator. A working electrode is at least partially in contact with the working electrolyte. A reference electrode is at least partially in contact with the reference electrolyte. A voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide-ion of interest. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide-ion of interest. The separator comprises an actinide, Zr, and Nb. Preferably, the actinide of the separator is Am or Np, more preferably Pu. In one embodiment, the actinide of the separator is the actinide of interest. In another embodiment, the separator further comprises P and O.

  3. Extraction of actinide (III, IV, V, VI) ions and TcO4- byN,N,N',N'- tetraisobutyl-3-oxa-glutaramide

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Guoxin; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Jianchen; Rao, Linfeng

    2005-05-01

    The extraction behavior of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), Am(III), and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} with N, N, N', N'-tetraisobutyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TiBOGA) were investigated. An organic phase of 0.2 mol/L TiBOGA in 40/60% (V/V) 1-octanol/kerosene showed good extractability for actinides (III, IV, V VI) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -}from aqueous solutions of HNO{sub 3} (0.1 to 4 mol/L). At 25 C, the distribution ratio of the actinide ions (D{sub An}) generally increased as the concentration of HNO{sub 3} in the aqueous phase was increased from 0.1 to 4 mol/L, while the D{sub Tc} at first increased, then decreased, with a maximum of 3.0 at 2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. Based on the slope analysis of the dependence of D{sub M} (M = An or Tc) on the concentrations of reagents, the formula of extracted complexes were assumed to be UO{sub 2}L{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NpO{sub 2}L{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}), PuL(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, AmL{sub 3}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, and HL{sub 2}(TcO{sub 4}) where L = TiBOGA. The enthalpy and entropy of the corresponding extraction reactions, {Delta}{sub r}H and {Delta}{sub r}S, were calculated from the dependence of D on temperature in the range of 15-55 C. For U(VI), Np(V), Am(III) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, the extraction reactions are enthalpy driven and disfavored by entropy ({Delta}{sub r}H < 0 and {Delta}{sub r}S < 0). In contrast, the extraction reaction of Pu(IV) is entropy driven and disfavored by enthalpy ({Delta}{sub r}H > 0 and {Delta}{sub r}S > 0). A test run with 0.2 mol/L TiBOGA in 40/60% 1-octanol/kerosene was performed to separate actinides and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from a simulated acidic high-level liquid waste (HLLW), using tracer amounts of {sup 238}U(VI), {sup 237}Np(V), {sup 239}Pu(VI), {sup 241}Am(III) and {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}. The distribution ratios of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(VI), Am(III) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} were 12.4, 3.9, 87, > 1000 and 1.5, respectively, confirming that TiBOGA is a promising extractant for the separation of all actinides and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from

  4. Actinide ion sensor for pyroprocess monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Jue, Jan-fong; Li, Shelly X.

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide ion concentrations which comprises a working electrode, a reference electrode, a container, a working electrolyte, a separator, a reference electrolyte, and a voltmeter. The container holds the working electrolyte. The voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode and measures the voltage between those electrodes. The working electrode contacts the working electrolyte. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide ion of interest. The reference electrode contacts the reference electrolyte. The reference electrolyte is separated from the working electrolyte by the separator. The separator contacts both the working electrolyte and the reference electrolyte. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide ion of interest. The reference electrolyte comprises a known concentration of the actinide ion of interest. The separator comprises a beta double prime alumina exchanged with the actinide ion of interest.

  5. Solution thermodynamic stability of complexes formed with the octadentate hydroxypyridinonate ligand 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO): a critical feature for efficient chelation of lanthanide(IV) and actinide(IV) ions.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-08-01

    The solution thermodynamics of water-soluble complexes formed between Ce(III), Ce(IV), Th(IV) and the octadentate chelating agent 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) were investigated. Several techniques including spectrofluorimetric and automated spectrophotometric titrations were used to overcome the slow spontaneous oxidation of Ce(III) complexes yielding to stability constants of log β110 = 17.4 ± 0.5, log β11-1 = 8.3 ± 0.4 and log β111 = 21.2 ± 0.4 for [Ce(III)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))](-), [Ce(III)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO)(OH)](2-), and [Ce(III)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO)H], respectively. Using the spectral properties of the hydroxypyridinonate chelator in ligand competition titrations against nitrilotriacetic acid, the stability constant log β110 = 41.5 ± 0.5 was determined for [Ce(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]. Finally, the extraordinarily stable complex [Ce(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))] was used in Th(IV) competition titrations, resulting in a stability constant of log β110 = 40.1 ± 0.5 for [Th(IV)3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]. These experimental values are in excellent agreement with previous estimates, they are discussed with respect to the ionic radius and oxidation state of each cationic metal, and allow predictions on the stability of other actinide complexes including [U(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))], [Np(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))], and [Pu(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]. Comparisons with the standard ligand diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) provide a thermodynamic basis for the observed significantly higher efficacy of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) as an in vivo actinide decorporation agent. PMID:23855806

  6. Solution thermodynamic stability of complexes formed with the octadentate hydroxypyridinonate ligand 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO): A critical feature for efficient chelation of lanthanide(IV) and actinide(IV) ions

    PubMed Central

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    The solution thermodynamics of water soluble complexes formed between Ce(III), Ce(IV), Th(IV) and the octadentate chelating agent 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) were investigated. Several techniques including spectrofluorimetric and automated spectrophotometric titrations were used to overcome the slow spontaneous oxidation of Ce(III) complexes yielding to stability constants of log β110 = 17.4 ± 0.5, log β11-1 = 8.3 ± 0.4 and log β111 = 21.2 ± 0.4 for [Ce(III)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]−, [Ce(III)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO)(OH)]2− and [Ce(III)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO)H], respectively. Using the spectral properties of the hydroxypyridinonate chelator in ligand competition titrations against nitrilotriacetic acid, the stability constant log β110 = 41.5 ± 0.5 was determined for [Ce(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]. Finally, the extraordinarily stable complex [Ce(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))] was used in Th(IV) competition titrations, resulting in a stability constant of log β110 = 40.1 ± 0.5 for [Th(IV)3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]. These experimental values are in excellent agreement with previous estimates, they are discussed with respect to the ionic radius and oxidation state of each cationic metal and allow predictions on the stability of other actinide complexes including [U(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))], [Np(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))] and [Pu(IV)(3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO))]. Comparisons with the standard ligand diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) provide a thermodynamic basis for the observed significantly higher efficacy of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) as an in vivo actinide decorporation agent. PMID:23855806

  7. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  8. Actinide thermodynamic predictions. 3. Thermodynamics of compounds and aquo ions of the 2+, 3+ and 4+ oxidation states and standard electrode potentials at 298. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Bratsch, S.G.; Lagowski, J.J.

    1986-01-16

    A modified ionic model is applied to selected actinide thermodynamic measurements to allow the evaluation of gas-phase ion thermodynamics across the actinide series. These are used to predict the thermodynamic properties of a number of actinide compounds and aquo ions at 298.15 K. General guidelines are offered for predicting the relative stabilities of actinide(II), -(III), and -(IV) compounds in various chemical environments. 40 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  9. The reduction of actinide ions by hydroxamic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. J.; May, I.

    1999-01-01

    Simple hydroxamic acids have been shown to have useful applications in an Advanced Purex process for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. They are especially suited to the separation of neptunium (IV) from uranium (VI) by the selective formation of a hydrophilic complex with Np(IV). U(VI) extraction in to 30% tributyl phosphate is unaffected. However, they have also been shown to be very fast reducing agents for Np(VI). The timescales of the reduction have been defined under a range of typical Purex Process conditions although the accurate determination of the reaction kinetics was not possible due to the rapidity of the reaction. U(VI) was shown not to be reduced. Therefore, Np(VI) can be efficiently reductively stripped when solvent phase (30% tributyl phosphate in odourless kerosene) solutions of Np(VI) and U(VI) are contacted with aqueous phase hydroxamic acid solutions. The slow reduction of plutonium (IV) to Pu(III) has also been observed and this is apparently enhanced by the presence of U(VI) ions. The observed reactions of these actinide ions was shown to be compatible with experimentally determined onset potentials for hydroxamic acids. The hydrolysis of hydroxamic acids to hydroxylamine in nitric acid also affects the reduction of Pu(IV), particularly by FHA.

  10. Reactions of actinide ions with ethylene oxide.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J K

    2001-03-01

    Naked and oxo-ligated actinide (An) monopositive ions were reacted with ethylene oxide, cyclo-C(2)H(4)O (EtO). Along with An = U, Np, Pu and Am, ions of two lanthanide (Ln) elements, Ln = Tb and Tm, were studied for comparison. Metal and metal oxide ions, M(+), MO(+) and MO(2)(+), were generated by laser ablation and immediately reacted with EtO. Unreacted and product ions were detected by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It was apparent that the overall reaction cross-sections decreased in the order U(+) > or = Np(+) > Pu(+) > Am(+). A primary reaction channel for each studied metal was the formation of MO(+) from M(+), in accord with the expected exothermicity of oxygen abstraction from EtO. For U, Np and Pu, the dioxides were also major products, indicating OAn(+)--O dissociation energies of at least 350 kJ mol(-1), the energy required for O-atom abstraction from EtO. For Am, Tb and Tm, the dioxides were only very minor products, reflecting the stabilities of the trivalent states and resistance to oxidation to higher valence states; the structures/bonding in these MO(2)(+) are intriguing given that the formal pentavalent bonding state is effectively unattainable. It was demonstrated that EtO, unlike more thermochemically favorable but kinetically restricted O-donors, is effective at achieving facile oxidation of actinide metal ions to the monoxide, and to the dioxide if the second O-abstraction reaction is exothermic. Several intriguing minor products were also identified, most of which incorporate metal--oxygen bonding and are attributed to the oxophilicity of the f-block elements; the contrast to the behavior of first-row d-block transition elements is striking in this regard. Particularly noteworthy was the formation of MH(4)(+) (and MOH(4)(+)), evidently via abstraction of all four H atoms from a single C(2)H(4)O molecule; the structures/bonding in these novel 'hydride' species are indeterminate and warrant further attention.

  11. Coordination Chemistry of Homoleptic Actinide(IV)-Thiocyanate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tyler J; Wilson, Richard E

    2015-10-26

    The synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, vibrational and optical spectroscopy for the eight-coordinate thiocyanate compounds, [Et4 N]4 [Pu(IV) (NCS)8 ], [Et4 N]4 [Th(IV) (NCS)8 ], and [Et4 N]4 [Ce(III) (NCS)7 (H2 O)] are reported. Thiocyanate was found to rapidly reduce plutonium to Pu(III) in acidic solutions (pH<1) in the presence of NCS(-) . The optical spectrum of [Et4 N][SCN] containing Pu(III) solution was indistinguishable from that of aquated Pu(III) suggesting that inner-sphere complexation with [Et4 N][SCN] does not occur in water. However, upon concentration, the homoleptic thiocyanate complex [Et4 N]4 [Pu(IV) (NCS)8 ] was crystallized when a large excess of [Et4 N][NCS] was present. This compound, along with its U(IV) analogue, maintains inner-sphere thiocyanate coordination in acetonitrile based on the observation of intense ligand-to-metal charge-transfer bands. Spectroscopic and crystallographic data do not support the interaction of the metal orbitals with the ligand π system, but support an enhanced An(IV) -NCS interaction, as the Lewis acidity of the metal ion increases from Th to Pu.

  12. The role of transferrin in actinide(IV) uptake: comparison with iron(III).

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Aurélie; Ferrand, M; Funke, Harald; Hennig, Christoph; Moisy, Philippe; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2010-01-25

    The impact of actinides on living organisms has been the subject of numerous studies since the 1950s. From a general point of view, these studies show that actinides are chemical poisons as well as radiological hazards. Actinides in plasma are assumed to be mainly complexed to transferrin, the iron carrier protein. This paper casts light on the uptake of actinides(IV) (thorium, neptunium, plutonium) by transferrin, focusing on the pH dependence of the interaction and on a molecular description of the cation binding site in the protein. Their behavior is compared with that of iron(III), the endogenous transferrin cation, from a structural point of view. Complementary spectroscopic techniques (UV/Vis spectrophotometry, microfiltration coupled with gamma spectrometry, and X-ray absorption fine structure) have been combined in order to propose a structural model for the actinide-binding site in transferrin. Comparison of our results with data available on holotransferrin suggests some similarities between the behavior of Fe(III) and Np(IV)/Pu(IV)/ Np(IV) is not complexed at pH <7, whereas at pH approximately 7.4 complexation can be regarded as quantitative. This pH effect is consistent with the in vivo transferrin "cycle". Pu(IV) also appears to be quantitatively bound by apotransferrin at around pH approximately 7.5, whereas Th(IV) was never complexed under our experimental conditions. EXAFS data at the actinide edge have allowed a structural model of the actinide binding site to be elaborated: at least one tyrosine residue could participate in the actinide coordination sphere (two for iron), forming a mixed hydroxo-transferrin complex in which actinides are bound with transferrin both through An-tyrosine and through An--OH bonds. A description of interatomic distances is provided.

  13. Correlation and relativistic effects in actinide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.

    2011-11-15

    Wavelengths, line strengths, and transition rates are calculated for the multipole (E1, M1, E2, M2, E3, and M3) transitions between the excited 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 5}nl and 6s6p{sup 6}nl states and the ground 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 6} state in Ac{sup 3+}, Th{sup 4+}, and U{sup 6+} Rn-like ions. Relativistic many-body perturbation theory (RMBPT), including the Breit interaction, is used to evaluate energies and transition rates for multipole transitions in these hole-particle systems. The RMBPT method agrees with multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations in lowest order, includes all second-order correlation corrections, and includes corrections from negative-energy states. The calculations start from a [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}6s{sup 2}6p{sup 6} Dirac-Fock potential. First-order perturbation theory is used to obtain intermediate-coupling coefficients, and second-order RMBPT is used to determine the matrix elements. Evaluated multipole matrix elements for transitions from excited states to the ground states are used to determine the line strengths, transition rates, and multipole polarizabilities. This work provides a number of yet unmeasured properties of these actinide ions for various applications and for benchmark tests of theory and experiment.

  14. Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

    2013-12-01

    The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

  15. Identification of hexanuclear Actinide(IV) carboxylates with Thorium, Uranium and Neptunium by EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Christoph; Takao, Shinobu; Takao, Koichiro; Weiss, Stephan; Kraus, Werner; Emmerling, Franziska; Meyer, Michel; Scheinost, Andreas C.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrated actinide(IV) ions undergo hydrolysis and further polymerization and precipitation with increasing pH. The resulting amorphous and partly crystalline oxydydroxides AnOn(OH)4-2n·xH2O can usually be observed as colloids above the An(IV) solubility limit. The aging process of such colloids results in crystalline AnO2. The presence of carboxylates in the solution prevents the occurrence of such colloids by formation of polynuclear complexes through a competing reaction between hydrolysis and ligation. The majority of recently described carboxylates reveals a hexanuclear core of [An6(μ3-O)4(μ3-OH)4]12+ terminated by 12 carboxylate ligands. We found that the An(IV) carboxylate solution species remain often preserved in crystalline state. The An(IV) carboxylates show An-An distances which are ~ 0.03 Å shorter than the An-An distances in AnO2 like colloids. The difference in the distances could be used to identify such species in solution.

  16. Surprising coordination for low-valent actinides resembling uranyl(vi) in thorium(iv) organic hybrid layered and framework structures based on a graphene-like (6,3) sheet topology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxiang; Weng, Zhehui; Wang, Yanlong; Chen, Lanhua; Sheng, Daopeng; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-01-21

    Three thorium(iv)-based metal-organic hybrid compounds with 2D layered and 3D framework structures exhibiting graphene-like (6,3) sheet topologies were prepared with linkers with threefold symmetry. These compounds contain rare and relatively anisotropic coordination environments for low-valent actinides that are similar to those often observed for high-valent actinide ions. PMID:26672441

  17. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Ali, Manjoor; Ningthoujam, Raghumani S; Gaikwad, Pallavi; Kumar, Mukesh; Nath, Bimalendu B; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-15

    Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal-heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal-Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity. PMID:26799219

  18. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides.

  19. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides. PMID:26821345

  20. Hydrothermal method of preparation of actinide(IV) phosphate hydrogenphosphate hydrates and study of their conversion into actinide(IV) phosphate diphosphate solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, N; Grandjean, S; Rousselle, J; Clavier, N

    2007-11-26

    Several compositions of Th2-x/2AnIVx/2(PO4)2(HPO4).H2O (An=U, Np, Pu) were prepared through hydrothermal precipitation from a mixture of nitric solutions containing cations and concentrated phosphoric acid. All the samples were fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis, and infrared spectroscopies to check for the existence of thorium-actinide(IV) phosphate hydrogenphosphate hydrates solid solutions. Such compounds were obtained as single phases, up to x=4 for uranium, x=2 for neptunium, and x<4 for plutonium, the cations being fully maintained in the tetravalent oxidation state. In a second step, the samples obtained after heating crystallized precursors at high temperature (1100 degrees C) were characterized. Single-phase thorium-actinide(IV) phosphate-diphosphate solid solutions were obtained up to x=0.8 for Np(IV) and x=1.6 for Pu(IV). For higher substitution rates, polyphase systems composed by beta-TAnPD, An2O(PO4)2, and/or alpha-AnP2O7 were formed. Finally, this hydrothermal route of preparation was applied successfully to the synthesis of an original phosphate-based compound incorporating simultaneously tetravalent uranium, neptunium and plutonium. PMID:17973479

  1. Actinide(IV) Deposits on Bone: Potential Role of the Osteopontin-Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Creff, Gaëlle; Safi, Samir; Roques, Jérôme; Michel, Hervé; Jeanson, Aurélie; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Basset, Christian; Simoni, Eric; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In case of a nuclear event, contamination (broad or limited) of the population or of specific workers might occur. In such a senario, the fate of actinide contaminants may be of first concern, in particular with regard to human target organs like the skeleton. To improve our understanding of the toxicological processes that might take place, a mechanistic approach is necessary. For instance, ∼50% of Pu(IV) is known from biokinetic data to accumulate in bone, but the underlining mechanisms are almost unknown. In this context, and to obtain a better description of the toxicological mechanisms associated with actinides(IV), we have undertaken the investigation, on a molecular scale, of the interaction of thorium(IV) with osteopontin (OPN) a hyperphosphorylated protein involved in bone turnover. Thorium is taken here as a simple model for actinide(IV) chemistry. In addition, we have selected a phosphorylated hexapeptide (His-pSer-Asp-Glu-pSer-Asp-Glu-Val) that is representative of the peptidic sequence involved in the bone interaction. For both the protein and the biomimetic peptide, we have determined the local environment of Th(IV) within the bioactinidic complex, combining isothermal titration calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, theoretical calculations with density functional theory, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Th LIII edge. The results demonstrate a predominance of interaction of metal with the phosphate groups and confirmed the previous physiological studies that have highlighted a high affinity of Th(IV) for the bone matrix. Data are further compared with those of the uranyl case, representing the actinyl(V) and actinyl(VI) species. Last, our approach shows the importance of developing simplified systems [Th(IV)-peptide] that can serve as models for more biologically relevant systems. PMID:26684435

  2. Actinide(IV) Deposits on Bone: Potential Role of the Osteopontin-Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Creff, Gaëlle; Safi, Samir; Roques, Jérôme; Michel, Hervé; Jeanson, Aurélie; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Basset, Christian; Simoni, Eric; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In case of a nuclear event, contamination (broad or limited) of the population or of specific workers might occur. In such a senario, the fate of actinide contaminants may be of first concern, in particular with regard to human target organs like the skeleton. To improve our understanding of the toxicological processes that might take place, a mechanistic approach is necessary. For instance, ∼50% of Pu(IV) is known from biokinetic data to accumulate in bone, but the underlining mechanisms are almost unknown. In this context, and to obtain a better description of the toxicological mechanisms associated with actinides(IV), we have undertaken the investigation, on a molecular scale, of the interaction of thorium(IV) with osteopontin (OPN) a hyperphosphorylated protein involved in bone turnover. Thorium is taken here as a simple model for actinide(IV) chemistry. In addition, we have selected a phosphorylated hexapeptide (His-pSer-Asp-Glu-pSer-Asp-Glu-Val) that is representative of the peptidic sequence involved in the bone interaction. For both the protein and the biomimetic peptide, we have determined the local environment of Th(IV) within the bioactinidic complex, combining isothermal titration calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, theoretical calculations with density functional theory, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Th LIII edge. The results demonstrate a predominance of interaction of metal with the phosphate groups and confirmed the previous physiological studies that have highlighted a high affinity of Th(IV) for the bone matrix. Data are further compared with those of the uranyl case, representing the actinyl(V) and actinyl(VI) species. Last, our approach shows the importance of developing simplified systems [Th(IV)-peptide] that can serve as models for more biologically relevant systems.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Templated Ion Exchange Resins for the Selective Complexation of Actinide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Uy, O. Manual

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a polymeric extractant for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and even body fluids). Chemical insights into what makes a good complexation site will be used to synthesize reagents tailor-made for the complexation of uranyl and other actinide ions. These insights, derived from studies of molecular recognition include ion coordination number and geometry, ionic size and ionic shape, as well as ion to ligand thermodynamic affinity. Selectivity for a specific actinide ion will be obtained by providing the polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced by using a specific ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The complexing ligands will be ones containing functional groups known to form stable complexes with a specific ion and less stable complexes with other cations. Prior investigator's approaches for making templated resins for metal ions have had marginal success. We have extended and amended these methodologies in our work with Pb(II) and uranyl ion, by changing the order of the steps, by the inclusion of sonication, by using higher complex loading, and the selection of functional groups with better complexation constants. This has resulted in significant improvements to selectivity. The unusual shape of the uranyl ion suggests that this approach will result in even greater selectivities than already observed for Pb(II). Preliminary data obtained for uranyl templated polymers shows unprecedented selectivity and has resulted in the first ion selective electrode for uranyl ion.

  4. Synthesis and extraction studies with a rationally designed diamide ligand selective to actinide(iv) pertinent to the plutonium uranium redox extraction process.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Panja, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Dhami, Prem S; Gandhi, Preetam M; Ghosh, Sunil K

    2016-05-01

    A new class of conformationally constrained oxa-bridged tricyclo-dicarboxamide (OTDA) ligand was rationally designed for the selective extraction of tetravalent actinides pertinent to the Plutonium Uranium Redox EXtraction (PUREX) process. Two of the designed diamide ligands were synthesized and extraction studies were performed for Pu(iv) from HNO3 medium. The mechanism of extraction was investigated by studying various parameters such as feed HNO3, NaNO3 and OTDA concentrations. The nature of the extracted species was found to be [Pu(NO3)4(OTDA)]. One of the OTDA ligands was elaborately tested and showed the selective extraction of Pu(iv) and Np(iv) over other actinide species, viz., U(vi), Np(v), Am(iii), lanthanides and fission products contained in a nuclear waste from the PUREX process. DFT calculations predicted the charge density on each of the coordinating 'O' atoms of OTDA supporting its high Pu(iv) selectivity over other ions studied and also provided the energy optimized structure of OTDA and its Pu(iv) complex. PMID:27054892

  5. On the use of speciation techniques and ab initio modelling to understand tetravalent actinide behavior in a biological medium: An(IV)DTPA case.

    PubMed

    Aupiais, J; Bonin, L; Den Auwer, C; Moisy, P; Siberchicot, B; Topin, S

    2016-03-01

    In the case of an accidental nuclear event, contamination of human bodies by actinide elements may occur. Such elements have the particularity to exhibit both radiological and chemical toxicities that may induce severe damages at several levels, depending on the biokinetics of the element. In order to eliminate the actinide elements before they are stored in target organs (liver, kidneys, or bone, depending on the element), sequestering agents must be quickly injected. However, to date, there is still no ideal sequestering agent, despite the recent interest in this topic due to contamination concerns. DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) is currently generating interest for the development of oral or alternative self-administrable forms. Although biokinetics data are mostly available, molecular scale characterization of actinide-DTPA complexes is still scarce. Nevertheless, strong interest is growing in the characterization of An(IV)DTPA(-) complexes at the molecular level because this opens the way for predicting the stability constants of unknown systems or even for developing new analytical strategies aimed at better and more selective decorporation. For this purpose, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (AIMD) investigations were undertaken and compared with capillary electrophoresis (CE) used in a very unusual way. Indeed, it is commonly believed that CE is incapable of extracting structural information. In capillary electrophoresis, the electrophoretic mobility of an ion is a function of its charge and size. Despite very similar ratios, partial separations between An(IV)DTPA(-) species (An(IV) = Th, U, Np, Pu) were obtained. A linear relationship between the electrophoretic mobility and the actinide--oxygen distance calculated by AIMD was evidenced. As an example, the interpolated U-O distances in U(IV)DTPA(-) from CE-ICPMS experiments, EXAFS, AIMD, and the relationship between the stability constants and

  6. Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

    2013-09-17

    This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS) and determined to have high affinities

  7. Actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) carbonate speciation studies by PAS and NMR spectroscopies; Yucca Mountain Project: Milestone report 3031-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Ekberg, S.A.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pulsed-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to study speciation of actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) ions (Np, Pu, Am) in aqueous carbonate solutions vs pH, carbonate content, actinide content, temperature. PAS focused on Pu(IV) speciation. Stability fields on a pH (8.4 to 12.0) versus total carbonate content (0.003 to 1.0 M) plot for dilute Pu(IV) carbonate species ([Pu]{sub tot} = 1 mM) were mapped. Four plutonium species, with absorption peaks at 486, 492, 500, and 512 nm were found. Loss of a single carbonate ligand does not account for the difference in speciation for the 486 and 492 nm absorption peaks, nor can any of the observed species be identified as colloidal Pu(IV). NMR data have been obtained for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. This report focuses on results for PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on the PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. In each of the six different PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} samples, two NMR signals are present, one for the free carbonate ligand and one for the carbonate ligand coordinated to a paramagnetic plutonium metal center. The single{sup 13}C resonance line for coordinated carbonate is consistent with expectations of a monomeric PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} species in solution. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was used for determining ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Eyring analysis at standard conditions provided activation parameters of {Delta}H = 38 KJ/M and {Delta}S = {minus}60 J/K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl(VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction.

  8. Actinide ions for testing the spatial α -variation hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    Testing the spatial variation of the fine-structure constant α indicated by Webb et al. [J. K. Webb, J. A. King, M. T. Murphy, V. V. Flambaum, R. F. Carswell, and M. B. Bainbridge, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 191101 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.191101] with terrestrial laboratory atomic measurements requires at least α ˙/α ˜10-19yr-1 sensitivity. We conduct a systematic search of atomic systems for such a test that have all features of the best optical clock transitions leading to the possibility of the frequency measurements with fractional accuracy on the level of 10-18 or better and have a factor of 100 extra enhancement of α variation in comparison to experimental frequency ratio measurement accuracy. We identify the pair of actinide Cf15 + and Es16 + ions as the best system for a test of spatial α -variation hypothesis as it satisfies both of these requirements and has sufficiently simple electronic structure to allow for high-precision predictions of all atomic properties required for rapid experimental progress.

  9. Ion exchange in the atomic energy industry with particular reference to actinide and fission product separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviewed are some of the uses of ion exchange processes used by the nuclear industry for the period April, 1978 to April, 1983. The topics dealt with are: thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, cesium and actinide-lanthanide separations; the higher actinides - Cm, Bk, Cf, Es and Fm; fission products; ion exchange in the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Consideration is given to safety in the use of ion exchangers and in safe methods of disposal of such materials. Full scale and pilot plant process descriptions are included as well as summaries of laboratory studies. 130 references.

  10. Uptake of actinides and other ions by Diphosil, a new silica-based chelating ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; D`Arcy, K.A.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Trochimczuk

    1996-06-01

    After adsorption of actinides on a phosphonic acid resin, it may be desirable to leave the actinides on the resin. It may be preferable that the polymeric resin matrix be replaced by an inorganic material, in order to prevent formation of radiolytic gases from the organic polymer. A new version of the Diphonix resin has been prepared, where the chelating diphosphonic acid groups are grafted to a silica support. This material is called Diphosil, for Diphonix on silica. This paper reports some results on equilibrium and kinetics of uptake of a number of actinide species and other metal ions of nuclear, environmental, or hydrometallurgical interest by Diphosil.

  11. Actinide sulfite tetrahydrate and actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, D.; Watt, G.

    1980-07-08

    A compound is prepared that comprises an actinide sulfite tetrahydrate selected from the group consisting of uranium (IV) sulfite tetrahydrate and plutonium (IV) sulfite tetrahydrate. A compound is also prepared that comprises an actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate selected from the group consisting of uranium (IV) oxysulfite tetrahydrate and plutonium (IV) oxysulfite tetrahydrate

  12. f-state luminescence of lanthanide and actinide ions in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.

    1993-09-01

    Detailed studies of the luminescence of aquated Am{sup 3+} are presented in the context of prior lanthanide and actinide ion work. The luminescing state of aquated Am{sup 3+} is confirmed to be {sup 5}D{sub l} based on observed emission and excitation spectra. The luminescence lifetime of Am{sup 3+} in H{sub 2}O solution is (22 {plus_minus} 3) ns and (155 {plus_minus} 4) ns in D{sub 2}O solution at 295 K. Judd-Ofelt transition intensity theory qualitatively describes the observed Am{sup 3+} relative integrated fluorescence intensities. Recent luminescence studies on complexed trivalent f-element ions in solution are reviewed as to the similarities and differences between lanthanide ion 4f state and actinide ion 5f state properties.

  13. Actinide chelation: biodistribution and in vivo complex stability of the targeted metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kullgren, Birgitta; Jarvis, Erin E; An, Dahlia D; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-01-01

    Because of the continuing use of nuclear fuel sources and heightened threats of nuclear weapon use, the amount of produced and released radionuclides is increasing daily, as is the risk of larger human exposure to fission product actinides. A rodent model was used to follow the in vivo distribution of representative actinides, administered as free metal ions or complexed with chelating agents including diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and the hydroxypyridinonate ligands 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO). Different metabolic pathways for the different metal ions were evidenced, resulting in intricate ligand- and metal-dependent decorporation mechanisms. While the three studied chelators are known for their unrivaled actinide decorporation efficiency, the corresponding metal complexes may undergo in vivo decomposition and release metal ions in various biological pools. This study sets the basis to further explore the metabolism and in vivo coordination properties of internalized actinides for the future development of viable therapeutic chelating agents. PMID:22957518

  14. Actinide chelation: biodistribution and in vivo complex stability of the targeted metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kullgren, Birgitta; Jarvis, Erin E; An, Dahlia D; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-01-01

    Because of the continuing use of nuclear fuel sources and heightened threats of nuclear weapon use, the amount of produced and released radionuclides is increasing daily, as is the risk of larger human exposure to fission product actinides. A rodent model was used to follow the in vivo distribution of representative actinides, administered as free metal ions or complexed with chelating agents including diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and the hydroxypyridinonate ligands 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO). Different metabolic pathways for the different metal ions were evidenced, resulting in intricate ligand- and metal-dependent decorporation mechanisms. While the three studied chelators are known for their unrivaled actinide decorporation efficiency, the corresponding metal complexes may undergo in vivo decomposition and release metal ions in various biological pools. This study sets the basis to further explore the metabolism and in vivo coordination properties of internalized actinides for the future development of viable therapeutic chelating agents.

  15. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Charu L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-01

    A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  16. Method and apparatus for providing negative ions of actinide-metal hexafluorides

    DOEpatents

    Compton, Robert N.; Reinhardt, Paul W.; Garrett, William R.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a novel method and a novel generator, or source, for providing gaseous negative ions of selected metal hexafluorides. The method is summarized as follows: in an evacuated zone, reacting gaseous fluorine with an actinide-metal body selected from the group consisting of uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium to convert at least part of the metal to the hexafluoride state, thus producing gaseous negatively charged metal-hexafluoride ions in the evacuated zone, and applying an electric field to the zone to remove the ions therefrom. The ion source comprises a chamber defining a reaction zone; means for evacuating the zone; an actinide-metal body in the zone, the metal being uranium, plutonium, neptunium, or americium; means for contacting the body with gaseous fluorine to convert at least a part thereof to the hexafluoride state; and means for applying an electric field to the evacuated zone to extract gaseous, negatively charged metal-hexafluoride ions therefrom. The invention provides unique advantages over conventional surface-ionization techniques for producing such ions.

  17. Determination of Uncertainties for +III and +IV Actinide Solubilities in the WIPP Geochemistry Model for the 2009 Compliance Recertification Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. E.; Xiong, Y.; Nowak, E. J.; Brush, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository in southeast New Mexico for defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. Every five years, the DOE is required to submit an application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) demonstrating the WIPP’s continuing compliance with the applicable EPA regulations governing the repository. Part of this recertification effort involves a performance assessment—a probabilistic evaluation of the repository performance with respect to regulatory limits on the amount of releases from the repository to the accessible environment. One of the models used as part of the performance assessment process is a geochemistry model, which predicts solubilities of the radionuclides in the brines that may enter the repository in the different scenarios considered by the performance assessment. The dissolved actinide source term comprises actinide solubilities, which are input parameters for modeling the transport of radionuclides as a result of brine flow through and from the repository. During a performance assessment, the solubilities are modeled as the product of a “base” solubility determined from calculations based on the chemical conditions expected in the repository, and an uncertainty factor that describes the potential deviations of the model from expected behavior. We will focus here on a discussion of the uncertainties. To compute a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the uncertainties, we compare published, experimentally measured solubility data to predictions made using the established WIPP geochemistry model. The differences between the solubilities observed for a given experiment and the calculated solubilities from the model are used to form the overall CDF, which is then sampled as part of the performance assessment. We will discuss the methodology used to update the CDF’s for the +III actinides, obtained from data for Nd, Am, and Cm, and the +IV actinides, obtained

  18. Actinide production in the reaction of heavy ions with curium-248

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of /sup 248/Cm with /sup 18/Kr and /sup 86/O, /sup 136/Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from /sup 48/Ca and /sup 238/U bombardments of /sup 248/Cm. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate /sup 247/Pu is outlined. The absolute ..gamma.. ray intensities from /sup 251/Bk decay, necessary for calculating the /sup 251/Bk cross section, are also determined.

  19. Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-07-01

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

  20. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. IV. Miscellaneous aspects. [Transport; fuel fabrication; decay; policy; economics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.W.; Croff, A.G.

    1980-09-01

    This report discusses seven aspects of actinide partitioning-transmutation (P-T) which are important in any complete evaluation of this waste treatment option but which do not fall within other major topical areas concerning P-T. The so-called miscellaneous aspects considered are (1) the conceptual design of a shipping cask for highly neutron-active fresh and spent P-T fuels, (2) the possible impacts of P-T on mixed-oxide fuel fabrication, (3) alternatives for handling the existing and to-be-produced spent fuel and/or wastes until implementation of P-T, (4) the decay and dose characteristics of P-T and standard reactor fuels, (5) the implications of P-T on currently existing nuclear policy in the United States, (6) the summary costs of P-T, and (7) methods for comparing the risks, costs, and benefits of P-T.

  1. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  2. Comparative evaluation of actinide ion uptake by polymer inclusion membranes containing TODGA as the carrier extractant.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, B N; Raut, D R; Mohapatra, P K; Das, D K; Behere, P G; Afzal, Md

    2014-06-30

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIM) containing TODGA (N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyl diglycolamide) were evaluated for the separation of actinide ions such as Am(3+), Pu(4+), UO2(2+) and Th(4+) from acidic feeds. The PIMs were prepared using cellulose triacetate (CTA) as the polymer matrix and 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) as the plasticizer along with the diglycolamide carrier extractants and were characterized by conventional techniques such as XRD, thermal analysis and AFM. The PIM composition was optimized by a series of studies which involved variation in the CTA, NPOE and carrier concentration which suggested 58% TODGA, 30% NPOE and 12% CTA to be optimum. The uptake studies were carried out using feed solutions containing varying concentrations of nitric acid and showed the trend: Am(3+)>Pu(4+)>Th(4+)>UO2(2+). Transport studies were carried out in a two-compartment cell where nitric acid concentration the feed was varied (1-3M) while the receiver compartment contained alpha-hydroxy-iso-butyric acid (AHIBA). The actinide ion transport efficiencies with TODGA containing PIMs followed the same trend as seen in the uptake studies. The AFM patterns of the PIMs changed when loaded with Eu(3+) carrier (used as a surrogate for Am(3+)) while the regenerated membranes have displayed comparable morphologies. Diffusion coefficient values were experimentally obtained from the transport studies and were found to be 8.89×10(-8) cm(2)/s for Am(3+) transport.

  3. Supercritical carbon dioxide-soluble ligands for extracting actinide metal ions from porous solids (EMSP Project Number 64965)

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, M. L.; Barrans, Jr., R. E.; Herlinger, A. W.; Brennecke, J. F.

    2000-04-24

    The objective of this project is to develop novel, substituted diphosphonic acid ligands that can be used for supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCDE) of actinide ions from solid wastes. Specifically, selected diphosphonic acids, which are known to form extremely stable complexes with actinides in aqueous and organic solution, are to be rendered carbon dioxide-soluble by the introduction of appropriate alkyl- or silicon-containing substituents. The metal complexation chemistry of these new ligands in SC-CO{sub 2} will then be investigated and techniques for their use in actinide extraction from porous solids developed. This report summarizes the work performed during the first 1.3 years of a 3-year program. Because the planned studies of metal complexation and the development of techniques for actinide removal from solids are dependent on the availability of suitable ligands, efforts to date have focused primarily on the synthesis of selected alkyl- or silicon-containing diphosphonic acids. The authors' principal targets have been derivatives in which the silicon-containing groups either serve as the ester function or are attached to the anchor carbon of the diphosphonic acid. Because methylenediphosphonic acid (MDPA) is commercially available and because its esterification with simple alcohols to yield symmetrical diesters is well-established, their initial studies have focused on this ligand and its reactions with silyl alcohols. Success has been achieved in the reaction of MDPA and its ethylene, propylene, and butylene analogs with 3-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propanol. Using a procedure similar to that previously employed for the synthesis of C-8 dialkylmethylenediphosphonic acids, this series of alkylenediphosphonic acids has been esterified in good yield (ca. 60%) to the symmetrically-substituted diesters. Vapor phase osmometric and cryoscopic studies of these compounds in toluene and 1-decanol, respectively, indicate that their aggregation properties closely

  4. Determination of actinides in environmental and biological samples using high-performance chelation ion chromatography coupled to sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Truscott, J B; Jones, P; Fairman, B E; Evans, E H

    2001-08-31

    High-performance chelation ion chromatography, using a neutral polystyrene substrate dynamically loaded with 0.1 mM dipicolinic acid, coupled with sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been successfully used for the separation of the actinides thorium, uranium, americium, neptunium and plutonium. Using this column it was possible to separate the various actinides from each other and from a complex sample matrix. In particular, it was possible to separate plutonium and uranium to facilitate the detection of the former free of spectral interference. The column also exhibited some selectivity for different oxidation states of Np, Pu and U. Two oxidation states each for plutonium and neptunium were found, tentatively identified as Np(V) and Pu(III) eluting at the solvent front, and Np(IV) and Pu(IV) eluting much later. Detection limits were 12, 8, and 4 fg for 237Np, 239Pu, and 241Am, respectively, for a 0.5 ml injection. The system was successfully used for the determination of 239Pu in NIST 4251 Human Lung and 4353 Rocky Flats Soil, with results of 570+/-29 and 2939+/-226 fg g(-1), respectively, compared with a certified range of 227-951 fg g(-1) for the former and a value of 3307+/-248 fg g(-1) for the latter. PMID:11589474

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOTYPE TITANATE ION EXCHANGE LOADED MEMBRANES FOR STRONTIUM, CESIUM AND ACTINIDE DECONTAMINATION FROM AQUEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L; Keisha Martin, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-30

    We have successfully incorporated high surface area particles of titanate ion exchange materials (monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate) with acceptable particle size distribution into porous and inert support membrane fibrils consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{reg_sign}), polyethylene and cellulose materials. The resulting membrane sheets, under laboratory conditions, were used to evaluate the removal of surrogate radioactive materials for cesium-137 and strontium-90 from high caustic nuclear waste simulants. These membrane supports met the nominal requirement for nonchemical interaction with the embedded ion exchange materials and were porous enough to allow sufficient liquid flow. Some of this 47-mm size stamped out prototype titanium impregnated ion exchange membrane discs was found to remove more than 96% of dissolved cesium-133 and strontium-88 from a caustic nuclear waste salt simulants. Since in traditional ion exchange based column technology monosodium titanate (MST) is known to have great affinity for the sorbing of other actinides like plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, we expect that the MST-based membranes developed here, although not directly evaluated for uptake of these three actinides because of costs associated with working with actinides which do not have 'true' experimental surrogates, would also show significant affinity for these actinides in aqueous media. It was also observed that crystalline silicotitanate impregnated polytetrafluoroethylene or polyethylene membranes became less selective and sorbed both cesium and strontium from the caustic aqueous salt simulants.

  6. Zirconium(IV)-Benzene Phosphonate Coordination Polymers: Lanthanide and Actinide Extraction and Thermal Properties.

    PubMed

    Luca, Vittorio; Tejada, Juan J; Vega, Daniel; Arrachart, Guilhem; Rey, Cyrielle

    2016-08-15

    Coordination polymers with different P/(Zr + P) molar ratios were prepared by combining aqueous solutions of Zr(IV) and benzenephosphonate derivatives. 1,3,5-Benzenetrisphosphonic acid (BTP) as well as phosphonocarboxylate derivatives in which carboxylate substitutes one or two of the phosphonate groups were chosen as the building blocks. The precipitates obtained on combining the two solutions were not X-ray amorphous but rather were indicative of poorly ordered materials. Hydrothermal treatment did not alter the structure of the materials produced but did result in improved crystalline order. The use of HF as a mineralizing agent during hydrothermal synthesis resulted in the crystallization of at least three relatively crystalline phases whose structure could not be determined owing to the complexity of the diffraction patterns. Gauging from the similarity of the diffraction patterns of all the phases, the poorly ordered precipitates and crystalline materials appeared to have similar underlying structures. The BTP-based zirconium phosphonates all showed a higher selectivity for lanthanides and thorium compared with cations such as Cs(+), Sr(2+), and Co(2+). Substitution of phosphonate groups by carboxylate groups did little to alter the pattern of selectivity implying that selectivity in the system was entirely determined by the -POH group with little influence from the -COOH groups. Samples with the highest phosphorus content showed the highest extraction efficiencies for lanthanide elements, especially the heavy lanthanides such as Dy(3+) and Ho(3+) with separation factors of around four with respect to La(3+). In highly acid solutions (4 M HNO3) there was a pronounced variation in extraction efficiency across the lanthanide series. In situ, nonambient diffraction was performed on ZrBTP-0.8 loaded with Th, Ce, and a complex mixture of lanthanides. In all cases the crystalline Zr2P2O7 pyrophosphate phase was formed at ∼800 °C demonstrating the versatility of

  7. Zirconium(IV)-Benzene Phosphonate Coordination Polymers: Lanthanide and Actinide Extraction and Thermal Properties.

    PubMed

    Luca, Vittorio; Tejada, Juan J; Vega, Daniel; Arrachart, Guilhem; Rey, Cyrielle

    2016-08-15

    Coordination polymers with different P/(Zr + P) molar ratios were prepared by combining aqueous solutions of Zr(IV) and benzenephosphonate derivatives. 1,3,5-Benzenetrisphosphonic acid (BTP) as well as phosphonocarboxylate derivatives in which carboxylate substitutes one or two of the phosphonate groups were chosen as the building blocks. The precipitates obtained on combining the two solutions were not X-ray amorphous but rather were indicative of poorly ordered materials. Hydrothermal treatment did not alter the structure of the materials produced but did result in improved crystalline order. The use of HF as a mineralizing agent during hydrothermal synthesis resulted in the crystallization of at least three relatively crystalline phases whose structure could not be determined owing to the complexity of the diffraction patterns. Gauging from the similarity of the diffraction patterns of all the phases, the poorly ordered precipitates and crystalline materials appeared to have similar underlying structures. The BTP-based zirconium phosphonates all showed a higher selectivity for lanthanides and thorium compared with cations such as Cs(+), Sr(2+), and Co(2+). Substitution of phosphonate groups by carboxylate groups did little to alter the pattern of selectivity implying that selectivity in the system was entirely determined by the -POH group with little influence from the -COOH groups. Samples with the highest phosphorus content showed the highest extraction efficiencies for lanthanide elements, especially the heavy lanthanides such as Dy(3+) and Ho(3+) with separation factors of around four with respect to La(3+). In highly acid solutions (4 M HNO3) there was a pronounced variation in extraction efficiency across the lanthanide series. In situ, nonambient diffraction was performed on ZrBTP-0.8 loaded with Th, Ce, and a complex mixture of lanthanides. In all cases the crystalline Zr2P2O7 pyrophosphate phase was formed at ∼800 °C demonstrating the versatility of

  8. A systematic study of actinide production from the interactions of heavy ions with sup 248 Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Leyba, J.D.

    1990-09-07

    Production cross sections for heavy actinides produced from the interactions of {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca ions with {sup 248}Cm were measured at energies ranging from 0.98 to 1.35 X Coulomb barrier. The recoiling reaction products were collected in copper or gold catcher foils located near the {sup 248}Cm target. Separate fractions of Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and Md were obtained from a radiochemical separation procedure. For the {sup 12}C system, a He/KCl jet was used to transport the recoiling No activities of interest to a rotating wheel system. The isotopic distributions of the actinide products were found to be essentially symmetric about the maximum with full-widths-at-half-maximum of approximately 2.5 mass units. Isotopic distributions of the {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca systems were found to be very similar to the {sup 40,48}Ca systems studied previously. The maxima of the isotopic distributions generally occurred for those reaction channels which involved the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy was a positive quantity. Additionally, the maxima of the excitation functions occurred at those projectile energies which were consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The experimental data from the four systems investigated were compared to several models of heavy ion interactions including a damped reaction mechanism, compound nucleus formation and subsequent particle evaporation, and classical partial wave calculations for binary systems.

  9. Parity nonconservation in Fr-like actinide and Cs-like rare-earth-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Parity-nonconservation (PNC) amplitudes are calculated for the 7s-6d3/2 transitions of the francium isoelectronic sequence (Fr, Ra+, Ac2+, Th3+, Pa4+, U5+, and Np6+) and for the 6s-5d3/2 transitions of the cesium isoelectronic sequence (Cs, Ba+, La2+, Ce3+, and Pr4+). We show in particular that isotopes of La2+, Ac2+, and Th3+ ions have strong potential in the search for new physics beyond the standard model: The PNC amplitudes are large, the calculations are accurate, and the nuclei are practically stable. In addition, 232Th3+ ions have recently been trapped and cooled [Campbell , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.233004 102, 233004 (2009)]. We also extend previous works by calculating the s-s PNC transitions in Ra+ and Ba+ and provide calculations of several energy levels, and electric dipole and quadrupole transition amplitudes for the Fr-like actinide ions.

  10. Diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes showing unusual complexation of actinide ions in room temperature ionic liquids: role of ligand structure, radiolytic stability, emission spectroscopy, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Prasanta K; Sengupta, Arijit; Iqbal, Mudassir; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-03-01

    Diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arenes (C4DGAs) with varying structural modifications were evaluated for actinide complexation from their extraction behavior toward actinide ions such as UO2(2+), Pu(4+), PuO2(2+), and Am(3+) in the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-n-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (C8mimNTf2). The formation constants were calculated for Am(3+) which showed a significant role of ligand structure, nature of substituents, and spacer length. Although the alkyl substituents on the amidic nitrogen increase the extraction efficiency of americium at lower acidity because of the inductive effect of the alkyl groups, at higher acidity the steric crowding around the ligating site determines the extraction efficiency. All C4DGAs formed 1:1 complexes with Am(3+) while for the analogous Eu(3+) complexes no inner sphere water molecules were detected and the asymmetry of the metal ligand complex differed from one another as proved by time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIFS). Thermodynamic studies indicated that the extraction process, predominant by the Am(3+)-C4DGA complexation reaction, is exothermic. The unique role of the medium on Am(3+) complexation with the C4DGA molecules with varying spacer length, L-IV and L-V, was noticed for the first time with a reversal in the trend observed in the RTIL compared to that seen in a nonpolar molecular diluent like n-dodecane. Various factors leading to a more preorganized structure were responsible for favorable metal ion complexation. The solvent systems show promise to be employed for nuclear waste remediation, and sustainability options were evaluated from radiolytic stability as well as stripping studies.

  11. Experimental findings on actinide recovery utilizing oxidation by peroxydisulfate followed by ion exchange: Fuel cycle research & development

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.

    2015-08-31

    Our research seeks to determine if inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective minor actinide (Am, Cm) separation from lanthanides. Previous work has established that a number of inorganic and UMOF ion-exchange materials exhibit varying affinities for actinides and lanthanides, which may be exploited for effective separations. During FY15, experimental work focused on investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric and perchloric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium in dilute nitric acid. Ion-exchange materials tested included a variety of alkali titanates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of AmIII. Experimental findings indicated that CeIII, NpV, and RuII are oxidized by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of CeIII, NpV, and RuII affected the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used.

  12. Experimental findings on actinide recovery utilizing oxidation by peroxydisulfate followed by ion exchange: Fuel cycle research & development

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.

    2015-08-31

    Our research seeks to determine if inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective minor actinide (Am, Cm) separation from lanthanides. Previous work has established that a number of inorganic and UMOF ion-exchange materials exhibit varying affinities for actinides and lanthanides, which may be exploited for effective separations. During FY15, experimental work focused on investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric and perchloric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium in dilute nitric acid. Ion-exchange materials tested included a variety of alkali titanates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of AmIII. Experimental findings indicated that CeIII, NpV, and RuII are oxidized by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of CeIII, NpV, and RuII affected the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used.

  13. The use of Diphonix{sup {trademark}} ion exchange resin as a preconcentration step for the lanthanides and actinides in analytical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, A.N.; Thakkar, A.H.; Fern, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Diphonix ion exchange resin is a chelating ion exchange resin containing sulfonic and gemdiphosphonic acid groups. This resin has a high specificity for the lanthanides and actinides, especially at acidities below pH = 3. Currently, we are investigating new ways to use Diphonix resin as a preconcentration step to separate the lanthanides and actinides from interfering elements present in a variety of environmental matrices. Once the lanthanides and actinides have been separated from the interfering matrix constituents, the elements are removed from the resin and passed through subsequent separation schemes. This presentation will outline the use of Diphonix resin with a variety of problem matrices, and demonstrate its usefulness for analysis of the lanthanides and actinides.

  14. Final Project Report for ER15351 “A Study of New Actinide Zintl Ion Materials”

    SciTech Connect

    Peter K. Dorhout

    2007-11-12

    The structural chemistry of actinide main-group metal materials provides the fundamental basis for the understanding of structural coordination chemistry and the formation of materials with desired or predicted structural features. The main-group metal building blocks, comprising sulfur-group, phosphorous-group, or silicon-group elements, have shown versatility in oxidation state, coordination, and bonding preferences. These building blocks have allowed us to elucidate a series of structures that are unique to the actinide elements, although we can find structural relationships to transition metal and 4f-element materials. In the past year, we investigated controlled metathesis and self-propagating reactions between actinide metal halides and alkali metal salts of main-group metal chalcogenides such as K-P-S salts. Ternary plutonium thiophosphates have resulted from these reactions at low temperature in sealed ampules. we have also focused efforts to examine reactions of Th, U, and Pu halide salts with other alkali metal salts such as Na-Ge-S and Na-Si-Se and copper chloride to identify if self-propagating reactions may be used as a viable reaction to prepare new actinide materials and we prepared a series of U and Th copper chalcogenide materials. Magnetic measurements continued to be a focus of actinide materials prepared in our laboratory. We also contributed to the XANES work at Los Alamos by preparing materials for study and for comparison with environmental samples.

  15. Plutonium(IV) complexation by diglycolamide ligands--coordination chemistry insight into TODGA-based actinide separations.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Sean D; Gaunt, Andrew J; Scott, Brian L; Modolo, Giuseppe; Iqbal, Mudassir; Verboom, Willem; Sarsfield, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    Complexation of Pu(IV) with TMDGA, TEDGA, and TODGA diglycolamide ligands was followed by vis-NIR spectroscopy. A crystal structure determination reveals that TMDGA forms a 1 : 3 homoleptic Pu(IV) complex with the nitrate anions forced into the outer coordination sphere.

  16. Enhanced electron-transfer reactivity of nonheme manganese(IV)-oxo complexes by binding scandium ions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong-Min; Wu, Xiujuan; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Fuhkuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-06-19

    One and two scandium ions (Sc(3+)) are bound strongly to nonheme manganese(IV)-oxo complexes, [(N4Py)Mn(IV)(O)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) and [(Bn-TPEN)Mn(IV)(O)](2+) (Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane), to form Mn(IV)(O)-(Sc(3+))1 and Mn(IV)(O)-(Sc(3+))2 complexes, respectively. The binding of Sc(3+) ions to the Mn(IV)(O) complexes was examined by spectroscopic methods as well as by DFT calculations. The one-electron reduction potentials of the Mn(IV)(O) complexes were markedly shifted to a positive direction by binding of Sc(3+) ions. Accordingly, rates of the electron transfer reactions of the Mn(IV)(O) complexes were enhanced as much as 10(7)-fold by binding of two Sc(3+) ions. The driving force dependence of electron transfer from various electron donors to the Mn(IV)(O) and Mn(IV)(O)-(Sc(3+))2 complexes was examined and analyzed in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer to determine the reorganization energies of electron transfer. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentials of the Mn(IV)(O)-(Sc(3+))2 complexes resulted in remarkable enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of the Mn(IV)(O) complexes. Such a dramatic enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of the Mn(IV)(O) complexes by binding of Sc(3+) ions resulted in the change of mechanism in the sulfoxidation of thioanisoles by Mn(IV)(O) complexes from a direct oxygen atom transfer pathway without metal ion binding to an electron-transfer pathway with binding of Sc(3+) ions.

  17. A calculation for radial expectation values of helium like actinide ions (Z=89-93)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ürer, G.; Arslan, M.; Balkaya, E.; Keçeli, A.

    2016-03-01

    Radial expectation values, , for helium like actinides (ZAc=89, ZTh=90, ZPa=91, ZU=92, and ZNp=93) are reported using the Multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) within the framework Breit-Pauli corrections. Atomic data as energy levels, wavelengths, weighted oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for allowed and forbidden transitions need these calculations. The obtained results are compared available works.

  18. Synthesis, composition, and ion-exchange behavior of thermally stable Zr(IV) and Ti(IV) arsenophosphates: separation of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Premadas, A.

    1981-01-01

    Two new inorganic ion-exchange materials, Zr(IV) and Ti(IV) arsenophosphates, have been synthesized. They are reproducible in behavior and possess excellent thermal stability. Their tentative structures have been proposed based on pH titrations, thermogravimetry, chemical analysis, ir studies, and other ion-exchange properties. Distribution studies of some metal ions have also been made on the basis of which several useful binary separations have been achieved such as Fe(III) from VO(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II); Pb(II) from Cu(II), Hg(II), and Zn(II); Ti(IV) from UO/sub 2/(II) and Ce(IV); and Mg(II) from Sr(II) and Ba(II).

  19. The TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) at GSI Optimization of ion-optical structures and magnet designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchenkov, A.; Brüchle, W.; Jäger, E.; Schimpf, E.; Schädel, M.; Mühle, C.; Klos, F.; Türler, A.; Yakushev, A.; Belov, A.; Belyakova, T.; Kaparkova, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Lamzin, E.; Sytchevsky, S.

    2008-10-01

    The new, highly efficient gas-filled TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) was designed and built at GSI with the aim to study chemical and physical properties of superheavy elements with atomic numbers 104 and higher produced in heavy-ion reactions with actinide targets. To reach the highest possible transmission, while exploiting an existing dipole magnet and two quadrupoles of a previously used gas-filled separator, an optimization of the ion-optical structure of TASCA was performed with the program TRANSPORT. Two modes of TASCA operation, the "High Transmission Mode" and the "Small Image-size Mode" were selected. Magnetic field measurements were carried out with the dipole and were compared with KOMPOT model calculations. Magnetic field model calculations of the dipole and the quadrupoles, including a duct and a large exit valve, were performed to optimize the pole pieces of the dipole and the ducts. This increased the efficiency up to 50%. Both modes of operation were successfully tested in first commissioning experiments.

  20. Actinide metals with multiple bonds to carbon: synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of U(IV) and Th(IV) bis(iminophosphorano)methandiide pincer carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guibin; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Cavell, Ronald G

    2011-07-18

    Treatment of ThCl(4)(DME)(2) or UCl(4) with 1 equiv of dilithiumbis(iminophosphorano) methandiide, [Li(2)C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2)] (1), afforded the chloro actinide carbene complexes [Cl(2)M(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (2 (M = Th) and 3 (M = U)) in situ. Stable PCP metal-carbene complexes [Cp(2)Th(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (4), [Cp(2)U(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (5), [TpTh(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (6), and [TpU(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (7) were generated from 2 or 3 by further reaction with 2 equiv of thallium(I) cyclopentadienide (CpTl) in THF to yield 4 or 5 or with 1 equiv of potassium hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl) borate (TpK) also in THF to give 6 or 7, respectively. The derivative complexes were isolated, and their crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. All of these U (or Th)-carbene complexes (4-7) possess a very short M (Th or U)═carbene bond with evidence for multiple bond character. Gaussian 03 DFT calculations indicate that the M═C double bond is constructed by interaction of the 5f and 6d orbitals of the actinide metal with carbene 2p orbitals of both π and σ character. Complex 3 reacted with acetonitrile or benzonitrile to cyclo-add C≡N to the U═carbon double bond, thereby forming a new C-C bond in a new chelated quadridentate ligand in the bridged dimetallic complexes (9 and 10). A single carbon-U bond is retained. The newly coordinated uranium complex dimerizes with one equivalent of unconverted 3 using two chlorides and the newly formed imine derived from the nitrile as three connecting bridges. In addition, a new crystal structure of [CpUCl(3)(THF)(2)] (8) was determined by X-ray diffraction.

  1. Speciation and surface interactions of actinides on aged ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.E.; Buscher, C.T.; Donohoe, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy is presently faced with the stabilization and safe disposition of hundreds of metric tons of residue materials resulting from 50+ years of nuclear weapons production activities. These residues encompass a broad range of substrates and radionuclides and include both solid and liquid materials. Combustible residues constitute a significant fraction of the total residue inventory, and an important constituent within the combustible category is spent anion ion-exchange resins. These resins are typically utilized for the separation of plutonium from other radionuclides under strongly acidic nitric or hydrochloric acid solution conditions which favor the formation and partitioning of anionic Pu(IV) nitrato or chloride species. The spent resins are usually rinsed prior to storage as residues to reduce both acid and radionuclide concentrations, but significant radionuclide concentrations remain in these resins, and the long-term effects of concentrated acid and radiolysis on the resin integrity are relatively unexplored. Thus, new research is needed to assess the stability of these resin residues and address the need for further treatment to ensure stability prior to long-term disposal.

  2. STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SORPTION BY MST AND MMST UNDER CONDITIONS REVELANT TO THE SMALL COLUMN ION-EXCHANGE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Poirier, M.

    2011-05-06

    A series of tests were performed to examine the kinetics of Sr and actinide removal by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) under mixing conditions similar to what will be provided in the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Program. Similar removal kinetics were seen for two different mixing energies, indicating that under these conditions bulk solution transport is not the rate limiting step for Sr and actinide removal. Sr removal was found to be rapid for both MST and mMST, reaching steady-state conditions within six hours. In contrast, at least six weeks is necessary to reach steady-state conditions for Pu with MST. For mMST, steady-state conditions for Pu were achieved within two weeks. The actual contact time required for the SCIX process will depend on starting sorbate concentrations as well as the requirements for the decontaminated salt solution. During testing leaks occurred in both the MST and mMST tests and evidence of potential desorption was observed. The desorption likely occurred as a result of the change in solids to liquid phase ratio that occurred due to the loss of solution. Based on these results, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommended additional testing to further study the effect of changing phase ratios on desorption. This testing is currently in progress and results will be documented in a separate report.

  3. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Albert W. Herlinger; Dr. Mark L. Dietz

    2003-03-06

    Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.

  4. Sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, K.N.; White, D.J.; Xu, Jide; Mohs, T.R.

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this project is to take a biomimetic approach toward developing new separation technologies for the removal of radioactive elements from contaminated DOE sites. To achieve this objective, the authors are investigating the fundamental chemistry of naturally occurring, highly specific metal ion sequestering agents and developing them into liquid/liquid and solid supported actinide extraction agents. Nature produces sideophores (e.g., Enterobactin and Desferrioxamine B) to selectivity sequester Lewis acidic metal ions, in particular Fe(III), from its surroundings. These chelating agents typically use multiple catechols or hydroxamic acids to form polydentate ligands that chelate the metal ion forming very stable complexes. The authors are investigating and developing analogous molecules into selective chelators targeting actinide(IV) ions, which display similar properties to Fe(III). By taking advantage of differences in charge, preferred coordination number, and pH stability range, the transition from nature to actinide sequestering agents has been applied to the development of new and highly selective actinide extraction technologies. Additionally, the authors have shown that these chelating ligands are versatile ligands for chelating U(VI). In particular, they have been studying their coordination chemistry and fundamental interactions with the uranyl ion [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2+}, the dominant form of uranium found in aqueous media. With an understanding of this chemistry, and results obtained from in vivo uranium sequestration studies, it should be possible to apply these actinide(IV) extraction technologies to the development of new extraction agents for the removal of uranium from waste streams.

  5. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr2+, Fe3+, Nd3+, and Am3+, from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity. PMID:27163056

  6. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework.

    PubMed

    Demir, Selvan; Brune, Nicholas K; Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; Mason, Jarad A; Plakhova, Tatiana V; Wang, Shuao; Tian, Guoxin; Minasian, Stefan G; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Shuh, David K; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-04-27

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr(2+), Fe(3+), Nd(3+), and Am(3+), from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity. PMID:27163056

  7. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework.

    PubMed

    Demir, Selvan; Brune, Nicholas K; Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; Mason, Jarad A; Plakhova, Tatiana V; Wang, Shuao; Tian, Guoxin; Minasian, Stefan G; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Shuh, David K; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-04-27

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr(2+), Fe(3+), Nd(3+), and Am(3+), from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity.

  8. Thermodynamic Properties of Actinides and Actinide Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konings, Rudy J. M.; Morss, Lester R.; Fuger, Jean

    The necessity of obtaining accurate thermodynamic quantities for the actinide elements and their compounds was recognized at the outset of the Manhattan Project, when a dedicated team of scientists and engineers initiated the program to exploit nuclear energy for military purposes. Since the end of World War II, both fundamental and applied objectives have motivated a great deal of further study of actinide thermodynamics. This chapter brings together many research papers and critical reviews on this subject. It also seeks to assess, to systematize, and to predict important properties of the actinide elements, ions, and compounds, especially for species in which there is significant interest and for which there is an experimental basis for the prediction.

  9. Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Maxwell, III, Sherrod L.; Nichols, Sheldon T.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

  10. The structure of actinide ions exchanged into native and modified zeolites and clays

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S. R.; Soderholm, L.; Giaquinta, D. M.

    2000-02-16

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the structure and valence of thorium (Th{sup 4+}) and uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) cations exchanged into two classes of microporous aluminosilicate minerals: zeolites and smectite clays. XAS is also employed to examine the fate of the exchanged cations after modification of the mineral surface using self-assembled organic films and/or exposure to hydrothermal conditions. These treatments serve as models for the forces that ultimately determine the chemical fate of the actinide cations in the environment. The speciation of the cations depends on the pore size of the aluminosilicate, which is fixed for the zeolites and variable for the smectites.

  11. Diffusion coefficients of actinide and lanthanide ions in molten Li[sub 2]BeF[sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, Hirotake; Moritani, Kimikazu; Ito, Yasuhiko . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    In the conceptual design of molten salt breeder reactors (MSBR) developed at ORNL, molten fluoride mixtures are used as the fuel carrier and coolant. The fuel salt must be reprocessed continuously in order to meet a high breeding ratio. The main function of the reprocessing are to isolate [sup 233]Pa from the neutron flux and to remove the fission product lanthanides having high neutron absorption cross sections. The processing method involves the reductive extraction of these components from the fuel salt into liquid bismuth solutions in a two phase contacting system. Diffusion coefficients of actinide and lanthanide ions in molten Li[sub 2]BeF[sub 4] were measured in the temperature range from 813 to 1,023 K by a capillary method. The diffusion coefficients of both ions are unusually high, considering the high viscosity of the liquids. The dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature and ionic charge are discussed in terms of the theories of Stokes and Einstein.

  12. Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Richmann, Michael K; Reed, Donald T; Yongliang, Xiong

    2010-01-01

    The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

  13. A Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junying; Lee, Yong-Min; Davis, Katherine M.; Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Yoon, Heejung; Park, Young Jun; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2013-05-29

    Redox-inactive metal ions play pivotal roles in regulating the reactivities of high-valent metal–oxo species in a variety of enzymatic and chemical reactions. A mononuclear non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex bearing a pentadentate N5 ligand has been synthesized and used in the synthesis of a Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding scandium ions. The Mn(IV)–oxo complexes were characterized with various spectroscopic methods. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)–oxo complex are markedly influenced by binding of Sc3+ ions in oxidation reactions, such as a ~2200-fold increase in the rate of oxidation of thioanisole (i.e., oxygen atom transfer) but a ~180-fold decrease in the rate of C–H bond activation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene (i.e., hydrogen atom transfer). The present results provide the first example of a non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions that shows a contrasting effect of the redox-inactive metal ions on the reactivities of metal–oxo species in the oxygen atom transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions.

  14. Development of Biodegradable Isosaccharinate-Containing Foams for Decontamination of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Dhanpat; Rao, Linfeng; Moore, R.C.; Hess, Nancy J.; Tucker, Mark D.

    2003-09-11

    The objective of this project is to develop fundamental information that will lead to the development of a new, more environmentally acceptable technology for decontaminating Pu and other actinides. The key component of this technology is isosaccharinate (ISA), a degradation product of cellulose materials that is biodegradable and binds strongly with tetravalent actinides. We are developing fundamental constants for (1) the effect of a wide range in pH and Ca concentrations on the speciation and thermodynamic reactions of ISA and (2) thermodynamic and kinetic reactions of ISA with tetravalent actinides and other competing ions such as Fe(III). We have successfully formulated and tested several ISA containing foams and gels for their effectiveness in removing tetravalent actinides from concrete and steel surfaces. These data along with a comprehensive thermodynamic mo del developed for Np(IV) and Ca(II) and applicable to a wide range in pH, ISA concentrations, and ionic strengths, will be presented.

  15. Chemical nature of implant-derived titanium(IV) ions in synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Silwood, Christopher J.L.; Grootveld, Martin . E-mail: grootvm@lsbu.ac.uk

    2005-05-13

    Previous investigations have indicated a deleterious leakage of Ti(III) and/or Ti(IV) species from Ti-Al-V alloy joint prostheses into adjacent tissue, synovium or synovial fluid (SF) in vivo. In view of the importance of the particular chemical nature of such complexes in determining their biological activity, we have employed high field proton ({sup 1}H) NMR spectroscopy to 'speciate' Ti(IV) in inflammatory SF. Treatment of osteoarthritic SF samples with increasing concentrations of Ti(IV) (0.10-1.03 mM [TiO(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-}) gave rise to a specific broadening of the citrate proton resonances, indicating that this bioavailable oxygen-donor ligand plays an important role in complexing implant-derived Ti(IV). {sup 1}H NMR analysis of Ti(IV)-loaded SF samples subsequently treated with a large excess of ascorbate (0.05 M) showed that this added Ti(IV) chelator was only poorly effective in removing this metal ion from Ti(IV)-citrate/Ti(IV)-oxycitrate complexes. The results obtained here provide evidence for complexation of the low-molecular-mass (non-protein-bound) fraction of implant-derived Ti(IV) by citrate in vivo.

  16. Novel Separation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R

    2011-02-17

    The separation of actinides and other elements of interest for nuclear forensics and threat reduction is currently performed using decades-old chemistries and ion-exchange columns. We propose to determine the technical feasibility of a novel method for separating actinide ions in solution. This method is based upon isotachophoresis (ITP), which has been applied in the purification of pharmaceuticals and other biochemical applications. This technique has the potential to separate inorganic ions more effectively than existing methods, which is key to analyzing very small samples. We will perform a quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of specific isotachophoretic approaches including predicting the physical and chemical properties, such as ion mobility, of inorganic ions under specific solvent conditions using a combination of ab initio calculations and semi-empirical methods. We expect to obtain a thorough understanding of the analytical systems parameters under which ITP is most effective for the separation of inorganic samples, including the influence of the double layer surrounding actinide ions, the Debye length for different ions and ion complexes, and Debye-Hueckel limits. Inorganic separations are key to nuclear forensics for countering terrorism and nuclear proliferation. If found to be feasible and potentially superior to currently used separation approaches, ITP could provide the conceptual basis for an improved means to separate samples of nuclear explosion debris for nuclear forensic analysis, in support of the Laboratory's missions in homeland and national security.

  17. Actinides-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  18. Calculation of cross sections for binary reactions between heavy ion projectiles and heavy actinide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Hoffman, M.M.

    1990-11-01

    The computer program, described in this report, is identified as PWAVED5. It was developed to calculate cross sections for nucleon transfer reactions in low energy heavy ion bombardments. The objective was to calculate cross sections that agree with experimental results for ions of different charge and mass and to develop a predictive capability. It was undertaken because previous heavy ion calculations, for which programs were readily available, appeared to focus primarily on reactions resulting in compound nucleus formation and were not particularly applicable to calculations of binary reaction cross sections at low interaction energies. There are to principal areas in which this computation differs from several other partial wave calculations of heavy-ion reaction cross sections. First, this program is designed specifically to calculate cross sections for nucleon exchange interactions and to exclude interactions that are expected to result in fusion of the two nuclei. A second major difference in this calculation is the use of a statistical distribution to assign the total interaction cross section to individual final mass states.

  19. Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture: the quest for therapeutic actinide chelators.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Patricia W

    2008-11-01

    All of the actinides are radioactive. Taken into the body, they damage and induce cancer in bone and liver, and in the lungs if inhaled, and U(VI) is a chemical kidney poison. Containment of radionuclides is fundamental to radiation protection, but if it is breached accidentally or deliberately, decontamination of exposed persons is needed to reduce the consequences of radionuclide intake. The only known way to reduce the health risks of internally deposited actinides is to accelerate their excretion with chelating agents. Ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) were introduced in the 1950's. DTPA is now clinically accepted, but its oral activity is low, it must be injected as a Ca(II) or Zn(II) chelate to avoid toxicity, and it is structurally unsuitable for chelating U(VI) or Np(V). Actinide penetration into the mammalian iron transport and storage systems suggested that actinide ions would form stable complexes with the Fe(III)-binding units found in potent selective natural iron chelators (siderophores). Testing of that biomimetic approach began in the late 1970's with the design, production, and assessment for in vivo Pu(IV) chelation of synthetic multidentate ligands based on the backbone structures and Fe(III)-binding groups of siderophores. New efficacious actinide chelators have emerged from that program, in particular, octadentate 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and tetradentate 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO) have potential for clinical acceptance. Both are much more effective than CaNa3-DTPA for decorporation of Pu(IV), Am(III), U(VI), and Np(IV,V), they are orally active, and toxicity is acceptably low at effective dosage.

  20. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral Tridentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Hu, Han-Shi; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Li, Jun; Gibson, John K.

    2013-07-01

    ESI of 1:1 mixtures of Th(ClO₄)₄ and ligand TMOGA in acetonitrile resulted in the observation of the TMOGA supported tetracation, Th(L)₃⁴⁺, in the gas phase. Three TMOGA ligands are necessary to stabilize the tetrapositive thorium ion; no Th(L)₂⁴⁺ or Th(L)₄⁴⁺ was observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the Th(L)₃⁴⁺ complex possesses C₃ symmetry with the thorium center coordinated by nine oxygen atoms from three ligands, which forms a twisted TPP geometry. Actinide compounds with such a geometry feature a nine-coordinate chiral actinide center. The Th-L binding energy and bond orders of Th(L)n⁴⁺ decrease as the coordination number increases, consistent with the trend of concurrently increasing Th-O distances. The Th-O bonding is mainly electrostatic in nature, but the covalent interactions are not negligible. CID of the Th(L)₃⁴⁺ complex mainly resulted in charge reduction to form Th(L)₂(L-86)³⁺oss of neutral TMOGA was not observed. The protic ligand methanol stabilized only tri- and dications of ligated thorium. The intensity of the Th(L)₃⁴⁺ peak was reduced as the percentage of water increased in the Th(ClO₄)₄/TMOGA solution.

  1. Enhanced Electron-Transfer Reactivity of Nonheme Manganese(IV)– Oxo Complexes by Binding Scandium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong-Min; Wu, Xiujuan; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2014-01-01

    One and two scandium ions (Sc3+) are bound strongly to nonheme manganese(IV)–oxo complexes, [(N4Py)MnIV(O)]2+ (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) and [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)]2+ (Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N′,N′-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane), to form MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)1 and MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)2 complexes, respectively. The binding of Sc3+ ions to the MnIV(O) complexes was examined by spectroscopic methods as well as by DFT calculations. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes were markedly shifted to a positive direction by binding of Sc3+ ions. Accordingly, rates of the electron transfer reactions of the MnIV(O) complexes were enhanced as much as 107–fold by binding of two Sc3+ ions. The driving force dependence of electron transfer from various electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)2 complexes was examined and analyzed in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer to determine the reorganization energies of electron transfer. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentials of the MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)2 complexes resulted in remarkable enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of the MnIV(O) complexes. Such a dramatic enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of the MnIV(O) complexes by binding of Sc3+ ions resulted in the change of mechanism in the sulfoxidation of thioanisoles by MnIV(O) complexes from a direct oxygen atom transfer pathway without metal ion binding to an electron-transfer pathway with binding of Sc3+ ions. PMID:23742163

  2. Computational study of organo-cesium complexes and the possibility of lanthanide/actinide ions substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabanal-León, Walter A.; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Roberts, Sue A.; Hulme, Christopher; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic DFT calculations suggest that two organo-cesium complexes studied herein afford large HOMO-LUMO gaps of around 2.4 eV with the PBE xc-functional, which accounts for their stability. Energy decomposition studies suggest these two complexes are largely ionic with about 20% covalency. However, when the Cs+ ions are substituted by the isoelectronic La3+ and Th4+, their predicted ionicity decreases significantly. The significant increase in covalence indicates that employing Ugi reaction cascades that afford tetramic acid-based organo-cesium complexes may be extended to La3+ and Th4+ organometallics.

  3. Specific sequestering agents for iron and the actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, K.N.

    1983-06-01

    The transuranium actinide ions represent one unique environmental hazard associated with the waste of the nuclear power industry. A major component associated with that waste and a potential hazard is plutonium. The synthesis of metal-ion-specific complexing agents for ions such as Pu(IV) potentially represents a powerful new approach to many of the problems posed by waste treatment. This document is a progress report of a rational approach to the synthesis of such chelating agents based on the similarities of Pu(IV) and Fe(III), the structures of naturally-occurring complexing agents which are highly specific for Fe(III), and the incorporation of the same kinds of ligating groups present in the iron complexes to make octadentate complexes highly specific for plutonium. Both thermodynamic and animal test results indicate that a relatively high degree of success has already been achieved in this aim.

  4. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  5. Actinide co-conversion by internal gelation

    SciTech Connect

    Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Dauby, Jacques; Dumont-Shintu, Corinne; Machon, Estelle; Grandjean, Stephane

    2007-07-01

    Suitable microstructures and homogenous microspheres of actinide compounds are of interest for future nuclear fuel or transmutation target concepts to prevent the generation and dispersal of actinide powder. Sol-gel routes are being investigated as one of the possible solutions for producing these compounds. Preliminary work is described involving internal gelation to synthesize mixed compounds including minor actinides, particularly mixed actinide or mixed actinide-inert element compounds. A parameter study is discussed to highlight the importance of the initial broth composition for obtaining gel microspheres without major defects (cracks, craters, etc.). In particular, conditions are defined to produce gel beads from Zr(IV)/Y(III)/Ce(III) or Zr(IV)/An(III) systems. After gelation, the heat treatment of these microspheres is described for the purpose of better understanding the formation of cracks after calcination and verifying the effective synthesis of an oxide solid-solution. (authors)

  6. Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2010-02-24

    A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

  7. Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions: a contribution to a systematic understanding of actinide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G

    2002-11-01

    Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions has been studied for the first time. Comparisons were made with thorium, uranium, and neptunium ion chemistry to further the systematic understanding of 5f elements. The rates of oxidation of Pa(+) and PaO(+) by ethylene oxide compared with those of the homologous uranium ions indicate that the first and second bond dissociation energies, BDE[Pa(+)-O] and BDE[OPa(+)-O], are approximately 800 kJ mol(-1). The relatively facile fluorination of Pa(+) to PaF(4)(+) by SF(6) is consistent with the high stability of the pentavalent oxidation state of Pa. Reactions with ethene, propene, 1-butene, and iso-butene revealed that Pa(+) is a very reactive metal ion. In analogy with U(+) chemistry, ethene was trimerized by Pa(+) to give PaC(6)H(6)(+). Reactions of Pa(+) with larger alkenes resulted in secondary and tertiary products not observed for U(+) or Np(+). The bare protactinium ion is significantly more reactive with organic substrates than are heavier actinide ions. The greatest difference between Pa and heavier actinide congeners was the exceptional dehydrogenation activity of PaO(+) with alkenes; UO(+) and NpO(+) were comparatively inert. The striking reactivity of PaO(+) is attributed to the distinctive electronic structure at the metal center in this oxide, which is considered to reflect the greater availability of the 5f electrons for participation in bonding, either directly or by promotion/hybridization with higher-energy valence orbitals.

  8. Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions: a contribution to a systematic understanding of actinide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G

    2002-11-01

    Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions has been studied for the first time. Comparisons were made with thorium, uranium, and neptunium ion chemistry to further the systematic understanding of 5f elements. The rates of oxidation of Pa(+) and PaO(+) by ethylene oxide compared with those of the homologous uranium ions indicate that the first and second bond dissociation energies, BDE[Pa(+)-O] and BDE[OPa(+)-O], are approximately 800 kJ mol(-1). The relatively facile fluorination of Pa(+) to PaF(4)(+) by SF(6) is consistent with the high stability of the pentavalent oxidation state of Pa. Reactions with ethene, propene, 1-butene, and iso-butene revealed that Pa(+) is a very reactive metal ion. In analogy with U(+) chemistry, ethene was trimerized by Pa(+) to give PaC(6)H(6)(+). Reactions of Pa(+) with larger alkenes resulted in secondary and tertiary products not observed for U(+) or Np(+). The bare protactinium ion is significantly more reactive with organic substrates than are heavier actinide ions. The greatest difference between Pa and heavier actinide congeners was the exceptional dehydrogenation activity of PaO(+) with alkenes; UO(+) and NpO(+) were comparatively inert. The striking reactivity of PaO(+) is attributed to the distinctive electronic structure at the metal center in this oxide, which is considered to reflect the greater availability of the 5f electrons for participation in bonding, either directly or by promotion/hybridization with higher-energy valence orbitals. PMID:12401099

  9. Effects of titanium(iv) ions on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Erwin Ph; Mhawi, Amir; Clode, Peta; Saunders, Martin; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-03-01

    Orthopaedic metal implants composed of titanium are routinely used in bone fracture repair and for joint replacement therapies. A considerable fraction of implant recipients are unable to benefit due to implant failure resulting from aseptic loosening, while others may experience cutaneous sensitivity to titanium after implantation. An adaptive immune reactivity towards titanium ions, originating from the biocorrosion of the implants, could play a role. As an initiator of the adaptive immune response, dendritic cells (DC) were studied for uptake and characteristics after titanium exposure. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy showed uptake of titanium(iv) (Ti(iv)) ions by DCs in vitro and co-localisation with phosphorus-rich cell structures of the DC membranes (phospholipids), cytoplasm (ribosomes and phosphorylated proteins) and the nucleus (DNA). DC maturation and function were investigated by measuring cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry. After exposure, DCs showed a decrease in MHC class II (HLA-DR), co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 & CD86) and chemokine receptors (CCR) 6 and CCR7 but an increase in CCR4 after Ti(iv) treatment. However, Ti(iv) treated DCs had an increased stimulatory capacity towards allogenic lymphocytes. A Ti(iv) concentration dependant increase of IL-12p70 was observed amidst decrease of the other measured cytokines (TGF-β1 and TGF-β2). Hence, Ti(iv) alters DC properties, resulting in an enhanced T lymphocyte reactivity and deviation towards a Th1 type immune response. This effect may be responsible for the inflammatory side effects of titanium implants seen in patients.

  10. Quantitative separation of Hg(II) from several metal ions on Zr(IV) antimonate papers

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, N.S.; Rajput, R.P.S.; Agrawal, N.K.; Agrawal, S.K.; Agrawal, S.

    1985-09-01

    The chromatographic behavior of 32 metal ions has been studied on paper impregnated with Zirconium(IV) antimonate in aqueous HCl and mixed solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide and dioxane. Several important binary and ternary separations have been achieved. Quantitative separation of Hg(II) from NiS , PbS , PdS , RuT , RhT , BiT , CoS , CdS and GdT is described. 6 references, 3 tables.

  11. In silico prediction of atomic static electric-dipole polarizabilities of the early tetravalent actinide ions: Th4+(5f0) , Pa4+(5f1) , and U4+(5f2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réal, Florent; Vallet, Valérie; Clavaguéra, Carine; Dognon, Jean-Pierre

    2008-11-01

    The dipole polarizability tensor components of the tetravalent actinide ions Th4+ , Pa4+ , and U4+ are computed using the numerical finite-field technique. Four-component correlated calculations have been performed to serve as a reference for establishing the accuracy of two- and one-component relativistic methods. A good agreement within all methods is achieved provided that extended basis sets are used to reach the complete basis set limit. The four-component correlated polarizabilities represent a database of reference values of the dipole polarizability for the early tetravalent actinide ions.

  12. Isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from other actinides on ion exchange resins from aqueous and aqueous ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in aqueous and aqueous alcohol solutions of sulfuric acid was investigated as a function of the concentration of various components of the solution. It was found that the presence of alcohol in sulfuric acid solutions leads to an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchange resins and on anion exchange resins. The possibility of using ion exchange resins for the concentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements that form strong complexes with sulfate ions in a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations was demonstrated.

  13. Resonance excitation of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap. Part IV. Theory of quadrupolar excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Roland L.; Londry, Frank A.; March, Raymond E.

    1993-06-01

    A new theoretical treatment is presented for quadrupolar resonance excitation of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap. When the ratio of the tickle voltage amplitude to that of the drive potential is small, the equation of ion motion can be expressed in the form of a perturbation series. Exact and approximate solutions to the first-order perturbation eqations are presented. Ion trajectories calculated from these solutions are compared with those calculated by numerical integration. The resonance conditions were found to correspond to a series of angular frequencies given by [omega]u,n = n + [beta]u - [infinity] < n < [infinity]. Some of these, [beta]z[Omega], (1 + [beta]z)[Omega](1 - [beta]z)[Omega] [beta],[Omega], had been observed previously in simulation studies.

  14. Actinide-specific complexing agents: their structural and solution chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, K.N.; Freeman, G.E.; Kappel, M.J.

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of a series of tetracatecholate ligands designed to be specific for Pu(IV) and other actinide(IV) ions has been achieved. Although these compounds are very effective as in vivo plutonium removal agents, potentiometric and voltammetric data indicate that at neutral pH full complexation of the Pu(IV) ion by all four catecholate groups does not occur. Spectroscopic results indicate that the tetracatecholates, 3,4,3-LICAMS and 3,4,3-LICAMC, complex Am(III). The Am(IV)/(III)-catecholate couple (where catecholate = 3,4,3-LICAMS or 3,4,3-LICAMC) is not observed, but may not be observable due to the large currents associated with ligand oxidation. However, within the potential range where ligand oxidation does not occur, these experiments indicate that the reduction potential of free Am(IV)/(III) is probably greater than or equal to + 2.6 V vs NHE or higher. Proof of the complexation of americium in the trivalent oxidation state by 3,4,3-LICAMS and 3,4,3-LICAMC elimates the possibility of tetracatholates stabilizing Am(IV) in vivo.

  15. Stability of tetravalent actinides in perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.W.; Morss, L.R.; Choi, I.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the first determination of the enthalpy of formation of a complex actinide(IV) oxide: ..delta..H/sup 0//sub f/ (BaUO/sub 3/, s, 298 K) = -1690 +- 10 kJ mol/sup -1/. The preparation and properties of this and other actinide(IV) complex oxides are described and are compared with other perovskites BaMO/sub 3/. The relative stabilities of tetravalent and hexavalent uranium in various environments are compared in terms of the oxidation-reduction behavior of uranium in geological nuclear waste storage media; in perovskite, uranium(IV) is very unstable in comparison with uranium(VI).

  16. Synthesis and characterization of thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) corrole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ashleigh L; Buckley, Heather L; Lukens, Wayne W; Arnold, John

    2013-09-18

    The first examples of actinide complexes incorporating corrole ligands are presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesized via salt metathesis with the corresponding lithium corrole in remarkably high yields (93% and 83%, respectively). Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed both complexes to be dimeric, having two metal centers bridged via bis(μ-chlorido) linkages. In each case, the corrole ring showed a large distortion from planarity, with the Th(IV) and U(IV) ions residing unusually far (1.403 and 1.330 Å, respectively) from the N4 plane of the ligand. (1)H NMR spectroscopy of both the Th and U dimers revealed dynamic solution behavior. In the case of the diamagnetic thorium corrole, variable-temperature, DOSY (diffusion-ordered) and EXSY (exhange) (1)H NMR spectroscopy was employed and supported that this behavior was due to an intrinsic pseudorotational mode of the corrole ring about the M-M axis. Additionally, the electronic structure of the actinide corroles was assessed using UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility. This novel class of macrocyclic complexes provides a rich platform in an underdeveloped area for the study of nonaqueous actinide bonding and reactivity.

  17. Composite polymeric beads containing N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide for actinide ion uptake from nitric acid feeds: Batch uptake, kinetic modelling and column studies.

    PubMed

    Gujar, R B; Mohapatra, P K; Lakshmi, D Shanthana; Figoli, A

    2015-11-27

    Polyethersulphone (PES) based composite polymeric beads (CPB) containing TODGA (N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide) as the extractant were prepared by conventional phase inversion technique and were tested for the uptake of actinide ions such as Am(3+), UO2(2+), Pu(4+), Np(4+) and fission product ions such as Eu(3+) and Sr(2+). The CPBs containing 2.5-10wt.% TODGA were characterized by various physical methods and their porosity, size, surface morphology, surface area and the degradation profile by thermogravimetry were analyzed. The batch uptake studies involved kinetics of metal ion sorption, uptake as a function of nitric acid concentration, kinetic modelling and adsorption isotherms and most of the studies involved the Am(3+) ions. The batch saturation sorption capacities for Eu(3+) loading at 3M HNO3 were determined to be 6.6±0.02, 9.1±0.02 and 22.3±0.04mgg(-1) of CRBs with 2.5wt.%, 5wt.% and 10wt.% TODGA, respectively. The sorption isotherm analysis with Langmuir, D-R and Freundlisch isotherms indicated chemisorption monolayer mechanism. Chromatographic studies indicated breakthrough of Eu(3+) (using a solution containing Eu carrier) after about 0.75 bed volume (3.5-4mL). Elution of the loaded Eu was carried out using 0.01M EDTA as the eluent.

  18. Relativistic calculations of radiative properties and fine structure constant varying sensitivity coefficients in the astrophysically relevant Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-03-01

    We have carried out calculations of the relativistic sensitivity coefficients, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, lifetimes and magnetic dipole hyperfine structure constants for a number of low-lying states in the Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions which are abundant in the distant quasars and various stellar plasmas. These spectroscopic data will be very useful for probing temporal variation of the fine structure constant (αe) and in the diagnostic processes of some of the astrophysical plasmas. We have employed all-order perturbative methods in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian to calculate the atomic wavefunctions of the considered ions. Reference states are constructed with the VN-1 and VN+1 potentials and then the electron-electron correlation effects are taken into account by constructing all possible singly and doubly excited configurations, involving both the core and valence electrons, from the respective reference states. We have also determined one electron affinities and ionization potentials of many excited states in these Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions. Except for a few states we have attained accuracies within 1 per cent for the energies compared with their experimental values. Our calculated sensitivity coefficients are estimated to have similar accuracies as of the calculated energies. Furthermore, combining our calculated transition matrix elements with the experimental wavelengths we evaluate transition probabilities, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of some of the excited states in these ions. These results are compared with the available data in a few cases and found to be in very good agreement among themselves. Using our reported hyperfine structure constants due to the dominant magnetic dipole interaction, it is possible to determine hyperfine splittings approximately in the above considered ions.

  19. Assessment of photochemical applications to specific stages in Savannah River Plant actinide reprocessing streams

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Bell, J.T.; Mailen, J.C.; Dodson, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    The application of photochemical redox methods has been evaluated as a means of separating actinides in Purex reprocessing streams. This chemistry promises to eliminate many of the chemical reagents which are otherwise necessary to effect valence control of such actinides as plutonium and neptunium. The most promising processing stages of the Savannah River Plant reprocessing facility for feasibility testing of the photochemical method appear to be those in which the concentrations of the actinides in question are the lowest, thus minimizing the required amount of absorbed light. Although neptunium valence control appears to be feasible through the photochemical generation of nitrite ion, the urgency for its control is secondary to that of plutonium. Therefore, the Purex ''2nd-U-cycle feed'' stage has been selected as the top priority for testing the photochemical technique. The chemistry initially involves the photoreduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which in turn reduces Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The results of preliminary experiments on nitrate ion and uranyl ion photoreduction are also given. With less than 100 W of absorbed power, the rates of NO/sub 2//sup -/ and U/sup 4 +/ generation, respectively, appear ample to handle process requirements. 14 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  1. Ion-exchange extraction of platinum(II,IV) from chloride solutions in the presence of iron(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononova, O. N.; Duba, E. V.; Karplyakova, N. S.; Krylov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The sorption concentration of platinum(II,IV) in the presence of iron(III) is studied on new samples of domestically produced ionites of the CYBBER brand. In comparing the sorption and kinetic properties of the new ionites to those of sorbents of the Purolite brand studied earlier, the higher effectiveness of the former is demonstrated via the extraction of platinum(II,IV) ions from strongly and weakly acidic chloride solutions. It is found that the sorbed platinum ions can be completely separated from iron(III) ions through separate elution using 0.01-0.001 M HCl (iron ions) and a thiourea solution (80 g/L) in 0.3 M H2SO4 (platinum ions).

  2. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:27451112

  3. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions.

  4. Evaluation and testing of sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Romanovski, V.V.; Veeck, A.C.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate and test the complexing ability of a variety of promising new complexing agents synthesized by Professor Kenneth Raymond`s group at the University of California, Berkeley (ESP-CP TTP Number SF16C311). Some of these derivatives have already shown the potential for selectivity binding Pu(IV) in a wide range of solutions in the presence of other metals. Professor Raymond`s group uses molecular modeling to design and synthesize ligands based on modification of natural siderophores, or their analogs, for chelation of actinides. The ligands are then modified for use as liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extractants. The authors` group at the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science (ITS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory determines the complex formation constants between the ligands and actinide ions, the capacity and time dependence for uptake on the resins, and the effect of other metal ions and pH.

  5. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Carroll, S.A.

    1993-10-01

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage.

  6. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, S E; Marston, J B

    2011-02-14

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  7. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, S. E.; Marston, J. B.

    2011-02-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  8. Selection of Actinide Chemical Analogues for WIPP Tests: Potential Nonradioactive Sorbing and Nonsorbing Tracers for Study of Ion Transport in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Spall; Robert Villarreal

    1998-08-01

    Chemical characteristics of the actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) have been studied relative to nonradioactive chemical elements that have similar characteristics in an attempt to identify a group of actinide chemical analogues that are nonradioactive. In general, the chemistries of the actinides, especially U, Np, Pu, and Am, are very complex and attempts to identify a single chemical analogue for each oxidation state were not successful. However, the rationale for selecting a group of chemical analogues that would mimic the actinides as a group is provided. The categorization of possible chemical analogues (tracers) with similar chemical properties was based on the following criteria. Categorization was studied according.

  9. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 40/Ca and /sup 48/Ca ions with /sup 248/Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Fowler, M.M.; Daniels, W.R.; von Gunten, H.R.; Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Gregorich, K.; Welch, R.; Seaborg, G.T.; Bruechle, W.

    1985-05-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 234- to 294-MeV /sup 40/Ca ions and with 239- to 318-MeV /sup 48/Ca ions. The maxima of the isotopic distributions for these elements occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions. The shapes of the distributions and the half-widths of about 2.5 mass numbers are quite similar to those observed previously for reactions of /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 22/Ne with /sup 248/Cm. In general, the excitation functions for /sup 40/Ca show maxima near the Coulomb barrier while those for /sup 48/Ca are about 20 MeV above the barrier. The cross sections decrease rather slowly with increasing projectile energy over the energy range studied, indicating that the additional projectile energy is not manifested as excitation energy of these actinide products.

  10. Intramolecular Gas Phase Reactions of Synthetic Non-heme Oxoiron(IV) Ions: Proximity and Spin-State Reactivity Rules

    PubMed Central

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; McDonald, Aidan R.; Reed, Dana; Usharani, Dandamudi; Schyman, Patric; Milko, Petr

    2012-01-01

    The intramolecular gas phase reactivity of four oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by tetradentate N4 ligands (L) has been studied by means of tandem mass spectrometry measurements where the gas-phase ions [FeIV(O)(L)(OTf)]+ and [FeIV(O)(L)]2+ were isolated and then allowed to fragment by collision-induced decay (CID). CID fragmentation of cations derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of TMC (1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) and L8Py2 (N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,5-diazacyclooctane) afforded the same predominant products irrespective of whether they were hexacoordinate or pentacoordinate. These products resulted from the loss of water by dehydrogenation of ethylene or propylene linkers on the tetradentate ligand. In contrast, CID fragmentation of ions derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of linear tetradentate ligands BPMEN (N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane) and BPMPN (N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane) showed predominant oxidative N-dealkylation for the hexacoordinate [FeIV(O)(L)(OTf)]+ cations and predominant dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane/propane backbone for the pentacoordinate [FeIV(O)(L)]2+ cations. DFT calculations on [FeIV(O)(BPMEN)] ions showed that the experimentally observed preference for oxidative N-dealkylation versus dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane linker for the hexa- and pentacoordinate ions, respectively, is dictated by the proximity of the target C–H bond to the oxoiron(IV) moiety and the reactive spin state. Therefore, there must be a difference in ligand topology between the two ions. More importantly, despite the constraints on the geometries of the TSs that prohibit the usual upright σ-trajectory and prevent optimal σCH-σ*z2 overlap, all the reactions still proceed preferentially on the quintet (S = 2) state surface, which increases the number of exchange interactions in the d-block of iron and leads thereby to exchange enhanced reactivity (EER). As such, EER is responsible for the

  11. Intramolecular gas-phase reactions of synthetic nonheme oxoiron(IV) ions: proximity and spin-state reactivity rules.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; McDonald, Aidan R; Reed, Dana; Usharani, Dandamudi; Schyman, Patric; Milko, Petr; Shaik, Sason; Que, Lawrence

    2012-09-10

    The intramolecular gas-phase reactivity of four oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by tetradentate N(4) ligands (L) has been studied by means of tandem mass spectrometry measurements in which the gas-phase ions [Fe(IV)(O)(L)(OTf)](+) (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) and [Fe(IV) (O)(L)](2+) were isolated and then allowed to fragment by collision-induced decay (CID). CID fragmentation of cations derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (tmc) and N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,5-diazacyclooctane (L(8)Py(2)) afforded the same predominant products irrespective of whether they were hexacoordinate or pentacoordinate. These products resulted from the loss of water by dehydrogenation of ethylene or propylene linkers on the tetradentate ligand. In contrast, CID fragmentation of ions derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of linear tetradentate ligands N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane (bpmen) and N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (bpmpn) showed predominant oxidative N-dealkylation for the hexacoordinate [Fe(IV)(O)(L)(OTf)](+) cations and predominant dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane/propane backbone for the pentacoordinate [Fe(IV)(O)(L)](2+) cations. DFT calculations on [Fe(IV)(O)(bpmen)] ions showed that the experimentally observed preference for oxidative N-dealkylation versus dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane linker for the hexa- and pentacoordinate ions, respectively, is dictated by the proximity of the target C-H bond to the oxoiron(IV) moiety and the reactive spin state. Therefore, there must be a difference in ligand topology between the two ions. More importantly, despite the constraints on the geometries of the TS that prohibit the usual upright σ trajectory and prevent optimal σ(CH)-σ*(z2) overlap, all the reactions still proceed preferentially on the quintet (S = 2) state surface, which increases the number of exchange interactions in the d block of iron and leads thereby to exchange enhanced

  12. Extraction studies of selected actinide ions from aqueous solutions with 4-benzoyl-2,4-Dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione and Tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C.; Smith, B.F.

    1992-07-01

    The first measurements of distribution coefficients (k{sub d}) for Cm(III), Bk(III), Cf(III), Es(III), and Fm(III) between aqueous perchlorate solutions and solutions of 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT) and the synergist tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in toluene are reported. Curium-243, berkelium-250, californium-249, einsteinium-254, and fermium-253 were used in these studies. The K{sub d} for {sup 241}Am was also measured and is in agreement with previously published results. Our new results show that the K{sub d}`s decrease gradually with increasing atomic number for the actinides with a dip at Cf. In general, the K{sub d}`s for these actinides are about about a factor of 10 greater than the K{sub d}`s for the homologous lanthanides at a pH of 2.9, a BMPPT concentration of 0.2 M, and a TOPO concentration of 0.04 M. The larger K{sub d}`s for the actinides are consistent with greater covalent bonding between the actinide metal ion and the sulfur bonding site in the ligand. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Extraction studies of selected actinide ions from aqueous solutions with 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry); Smith, B.F. )

    1991-11-01

    The first measurements of distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cm(III), Bk(III), Cf(III), Es(III), and Fm(III) between aqueous perchlorate solutions and solutions of 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT) and the synergist tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in toluene are reported. Curium-243, berkelium-250, californium-249, einsteinium-254, and fermium-253 were used in these studies. The K{sub d} for {sup 241}Am was also measured and is in agreement with previously published results. Our new results show that the K{sub d}'s decrease gradually with increasing atomic number for the actinides with a dip at Cf. In general, the K{sub d}'s for these actinides are about a factor of 5 to 10 greater than the K{sub d}'s for the homologous lanthanides at a pH of 2.9, a BMPPT concentration of 0.2 M, and a TOPO concentration of 0.04 M. The larger K{sub d}'s for the actinides are consistent with greater covalent bonding between the actinide metal ion and the sulfur bonding site in the ligand.

  14. Extraction studies of selected actinide ions from aqueous solutions with 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C. |; Smith, B.F.

    1991-11-01

    The first measurements of distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cm(III), Bk(III), Cf(III), Es(III), and Fm(III) between aqueous perchlorate solutions and solutions of 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT) and the synergist tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in toluene are reported. Curium-243, berkelium-250, californium-249, einsteinium-254, and fermium-253 were used in these studies. The K{sub d} for {sup 241}Am was also measured and is in agreement with previously published results. Our new results show that the K{sub d}`s decrease gradually with increasing atomic number for the actinides with a dip at Cf. In general, the K{sub d}`s for these actinides are about a factor of 5 to 10 greater than the K{sub d}`s for the homologous lanthanides at a pH of 2.9, a BMPPT concentration of 0.2 M, and a TOPO concentration of 0.04 M. The larger K{sub d}`s for the actinides are consistent with greater covalent bonding between the actinide metal ion and the sulfur bonding site in the ligand.

  15. Selective Media for Actinide Collection and Pre-Concentration: Results of FY 2006 Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Warner, Marvin G.; Latesky, Stanley L.

    2006-11-17

    3] > 0.3 M. Preliminary results suggest that the Kl?ui resins can separate Pu(IV) from sample solutions containing high concentrations of competing ions. Conceptual protocols for recovery of the Pu from the resin for subsequent analysis have been proposed, but further work is needed to perfect these techniques. Work on this subject will be continued in FY 2007. Automated laboratory equipment (in conjunction with Task 3 of the NA-22 Automation Project) will be used in FY 2007 to improve the efficiency of these experiments. The sorption of actinide ions on self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports materials containing diphosphonate groups was also investigated. These materials also showed a very high affinity for tetravalent actinides, and they also sorbed U(VI) fairly strongly. Computational Ligand Design An extended MM3 molecular mechanics model was developed for calculating the structures of Kl?ui ligand complexes. This laid the groundwork necessary to perform the computer-aided design of bis-Kl?ui architectures tailored for Pu(IV) complexation. Calculated structures of the Kl?ui ligand complexes [Pu(Kl?ui)2(OH2)2]2+ and [Fe(Kl?ui)2]+ indicate a ''bent'' sandwich arrangement of the Kl?ui ligands in the Pu(IV) complex, whereas the Fe(III) complex prefers a ''linear'' octahedral arrangement of the two Kl?ui ligands. This offers the possibility that two Kl?ui ligands can be tethered together to form a material with very high binding affinity for Pu(IV) over Fe(III). The next step in the design process is to use de novo molecule building software (HostDesigner) to identify potential candidate architectures.

  16. Hydration structures of U(III) and U(IV) ions from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2012-08-21

    We apply DFT+U-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the hydration structures of U(III) and U(IV) ions, pertinent to redox reactions associated with uranium salts in aqueous media. U(III) is predicted to be coordinated to 8 water molecules, while U(IV) has a hydration number between 7 and 8. At least one of the innershell water molecules of the hydrated U(IV) complex becomes spontaneously deprotonated. As a result, the U(IV)-O pair correlation function exhibits a satellite peak at 2.15 A associated with the shorter U(IV)-(OH{sup -}) bond. This feature is not accounted for in analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray adsorption near edge structure measurements, which yield higher estimates of U(IV) hydration numbers. This suggests that it may be useful to include the effect of possible hydrolysis in future interpretation of experiments, especially when the experimental pH is close to the reported hydrolysis equilibrium constant value.

  17. Actinide valences in xenotime and monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, E. R.; Zhang, Y.; McLeod, T.; Davis, J.

    2011-02-01

    Tetravalent U, Np and Pu can be substituted by ceramic methods into the rare earth site of xenotime and monazite in air atmospheres using Ca ions as charge compensators, while no evidence of penta- or hexavalent actinide ions was found. Some Pu 3+ and Np 3+ can be incorporated in xenotime samples fired in a reducing atmosphere.

  18. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean - Francois; Richmann, Michael K; Reed, Donald T; Khaing, Hnin; Swanson, Juliet

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  19. Preparation of actinide targets by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, N.; Folger, H.

    1989-10-01

    Actinide targets with varying thicknesses on different substrates have been prepared by electrodeposition either from aqueous solutions or from solutions of their nitrates in isopropyl alcohol. With these techniques the actinides can be deposited almost quantitatively on various backing materials within 15 to 30 min. Targets of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium and californium with areal densities from almost carrier-free up to 1.4 mg/cm 2 on thin beryllium, carbon, titanium, tantalum and platinum foils have been prepared. In most cases, prior to the deposition, the actinides had to be purified chemically and for some of them, due to the limited amount of material available, recycling procedures were required. Applications of actinide targets in heavy-ion reactions are briefly discussed.

  20. Fine-structure resolved photoionization of metastable Be-like ionsC III, N IV, and O V

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, A.; Schippers, S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.; Brauning, H.; Schlachter, A.S.; McLaughlin, B.M.

    2006-09-01

    High-resolution photoionization experiments were carried outwith beams of C III, N IV, and O V containing roughly equal amounts ofground-state and metastable ions. The energy scales of the experimentsare calibrated with uncertainties of 1 to 10 meV depending on photonenergy. These data favorably compare with state-of-the-art R-matrixcalculations carried out on an energy grid with a spacing of 13.6 mueV.

  1. Removal of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution by a novel nanoporous ZnO: Isotherms, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Ayvacıklı, Mehmet; Hiçsönmez, Ümran; Kaynar, Sermin Çam

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of thorium (IV) from aqueous solutions onto a novel nanoporous ZnO particles prepared by microwave assisted combustion was studied using batch methods under different experimental conditions. The effect of contact time, solution pH, initial concentration and temperature on adsorption process was studied. The ability of this material to remove Th (IV) from aqueous solution was characterises by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption percent and distribution coefficient for nanoporous ZnO powders in optimum conditions were 97% ± 1.02; 8080 L kg(-1)for Th (IV), respectively. Based on the Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity of nanoporous ZnO for Th (IV) was found to be 1500 g kg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The results indicated that nanoporous ZnO was suitable as sorbent material for recovery and adsorption of Th (IV) ions from aqueous solutions. The radioactive Th (VI) in surface water, sea water and waste waters from technologies producing nuclear fuels, mining (uranium and thorium) and laboratories working with radioactive materials (uranium and thorium) can be removed with this nanoporous ZnO.

  2. Forward and reverse ion-exchange kinetics for some alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on amorphous zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Pandith, A.H.

    1999-10-26

    The Nernst-Planck equations are applied to study the ion-exchange kinetics on the surface of zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate for Li{sup +}/H{sup +}, Na{sup +}/H{sup +}, K{sup +}/H{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, and Sr{sup 2+}/H{sup +} exchanges in the forward and reverse directions under the conditions favoring particle diffusion. On the basis of these studies, various physical parameters such as the self-diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), the energy of activation (E{sub a}), and the entropy of activation ({Delta}S*) have been determined and a correlation has been made of these parameters with the ion-exchange characteristics of the material. The study gives an insight into the ion-exchange processes going on in the exchanger phase and its potential use in metal ion separations.

  3. Actinide extraction methods

    DOEpatents

    Peterman, Dean R [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D [Pocatello, ID

    2010-09-21

    Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

  4. Actinide Binding by Kläui Ligands: REDOX Speciation and Sorption on an Extraction Chromatography Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2008-12-01

    The sorption of Eu(III) and actinide ions in various oxidation states from nitric acid solutions by an extraction chromatography resin containing 1 wt% of the Kläui ligand Cp*Co[P(O)(OR)2]3– [Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, R = –CH2 CH2CH3] on Amberlite® XAD-7HP was examined. At 0.3 M HNO3 and a metal-to-ligand ratio of 0.07, the relative affinity of the resin for the ions investigated followed the order: tetravalent >> hexavalent > trivalent > pentavalent; however, the relative affinity for the trivalent and hexavalent ions can be reversed, depending on the extent of ligand loading and the nitric acid concentration. The sorption of the tetravalent ions was exceptionally strong in the entire range of nitric acid concentration examined (0.2 to 8 M HNO3). Resin samples loaded with various actinide ions were examined spectrophotometrically. No Np(V) and Pu(III) species were identified on the resin; rather, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) reactions occurred during equilibration, resulting in their complete conversion to M(IV) species bound by the Kläui ligand. Similarly, the sorption behavior of Pu(VI) and Np(VI) was complicated by their reduction to M(IV) upon sorption. The observed REDOX processes were apparently driven by the extremely high affinity of the Kläui ligand for the tetravalent ions. The acid-base properties of the methyl derivative of the Kläui ligand were investigated in aqueous solution, and its pKa was found to be highly dependent upon the solution ionic strength. The binding constants of this ligand with various actinide ions measured in a mixed methanol/carbon tetrachloride solvent exhibited qualitative agreement with the sorption selectivity trends.

  5. Research in actinide chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH[sup [minus

  6. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-01

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  7. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-14

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  8. Structure of the endonuclease IV homologue from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of active-site divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Hughes, Ronny C.; Ng, Joseph D.; Coates, Leighton

    2010-10-05

    The most frequent lesion in DNA is at apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites resulting from DNA-base losses. These AP-site lesions can stall DNA replication and lead to genome instability if left unrepaired. The AP endonucleases are an important class of enzymes that are involved in the repair of AP-site intermediates during damage-general DNA base-excision repair pathways. These enzymes hydrolytically cleave the 5{prime}-phosphodiester bond at an AP site to generate a free 3{prime}-hydroxyl group and a 5{prime}-terminal sugar phosphate using their AP nuclease activity. Specifically, Thermotoga maritima endonuclease IV is a member of the second conserved AP endonuclease family that includes Escherichia coli endonuclease IV, which is the archetype of the AP endonuclease superfamily. In order to more fully characterize the AP endonuclease family of enzymes, two X-ray crystal structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue were determined in the presence of divalent metal ions bound in the active-site region. These structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue further revealed the use of the TIM-barrel fold and the trinuclear metal binding site as important highly conserved structural elements that are involved in DNA-binding and AP-site repair processes in the AP endonuclease superfamily.

  9. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  10. Electron-ion recombination of Si IV forming Si III: Storage-ring measurement and multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E. W.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Hoffmann, J.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Wolf, A.; Lukic, D.; Savin, D. W.

    2007-09-15

    The electron-ion recombination rate coefficient for Si IV forming Si III was measured at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR. The experimental electron-ion collision energy range of 0-186 eV encompassed the 2p{sup 6}nln{sup '}l{sup '} dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s{yields}nl core excitations, 2s2p{sup 6}3snln{sup '}l{sup '} resonances associated with 2s{yields}nl (n=3,4) core excitations, and 2p{sup 5}3snln{sup '}l{sup '} resonances associated with 2p{yields}nl (n=3,...,{infinity}) core excitations. The experimental DR results are compared with theoretical calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method for DR via the 3s{yields}3pn{sup '}l{sup '} and 3s{yields}3dn{sup '}l{sup '}(both n{sup '}=3,...,6) and 2p{sup 5}3s3ln{sup '}l{sup '} (n{sup '}=3,4) capture channels. Finally, the experimental and theoretical plasma DR rate coefficients for Si IV forming Si III are derived and compared with previously available results.

  11. Extraction chromatographic separation of minor actinides from PUREX high-level wastes using CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, J.N.; Murali, M.S.; Iyer, R.H.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Rao, M.K.; Badheka, L.P.; Banerji, A.

    1995-02-01

    An extraction chromatographic technique using octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) adsorbed on chromosorb-102 (CAC) has been tested as an alternative to the TRUEX solvent extraction process, where CMPO has been used as the extracting agent to recover minor actinides from high-activity waste (HAW) solutions of PUREX origin. The batchwise uptake behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Eu(III), Zr(IV), Fe(III), Ru(III), and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from a nitric acid medium by CAC has been studied. The uptake of actinides and lanthanides are higher than those of other fission products and inert materials. The batchwise loading experiments in the presence of Nd(III)/U(VI) have shown that at lower concentrations of these metal ions, the uptake of Pu(IV), U(VI), and Am(III) are reasonably high. Studies on loading of Nd(III), U(VI), and Pu(IV) on a column containing 1.7 g of CAC have shown that Nd(III) (30 mg) and U(VI) (90 mg) could be loaded, while Pu(IV) ({approximately}0.6) was loaded on a small column containing 100 mg of CAC without any break-through. Further, a synthetic HAW solution as such and the actual PUREX HAW solution, after depleting the uranium content by a 30% tributyl-phosphate contact, were loaded on a CAC column. The effluents did not contain any alpha activity above the background level. The activities could subsequently be eluted with 0.0.4 M HNO{sub 3} (americium and rare earths), 0.01 M oxalic acid (plutonium), and 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} [U(VI)]. The recoveries of these metal ions were found to be >99%.

  12. Colloid-borne forms of tetravalent actinides: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Harald; Hennig, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Tetravalent actinides, An(IV), are usually assumed to be little mobile in near-neutral environmental waters because of their low solubility. However, there are certain geochemical scenarios during which mobilization of An(IV) in a colloid-borne (waterborne) form cannot be ruled out. A compilation of colloid-borne forms of tetravalent actinides described so far for laboratory experiments together with several examples of An(IV) colloids observed in field experiments and real-world scenarios are given. They are intended to be a knowledge base and a tool for those who have to interpret actinide behavior under environmental conditions. Synthetic colloids containing structural An(IV) and synthetic colloids carrying adsorbed An(IV) are considered. Their behavior is compared with the behavior of An(IV) colloids observed after the intentional or unintentional release of actinides into the environment. A list of knowledge gaps as to the behavior of An(IV) colloids is provided and items which need further research are highlighted.

  13. Actinide recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Navratil, James D.; Saba, Mark T.

    1987-07-28

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrenedivinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like.

  14. Development of the Actinide-Lanthanide Separation (ALSEP) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Gelis, Artem V.

    2014-09-30

    Separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from acidic high-level raffinates arising from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel is an important step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Most proposed approaches to this problem involve two solvent extraction steps: 1) co-extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and actinides, followed by 2) separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. The objective of our work is to develop a single solvent-extraction process for isolating the minor actinide elements. We report here a solvent containing N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) that can be used to separate the minor actinides in a single solvent-extraction process. T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid solution. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered solution of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus affecting separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. Separation factors between the lanthanides and actinides are approximately 20 in the pH range of 3 to 4, and the distribution ratios are not highly dependent on the pH in this system.

  15. Zirconium(IV) Phosphonate-Phosphates as Efficient Ion-Exchange Materials.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Rita; Martin, Caroline H; Clearfield, Abraham

    2016-02-15

    Layered metal phosphonate-phosphate hybrid materials are known to be ion-exchange materials. Hybrids with zirconium metal centers were synthesized at varying phosphonate-phosphate ratios in order to explore the function and charge preference. The zirconium hybrid materials were found to have a range of applicable uses with preference for highly charged ions (3+) over lower charged ions (1+ and 2+). The addition of a large excess of phosphate altered the selectivity, and these materials were able to remove all ions from solution regardless of charge. In this paper, we describe newly synthesized compounds that are simple to prepare, reproducible, stable, and offer a variety of separation schemes.

  16. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  17. PREFACE: Actinides 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Linfeng; Tobin, James G.; Shuh, David K.

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering consists of 98 papers that were presented at Actinides 2009, the 8th International Conference on Actinide Science held on 12-17 July 2009 in San Francisco, California, USA. This conference was jointly organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Actinides conference series started in Baden-Baden, Germany (1975) and this first conference was followed by meetings at Asilomar, CA, USA (1981), Aix-en-Provence, France (1985), Tashkent, USSR (1989), Santa Fe, NM, USA (1993), Baden-Baden, Germany (1997), Hayama, Japan (2001), and Manchester, UK (2005). The Actinides conference series provides a regular venue for the most recent research results on the chemistry, physics, and technology of the actinides and heaviest elements. Actinides 2009 provided a forum spanning a diverse range of scientific topics, including fundamental materials science, chemistry, physics, environmental science, and nuclear fuels. Of particular importance was a focus on the key roles that basic actinide chemistry and physics research play in advancing the worldwide renaissance of nuclear energy. Editors Linfeng Rao Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (lrao@lbl.gov) James G Tobin Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (tobin1@llnl.gov) David K Shuh Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (dkshuh@lbl.gov)

  18. Scandium ion-enhanced oxidative dimerization and N-demethylation of N,N-dimethylanilines by a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyun; Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; You, Youngmin; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-11-21

    Oxidative dimerization of N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) occurs with a nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complex, [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine), to yield the corresponding dimer, tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), in acetonitrile. The rate of the oxidative dimerization of DMA by [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) is markedly enhanced by the presence of scandium triflate, Sc(OTf)(3) (OTf = CF(3)SO(3)(-)), when TMB is further oxidized to the radical cation (TMB(•+)). In contrast, we have observed the oxidative N-demethylation with para-substituted DMA substrates, since the position of the C-C bond formation to yield the dimer is blocked. The rate of the oxidative N-demethylation of para-substituted DMA by [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) is also markedly enhanced by the presence of Sc(OTf)(3). In the case of para-substituted DMA derivatives with electron-donating substituents, radical cations of DMA derivatives are initially formed by Sc(3+) ion-coupled electron transfer from DMA derivatives to [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+), giving demethylated products. Binding of Sc(3+) to [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) enhances the Sc(3+) ion-coupled electron transfer from DMA derivatives to [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+), whereas binding of Sc(3+) to DMA derivatives retards the electron-transfer reaction. The complicated kinetics of the Sc(3+) ion-coupled electron transfer from DMA derivatives to [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) are analyzed by competition between binding of Sc(3+) to DMA derivatives and to [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+). The binding constants of Sc(3+) to DMA derivatives increase with the increase of the electron-donating ability of the para-substituent. The rate constants of Sc(3+) ion-coupled electron transfer from DMA derivatives to [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+), which are estimated from the binding constants of Sc(3+) to DMA derivatives, agree well with those predicted from the driving force dependence of the rate constants of Sc(3+) ion-coupled electron transfer from one-electron reductants to [Fe(IV

  19. The Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Gelis, Artem V.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Smoot, Margaret R.

    2014-02-21

    The Actinide-Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP) process is described. The process uses an extractant phase consisting of either N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]). The neutral TODGA or T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid media. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus resulting in separation of these two groups of elements.

  20. Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.

    1995-08-01

    This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

  1. Actinides in the Geosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runde, Wolfgang; Neu, Mary P.

    Since the 1950s actinides have been used to benefit industry, science, health, and national security. The largest industrial application, electricity generation from uranium and thorium fuels, is growing worldwide. Thus, more actinides are being mined, produced, used and processed than ever before. The future of nuclear energy hinges on how these increasing amounts of actinides are contained in each stage of the fuel cycle, including disposition. In addition, uranium and plutonium were built up during the Cold War between the United States and the Former Soviet Union for defense purposes and nuclear energy.

  2. Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of thermally treated and. gamma. -irradiated phases of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger: separation of Al(III) from some metal ions and removal of cations from water

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1983-01-01

    Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate (ZAP) has been studied systematically after thermal and irradiation treatments. As a result, an increase in the ion-exchange capacity and a complete reversal in the selectivity sequence for some common metal ions has been observed on heating. The modified phase of ZAP has been utilized successfully for the quantitative separation of aluminum from numerous metal ions and for the removal of cations from water. 5 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-12-01

    high level liquid wastes and a general actinide clean-up procedure. The selectivity of the standard extractant for tetravalent actinides, (N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide (CMPO), was markedly improved by the attachment of three CMPO-like functions onto a triphenoxymethane platform, and a ligand that is both highly selective and effective for An(IV) ions was isolated. A 10 fold excess of ligand will remove virtually all of the 4+ actinides from the acidic layer without extracting appreciable quantities of An(III) and Ln(III) unlike simple CMPO ligands. Inspired by the success of the DIAMEX industrial process for extractions, three new tripodal chelates bearing three diglycolamide and thiodiglycolamide units precisely arranged on a triphenoxymethane platform have been synthesized for an highly efficient extraction of trivalent f-element cations from nitric acid media. A single equivalent of ligand will remove 80% of the Ln(III) ion from the acidic layer since the ligand is perfectly suited to accommodate the tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry preferred by the metal center. The ligand is perhaps the most efficient binder available for the heavier lanthanides and due to this unique attribute, the extraction event can be easily followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy confirming the formation of a TPP complex. The most lipophilic di-n-butyl tris-diglycolamide was found to be a significantly weaker extractant in comparison to the di-isopropyl analogs. The tris-thiodiglycolamide derivative proved to be an ineffective chelate for f-elements and demonstrated the importance of the etheric oxygens in the metal binding. The results presented herein clearly demonstrate a cooperative action of these three ligating groups within a single molecule, confirmed by composition and structure of the extracted complexes, and since actinides prefer to have high coordination numbers, the ligands should be particularly adept at binding with three arms. The use of such an

  4. Actinide recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

    1985-06-13

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

  5. PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.

    1963-11-01

    A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

  6. Thermochemistry of the actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D.

    1993-10-01

    The measurement of equilibria by Knudsen effusion techniques and the enthalpy of formation of the actinide atoms is briefly discussed. Thermochemical data on the sublimation of the actinide fluorides is used to calculate the enthalpies of formation and entropies of the gaseous species. Estimates are made for enthalpies and entropies of the tetrafluorides and trifluorides for those systems where data is not available. The pressure of important species in the tetrafluoride sublimation processes is calculated based on this thermochemical data.

  7. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Baker; Christopher A. McGrath

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from "minor" actinides that currently have poorly known or in some cases not measured (n,?) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 239Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  8. Thin extractive membrane for monitoring actinides in aqueous streams.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Vivek; Paul, Sumana; Pandey, Ashok K; Kalsi, P C; Goswami, A

    2013-09-15

    Alpha spectrometry and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are used for monitoring ultra-trace amount of alpha emitting actinides in different aqueous streams. However, these techniques have limitations i.e. alpha spectrometry requires a preconcentration step and SSNTDs are not chemically selective. Therefore, a thin polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) supported on silanized glass was developed for preconcentraion and determination of ultra-trace concentration of actinides by α-spectrometry and SSNTDs. PIMs were formed by spin coating on hydrophobic glass slide or solvent casting to form thin and self-supported membranes, respectively. Sorption experiments indicated that uptakes of actinides in the PIM were highly dependent on acidity of solution i.e. Am(III) sorbed up to 0.1 molL(-1) HNO₃, U(VI) up to 0.5 molL(-1) HNO₃ and Pu(IV) from HNO₃ concentration as high as 4 molL(-1). A scheme was developed for selective sorption of target actinide in the PIM by adjusting acidity and oxidation state of actinide. The actinides sorbed in PIMs were quantified by alpha spectrometry and SSNTDs. For SSNTDs, neutron induced fission-fragment tracks and α-particle tracks were registered in Garware polyester and CR-39 for quantifications of natural uranium and α-emitting actinides ((241)Am/(239)Pu/(233)U), respectively. Finally, the membranes were tested to quantify Pu in 4 molL(-1) HNO3 solutions and synthetic urine samples.

  9. Complex formation of Am(III) and Am(IV) with phosphate ions in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    The first dissociation constant of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile solution (K/sub 1//sup 0/ = 1.75/centered dot/10/sup /minus/13/) and the constant of formation of H(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup /minus// dimers (K/sub d//sup 0/ = 8/centered dot/10/sup 2/) were determined by the method of pH-potentiometry. The complex formation of Am(III) in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.05-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was investigated by a spectrophotometric method; the stability constants of the complexes AmH/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup 2+/ (/beta//sub 1//sup III/ = 1.0/centered dot/10/sup 12/) and Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup +/ (/beta//sub 2//sup III/ = 4.3/centered dot/10/sup 24/) were determined. The formal potentials of the couple Am/sup (IV)//Am/sup (III)/ in 0.3-1.9 M solutions of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile were measured, and the stability constant of the phosphate complex of tetravalent americium Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 3//sup +/ (/beta//sub 3//sup IV/ = 2.5/centered dot/10/sup 46/) was calculated according to the value of the shift of the potential relative to the standard.

  10. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  11. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  12. Preparation of Polypropylene Spin Tips Filled with Immobilized Titanium(IV) Ion Monolithic Adsorbent for Robust Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangjie; Wan, Hao; Liu, Zhongshan; Wang, Hongwei; Mao, Jiawei; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-05-17

    In this study, we developed a Ti(IV) monolithic spin tip for phosphoproteome analysis of a minute amount of biological sample for the first time. The surface of polypropylene pipet tip was activated by the photoinitiator benzophenone under UV light radiation followed by polymerization of ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate and bis-acrylamide in the tip to form a porous monolith with reactive phosphate groups. The as-prepared tips grafted with monolithic adsorbent were then chelated with titanium(IV) ion for phosphopeptide enrichment. It was found that the tips enabled fast and efficient capture of phosphopeptides from microscale complex samples. The monolithic tip was demonstrated to have a detection limit as low as 5 fmol β-casein tryptic digest, along with an exceptionally high specificity to capture phosphopeptides from complex tryptic digest mixed with an unphosphorylated protein and a phosphorylated protein at a molar ratio up to 1000:1. When the tip was applied to enrich phosphopeptides from 5 μg of tryptic digest of complex HeLa cell proteins, 1185 high confidence of phosphorylated sites were successfully identified with the specificity as high as 92.5%. So far, this is the most sensitive phosphoproteomics analysis using a standard liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system for proteome-wide phosphorylation analysis in mammalian cells. PMID:27101427

  13. Separation of berkelium (IV) from trivalent transplutonium elements on ion-exchangers in solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependences of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf and Es behavior on anion- and cation-exchangers in solutions of 0.1-8.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ on acid concentration and oxidant content in solution (KBrO/sub 3/) or in resin (PbO/sub 2/) have been studied. Significant differences in distribution coefficients of Bk and other transplutonium elements (TPE) have been found that can be explained by Bk oxidation to the tetravalent state. A simple and effective method of Bk (IV) separation from trivalent TPE has been developed. The method was applied to the isolation of isotopes Bk-249 and Bk-250; the purification factor of Bk (IV) from other TPE is 10/sup 4/-10/sub 6/ per cycle. The possibility of Bk separation from bromate and phosphate ions by its sorption on a cation-exchanger from diluted H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ solutions with subsequent desorption by the mineral acid has been shown. 20 references, 8 figures.

  14. Solid phase extraction, separation and preconcentration of rare elements thorium(IV), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), cerium(IV) and chromium(III) amid several other foreign ions with eriochrome black T anchored to 3-D networking silica gel.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Bhavya; Barman, Milan K; Chatterjee, Mousumi; Roy, Dipika; Mandal, Bhabatosh

    2016-06-17

    The present work reports the systematic studies on extraction, separation and preconcentration of Th(IV), U(VI), Zr(IV), Ce(IV) and Cr(III) amid several other foreign ions using EBT anchored {SiO2}n3-D microarray. The effect of various sorption parameters, such as pH, concentration, temperature, sample volume, flow-rate and co-existing foreign ions were investigated. Quantitative sorption was ensured at solution pH: 6.0-6.5 for Th(IV), Ce(IV), Cr(III) and pH: 2.75-3.0 for Zr(IV), U(VI) couple. Analysis on extracted species and extraction sites reveals that [Th4(μ(2)-OH)8(H2O)4](8+), [Ce6(μ(2)-OH)12(H2O)5](12+), [Cr3(μ(2)-OH)4(H2O)](5+), [(UO2)3(μ(2)-OH)5(H2O)3](+) and [Zr4(μ(2)-OH)8(H2O)0.5](8+) for the respective metal ions gets extracted at HOMO of the extractor. HOMO-{metal ion species} was found to be 1:1 complexation. Sorption was endothermic, entropy-gaining, instantaneous and spontaneous in nature. A density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to analyze the 3-D structure and electronic distribution of the synthesized extractor. PMID:27185054

  15. Solid phase extraction, separation and preconcentration of rare elements thorium(IV), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), cerium(IV) and chromium(III) amid several other foreign ions with eriochrome black T anchored to 3-D networking silica gel.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Bhavya; Barman, Milan K; Chatterjee, Mousumi; Roy, Dipika; Mandal, Bhabatosh

    2016-06-17

    The present work reports the systematic studies on extraction, separation and preconcentration of Th(IV), U(VI), Zr(IV), Ce(IV) and Cr(III) amid several other foreign ions using EBT anchored {SiO2}n3-D microarray. The effect of various sorption parameters, such as pH, concentration, temperature, sample volume, flow-rate and co-existing foreign ions were investigated. Quantitative sorption was ensured at solution pH: 6.0-6.5 for Th(IV), Ce(IV), Cr(III) and pH: 2.75-3.0 for Zr(IV), U(VI) couple. Analysis on extracted species and extraction sites reveals that [Th4(μ(2)-OH)8(H2O)4](8+), [Ce6(μ(2)-OH)12(H2O)5](12+), [Cr3(μ(2)-OH)4(H2O)](5+), [(UO2)3(μ(2)-OH)5(H2O)3](+) and [Zr4(μ(2)-OH)8(H2O)0.5](8+) for the respective metal ions gets extracted at HOMO of the extractor. HOMO-{metal ion species} was found to be 1:1 complexation. Sorption was endothermic, entropy-gaining, instantaneous and spontaneous in nature. A density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to analyze the 3-D structure and electronic distribution of the synthesized extractor.

  16. Nonaqueous actinide hydride dissolution and production of actinide $beta$- diketonates

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a hydride of the actinide material in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol. (auth)

  17. Change in the Affinity of Ethylene Glycol Methacrylate Phosphate Monomer and Its Polymer Anchored on a Graphene Oxide Platform toward Uranium(VI) and Plutonium(IV) Ions.

    PubMed

    Chappa, Sankararao; Singha Deb, Ashish K; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Debnath, A K; Aswal, D K; Pandey, Ashok K

    2016-03-24

    The complexation behavior of the carbonyl and phosphoryl ligating groups bearing ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP) monomer and its polymer fixed on a graphene oxide (GO) platform was studied to understand the coordination ability of segregated EGMP units and polymer chains toward UO2(2+) and Pu(4+) ions. The cross-linked poly(EGMP) gel and EGMP dissolved in solution have a similar affinity toward these ions. UV-initiator induced polymerization was used to graft poly(EGMP) on the GO platform utilizing a double bond of EGMP covalently fixed on it. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the GO and GO-EGMP was done to confirm covalent attachment of the EGMP via a -C-O-P- link between GO and EGMP. The extent of poly(EGMP) grafting on GO by thermal analyses was found to be 5.88 wt %. The EGMP units fixed on the graphene oxide platform exhibited a remarkable selectivity toward Pu(4+) ions at high HNO3 conc. where coordination is a dominant mode involved in the sorption of ions. The ratio of distribution coefficients of Pu(IV) to U(VI) (DPu(IV)/DU(VI)) followed a trend as cross-linked poly(EGMP) (0.95) < EGMP in solvent methyl isobutyl ketone (1.3) < GO-poly(EGMP) (25) < GO-EGMP (181); the DPu(IV)/DU(VI) values are given in parentheses. The density functional theory computations have been performed for the complexation of UO2(2+) and Pu(4+) ions with the EGMP molecule anchored on GO in the presence of nitrate ions. This computational modeling suggested that Pu(4+) ion formed a strong coordination complex with phosphoryl and carbonyl ligating groups of the GO-EGMP as compared to UO2(2+) ions. Thus, the nonselective EGMP becomes highly selective to Pu(IV) ions when it interacts as a single unit fixed on a GO platform. PMID:26926256

  18. Change in the Affinity of Ethylene Glycol Methacrylate Phosphate Monomer and Its Polymer Anchored on a Graphene Oxide Platform toward Uranium(VI) and Plutonium(IV) Ions.

    PubMed

    Chappa, Sankararao; Singha Deb, Ashish K; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Debnath, A K; Aswal, D K; Pandey, Ashok K

    2016-03-24

    The complexation behavior of the carbonyl and phosphoryl ligating groups bearing ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP) monomer and its polymer fixed on a graphene oxide (GO) platform was studied to understand the coordination ability of segregated EGMP units and polymer chains toward UO2(2+) and Pu(4+) ions. The cross-linked poly(EGMP) gel and EGMP dissolved in solution have a similar affinity toward these ions. UV-initiator induced polymerization was used to graft poly(EGMP) on the GO platform utilizing a double bond of EGMP covalently fixed on it. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the GO and GO-EGMP was done to confirm covalent attachment of the EGMP via a -C-O-P- link between GO and EGMP. The extent of poly(EGMP) grafting on GO by thermal analyses was found to be 5.88 wt %. The EGMP units fixed on the graphene oxide platform exhibited a remarkable selectivity toward Pu(4+) ions at high HNO3 conc. where coordination is a dominant mode involved in the sorption of ions. The ratio of distribution coefficients of Pu(IV) to U(VI) (DPu(IV)/DU(VI)) followed a trend as cross-linked poly(EGMP) (0.95) < EGMP in solvent methyl isobutyl ketone (1.3) < GO-poly(EGMP) (25) < GO-EGMP (181); the DPu(IV)/DU(VI) values are given in parentheses. The density functional theory computations have been performed for the complexation of UO2(2+) and Pu(4+) ions with the EGMP molecule anchored on GO in the presence of nitrate ions. This computational modeling suggested that Pu(4+) ion formed a strong coordination complex with phosphoryl and carbonyl ligating groups of the GO-EGMP as compared to UO2(2+) ions. Thus, the nonselective EGMP becomes highly selective to Pu(IV) ions when it interacts as a single unit fixed on a GO platform.

  19. The influence of platinum(IV) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the presence of platinum(IV) ions, in the form of Pt(OH)62- at a high pH, on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like α-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. In the presence of 1 or 5 mol% of platinum ions in the precipitation system the lath-like α-FeOOH particles were formed as a single phase after a short hydrothermal treatment (2 h). No significant change in the size and shape of these particles in comparison to the reference sample was observed. After 6 h of autoclaving the formation of platinum nanoparticles at the surface of α-FeOOH particles via reduction by TMAH and/or its decomposition products became visible. These nanoparticles acted as a catalyst for the reduction of Fe(III) ions into Fe(II) and gradual transformation of α-FeOOH into a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide (Fe 3O 4, magnetite) by the dissolution-recrystallization mechanism. The presence of a higher concentration of platinum ions accelerates the process of α-FeOOH → Fe 3O 4 transformation with the appearance of α-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) particles as an intermediate product.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of a novel hybrid nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate: Its analytical applications as ion-selective electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif Ali; Shaheen, Shakeeba

    2013-02-01

    A novel organic-inorganic nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate has been synthesized by incorporation of a polymer material into inorganic precipitate. The material is a class of hybrid ion-exchanger with good ion-exchange properties, reproducibility, stability and good selectivity for heavy metals. The physico-chemical properties of this nano composite material were characterized by using XRD, TGA, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The ion-exchange capacity, pH titrations, elution behavior and chemical stability were also carried out to study ion-exchange properties of the material. Distribution studies for various metal ions revealed that the nano composite is highly selective for Cd(II). An ion-selective membrane electrode was fabricated using this material for the determination of Cd(II) ions in solutions. The analytical utility of this electrode was established by employing it as an indicator electrode in electrometric titrations.

  1. Surface Complexation of Actinides with Iron Oxides: Implications for Radionuclide Transport in Near-Surface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerden, J. L.; Kropf, A. J.; Tsai, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  2. Mathematical modeling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate bioegradation on actinide speciation.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J.E.; VanBriesen, J.; Rittmann, B.E.; Reed, D.T.

    1998-03-19

    Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and, hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modeling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bio-utilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modeling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems.

  3. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikaev, Alexei K.; Shilov, Vladimir P.; Gogolev, Andrei V.

    1997-09-01

    The data on radiolytic transformations of ions of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium and transcurium elements in aqueous solutions are generalised. The results of studies on the kinetics of fast reactions of these ions with primary products of water radiolysis (hydrated electron e-aq, H, OH, and O- radicals and H2O2), many inorganic (Cl2-, NO3, SO4-, CO3-, O3- etc.) and organic free radicals are analysed. The mechanism of γ- and α-radiolysis of solutions of actinide ions is discussed. The bibliography includes 183 references.

  4. Use of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate columns for cation exchange separation of metal ions interfering in the spectrophotometric determination of uranium with sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Agrawal, S.; Anwar, S.; Varshney, K.

    1985-01-01

    A simple cation exchange method has been developed for the quantitative separation of uranium from some metal ions which generally interfere in its spectrophotometric determination using sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate as a reagent. The method requires only a single bed operation and enables a satisfactory (Error + or - separation of uranium (UO/sub 2/ (II)) up to 1080 ..mu..g from ten metal ions on a 2 g column of zirconium (IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger in H(I) form.

  5. Advances in actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Peter C; Ikeda, Y.; Czerwinski, K.

    2011-01-31

    Actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry has advanced through unexpected results that have further revealed the complex nature of the 5f elements. Nanoscale control of actinide materials is emerging, as shown by the creation of a considerable range of cluster and tubular topologies. Departures from established structural trends for actinyl ions are provided by cation-cation interactions in which an O atom of one actinyl ion is an equatorial ligand of a bipyramid of another actinyl ion. The solid-state structural complexity of actinide materials has been further demonstrated by open framework materials with interesting properties. The U(VI) tetraoxide core has been added to this cation's repertoire of coordination possibilities. The emergence of pentavalent uranium solid-state and coordination chemistry has resulted from the prudent selection of ligands. Finally, analogues of the uranyl ion have challenged our understanding of this normally unreactive functional group.

  6. Understanding the interactions of neptunium and plutonium ions with graphene oxide: scalar-relativistic DFT investigations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-11-01

    Due to the vast application potential of graphene oxide (GO)-based materials in nuclear waste processing, it is of pivotal importance to investigate the interaction mechanisms between actinide cations such as Np(V) and Pu(IV, VI) ions and GO. In this work, we have considered four types of GOs modified by hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl groups at the edge and epoxy group on the surface, respectively. The structures, bonding nature, and binding energies of Np(V) and Pu(IV, VI) complexes with GOs have been investigated systematically using scalar-relativistic density functional theory (DFT). Geometries and harmonic frequencies suggest that Pu(IV) ions coordinate more easily with GOs compared to Np(V) and Pu(VI) ions. NBO and electron density analyses reveal that the coordination bond between Pu(IV) ions and GO possesses more covalency, whereas for Np(V) and Pu(VI) ions electrostatic interaction dominates the An-OG bond. The binding energies in aqueous solution reveal that the adsorption abilities of all GOs for actinide ions follow the order of Pu(IV) > Pu(VI) > Np(V), which is in excellent agreement with experimental observations. It is expected that this study can provide useful information for developing more efficient GO-based materials for radioactive wastewater treatment.

  7. PC-ANN assisted to the determination of Vanadium (IV) ion using an optical sensor based on immobilization of Eriochorome Cyanine R on a triacetylcellulose film.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Mohammad Mahdi; Khajehsharifi, Habibollah; Solhjoo, Aida

    2015-01-01

    More detailed analytical studies of an optical sensor based on immobilization of Eriochorome Cyanine R (ECR) on a triacetylcellulose film have been described to determine Vanadium (IV) ions in some real samples. The sensor based on complex formation between Vanadium (IV) ions and ECR in acidic media caused the color of the film to change from violet to blue along with the appearance of a strong peak appears at 595 nm. At the optimal conditions, the calibration curve showed a linear range of 9.90×10(-7)-8.25×10(-5)mol L(-1). Vanadium (IV) ions can be detected with a detection limit of 1.03×10(-7)mol L(-1) within 15 min depending on its concentration. Also, the working range was improved by using PC-ANN algorithm. The sensor could regenerate with dilute acetic acid solution and could be completely reversible. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for determining V (IV) ions in environmental water and tea leaves.

  8. PC-ANN assisted to the determination of Vanadium (IV) ion using an optical sensor based on immobilization of Eriochorome Cyanine R on a triacetylcellulose film.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Mohammad Mahdi; Khajehsharifi, Habibollah; Solhjoo, Aida

    2015-12-01

    More detailed analytical studies of an optical sensor based on immobilization of Eriochorome Cyanine R (ECR) on a triacetylcellulose film have been described to determine Vanadium (IV) ions in some real samples. The sensor based on complex formation between Vanadium (IV) ions and ECR in acidic media caused the color of the film to change from violet to blue along with the appearance of a strong peak appears at 595 nm. At the optimal conditions, the calibration curve showed a linear range of 9.90×10(-7)-8.25×10(-5)mol L(-1). Vanadium (IV) ions can be detected with a detection limit of 1.03×10(-7)mol L(-1) within 15 min depending on its concentration. Also, the working range was improved by using PC-ANN algorithm. The sensor could regenerate with dilute acetic acid solution and could be completely reversible. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for determining V (IV) ions in environmental water and tea leaves. PMID:26142655

  9. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    PubMed

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials. PMID:27427893

  10. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    PubMed

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials.

  11. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  12. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  13. Colloidal behavior of actinides in an oligotrophic lake

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandini, K.A.; Penrose, W.R.; Findlay, M.W. ); Harvey, B.R.; Lovett, M.B. )

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the speciation of low levels of actinides from fallout and from local sources in freshwater systems is important if the authors are to predict their distributions in the environment. Since these materials make excellent tracers for determining sedimentation rates and other environmental parameters, it is important to determine their physical and chemical properties in relatively pristine systems. Reported here are the results of actinide analyses in an artificial, oligotrophic lake in northwest Wales, United Kingdom, which is used as a source of cooling water for a nuclear power plant. The concentrations of the actinide elements plutonium, americium, thorium, and curium, and their distributions among different colloidal sizes were determined. The majority of the actinides in the (nominal 100,000 MW) or 100-nm pore sizes; the actinides appeared to be bound reversibly to colloidal material of unknown composition. The two environmentally stable oxidation states of plutonium, IV and V, could be separated by ultrafiltration. These results indicate that submicron colloidal material can dominate the aqueous properties of actinides.

  14. Ethyl thiosemicarbazide intercalated organophilic calcined hydrotalcite as a potential sorbent for the removal of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Jalajamony, S

    2013-04-01

    This work was conducted to determine the practicability of using a new adsorbent 4-ethyl thiosemicarbazide intercalated, organophilic calcined hydrotalcite (ETSC-OHTC) for the removal of uranium (U(VI)), and thorium (Th(IV)) from water and wastewater. The FTIR analysis helped in realizing the involvement of nitrogen and sulphur atoms of ETSC in binding the metal ions through complex formation. Parameters like adsorbent dosage, solution pH, initial metal ions concentration, contact time and ionic strength, that influence adsorption phenomenon, were studied. The optimum pH for maximum adsorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) was found to be in the range 4.0-6.0. The contact time required for reaching equilibrium was 4 hr. The pseudo second-order kinetic model was the best fit to represent the kinetic data. Analysis of the equilibrium adsorption data using Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips models showed that the Freundlich model was well suited to describe the metal ions adsorption. The K(F) values were 25.43 and 29.11 mg/g for U(VI) and Th(IV), respectively, at 30 degrees C. The adsorbent can be regenerated effectively from U(VI) and Th(IV) loaded ones using 0.01 mol/L HCl. The new adsorbent was quite stable for many cycles, without much reduction in its adsorption capacity towards the metals.

  15. Superabsorbing gel for actinide, lanthanide, and fission product decontamination

    DOEpatents

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Mertz, Carol J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides an aqueous gel composition for removing actinide ions, lanthanide ions, fission product ions, or a combination thereof from a porous surface contaminated therewith. The composition comprises a polymer mixture comprising a gel forming cross-linked polymer and a linear polymer. The linear polymer is present at a concentration that is less than the concentration of the cross-linked polymer. The polymer mixture is at least about 95% hydrated with an aqueous solution comprising about 0.1 to about 3 percent by weight (wt %) of a multi-dentate organic acid chelating agent, and about 0.02 to about 0.6 molar (M) carbonate salt, to form a gel. When applied to a porous surface contaminated with actinide ions, lanthanide ions, and/or other fission product ions, the aqueous gel absorbs contaminating ions from the surface.

  16. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  17. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  18. Two Dihydroxo-Bridged Plutonium(IV) Nitrate Dimers and Their Relevance to Trends in Tetravalent Ion Hydrolysis and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Knope, Karah E.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.

    2015-11-02

    We report the room temperature synthesis and structural characterization of a μ2-hydroxobridged PuIV dimer obtained from an acidic, nitric acid solution. The discrete Pu2(OH)2(NO3)6(H2O)4 moiety crystallized with two distinct crystal structures, (1) [Pu2(OH)2(NO3)6(H2O)4]2·11H2O and (2) Pu2(OH)2(NO3)6(H2O)4·2H2O, which differ primarily in the number of incorporated water molecules. High-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) data obtained from the mother liquor showed evidence of a correlation at 3.7(10) Å but only after concentration of the stock solution. This distance is consistent with the dihydroxo-bridged distance of 3.799(1) Å seen in the solid-state structure as well as with the known Pu-Pu distance in PuO2. The structural characterization of a dihydroxo-bridged Pu moiety is discussed in terms of its relevance to the underlying mechanisms of tetravalent-metal-ion condensation

  19. Extraction of DBP and MBP from actinides: application to the recovery of actinides from TBP-sodium carbonate scrub solutions. [Aralex process

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Mason, G.W.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.; Leonard, R.A.; Bernstein, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    A flowsheet for the recovery of actinides from TBP-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub waste solutions has been developed, based on batch extraction data, and tested, using laboratory scale counter-current extraction techniques. The process, called the ARALEX process, utilizes 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EHOH) to extract the TBP degradation products (HDBP and H/sub 2/MBP) from acidified Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub waste leaving the actinides in the aqueous phase. Dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acids are attached to the 2-EHOH molecules through hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds also diminish the ability of the HDBP and H/sub 2/MBP to complex actinides and thus all actinides remain in the aqueous raffinate. Dilute sodium hydroxide solutions can be used to back-extract the dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acid esters as their sodium salts. The 2-EHOH can then be recycled. After extraction of the acidified carbonate waste with 2-EHOH, the actinides may be readily extracted from the raffinate with DHDECMP or, in the case of tetra- and hexavalent actinides, with TBP. The ARALEX process is relatively simple and involves inexpensive and readily available chamicals. The ARALEX process can also be applied to other actinide waste streams which contain appreciable concentrations of polar organic compounds that interfere with conventional actinide ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction procedures. One such application is the removal of detergents from laundry or clean-up solutions contaminated with actinides.

  20. Actinide halide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1991-02-07

    A compound of the formula MX{sub n}L{sub m} wherein M = Th, Pu, Np,or Am thorium, X = a halide atom, n = 3 or 4, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is 3 or 4 for monodentate ligands or is 2 for bidentate ligands, where n + m = 7 or 8 for monodentate ligands or 5 or 6 for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX{sub n} wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  1. Autocatalytic formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex via scandium ion-promoted radical chain autoxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and tetraphenylborate.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-06-01

    A non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex, [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (TMC = 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane), was formed by oxidation of an iron(II) complex ([(TMC)Fe(II)](2+)) with dioxygen (O2) and tetraphenylborate (BPh4(-)) in the presence of scandium triflate (Sc(OTf)3) in acetonitrile at 298 K via autocatalytic radical chain reactions rather than by a direct O2 activation pathway. The autocatalytic radical chain reaction is initiated by scandium ion-promoted electron transfer from BPh4(-) to [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) to produce phenyl radical (Ph(•)). The chain propagation step is composed of the addition of O2 to Ph(•) and the reduction of the resulting phenylperoxyl radical (PhOO(•)) by scandium ion-promoted electron transfer from BPh4(-) to PhOO(•) to produce phenyl hydroperoxide (PhOOH), accompanied by regeneration of phenyl radical. PhOOH reacts with [(TMC)Fe(II)](2+) to yield phenol (PhOH) and [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+). Biphenyl (Ph-Ph) was formed via the radical chain autoxidation of BPh3 by O2. The induction period of the autocatalytic radical chain reactions was shortened by addition of a catalytic amount of [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+), whereas addition of a catalytic amount of ferrocene that can reduce [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) resulted in elongation of the induction period. Radical chain autoxidation of BPh4(-) by O2 also occurred in the presence of Sc(OTf)3 without [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+), initiating the autocatalytic oxidation of [(TMC)Fe(II)](2+) with O2 and BPh4(-) to yield [(TMC)Fe(IV)(O)](2+). Thus, the general view for formation of non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complexes via O2-binding iron species (e.g., Fe(III)(O2(•-))) without contribution of autocatalytic radical chain reactions should be viewed with caution.

  2. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  3. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  4. Actinide and metal toxicity to prospective bioremediation bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Christy E; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Forsythe, Jennifer H; Lack, Joseph G; Hersman, Larry E; Neu, Mary P

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria may be beneficial for alleviating actinide contaminant migration through processes such as bioaccumulation or metal reduction. However, sites with radioactive contamination often contain multiple additional contaminants, including metals and organic chelators. Bacteria-based bioremediation requires that the microorganism functions in the presence of the target contaminant, as well as other contaminants. Here, we evaluate the toxicity of actinides, metals and chelators to two different bacteria proposed for use in radionuclide bioremediation, Deinococcus radiodurans and Pseudomonas putida, and the toxicity of Pu(VI) to Shewanella putrefaciens. Growth of D. radiodurans was inhibited at metal concentrations ranging from 1.8 microM Cd(II) to 32 mM Fe(III). Growth of P. putida was inhibited at metal concentrations ranging from 50 microM Ni(II) to 240 mM Fe(III). Actinides inhibited growth at mM concentrations: chelated Pu(IV), U(VI) and Np(V) inhibit D. radiodurans growth at 5.2, 2.5 and 2.1 mM respectively. Chelated U(VI) inhibits P. putida growth at 1.7 mM, while 3.6 mM chelated Pu(IV) inhibits growth only slightly. Pu(VI) inhibits S. putrefaciens growth at 6 mM. These results indicate that actinide toxicity is primarily chemical (not radiological), and that radiation resistance does not ensure radionuclide tolerance. This study also shows that Pu is less toxic than U and that actinides are less toxic than other types of metals, which suggests that actinide toxicity will not impede bioremediation using naturally occurring bacteria.

  5. Selective extraction of trivalent actinides from lanthanides with dithiophosphinic acids and tributylphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.; Barrans, R.; Schroeder, N.; Wade, K.; Jones, M.; Smith, B.F.; Mills, J.; Howard, G.; Freiser, H.; Muralidharan, S.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of chemical systems have been developed to separate trivalent actinides from lanthanides based on the slightly stronger complexation of the trivalent actinides with ligands that contain soft donor atoms. The greater stability of the actinide complexes in these systems has often been attributed to a slightly greater covalent bonding component for the actinide ions relative to the lanthanide ions. The authors have investigated several synergistic extraction systems that use ligands with a combination of oxygen and sulfur donor atoms that achieve a good group separation of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides. For example, the combination of dicyclohexyldithiophosphinic acid and tributylphosphate has shown separation factors of up to 800 for americium over europium in a single extraction stage. Such systems could find application in advanced partitioning schemes for nuclear waste.

  6. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamain, C.; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Rivenet, M.; Grandjean, S.; Abraham, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am2(C2O4)3(H2O)3·xH2O, Th(C2O4)2·6H2O, M2+x[PuIV2-xPuIIIx(C2O4)5]·nH2O and M1-x[PuIII1-xPuIVx(C2O4)2·H2O]·nH2O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds.

  7. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    SciTech Connect

    Gillmann, Clarissa; Jäkel, Oliver; Schlampp, Ingmar; Karger, Christian P.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  8. Actinide Speciation and Solubility in a Salt Repository (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D.; Borkowski, M.; Richmann, M.; Lucchini, J.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J.

    2009-12-01

    The use of bedded salt deposits for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste continues to receive much attention in the United States and internationally. This is largely based on the highly successful Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transuranic waste repository that was opened in 1999 in Southeastern New Mexico. A bedded salt formation, such as the one in which the WIPP is located, has many advantages that make it an ideal geology for permanent disposal of nuclear waste. This includes well established mining techniques, self-sealing that lead to a naturally-induced geologic isolation, a relatively dry environment, and a favorable chemistry. Herein we report on recent progress in our investigations, as part of ongoing recertification effort for the operating WIPP repository, to establish the redox distribution and overall solubility of actinides in brine. The overall ranking of actinides, from the perspective of potential contribution to release from the WIPP, is: Pu ~ Am >>U > Th >> Np, Cm. Our recent research emphasis has centered on the redox chemistry of multivalent actinides (e.g., U, Pu and Np) with the use of oxidation-state-invariant analogs (Th and Nd) to establish the solubilities. Under a wide range of conditions investigated, the predominant oxidation states established are Pu(III) and Pu(IV) for plutonium, U(IV) and U(VI) for uranium, and Am (III) for americium. Reduction pathways for plutonium include reaction with organics, reaction with reduced iron, and bioreduction by halophiles under anaerobic conditions. Uranium(VI) can also be reduced to U(IV) by reduced iron and microbial processes. Solubility data for neodymium (+3 analog), Uranium (+6 analog) and thorium (+4 analog) in brine are also reported. These data extend our past understanding of WIPP-specific actinide chemistry and show the WIPP, and salt-based repositories in general, to be a robust repository design from the perspective of actinide containment and immobilization.

  9. Actinide behavior in a freshwater pond

    SciTech Connect

    Trabalka, J.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Scott, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    Long-term investigations of solution chemistry in an alkaline freshwater pond have revealed that actinide oxidation state behavior, particularly that of plutonium, is complex. The Pu(V,VI) fraction was predominant in solution, but it varied over the entire range reported from other natural aquatic environments, in this case, as a result of intrinsic biological and chemical cycles (redox and pH-dependent phenomena). A strong positive correlation between plutonium (Pu), but not uranium (U), and hydroxyl ion over the observation period, especially when both were known to be in higher oxidation states, was particularly notable. Coupled with other examples of divergent U and Pu behavior, this result suggests that Pu(V), or perhaps a mixture of Pu(V,VI), was the prevalent oxidation state in solution. Observations of trivalent actinide sorption behavior during an algal bloom, coupled with the association with a high-molecular weight (nominally 6000 to 10,000 mol wt) organic fraction in solution, indicate that solution-detritus cycling of organic carbon, in turn, may be the primary mechanism in amercium-curium (Am-Cm) cycling. Sorption by sedimentary materials appears to predominate over other factors controlling effective actinide solubility and may explain, at least partially, the absence of an expected strong positive correlation between carbonate and dissolved U. 49 references, 6 figures, 12 tables.

  10. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides.

    PubMed

    Allred, Benjamin E; Rupert, Peter B; Gauny, Stacey S; An, Dahlia D; Ralston, Corie Y; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin-transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein-ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications.

  11. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Benjamin E.; Rupert, Peter B.; Gauny, Stacey S.; An, Dahlia D.; Ralston, Corie Y.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin–transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein–ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications. PMID:26240330

  12. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides.

    PubMed

    Allred, Benjamin E; Rupert, Peter B; Gauny, Stacey S; An, Dahlia D; Ralston, Corie Y; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin-transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein-ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications. PMID:26240330

  13. Local structure in solid solutions of stabilised zirconia with actinide dioxides (UO{sub 2}, NpO{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Marcus; Somers, Joseph; Bouexiere, Daniel; Rothe, Joerg

    2011-04-15

    The local structure of (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y,Np)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions has been investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Samples were prepared by mixing reactive (Zr,Lu)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y)O{sub 2-x} precursor materials with the actinide oxide powders, respectively. Sintering at 1600 {sup o}C in Ar/H{sub 2} yields a fluorite structure with U(IV) and Np(IV). As typical for stabilised zirconia the metal-oxygen and metal-metal distances are characteristic for the different metal ions. The bond lengths increase with actinide concentration, whereas highest adaptation to the bulk stabilised zirconia structure was observed for U---O and Np---O bonds. The Zr---O bond shows only a slight increase from 2.14 A at 6 mol% actinide to 2.18 A at infinite dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. The short interatomic distance between Zr and the surrounding oxygen and metal atoms indicate a low relaxation of Zr with respect to the bulk structure, i.e. a strong Pauling behaviour. -- Graphical abstract: Metal-oxygen bond distances in (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions with different oxygen vacancy concentrations (Lu/Zr=1 and Lu/Zr=0.5). Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} EXAFS indicates high U and Np adaption to the bulk structure of stabilised zirconia. {yields} Zr---O bond length is 2.18 A at infinite Zr dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. {yields} Low relaxation (strong Pauling behaviour) of Zr explains its low solubility in UO{sub 2}.

  14. PROCESS OF PRODUCING ACTINIDE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-07-14

    The preparation of actinide metals in workable, coherent form is described. In general, the objects of the invention are achieved by heating a mixture of an oxide and a halide of an actinide metal such as uranium with an alkali metal on alkaline earth metal reducing agent in the presence of iodine.

  15. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-09-17

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen-donor solvents water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (DMPU) has been studied in solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and DMSO-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions, vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O═V-O(perp) bond angle is ca. 98°. In the DMPU-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space-demanding properties of the DMPU molecule leave no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group, which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O═V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 107°, and the mean V═O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and DMSO-solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in the cis position with a mean V═O bond distance of 1.6 Å and a O═V═O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen-donor ligands.

  16. Effect of oxidation state and ionic strength on sorption of actinides (Th, U, Np, Am) to geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2015-10-30

    The degree of conservatism in the estimated sorption partition coefficients (Kds) used in a performance assessment model is being evaluated based on a complementary batch and column method. The main focus of this work is to investigate the role of ionic strength, solution chemistry, and oxidation state (III-VI) in actinide sorption to dolomite rock. Based on redox conditions and solution chemistry expected at the WIPP, possible actinide species include Pu(III), Pu(IV), U(IV), U(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Am(III), and Th(IV).

  17. Actinide-specific sequestering agents and decontamination applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1981-04-07

    With the commercial development of nuclear reactors, the actinides have become very important industrial elements. A major concern of the nuclear industry is the biological hazard associated with nuclear fuels and their wastes. The acute chemical toxicity of tetravalent actinides, as exemplified by Th(IV), is similar to Cr(III) or Al(III). However, the acute toxicity of 239Pu(IV) is similar to strychnine, which is much more toxic than any of the non-radioactive metals such as mercury. Although the more radioactive isotopes of the transuranium elements are more acutely toxic by weight than plutonium, the acute toxicities of 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm are nearly identical in radiation dose, ~100 μCi/kg in rodents. Finally and thus, the extreme acute toxicity of 239Pu is attributed to its high specific activity of alpha emission.

  18. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Zwick, Bill D.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Clark, David L.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  19. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  20. Metal ion effect on the switch of mechanism from direct oxygen transfer to metal ion-coupled electron transfer in the sulfoxidation of thioanisoles by a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyun; Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-04-13

    The mechanism of sulfoxidation of thioaniosoles by a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex is switched from direct oxygen transfer to metal ion-coupled electron transfer by the presence of Sc(3+). The switch in the sulfoxidation mechanism is dependent on the one-electron oxidation potentials of thioanisoles. The rate of sulfoxidation is accelerated as much as 10(2)-fold by the addition of Sc(3+).

  1. Formation of higher chloride complexes of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) in water-stable room-temperature ionic liquid [BuMeIm][Tf2N].

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, Sergey I; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-02-01

    A UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopic study shows that in [BuMeIm][(CF3SO2)2N] hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquid solutions, [BuMeIm]2[AnCl6] complexes, where BuMeIm+ is 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium and An(IV) is Np(IV) or Pu(IV), have an octahedral An(IV) environment similar to that observed in solid complexes. Water has no influence on the absorption spectra of AnCl6(2-) complexes, indicating their stability to hydrolysis in ionic liquid. Adding [BuMeIm]Cl modifies the UV/vis/near-IR absorption spectra of An(IV) in the ionic liquid and causes solids to precipitate. The solid-state reflectance spectra of the precipitates reveal considerable differences from the corresponding An(IV) hexachloro complexes. A voltammetric study indicates that AnCl6(2-) complexes are electrochemically inert in [BuMeIm][(CF3SO2)2N] at the glassy carbon working electrode. By contrast, quasi-reversible electrochemical reduction An(IV)/An(III) and An(IV) oxidation are observed in ionic liquids in the presence of [BuMeIm]Cl. The oxidation wave of noncoordinated chloride ions interferes with the An(IV) oxidation waves. The spectroscopic and voltammetric data clearly indicate the formation of nonoctahedral actinide(IV) chloride complexes with a Cl-/An(IV) ratio exceeding 6/1 in [BuMeIm][(CF3SO2)2N] in excess chloride ions.

  2. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Ken; Martin, Leigh; Lumetta, Gregg

    2015-04-02

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of used nuclear fuel is the separation of transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. This separation is essential if actinide transmutation options are to be pursued in advanced fuel cycles, as lanthanides compete with actinides for neutrons in both thermal and fast reactors, thus limiting efficiency. The separation is difficult because the chemistry of Am3+ and Cm3+ is nearly identical to that of the trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). The prior literature teaches that two approaches offer the greatest probability of devising a successful group separation process based on aqueous processes: 1) the application of complexing agents containing ligand donor atoms that are softer than oxygen (N, S, Cl-) or 2) changing the oxidation state of Am to the IV, V, or VI state to increase the essential differences between Am and lanthanide chemistry (an approach utilized in the PUREX process to selectively remove Pu4+ and UO22+ from fission products). The latter approach offers the additional benefit of enabling a separation of Am from Cm, as Cm(III) is resistant to oxidation and so can easily be made to follow the lanthanides. The fundamental limitations of these approaches are that 1) the soft(er) donor atoms that interact more strongly with actinide cations than lanthanides form substantially weaker bonds than oxygen atoms, thus necessitating modification of extraction conditions for adequate phase transfer efficiency, 2) soft donor reagents have been seen to suffer slow phase transfer kinetics and hydro-/radiolytic stability limitations and 3) the upper oxidation states of Am are all moderately strong oxidants, hence of only transient stability in media representative of conventional aqueous separations systems. There are examples in the literature of both approaches having been described. However, it is not clear at present that any extant process is sufficiently robust for application at the scale

  3. Spectroscopic capture and reactivity of a low-spin cobalt(IV)-oxo complex stabilized by binding redox-inactive metal ions.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seungwoo; Pfaff, Florian F; Kwon, Eunji; Wang, Yong; Seo, Mi-Sook; Bill, Eckhard; Ray, Kallol; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-09-22

    High-valent cobalt-oxo intermediates are proposed as reactive intermediates in a number of cobalt-complex-mediated oxidation reactions. Herein we report the spectroscopic capture of low-spin (S=1/2) Co(IV)-oxo species in the presence of redox-inactive metal ions, such as Sc(3+), Ce(3+), Y(3+), and Zn(2+), and the investigation of their reactivity in C-H bond activation and sulfoxidation reactions. Theoretical calculations predict that the binding of Lewis acidic metal ions to the cobalt-oxo core increases the electrophilicity of the oxygen atom, resulting in the redox tautomerism of a highly unstable [(TAML)Co(III)(O˙)](2-) species to a more stable [(TAML)Co(IV)(O)(M(n+))] core. The present report supports the proposed role of the redox-inactive metal ions in facilitating the formation of high-valent metal-oxo cores as a necessary step for oxygen evolution in chemistry and biology.

  4. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, Robert M; Patton, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  5. Advancing the scientific basis of trivalent actinide-lanthanide separations

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    2013-07-01

    For advanced fuel cycles designed to support transmutation of transplutonium actinides, several options have been demonstrated for process-scale aqueous separations for U, Np, Pu management and for partitioning of trivalent actinides and fission product lanthanides away from other fission products. The more difficult mutual separation of Am/Cm from La-Tb remains the subject of considerable fundamental and applied research. The chemical separations literature teaches that the most productive alternatives to pursue are those based on ligand donor atoms less electronegative than O, specifically N- and S-containing complexants and chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). These 'soft-donor' atoms have exhibited usable selectivity in their bonding interactions with trivalent actinides relative to lanthanides. In this report, selected features of soft donor reagent design, characterization and application development will be discussed. The roles of thiocyanate, aminopoly-carboxylic acids and lactate in separation processes are detailed. (authors)

  6. Prediction of dissolved actinide concentrations in concentrated electrolyte solutions: a conceptual model and model results for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.; Moore, R.C.; Bynum, R.V.

    1996-10-25

    The conceptual model for WIPP dissolved concentrations is a description of the complex natural and artificial chemical conditions expected to influence dissolved actinide concentrations in the repository. By a set of physical and chemical assumptions regarding chemical kinetics, sorption substrates, and waste-brine interactions, the system was simplified to be amenable to mathematical description. The analysis indicated that an equilibrium thermodynamic model for describing actinide solubilities in brines would be tractable and scientifically supportable. This paper summarizes the conceptualization and modeling approach and the computational results as used in the WIPP application for certification of compliance with relevant regulations for nuclear waste repositories. The WIPP site contains complex natural brines ranging from sea water to 10x more concentrated than sea water. Data bases for predicting solubility of Am(III) (as well as Pu(III) and Nd(III)), Th(IV), and Np(V) in these brines under potential repository conditions have been developed, focusing on chemical interactions with Na, K, Mg, Cl, SO{sub 4}, and CO{sub 3} ions, and the organic acid anions acetate, citrate, EDTA, and oxalate. The laboratory and modeling effort augmented the Harvie et al. parameterization of the Pitzer activity coefficient model so that it could be applied to the actinides and oxidation states important to the WIPP system.

  7. Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.

    2007-07-01

    Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

  8. Evaluating ion exchange resin efficiency and oxidative capacity for the separation of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously described methods to separate dissolved U(IV) from dissolved U(VI) under acidic anoxic conditions prior to laboratory analysis were ineffective with materials currently available commercially. Three strong anion exchange resins were examined for their efficiency in separating, recovering, and preserving both redox states during separation. Results Under oxic conditions, recovery of U(VI) from three exchange resins (Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 Poly-Prep® prefilled columns, Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 powder, and Dowex® 1x8 powder) ranged from 72% to 100% depending on the dosed mass, eluent volume, and resin selected. Dowex® 1x8 resin was the only resin found to provide 100% recovery of U(VI) with fewer than 5 bed volumes of eluent. Under anoxic conditions, all three resins oxidized U(IV) in aqueous solutions with relatively low U(IV) concentrations (<3x10-6 M). Resin-induced oxidation was observed visually using a leuco dye, safranin-o. Oxidants associated with the resin were irreversibly reduced by the addition of Ti(III). After anoxic resin pre-treatment, a series of U(IV)/U(VI) mixtures at micro-molar levels were prepared and separated using the Dowex® 1x8 resin with 100% recovery of both U(IV) and U(VI) with no resin-induced changes in oxidation state. Conclusions Currently available anion exchange resins with apparently identical physical properties were found to have significantly different recoveries for hexavalent uranium at micro-molar concentrations. A novel qualitative technique was developed to visually assess oxidative capacities of anion exchange resins under acidic anoxic conditions. A protocol was developed for pre-treatment and use of currently available anion exchange resins to achieve quantitative separation of U(IV) and U(VI) in aqueous solutions with low U(IV) concentrations. This method can be applied to future work to quantitatively assess dissolved U(IV) and U(VI) concentrations in both laboratory and field samples. PMID:23363052

  9. Recovery and chemical purification of actinides at JRC, Karlsruhe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokelund, H.; Apostolidis, C.; Glatz, J.-P.

    1989-07-01

    The application of actinide elements in research and in technology is many times subject to rather stringent purity requirements; often a nuclear grade quality is specified. The additional possible demand for a high isotopic purity is a special feature in the handling of these elements. The amount of actinide elements contained in or adhering to materials declared as waste should be low for safety reasons and out of economic considerations. The release of transuranium elements to the environment must be kept negligible. For these and for other reasons a keen interest in the separation of actinides from various materials exists, either for a re-use through recycling, or for their safe confinement in waste packages. This paper gives a short review of the separation methods used for recovery and purification of actinide elements over the past years in the European Institute for Transuranium Elements. The methods described here involve procedures based on precipitation, ion exchange or solvent extraction; often used in a combination. The extraction methods were preferably applied in a Chromatographie column mode. The actinide elements purified and/or separated from each other by the above methods include uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, and californium. For the various elements the work was undertaken with different aims, ranging from reprocessing and fabrication of nuclear fuels on a kilogramme scale, over the procurement of alpha-free waste, to the preparation of neutron sources of milligramme size.

  10. Kinetic approach to evaluate the energy and entropy of activation for the exchange of alkaline earth metal ions on tin(IV) tungstate cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Khan, A.A.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations has been applied to study the reaction kinetics on the surface of tin(IV) tungstate for the Mg(II)-H(I), Ca(II)-H(I), Sr(II)-H(I) and Ba(II)-H(I) exchanges under the conditions favouring a particle diffusion phenomenon. On the basis of these studies the various physical parameters such as the effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated which give some informations regarding the mechanism of ion-exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  11. The extraction of actinides from nitric acid solutions with diamides of dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapka, Joseph L.; Paulenova, Alena; Alyapyshev, Mikhail Yu; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott

    2010-03-01

    Diamides of dipicolinic acid (N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-dipicolinamide, EtTDPA) were synthesized and evaluated for their extraction capability for actinides. In this work the extractions of neptunium(V), protactinium(V), and thorium(IV) with EtTDPA in a polar fluorinated diluent from nitric acid were investigated. EtTDPA shows a high affinity for Th(IV) even at millimolar concentrations. Np(V) and Pa(V) are both reasonably extractable with EtTDPA; however, near saturated solutions are required to achieve appreciable distribution ratios. A comparison with previously published actinide extraction data is given.

  12. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport.

  13. Evaluation of actinide biosorption by microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional methods for removing metals from aqueous solutions include chemical precipitation, chemical oxidation or reduction, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrochemical treatment and evaporation. The removal of radionuclides from aqueous waste streams has largely relied on ion exchange methods which can be prohibitively costly given increasingly stringent regulatory effluent limits. The use of microbial cells as biosorbants for heavy metals offers a potential alternative to existing methods for decontamination or recovery of heavy metals from a variety of industrial waste streams and contaminated ground waters. The toxicity and the extreme and variable conditions present in many radionuclide containing waste streams may preclude the use of living microorganisms and favor the use of non-living biomass for the removal of actinides from these waste streams. In the work presented here, we have examined the biosorption of uranium by non-living, non-metabolizing microbial biomass thus avoiding the problems associated with living systems. We are investigating biosorption with the long term goal of developing microbial technologies for the remediation of actinides.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV) Arsenophosphate: Its Analytical Applications as Pb(II) Ion-Selective Membrane Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asif Ali; Habiba, Umme; Khan, Anish

    2009-01-01

    Poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV) arsenophosphate is a newly synthesized nanocomposite material and has been characterized on the basis of its chemical composition, ion exchange capacity, TGA-DTA, FTIR, X-RAY, SEM, and TEM studies. On the basis of distribution studies, the exchanger was found to be highly selective for lead that is an environmental pollutant. For the detection of lead in water a heterogeneous precipitate based ion-selective membrane electrode was developed by means of this composite cation exchanger as electroactive material. The membrane electrode is mechanically stable, with a quick response time, and can be operated over a wide pH range. The selectivity coefficients were determined by mixed solution method and revealed that the electrode is sensitive for Pb(II) in presence of interfering cations. The practical utility of this membrane electrode has been established by employing it as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Pb(II). PMID:20140082

  15. Environmental research on actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  16. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements (C)

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Baker; C. A. McGrath

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from “minor” actinides that currently have poorly known (n,g) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  17. Complexation of actinides with derivatives of oxydiaceticacid

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2006-01-04

    Complexation of Np(V), U(VI) and Nd(III) with dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DMOGA) and tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA) was studied in comparison with the complexation with oxydiacetic acid (ODA). Stability constants and enthalpy of complexation were determined by potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters, in conjunction with structural information of solid compounds, indicate that DMOGA and TMOGA form tridentate complexes with the ether-oxygen participating in bonding with actinide/lanthanide ions. The trends in the stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation are discussed in terms of the difference in the hydration of the amide groups and carboxylate groups and the difference in the charge density of the metal ions.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and ion-exchange properties of a new and novel 'organic-inorganic' hybrid cation-exchanger: Nylon-6,6, Zr(IV) phosphate.

    PubMed

    Inamuddin; Khan, Shakeel Ahmad; Siddiqui, Weqar Ahmad; Khan, Asif Ali

    2007-02-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials enable the integration of useful organic and inorganic characteristics within a single molecular-scale composite. Unique ion-exchange properties of these types of materials have been observed, and many others can be envisioned for this promising class of materials. In this paper, we describe the ion-exchange and physico-chemical properties of one family of self-assembling organic-inorganic hybrid based on nylon-6,6, framework with Zr(IV) phosphate an inorganic ion-exchanger. The physico-chemical properties of this hybrid material were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), CHN elemental analysis, ICP-MS, UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, TGA-DTA and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. Ion-exchange capacity (IEC), thermal stability and distribution behavior, etc. were also carried out to understand the cation-exchange behavior of the material. On the basis of distribution studies, the material was found to be highly selective for Hg(II), a highly toxic environmental pollutant. Its selectivity was examined by achieving some important binary separations like Hg(II)-Mg(II), Hg(II)-Zn(II), Hg(II)-Fe(III), Hg(II)-Bi(III), etc. Thus, the relatively new field of "organic-inorganic" hybrids offers a variety of exciting technological opportunities to decrease the environmental pollution.

  19. Research in actinide chemistry. Final report, March 1, 1993--February 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G R

    1997-01-01

    The present three-year grant period has been a fruitful one for the laboratory as research entered some new areas while continuing in others in which the group has been successful. As in past grant periods, the principal focus has been on complexation of actinide elements with inorganic and organic ligands. The ligands to study have been chosen for their value (known or potential) in actinide separations or for their potential role in environmental behavior of the actinides. Since the radioactivity of some actinides limits the variety of techniques which can be used in their study, we have used {open_quotes}oxidation state analogs{close_quotes}. These analogs have the same oxidation state and very similar chemical behavior but are stable or very long-lived. Also, the analogs are chosen for their redox stability to avoid uncertainties in interpretation of systems in which several oxidations may coexist (e.g., in the case of Pu). Examples of such analogs which we have used are: Nd(III), Eu(III) for Pu(III), Am(III), Cm(III); Th(IV) for U(IV), Pu(IV); NpO{sub 2}{sup +} for PuO{sub 2}{sup +}; UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. These analogs have allowed use of techniques which can increase significantly our understanding of actinide complexation.

  20. Chemical Speciation of Americium, Curium and Selected Tetravalent Actinides in High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.

    2005-06-01

    Large volumes of high-level waste (HLW) currently stored in tanks at DOE sites contain both sludges and supernatants. The sludges are composed of insoluble precipitates of actinides, radioactive fission products, and nonradioactive components. The supernatants are alkaline carbonate solutions, which can contain soluble actinides, fission products, metal ions, and high concentrations of major electrolytes including sodium hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, carbonate, aluminate, sulfate, and organic complexants. The organic complexants include several compounds that can form strong aqueous complexes with actinide species and fission products including ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA), citrate, glycolate, gluconate, and degradation products, formate and oxalate.

  1. Chemical Speciation of Americium, Curium and Selected Tetravalent Actinides in High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.

    2006-06-01

    Large volumes of high-level waste (HLW) currently stored in tanks at DOE sites contain both sludges and supernatants. The sludges are composed of insoluble precipitates of actinides, radioactive fission products, and nonradioactive components. The supernatants are alkaline carbonate solutions, which can contain soluble actinides, fission products, metal ions, and high concentrations of major electrolytes including sodium hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, carbonate, aluminate, sulfate, and organic complexants. The organic complexants include several compounds that can form strong aqueous complexes with actinide species and fission products including ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA), citrate, glycolate, gluconate, and degradation products, formate and oxalate.

  2. A Thermodynamic Model for Acetate, Lactate, and Oxalate Complexation with Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V), and U(VI) Valid to High Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bynaum, R.V.; Free, S.J.; Moore, R.C.

    1999-01-15

    The organic ligands acetate, lactate, oxalate and EDTA have been identified as components of wastes targeted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in Southeastern New Mexico. The presence of these ligands is of concern because complexation of the actinides with the ligands may increase dissolved actinide concentrations and impact chemical retardation during transport. The current work considers the complexation of Am(III), Th (IV), Np(V), and U(W) with two of the organic ligands, acetate and lactate, in NaCl media from dilute through high concentration. A thermodynamic model for actinide complexation with the organic ligands has been developed based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism and the Harvie-Moller-Weare, Felmy-Weare database for describing brine evaporite systems. The model was parameterized using first apparent stability constant data from the literature. Because of complexation of other metal ions (Fe, Mg, Ni, Pb, etc.) present in the WIPP disposal room with the organic ligands, preliminary results from model calculations indicate the organic ligands do not significantly increase dissolved actinide concentrations.

  3. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  4. Magnetic exchange coupling in actinide-containing molecules.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Harris, T David; Kozimor, Stosh A; Bartlett, Bart M; Long, Jeffrey R

    2009-04-20

    Recent progress in the assembly of actinide-containing coordination clusters has generated systems in which the first glimpses of magnetic exchange coupling can be recognized. Such systems are of interest owing to the prospects for involving 5f electrons in stronger magnetic exchange than has been observed for electrons in the more contracted 4f orbitals of the lanthanide elements. Here, we survey the actinide-containing molecules thought to exhibit magnetic exchange interactions, including multiuranium, uranium-lanthanide, uranium-transition metal, and uranium-radical species. Interpretation of the magnetic susceptibility data for compounds of this type is complicated by the combination of spin-orbit coupling and ligand-field effects arising for actinide ions. Nevertheless, for systems where analogues featuring diamagnetic replacement components for the non-actinide spin centers can be synthesized, a data subtraction approach can be utilized to probe the presence of exchange coupling. In addition, methods have been developed for employing the resulting data to estimate lower and upper bounds for the exchange constant. Emphasis is placed on evaluation of the linear clusters (cyclam)M[(mu-Cl)U(Me(2)Pz)(4)](2) (M = Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane; Me(2)Pz(-) = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolate), for which strong ferromagnetic exchange with 15 cm(-1) < or = J < or = 48 cm(-1) is observed for the Co(II)-containing species. Owing to the modular synthetic approach employed, this system in particular offers numerous opportunities for adjusting the strength of the magnetic exchange coupling and the total number of unpaired electrons. To this end, the prospects of such modularity are discussed through the lens of several new related clusters. Ultimately, it is hoped that this research will be of utility in the development of electronic structure models that successfully describe the magnetic behavior of actinide compounds and will perhaps even lead to new

  5. Selective recognition of uranyl ions from bulk of thorium(iv) and lanthanide(iii) ions by tetraalkyl urea: a combined experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Vats, Bal Govind; Das, Debasish; Sadhu, Biswajit; Kannan, S; Pius, I C; Noronha, D M; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-06-21

    The selective separation of uranyl ions from an aqueous solution is one of the most important criteria for sustainable nuclear energy production. We report herein a known, but unexplored extractant, tetraalkyl urea, which shows supreme selectivity for uranium in the presence of interfering thorium and other lanthanide ions from a nitric acid medium. The structural characterization of the uranyl complex (UO2X2·2L, where X = NO3(-), Cl(-) and Br(-)) by IR, NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction provides insight into the strong interaction between the uranyl ion and the ligand. The origin of this supreme selectivity for uranyl ions is further supported by electronic structure calculations. Uranyl binding with the extractant is thermodynamically more favourable when compared to thorium and the selectivity is achieved through a combination of electronic and steric effects. PMID:27241102

  6. Selective recognition of uranyl ions from bulk of thorium(iv) and lanthanide(iii) ions by tetraalkyl urea: a combined experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Vats, Bal Govind; Das, Debasish; Sadhu, Biswajit; Kannan, S; Pius, I C; Noronha, D M; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-06-21

    The selective separation of uranyl ions from an aqueous solution is one of the most important criteria for sustainable nuclear energy production. We report herein a known, but unexplored extractant, tetraalkyl urea, which shows supreme selectivity for uranium in the presence of interfering thorium and other lanthanide ions from a nitric acid medium. The structural characterization of the uranyl complex (UO2X2·2L, where X = NO3(-), Cl(-) and Br(-)) by IR, NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction provides insight into the strong interaction between the uranyl ion and the ligand. The origin of this supreme selectivity for uranyl ions is further supported by electronic structure calculations. Uranyl binding with the extractant is thermodynamically more favourable when compared to thorium and the selectivity is achieved through a combination of electronic and steric effects.

  7. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  8. Plasma mass filtering for separation of actinides from lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-06-01

    Separating lanthanides from actinides is a key process in reprocessing nuclear spent fuel. Plasma mass filters, which operate on dissociated elements, offer conceptual advantages for such a task as compared with conventional chemical methods. The capabilities of a specific plasma mass filter concept, called the magnetic centrifugal mass filter, are analyzed within this particular context. Numerical simulations indicate separation of americium ions from a mixture of lanthanides ions for plasma densities of the order of 1012 cm-3, and ion temperatures of about 10 eV. In light of collision considerations, separating small fractions of heavy elements from a larger volume of lighter ones is shown to enhance the separation capabilities.

  9. I-V and DLTS study of generation and annihilation of deep-level defects in an oxygen-ion irradiated bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, K. V.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ravindra, M.; Damle, R.

    A commercial bipolar junction transistor (2N 2219A, npn) irradiated with 84 MeV O6+-ions with fluence of the order of 1013 ions cm-2 is studied for radiation-induced gain degradation and deep-level defects or recombination centers. I-V measurements are made to study the gain degradation as a function of ion fluence. Properties such as activation energy, trap concentration and capture cross section of deep levels are studied by deep-level transient spectroscopy. Minority carrier trap energy levels with energies ranging from EC -0.17 eV to EC -0.55 eV are observed in the base-collector junction of the transistor. Majority carrier defect levels are also observed with energies ranging from EV +0.26 eV to EV +0.44 eV. The irradiated device is subjected to isothermal and isochronal annealing. The defects are seen to anneal above 250 °C. The defects generated in the base region of the transistor by displacement damage appear to be responsible for an increase in base current through Shockley-Read-Hall or multi-phonon recombination and consequent transistor gain degradation.

  10. Chemiluminescence of the reaction system Ce(IV)-non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs containing europium(III) ions and its application to the determination of naproxen in pharmaceutical preparations and urine.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata

    2011-11-01

    The chemiluminescence (CL) of oxidation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by Ce(IV) ions, was recorded in the presence and absence europium(III) ions, in solution of pH ~ 4 of solution. Kinetic curves and CL emission spectra of the all studied systems were discussed. CL of measurable intensity was observed in the Ce(IV)-NP-Eu(III) reaction system only in acidic solutions. The CL spectrum rcegistered for this system shows emission bands, typical of Eu(III) ions, with maximum at λ ~ 600 nm. The chemiluminescent method, based on Eu(III) emission in reaction system of NP-Ce(IV)-Eu(III) in acid solution was therefore used for the determination of naproxen in mixture of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  11. Improved Actinide Neutron Capture Cross Sections Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Collon, P.; Paul, M.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2014-09-01

    The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are developing a technique to inject solid material into the ECR with laser ablation. With laser ablation, we can better control material injection and potentially increase efficiency in the ECR, thus creating less contamination in the source and reducing cross talk. I will present work on the laser ablation system and preliminary results from our AMS measurements. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are

  12. Nuclear waste forms for actinides

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    1999-01-01

    The disposition of actinides, most recently 239Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons, requires effective containment of waste generated by the nuclear fuel cycle. Because actinides (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np) are long-lived, they have a major impact on risk assessments of geologic repositories. Thus, demonstrable, long-term chemical and mechanical durability are essential properties of waste forms for the immobilization of actinides. Mineralogic and geologic studies provide excellent candidate phases for immobilization and a unique database that cannot be duplicated by a purely materials science approach. The “mineralogic approach” is illustrated by a discussion of zircon as a phase for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium. PMID:10097054

  13. Electron affinities for rare gases and some actinides from local-spin-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Wrinn, M.C.; Whitehead, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The negative ions of the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and some actinides (Pu, Am, Bk, Cf, and Es) have been calculated self-consistently by the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional theory with self-interaction correction and correlation. The electron affinities were obtained as the differences between the statistical total energies of the negative ions and neutral atoms; the electron affinities were positive around several millirydbergs. Consequently, the negative ions are predicted stable for the rare gases and actinides.

  14. MICROBIAL IMPACTS ON THE MIGRATION OF ACTINIDES -EFFECTS OF EXUDATES ON ADSORPTION-

    SciTech Connect

    OHNUKI,T.; OZAKI, T.; YOSHIDA, T.; NANKAWA, T.; KOZAI, N.; SAKAMOTO, F.; SUZUKI, Y.; FRANCIS, A.J.

    2006-10-18

    The interaction of actinides with microorganisms has been extensively studied to elucidate migration behavior of actinides in the environments. However, the mechanisms of interaction of microorganisms and actinides are poorly understood. They have been conducting basic science on microbial accumulation of actinides in order to elucidate the environmental behavior of actinides under relevant conditions. The effect of exudates from bacteria cells on the sorption of Eu(III) and Cm(III) by Chlorella vulgaris was studied by a batch method. The pH dependence of log K{sub d} of Eu(III) and Cm(III) for cellulose, major component of C. vulgaris cell, differed from that for C. vulgaris. On the contrary, log K{sub d} of Eu(III) and Cm(III) for cellulose in the solution containing exudates from C. vulgaris cells in a 0.5% NaCl solution showed a similar pH dependence to that by C. vulgaris. These results strongly suggested that exudates affect on the sorption of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on C. vulgaris. Effect of desferrioxamine B (DFO), one of exudates to chelate the insoluble Fe(III), on the sorption of Pu(IV), Th(IV) and Eu(III) by Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied. In the presence of DFO the sorption of Pu(IV), Th(IV) and Eu(III) on the cells increased with a decrease in pH from 7 to 4. In contrast, without DFO most of Pu(IV), Th(IV) and Eu(III) were precipitated from solution. Adsorption of DFO on the cells was negligible in the solution with and without metals. Adsorption of Pu(IV), Th(IV) and Eu(III) on P. fluorescens cells decreased in the order Eu(III) > Th(IV) > Pu(IV), which corresponds to increasing stability constant of the DFO complexes. These results indicate that Th(IV), Pu(IV) and Eu(III) dissociate when in contact with cells, after which the metals are adsorbed.

  15. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  16. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  17. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  18. Polymeric beads containing Cyanex 923 for actinide uptake from nitric acid medium: Studies with uranium and plutonium.

    PubMed

    Gujar, R B; Lakshmi, D Shanthana; Figoli, A; Mohapatra, P K

    2013-08-30

    Conventional phase inversion technique has been successfully applied for the preparation of the solid phase extractant (SPE), Cyanex 923 loaded polymer beads. Two types of polymer beads prepared by blending Polyetherether ketone with card (PEEKWC)/DMF with 5% Cyanex 923 (SPE-I, av bead size: 900μm) and 10% Cyanex 923(SPE-II, av. bead size: 1100μm) were evaluated for the uptake of actinide ions. The polymer beads were characterized by various physical methods such as thermal analysis, surface morphology analysis by SEM, EDAX techniques, etc. The polymer beads were used for the experiments involving the uptake of both U(VI) and Pu(IV) at tracer scale and U(VI) at milli molar concentrations from nitric acid feeds. The actinide ion uptake studies involved kinetics of metal ion sorption, adsorption isotherms, and column studies. The metal sorption capacities for U(VI) at 3M HNO3 were found to be 38.8±1.9mg and 54.5±1.7mg per g of SPE-I and SPE-II, respectively. The sorption isotherm analysis with Langmuir, D-R and Freundlisch isotherms indicated chemisorption monolayer mechanism. Column studies were also carried out using 4.5mL bed volume columns containing about 0.4 and 0.45g of SPE-I and SPE-II, respectively. The breakthrough profiles were obtained for U(VI) and the elution profiles were obtained using 1M Na2CO3 as the eluent.

  19. Termolecular ion-molecule reactions in Titan's atmosphere. IV. A search made at up to 1 micron in pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, Vincent G.; Wilson, Paul; McEwan, Murray J.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a study of ion-molecule reactions occurring in pure methane, acetylene, ethylene, ethane, propyne, propene, propane, and diacetylene at pressures up to 40 microns of pressure are reported. A variety of experimental methods are used: The standard double resonance in an ICR, for determination of the precursor ions and the modulated double resonance ejection in an ICR, for the determination of the daughter ions. The FA-SIFT technique was used for validation and examination of termolecular reactions with rate coefficients that are less than 10(-26) cm(6) s(-1). An extensive database of reaction kinetics already exists for many of these reactions. The main point of this study was the determination of the accuracy of this database and to search for any missing reactions and reaction channels that may have been omitted from earlier investigations. A specific objective of this work was to extend the study to the highest pressures possible to find out if there were any important termolecular reaction channels occurring. A new approach was used here. In the pure hydrocarbon gases the mass spectra were followed as a function of the pressure changes of the gas. An initial guess was first made using the current literature as a source of the reaction kinetics that were expected. A model of the ion abundances was produced from the solution of the partial differential equations in terms of reaction rate coefficients and initial abundances. The experimental data was fitted to the model for all of the pressures by a least squares minimization to the reaction rate coefficients and initial abundances. The reaction rate coefficients obtained from the model were then compared to the literature values. Several new channels and reactions were discovered when the modeled fits were compared to the actual data. This is all explained in the text and the implications of these results are discussed for the Titan atmosphere.

  20. Accelerated heavy ions and the lens. IV. Biomicroscopic and cytopathological analyses of the lenses of mice irradiated with 600 MeV/amu sup 56 Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E. )

    1989-11-01

    The lenses of mice exposed to 600 MeV/amu iron ions were evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and cytopathological analyses. The doses ranged from 0.05 to 1.6 Gy, and the lenses were assessed at several intervals postirradiation. Cataract, the development of which is dependent on both time and dose, is significantly more advanced in all of the exposed mice when compared to the unirradiated controls. The great difference between the severity of the cataracts caused by 0.05 Gy (the lowest dose used) and those that developed spontaneously in the control animals is an indication that 0.05 Gy may far exceed the threshold dose for the production of cataracts by accelerated iron ions. Cytopathologically, a similar dose dependence was observed for a number of end points including micronucleation, interphase death, and meridional row disorganization. In addition the exposure to the 56Fe ions produced a long-term effect on the mitotic population and a pronounced focal loss of epithelial cytoarchitecture. The microscopic changes support the view that the mechanism of heavy-ion-induced cataractogenesis is the same as that for cataracts caused by low-LET radiation.

  1. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.

    1997-03-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs.

  2. Swedish-German actinide migration experiment at ASPO hard rock laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kienzler, B; Vejmelka, P; Römer, J; Fanghänel, E; Jansson, M; Eriksen, T E; Wikberg, P

    2003-03-01

    Within the scope of a bilateral cooperation between Svensk Kärnbränslehantering (SKB) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung (FZK-INE), an actinide migration experiment is currently being performed at the Aspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. This paper covers laboratory and in situ investigations on actinide migration in single-fractured granite core samples. For the in situ experiment, the CHEMLAB 2 probe developed by SKB was used. The experimental setup as well as the breakthrough of inert tracers and of the actinides Am, Np and Pu are presented. The breakthrough curves of inert tracers were analyzed to determine hydraulic properties of the fractured samples. Postmortem analyses of the solid samples were performed to characterize the flow path and the sorbed actinides. After cutting the cores, the abraded material was analyzed with respect to sorbed actinides. The slices were scanned optically to visualize the flow path. Effective volumes and inner surface areas were measured. In the experiments, only breakthrough of Np(V) was observed. In each experiment, the recovery of Np(V) was < or = 40%. Breakthrough of Am(III) and Pu(IV) as well as of Np(IV) was not observed.

  3. Separations of actinides, lanthanides and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ensor, Dale D.

    1995-01-01

    An organic extracting solution comprised of a bis(acylpyrazolone or a substituted bis(acylpyrazolone) and an extraction method useful for separating certain elements of the actinide series of the periodic table having a valence of four from one other, and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also useful for separating hexavalent actinides from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals.

  4. Organophosphorus reagents in actinide separations: Unique tools for production, cleanup and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K. L.

    2000-01-12

    Interactions of actinide ions with phosphate and organophosphorus reagents have figured prominently in nuclear science and technology, particularly in the hydrometallurgical processing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Actinide interactions with phosphorus-containing species impact all aspects from the stability of naturally occurring actinides in phosphate mineral phases through the application of the bismuth phosphate and PUREX processes for large-scale production of transuranic elements to the development of analytical separation and environment restoration processes based on new organophosphorus reagents. In this report, an overview of the unique role of organophosphorus compounds in actinide production, disposal, and environment restoration is presented. The broad utility of these reagents and their unique chemical properties is emphasized.

  5. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Separation of Uranium from Other Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of separating uranium from other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of an extraction and counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for used nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)) were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, the separation of uranium from plutonium in sc-CO2 modified with TBP was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, and the separation of uranium from neptunium was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid, oxalic acid, or sodium nitrite.

  6. Electron-transfer reactions of oxovanadium(IV) and dioxovanadium(V) ions with metal tris(polypyridine) complexes in aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Macartney, D.H.

    1986-06-18

    The kinetics of the oxidation of oxovanadium(IV), VO(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5//sup 2 +/, by RuL/sub 3//sup 3 +/ and NiL/sub 3//sup 3 +/ and the reduction of dioxovanadium(V), VO/sub 2/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 4//sup +/, by OsL/sub 3//sup 3 +/ (L is 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, or a substituted derivative) were studied in acidic aqueous media at 25/sup 0/C. The oxidations of CO/sup 2 +/ displayed an inverse rate dependence on acid concentration with a rate law of the form k/sub obsd/ = k/sub a/ + k/sub b/(H/sup +/)/sup -1/, while the rate constants for the reduction of VO/sub 2//sup +/ increased with (H/sup +/); k/sub obsd/ = k/sub c/ + k/sub d/(H/sup +/). The more reactive vanadium(IV) and -(V) species are the VO(OH)/sup +/ and VO(OH)/sup 2 +/ ions, respectively, and an application of the Marcus relationship to the cross-reaction data yields a self-exchange rate constant of approx.10/sup -3/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ for the VO(OH)/sup +/2+/ couple. The exchange rate constant is similar to the corresponding values derived from Marcus calculations for Fe/sup 2+/3+/(aq) and the isoelectronic TiOH/sup 2+/3+/(aq) couple.

  7. Enthalpies of formation of rare earths and actinide(III) hydroxides: Their acid-base relationships and estimation of their thermodynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, L.R.; Williams, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    This paper reviews the literature on rare earth(III) and actinide(III) hydroxide thermodynamics, in particular the determination of their enthalpies of formation at 25{degree}C. The hydroxide unit-cell volumes, lanthanide/actinide ion sizes, and solid-solution stability trends have been correlated with a generalized acid-base strength model for oxides to estimate properties for heterogeneous equilibria that are relevant to nuclear waste modeling and to characterization of potential actinide environmental interactions. Enthalpies of formation and solubility-product constants of actinide(III) hydroxides are estimated.

  8. Enthalpies of formation of rare earths and actinide(III) hydroxides: Their acid-base relationships and estimation of their thermodynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, L.R.; Williams, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on rare earth(III) and actinide(III) hydroxide thermodynamics, in particular the determination of their enthalpies of formation at 25{degree}C. The hydroxide unit-cell volumes, lanthanide/actinide ion sizes, and solid-solution stability trends have been correlated with a generalized acid-base strength model for oxides to estimate properties for heterogeneous equilibria that are relevant to nuclear waste modeling and to characterization of potential actinide environmental interactions. Enthalpies of formation and solubility-product constants of actinide(III) hydroxides are estimated.

  9. "Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes"

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2007-03-07

    We will present our recent studies on computational actinide chemistry of complexes which are not only interesting from the standpoint of actinide coordination chemistry but also of relevance to environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes. We will be discussing our recent collaborative efforts with Professor Heino Nitsche of LBNL whose research group has been actively carrying out experimental studies on these species. Computations of actinide complexes are also quintessential to our understanding of the complexes found in geochemical, biochemical environments and actinide chemistry relevant to advanced nuclear systems. In particular we have been studying uranyl, plutonyl, and Cm(III) complexes are in aqueous solution. These studies are made with a variety of relativistic methods such as coupled cluster methods, DFT, and complete active space multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by large-scale CI computations and relativistic CI (RCI) computations up to 60 million configurations. Our computational studies on actinide complexes were motivated by ongoing EXAFS studies of speciated complexes in geo and biochemical environments carried out by Prof Heino Nitsche's group at Berkeley, Dr. David Clark at Los Alamos and Dr. Gibson's work on small actinide molecules at ORNL. The hydrolysis reactions of urnayl, neputyl and plutonyl complexes have received considerable attention due to their geochemical and biochemical importance but the results of free energies in solution and the mechanism of deprotonation have been topic of considerable uncertainty. We have computed deprotonating and migration of one water molecule from the first solvation shell to the second shell in UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}NpO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup +}, and PuO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} complexes. Our computed Gibbs free energy(7.27 kcal/m) in solution for the first time agrees with the experiment (7.1 kcal

  10. The pentavalent actinide solution chemistry in the environment.

    PubMed

    Topin, Sylvain; Aupiais, Jean

    2016-03-01

    With regard to environmental monitoring of certain nuclear facilities, pentavalent actinides, in particular neptunium and plutonium, play a key role, as the chief soluble, mobile forms of actinides. In the past five years, investigations carried out by hyphenating capillary electrophoresis to ICP-MS (CE-ICP-MS) have allowed a number of hitherto unknown thermodynamic data to be determined for Np(V) and Pu(V) interactions with the chief environmentally abundant anions. For the first time, data were provided for Pu(V) interactions with carbonate, sulfate, oxalate, chloride, and nitrate ions, allowing the Np(V)/Pu(V) analogy to be verified experimentally. Knowledge of Np(V) chemistry, especially in carbonate, and sulfate media, was also refined. These CE-ICP-MS studies, combined with some earlier findings, have brought about a renewal in the knowledge of An(V) chemistry in solution. PMID:26808225

  11. Actinide solubility and spectroscopic speciation in alkaline Hanford waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, L.; Felmy, A.R.; Rai, D.

    1996-10-01

    Information on the solubility and the speciation of actinide elements, especially plutonium and neptunium, in alkaline solutions is of importance in the development of separation techniques for the Hanford tank HLW supernatant. In the present study, experimental data on the solubilities of plutonium in simulated Hanford tank solutions were analyzed with Pitzer`s specific ion-interaction approach, which is applicable in dilute to highly concentrated electrolyte solutions. In order to investigate the formation of actinide species in alkaline solutions with ligands (e.g., hydroxide, aluminate and carbonate), spectroscopic measurements of neptunium (V), as a chemical analog of plutonium (V), were conducted. Based on the solubility data and available information on both solid and aqueous species, a thermodynamic model was proposed. The applicability and limitations of this model are discussed.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and analytical application of nano-composite cation-exchange material, poly-o-toluidine Ce(IV) phosphate: Its application in making Cd(II) ion selective membrane electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif Ali; Akhtar, Tabassum

    2011-03-01

    An organic-inorganic composite, poly-o-toluidine Ce(IV) phosphate was chemically synthesized by mixing ortho-toluidine into the gel of Ce(IV) phosphate in different mixing volume ratios. Effect of eluant concentration, elution behavior and pH-titration studies were carried out to understand the ion-exchange capabilities. The physico-chemical properties of the material were determined using AAS, CHN elemental analysis, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, FTIR, SEM/EDX, TGA-DTA, TEM (Transmission electron microscopy), XRD and SEM studies. The distribution studies revealed that the cation-exchange material is highly selective for Cd(II). Due to selective nature of the cation-exchanger, ion selective membrane electrode was fabricated for the determination of Cd(ІІ) ions in solutions. The analytical utility of this electrode was established by employing it as an indicator electrode in electrometric titrations.

  13. Formation of neptunium(IV)-silica colloids at near-neutral and slightly alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Husar, Richard; Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Hübner, René; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Zänker, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The reducing conditions in a nuclear waste repository render neptunium tetravalent. Thus, Np is often assumed to be immobile in the subsurface. However, tetravalent actinides can also become mobile if they occur as colloids. We show that Np(IV) is able to form silica-rich colloids in solutions containing silicic acid at concentrations of both the regions above and below the "mononuclear wall" of silicic acid at 2 × 10(-3) M (where silicic acid is expected to start polymerization). These Np(IV)-silica colloids have a size of only very few nanometers and can reach significantly higher concentrations than Np(IV) oxyhydroxide colloids. They can be stable in the waterborne form over longer spans of time. In the Np(IV)-silica colloids, the actinide--oxygen--actinide bonds are increasingly replaced by actinide--oxygen--silicon bonds due to structural incorporation of Si. Possible implications of the formation of such colloids for environmental scenarios are discussed.

  14. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  15. Process for recovering actinide values

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Mason, George W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for rendering actinide values recoverable from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorous extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N,N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECAMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is preferably made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant is recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution.

  16. Actinide Recovery Method for Large Soil Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Nichols, S.

    1998-11-01

    A new Actinide Recovery Method has been developed by the Savannah River Site Central Laboratory to preconcentrate actinides in very large soil samples. Diphonix Resin(r) is used eliminate soil matrix interferences and preconcentrate actinides after soil leaching or soil fusion. A rapid microwave digestion technique is used to remove the actinides from the Diphonix Resin(r). After the resin digestion, the actinides are recovered in a small volume of nitric acid which can be easily loaded onto small extraction-chromatography columns, such as TEVA Resin(r), U-TEVA Resin(r) or TRU Resin(r) (Eichrom Industries). This method enables the application of small, selective extraction-columns to recover actinides from very large soil samples with high selectivity, consistent tracer recoveries and minimal liquid waste.

  17. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  18. Fall MRS 2003: Actinides Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J

    2003-11-24

    {lg_bullet} The focus was on fundamental actinide science and its role. {lg_bullet} History- none except the Nuclear Waste Management Symposia {lg_bullet} Joint Sessions- none but we are open to it in the future. {lg_bullet} Tutorials- none but we are open to it in the future. {lg_bullet} 3 days: 16 Invited talks; 36 Contributed Talks; 10 Posters

  19. Structure and Hydrolysis of the U(IV), U(V), and U(VI) Aqua Ions from Ab Initio Molecular Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Johnson, Donald F.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Schenter, Gregory K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-03-05

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at 300 K based on density functional theory have been used to study the hydration shell geometries, solvent dipole, and first hydrolysis of the Uranium(IV) (U{sup 4+}) and Uranyl(V) (UO{sub 2}{sup +}) ions in aqueous solution. The solvent dipole and first of hydrolysis of aqueous Uranium(VI) (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) has also been probed. The first shell of U{sup 4+} is coordinated by 8-9 water ligands with an average U-O distance of 2.42 {angstrom}. The average first shell coordination number and distance are in agreement with experimental estimates of 8-11 and 2.40-2.44 {angstrom} respectively. The simulated EXAFS spectra of U{sup 4+} matched well with recent experimental data. The first shell of UO{sub 2}{sup +} is coordinated by 5 water ligands in the equatorial plane, with the average U=O{sub ax} and U-O distances being 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.54 {angstrom} respectively. Overall, the hydration shell structure of UO{sub 2}{sup +} matches closely with that of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} except for small expansions in the average U=O{sub ax} and U-O distances. Each ion strongly polarizes their respective first shell water ligands. The computed acidity constant (pK{sub a}) of U{sup 4+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} are 0.93 and 4.95, in good agreement with the experimental values of 0.54 and 5.24 respectively. The predicted pK{sub a} of UO{sub 2}{sup +} is 8.5.

  20. Preparation of minor actinides targets or blankets by means of ionic exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Mokhtari, H.; Ramière, I.; Jobelin, I.

    2010-03-01

    The conversion of minor actinides to fuel starting materials for transmutation in a closed nuclear cycle is a big challenge for the next decades and the development of Gen(IV) nuclear systems. Conversion routes are numerous, but one needs to prove that they can be adapted to handle minor actinides. One of them is called the resin process and is particularly attractive because it stands for a "dustless" process as it produces microspheres of oxide or carbide after thermal treatment of the loaded resin. The study presented herein focuses on the experiments and tests which enable us to optimize the fixation of minor actinides onto ionic exchange resin and their carbonization into oxide type materials.

  1. Theoretical Studies of the Electronic Structure of the Compounds of the Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Li, Jun; Blaudeau, Jean-Philippe; Bursten, Bruce E.

    2006-02-02

    In this chapter, we will present an overview of the theoretical and computational developments that have increased our understanding of the electronic structure of actinide-containing molecules and ions. The application of modern electronic structure methodologies to actinide systems remains one of the great challenges in quantum chemistry; indeed, as will be discussed below, there is no other portion of the periodic table that leads to the confluence of complexity with respect to the calculation of ground- and excited-state energies, bonding descriptions, and molecular properties. But there is also no place in the periodic table in which effective computational modeling of electronic structure can be more useful. The difficulties in creating, isolating, and handling many of the actinide elements provide an opportunity for computational chemistry to be an unusually important partner in developing the chemistry of these elements. The importance of actinide electronic structure begins with the earliest studies of uranium chemistry and predates the discovery of quantum mechanics. The fluorescence of uranyl compounds was observed as early as 1833 (Jørgensen and Reisfeld, 1983), a presage of the development of actinometry as a tool for measuring photochemical quantum yields. Interest in nuclear fuels has stimulated tremendous interest in understanding the properties, including electronic properties, of small actinide-containing molecules and ions, especially the oxides and halides of uranium and plutonium. The synthesis of uranocene in 1968 (Streitwieser and Mu¨ ller-Westerhoff, 1968) led to the flurry of activity in the organometallic chemistry of the actinides that continues today. Actinide organometallics (or organoactinides) are nearly always molecular systems and are often volatile, which makes them amenable to an arsenal of experimental probes of molecular and electronic structure (Marks and Fischer, 1979). Theoretical and computational studies of the electronic

  2. Sensitivity of Solvation Environment to Oxidation State and Position in the Early Actinide Period.

    PubMed

    Clark, Aurora E; Samuels, Alex; Wisuri, Katy; Landstrom, Sarah; Saul, Tessa

    2015-07-01

    The aqueous solvation of U-Pu in the III-VI oxidation states has been examined using density functional theory and hydrated cluster models of the form An(H2O)30(4+/3+) and AnO2(H2O)30(2+/+) embedded within a polarizable continuum model to approximate the effect of bulk water. The structural features are compared to available data from extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Then, using a multiple-scattering approach, the X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) have been simulated and compared to experiment. These structural data are complemented by a detailed thermodynamic analysis using a recently benchmarked protocol. The structural, spectroscopic, and thermodynamic information has been used to assign the primary solvation environments in water, with an emphasis upon understanding how oxidation state and position in the period modifies the hydration number and equilibrium between different solvation shell environments. Tetravalent U is proposed to exist in equilibrium between the 8- and 9-coordinate species. Moving to the right of the period, Np(IV) and Pu(IV) exist solely as the octa-aquo species. Reduction to the trivalent ions leads to thermodynamic favorability for this solvation environment, whose features reproduce the XANES spectra. The actinyl dications (AnO2(2+)) of U and Np have a preferred environment in the equatorial plane consisting of 5 solvating waters; however, changes to the ionic radius and electronic structure at Pu leads to an equilibrium between the 4- and 5-coordinate species for PuO2(2+). Reduction of the dications to form the monocations generally leads to a preference for the 4-coordinate primary solvation shell, with an equilibrium existing for uranyl, while the neptunyl and plutonyl species exist solely as AnO2(H2O)4(+). These data provide accurate thermodynamic information for several rare species and the combined thermodynamic, structural, and spectroscopic approach reveals trends in hydration behavior across actinide oxidation

  3. Synthesis of Ge1-xSnx alloys by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting: Towards a group IV direct bandgap material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Smillie, Lachlan A.; Akey, Austin J.; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    The germanium-tin (Ge1-xSnx) material system is expected to be a direct bandgap group IV semiconductor at a Sn content of 6.5 - 11 at . % . Such Sn concentrations can be realized by non-equilibrium deposition techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy or chemical vapour deposition. In this report, the combination of ion implantation and pulsed laser melting is demonstrated to be an alternative promising method to produce a highly Sn concentrated alloy with a good crystal quality. The structural properties of the alloys such as soluble Sn concentration, strain distribution, and crystal quality have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, x ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that it is possible to produce a high quality alloy with up to 6.2 at . % Sn . The optical properties and electronic band structure have been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The introduction of substitutional Sn into Ge is shown to either induce a splitting between light and heavy hole subbands or lower the conduction band at the Γ valley. Limitations and possible solutions to introducing higher Sn content into Ge that is sufficient for a direct bandgap transition are also discussed.

  4. Group Hexavalent Actinide Separations: A New Approach to Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling

    DOE PAGES

    Burns, Jonathan D.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2016-08-17

    Hexavalent Np, Pu, and Am individually, and as a group, have all been cocrystallized with UO2(NO3)2∙ 6H2O, constituting the first demonstration of an An(VI) group cocrystalliza- tion. The hexavalent dioxo cations of Np, Pu, and Am cocrystallize with UO2(NO3)2∙ 6H2O in near proportion with a simple reduction in temperature, while the lower valence states, An(III) and An(IV), are only slightly removed from solution. A separation of An(VI) species from An(III) ions by crystallization has been demonstrated, with an observed separation factor of 14. Separation of An(VI) species from key fission products, 95Zr, 95Nb, 137Cs, and 144Ce, has also been demonstratedmore » by crystallization, with separation factors ranging from 6.5 to 71 in the absence of Am(VI), while in the presence of Am(VI), the separation factors were reduced to 0.99 7.7. One interesting observation is that Am(VI) shows increased stability in the cocrystallized form, with no reduction observed after 13 days, as opposed to in solution, in which >50% is reduced after only 10 days. The ability to cocrystallize and stabilize hexavalent actinides from solution, especially Am(VI), introduces a new separations approach that can be applied to closing the nuclear fuel cycle.« less

  5. Group Hexavalent Actinide Separations: A New Approach to Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan D; Moyer, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Hexavalent Np, Pu, and Am individually, and as a group, have all been cocrystallized with UO2(NO3)2·6H2O, constituting the first demonstration of an An(VI) group cocrystallization. The hexavalent dioxo cations of Np, Pu, and Am cocrystallize with UO2(NO3)2·6H2O in near proportion with a simple reduction in temperature, while the lower valence states, An(III) and An(IV), are only slightly removed from solution. A separation of An(VI) species from An(III) ions by crystallization has been demonstrated, with an observed separation factor of 14. Separation of An(VI) species from key fission products, (95)Zr, (95)Nb, (137)Cs, and (144)Ce, has also been demonstrated by crystallization, with separation factors ranging from 6.5 to 71 in the absence of Am(VI), while in the presence of Am(VI), the separation factors were reduced to 0.99-7.7. One interesting observation is that Am(VI) shows increased stability in the cocrystallized form, with no reduction observed after 13 days, as opposed to in solution, in which >50% is reduced after only 10 days. The ability to cocrystallize and stabilize hexavalent actinides from solution, especially Am(VI), introduces a new separations approach that can be applied to closing the nuclear fuel cycle. PMID:27532485

  6. Stabilization of actinides and lanthanides in unusually high oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, P.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical environments can be chosen which stabilize actinides and lanthanides in unusually high or low oxidation states and in unusual coordination. In many cases, one can rationalize the observed species as resulting from strong charge/size influences provided by specific sites in host lattices (e.g., Tb(IV) in BaTbO/sub 3/ or Am(IV) in polytungstate anions). In other cases, the unusual species can be considered from an acid-base viewpoint (e.g., U(III) in AsF/sub 5//HF solution or Pu(VII) in Li/sub 5/PuO/sub 6/). In still other cases, an interplay of steric and redox effects can lead to interesting comparisons (e.g., instability of double fluoride salts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) relative to U, Np, and Am analogues). Generalized ways to rationalize compounds containing actinides and lanthanides in unusual valences (particularly high valences), including the above and numerous other examples, will form the focus of this paper. Recently developed methods for synthesizing high valent f-element fluorides using superoxidizers and superacids at low temperatures will also be described. 65 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Extraction of actinides from a chloride medium using pentaalkylpropanediamides

    SciTech Connect

    Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.

    1993-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical processes for the purification of plutonium for defense create waste solutions containing actinides, mainly americium, in chloride medium. Studies have been undertaken to study the extraction of actinides in a chloride medium (hydrochloric acid mixed with concentrated salts such as LiCl, CaCl{sub 2}, MgCl{sub 2}, KCl) using pentaalkylpropanediamides as extractants. Plutonium(IV) is very easily extracted, but Am(III) needs a salting-out agent such as LiCl. Back extraction of trivalent cations is easy in HCl < 5 {und M}. Plutonium(IV) and (VI) can be stripped by reduction either with ascorbic acid or hydroxylammonium salts in a weak-acid medium. Several diluents can be used (aromatic, chlorinated, or even aliphatic) with addition of decanol to prevent third-phase formation. In conclusion, diamides can be used for declassification of various wastes, they are potentially completely incinerable, and, as the synthesis has been optimized, they appear to be promising extractants.

  8. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series.

    PubMed

    Cary, Samantha K; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E; Stritzinger, Jared T; Green, Thomas D; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A; DePrince, A Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J; Van Cleve, Shelley M; House, Jane H; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A; Dixon, David A; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. The metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence. PMID:25880116

  9. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series.

    PubMed

    Cary, Samantha K; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E; Stritzinger, Jared T; Green, Thomas D; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A; DePrince, A Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J; Van Cleve, Shelley M; House, Jane H; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A; Dixon, David A; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-04-16

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. The metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence.

  10. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Green, Thomas D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; DePrince, A. Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J.; Van Cleve, Shelley M.; House, Jane H.; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A.; Dixon, David A.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2015-04-16

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. As a result, the metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence.

  11. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Green, Thomas D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; DePrince, A. Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J.; Van Cleve, Shelley M.; House, Jane H.; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A.; Dixon, David A.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. The metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence. PMID:25880116

  12. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    DOE PAGES

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Green, Thomas D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; et al

    2015-04-16

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, andmore » show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. As a result, the metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence.« less

  13. Novel complexing agents for the efficient separation of actinides and remediation of actinide-contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, P.; Kadkhodayan, B.

    1996-03-15

    Research into the coordination chemistry of transactinide elements should provide us with new fundamental knowledge about structure, geometry, and stability of these metal complexes. Our approach involves the design, synthesis, and characterization of {open_quotes}expanded porphyrin{close_quotes} macrocyclic ligands which coordinate the actinide metal cations with high thermodynamic affinity and kinetic stability. We can use the knowledge from understanding the fundamental coordination chemistry of these elements as a stepping stone to heavy metal detoxification, radioactive waste cleanup, and possibly radioactive isotope separation. The critical components of this research endeavor, along with the viability of metal complex formation, will be correlated to ring size and core geometry of the ligand and, the atomic radius, oxidation state, coordination geometry and coordination number of the transactinium metal ion. These chelating agents may have certain applications to the solution of some radioactive waste problems if they can be attached to polymer supports and used to chemically separate the radioactive components in waste.

  14. Studies of removal of platinum(IV) ion microquantities from the model solutions of aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride macroquantities on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37.

    PubMed

    Hubicki, Z; Wójcik, G

    2006-08-25

    Platinum has been widely applied in catalytic industry and the recovery of noble metals from industrial wastes becomes an economic issue. The laboratory studies of platinum(IV) microquantities removal from 1M aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride solutions in 0.1M hydrochloric acid solutions on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37 of the functional secondary and tertiary amine groups were carried out. For this anion exchanger the fraction extracted values (%E, Pt(IV)) as well as the sorption isotherms were determined depending on the kind of aqueous phase and phase contact time. Moreover, the bed and weight distribution coefficients as well as working and total ion-exchange capacities were calculated from the platinum(IV) breakthrough curves. Kinetic parameters were determined. PMID:16469435

  15. Ligational behavior of thiosemicarbazone, semicarbazone and thiocarbohydrazone ligands towards VO(IV), Ce(III), Th(IV) and UO 2(VI) ions: Synthesis, structural characterization and biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, M.; Seleem, H. S.; El-Shetary, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Mono- and binuclear VO(IV), Ce(III), Th(IV) and UO 2(VI) complexes of thiosemicarbazone, semicarbazone and thiocarbohydrazone ligands derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol were synthesized. The structures of these complexes were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, ESR, 1H NMR and mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal analyses. The thiosemicarbazone (H 4L 1) and the semicarbazone (H 4L 2) ligands behave as dibasic pentadentate ligands in case of VO(IV) and UO 2(VI) complexes, tribasic pentadentate in case of Ce(III) complexes and monobasic pentadentate in case of Th(IV) complexes. However, the thiocarbohydrazone ligand (H 3L 3) acts as a monobasic tridentate ligand in all complexes except the VO(IV) complex in which it acts as a dibasic tridentate ligand. The antibacterial and antifungal activities were also tested against Rhizobium bacteria and Fusarium-Oxysporium fungus. The metal complexes of H 4L 1 ligand showed a higher antibacterial effect than the free ligand while the other ligands (H 4L 2 and H 3L 3) showed a higher effect than their metal complexes. The antifungal effect of all metal complexes is lower than the free ligands.

  16. Microbially-Promoted Solubilization of Steel Corrosion Products and Fate of Associated Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Gill Geesey; Timothy Magnuson; Andrew Neal

    2002-06-15

    Microorganisms have the capacity to modify iron oxides during anaerobic respiration. When the dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 respires soluble sulfate during colonization of the solid-phase iron oxide hematite, the sulfide product reacts with the iron to produce the insoluble iron sulfide, pyrrhotite. When soluble uranium is present as uranyl ion, these microorganisms reduce the U(VI) to U(IV) as insoluble uraninite on the hematite surface. There is also evidence that a stable form of U is produced under these conditions that displays an oxidation state between U(VI) and U(iv). The dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR1 can utilize insoluble hematite as the sole electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration during growth and biofilm development on the mineral. The growth rate, maximum cell density and detachment rate for this bacterium are significantly greater on hematite than on magnetite (111) and (100). The difference could not be attributed to iron site density in the iron oxide. A gene (ferA) encoding a c-tyoe cytochrome involved in dissimulatory iron reduction in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was completed sequenced and characterized. The sequence information was used to develop an in-situ reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay that could detect expression of the gene during growth and biofilm development on ferrihydrite at the single cell and microcolony level. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis revealed that the ferrihydrite was reduced during expression of this gene. The assay was extended to detect expression of genes involved in sulfate reduction and hydrogen reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria. This assay will be useful to assess mechanisms of biotransformation of minerals including corrosion products on buried metal containers containing radionuclide waste. In summary, the research has shown that dissimilatory sulfate and iron reducing bacteria can

  17. Redox response of actinide materials to highly ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Cameron L; Lang, Maik; Pray, John M; Zhang, Fuxiang; Popov, Dmitry; Park, Changyong; Trautmann, Christina; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Skuratov, Vladimir A; Ewing, Rodney C

    2015-01-01

    Energetic radiation can cause dramatic changes in the physical and chemical properties of actinide materials, degrading their performance in fission-based energy systems. As advanced nuclear fuels and wasteforms are developed, fundamental understanding of the processes controlling radiation damage accumulation is necessary. Here we report oxidation state reduction of actinide and analogue elements caused by high-energy, heavy ion irradiation and demonstrate coupling of this redox behaviour with structural modifications. ThO2, in which thorium is stable only in a tetravalent state, exhibits damage accumulation processes distinct from those of multivalent cation compounds CeO2 (Ce(3+) and Ce(4+)) and UO3 (U(4+), U(5+) and U(6+)). The radiation tolerance of these materials depends on the efficiency of this redox reaction, such that damage can be inhibited by altering grain size and cation valence variability. Thus, the redox behaviour of actinide materials is important for the design of nuclear fuels and the prediction of their performance.

  18. Ground-state Electronic Structure of Actinide Monocarbides and Mononitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually increasing degree of f electron localization from U to Cm, with the tendency toward localization being slightly stronger in the (more ionic) nitrides compared to the (more covalent) carbides. The itinerant band picture is found to be adequate for UC and acceptable for UN, while a more complex manifold of competing localized and delocalized f-electron configurations underlies the ground states of NpC, PuC, AmC, NpN, and PuN. The fully localized 5f-electron configuration is realized in CmC (f{sup 7}), CmN (f{sup 7}), and AmN (f{sup 6}). The observed sudden increase in lattice parameter from PuN to AmN is found to be related to the localization transition. The calculated valence electron densities of states are in good agreement with photoemission data.

  19. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    DOEpatents

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod L.

    2009-03-24

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  20. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGES

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; Kornilov, N. V.; Lestone, J. P.; Litaize, O.; Morillon, B.; Neudecker, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Ohsawa, T.; et al

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  1. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  2. Minor Actinides Recycling in PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Delpech, M.; Golfier, H.; Vasile, A.; Varaine, F.; Boucher, L.; Greneche, D.

    2006-07-01

    Recycling of minor actinides in current and near future PWR is considered as one of the options of the general waste management strategy. This paper presents the analysis of this option both from the core physics and fuel cycle point of view. A first indicator of the efficiency of different neutron spectra for transmutation purposes is the capture to fission cross sections ratio which is less favourable by a factor between 5 to 10 in PWRs compared to fast reactors. Another indicator presented is the production of high ranking isotopes like Curium, Berkelium or Californium in the thermal or epithermal spectrum conditions of PWR cores by successive neutron captures. The impact of the accumulation of this elements on the fabrication process of such PWR fuels strongly penalizes this option. The main constraint on minor actinides loadings in PWR (or fast reactors) fuels are related to their direct impact (or the impact of their transmutation products) on the reactivity coefficients, the reactivity control means and the core kinetics parameters. The main fuel cycle physical parameters like the neutron source, the alpha decay power, the gamma and neutrons dose rate and the criticality aspects are also affected. Recent neutronic calculations based on a reference core of the Evolutionary Pressurized Reactor (EPR), indicates typical maximum values of 1 % loadings. Different fuel design options for minor actinides transmutation purposes in PWRs are presented: UOX and MOX, homogeneous and heterogeneous assemblies. In this later case, Americium loading is concentrated in specific pins of a standard UOX assembly. Recycling of Neptunium in UOX and MOX fuels was also studied to improve the proliferation resistance of the fuel. The impact on the core physics and penalties on Uranium enrichment were underlined in this case. (authors)

  3. Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f/sup 14/7s/sup 2/7p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable.

  4. Applications of time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy to the environmental biogeochemistry of actinides.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard N; Saito, Takumi; Aoyagi, Noboru; Payne, Timothy E; Kimura, Takaumi; Waite, T David

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is a useful means of identifying certain actinide species resulting from various biogeochemical processes. In general, TRLFS differentiates chemical species of a fluorescent metal ion through analysis of different excitation and emission spectra and decay lifetimes. Although this spectroscopic technique has largely been applied to the analysis of actinide and lanthanide ions having fluorescence decay lifetimes on the order of microseconds, such as UO , Cm, and Eu, continuing development of ultra-fast and cryogenic TRLFS systems offers the possibility to obtain speciation information on metal ions having room-temperature fluorescence decay lifetimes on the order of nanoseconds to picoseconds. The main advantage of TRLFS over other advanced spectroscopic techniques is the ability to determine in situ metal speciation at environmentally relevant micromolar to picomolar concentrations. In the context of environmental biogeochemistry, TRLFS has principally been applied to studies of (i) metal speciation in aqueous and solid phases and (ii) the coordination environment of metal ions sorbed to mineral and bacterial surfaces. In this review, the principles of TRLFS are described, and the literature reporting the application of this methodology to the speciation of actinides in systems of biogeochemical interest is assessed. Significant developments in TRLFS methodology and advanced data analysis are highlighted, and we outline how these developments have the potential to further our mechanistic understanding of actinide biogeochemistry.

  5. Separation of actinides from lanthanides

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  6. Exploring actinide materials through synchrotron radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Qun; Yuan, Li-Yong; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wang, Lin; Mei, Lei; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Li; Li, Zi-Jie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2014-12-10

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) based techniques have been utilized with increasing frequency in the past decade to explore the brilliant and challenging sciences of actinide-based materials. This trend is partially driven by the basic needs for multi-scale actinide speciation and bonding information and also the realistic needs for nuclear energy research. In this review, recent research progresses on actinide related materials by means of various SR techniques were selectively highlighted and summarized, with the emphasis on X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering spectroscopy, which are powerful tools to characterize actinide materials. In addition, advanced SR techniques for exploring future advanced nuclear fuel cycles dealing with actinides are illustrated as well.

  7. Evaluation of Cyanex 923-coated magnetic particles for the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibu, B. S.; Reddy, M. L. P.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Manchanda, V. K.

    2006-06-01

    In the magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process, tiny ferromagnetic particles coated with solvent extractant are used to selectively separate radionuclides and hazardous metals from aqueous waste streams. The contaminant-loaded particles are then recovered from the waste solutions using a magnetic field. The contaminants attached to the magnetic particles are subsequently removed using a small volume of stripping agent. In the present study, Cyanex 923 (trialkylphosphine oxide) coated magnetic particles (cross-linked polyacrylamide and acrylic acid entrapping charcoal and iron oxide, 1:1:1, particle size=1-60 μm) are being evaluated for the possible application in the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams. The uptake behaviour of Th(IV), U(VI), Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid solutions was investigated by batch studies. The effects of sorption kinetics, extractant and nitric acid concentrations on the uptake behaviour of metal ions were systematically studied. The influence of fission products (Cs(I), Sr(II)) and interfering ions including Fe(III), Cr(VI), Mg(II), Mn(II), and Al(III) were investigated. The recycling capacity of the extractant-coated magnetic particles was also evaluated.

  8. Study of chemical bonding, physical and biological effect of metformin drug as an organized medicine for diabetes patients with chromium(III) and vanadium(IV) ions.

    PubMed

    Adam, Abdel Majid A; Sharshar, T; Mohamed, Mahmoud A; Ibrahim, Omar B; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-01

    New vanadium(IV) and chromium(III) complexes of metformin (MFN) were synthesized upon the chemical interaction between vanadyl(II) sulfate monohydrate or chromium(III) chloride hexahydrate with metformin diabetic drug in the media of a pure grade of methanol solvent. The [(VO)2(MFN)2(SO4)2]2H2O and [Cr(MFN)3]·Cl3·6H2O complexes were discussed using microanalytical measurements, molar conductance, spectroscopic (infrared, ESR, XRD, and UV-vis), effective magnetic moment, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermal analyses (TG/DTG). The elemental analysis shows that VO(II) and Cr(III) complexes were associated with 1:1 and 1:3M ratios, respectively. The infrared spectroscopic results data received from the comparison between free MFN free ligand and their vanadyl(II) and chromium(III) complexes were proven that metformin reacted with respected metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters were estimated from the DTG curves. The microstructure changes of the VO(II) and Cr(III) complexes have been probed using positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) and positron annihilation Doppler broadening (PADB) techniques. The PAL and PADB line-shape parameters were found to be dependent on the structure, electronic configuration and molecular weight of metal complexes. Antimicrobial activity of the metformin free ligand and its vanadyl(II) and chromium(III) complexes were evaluated against the gram negative and gram positive bacteria strains and different fungal strains. Moderate antimicrobial activity recorded by disk diffusion inhibition growth zone method in vanadyl(II) and chromium(III) complexes compared to metformin free ligand.

  9. Detection of Actinides via Nuclear Isomer De-Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Francy, Christopher J.

    2009-07-01

    This dissertation discusses a data collection experiment within the Actinide Isomer Identification project (AID). The AID project is the investigation of an active interrogation technique that utilizes nuclear isomer production, with the goal of assisting in the interdiction of illicit nuclear materials. In an attempt to find and characterize isomers belonging to 235U and its fission fragments, a 232Th target was bombarded with a monoenergetic 6Li ion beam, operating at 45 MeV.

  10. Actinides AMS at CIRCE in Caserta (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, M.; Gialanella, L.; Rogalla, D.; Petraglia, A.; Guan, Y.; De Cesare, N.; D'Onofrio, A.; Quinto, F.; Roca, V.; Sabbarese, C.; Terrasi, F.

    2010-04-01

    The operation of Nuclear Power Plants and atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons performed in the past, together with production, transport and reprocessing of nuclear fuel, lead to the release into the environment of a wide range of radioactive nuclides, such as uranium, plutonium, fission and activation products. These nuclides are present in the environment at ultra trace levels. Their detection requires sensitive techniques like AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry). In order to perform isotopic ratio measurements of the longer-lived actinides, e.g., of 236U relative to the primary 238U and various Pu isotopes relative to 239Pu, an upgrade of the CIRCE accelerator (Center for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage) in Caserta, Italy, is underway. In this paper we report on the results of simulations aiming to define the best ion optics and to understand the origin of possible measurement background. The design of a high resolution TOF- E (Time of Flight-Energy) detector system is described, which will be used to identify the rare isotopes among interfering background signals.

  11. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  12. Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorich, K.E.

    1985-08-01

    The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Paving the way for the synthesis of a series of divalent actinide complexes: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q-Y; Lan, J-H; Wang, C-Z; Cheng, Z-P; Chai, Z-F; Gibson, J K; Shi, W-Q

    2016-02-21

    Recently, the +2 formal oxidation state in soluble molecular complexes for lanthanides (La-Nd, Sm-Lu) and actinides (Th and U) has been discovered [W. J. Evans, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 15914; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 8420; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 13310; Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 517]. To explore the nature of the bonding and stabilities of the low-valent actinide complexes, a series of divalent actinide species, [AnCp'3](-) (An[double bond, length as m-dash]Th-Am, Cp' = [η(5)-C5H4(SiMe3)](-)) have been investigated in THF solution using scalar relativistic density functional theory. The electronic structures and electron affinity properties were systematically studied to identify the interactions between the +2 actinide ions and Cp' ligands. The ground state electron configurations for the [AnCp'3](-) species are [ThCp'3](-) 6d(2), [PaCp'3](-) 5f(2)6d(1), [UCp'3](-) 5f(3)6d(1), [NpCp'3](-) 5f(5), [PuCp'3](-) 5f(6), and [AmCp'3](-) 5f(7), respectively, according to the MO analysis. The total bonding energy decreases from the Th- to the Am-complex and the electrostatic interactions mainly dominate the bonding between the actinide atom and ligands. The electron affinity analysis suggests that the reduction reaction of AnCp'3→ [AnCp'3](-) should become increasingly facile across the actinide series from Th to Am, in accord with the known An(iii/ii) reduction potentials. This work expands the knowledge on the low oxidation state chemistry of actinides, and further motivates and guides the synthesis of related low oxidation state compounds of 5f elements.

  14. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Decontamination of matrices containing actinide oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Villarreal, Robert

    1997-12-01

    There is provided a method for removing actinides and actinide oxides, particularly fired actinides, from soil and other contaminated matrices, comprising: (a) contacting a contaminated material with a solution of at least one inhibited fluoride and an acid to form a mixture; (b) heating the mixture of contaminated material and solution to a temperature in the range from about 30 C to about 90 C while stirring; (c) separating the solution from any undissolved matrix material in the mixture; (d) washing the undissolved matrix material to remove any residual materials; and (e) drying and returning the treated matrix material to the environment.

  16. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  17. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  18. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  19. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  20. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  1. Activity coefficients of microquantities of lanthanides and actinides in nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, V.S.; Rozen, A.M.

    1988-09-01

    We carried out calculations on the basis of the Zdanovskii-Mikulin rule. The radii of the ions of the actinides americium and curium(III) (0.099 nm) are closest to the radius of the neodymium ion (0.0995 nm), and the radius of the californium ion (0.0976 nm) is closest to the radius of the promethium ion (0.0979 nm). It may accordingly be assumed that the activity coefficients of americium and curium are approximately equal to the activity coefficients of neodymium and that the values for californium are approximately equal to the values for promethium.

  2. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  3. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  4. The Actinide Transition Revisited by Gutzwiller Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the problem of the actinide transition using the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) in combination with the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, we compute the equilibrium volumes of the actinide series and reproduce the abrupt change of density found experimentally near plutonium as a function of the atomic number. We discuss how this behavior relates with the electron correlations in the 5 f states, the lattice structure, and the spin-orbit interaction. Our results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  5. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides. PMID:16604724

  6. Receptor recognition of transferrin bound to lanthanides and actinides: a discriminating step in cellular acquisition of f-block metals.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-06-01

    Following an internal contamination event, the transport of actinide (An) and lanthanide (Ln) metal ions through the body is facilitated by endogenous ligands such as the human iron-transport protein transferrin (Tf). The recognition of resulting metallo-transferrin complexes (M2Tf) by the cognate transferrin receptor (TfR) is therefore a critical step for cellular uptake of these metal ions. A high performance liquid chromatography-based method has been used to probe the binding of M2Tf with TfR, yielding a direct measurement of the successive thermodynamic constants that correspond to the dissociation of TfR(M2Tf)2 and TfR(M2Tf) complexes for Fe(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+), Yb(3+), Lu(3+), (232)Th(4+), (238)UO2(2+), and (242)Pu(4+). Important features of this method are (i) its ability to distinguish both 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes formed between the receptor and the metal-bound transferrin, and (ii) the requirement for very small amounts of each binding partner (<1 nmol of protein per assay). Consistent with previous reports, the strongest receptor affinity is found for Fe2Tf (Kd1 = 5 nM and Kd2 = 20 nM), while the lowest affinity was measured for Pu2Tf (Kd1 = 0.28 μM and Kd2 = 1.8 μM) binding to the TfR. Other toxic metal ions such as Th(IV) and U(VI), when bound to Tf, are well recognized by the TfR. Under the described experimental conditions, the relative stabilities of TfR:(MxTf)y adducts follow the order Fe(3+) > Th(4+) ~ UO2(2+) ~ Cm(3+) > Ln(3+) ~ Ga(3+) > Yb(3+) ~ Pu(4+). This study substantiates a role for Tf in binding lanthanide fission products and actinides, and transporting them into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:23446908

  7. Receptor recognition of transferrin bound to lanthanides and actinides: a discriminating step in cellular acquisition of f-block metals.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-06-01

    Following an internal contamination event, the transport of actinide (An) and lanthanide (Ln) metal ions through the body is facilitated by endogenous ligands such as the human iron-transport protein transferrin (Tf). The recognition of resulting metallo-transferrin complexes (M2Tf) by the cognate transferrin receptor (TfR) is therefore a critical step for cellular uptake of these metal ions. A high performance liquid chromatography-based method has been used to probe the binding of M2Tf with TfR, yielding a direct measurement of the successive thermodynamic constants that correspond to the dissociation of TfR(M2Tf)2 and TfR(M2Tf) complexes for Fe(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+), Yb(3+), Lu(3+), (232)Th(4+), (238)UO2(2+), and (242)Pu(4+). Important features of this method are (i) its ability to distinguish both 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes formed between the receptor and the metal-bound transferrin, and (ii) the requirement for very small amounts of each binding partner (<1 nmol of protein per assay). Consistent with previous reports, the strongest receptor affinity is found for Fe2Tf (Kd1 = 5 nM and Kd2 = 20 nM), while the lowest affinity was measured for Pu2Tf (Kd1 = 0.28 μM and Kd2 = 1.8 μM) binding to the TfR. Other toxic metal ions such as Th(IV) and U(VI), when bound to Tf, are well recognized by the TfR. Under the described experimental conditions, the relative stabilities of TfR:(MxTf)y adducts follow the order Fe(3+) > Th(4+) ~ UO2(2+) ~ Cm(3+) > Ln(3+) ~ Ga(3+) > Yb(3+) ~ Pu(4+). This study substantiates a role for Tf in binding lanthanide fission products and actinides, and transporting them into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  8. Receptor recognition of transferrin bound to lanthanides and actinides: a discriminating step in cellular acquisition of f-block metals

    PubMed Central

    Deblonde, Gauthier J.-P.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Mason, Anne B.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Following an internal contamination event, the transport of actinide and lanthanide metal ions through the body is facilitated by endogenous ligands such as the human iron-transport protein transferrin (Tf). The recognition of resulting metallo-transferrin complexes (M2Tf) by the cognate transferrin receptor (TfR) is therefore a critical step for cellular uptake of these metal ions. A high performance liquid chromatography-based method has been used to probe the binding of M2Tf with TfR, yielding a direct measurement of the successive thermodynamic constants that correspond to the dissociation of TfR(M2Tf)2 and TfR(M2Tf) complexes for Fe3+, Ga3+, La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+, Yb3+, Lu3+, 232Th4+, 238UO22+, and 242Pu4+. Important features of this method are (i) its ability to distinguish both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes formed between the receptor and the metal-bound transferrin, and (ii) the requirement for very small amounts of each binding partner (<1 nmol of protein per assay). Consistent with previous reports, the strongest receptor affinity is found for Fe2Tf (Kd1 = 5 nM and Kd2 = 20 nM), while the lowest affinity was measured for Pu2Tf (Kd1 = 0.28 µM and Kd2 = 1.8 µM) binding to the TfR. Other toxic metal ions such as ThIV and UVI, when bound to Tf, are well recognized by the TfR. Under the described experimental conditions, the relative stabilities of TfR:(MxTf)y adducts follow the order Fe3+ >> Th4+ □ UO22+ □ Cm3+ > Ln3+ □ Ga3+ >>> Yb3+ □ Pu4+. This study substantiates a role for Tf in binding lanthanide fission products and actinides, and transporting them into cells by receptor mediated endocytosis. PMID:23446908

  9. Rapid determination of actinides in seawater samples

    DOE PAGES

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2014-03-09

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The actinides can be measured by alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The new method employs novel pre-concentration steps to collect the actinide isotopes quickly from 80 L or more of seawater. Actinides are co-precipitated using an iron hydroxide co-precipitation step enhanced with Ti+3 reductant, followed by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Stacked TEVA Resin and TRU Resin cartridges are used to rapidly separate Pu, U, and Np isotopes from seawater samples. TEVA Resin and DGA Resin were used tomore » separate and measure Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in seawater volumes up to 80 L. This robust method is ideal for emergency seawater samples following a radiological incident. It can also be used, however, for the routine analysis of seawater samples for oceanographic studies to enhance efficiency and productivity. In contrast, many current methods to determine actinides in seawater can take 1–2 weeks and provide chemical yields of ~30–60 %. This new sample preparation method can be performed in 4–8 h with tracer yields of ~85–95 %. By employing a rapid, robust sample preparation method with high chemical yields, less seawater is needed to achieve lower or comparable detection limits for actinide isotopes with less time and effort.« less

  10. Actinide recovery method -- Large soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell , S.L. III

    2000-04-25

    There is a need to measure actinides in environmental samples with lower and lower detection limits, requiring larger sample sizes. This analysis is adversely affected by sample-matrix interferences, which make analyzing soil samples above five-grams very difficult. A new Actinide-Recovery Method has been developed by the Savannah River Site Central Laboratory to preconcentrate actinides from large-soil samples. Diphonix Resin (Eichrom Industries), a 1994 R and D 100 winner, is used to preconcentrate the actinides from large soil samples, which are bound powerfully to the resin's diphosphonic acid groups. A rapid microwave-digestion technique is used to remove the actinides from the Diphonix Resin, which effectively eliminates interfering matrix components from the soil matrix. The microwave-digestion technique is more effective and less tedious than catalyzed hydrogen peroxide digestions of the resin or digestion of diphosphonic stripping agents such as HEDPA. After resin digestion, the actinides are recovered in a small volume of nitric acid which can be loaded onto small extraction chromatography columns, such as TEVA Resin, U-TEVA Resin or TRU Resin (Eichrom Industries). Small, selective extraction columns do not generate large volumes of liquid waste and provide consistent tracer recoveries after soil matrix elimination.

  11. Actinide speciation in relation to biological processes.

    PubMed

    Ansoborlo, Eric; Prat, Odette; Moisy, Philippe; Den Auwer, Christophe; Guilbaud, Philippe; Carriere, M; Gouget, Barbara; Duffield, John; Doizi, Denis; Vercouter, Thomas; Moulin, Christophe; Moulin, Valérie

    2006-11-01

    In case of accidental release of radionuclides into the environment, actinides represent a severe health risk to human beings following internal contamination (inhalation, ingestion or wound). For a better understanding of the actinide behaviour in man (in term of metabolism, retention, excretion) and in specific biological systems (organs, cells or biochemical pathways), it is of prime importance to have a good knowledge of the relevant actinide solution chemistry and biochemistry, in particular of the thermodynamic constants needed for computing actinide speciation. To a large extent, speciation governs bioavailability and toxicity of elements and has a significant impact on the mechanisms by which toxics accumulate in cell compartments and organs and by which elements are transferred and transported from cell to cell. From another viewpoint, speciation is the prerequisite for the design and success of potential decorporation therapies. The purpose of this review is to present the state of the art of actinide knowledge within biological media. It is also to discuss how actinide speciation can be determined or predicted and to highlight the areas where information is lacking with the aim to encourage new research efforts.

  12. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB₅O₆(OH)₆][BO(OH)₂]·2.5H₂O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO4- Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topological relationships. Neptunium borates are often mixed-valent and yield rare examples of compounds with one metal in three different oxidation states. Plutonium borates display new coordination chemistry for trivalent actinides. Finally, americium borates show a dramatic departure from plutonium borates, and there are scant examples of families of actinides compounds that extend past plutonium to examine the bonding of later actinides. There are several grand challenges that this work addresses. The foremost of these challenges is the development of structure-property relationships in transuranium materials. A deep understanding of the materials chemistry of actinides will likely lead to the development of advanced waste forms for radionuclides present in nuclear waste that prevent their transport in the environment. This work may have also uncovered the solubility-limiting phases of actinides in some repositories, and allows for measurements on the stability of these materials.

  13. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-10-21

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB(5)O(6)(OH)(6)][BO(OH)(2)]·2.5H(2)O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO(4)(-). Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topological relationships. Neptunium borates are often mixed-valent and yield rare examples of compounds with one metal in three different oxidation states. Plutonium borates display new coordination chemistry for trivalent actinides. Finally, americium borates show a dramatic departure from plutonium borates, and there are scant examples of families of actinides compounds that extend past plutonium to examine the bonding of later actinides. There are several grand challenges that this work addresses. The foremost of these challenges is the development of structure-property relationships in transuranium materials. A deep understanding of the materials chemistry of actinides will likely lead to the development of advanced waste forms for radionuclides present in nuclear waste that prevent their transport in the environment. This work may have also uncovered the solubility-limiting phases of actinides in some repositories, and allows for measurements on the stability of these materials.

  14. Predictions of Actinide Solubilities under Near-Field Conditions Expected in the WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, L. H.; Xiong, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository in southeast New Mexico for defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The repository, which opened in March 1999, is located at a subsurface depth of 655 m (2150 ft) in the Salado Fm., a Permian bedded-salt formation. The repository will eventually contain the equivalent of 844,000 208 L (55 gal) drums of TRU waste. After filling the rooms and access drifts and installing panel closures, creep closure of the salt will crush the steel waste containers in most cases and encapsulate the waste. The WIPP actinide source term model used for long-term performance assessment (PA) of the repository comprises dissolved and suspended submodels (solubilities and colloids). This presentation will describe the solubilities. From the standpoint of long-term PA, the order of importance of the radioelements in the TRU waste to be emplaced in the WIPP is Pu ~ Am >> U > Th >> Np ~ Cm and fission products. The DOE has included all of these actinides, but not fission products, in the WIPP Actinide Source Term Program (ASTP). Anoxic corrosion of Fe- and Al-base metals and microbial consumption of cellulosic, plastic, and rubber materials will produce gas and create strongly reducing conditions in the WIPP after closure. The use of MgO as an engineered barrier to consume microbially produced CO2 will result in low fCO2 and basic pH. Under these conditions, Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am will speciate essentially entirely as Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III), and Am(III); or Th(IV), U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), and Am(III). The DOE has developed thermodynamic speciation-and-solubility models for +III, +IV, and +V actinides in brines. Experimental data for Nd, Am, and Cm species were used to parameterize the +III Pitzer activity-coefficient model; data for Th species were used for the +IV model; and data for Np(V) species were used for the +V model. These models include the effects of the organic ligands acetate, citrate

  15. Sorption speciation of lanthanides/actinides on minerals by TRLFS, EXAFS and DFT studies: a review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoli; Fang, Ming; Wang, Xiangke

    2010-11-17

    Lanthanides/actinides sorption speciation on minerals and oxides by means of time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and density functional theory (DFT) is reviewed in the field of nuclear disposal safety research. The theoretical aspects of the methods are concisely presented. Examples of recent research results of lanthanide/actinide speciation and local atomic structures using TRLFS, EXAFS and DFT are discussed. The interaction of lanthanides/actinides with oxides and minerals as well as their uptake are also of common interest in radionuclide chemistry. Especially the sorption and inclusion of radionuclides into several minerals lead to an improvement in knowledge of minor components in solids. In the solid-liquid interface, the speciation and local atomic structures of Eu(III), Cm(III), U(VI), and Np(IV/VI) in several natural and synthetic minerals and oxides are also reviewed and discussed. The review is important to understand the physicochemical behavior of lanthanides/actinides at a molecular level in the natural environment.

  16. Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R; Chen, Y J; Hambsch, F J; Kornilov, N V; Lestone, J P; Litaize, O; Morillon, B; Neudecker, D; Oberstedt, S; Ohsawa, T; Smith, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides”was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei. The following technical areas were addressed: (i) experiments and uncertainty quantification (UQ): New data for neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu have been measured, and older data have been compiled and reassessed. There is evidence from the experimental work of this CRP that a very small percentage of neutrons emitted in fission are actually scission neutrons; (ii) modeling: The Los Alamos model (LAM) continues to be the workhorse for PFNS evaluations. Monte Carlo models have been developed that describe the fission phenomena microscopically, but further development is needed to produce PFNS evaluations meeting the uncertainty targets; (iii) evaluation methodologies: PFNS evaluations rely on the use of the least-squares techniques for merging experimental and model data. Considerable insight was achieved on how to deal with the problem of too small uncertainties in PFNS evaluations. The importance of considering that all experimental PFNS data are “shape” data was stressed; (iv) PFNS evaluations: New evaluations, including covariance data, were generated for major actinides including 1) non-model GMA evaluations of the 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f), and 233U(nth,f) PFNS based exclusively on experimental data (0.02 ≤ E ≤ 10 MeV), which resulted in PFNS average energies E of 2.00±0.01, 2.073±0.010, and 2.030±0.013 MeV, respectively; 2) LAM evaluations of neutron-induced fission spectra on uranium and plutonium targets with improved UQ for incident energies from thermal up to 30 MeV; and 3) Point-by-Point calculations for 232Th, 234U and 237Np targets; and (v) data

  17. Occlusion and ion exchange in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + alkaline earth chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with alkaline earth chlorides of calcium and strontium, and in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + actinide chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with the actinide chloride of uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Lexa, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2003-04-01

    The interaction between molten salts of the type LiCl-KCl-MeCl n (Me=Ca, Sr, U; x{sub MeCLn} $$ = to 0.45; and x {sub KCl}/x LiCl=0.69) and zeolite 4A have been studied at 823 K. The main interactions between these salts and zeolite are molten salt occlusion to form salt-loaded zeolite and ion exchange between the molten salt and salt-loaded zeolite. An irreversible chemical reaction has been observed in the LiCl-KCl-UCl{sup 3+}zeolite system. The extent of occlusion is a function of the concentration of MeCl n in the zeolite and is equal to 10{+-}1 Cl- per zeolite unit cell, (AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 12}, at infinite MeCl n dilution. The ion-exchange mole-fraction equilibrium constants (separation factors) with respect to Li are decreasing functions of the concentration of SrCl{sub 2} and UCl{sub 3}, but an increasing function of the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the zeolite. At infinite MeCl n dilution, they are equal to 0.9, 11.9, and 13 for CaCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2}, and UCl{sub 3}, respectively. The standard ion-exchange chemical potentials are equal to -50.0, -84, and -101.1 kJ x mol-1 for Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and U{sup 3+}, respectively.

  18. Development of a very sensitive AMS method for the detection of supernova-produced longliving actinide nuclei in terrestrial archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, C.; Faestermann, T.; Gerstmann, U.; Hillebrandt, W.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Lierse, C.; Pomar, C.; Rugel, G.

    2000-10-01

    For a search of supernova-produced actinide atoms in terrestrial archives, techniques for measuring minute amounts of atoms of actinides with AMS have been developed at the Munich tandem accelerator laboratory. A large analyzing magnet has been installed, able to bend even the heavy transuranic ions at the high energies achievable with our MP tandem. The final detector is a time-of-flight and a multiple energy loss measurement which allows a nearly background-free detection of individual actinides like 244Pu. An efficient chemical preparation method has been developed for the extraction of small amounts of plutonium from samples up to nearly 1 kg. Furthermore, the preparation of sputter cathodes, containing the final sample material, was optimized for high yields of negative molecules in the Cs-sputter ion source. The first search for supernova-originated 244Pu in a deep sea ferromanganese crust has already been carried out.

  19. Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation and Implications for Long-Term Immobilization of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Wang, Lumin M.

    2011-11-14

    The irradiation responses of Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} and Sr{sub 2}Nd{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} with the apatite structure are investigated to predict their long-term behaviour as host phases for immobilization of actinide elements from the nuclear fuel cycle. Different ions and energies are used to study the effects of dose, temperature, atomic displacement rate and ionization rate on irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization. The dose for amorphization increases with temperature in two stages, below and above 150 K. In the high temperature stage relevant to actinide immobilization, the increase of amorphization dose with temperature exhibits a strong dependence on the ratio of ionization rate to displacement rate for the different ions. Data analysis using a dynamic model for amorphization reveals that ionization-induced processes, with activation energy of 0.15 {+-} 0.02 eV, dominate dynamic recovery for ions from Ne through Xe. For heavier Au ions or for alpha-recoil nuclei emitted in alpha decay of actinides, ionization becomes less dominant and dynamic recovery is controlled primarily by thermally-driven processes. In post-irradiation annealing studies of amorphous samples, epitaxial thermal recrystallization is observed at 1123 K, and irradiation-enhanced nucleation of nanocrystallites is observed under irradiation with heavier ions. The recrystallization temperature under irradiation decreases with increasing ion mass to a value of {approx} 823 K, which also defines the thermally-driven critical temperature for amorphization under irradiation with heavy ions. Some partial recovery due to alpha particle irradiation at 300 K is observed that suggests a self-healing mechanism in apatite phases containing actinides. Based on the results and dynamic model, the temperature and time dependences of amorphization in silicate-apatite host phases for actinide immobilization are predicted.

  20. Dynamic recovery in silicate-apatite structures under irradiation and implications for long-term immobilization of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J; Zhang, Yanwen; Xiao, Haiyan; Wang, Prof. Lumin

    2012-01-01

    The irradiation responses of Ca2La8(SiO4)6O2 and Sr2Nd8(SiO4)6O2 with the apatite structure are investigated to predict their long-term behaviour as host phases for immobilization of actinide elements from the nuclear fuel cycle. Different ions and energies are used to study the effects of dose, temperature, atomic displacement rate and ionization rate on irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization. The dose for amorphization increases with temperature in two stages, below and above 150 K. In the high temperature stage relevant to actinide immobilization, the increase of amorphization dose with temperature exhibits a strong dependence on the ratio of ionization rate to displacement rate for the different ions. Data analysis using a dynamic model for amorphization reveals that ionization-induced processes, with activation energy of 0.15 0.02 eV, dominate dynamic recovery for ions from Ne through Xe. For heavier Au ions or for alpha-recoil nuclei emitted in alpha decay of actinides, ionization becomes less dominant and dynamic recovery is controlled primarily by thermally-driven processes. In post-irradiation annealing studies of amorphous samples, epitaxial thermal recrystallization is observed at 1123 K, and irradiation-enhanced nucleation of nanocrystallites is observed under irradiation with heavier ions. The recrystallization temperature under irradiation decreases with increasing ion mass to a value of ~ 823 K, which also defines the thermally-driven critical temperature for amorphization under irradiation with heavy ions. Some partial recovery due to alpha particle irradiation at 300 K is observed that suggests a self-healing mechanism in apatite phases containing actinides. Based on the results and dynamic model, the temperature and time dependences of amorphization in silicate-apatite host phases for actinide immobilization are predicted.

  1. Utilization of Minor Actinides as a Fuel Component for Ultra-Long Life Bhr Configurations: Designs, Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pavel V. Tsvetkov

    2009-05-20

    This project assessed the advantages and limitations of using minor actinides as a fuel component to achieve ultra-long life Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) configurations. Researchers considered and compared the capabilities of pebble-bed and prismatic core designs with advanced actinide fuels to achieve ultra-long operation without refueling. Since both core designs permit flexibility in component configuration, fuel utilization, and fuel management, it is possible to improve fissile properties of minor actinides by neutron spectrum shifting through configuration adjustments. The project studied advanced actinide fuels, which could reduce the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository and enable recovery of the energy contained in spent fuel. The ultra-long core life autonomous approach may reduce the technical need for additional repositories and is capable to improve marketability of the Generation IV VHTR by allowing worldwide deployment, including remote regions and regions with limited industrial resources. Utilization of minor actinides in nuclear reactors facilitates developments of new fuel cycles towards sustainable nuclear energy scenarios.

  2. Nonaqueous method for dissolving lanthanide and actinide metals

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Lanthanide and actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a lanthanide or actinide element in the elemental metallic state in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol.

  3. Detailed studies of Minor Actinide transmutation-incineration in high-intensity neutron fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Bringer, O.; Blandin, C.; Oriol, L.

    2006-07-01

    The Mini-INCA project is dedicated to the measurement of incineration-transmutation chains and potentials of minor actinides in high-intensity thermal neutron fluxes. In this context, new types of detectors and methods of analysis have been developed. The {sup 241}Am and {sup 232}Th transmutation-incineration chains have been studied and several capture and fission cross sections measured very precisely, showing some discrepancies with existing data or evaluated data. An impact study was made on different based-like GEN-IV reactors. It underlines the necessity to proceed to precise measurements for a large number of minor-actinides that contribute to these future incineration scenarios. (authors)

  4. Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

  5. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  6. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  7. Complexation of Actinides in Solution: Thermodynamic Measurementsand Structural Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, L.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a brief introduction of the studies of actinide complexation in solution at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An integrated approach of thermodynamic measurements and structural characterization is taken to obtain fundamental understanding of actinide complexation in solution that is of importance in predicting the behavior of actinides in separation processes and environmental transport.

  8. THEORY FOR THE XPS OF ACTINIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-08-01

    Two aspects of the electronic structure of actinide oxides that significantly affect the XPS spectra are described; these aspects are also important for the materials properties of the oxides. The two aspects considered are: (1) The spin-orbit coupling of the open 5f shell electrons in actinide cations and how this coupling affects the electronic structure. And, (2) the covalent character of the metal oxygen interaction in actinide compounds. Because of this covalent character, there are strong departures from the nominal oxidation states that are significantly larger in core-hole states than in the ground state. The consequences for the XPS of this covalent character are examined. A proper understanding of the way in which they influence the XPS makes it possible to use the XPS to correctly characterize the electronic structure of the oxides.

  9. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  10. Actinide separations by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.; Chiarizia, R.

    1984-01-01

    The work has demonstrated that actinide removal from synthetic waste solutions using both flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLM's is a feasible chemical process at the laboratory scale level. The process is characterized by the typical features of SLM's processes: very small quantities of extractant required; the potential for operations with high feed/strip volume ratios, resulting in a corresponding concentration factor of the actinides; and simplicity of operation. Major obstacles to the implementation of the SLM technology to the decontamination of liquid nuclear wastes are the probable low resistance of polypropylene supports to high radiation fields, which may prevent the application to high-level nuclear wastes; the unknown lifetime of the SLM; and the high Na content of the separated actinide solution.

  11. Autoradiographic study of actinide sorption on climax stock granite

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, G.W.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Allard, B.

    1980-06-01

    An autoradiographic technique that employed an arrangement for placing in firm contact Polaroid sheet film, a scintillator screen, and the radioactive face of a specimen was applied to a study of the sorption of americium, neptunium, plutonium, and uranium on Climax Stock granite under varying conditions of pH and Eh. Qualitative agreement was found between the sorption of americium on crushed, pure minerals and on the minerals comprising the specimen of Climax Stock granite. The observations also supported a mechanism for reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) by Fe(II)-containing minerals. There was no evidence for reduction of U(VI) by the Fe(II)-containing minerals, although the uranium, assumed to be present as UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, appeared to be the only actinide species to exhibit sorption by a simple, cation-exchange mechanism at particular mineral sites. Some implications of these results for nuclear waste isolation are discussed briefly.

  12. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  13. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  14. Actinide Lanthanide Separation Process – ALSEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Artem V.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2014-01-29

    Separation of the minor actinides (Am, Cm) from the lanthanides at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. To increase the safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing, as well as reduce associated costs, a novel solvent extraction process has been developed. The process allows for partitioning minor actinides, lanthanides and fission products following uranium/plutonium/neptunium removal; minimizing the number of separation steps, flowsheets, chemical consumption, and waste. This new process, Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP), uses an organic solvent consisting of a neutral diglycolamide extractant, either N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA), and an acidic extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]), dissolved in an aliphatic diluent (e.g. n-dodecane). The An/Ln co-extraction is conducted from moderate-to-strong nitric acid, while the selective stripping of the minor actinides from the lanthanides is carried out using a polyaminocarboxylic acid/citrate buffered solution at pH anywhere between 3 and 4.5. The extraction and separation of the actinides from the fission products is very effective in a wide range of HNO3 concentrations and the minimum separation factors for lanthanide/Am exceed 30 for Nd/Am, reaching > 60 for Eu/Am under some conditions. The experimental results presented here demonstrate the great potential for a combined system, consisting of a neutral extractant such as T2EHDGA or TODGA, and an acidic extractant such as HEH[EHP], for separating the minor actinides from the lanthanides.

  15. Heavy actinide cross sections in the /sup 238/U + /sup 248/Cm reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kratz, J V; Bruechle, W; Gaeggeler, H

    1981-01-01

    Cross sections for the production of Cf, Es, Fm, and Md isotopes in the reactions of 7.4 MeV/u /sup 238/U-ions with /sup 248/Cm targets are presented and discussed. Cross sections for the formation of heavy actinides in the reactions of 7.5 MeV/u /sup 136/Xe and /sup 238/U-projectiles with /sup 238/U-targets are presented for comparison. (WHK)

  16. The gastrointestinal absorption of the actinide elements.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D

    1991-03-01

    The greatest uncertainty in dose estimates for the ingestion of long-lived, alpha-emitting isotopes of the actinide elements is in the values used for their fractional absorption from the gastrointestinal tract (f1 values). Recent years have seen a large increase in the available data on actinide absorption. Human data are reviewed here, together with animal data, to illustrate the effect on absorption of chemical form, incorporation into food materials, fasting and other dietary factors, and age at ingestion. The f1 values recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency and by the National Radiological Protection Board are discussed.

  17. Elevated concentrations of actinides in mono lake.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R F; Bacon, M P; Brewer, P G

    1982-04-30

    Tetravalent thorium, pentavalent protactinium, hexavalent uranium, and plutonium (oxidation state uncertain) are present in much higher concentrations in Mono Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern central California, than in seawater. Low ratios of actinium to protactinium and of americium to plutonium indicate that the concentrations of trivalent actinides are not similarly enhanced. The elevated concentrations of the ordinarily very insoluble actinides are maintained in solution by natural ligands, which inhibit their chemical removal from the water column, rather than by an unusually large rate of supply.

  18. Elevated concentrations of actinides in mono lake.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R F; Bacon, M P; Brewer, P G

    1982-04-30

    Tetravalent thorium, pentavalent protactinium, hexavalent uranium, and plutonium (oxidation state uncertain) are present in much higher concentrations in Mono Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern central California, than in seawater. Low ratios of actinium to protactinium and of americium to plutonium indicate that the concentrations of trivalent actinides are not similarly enhanced. The elevated concentrations of the ordinarily very insoluble actinides are maintained in solution by natural ligands, which inhibit their chemical removal from the water column, rather than by an unusually large rate of supply. PMID:17735740

  19. Systematization of actinides using cluster analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kopyrin, A.A.; Terent`eva, T.N.; Khramov, N.N.

    1994-11-01

    A representation of the actinides in multidimensional property space is proposed for systematization of these elements using cluster analysis. Literature data for their atomic properties are used. Owing to the wide variation of published ionization potentials, medians are used to estimate them. Vertical dendograms are used for classification on the basis of distances between the actinides in atomic-property space. The properties of actinium and lawrencium are furthest removed from the main group. Thorium and mendelevium exhibit individualized properties. A cluster based on the einsteinium-fermium pair is joined by californium.

  20. Solid-state actinide acid phosphites from phosphorous acid melts

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, George N.; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-07-01

    The reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with dimethylformamide (DMF) produces crystals of the compound (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})]. This compound crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}/n and consists of layers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share equatorial vertices with phosphite units, separated by dimethylammonium. In contrast, the reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup. Subsequent dilution in solvents and use of standard solution-state methods results in the crystallization of two polymorphs of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th) and of the mixed acid phosphite–phosphite U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)·2(H{sub 2}O). α- and β-An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} crystallize in space groups C2/c and P2{sub 1}/n, respectively, and comprise a three-dimensional network of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphite units, whereas U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}·(H{sub 2}O) crystallizes in a layered structure in space group Pbca that is composed of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphites and water ligands. We discuss our findings in using solid inorganic reagents to produce a solution-workable precursor from which solid-state compounds can be crystallized. - Graphical abstract: Reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with DMF produces crystals of (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})] with a layered structure. Reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup and further solution-state reactions result in the crystallization of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th), with a three-dimensional network structure, and the mixed acid phosphite

  1. Nobelium: tracer chemistry of the divalent and trivalent ions.

    PubMed

    Maly, J; Sikkeland, T; Silva, R; Ghiorso, A

    1968-06-01

    In the absence of oxidizing or reducing agents the chromatographic and coprecipitation behavior of element 102 is similar to that of the alkaline earth elements. After oxidation with ceric ions, the behavior is that expected of a trivalent actinide. Nobelium is the first actinide for which the +2 oxidation state is the most stable species in aqueous solution.

  2. Nobelium: tracer chemistry of the divalent and trivalent ions.

    PubMed

    Maly, J; Sikkeland, T; Silva, R; Ghiorso, A

    1968-06-01

    In the absence of oxidizing or reducing agents the chromatographic and coprecipitation behavior of element 102 is similar to that of the alkaline earth elements. After oxidation with ceric ions, the behavior is that expected of a trivalent actinide. Nobelium is the first actinide for which the +2 oxidation state is the most stable species in aqueous solution. PMID:17749450

  3. Overall assessment of actinide partitioning and transmutation for waste management purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Blomeke, J. O.; Croff, A. G.; Finney, B. C.; Tedder, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A program to establish the technical feasibility and incentives for partitioning (i.e., recovering) actinides from fuel cycle wastes and then transmuting them in power reactors to shorter-lived or stable nuclides has recently been concluded at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The feasibility was established by experimentally investigating the reduction that can be practicably achieved in the actinide content of the wastes sent to a geologic repository, and the incentives for implementing this concept were defined by determining the incremental costs, risks, and benefits. Eight US Department of Energy laboratories and three private companies participated in the program over its 3-year duration. A reference fuel cycle was chosen based on a self-generated plutonium recycle PWR, and chemical flowsheets based on solvent extraction and ion-exchange techniques were generated that have the potential to reduce actinides in fuel fabrication and reprocessing plant wastes to less than 0.25% of those in the spent fuel. Waste treatment facilities utilizing these flowsheets were designed conceptually, and their costs were estimated. Finally, the short-term (contemporary) risks from fuel cycle operations and long-term (future) risks from deep geologic disposal of the wastes were estimated for cases with and without partitioning and transmutation. It was concluded that, while both actinide partitioning from wastes and transmutation in power reactors appear to be feasible using currently identified and studied technology, implementation of this concept cannot be justified because of the small long-term benefits and substantially increased costs of the concept.

  4. Actinides in Solution: Disproportionation, Strong Correlations, and Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Brad; Horowitz, Steven

    2010-03-01

    Plutonium in acid solutions can be found in oxidation states III through VI. There is a striking near perfect degeneracy of the reduction-oxidation (redox) potentials, each being about 1 volt. Neptunium is the only other element that approaches this degree of degeneracy. One consequence of the redox degeneracy is a marked tendency of plutonium ions to disproportionate; up to four different oxidation states can coexist simultaneously in the same solution, greatly complicating the environmental chemistry of the element. While the degeneracy could simply be a coincidence, it could also be the manifestation of a higher-level organizing principle at work. Other systems that exhibit disproportionation raise the possibility of an emergent negative-U attractive interaction. The hypothesis is tested by combining first-principles relativistic density-functional calculations using the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) package with exact diagonalizations of Hubbard-like models of the strong correlations between the actinide 5f electrons.

  5. [Impulse photoconductance of solutions of chlorophyll and its analogs. IV. Absolute quantum yield of ion radical formation during photooxidation of chlorophyll a by n-benzoquinone].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, N D; Stolovitskiĭ, Iu M; Evstigneev, V B

    1978-01-01

    The values of absolute quantum yield phi of the formation of free ion-radicals during the illumination of alkohol solutions of chlorophyll alpha (Chl) and rho-benzoquinone (Q) at room temperature were obtained by the method of impulse photoconductance. With an increase of the dielectric constant epsilon of the solvent from approximately 6 to approximately 25 phi increases by two orders ( approximately 10(-3)--approximately 10(-1). That obtained relationship phi (epsilon) is explained by epsilon effect on the efficiency of dissociation of "solvent-shared" ion-radical pair Chls+. Os-. The comparison of experimental data and theoretically expected ones allowed the estimation of some parameters to be obtained which characterize the ion-radical pair: interionic distance (10 A), the dissociation velocity constant ( approximately 10(5)--10(8) s-1), the velocity constant of reverse electron transfer (10(8) s-1), the life time approximately 10(-8) s).

  6. A comparative study of actinide complexation in three ligand systems with increasing complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanson, A.; Dahou, S.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Den Auwer, C.; Scheinost, A.; Hennig, C.; Vidaud, C.; Subra, G.; Solari, P. L.

    2009-11-01

    The complexation of thorium, neptunium and plutonium at oxidation state +IV with three ligands of increasing complexity has been investigated. These ligands are relevant for bio inorganic systems. The first ligand is the small nitrilotriacetic acid that often play the role of protecting ligands against hydrolysis. EXAFS results for the Th to Pu series have been correlated to quantum chemical calculations and show an homogeneous behavior of the actinide at oxidation state +IV. For larger ligands, steric effects may become significant and one can ask how the ligand may accommodate the large actinide cation coordination sphere. Model pentapeptides have been synthesized and tested as complexing agents. Comparison with NTA shows that the molecular arrangements are radically different. The third ligand system is transferrin, a diferric metalloptrotein that is well known to coordinate a large variety of cations from transition metals of f-elements. Metalloproteins bear primary, secondary and tertiary structures that all play a crucial role in bonding. At a given oxidation state (+IV), but for various atomic numbers (Th, Np, Pu) EXAFS data at the cation LIII edge exhibit significant coordination discrepancies that are related to a changes in protein geometry. In that sense, the metalloprotein may be viewed as a complex system.

  7. Actinide Sorption in Rainier Mesa Tunnel Waters from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P; Zavarin, M; Leif, R; Powell, B; Singleton, M; Lindvall, R; Kersting, A

    2007-12-17

    The sorption behavior of americium (Am), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), and uranium (U) in perched Rainier Mesa tunnel water was investigated. Both volcanic zeolitized tuff samples and groundwater samples were collected from Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, NV for a series of batch sorption experiments. Sorption in groundwater with and without the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated. Am(III) and Pu(IV) are more soluble in groundwater that has high concentrations of DOM. The sorption K{sub d} for Am(III) and Pu(IV) on volcanic zeolitized tuff was up to two orders of magnitude lower in samples with high DOM (15 to 19 mg C/L) compared to samples with DOM removed (< 0.4 mg C/L) or samples with naturally low DOM (0.2 mg C/L). In contrast, Np(V) and U(VI) sorption to zeolitized tuff was much less affected by the presence of DOM. The Np(V) and U(VI) sorption Kds were low under all conditions. Importantly, the DOM was not found to significantly sorb to the zeolitized tuff during these experiment. The concentration of DOM in groundwater affects the transport behavior of actinides in the subsurface. The mobility of Am(III) and Pu(IV) is significantly higher in groundwater with elevated levels of DOM resulting in potentially enhanced transport. To accurately model the transport behavior of actinides in groundwater at Rainier Mesa, the low actinide Kd values measured in groundwater with high DOM concentrations must be incorporated in predictive transport models.

  8. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE PAGES

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore » present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  9. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  10. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  11. Hydrophilic Clicked 2,6-Bis-triazolyl-pyridines Endowed with High Actinide Selectivity and Radiochemical Stability: Toward a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle.

    PubMed

    Macerata, Elena; Mossini, Eros; Scaravaggi, Stefano; Mariani, Mario; Mele, Andrea; Panzeri, Walter; Boubals, Nathalie; Berthon, Laurence; Charbonnel, Marie-Christine; Sansone, Francesco; Arduini, Arturo; Casnati, Alessandro

    2016-06-15

    There is still an evident need for selective and stable ligands able to separate actinide(III) from lanthanide(III) metal ions in view of the treatment of the accumulated radioactive waste and of the recycling of minor actinides. We have herein demonstrated that hydrophilic 2,6-bis-triazolyl-pyridines are able to strip all actinides in all the different oxidation states from a diglycolamide-containing kerosene solution into an acidic aqueous phase. The ascertained high actinide selectivity, efficiency, extraction kinetics, and chemical/radiolytic stability spotlight this hydrophilic class of ligands as exceptional candidates for advanced separation processes fundamental for closing the nuclear fuel cycle and solving the environmental issues related to the management of existing nuclear waste. PMID:27203357

  12. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.

    2015-09-30

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Recycle (STAAR) has made notable progress in FY 2015 toward the overarching goal to develop more efficient separation methods for actinides in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) objective of sustainable fuel cycles. Research in STAAR has been emphasizing the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MAs) to enable closed nuclear fuel recycle options, mainly within the paradigm of aqueous reprocessing of used oxide nuclear fuel dissolved in nitric acid. Its major scientific challenge concerns achieving selectivity for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides. Not only is this challenge yielding to research advances, but technology concepts such as ALSEP (Actinide Lanthanide Separation) are maturing toward demonstration readiness. Efforts are organized in five task areas: 1) combining bifunctional neutral extractants with an acidic extractant to form a single process solvent, developing a process flowsheet, and demonstrating it at bench scale; 2) oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) and subsequent separation with other multivalent actinides; 3) developing an effective soft-donor solvent system for An(III) selective extraction using mixed N,O-donor or all-N donor extractants such as triazinyl pyridine compounds; 4) testing of inorganic and hybrid-type ion exchange materials for MA separations; and 5) computer-aided molecular design to identify altogether new extractants and complexants and theory-based experimental data interpretation. Within these tasks, two strategies are employed, one involving oxidation of americium to its pentavalent or hexavalent state and one that seeks to selectively complex trivalent americium either in the aqueous phase or the solvent phase. Solvent extraction represents the primary separation method employed, though ion exchange and crystallization play an important role. Highlights of accomplishments include: Confirmation of the first-ever electrolytic oxidation of Am(III) in a

  13. Speciation of arsenic(III)/arsenic(V) and selenium(IV)/ selenium(VI) using coupled ion chromatography - hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple analytical methods have been developed to speciate inorganic arsenic and selenium in the ppb range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determinations of the redox states arsenite A...

  14. Orthometalation of dibenzo[1,2]quinoxaline with ruthenium(II/III), osmium(II/III/IV), and rhodium(III) ions and orthometalated [RuNO](6/7) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Maity, Suvendu; Kundu, Suman; Saha Roy, Amit; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2015-02-16

    A new family of organometallics of ruthenium(II/III), osmium(II/III/IV), and rhodium(III) ions isolated from C-H activation reactions of dibenzo[1,2]quinoxaline (DBQ) using triphenylphosphine, carbonyl, and halides as coligands is reported. The CN-chelate complexes isolated are trans-[Ru(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (1), trans-[Ru(II)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Cl] (2), trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Br2] (3), trans-[Os(II)(DBQ)(PPh3)2(CO)Br] (4), and trans-[Rh(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (5). Reaction of 1 with NO affords trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PPh3)2Cl]Cl (6(+)Cl(-)), isoelectronic to 2, with a byproduct, [Ru(NO)(PPh3)2Cl3] (7). Complexes 1-5 and 6(+) were characterized by elemental analyses, mass, IR, NMR, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra including the single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1-3 and 5. The Ru(III)-C, Ru(II)-C, Os(III)-C, and Rh(III)-C lengths are 2.049(2), 2.074(3), 2.105(16), and 2.012(3) Å in 1, 2, 3, and 5. In cyclic voltammetry, 2, 3, and 4 undergo oxidation at 0.59, 0.39, and 0.46 V, versus Fc(+)/Fc couple, to trans-[Ru(III)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Cl](+) (2(+)), trans-[Os(IV)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Br2](+) (3(+)), and trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Br](+) (4(+)) ions. Complex 3(+) incorporates an Os(IV)(d(4) ion)-C bond. The 6(+)/trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PPh3)2Cl] (6) reduction couple at -0.65 V is reversible. 2(+), 3(+), 4(+) and 6 were substantiated by spectroelectrochemical measurements, EPR spectra, and density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. The frozen-glass EPR spectrum of the electrogenerated 6 exhibits hyperfine couplings due to (99,101)Ru and (14)N nuclei. DFT calculations on trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(PMe3)2Br2] (3(Me)), St = 1/2 and trans-[Os(IV)(DBQ)(PMe3)2Br2](+) (3(Me+)), St = 0, trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PMe3)2Cl](+) (6(Me+)), St = 0 and trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PMe3)2Cl] (6(Me)), St = 1/2, authenticated a significant mixing between dOs and πaromatic* orbitals, which stabilizes M(II/III/IV)-C bonds and the [RuNO](6) and [RuNO](7) states

  15. Potential agents for removal of actinides from waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Romanovski, V.V.; Whisenhunt, D.W.; Veeck, A.C.; Andersen, W.A.; Hoffman, D.C.; Jide, X.; White, D.; Raymond, K.N.

    1996-07-01

    The uptake of Th(IV) from nitric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions by chelating ion exchange resins containing catechol, 1,2- hydroxypyridinone (1,2-HOPO) and 3,4-hydroxypyridinone (3,4-HOPO) functional groups, has been investigated. These polystyrene based materials show excellent kinetics for uptake of Th(IV) and have a high loading capacity. Liquid/liquid extractants have also been synthesized by addition of lipophilic side chains to the chelating groups (1,2-HOPO; 3,4-HOPO; 3,2-HOPO; catecholamide; terephthalamide). The initial evaluation of the extraction properties has been carried out.

  16. Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2005-06-01

    Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the

  17. Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation: PNNL FY 2011 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.

    2011-08-13

    This report summarizes work conducted in FY 2011 at PNNL to investigate new methods of separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from the trivalent lanthanide elements, and separation of Am from Cm. For the former, work focused on a solvent extraction system combining an acidic extractant (HDEHP) with a neutral extractant (CMPO) to form a hybrid solvent extraction system referred to as TRUSPEAK (combining the TRUEX and TALSPEAK processes). For the latter, ligands that strongly bing uranyl ion were investigated for stabilizing corresponding americyl ion.

  18. The self-consistent parallel electric field due to electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in downward auroral-current regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. IV

    SciTech Connect

    Jasperse, John R.; Basu, Bamandas; Lund, Eric J.; Grossbard, Neil

    2010-06-15

    The physical processes that determine the self-consistent electric field (E{sub ||}) parallel to the magnetic field have been an unresolved problem in magnetospheric physics for over 40 years. Recently, a new multimoment fluid theory was developed for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma in the guiding-center and gyrotropic approximation that includes the effect of electrostatic, turbulent, wave-particle interactions (see Jasperse et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072903 (2006); ibid.13, 112902 (2006)]). In the present paper and its companion paper [Jasperse et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 062903 (2010)], which are intended as sequels to the earlier work, a fundamental model for downward, magnetic field-aligned (Birkeland) currents for quasisteady conditions is presented. The model includes the production of electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in the long-range potential region by an electron, bump-on-tail-driven ion-cyclotron instability. Anomalous momentum transfer (anomalous resistivity) by itself is found to produce a very small contribution to E{sub ||}; however, the presence of electrostatic, ion-cyclotron turbulence has a very large effect on the altitude dependence of the entire quasisteady solution. Anomalous energy transfer (anomalous heating and cooling) modifies the density, drift, and temperature altitude profiles and hence the generalized parallel-pressure gradients and mirror forces in the electron and ion momentum-balance equations. As a result, |E{sub ||}| is enhanced by nearly a factor of 40 compared to its value when turbulence is absent. The space-averaged potential increase associated with the strong double layer at the bottom of the downward-current sheet is estimated using the FAST satellite data and the multimoment fluid theory.

  19. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Sluys, W.G.; Burns, C.J.; Smith, D.C.

    1991-04-02

    This invention is comprised of a process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An{sub x}Z{sub y} wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effective amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  20. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    DOEpatents

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  1. Hydroxypyri(mi)dine-based chelators as antidotes of toxicity due to aluminum and actinides.

    PubMed

    Santos, M A; Esteves, M A; Chaves, S

    2012-01-01

    This review is focused on recent developments on hydroxypyri(mi)dines, as aluminum and actinide chelating agents to combat the toxicity due to accumulations of these metal ions in human body resulting from excessive metal exposure. After a brief update revision of the most common processes of aluminum (Al) exposure, as well as the associated toxicities and pathologies, we will focus on the current available Al chelators and future perspective as potential antidotes of Al toxicity. Due to the similarity between Al and Fe, a major emphasis is given to the hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrimidinone chelators, since they are analogues of the current iron chelators in clinical use (DFP and DFO). This review includes issues such as molecular design strategies and corresponding effects on the associated physico-chemical properties, lipo-hydrophilic balance, toxicity, in vivo bioassays and current clinical applications. The hydroxypyri(mi)dine chelators are also suitable for other hard metal ions, such as the radiotoxic actinides, and so a brief review is included on the applications of these chelators in actinides scavenging.

  2. Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-12

    As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

  3. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2012-07-01

    A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

  4. Radiative rates for E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in the Br-like ions Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII, and Mo VIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2015-09-15

    Energies and lifetimes are reported for the lowest 375 levels of five Br-like ions, namely Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII, and Mo VIII, mostly belonging to the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 5}, 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4ℓ, 4s4p{sup 6}, 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}5ℓ, 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d{sup 2}, 4s4p{sup 5}4ℓ, and 4s4p{sup 5}5ℓ configurations. Extensive configuration interaction has been included and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP) has been adopted for the calculations. Additionally, radiative rates are listed among these levels for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions. From a comparison with the measurements, the majority of our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 2%, although discrepancies between theory and experiment for a few are up to 6%. An accuracy assessment of the calculated radiative rates (and lifetimes) is more difficult, because no prior results exist for these ions.

  5. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  6. Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    1993-10-01

    Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described.

  7. Identification and Speciation of Actinides in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude

    All actinide isotopes are radioactive. Since the middle of the last century, new bactinide and transactinide isotopes have been artificially produced and the use of several of the naturally occurring actinide isotopes has increased. This production is due to the nuclear power industry and the military fabrication and use of nuclear weapons. These activities have created anxiety about the introduction of actinide elements into the environment. Consequently, environmental systems that contain or are exploited for natural actinides, or, are potentially contaminated by anthropogenic actinides, must be investigated. The analytical techniques introduced in this chapter are used, after sampling when required, to identify and quantify the actinide isotopes and to determine the species in which they are present.

  8. Separation of Californium from other Actinides

    DOEpatents

    Mailen, J C; Ferris, L M

    1973-09-25

    A method is provided for separating californium from a fused fluoride composition containing californium and at least one element selected from the group consisting of plutonium, americium, curium, uranium, thorium, and protactinium which comprises contacting said fluoride composition with a liquid bismuth phase containing sufficient lithium or thorium to effect transfer of said actinides to the bismuth phase and then contacting the liquid bismuth phase with molten LiCl to effect selective transfer of californium to the chloride phase.

  9. Surrogate Reactions in the Actinide Region

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Scielzo, N D; Bleuel, D L; Lesher, S R; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Dietrich, F S; Hoffman, R D; Norman, E B; Sheets, S A; Phair, L; Fallon, P; Clark, R M; Gibelin, J; Jewett, C; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Wiedeking, M; Lyles, B F; Beausang, C W; Allmond, J M; Ai, H; Cizewski, J A; Hatarik, R; O'Malley, P D; Swan, T

    2008-01-30

    Over the past three years we have studied various surrogate reactions (d,p), ({sup 3}He,t), ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}) on several uranium isotopes {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U. An overview of the STARS/LIBERACE surrogate research program as it pertains to the actinides is discussed. A summary of results to date will be presented along with a discussion of experimental difficulties encountered in surrogate experiments and future research directions.

  10. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    temperature or below. For many spectroscopic measurements, low temperatures have been achieved by co-condensing the actinide vapor in rare gas or inert molecule host matrices. Spectra recorded in matrices are usually considered to be minimally perturbed. Trapping the products from gas-phase reactions that occur when trace quantities of reactants are added to the inert host gas has resulted in the discovery of many new actinide species. Selected aspects of the matrix isolation data were discussed in chapter 17. In the present chapter we review the spectroscopic matrix data in terms of its relationship to gas-phase measurements, and update the description of the new reaction products found in matrices to reflect the developments that have occurred during the past two years. Spectra recorded in matrix environments are usually considered to be minimally perturbed, and this expectation is borne out for many closed shell actinide molecules. However, there is growing evidence that significant perturbations can occur for open shell molecules, resulting in geometric distortions and/or electronic state reordering. Studies of actinide reactions in the gas phase provide an opportunity to probe the relationship between electronic structure and reactivity. Much of this work has focused on the reactions of ionic species, as these may be selected and controlled using various forms of mass spectrometry. As an example of the type of insight derived from reaction studies, it has been established that the reaction barriers for An+ ions are determined by the promotion energies required to achieve the 5fn6d7s configuration. Gas-phase reaction studies also provide fundamental thermodynamic properties such as bond dissociation and ionization energies. In recent years, an increased number of gas-phase ion chemistry studies of bare (atomic) and ligated (molecular) actinide ions have appeared, in which relevant contributions to fundamental actinide chemistry have been made. These studies were initiated

  11. Performance Characteristics of Actinide-Burning Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.T

    2005-05-15

    Performance characteristics were summarized of two molten salt based fusion power plants. One of them is to burn spent fuel actinides, the other is to burn U{sup 238}. Both power plants produce output energy larger than a fusion power plant would normally produce without including actinides. Additional features, obtainable by design for these actinide burning power plants, are adequate tritium breeding, sub-critical condition, and stable power output.

  12. Preparation, properties, and some recent studies of the actinide metals

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The actinide elements form a unique series of metals. The variation in their physial properties combined with the varying availability of the different elements offers a challenge to the preparative scientist. This article provides a brief review of selected methods used for preparing ..mu..g to kg amounts of the actinide metals and the properties of these metals. In addition, some recent studies on selected actinide metals are discussed. 62 refs.

  13. Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Guelis, Artem V.

    2013-01-15

    The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

  14. Value of burnup credit beyond actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, Chi

    1997-12-01

    DOE has submitted a topical report to the NRC justifying burnup credit based only on actinide isotopes (U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241). When this topical report is approved, it will allow a great deal of the commercial spent nuclear fuel to be transported in significantly higher capacity casks. A cost savings estimate for shipping fuel in 32 assembly (burnup credit) casks as opposed to 24 assembly (non-burnup credit) casks was previously presented. Since that time, more detailed calculations have been performed using the methodology presented in the Actinide-Only Burnup Credit Topical Report. Loading curves for derated casks have been generated using actinide-only burnup credit and are presented in this paper. The estimates of cost savings due to burnup credit for shipping fuel utilizing 32, 30, 28, and 24 assembly casks where only the 24 assembly cask does not burnup credit have been created and are discussed. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souček, P.; Cassayre, L.; Eloirdi, R.; Malmbeck, R.; Meier, R.; Nourry, C.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys, which originate from pyrochemical recovery of actinides from spent metallic nuclear fuel by electrochemical methods in molten LiCl-KCl. In the present work, the most important steps of this route were experimentally tested using U-Pu-Al alloy prepared by electrodeposition of U and Pu on solid aluminium plate electrodes. The investigated processes were vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the alloy by chlorine gas and sublimation of the AlCl3 formed. The processes parameters were set on the base of a previous thermochemical study and an experimental work using pure UAl3 alloy. The present experimental results indicated high efficiency of salt distillation and chlorination steps, while the sublimation step should be further optimised.

  16. Plutonium incorporation in phosphate and titanate ceramics for minor actinide containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschanels, X.; Picot, V.; Glorieux, B.; Jorion, F.; Peuget, S.; Roudil, D.; Jégou, C.; Broudic, V.; Cachia, J. N.; Advocat, T.; Den Auwer, C.; Fillet, C.; Coutures, J. P.; Hennig, C.; Scheinost, A.

    2006-06-01

    Two ceramics, zirconolite and a monazite-brabantite solid solution (MBss) were studied for the immobilization of minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) produced by reprocessing spent fuel. Monoclinic zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) is a fluorite derivative structure and is the primary actinide host phase in Synroc (a titanate composite). Monazite (LnPO4, where Ln = La, Ce, Nd, Gd, etc.) is a monoclinic orthophosphate containing trivalent cations, and brabantite (Ca0.5An0.5PO4) is an isostructural monazite compound containing tetravalent cations (An = Th and U). The nominal composition of the ceramics studied in this work is (Ca0.87Pu0.13)Zr(Al0. 26Ti1.74)O7 for zirconolite and (Ca0.09Pu0.09La0.73Th0.09)PO4 for the monazite-brabantite solid solution. These formulas correspond to 10 wt% PuO2 loading in each material. XANES spectroscopy showed that the plutonium is tetravalent in zirconolite and trivalent in MBss. Thorium, another tetravalent cation, can be incorporated at 10 wt% ThO2 in MBss. Aluminum and calcium balance the excess cationic charge resulting from the incorporation of Pu(IV) in zirconolite and Th(IV) in brabantite, respectively. The relative density of the pellets exceeded 90% of theoretical density. The samples exhibited a homogeneous microstructure even if some minor phases, representing less than 2% of the surface area, were detected. The two ceramics are compared in terms of actinide loading, and preliminary results on their long-term behavior are discussed.

  17. Dust in Jupiter's magnetosphere. I - Physical processes. II - Origin of the ring. III - Time variations. IV - Effect on magnetospheric electrons and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Gruen, E.; Johnson, T. V.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes acting on charged microscopic dust grains in the Jovian atmosphere involve electromagnetic forces which dominate dust particle dynamics and diffusion across field lines resulting from random charge fluctuations of the dust grains. A model of the Jovian ring hypothesizes that the 'visible' ring particles are produced by erosive collisions between an assumed population of kilometer-sized parent bodies and submicron-sized magnetospheric dust particles. Fluctuations in the ring topology and intensity are determined over various time scales, showing that the ring is a quasipermanent and quasistable characteristic of the Jovian system. Finally, the interaction of the Jovian energetic belt electrons and the Jovian plasma with an ambient dust population is examined; the distribution of dust ejected from Io in the inner magnetosphere and losses of magnetospheric ions and electrons due to direct collisions with charged dust particles are calculated.

  18. Bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction process for actinide recovery and partition

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1976-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery and partitioning of actinide values from acidic nuclear waste aqueous solutions, the actinide values including trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent oxidation states is provided and includes the steps of contacting the aqueous solution with a bidentate organophosphorous extractant to extract essentially all of the actinide values into the organic phase. Thereafter the respective actinide fractions are selectively partitioned into separate aqueous solutions by contact with dilute nitric or nitric-hydrofluoric acid solutions. The hexavalent uranium is finally removed from the organic phase by contact with a dilute sodium carbonate solution.

  19. Impact of Including Higher Actinides in Fast Reactor Transmutation Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    B. Forget; M. Asgari; R. Ferrer; S. Bays

    2007-09-01

    Previous fast reactor transmutation studies generally disregarded higher mass minor actinides beyond Cm-246 due to various considerations including deficiencies in nuclear cross-section data. Although omission of these higher mass actinides does not significantly impact the neutronic calculations and fuel cycle performance parameters follow-on neutron dose calculations related to fuel recycling, transportation and handling are significantly impacted. This report shows that including the minor actinides in the equilibrium fast reactor calculations will increase the predicted neutron emission by about 30%. In addition a sensitivity study was initiated by comparing the impact of different cross-section evaluation file for representing these minor actinides.

  20. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 18/O with /sup 248/Cm and /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Nurmia, M.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; von Gunten, H.R.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1983-06-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 97- to 122-MeV /sup 18/O ions and of isotopes of Bk through No in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 91- to 150-MeV /sup 18/O ions. The cross sections and widths of the mass distributions for the actinides produced in these reactions are very similar for transfer of the same numbers of nucleons. A semiquantitative comparison of the experimental results with calculations based on a simple model shows that calculations of this type are helpful in selection of projectile-target systems and optimum energies for production of specific actinide isotopes and for synthesis of as yet unknown heavy isotopes and elements. Comparisons of experimental results with calculations show that, in general, about half of the kinetic energy of the projectile is transferred to the actinide product.

  1. Generation-IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Harold

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear power technology has evolved through roughly three generations of system designs: a first generation of prototypes and first-of-a-kind units implemented during the period 1950 to 1970; a second generation of industrial power plants built from 1970 to the turn of the century, most of which are still in operation today; and a third generation of evolutionary advanced reactors which began being built by the turn of the 20^th century, usually called Generation III or III+, which incorporate technical lessons learned through more than 12,000 reactor-years of operation. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a cooperative international endeavor to develop advanced nuclear energy systems in response to the social, environmental and economic requirements of the 21^st century. Six Generation IV systems under development by GIF promise to enhance the future contribution and benefits of nuclear energy. All Generation IV systems aim at performance improvement, new applications of nuclear energy, and/or more sustainable approaches to the management of nuclear materials. High-temperature systems offer the possibility of efficient process heat applications and eventually hydrogen production. Enhanced sustainability is achieved primarily through adoption of a closed fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycling of plutonium, uranium and minor actinides using fast reactors. This approach provides significant reduction in waste generation and uranium resource requirements.

  2. SURFACE COMPLEXATION OF ACTINIDES WITH IRON OXIDES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN NEAR-SURFACE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jerden Jr.; A.J. Kropf; Y. Tsai

    2005-08-25

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  3. Synergism between rare earth cerium(IV) ion and vanillin on the corrosion of steel in H 2SO 4 solution: Weight loss, electrochemical, UV-vis, FTIR, XPS, and AFM approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianghong; Deng, Shuduan; Fu, Hui; Mu, Guannan; Zhao, Ning

    2008-06-01

    The synergism between rare earth cerium(IV) ion and vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzaldehyde) on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 1.0 M H 2SO 4 solution at five temperatures ranging from 20 to 60 °C was first studied by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization methods. The inhibited solutions were analyzed by ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis). The adsorbed film of CRS surface containing optimum doses of the blends Ce 4+-vanillin was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results revealed that vanillin had a moderate inhibitive effect, and the inhibition efficiency (IE) increased with the vanillin concentration. The adsorption of vanillin obeyed Temkin adsorption isotherm. Polarization curves showed that vanillin was a mixed-type inhibitor in sulfuric acid, while prominently inhibited the cathodic reaction. For the cerium(IV) ion, it had a negligible effect, and the maximum IE was only about 20%. However, incorporation of Ce 4+ with vanillin improved significantly the inhibition performance. The IE for Ce 4+ in combination with vanillin was higher than the summation of IE for single Ce 4+ and single vanillin, which was synergism in nature. A high inhibition efficiency, 98% was obtained by a mixture of 25-200 mg l -1 vanillin and 300-475 mg l -1 Ce 4+. UV-vis showed that the new complex of Ce 4+-vanillin was formed in 1.0 M H 2SO 4 for Ce 4+ combination with vanillin. Polarization studies showed that the complex of Ce 4+-vanillin acted as a mixed-type inhibitor, which drastically inhibits both anodic and cathodic reactions. FTIR and XPS revealed that a protective film formed in the presence of both vanillin and Ce 4+ was composed of cerium oxide and the complex of Ce 4+-vanillin. The synergism between Ce 4+ and vanillin could also be evidenced by AFM images. Depending on the results, the synergism mechanism was discussed from the

  4. Interstellar C IV and Si IV column densities toward early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Equivalent widths and deduced column densities of Si IV and C IV are examined for 18 early-type close binaries, and physical processes responsible for the origin of these ions in the interstellar medium are investigated. The available C IV/Si IV column density ratios typically lie within a narrow range from 0.8 to 4.5, and there is evidence that the column density of C IV is higher than that of N V along most lines of sight, suggesting that C IV is not formed in the same hot region as O VI. In addition, the existence of regions with a narrowly defined new temperature range around 50,000 deg K is indicated. The detection of the semitorrid gas of Bruhweiler, Kondo, and McCluskey (1978, 1979) is substantiated, and the relation of this gas to the observations of coronal gas in the galactic halo is discussed.

  5. Preparation of Copper Telluride Films by Co-Reduction of Cu(I) and Te(IV) Ions in Choline Chloride: Ethylene Glycol Ionic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgovici, Florentina; Catrangiu, Adriana-Simona; Stoian, Andrei Bogdan; Anicai, Liana; Visan, Teodor

    2016-07-01

    Cathodic processes of direct co-reduction of Cu+ and Te4+ ions on Pt electrode at 60°C were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The ionic liquid as background electrolyte consisted of a mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol (ChCl-EG 1:2 mol ratio) in which 5-20 mM CuCl and 8 mM TeO2 were dissolved. The voltammograms exhibited the following successive cathodic processes: Cu2+/Cu+ reduction, Te underpotential deposition, simultaneous deposition of Cu metal and CuTe compound, and deposition of Te-rich CuTe compound at the most negative potentials (from -0.5 V to -0.8 V). Corresponding dissolution or oxidation peaks were recorded on the anodic branch. The voltammetric results were confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectra. Copper telluride films have been synthesized on platinum substrate via potentiostatic electrodeposition at 60°C. It was found from atomic force microscopy that CuTe film samples prepared from ChCl-EG + 5 mM CuCl + 8 mM TeO2 ionic liquid have high growth rates. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the deposited films from ChCl-EG + 10 mM CuCl + 8 mM TeO2 ionic liquid indicated the presence of a Cu2Te phase for film deposited at -0.7 V and a Cu0.656Te0.344 phase for film deposited at -0.6 V.

  6. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  7. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ashleigh L; Lukens, Wayne W; Lu, Connie C; Arnold, John

    2014-03-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium, and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[ο-(NHCH2P(i)Pr2)C6H4]3 with either Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) and a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4](-) unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the resulting isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively unusual class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl and formation of the metal-metal bond is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) Å and 3.0319(7) Å for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution-state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using (1)H, (1)H-(1)H COSY, (31)P, and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  8. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Ashleigh; Lukens, Wayne; Lu, Connie; Arnold, John

    2014-04-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[-(NHCH2PiPr2)C6H4]3 and Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) with a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4]- unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively rare class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) and 3.0319(7) for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using 1H, 1H-1H COSY, 31P and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-Vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  9. Sensitizing curium luminescence through an antenna protein to investigate biological actinide transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-02-20

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the biomolecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms. PMID:23363005

  10. Sensitizing curium luminescence through an antenna protein to investigate biological actinide transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-02-20

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the biomolecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms.

  11. Sensitizing Curium Luminescence through an Antenna Protein to Investigate Biological Actinide Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J.-P.; Mason, Anne B.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the bio-molecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms. PMID:23363005

  12. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, Maria M.; Huenenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-14

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006); M. M. Reif and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) and halide (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998); Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}]=-1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol{sup -1}, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets L{sub E}, M{sub E}, and H{sub E} for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective

  13. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  14. Study of actinide chemistry in saturated potassium fluoride solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Thalmayer, C. E.

    1969-01-01

    Study concerning the chemistry of actinides in saturated KF solution included work with neptunium, uranium, and americium. Solubilities, absorption spectra, oxidation-reduction reactions, and solid compounds which can be produced in KF solution were examined. The information is used for preparation of various materials from salts of the actinides.

  15. Process for Making a Ceramic Composition for Immobilization of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Curtis, Paul G.; Hobson, Beverly F.; Farmer, Joseph; Herman, Connie Cicero; Herman, David Thomas

    1999-06-22

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  16. Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOEpatents

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Herman, Connie Cicero; Hobson, Beverly F.; Herman, David Thomas; Curtis, Paul G.; Farmer, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  17. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  18. POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

    2011-10-19

    A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

  19. Detailed calculations of minor actinide transmutation in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-31

    The transmutation of minor actinides in a fast reactor is investigated by a new method to investigate the transmutation behavior of individual minor actinides. It is found that Np-237 and Am-241 mainly contributes to the transmutation rate though the transmutation behaviors are very different.

  20. Chemistry of lower valent actinide halides

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.H.; Hildenbrand, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This research effort was concerned almost entirely with the first two members of the actinide series, thorium and uranium, although the work was later extended to some aspects of the neptunium-fluorine system in a collaborative program with Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed information about the lighter actinides will be helpful in modeling the properties of the heavier actinide compounds, which will be much more difficult to study experimentally. In this program, thermochemical information was obtained from high temperature equilibrium measurements made by effusion-beam mass spectrometry and by effusion-pressure techniques. Data were derived primarily from second-law analysis so as to avoid potential errors in third-law calculations resulting from uncertainties in spectroscopic and molecular constants. This approach has the additional advantage of yielding reaction entropies that can be checked for consistency with various molecular constant assignments for the species involved. In the U-F, U-Cl, and U-Br systems, all of the gaseous species UX, UX{sub 2}, UX{sub 3}, UX{sub 4}, and UX{sub 5}, where X represents the halogen, were identified and characterized; the corresponding species ThX, ThX{sub 2}, ThX{sub 3}, and ThX{sub 4} were studied in the Th-F, Th-Cl, and Th-Br systems. A number of oxyhalide species in the systems U-0-F, U-0-Cl, Th-0-F, and Th-O-Cl were studied thermochemically. Additionally, the sublimation thermodynamics of NpF{sub 4}(s) and NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(s) were studied by mass spectrometry.

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF ACTINIDES BETWEEN THE AQUEOUS AND ORGANIC PHASES IN THE TALSPEAK PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.; Kyser, E.

    2010-09-02

    the actinide's valence. Since our plans included the measurement of Pu(III) distribution coefficients using a Np(V) solution containing small amounts of {sup 238}Pu, it was necessary to demonstrate that the desired oxidation states of Np and Pu are produced and could be stabilized in a buffered lactate solution containing diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTPA). The stability of Np(V) and Pu(III) in lactic acid/DTPA solutions was evaluated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. To perform the evaluation, Np and Pu were added to solutions containing either hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) or ferrous sulfamate (FS) as the reductant and nominally 1.5 M lactic acid/0.05 M DTPA. The pH of the solution was subsequently adjusted to nominally 2.8 as would be performed in the TALSPEAK process. In the valence adjustment study, we found that it was necessary to reduce Pu to Pu(III) prior to combining with the lactic acid and DTPA. The Pu reduction was performed using either HAN or FS. When FS was used, Np was reduced to Np(IV). The spectroscopic studies showed that Np(V) and Pu(III) are not stable in lactic acid/DTPA solutions. The stability of Np(IV)- and Pu(IV)-DTPA complexes are much greater than the stability of the Np(V)- and Pu(III)-DTPA complexes, and as a result, Np is slowly reduced to Np(IV) and Pu is slowly oxidized to Pu(IV) due to the reduced activity of the more stable complexes. When Np(V) was added to a solution containing a 1.5 M lactic acid/ammonium lactate buffer and 0.05 M DTPA, approximately 50% of the Np was reduced to Np(IV) in the first day. The fraction of Np(V) in the solution continued to diminish with time and was essentially reduced to Np(IV) after one week. When Pu(III) was added to a lactic acid/DTPA solution of the same composition, the spectrum recorded following at least two days after preparation of the solution continued to show some sign of Pu(III). The Pu(III) was completely oxidized to Pu(IV) after 3-4 days. The UV-vis spectroscopy

  2. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  3. Multicoordinate ligands for actinide/lanthanide separations.

    PubMed

    Dam, Henk H; Reinhoudt, David N; Verboom, Willem

    2007-02-01

    In nuclear waste treatment processes there is a need for improved ligands for the separation of actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)). Several research groups are involved in the design and synthesis of new An(III) ligands and in the confinement of these and existing An(III) ligands onto molecular platforms giving multicoordinate ligands. The preorganization of ligands considerably improves the An(III) extraction properties, which are largely dependent on the solubility and rigidity of the platform. This tutorial review summarizes the most important An(III) ligands with emphasis on the preorganization strategy using (macrocyclic) platforms.

  4. Status of nuclear data for actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Gorelov, V.P.; Grebennikov, A.N.

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear data required for transmutation problem include many actinide nuclei. In present paper the analysis of neutron fission, capture, (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections at energy region from thermal point to 14 MeV was carried out for Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotops using modern evaluated nuclear data libraries and handbooks of recommended nuclear data. Comparison of these data indicates on substantial discrepancies in different versions of files, that connect with quality and completeness of original experimental data.

  5. Thermodynamics of carbothermic synthesis of actinide mononitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Shirasu, Yoshiro; Minato, Kazuo; Serizawa, Hiroyuki

    1997-08-01

    Carbothermic synthesis will be further applied to the fabrication of nitride fuels containing minor actinides (MA) such as neptunium, americium and curium. A thorough understanding of the carbothermic synthesis of UN will be beneficial in the development of the MA-containing fuels. Thermodynamic analysis was carried out for conditions of practical interest in order to better understand the recent fabrication experiences. Two types of solution phases, oxynitride and carbonitride phases, were taken into account. The PuNO ternary isotherm was assessed for the modelling of M(C, N, O). With the understanding of the UN synthesis, the fabrication problems of Am-containing nitrides are discussed.

  6. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-31

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GW{sub e}y if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  7. Actinides and Rare Earths Topical Conference (Code AC)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2009-11-24

    Actinide and the Rare Earth materials exhibit many unique and diverse physical, chemical and magnetic properties, in large part because of the complexity of their f electronic structure. This Topical Conference will focus upon the chemistry, physics and materials science in Lanthanide and Actinide materials, driven by 4f and 5f electronic structure. Particular emphasis will be placed upon 4f/5f magnetic structure, surface science and thin film properties. For the actinides, fundamental actinide science and its role in resolving technical challenges posed by actinide materials will be stressed. Both basic and applied experimental approaches, including synchrotron-radiation-based investigations, as well as theoretical modeling and computational simulations, are planned to be part of the Topical Conference. Of particular importance are the issues related to the potential renaissance in Nuclear Fuels, including synthesis, oxidation, corrosion, intermixing, stability in extreme environments, prediction of properties via benchmarked simulations, separation science, environmental impact and disposal of waste products.

  8. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  9. Research in actinide chemistry. Progress report, 1990--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-04-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}, humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements.

  10. Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmett, D.L.; Fusselman, S.P.; Roy, J.J.; Gay, R.L.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Takahashi, N.

    1996-10-01

    TRUMP-S (TRansUranic Management through Pyropartitioning Separation) is a pyrochemical process being developed to separate actinides form fission products in nuclear waste. A key process step involving molten salt electrorefining to separate actinides from lanthanides has been studied on a laboratory scale. Electrorefining of U, Np, Pu, Am, and lanthanide mixtures from molten cadmium at 450 C to a solid cathode utilizing a molten chloride electrolyte resulted in > 99% removal of actinides from the molten cadmium and salt phases. Removal of the last few percent of actinides is accompanied by lowered cathodic current efficiency and some lanthanide codeposition. Actinide/lanthanide separation ratios on the cathode are ordered U > Np > Pu > Am and are consistent with predictions based on equilibrium potentials.

  11. Fusion-Fission Burner for Transuranic Actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chan

    2013-10-01

    The 14-MeV DT fusion neutron spectrum from mirror confinement fusion can provide a unique capability to transmute the transuranic isotopes from light water reactors (LWR). The transuranic (TRU) actinides, high-level radioactive wastes, from spent LWR fuel pose serious worldwide problem with long-term decay heat and radiotoxicity. However, ``transmuted'' TRU actinides can not only reduce the inventory of the TRU in the spent fuel repository but also generate additional energy. Typical commercial LWR fuel assemblies for BWR (boiling water reactor) and PWR (pressurized water reactor) measure its assembly lengths with 4.470 m and 4.059 m, respectively, while its corresponding fuel rod lengths are 4.064 m and 3.851 m. Mirror-based fusion reactor has inherently simple geometry for transmutation blanket with steady-state reactor operation. Recent development of gas-dynamic mirror configuration has additional attractive feature with reduced size in central plasma chamber, thus providing a unique capability for incorporating the spent fuel assemblies into transmutation blanket designs. The system parameters for the gas-dynamic mirror-based hybrid burner will be discussed.

  12. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald T.

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  13. Melting of aluminum, molybdenum, and the light actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Marvin; Yang, Lin H.; Boehler, Reinhard

    2004-11-01

    A semiempirical model was developed in order to explain why the measured melting curves of molybdenum, and the other bcc transition metals, have an unusually low slope (dT/d Ptilde 0) . The total binding energy of Mo is written as the sum of the repulsive energy of the ions and sp electrons (modeled by an inverse sixth power potential) and the d -band cohesive energy is described by the well known Friedel equation. Using literature values for the Mo band width energy, the number of d electrons and their volume dependence, we find that a small broadening of the liquid d -band width (˜1%) leads to an increase in the stability of the liquid relative to the solid. This is sufficient to depress the melting temperature and lower the melting slope to a value in agreement with the recent diamond-anvil cell measurements. Omission of the d -band physics results in an Al-like melting curve with a much steeper melt slope. The model, when applied to the f electrons of the light actinides (Th-Am), gives agreement with the observed fall and rise in the melting temperature with increasing atomic number.

  14. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Palmer, M.J.

    1997-10-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements.

  15. On the Suitability of Lanthanides as Actinide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-11

    With the current level of actinide materials used in civilian power generation and the need for safe and efficient methods for the chemical separation of these species from their daughter products and for long-term storage requirements, a detailed understanding of actinide chemistry is of great importance. Due to the unique bonding properties of the f-elements, the lanthanides are commonly used as structural and chemical models for the actinides, but differences in the bonding between these 4f and 5f elements has become a question of immediate applicability to separations technology. This brief overview of actinide coordination chemistry in the Raymond group at UC Berkeley/LBNL examines the validity of using lanthanide analogs as structural models for the actinides, with particular attention paid to single crystal X-ray diffraction structures. Although lanthanides are commonly accepted as reasonable analogs for the actinides, these comparisons suggest the careful study of actinide materials independent of their lanthanide analogs to be of utmost importance to present and future efforts in nuclear industries.

  16. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation. [uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.; Wan, P. T.; Chow, S.

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design of a uranium hexafluoride actinide transmutation reactor to convert long-lived actinide wastes to shorter-lived fission product wastes was analyzed. It is shown that externally moderated gas core reactors are ideal radiators. They provide an abundant supply of thermal neutrons and are insensitive to composition changes in the blanket. For the present reactor, an initial load of 6 metric tons of actinides is loaded. This is equivalent to the quantity produced by 300 LWR-years of operation. At the beginning, the core produces 2000 MWt while the blanket generates only 239 MWt. After four years of irradiation, the actinide mass is reduced to 3.9 metric tonnes. During this time, the blanket is becoming more fissile and its power rapidly approaches 1600 MWt. At the end of four years, continuous refueling of actinides is carried out and the actinide mass is held constant. Equilibrium is essentially achieved at the end of eight years. At equilibrium, the core is producing 1400 MWt and the blanket 1600 MWt. At this power level, the actinide destruction rate is equal to the production rate from 32 LWRs.

  17. Plutonium and ''minor'' actinides: safe sequestration [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    2005-01-01

    The actinides exhibit a number of unique chemical and nuclear properties. Of particular interest are the man-made actinides (Np, Pu, Cm and Am) that are produced in significant enough quantities that they are a source of energy in fission reactions, a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons and of environmental concern because of their long half-lives and radiotoxicity. During the past 50 yr, over 1400 mT of Pu and substantial quantities of the "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these elements: (1) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; (2) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of isometric pyrochlore, A 2B 2O 7 (A=rare earths; B=Ti, Zr, Sn and Hf), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium. Systematic studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B=Zr, Hf) are stable to very high doses of α-decay event damage. The radiation stability of these compositions is closely related to the structural distortions that occur for specific pyrochlore compositions and the electronic structure of the B-site cation. This understanding provides the basis for designing materials for the safe, long-term immobilization and sequestration of actinides.

  18. Actinide immobilization in the subsurface environment by in-situ treatment with a hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus complexant: Uranyl uptake by calcium phytate

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Jensen, M.P.; Schmidt, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    In addition to naturally occurring uranium and thorium, actinide ions exist in the subsurface environment as a result of accidental releases and intentional disposal practices associated with nuclear weapons production. These species present a significant challenge to cost-effective remediation of contaminated environments. An attractive approach to decreasing the probability of actinide migration in the subsurface is to transform the ions into a less mobile form by remote treatment. We have under development a process which relies on a polyfunctional organophosphorus complexant to sequester the mobile metal ions by complexation/cation exchange in the near term, and to subsequently decompose, transforming the actinides into insoluble phosphate mineral forms in the long term. Studies to date include identification of a suitable organophosphorus reagent, profiling of its decomposition kinetics, verification of the formation of phosphate mineral phases upon decomposition of the reagent, and extensive comparison of the actinide uptake ability of the calcium salt of the reagent as compared with hydroxyapatite. In this report, we briefly describe the process with focus on the cation exchange behavior of the calcium salt of the organophosphorus sequestrant.

  19. 5f-electron localization in the actinide metals: thorides, actinides and the Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    For the light actinides Ac-Cm, the numbers of localized and itinerant 5f-electrons are determined by comparing various estimates of the f-electron counts. At least one itinerant f-electron is found for each element, Pa-Cm. These results resolve certain disagreements among electron counts determined by different methods and are consistent with the Mott transition model and with the picture of the 5f-electrons' dual nature.

  20. Chemistry of tetravalent actinide phosphates-Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Brandel, V. . E-mail: vbrandel@neuf.fr; Dacheux, N. . E-mail: dacheux@ipno.in2p3.fr

    2004-12-01

    The chemistry and crystal structure of phosphates of tetravalent cations, including that of actinides was reviewed several times up to 1985. Later, new compounds were synthesized and characterized. In more recent studies, it was found that some of previously reported phases, especially those of thorium, uranium and neptunium, were wrongly identified. In the light of these new facts an update review and classification of the tetravalent actinide phosphates is proposed in the two parts of this paper. Their crystal structure and some chemical properties are also compared to non-actinide cation phosphates.

  1. Engineering-Scale Distillation of Cadmium for Actinide Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Price; D. Vaden; R.W. Benedict

    2007-10-01

    During the recovery of actinide products from spent nuclear fuel, cadmium is separated from the actinide products by a distillation process. Distillation occurs in an induction-heated furnace called a cathode processor capable of processing kilogram quantities of cadmium. Operating parameters have been established for sufficient recovery of the cadmium based on mass balance and product purity. A cadmium distillation rate similar to previous investigators has also been determined. The development of cadmium distillation for spent fuel treatment enhances the capabilities for actinide recovery processes.

  2. Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Hill, Dallas D.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Stewart, Walter F.; Tolt, Thomas L.; Worl, Laura A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

  3. An emergency bioassay method for actinides in urine.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiongxin; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    A rapid bioassay method has been developed for the sequential measurements of actinides in human urine samples. The method involves actinide separation from a urine matrix by co-precipitation with hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), followed by anion exchange and extraction chromatography column purification, and final counting by alpha spectrometry after cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. The minimal detectable activities for the method were determined to be 20 mBq L(-1) or less for plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes, with an 8-h sample turn-around time. Spike tests showed that this method would meet the requirements for actinide bioassay following a radiation emergency.

  4. Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

    2012-08-22

    This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

  5. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Crystal Structures of Actinide Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runde, Wolfgang; Neu, Mary P.

    Since the 1950s actinides have been used to benefit industry, science, health, and national security. The largest industrial application, electricity generation from uranium and thorium fuels, is growing worldwide. Thus, more actinides are being mined, produced, used and processed than ever before. The future of nuclear energy hinges on how these increasing amounts of actinides are contained in each stage of the fuel cycle, including disposition. In addition, uranium and plutonium were built up during the Cold War between the United States and the Former Soviet Union for defense purposes and nuclear energy. These stockpiles have been significantly reduced in the last decade.

  6. Separations and Actinide Science -- 2005 Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    The Separations and Actinide Science Roadmap presents a vision to establish a separations and actinide science research (SASR) base composed of people, facilities, and collaborations and provides new and innovative nuclear fuel cycle solutions to nuclear technology issues that preclude nuclear proliferation. This enabling science base will play a key role in ensuring that Idaho National Laboratory (INL) achieves its long-term vision of revitalizing nuclear energy by providing needed technologies to ensure our nation's energy sustainability and security. To that end, this roadmap suggests a 10-year journey to build a strong SASR technical capability with a clear mission to support nuclear technology development. If nuclear technology is to be used to satisfy the expected growth in U.S. electrical energy demand, the once-through fuel cycle currently in use should be reconsidered. Although the once-through fuel cycle is cost-effective and uranium is inexpensive, a once-through fuel cycle requires long-term disposal to protect the environment and public from long-lived radioactive species. The lack of a current disposal option (i.e., a licensed repository) has resulted in accumulation of more than 50,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel. The process required to transition the current once-through fuel cycle to full-recycle will require considerable time and significant technical advancement. INL's extensive expertise in aqueous separations will be used to develop advanced separations processes. Computational chemistry will be expanded to support development of future processing options. In the intermediate stage of this transition, reprocessing options will be deployed, waste forms with higher loading densities and greater stability will be developed, and transmutation of long-lived fission products will be explored. SASR will support these activities using its actinide science and aqueous separations expertise. In the final stage, full recycle will be enabled by

  7. The nature of chemical bonding in actinide and lanthanide ferrocyanides determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Thomas; Guillaumont, Dominique; Fillaux, Clara; Scheinost, Andreas; Moisy, Philippe; Petit, Sébastien; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-28

    The electronic properties of actinide cations are of fundamental interest to describe intramolecular interactions and chemical bonding in the context of nuclear waste reprocessing or direct storage. The 5f and 6d orbitals are the first partially or totally vacant states in these elements, and the nature of the actinide ligand bonds is related to their ability to overlap with ligand orbitals. Because of its chemical and orbital selectivities, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an effective probe of actinide species frontier orbitals and for understanding actinide cation reactivity toward chelating ligands. The soft X-ray probes of the light elements provide better resolution than actinide L3-edges to obtain electronic information from the ligand. Thus coupling simulations to experimental soft X-ray spectral measurements and complementary quantum chemical calculations yields quantitative information on chemical bonding. In this study, soft X-ray XAS at the K-edges of C and N, and the L2,3-edges of Fe was used to investigate the electronic structures of the well-known ferrocyanide complexes K4Fe(II)(CN)6, thorium hexacyanoferrate Th(IV)Fe(II)(CN)6, and neodymium hexacyanoferrate KNd(III)Fe(II)(CN)6. The soft X-ray spectra were simulated based on quantum chemical calculations. Our results highlight the orbital overlapping effects and atomic effective charges in the Fe(II)(CN)6 building block. In addition to providing a detailed description of the electronic structure of the ferrocyanide complex (K4Fe(II)(CN)6), the results strongly contribute to confirming the actinide 5f and 6d orbital oddity in comparison to lanthanide 4f and 5d.

  8. The nature of chemical bonding in actinide and lanthanide ferrocyanides determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Thomas; Guillaumont, Dominique; Fillaux, Clara; Scheinost, Andreas; Moisy, Philippe; Petit, Sébastien; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-28

    The electronic properties of actinide cations are of fundamental interest to describe intramolecular interactions and chemical bonding in the context of nuclear waste reprocessing or direct storage. The 5f and 6d orbitals are the first partially or totally vacant states in these elements, and the nature of the actinide ligand bonds is related to their ability to overlap with ligand orbitals. Because of its chemical and orbital selectivities, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an effective probe of actinide species frontier orbitals and for understanding actinide cation reactivity toward chelating ligands. The soft X-ray probes of the light elements provide better resolution than actinide L3-edges to obtain electronic information from the ligand. Thus coupling simulations to experimental soft X-ray spectral measurements and complementary quantum chemical calculations yields quantitative information on chemical bonding. In this study, soft X-ray XAS at the K-edges of C and N, and the L2,3-edges of Fe was used to investigate the electronic structures of the well-known ferrocyanide complexes K4Fe(II)(CN)6, thorium hexacyanoferrate Th(IV)Fe(II)(CN)6, and neodymium hexacyanoferrate KNd(III)Fe(II)(CN)6. The soft X-ray spectra were simulated based on quantum chemical calculations. Our results highlight the orbital overlapping effects and atomic effective charges in the Fe(II)(CN)6 building block. In addition to providing a detailed description of the electronic structure of the ferrocyanide complex (K4Fe(II)(CN)6), the results strongly contribute to confirming the actinide 5f and 6d orbital oddity in comparison to lanthanide 4f and 5d. PMID:26733312

  9. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  10. Salts purification and voltammetric study of the electroreduction of U(IV) to U(III) in molten LiF-ThF 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonichkin, V.; Bovet, A.; Shishkin, V.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction of molten fluorides as reactor coolants and fuels (both as actinide burner and Th-U breeder) is one of the promising ways to sustainable development of these reactors. Special attention should be paid to the on-line control of the redox condition of the circulating molten fluorides mixtures, in particular, of the U(IV)/U(III) ratio by voltammetry. A "dry" technique for production and purification of metal fluorides, their mixtures, and fusion cakes without gaseous HF has been developed. The experimental studies confirmed that solid NH 4HF 2 can be efficiently used instead of the HF gas for conversion of UO 2 and ThO 2 to anhydrous tetrafluorides and for removal of oxygen-containing impurities from fluoride salts. The electrochemical behavior of UF 4 in a 77LiF-23ThF 4 (mole%) melt was studied by cyclic voltammetry at temperatures up to 800 °C. The studies have revealed that well reproducible voltammograms can only be obtained in partially reduced LiF-ThF 4-UF 4 melts containing UF 3, which are free from electropositive impurity ions. Processing of the experimental dependences shows that the basic calculated characteristics of the stage U(IV) electroreduction to U(III) considerably differ from the theoretical values corresponding to the one-electron process governed by a diffusion-controlled charge transfer. This points to quasi-reversibility of the electrode reaction studied. Since the Nernst equation can be used for processing voltammograms only reversible electroreduction U(IV), quasi-reversibility will lead to errors in voltammetric determination of the equilibrium relations U(IV)/U(III) in the melt studied. The results have to be considered as estimates or semiquantitative values.

  11. Systematic investigation of thorium(IV)- and uranium(IV)-ligand bonding in dithiophosphonate, thioselenophosphinate, and diselenophosphonate complexes.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Barnes, Charles L; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Walensky, Justin R

    2013-09-16

    Homoleptic soft-donor actinide complexes of the general form An[E2PROR']4 were synthesized from salt metathesis between ThCl4(DME)2 or UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 and M[E2PROR'], M = Na, K, to yield 2 (An = Th, E = S, R = 4-MeOC6H4, R' = Me), 3 (An = Th, E = S, R = 4-MeOC6H4, R' = (t)Bu), 4 (An = U, E = S, R = 4-MeOC6H4, R' = Me), 5 (An = Th, E = Se, R = C6H5, R' = Me), and 6 (An = U, E = Se, R = C6H5, R' = Me). In addition thorium and uranium thioselenophosphinate complexes 7 and 8 were produced from the reaction of ThCl4(DME)2 and UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 and Na[SSePPh2], respectively. All compounds were characterized using elemental analysis, (1)H and (31)P NMR, and IR spectroscopy, and the U(IV) compounds were also examined with UV-vis spectroscopy. The (77)Se NMR spectrum of 5 reveals the first reported resonance with a Th-Se bond. The solid-state structures of 2, 5, 7, and 8 were determined by X-ray crystallography. The actinide-ligand bonding was examined using density functional theory calculations in conjunction with quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules analysis and shows slightly increased covalency in actinide-selenium bonds than actinide-sulfur.

  12. Technical and economic assessment of different options for minor actinide transmutation: the French case

    SciTech Connect

    Chabert, C.; Coquelet-Pascal, C.; Saturnin, A.; Mathonniere, G.; Boullis, B.; Warin, D.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Caron-Charles, M.; Garzenne, C.

    2013-07-01

    Studies have been performed to assess the industrial perspectives of partitioning and transmutation of long-lived elements. These studies were carried out in tight connection with GEN-IV systems development. The results include the technical and economic evaluation of fuel cycle scenarios along with different options for optimizing the processes between the minor actinide transmutation in fast neutron reactors, their interim storage and geological disposal of ultimate waste. The results are analysed through several criteria (impacts on waste, on waste repository, on fuel cycle plants, on radiological exposure of workers, on costs and on industrial risks). These scenario evaluations take place in the French context which considers the deployment of the first Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) in 2040. 3 management options of minor actinides have been studied: no transmutation, transmutation in SFR and transmutation in an accelerator-driven system (ADS). Concerning economics the study shows that the cost overrun related to the transmutation process could vary between 5 to 9% in SFR and 26 % in the case of ADS.

  13. Nuclear waste disposal—pyrochlore (A2B2O7): Nuclear waste form for the immobilization of plutonium and "minor" actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Weber, William J.; Lian, Jie

    2004-06-01

    During the past half-century, the nuclear fuel cycle has generated approximately 1400 metric tons of plutonium and substantial quantities of the "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am, and Cm. The successful disposition of these actinides has an important impact on the strategy for developing advanced nuclear fuel cycles, weapons proliferation, and the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. During the last decade, there has been substantial interest in the use of the isometric pyrochlore structure-type, A2B2O7, for the immobilization of actinides. Most of the interest has focused on titanate-pyrochlore because of its chemical durability; however, these compositions experience a radiation-induced transition from the crystalline-to-aperiodic state due to radiation damage from the alpha-decay of actinides. Depending on the actinide concentration, the titanate pyrochlore will become amorphous in less than 1000 years of storage. Recently, systematic ion beam irradiations of a variety of pyrochlore compositions has revealed that many zirconate pyrochlores do not become amorphous, but remain crystalline as a defect fluorite structure-type due to disordering of the A- and B-site cations. The zirconate pyrochlores will remain crystalline even to very high doses, greater than 100 displacements per atom. Systematic experimental studies of actinide-doped and ion beam-irradiated pyrochlore, analyses of natural U- and Th-bearing pyrochlore, and simulations of the energetics of the disordering process now provide a rather detailed understanding of the structural and chemical controls on the response of pyrochlore to radiation. These results provide a solid basis for predicting the behavior and durability of pyrochlore used to immobilize plutonium.

  14. Theoretical atomic volumes of the light actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M. D.; Boettger, J. C.; Albers, R. C.; Singh, D. J.

    2000-02-15

    The zero-pressure zero-temperature equilibrium volumes and bulk moduli are calculated for the light actinides Th through Pu using two independent all-electron, full-potential, electronic-structure methods: the full-potential linear augmented-plane-wave method and the linear combinations of Gaussian-type orbitals-fitting function method. The results produced by these two distinctly different electronic-structure techniques are in good agreement with each other, but differ significantly from previously published calculations using the full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital (FP-LMTO) method. The theoretically calculated equilibrium volumes are in some cases nearly 10% larger than the previous FP-LMTO calculations, bringing them much closer to the experimentally observed volumes. We also discuss the anomalous upturn in equilibrium volume seen experimentally for {alpha}-Pu. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lavietes, A.D.

    1999-10-01

    The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF) was designed to provide long-term storage of radionuclides. Task A.229 defined the requirement for a small, low-power radiation detection capability. This detection system was to be deployed as a component of an autonomously guided vehicle (AGV) located within the storage vault of the facility and necessarily had to exhibit the qualities of low maintenance, long lifetime, and stable performance typically required of unattended monitoring systems. The detection system would interface directly with the on-board computer developed as part of the AGV under a separate task. The overall task for this system would be to provide isotopic identification of the material stored within this facility.

  16. New density functional theory approaches for enabling prediction of chemical and physical properties of plutonium and other actinides.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    functional the Harmonic Oscillator Gas is providing the necessary reference system for the strong correlation and localization occurring in actinides. Preliminary testing shows that the new Hao-Armiento-Mattsson (HAM) functional gives a trend towards improved results for the crystalline copper oxide test system we have chosen. This test system exhibits the same exchange-correlation physics as the actinide systems do, but without the relativistic effects, giving access to a pure testing ground for functionals. During the work important insights have been gained. An example is that currently available functionals, contrary to common belief, make large errors in so called hybridization regions where electrons from different ions interact and form new states. Together with the new understanding of functional issues, the Dirac implementation into the RSPt code will permit us to gain more fundamental understanding, both quantitatively and qualitatively, of materials of importance for Sandia and the rest of the Nuclear Weapons complex.

  17. Decay analysis of pre-actinide and trans-actinide nuclei formed using various projectiles on a 197Au target at ECN*=60 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Neha; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2016-01-01

    The collective clusterization approach of the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM) has been applied to study the decay of odd mass nuclei 223Pa*, 215Fr*, 227Np*, and 233Am*, which are formed in heavy-ion-induced reactions. The aim of this study is to investigate the decay pattern and related behavior of these heavy mass nuclei formed in four distinct reactions involving different projectiles (with mass A =18 -36 ) induced on 197Au target nucleus. Further, in order to analyze the role of deformations, the calculations have been done by considering spherical choice of fragmentation as well as with inclusion of quadrupole (β2) deformation. For the heavy mass region, with fission being the dominant decay mode, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of projectile mass in reference to fission decay patterns of the pre-actinide 215Fr* nucleus and the trans-actinide nuclei 227Np* 223Pa*, 223Am* and formed at common excitation energy, ECN*=60 MeV . Besides this, the shell closure effects and the role of orientation have been explored, which suggest the presence of a noncompound nucleus process such as quasifission (QF) for the odd mass nuclei under consideration. For both the compound nucleus and the noncompound nucleus processes, the results obtained using DCM are found to have nice agreement with experimental observations. The isotopic and isobaric analysis is also worked out so as to have a comprehensive idea about the dynamics involved.

  18. Actinide cross section program at ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, J. W.T.

    1980-01-01

    The actinide cross section program at ORELA, the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, is aimed at obtaining accurate neutron cross sections (primarily fission, capture, and total) for actinide nuclides which occur in fission reactors. Such cross sections, measured as a function of neutron energy over as wide a range of energies as feasible, comprise a data base that permits calculated predictions of the formation and removal of these nuclides in reactors. The present program is funded by the Division of Basic Energy Sciences of DOE, and has components in several divisions at ORNL. For intensively ..cap alpha..-active nuclides, many of the existing fission cross section data have been provided by underground explosions. New measurement techniques, developed at ORELA, now permit linac measurements on fissionable nuclides with alpha half-lives as short as 28 years. Capture and capture-plus-fission measurements utilize scintillation detectors (of capture ..gamma.. rays and fission neutrons) in which pulse shape discrimination plays an important role. Total cross sections can be measured at ORELA on samples of only a few milligrams. A simultaneous program of chemical and isotopic analyses of samples irradiated in EBR-II is in progress to provide benchmarks for the existing differential measurements. These analyses are being studied with updated versions of ORIGEN and with sensitivity determinations. Calculations of the sensitivity to cross section changes of various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle are also being made. Even in this relatively mature field, many cross sections still require improvements to provide an adequate data base. Examples of recent techniques and measurements are presented. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Electronic Structure of AC-Clusters and High-Resolution X-ray Spectra of Actinides in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, Nicolay Alex

    2007-07-01

    Ab initio calculations using SCF approach for and analysis of results of investigation of the electronic structure of the clusters RAn+:[L]k with rare earths or actinides were carried out for the clusters in solids and liquids. Theoretical results for the electronic structure, radial integrals and energy of X- ray lines are presented for AC ions with unoccupied 5f-shell in the clusters in oxides, chlorides and fluorides environment. Possibility of collapse of nf-shell for the separate clusters and identification of electronic state of ions with unstable nuclei, are discussed, too. (author)

  20. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hobart, D. E.

    1981-06-01

    Simultaneous observation of electrochemical and spectroscopic properties (spectroelectrochemistry) at optically transparent electrodes (OTE's) was used to study some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements. Cyclic voltammetry at microelectrodes was used in conjunction with spectroelectrochemistry for the study of redox couples. Additional analytical techniques were used. The formal reduction potential (E/sup 0/') values of the M(III)/M(II) redox couples in 1 M KCl at pH 6 were -0.34 +- 0.01 V for Eu, -1.18 +- 0.01 V for Yb, and -1.50 +- 0.01 V for Sm. Spectropotentiostatic determination of E/sup 0/' for the Eu(III)/Eu(II) redox couple yielded a value of -0.391 +- 0.005 V. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Ce(IV)/Ce(III) redox couple in concentrated carbonate solution gave E/sup 0/' equal to 0.051 +- 0.005 V, which is about 1.7 V less positive than the E/sup 0/' value in noncomplexing solution. This same difference in potential was observed for the E/sup 0/' values of the Pr(IV)/Pr(III) and Tb(IV)/Tb(III) redox couples in carbonate solution, and thus Pr(IV) and Tb(IV) were stabilized in this medium. The U(VI)/U(V)/U(IV) and U(IV)/U(III) redox couples were studied in 1 M KCl at OTE's. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Np(VI)/Np(V) redox couple in 1 M HClO/sub 4/ gave an E/sup 0/' value of 1.140 +- 0.005 V. An E/sup 0/' value of 0.46 +- 0.01 V for the Np(VII)/Np(VI) couple was found by voltammetry. Oxidation of Am(III) was studied in concentrated carbonate solution, and a reversible cyclic voltammogram for the Am(IV)/Am(III) couple yielded E/sup 0/' = 0.92 +- 0.01 V in this medium; this value was used to estimate the standard reduction potential (E/sup 0/) of the couple as 2.62 +- 0.01 V. Attempts to oxidize Cm(III) in concentrated carbonate solution were not successful which suggests that the predicted E/sup 0/ value for the Cm(IV)/Cm(III) redox couple may be in error.

  1. Interaction of Pseudomonas fluorescens with Eu(III) and Ce(IV) - Desferrioxamine Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A.

    2002-12-01

    Naturally occurring chelating agents-, such as siderophores, are able to form complexes with actinides and enhance their solubility and mobility in the environment. Adsorption and/or biodegradation of chelated actinides by microorganisms are important processes which regulate their mobility in the natural environment. In this study, association of Eu(III), Ce(IV), and Fe(III) - desferrioxamine B (DFO) complexes with aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC 55241), was investigated-, Eu(III) and Ce(IV) were used as analogues to trivalent and tetravalent actinides, respectively. When 20 μM of 1:1 Eu(III) - and Ce(IV) - DFO complexes were incubated with P. fluorescens in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 7.3), the metals were removed from solution, with no change in DFO in solution. With decreasing metal/DFO molar ratio from 1 to 0.01, the accumulation of Eu(III) and Ce(IV) by P. fluorescens decreased. Kinetics study showed that accumulation of Eu(III) reached the maximum within 30 minutes, and then it decreased slightly with time. On the other hand, Ce(IV) accumulation proceeded in a parabolic process where the kinetics was slower than that of Eu(III) accumulation. In comparison to Eu(III) and Ce(IV), the removal of Fe(III) added as a DFO complex by P. fluorescens was not observed. The formation constants (log K) of Eu(III) - DFO and Fe(III) - DFO are reported to be 15 and 30.6, respectively. These results suggest that Eu(III) - DFO complex was dissociated in the presence of bacteria cells and was readily biosorbed.

  2. Double liquid membrane system for the removal of actinides and lanthanides from acidic nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Danesi, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Supported liquid membranes (SLM), consisting of an organic solution of n-octyl-(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in decalin are able to perform selective separation and concentration of actinide and lanthanide ions from aqueous nitrate feed solutions and synthetic nuclear wastes. In the membrane process a possible strip solution is a mixture of formic acid and hydroxylammonium formate (HAF). The effectiveness of this strip solution is reduced and eventually nullified by the simultaneous transfer through the SLM of nitric acid which accumulates in the strip solution. A possible way to overcome this drawback is to make use of a second SLM consisting of a primary amine which is able to extract only HNO/sub 3/ from the strip solution. In this work the results obtained by experimentally studying the membrane system: synthetic nuclear waste/CMPO-TBP membrane/HCOOH-HAF strip solution/primary amine membrane/NaOH solution, are reported. They show that the use of a second liquid membrane is effective in controlling the HNO/sub 3/ concentration in the strip solution, thus allowing the actinide and lanthanide ions removal from the feed solution to proceed to completion. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Double liquid membrane system for the removal of actinides and lanthanides from acidic nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Danesi, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Supported liquid membranes (SLM), consisting of an organic solution of n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in decalin are able to perform selective separation and concentration of actinide and lanthanide ions from aqueous nitrate feed solutions and synthetic nuclear wastes. In the membrane process a possible strip solution is a mixture of formic acid and hydroxylammonium formate (HAF). The effectiveness of this strip solution is reduced and eventually nullified by the simultaneous transfer through the SLM of HNO3 which accumulates in the strip solution. A possible way to overcome this drawback is to make use of a second SLM consisting of a primary amine which is able to extract only HNO3 from the strip solution. In this work the results obtained by experimentally studying the membrane system: synthetic nuclear waste/CMPO-TBP membrane/HCOOH-HAF strip solution/primary amine membrane/NaOH solution, are reported. They show that the use of a second liquid membrane is effective in controlling the HNO3 concentration in the strip solution, thus allowing the actinide and lanthanide ions removal from the feed solution to proceed to completion.

  4. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  5. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    DOE PAGES

    Roberto, J.; Alexander, Charles W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Ezold, Julie G.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Hogle, Susan L.

    2015-06-18

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing themore » production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.« less

  6. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.; Alexander, Charles W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Ezold, Julie G.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Hogle, Susan L.

    2015-06-18

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing the production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.

  7. Separation of Minor Actinides from Lanthanides by Dithiophosphinic Acid Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Peterman; M. R. Greenhalgh; R. D. Tillotson; J. R. Klaehn; M. K. Harrup; T. A. Luther; J. D. Law; L. M. Daniels

    2008-09-01

    The selective extraction of the minor actinides (Am(III) and Cm(III)) from the lanthanides is an important part of advanced reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. This separation would allow the Am/Cm to be fabricated into targets and recycled to a reactor and the lanthanides to be dispositioned. This separation is difficult to accomplish due to the similarities in the chemical properties of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides. Research efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory have identified an innovative synthetic pathway yielding new regiospecific dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants. The synthesis provides DPAH derivatives that can address the issues concerning minor actinide separation and extractant stability. For this work, two new symmetric DPAH extractants have been prepared. The use of these extractants for the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides will be discussed.

  8. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberto, J. B.; Alexander, C. W.; Boll, R. A.; Burns, J. D.; Ezold, J. G.; Felker, L. K.; Hogle, S. L.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing the production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.

  9. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  10. Pyrochlore-structured titanate ceramics for immobilisation of actinides: Hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and stainless steel/waste form interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Huijun; Moricca, Sam

    2008-07-01

    A pyrochlore-structured titanate ceramic has been studied in respect of its overall feasibility for immobilisation of impure actinide-rich radioactive wastes through the hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) technique. The resultant waste form contains mainly pyrochlore (˜70%), rutile (˜14%) as well as perovskite (˜12%), hollandite (˜2%) and brannerite (˜1%). Optical spectroscopy confirms that uranium (used to simulate Pu) exists mainly in the stable pyrochlore-structured phase as tetravalent ions as designed. The stainless steel/waste form interactions under HIPing conditions (1280 °C/100 MPa/3 h) do not seem to change the actinide-bearing phases and therefore should have no detrimental effect on the waste form.

  11. Actinide Source Term Program, position paper. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.; Papenguth, H.W.; Crafts, C.C.; Dhooge, N.J.

    1994-11-15

    The Actinide Source Term represents the quantity of actinides that could be mobilized within WIPP brines and could migrate with the brines away from the disposal room vicinity. This document presents the various proposed methods for estimating this source term, with a particular focus on defining these methods and evaluating the defensibility of the models for mobile actinide concentrations. The conclusions reached in this document are: the 92 PA {open_quotes}expert panel{close_quotes} model for mobile actinide concentrations is not defensible; and, although it is extremely conservative, the {open_quotes}inventory limits{close_quotes} model is the only existing defensible model for the actinide source term. The model effort in progress, {open_quotes}chemical modeling of mobile actinide concentrations{close_quotes}, supported by a laboratory effort that is also in progress, is designed to provide a reasonable description of the system and be scientifically realistic and supplant the {open_quotes}Inventory limits{close_quotes} model.

  12. Analysis of the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Design power plant studies were carried out for two applications of the plasma core reactor: (1) As a breeder reactor, (2) As a reactor able to transmute actinides effectively. In addition to the above applications the reactor produced electrical power with a high efficiency. A reactor subsystem was designed for each of the two applications. For the breeder reactor, neutronics calculations were carried out for a U-233 plasma core with a molten salt breeding blanket. A reactor was designed with a low critical mass (less than a few hundred kilograms U-233) and a breeding ratio of 1.01. The plasma core actinide transmutation reactor was designed to transmute the nuclear waste from conventional LWR's. The spent fuel is reprocessed during which 100% of Np, Am, Cm, and higher actinides are separated from the other components. These actinides are then manufactured as oxides into zirconium clad fuel rods and charged as fuel assemblies in the reflector region of the plasma core actinide transmutation reactor. In the equilibrium cycle, about 7% of the actinides are directly fissioned away, while about 31% are removed by reprocessing.

  13. Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS

    SciTech Connect

    Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. Kurniadi, R. Su'ud, Z.

    2014-09-30

    Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS have been conducted. In this work, fission cross section resulted from MCNP6 prediction will be compared with result from TALYS calculation. MCNP6 with its event generator CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 have been validated and verified for several intermediate and heavy nuclides fission reaction data and also has a good agreement with experimental data for fission reaction that induced by photons, pions, and nucleons at energy from several ten of MeV to about 1 TeV. The calculation that induced within TALYS will be focused mainly to several hundred MeV for actinide and sub-actinide nuclides and will be compared with MCNP6 code and several experimental data from other evaluator.

  14. A NEW EXTRACTION CHROMATOGRAPHY RESIN CONTAINING KLÄUI LIGANDS FOR APPLICATION IN ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Wester, Dennis W.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Latesky, Stanley L.; Martyr, Cuthbert C.; Richards, Kia N.

    2004-11-01

    An extraction chromatography resin containing the anionic ligand (η5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)tris-(diethylphosphito-P)cobalt(III), (L) has been prepared. The resin consists of 1 wt% L on Amberlite® XAD-7. This resin strongly sorbs Am(III) and Pu(IV). The sorption of these ions decreases with increasing nitric acid concentration, but this effect is more pronounced for Am(III). This allows for convenient separation of Am(III) from Pu(IV) by simple adjustments in the nitric acid concentration. The tripodal geometry of L disfavors the complexation of uranyl ion, so sorption of U(VI) by the L-containing resin is weak.

  15. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-08-12

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO2 2+). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative

  16. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  17. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  18. Synthesis of crystalline ceramics for actinide immobilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Burakov, B.; Gribova, V.; Kitsay, A.; Ojovan, M.; Hyatt, N.C.; Stennett, M.C.

    2007-07-01

    Methods for the synthesis of ceramic wasteforms for the immobilization of actinides are common to those for non-radioactive ceramics: hot uniaxial pressing (HUP); hot isostatic pressing (HIP); cold pressing followed by sintering; melting (for some specific ceramics, such as garnet/perovskite composites). Synthesis of ceramics doped with radionuclides is characterized with some important considerations: all the radionuclides should be incorporated into crystalline structure of durable host-phases in the form of solid solutions and no separate phases of radionuclides should be present in the matrix of final ceramic wasteform; all procedures of starting precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis should follow safety requirements of nuclear industry. Synthesis methods that avoid the use of very high temperatures and pressures and are easily accomplished within the environment of a glove-box or hot cell are preferable. Knowledge transfer between the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI, Russia) and Immobilisation Science Laboratory (ISL, UK) was facilitated in the framework of a joint project supported by UK Royal Society. In order to introduce methods of precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis we selected well-known procedures readily deployable in radiochemical processing plants. We accounted that training should include main types of ceramic wasteforms which are currently discussed for industrial applications. (authors)

  19. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL`s Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused.

  20. Microbial transformations of actinides in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livens, F. R.; Al-Bokari, M.; Fomina, M.; Gadd, G. M.; Geissler, A.; Lloyd, J. R.; Renshaw, J. C.; Vaughan, D. J.

    2010-03-01

    The diversity of microorganisms is still far from understood, although many examples of the microbial biotransformation of stable, pollutant and radioactive elements, involving Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi, are known. In estuarine sediments from the Irish Sea basin, which have been labelled by low level effluent discharges, there is evidence of an annual cycle in Pu solubility, and microcosm experiments have demonstrated both shifts in the bacterial community and changes in Pu solubility as a result of changes in redox conditions. In the laboratory, redox transformation of both U and Pu by Geobacter sulfurreducens has been demonstrated and EXAFS spectroscopy has been used to understand the inability of G. sufurreducens to reduce Np(V). Fungi promote corrosion of metallic U alloy through production of a range of carboxylic acid metabolites, and are capable of translocating the dissolved U before precipitating it externally to the hyphae, as U(VI) phosphate phases. These examples illustrate the far-reaching but complex effects which microorganisms can have on actinide behaviour.

  1. A systematic analysis of the spectra of trivalent actinide chlorides in D sub 3 h site symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Carnall, W.T. )

    1992-06-15

    The optical spectra of actinide ions in the compound AnCl{sub 3} and doped into single-crystal LaCl{sub 3} were interpreted in terms of transitions within 5{ital f}{sup {ital N}} configurations. Energy-level calculations were carried out using an effective-operator Hamiltonian, the parameters of which were determined by fitting experimental data. Atomic and crystal-field matrices were diagonalized simultaneously assuming an approximate {ital D}{sub 3{ital h}} site symmetry. Spectroscopic data were taken from the literature but in most cases supplemented by unpublished measurements in absorption and in fluorescence. Data for each ion were analyzed independently, then the model parameters were intercompared and in many cases adjusted such that in the final fitting process the principal interactions showed uniform trends in parameter values with increasing atomic number. Consistent with analyses of the spectra of lanthanide ions in both LaCl{sub 3} and LaF{sub 3}, abrupt changes in magnitude of certain crystal-field parameters were found near the center of the 5{ital f}{sup {ital N}} series. This resulted in two groups of parameter values, but with consistent trends for both halves of the series, and generally very good agreement between observed and computed energies. A new energy-level chart based on computed crystal-field level energies for each trivalent actinide ion has been prepared.

  2. Laboratory studies of actinide metal-silicate fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Actinide and Sm partition coefficients between silicate melt and several metallic phases have been measured. Under reducing conditions Si, Th, U and Pu can be reduced to metals from silicate melts and alloyed with a platinum-gold alloy. U and Pu enter a molten Pt-Si alloy with roughly equal affinity but U strongly partitions into the solid Pt. Th behaves qualitatively the same as Pu but is much less readily reduced than U, and Sm appears to remain unreduced. Experiments with Fe metal have shown that the partition coefficients of the actinides between Fe and silicate liquid are extremely low, suggesting a very low actinide concentration in planetary cores. Experiments show that platinum metals can efficiently fractionate actinides and fractionate actinides from lanthanides and this process may be relevant to the condensation behavior of these elements from the solar nebula. Pt-metal grains in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions appear to be U-poor, although the sub-class of Zr-bearing Pt metals may have high U contents.

  3. Theoretical investigation on multiple bonds in terminal actinide nitride complexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Xiang-Ke; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-09-15

    A series of actinide (An) species of L-An-N compounds [An = Pa-Pu, L = [N(CH2CH2NSiPr(i)3)3](3-), Pr(i) = CH(CH3)2] have been investigated using scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) without considering spin-orbit coupling effects. The ground state geometric and electronic structures and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of actinide compounds were studied systematically in neutral and anionic forms. It was found that with increasing actinide atomic number, the bond length of terminal multiple An-N1 bond decreases, in accordance with the actinide contraction. The Mayer bond order of An-N1 decreases gradually from An = Pa to Pu, which indicates a decrease in bond strength. The terminal multiple bond for L-An-N compounds contains one σ and two π molecular orbitals, and the contributions of the 6d orbital to covalency are larger in magnitude than the 5f orbital based on NBO analysis and topological analysis of electron density. This work may help in understanding of the bonding nature of An-N multiple bonds and elucidating the trends and electronic structure changes across the actinide series. It can also shed light on the construction of novel An-N multiple bonds.

  4. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions.

  5. Computational Tools for Predictive Modeling of Properties in Complex Actinide Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Autschbach, Jochen; Govind, Niranjan; Atta Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, John H.; de Jong, Wibe A.

    2015-03-30

    In this chapter we focus on methodological and computational aspects that are key to accurately modeling the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular systems containing actinides within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. Our focus is on properties that require either an accurate relativistic all-electron description or an accurate description of the dynamical behavior of actinide species in an environment at finite temperature, or both. The implementation of the methods and the calculations discussed in this chapter were done with the NWChem software suite (Valiev et al. 2010). In the first two sections we discuss two methods that account for relativistic effects, the ZORA and the X2C Hamiltonian. Section 1.2.1 discusses the implementation of the approximate relativistic ZORA Hamiltonian and its extension to magnetic properties. Section 1.3 focuses on the exact X2C Hamiltonian and the application of this methodology to obtain accurate molecular properties. In Section 1.4 we examine the role of a dynamical environment at finite temperature as well as the presence of other ions on the thermodynamics of hydrolysis and exchange reaction mechanisms. Finally, Section 1.5 discusses the modeling of XAS (EXAFS, XANES) properties in realistic environments accounting for both the dynamics of the system and (for XANES) the relativistic effects.

  6. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride contaminated actinide waste

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Brian L.; Donald, Ian W.; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2009-03-31

    AWE has developed a process for the immobilization of ILW waste containing a significant quantity of chloride using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate based phases, chlorapatite, Ca5(PO4)3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca2(PO4)Cl. Non-active trials performed at AWE using samarium as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process using actinide-doped material were performed at PNNL which confirmed the immobilized wasteform resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu /241Am loaded ceramic at 40°C/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 x 10-5 g.m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g.m-2 for Pu and Cl respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced by 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected using XRD after the samples had experienced a radiation dose of 4 x 1018 α.g-1. Leach trials showed that there had been an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  7. Application of N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides in the separation of some actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, G.M.; Grossi, G.

    1980-05-01

    N,N-dialkyl substituted alkyl amides are known to be good extractants of some actinides such as U, Pu, and Th. Their stability is comparable to that of TBP, and their degradation products do not interfere as do the degradation products of TBP. On the other hand, the principal disadvantage of the amides is their tendency to form poorly soluble U adducts in organic diluents. A systematic investigation has been carried out on the extractive behavior of two typical alkyl amides of different structures with respect to the actinide ions UO/sub 2/ /sup 2+/, Th /sup 4+/, Np /sup +4/, Pu /sup +4/, NpO /sub 2/ /sup 2+/, PuO /sub 2/ / sup 2+/, Pu /sup 3+/, and Am /sup 3+/, as well as with respect to the most significant fission products. The results obtained have been compared with those obtained using TBP in the same experimental conditions, verifying the applicability of amides in the separation of U from Th.

  8. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride contaminated actinide waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, B. L.; Donald, I. W.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2009-03-01

    A process for the immobilization of intermediate level waste containing a significant quantity of chloride using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material has been developed. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate-based phases, chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Non-active trials performed using Sm as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process, in which actinide-doped materials were used, were performed at PNNL which confirmed the wasteform resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu/241Am loaded ceramic at 313 K/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 × 10-5 g m-2 and 2.7 × 10-3 g m-2 for Pu and Cl, respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced with 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected in the XRD spectra after the samples had experienced an α radiation fluence of 4 × 1018 g-1. Leach trials showed that there was an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  9. Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation: PNNL FY 2010 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Neiner, Doinita; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2010-08-24

    Work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in FY 2010 addressed two lines of inquiry. The two hypotheses put forth were: 1. The extractants from the TRUEX( ) process (CMPO)( ) and from the TALSPEAK( ) process (HDEHP)( ) can be combined into a single process solvent to separate 1) the lanthanides and actinides from acidic high-level waste and 2) the actinides from the lanthanides in a single solvent extraction process. (Note: This combined process will hereafter be referred to as the TRUSPEAK process.) A series of empirical measurements performed (both at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory) in FY 2009 supported this hypothesis, but also indicated some nuances to the chemistry. Lanthanide/americium separation factors of 12 and higher were obtained with a prototypic TRUSPEAK solvent when extracting the lanthanides from a citrate-buffered DTPA( ) solution. Although the observed separation factors are sufficiently high to design an actinide/lanthanide separation process, a better understanding of the chemistry is expected to lead to improved solvent formulations and improved process performance. Work in FY 2010 focused on understanding the synergistic extraction behavior observed for Nd(III) and Am(III) when extracted into mixtures of CMPO and HDEHP. The interaction between CMPO and HDEHP in dodecane was investigated by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and an adduct of the type CMPO•HDEHP was found to form. The formation of this adduct will reduce the effective extractant concentrations and must be taken into account when modeling metal ion extraction data in this system. Studies were also initiated to determine the Pitzer parameters for Nd(III) in lactate media. 2. Higher oxidation states (e.g., +5 and +6) of Am can be stabilized in solution by complexation with uranophilic ligands, and this chemistry can be exploited to separate Am from Cm. To test this hypothesis, the previously reported stereognostic uranophilic ligands NPB( ) and ETAC(e) were

  10. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  11. FY06 ANNUAL REPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT #95061STRATEGIC DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF INORGANIC SORBENTSFOR CESIUM, STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D

    2006-08-10

    The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations. During the fifth year of the project our studies focused along the following paths: (1) determination of Cs{sup +} ion exchange mechanism in sodium titanium silicates with sitinikite topology and the influence of crystallinity on ion exchange, (2) synthesis and characterization of novel peroxo-titanate materials for strontium and actinide separations, and (3) further refinements in computational models for the CST and polyoxoniobate materials.

  12. Modeling actinide chemistry with ASPEN PLUS

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    When chemical engineers think of chemical processing, they often do not include the US government or the national laboratories as significant participants. Compared to the scale of chemical processing in the chemical process, petrochemical and pharmaceutical industries, the government contribution to chemical processing is not large. However, for the past fifty years, the US government has been, heavily involved in chemical processing of some very specialized materials, in particular, uranium and plutonium for nuclear weapons. Individuals and corporations have paid taxes that, in part have been used to construct and to maintain a series of very expensive laboratories and production facilities throughout the country. Even ignoring the ongoing R & D costs, the price per pound of enriched uranium or of plutonium exceeds that of platinum by a wide margin. Now, with the end of the cold war, the government is decommissioning large numbers of nuclear weapons and cleaning up the legacy of radioactive wastes generated over the last fifty years. It is likely that the costs associated with the build-down and clean-up of the nuclear weapons complex will exceed the investment of the past fifty years of production. Los Alamos National Laboratory occupies a special place in the history of nuclear weapons. The first weapons were designed and assembled at Los Alamos using uranium produced in Oak Ridge, Tennessee or plutonium produced in Richland, Washington. Many of the thermophysical and metallurgical properties of actinide elements have been investigated at Los Alamos. The only plutonium processing facility currently operating in the US is in Los Alamos, and the Laboratory is striving to capture and maintain the uranium processing technology applicable to the post-cold war era. Laboratory researchers are actively involved in developing methods for cleaning up the wastes associated with production of nuclear weapons throughout the US.

  13. In pursuit of homoleptic actinide alkyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Lani A; Walensky, Justin R; Wu, Guang; Hayton, Trevor W

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article describes the pursuit of isolable homoleptic actinide alkyl complexes, starting with the pioneering work of Gilman during the Manhattan project. The initial reports in this area suggested that homoleptic uranium alkyls were too unstable to be isolated, but Wilkinson demonstrated that tractable uranium alkyls could be generated by purposeful "ate" complex formation, which serves to saturate the uranium coordination sphere and provide the complexes with greater kinetic stability. More recently, we reported the solid-state molecular structures of several homoleptic uranium alkyl complexes, including [Li(THF)4][U(CH2(t)Bu)5], [Li(TMEDA)]2[UMe6], [K(THF)]3[K(THF)2][U(CH2Ph)6]2, and [Li(THF)4][U(CH2SiMe3)6], by employing Wilkinson's strategy. Herein, we describe our attempts to extend this chemistry to thorium. The treatment of ThCl4(DME)2 with 5 equiv of LiCH2(t)Bu or LiCH2SiMe3 at -25 °C in THF affords [Th(CH2(t)Bu)5] (1) and [Li(DME)2][Th(CH2SiMe3)5 (2), respectively, in moderate yields. Similarly, the treatment of ThCl4(DME)2 with 6 equiv of K(CH2Ph) produces [K(THF)]2[Th(CH2Ph)6] (3), in good yield. Complexes 1-3 have been fully characterized, while the structures of 1 and 3 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, the electronic properties of 1 and 3 were explored by density functional theory.

  14. Actinide Selective Systems for Environmental Extraction and Sensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xianghong Wu; Mohan Singh Bharara; Tate, Brandon K.; Tonks, Stephen A.; Vilseck, Jonah Z.; Gorden, Anne Elizabeth Vivian

    2008-07-01

    The potential environmental and health concerns surrounding actinides and the use of nuclear fuels limits the acceptance of nuclear power by the public. This in turn, hinders the capability of this country to take advantage of nuclear power. Expanding our fundamental knowledge of actinide coordination chemistry will allow for the development of improved actinide sensors, new separations methods, or new means of radioactive waste remediation. We have designed and optimized a solution-phase parallel method for the synthesis of a library of symmetrical 2-quinoxalinol salens, Schiff-base type ligands with a 2-quinoxalinol incorporated into the salen backbone. This combines the rigid salen coordination framework with the quinoxaline properties that impart properties for use in colorimetric or fluorescent sensors. These have now been incorporated into organic soluble resins for metal extraction. (authors)

  15. Actinide chemistry in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrell, M. T.; Burnett, D. S.

    1987-01-01

    Fission track radiography is used to investigate the U and Th microscale distribution in a set of Allende-meteorite Ca-Al-rich inclusions. In the Type B inclusions, the major phases melilite and fassaite are important actinide host phases, and on the rims of Type B inclusions and throughout all other inclusions studied, perovskite is the dominant actinide host phase. Results suggest that neither alteration nor loss or gain of an actinide-rich phase appears to have been an important Th/U fractionation mechanism, and that volatility differences may be the dominant factor. Th/U and rare earth element abundance patterns for the spinel and perovskite rim suggest rim formation by volatilization of interior material, and within the constraints of the brief time scale required for this heating, several mechanisms for spinel-perovskite rim formation are possible.

  16. FY2010 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Miller, Erin A.; Hatarik, R.

    2011-01-01

    This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Future work will include a follow-up measurement scheduled for December 2010 at LBNL. Lessons learned from the July 2010 measurements will be incorporated into these new measurements. Analysis of both the July and December experiments will be completed in a few months. A research paper to be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal will be drafted if the conclusions from the measurements warrant publication.

  17. Nuclear waste actinides as fissile fuel in hybrid blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, S.; Al-Kusayer, T.A.

    1983-12-01

    The widespread use of the present LWRs produces substantial quantities of nuclear waste materials. Among those, actinide nuclear waste poses a serious problem of stockage because the associated half life times for actinides is measured in terms of geological time periods (several millions of years) so that no waste disposal guarantee over such time intervals can be given, except for space disposal. On the other hand, these nuclear waste actinides are very good fissionable materials for high energetic (D,T) fusion neutrons. It is therefore worthwhile to investigate their quality as potential nuclear fuel in hybrid blankets. The present study investigates the neutronic performance of hybrid blankets containing Np/sup 237/ and Cm/sup 244/ as fissile materials. The isotopic composition of Americium has been adjusted to the spent fuel isotope composition of a LWR. The geometrical design has been made, according to the AYMAN fussion-fission (hybrid) experimental facility, now in the very early phase of planning.

  18. A new opportunity: coincident spectroscopy in neutron-deficient actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Oliver; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Baartman, B.; Fallon, P.; Esker, N. E.; Kwarsick, J.; Machiavelli, A. O.; Mudder, P. R.; Olive, D. T.; Pang, G.; Rissanen, J.; Nitsche, H.

    2014-09-01

    Due to high γ-ray background rates heavy element production facilities are usually not sensitive to the electron capture decay of neutron deficient actinides. We have developed new capabilities at the Berkeley Gas Filled Separator (BGS) that allow us to study these isotopes. The highly selective and efficient separation of compound nucleus evaporation residue products using the BGS couple with a rapid delivery to a low-background detector facility, opens up many new possibilities for nuclear decay and structure studies in the neutron deficient actinides. The decay of these actinides produces vacancies in the K-shell resulting in x-rays uniquely identifying the Z of the decay products. We present the first results of this new methodology in studying the nuclear structure of fermium-254 by observing the gamma rays in coincidence with fermium x-rays. Coincident gamma-decay spectroscopy gives us a new tool to study the nuclear structure of previously inaccessible systems.

  19. Crystal structure of actinide metals at high compression

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, L.; Soederlind, P.

    1995-08-01

    The crystal structures of some light actinide metals are studied theoretically as a function of applied pressure. The first principles electronic structure theory is formulated in the framework of density functional theory, with the gradient corrected local density approximation of the exchange-correlation functional. The light actinide metals are shown to be well described as itinerant (metallic) f-electron metals and generally, they display a crystal structure which have, in agreement with previous theoretical suggestions, increasing degree of symmetry and closed-packing upon compression. The theoretical calculations agree well with available experimental data. At very high compression, the theory predicts closed-packed structures such as the fcc or the hcp structures or the nearly closed-packed bcc structure for the light actinide metals. A simple canonical band picture is presented to explain in which particular closed-packed form these metals will crystallize at ultra-high pressure.

  20. Actinide Dioxides in Water: Interactions at the Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitaly; Shvareva, Tatiana Y.; Hayun, Shmuel; Asta, Mark; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-12-15

    A comprehensive understanding of chemical interactions between water and actinide dioxide surfaces is critical for safe operation and storage of nuclear fuels. Despite substantial previous research, understanding the nature of these interactions remains incomplete. In this work, we combine accurate calorimetric measurements with first-principles computational studies to characterize surface energies and adsorption enthalpies of water on two fluorite-structured compounds, ThO₂ and CeO₂, that are relevant for understanding the behavior of water on actinide oxide surfaces more generally. We determine coverage-dependent adsorption enthalpies and demonstrate a mixed molecular and dissociative structure for the first hydration layer. The results show a correlation between the magnitude of the anhydrous surface energy and the water adsorption enthalpy. Further, they suggest a structural model featuring one adsorbed water molecule per one surface cation on the most stable facet that is expected to be a common structural signature of water adsorbed on actinide dioxide compounds.

  1. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  2. Selection of actinide chemical analogues for WIPP tests

    SciTech Connect

    Villarreal, R.; Spall, D.

    1995-07-05

    The Department of Energy must demonstrate the effectiveness of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a permanent repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. Performance assessments of the WIPP require that estimates of the transportability and outcome of the radionuclides (actinides) be determined from disposal rooms that may become either partially or completely filled with brine. Federal regulations limit the amount of radioactivity that may be unintentionally released to the accessible environment by any mechanism during the post closure phase up to 10,000 years. Thermodynamic models have been developed to predict the concentrations of actinides in the WIPP disposal rooms under various situations and chemical conditions. These models are based on empirical and theoretical projections of the chemistry that might be present in and around the disposal room zone for both near and long-term periods. The actinides that are known to be present in the TRU wastes (and are included in the model) are Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am. Knowledge of the chemistry that might occur in the disposal rooms when the waste comes in contact with brine is important in understanding the range of oxidation states that might be present under different conditions. There is a need to establish the mechanisms and resultant rate of transport, migration, or effective retardation of actinides beyond the disposal rooms to the boundary of the accessible environment. The influence of the bulk salt rock, clay sediments and other geologic matrices on the transport behavior of actinides must be determined to establish the overall performance and capability of the WIPP in isolating waste from the environment. Tests to determine the capabilities of the WIPP geologic formations in retarding actinide species in several projected oxidation states would provide a means to demonstrate the effectiveness of the WIPP in retaining TRU wastes.

  3. Grouped actinide separation in advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, J.P.; Malmbeck, R.; Ougier, M.; Soucek, P.; Murakamin, T.; Tsukada, T.; Koyama, T.

    2013-07-01

    Aiming at cleaner waste streams (containing only the short-lived fission products) a partitioning and transmutation (P-T) scheme can significantly reduce the quantities of long-lived radionuclides consigned to waste. Many issues and options are being discussed and studied at present in view of selecting the optimal route. The choice is between individual treatment of the relevant elements and a grouped treatment of all actinides together. In the European Collaborative Project ACSEPT (Actinide recycling by Separation and Transmutation), grouped separation options derived from an aqueous extraction or from a dry pyroprocessing route were extensively investigated. Successful demonstration tests for both systems have been carried out in the frame of this project. The aqueous process called GANEX (Grouped Actinide Extraction) is composed of 2 cycles, a first one to recover the major part of U followed by a co-extraction of Np, Pu, Am, and Cm altogether. The pyro-reprocessing primarily applicable to metallic fuels such as the U-Pu-Zr alloy originally developed by the Argonne National Laboratory (US) in the mid 1980s, has also been applied to the METAPHIX fuels containing up to 5% of minor actinides and 5% of lanthanides (e.g. U{sub 60}Pu{sub 20}-Zr{sub 10}Am{sub 2}Nd{sub 3.5}Y{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}). A grouped actinide separation has been successfully carried out by electrorefining on solid Al cathodes. At present the recovery of the actinides from the alloy formed with Al upon electrodeposition is under investigation, because an efficient P-T cycle requires multiple re-fabrication and re-irradiation. (authors)

  4. Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution Analytical Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Weaver, Jamie L.

    2015-11-01

    This document is a companion report to a previous report, PNNL 24519, Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution, A Brief Review of the Literature, August 2015. In this companion report, we report a fast, accurate, newly developed analytical method for measurement of trace alpha-emitting actinide elements in commercial high-activity molybdenum-99 solution. Molybdenum-99 is widely used to produce 99mTc for medical imaging. Because it is used as a radiopharmaceutical, its purity must be proven to be extremely high, particularly for the alpha emitting actinides. The sample of 99Mo solution is measured into a vessel (such as a polyethylene centrifuge tube) and acidified with dilute nitric acid. A gadolinium carrier is added (50 µg). Tracers and spikes are added as necessary. Then the solution is made strongly basic with ammonium hydroxide, which causes the gadolinium carrier to precipitate as hydrous Gd(OH)3. The precipitate of Gd(OH)3 carries all of the actinide elements. The suspension of gadolinium hydroxide is then passed through a membrane filter to make a counting mount suitable for direct alpha spectrometry. The high-activity 99Mo and 99mTc pass through the membrane filter and are separated from the alpha emitters. The gadolinium hydroxide, carrying any trace actinide elements that might be present in the sample, forms a thin, uniform cake on the surface of the membrane filter. The filter cake is first washed with dilute ammonium hydroxide to push the last traces of molybdate through, then with water. The filter is then mounted on a stainless steel counting disk. Finally, the alpha emitting actinide elements are measured by alpha spectrometry.

  5. Actinide Sorption in a Brine/Dolomite Rock System: Evaluating the Degree of Conservatism in Kd Ranges used in Performance Assessment Modeling for the WIPP Nuclear Waste Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Reed, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM is the only operating nuclear waste repository in the US and has been accepting transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999. The WIPP is located in a salt deposit approximately 650 m below the surface and performance assessment (PA) modeling for a 10,000 year period is required to recertify the operating license with the US EPA every five years. The main pathway of concern for environmental release of radioactivity is a human intrusion caused by drilling into a pressurized brine reservoir below the repository. This could result in the flooding of the repository and subsequent transport in the high transmissivity layer (dolomite-rich Culebra formation) above the waste disposal rooms. We evaluate the degree of conservatism in the estimated sorption partition coefficients (Kds) ranges used in the PA based on an approach developed with granite rock and actinides (Dittrich and Reimus, 2015; Dittrich et al., 2015). Sorption onto the waste storage material (Fe drums) may also play a role in mobile actinide concentrations. We will present (1) a conceptual overview of how Kds are used in the PA model, (2) technical background of the evolution of the ranges and (3) results from batch and column experiments and model predictions for Kds with WIPP dolomite and clays, brine with various actinides, and ligands (e.g., acetate, citrate, EDTA) that could promote transport. The current Kd ranges used in performance models are based on oxidation state and are 5-400, 0.5-10,000, 0.03-200, and 0.03-20 mL g-1 for elements with oxidation states of III, IV, V, and VI, respectively. Based on redox conditions predicted in the brines, possible actinide species include Pu(III), Pu(IV), U(IV), U(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Am(III), and Th(IV). We will also discuss the challenges of upscaling from lab experiments to field scale predictions, the role of colloids, and the effect of engineered barrier materials (e.g., MgO) on transport conditions. Dittrich

  6. Thermally unstable complexants/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.

    1996-10-01

    In situ immobilization is an approach to isolation of radionuclides from the hydrosphere that is receiving increasing attention. Rather than removing the actinides from contaminated soils, this approach transforms the actinides into intrinsically insoluble mineral phases resistant to leaching by groundwater. The principal advangates of this concept are the low cost and low risk of operator exposure and/or dispersion of the radionuclides to the wider environment. The challenge of this approach is toe accomplish the immobilization without causing collateral damage to the environment (the cure shouldn`t be worse than the disease) and verification of system performance.

  7. Actinide geochemistry: from the molecular level to the real system.

    PubMed

    Geckeis, Horst; Rabung, Thomas

    2008-12-12

    Geochemical processes leading to either mobilization or retention of radionuclides in an aquifer system are significantly influenced by their interaction with rock, sediment and colloid surfaces. Therefore, a sound safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal requires the elucidation and quantification of those processes. State-of-the-art analytical techniques as e.g. laser- and X-ray spectroscopy are increasingly applied to study solid-liquid interface reactions to obtain molecular level speciation insight. We have studied the sorption of trivalent lanthanides and actinides onto aluminium oxides, hydroxides and purified clay minerals by the time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray-absorption spectroscopy. Chemical constitution and structure of surface bound actinides are proposed based on spectroscopic information. Open questions still remain with regard to the exact nature of mineral surface ligands and the mineral/water interface. Similarities of spectroscopic data obtained for M(III) sorbed onto gamma-alumina, and clay minerals suggest the formation of very comparable inner-sphere surface complexes such as S-O-An(III)(OH)x(2-x)(H2O)5-x at pH > 5. Those speciation data are found consistent with those predicted by surface complexation modelling. The applicability of data obtained for pure mineral phases to actinide sorption onto heterogeneously composed natural clay rock is examined by experiments and by geochemical modelling. Good agreement of experiment and model calculations is found for U(VI) and trivalent actinide/lanthanide sorption to natural clay rock. The agreement of spectroscopy, geochemical modelling and batch experiments with natural rock samples and purified minerals increases the reliability in model predictions. The assessment of colloid borne actinide migration observed in various laboratory and field studies calls for detailed information on actinide-colloid interaction. Kinetic stabilization of colloid bound actinides can be due

  8. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  9. Actinide geochemistry: from the molecular level to the real system.

    PubMed

    Geckeis, Horst; Rabung, Thomas

    2008-12-12

    Geochemical processes leading to either mobilization or retention of radionuclides in an aquifer system are significantly influenced by their interaction with rock, sediment and colloid surfaces. Therefore, a sound safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal requires the elucidation and quantification of those processes. State-of-the-art analytical techniques as e.g. laser- and X-ray spectroscopy are increasingly applied to study solid-liquid interface reactions to obtain molecular level speciation insight. We have studied the sorption of trivalent lanthanides and actinides onto aluminium oxides, hydroxides and purified clay minerals by the time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray-absorption spectroscopy. Chemical constitution and structure of surface bound actinides are proposed based on spectroscopic information. Open questions still remain with regard to the exact nature of mineral surface ligands and the mineral/water interface. Similarities of spectroscopic data obtained for M(III) sorbed onto gamma-alumina, and clay minerals suggest the formation of very comparable inner-sphere surface complexes such as S-O-An(III)(OH)x(2-x)(H2O)5-x at pH > 5. Those speciation data are found consistent with those predicted by surface complexation modelling. The applicability of data obtained for pure mineral phases to actinide sorption onto heterogeneously composed natural clay rock is examined by experiments and by geochemical modelling. Good agreement of experiment and model calculations is found for U(VI) and trivalent actinide/lanthanide sorption to natural clay rock. The agreement of spectroscopy, geochemical modelling and batch experiments with natural rock samples and purified minerals increases the reliability in model predictions. The assessment of colloid borne actinide migration observed in various laboratory and field studies calls for detailed information on actinide-colloid interaction. Kinetic stabilization of colloid bound actinides can be due

  10. Isotopic and criticality validation for actinide-only burnup credit

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, E.; Lancaster, D.; Rahimi, M.

    1997-07-01

    The techniques used for actinide-only burnup credit isotopic validation and criticality validation are presented and discussed. Trending analyses have been incorporated into both methodologies, requiring biases and uncertainties to be treated as a function of the trending parameters. The isotopic validation is demonstrated using the SAS2H module of SCALE 4.2, with the 27BURNUPLIB cross section library; correction factors are presented for each of the actinides in the burnup credit methodology. For the criticality validation, the demonstration is performed with the CSAS module of SCALE 4.2 and the 27BURNUPLIB, resulting in a validated upper safety limit.

  11. Production of heavy actinides in incomplete fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, N. V.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Iljinov, A. S.; Mebel, M. V.

    1994-10-01

    We present preliminary results of calculations by the phenomenological model of the estimated yield of some heavy actinide isotopes. It is assumed that these isotopes are produced as a result of multinucleon transfers followed by neutrons and charged particle emission A.S. Iljinov and E.A. Cherepanov (1980). The yield P(sub Z, N)(E*) of primary excited actinides is found using the model of N.V. Antonenko and R.V. Jolos (1991). Absolute cross-sections for different binary reaction channels are obtained by summing the cross-sections for all subchannels with an appreciable yield according to J. Wilczynski et al. (1980).

  12. New cubic structure compounds as actinide host phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Livshits, T. S.

    2010-03-01

    Various compounds with fluorite (cubic zirconia) and fluorite-derived (pyrochlore, zirconolite) structures are considered as promising actinide host phases at immobilization of actinide-bearing nuclear wastes. Recently some new cubic compounds — stannate and stannate-zirconate pyrochlores, murataite and related phases, and actinide-bearing garnet structure compounds were proposed as perspective matrices for complex actinide wastes. Zirconate pyrochlore (ideally Gd2Zr2O7) has excellent radiation resistance and high chemical durability but requires high temperatures (at least 1500 °C) to be produced by hot-pressing from sol-gel derived precursor. Partial Sn4+ substitution for Zr4+ reduces production temperature and the compounds REE2ZrSnO7 may be hot-pressed or cold pressed and sintered at ~1400 °C. Pyrochlore, A2B2O7-x (two-fold elementary fluorite unit cell), and murataite, A3B6C2O20-y (three-fold fluorite unit cell), are end-members of the polysomatic series consisting of the phases whose structures are built from alternating pyrochlore and murataite blocks (nano-sized modules) with seven- (2C/3C/2C), five- (2C/3C), eight- (3C/2C/3C) and three-fold (3C — murataite) fluorite unit cells. Actinide content in this series reduces in the row: 2C (pyrochlore) > 7C > 5C > 8C > 3C (murataite). Due to congruent melting murataite-based ceramics may be produced by melting and the firstly segregated phase at melt crystallization is that with the highest fraction of the pyrochlore modules in its structure. The melts containing up to 10 wt. % AnO2 (An = Th, U, Np, Pu) or REE/An fraction of HLW form at crystallization zoned grains composed sequentially of the 5C → 8C → 3C phases with the highest actinide concentration in the core and the lowest — in the rim of the grains. Radiation resistance of the "murataite" is comparable to titanate pyrochlores. One more promising actinide hosts are ferrites with garnet structure. The matrices containing sometime complex fluorite

  13. Analogue Study of Actinide Transport at Sites in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, A P; Simmons, A M; Halsey, W G

    2003-02-12

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) are engaged in a three-year cooperative study to observe the behavior of actinides in the natural environment at selected disposal sites and/or contamination sites in Russia. The purpose is to develop experimental data and models for actinide speciation, mobilization and transport processes in support of geologic repository design, safety and performance analyses. Currently at the mid-point of the study, the accomplishments to date include: evaluation of existing data and data needs, site screening and selection, initial data acquisition, and development of preliminary conceptual models.

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  15. Thermodynamic constants for actinide oxides and oxyhydroxides relevant to actinide volatility calculations for thermal oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1993-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to provide input of thermodynamic data on actinide volatilities to EERC for use in their computer code for modeling of metal volatilities in incinerators. It is also anticipated that the data may be documented later in an EPA sponsored ``Metals Bible.`` It should be noted that only upper limits for the volatility of PuO{sub 2}(s) due to PuO{sub 3}(g) and PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) and the volatility of AmO{sub 2} in PuO{sub 2}(s) due to AmO{sub 3}(g) and AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) could be set. The data on the americium vapor species are intended for calculations where AmO{sub 2} is present as a solid solution in PuO{sub 2}(s).

  16. High-resolution solid-state oxygen-17 NMR of actinide-bearing compounds: an insight into the 5f chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martel, Laura; Magnani, Nicola; Vigier, Jean-Francois; Boshoven, Jacobus; Selfslag, Chris; Farnan, Ian; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Somers, Joseph; Fanghänel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    A massive interest has been generated lately by the improvement of solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR methods for the study of a broad range of paramagnetic organic and inorganic materials. The open-shell cations at the origin of this paramagnetism can be metals, transition metals, or rare-earth elements. Actinide-bearing compounds and their 5f unpaired electrons remain elusive in this intensive research area due to their well-known high radiotoxicity. A dedicated effort enabling the handling of these highly radioactive materials now allows their analysis using high-resolution MAS NMR (>55 kHz). Here, the study of the local structure of a series of actinide dioxides, namely, ThO2, UO2, NpO2, PuO2, and AmO2, using solid-state (17)O MAS NMR is reported. An important increase of the spectral resolution is found due to the removal of the dipolar broadening proving the efficiency of this technique for structural analysis. The NMR parameters in these systems with numerous and unpaired 5f electrons were interpreted using an empirical approach. Single-ion model calculations were performed for the first time to determine the z component of electron spin on each of the actinide atoms, which is proportional to the shifts. A similar variation thereof was observed only for the heavier actinides of this study.

  17. Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullhusen, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear data needs for generation IV systems. Future of nuclear energy and the role of nuclear data / P. Finck. Nuclear data needs for generation IV nuclear energy systems-summary of U.S. workshop / T. A. Taiwo, H. S. Khalil. Nuclear data needs for the assessment of gen. IV systems / G. Rimpault. Nuclear data needs for generation IV-lessons from benchmarks / S. C. van der Marck, A. Hogenbirk, M. C. Duijvestijn. Core design issues of the supercritical water fast reactor / M. Mori ... [et al.]. GFR core neutronics studies at CEA / J. C. Bosq ... [et al]. Comparative study on different phonon frequency spectra of graphite in GCR / Young-Sik Cho ... [et al.]. Innovative fuel types for minor actinides transmutation / D. Haas, A. Fernandez, J. Somers. The importance of nuclear data in modeling and designing generation IV fast reactors / K. D. Weaver. The GIF and Mexico-"everything is possible" / C. Arrenondo Sánchez -- Benmarks, sensitivity calculations, uncertainties. Sensitivity of advanced reactor and fuel cycle performance parameters to nuclear data uncertainties / G. Aliberti ... [et al.]. Sensitivity and uncertainty study for thermal molten salt reactors / A. Biduad ... [et al.]. Integral reactor physics benchmarks- The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP) / J. B. Briggs, D. W. Nigg, E. Sartori. Computer model of an error propagation through micro-campaign of fast neutron gas cooled nuclear reactor / E. Ivanov. Combining differential and integral experiments on [symbol] for reducing uncertainties in nuclear data applications / T. Kawano ... [et al.]. Sensitivity of activation cross sections of the Hafnium, Tanatalum and Tungsten stable isotopes to nuclear reaction mechanisms / V. Avrigeanu ... [et al.]. Generating covariance data with nuclear models / A. J. Koning. Sensitivity of Candu-SCWR reactors physics calculations to nuclear data files / K. S

  18. Multi-podant diglycolamides and room temperature ionic liquid impregnated resins: An excellent combination for extraction chromatography of actinides.

    PubMed

    Gujar, R B; Ansari, S A; Verboom, W; Mohapatra, P K

    2016-05-27

    Extraction chromatography resins, prepared by impregnating two multi-podant diglycolamide ligands, viz. diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (RTIL: C4mimTf2N) on Chromosorb-W (an inert solid support), gave excellent results for the removal of trivalent actinides from acidic waste solutions. Distribution coefficient measurements on several metal ions showed selective sorption of Am(III) over hexavalent uranyl ions and other fission product elements such as strontium and cesium. The sorbed metal ions could be efficiently desorbed with a complexing solution containing guanidine carbonate and EDTA buffer. The sorption of Am(III) on both resins followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics with rate constants of 1.37×10(-6) and 6.88×10(-7)g/cpmmin for T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The metal sorption on both resins indicated the Langmuir monolayer chemisorption phenomenon with Eu(III) sorption capacities of 4.83±0.21 and 0.52±0.05mg per g of T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The results of column studies show that these resins are of interest for a possible application for the recovery of hazardous trivalent actinides from dilute aqueous solutions. PMID:27130582

  19. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R; Vaughn, Anthony E; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  20. Gas-phase reactions of doubly charged actinide cations with alkanes and alkenes--probing the chemical activity of 5f electrons from Th to Cm.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Gibson, John K

    2011-11-01

    Small alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) were used to probe the gas-phase reactivity of doubly charged actinide cations, An(2+) (An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Different combinations of doubly and singly charged ions were observed as reaction products, comprising species formed via metal-ion induced eliminations of small molecules, simple adducts and ions resulting from electron, hydride or methide transfer channels. Th(2+), Pa(2+), U(2+) and Np(2+) preferentially yielded doubly charged products of hydrocarbon activation, while Pu(2+), Am(2+) and Cm(2+) reacted mainly through transfer channels. Cm(2+) was also capable of forming doubly charged products with some of the hydrocarbons whereas Pu(2+) and Am(2+) were not, these latter two ions conversely being the only for which adduct formation was observed. The product distributions and the reaction efficiencies are discussed in relation to the electronic configurations of the metal ions, the energetics of the reactions and similar studies previously performed with doubly charged lanthanide and transition metal cations. The conditions for hydrocarbon activation to occur as related to the accessibility of electronic configurations with one or two 5f and/or 6d unpaired electrons are examined and the possible chemical activity of the 5f electrons in these early actinide ions, particularly Pa(2+), is considered.