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Sample records for actinide oxide material

  1. Gas Generation from Actinide Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    George Bailey; Elizabeth Bluhm; John Lyman; Richard Mason; Mark Paffett; Gary Polansky; G. D. Roberson; Martin Sherman; Kirk Veirs; Laura Worl

    2000-12-01

    This document captures relevant work performed in support of stabilization, packaging, and long term storage of plutonium metals and oxides. It concentrates on the issue of gas generation with specific emphasis on gas pressure and composition. Even more specifically, it summarizes the basis for asserting that materials loaded into a 3013 container according to the requirements of the 3013 Standard (DOE-STD-3013-2000) cannot exceed the container design pressure within the time frames or environmental conditions of either storage or transportation. Presently, materials stabilized and packaged according to the 3013 Standard are to be transported in certified packages (the certification process for the 9975 and the SAFKEG has yet to be completed) that do not rely on the containment capabilities of the 3013 container. Even though no reliance is placed on that container, this document shows that it is highly likely that the containment function will be maintained not only in storage but also during transportation, including hypothetical accident conditions. Further, this document, by summarizing materials-related data on gas generation, can point those involved in preparing Safety Analysis Reports for Packages (SARPs) to additional information needed to assess the ability of the primary containment vessel to contain the contents and any reaction products that might reasonably be produced by the contents.

  2. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  3. Decontamination of matrices containing actinide oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Villarreal, Robert

    1997-12-01

    There is provided a method for removing actinides and actinide oxides, particularly fired actinides, from soil and other contaminated matrices, comprising: (a) contacting a contaminated material with a solution of at least one inhibited fluoride and an acid to form a mixture; (b) heating the mixture of contaminated material and solution to a temperature in the range from about 30 C to about 90 C while stirring; (c) separating the solution from any undissolved matrix material in the mixture; (d) washing the undissolved matrix material to remove any residual materials; and (e) drying and returning the treated matrix material to the environment.

  4. Structural and magnetic characterization of actinide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, B.; Allen, T.H.; Lawson, A.C.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have successfully used neutron scattering techniques to investigate physicochemical properties of elements, compounds, and alloys of the light actinides. The focus of this work is to extend the fundamental research capability and to address questions of practical importance to stockpile integrity and long-term storage of nuclear material. Specific subject areas are developing neutron diffraction techniques for smaller actinide samples; modeling of inelastic scattering data for actinide metal hydrides; characterizing actinide oxide structures; and investigating aging effects in actinides. These studies utilize neutron scattering supported by equilibrium studies, kinetics, and x-ray diffraction. Major accomplishments include (1) development of encapsulation techniques for small actinide samples and neutron diffraction studies of AmD{sub 2.4} and PuO{sub 2.3}; (2) refinement of lattice dynamics model to elucidate hydrogen-hydrogen and hydrogen-metal interactions in rare-earth and actinide hydrides; (3) kinetic studies with PuO{sub 2} indicating that the recombination reaction is faster than radiolytic decomposition of adsorbed water but a chemical reaction produces H{sub 2}; (4) PVT studies of the reaction between PuO{sub 2} and water demonstrate that PuO{sub 2+x} and H{sub 2} form and that PuO{sub 2} is not the thermodynamically stable form of the oxide in air; and (5) model calculations of helium in growth in aged plutonium predicting bubble formation only at grain boundaries at room temperature. The work performed in this project has application to fundamental properties of actinides, aging, and long-term storage of plutonium.

  5. Exploring actinide materials through synchrotron radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Qun; Yuan, Li-Yong; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wang, Lin; Mei, Lei; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Li; Li, Zi-Jie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2014-12-10

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) based techniques have been utilized with increasing frequency in the past decade to explore the brilliant and challenging sciences of actinide-based materials. This trend is partially driven by the basic needs for multi-scale actinide speciation and bonding information and also the realistic needs for nuclear energy research. In this review, recent research progresses on actinide related materials by means of various SR techniques were selectively highlighted and summarized, with the emphasis on X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering spectroscopy, which are powerful tools to characterize actinide materials. In addition, advanced SR techniques for exploring future advanced nuclear fuel cycles dealing with actinides are illustrated as well. PMID:25169914

  6. Actinide metal processing

    DOEpatents

    Sauer, Nancy N.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  7. Actinide metal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  8. Actinide metal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1991-04-05

    This invention is comprised of a process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  9. Preparation of actinide-metal research materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, W.S.; Culpepper, C.A.; Campbell, K.B.

    1986-01-01

    The preparation of actinide-metal research materials is one of many functions of the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Research samples of uranium, plutonium, americium, and curium, typically from milligram quantities up to approx. 100 g, are prepared as pure metals or alloys to customer specifications. Larger quantities, up to many kilograms, of the lower activity actinides, such as /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th, are also fabricated into custom research forms. Physical forms of these metals include rolled foils or sheets, castings (ingot, rod, or special shapes), and evaporated or sputtered films. The actinide-metal processing capabilities of the IRML are continuing to be improved and applied to a wide variety of custom material preparations to meet the needs of the world-wide research community.

  10. Method for recovery of actinides from actinide-bearing scrap and waste nuclear material using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Asprey, L.B.; Eller, P.G.

    1984-09-12

    Method for recovery of actinides from nuclear waste material containing sintered and other oxides thereof and from scrap materials containing the metal actinides using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ to generate the hexafluorides of the actinides present therein. The fluorinating agent, O/sub 2/F/sub 2/, has been observed to perform the above-described tasks at sufficiently low temperatures that there is virtually no damage to the containment vessels. Moreover, the resulting actinide hexafluorides are not detroyed by high temperature reactions with the walls of the reaction vessel. Dioxygen difluoride is readily prepared, stored and transferred to the place of reaction.

  11. Fusion Techniques for the Oxidation of Refractory Actinide Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-15

    Small-scale experiments were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of fusing refractory actinide oxides with a series of materials commonly used to decompose minerals, glasses, and other refractories as a pretreatment to dissolution and subsequent recovery operations. In these experiments, 1-2 g of plutonium or neptunium oxide (PuO2 or NpO2) were calcined at 900 degrees Celsius, mixed and heated with the fusing reagent(s), and dissolved. For refractory PuO2, the most effective material tested was a lithium carbonate (Li2CO3)/sodium tetraborate (Na2B4O7) mixture which aided in the recovery of 90 percent of the plutonium. The fused product was identified as a lithium plutonate (Li3PuO4) by x-ray diffraction. The use of a Li2CO3/Na2B4O7 mixture to solubilize high-fired NpO2 was not as effective as demonstrated for refractory PuO2. In a small-scale experiment, 25 percent of the NpO2 was oxidized to a neptunium (VI) species that dissolved in nitric acid. The remaining neptunium was then easily recovered from the residue by fusing with sodium peroxide (Na2O2). Approximately 70 percent of the neptunium dissolved in water to yield a basic solution of neptunium (VII). The remainder was recovered as a neptunium (VI) solution by dissolving the residue in 8M nitric acid. In subsequent experiments with Na2O2, the ratio of neptunium (VII) to (VI) was shown to be a function of the fusion temperature, with higher temperatures (greater than approximately 400 degrees C) favoring the formation of neptunium (VII). The fusion of an actual plutonium-containing residue with Na2O2 and subsequent dissolution was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of a pretreatment process on a larger scale. Sodium peroxide was chosen due

  12. Density Functional Theory Studies of the Electronic Structure of Solid State Actinide Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiaodong; Martin, Richard L.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2013-02-13

    The actinide oxides have been extensively studied in the context of the nuclear fuel cycle. They are also of fundamental interest as members of a class of strongly correlated materials, the Mott insulators. Their complex physical and chemical properties make them challenging systems to characterize, both experimentally and theoretically. Chiefly, this is because actinide oxides can exhibit both electronic localization and electronic delocalization and have partially occupied f orbitals, which can lead to multiple possibilities for ground states. Of particular concern for theoretical work is that the large number of competing states display strong correlations which are dffcult to capture with computationally tractable methods.

  13. Oxidative dissolution of actinide oxides in H 2O 2 containing aqueous solution - A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehrman, Reijo; Amme, Marcus; Roth, Olivia; Ekeroth, Ella; Jonsson, Mats

    2010-02-01

    Oxidative dissolution of spent nuclear fuel is an important issue in the safety assessment of a future geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. Although UO 2 constitutes, in terms of mass, the majority of the spent fuel material, its main radiotoxicity is (after extended storage times) contained in actinides with half lives shorter than that of 238-uranium, such as isotopes of Np and Pu. Relatively little information is available on the dissolution behavior of Np and Pu in comparable environments. This work investigates the oxidative dissolution of NpO 2 and PuO 2 in non-complexing aqueous solutions containing H 2O 2 and compares their behavior with that of UO 2. We have found that oxidative dissolution takes place for all three actinides in the presence of H 2O 2. Based on the obtained dissolution rates, we would not expect the dissolution of the actinides to be congruent. Instead, in a system without complexing agent, the release rates of Np and Pu are expected to be lower than the U release rate.

  14. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, L.; Svane, A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmerman, W. M.; Stocks, G. M.

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO , A2O3 , and AO2 ( A=U , Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f -electron localization, which for AO2 and A2O3 is found to follow the stoichiometry, namely, corresponding to A4+ ions in the dioxide and A3+ ions in the sesquioxides. In contrast, the A2+ ionic configuration is not favorable in the monoxides, which therefore become metallic. The energetics of the oxidation and reduction in the actinide dioxides is discussed, and it is found that the dioxide is the most stable oxide for the actinides from Np onward. Our study reveals a strong link between preferred oxidation number and degree of localization which is confirmed by comparing to the ground-state configurations of the corresponding lanthanide oxides. The ionic nature of the actinide oxides emerges from the fact that only those compounds will form where the calculated ground-state valency agrees with the nominal valency expected from a simple charge counting.

  15. Chemical aspects of actinides in the geosphere: towards a rational nuclear materials management

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P; Sylwester, E

    2001-02-09

    A complete understanding of actinide interactions in the geosphere is paramount for developing a rational Nuclear and Environmental Materials Management Policy. One of the key challenges towards understanding the fate and transport of actinides is determining their speciation (i.e., oxidation state and structure). Since an element's speciation directly dictates physical properties such as toxicity and solubility, this information is critical for evaluating and controlling the evolution of an actinide element through the environment. Specific areas within nuclear and environmental management programs where speciation is important are (1) waste processing and separations; (2) wasteform materials for long-term disposition; and (3) aqueous geochemistry. The goal of this project was to develop Actinide X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy ( U S ) as a core capability at LLNL and integrate it with existing facilities, providing a multi-technique approach to actinide speciation. XAS is an element-specific structural probe which determines the oxidation state and structure for most atoms. XAS can be more incisive than other spectroscopies because it originates from an atomic process and the information is always attainable, regardless of an element's speciation. Despite the utility, XAS is relatively complex due to the need for synchrotron radiation and significant expertise with data acquisition and analysis. The coupling of these technical hurdles with the safe handling of actinides at a general user synchrotron facility such as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRL) make such experiments even more difficult. As a result, XAS has been underutilized by programs that could benefit by its application. We achieved our project goals by implementing key state-of-the-art Actinide XAS instrumentation at SSRL (Ge detector and remote positioning equipment), and by determining the chemical speciation of actinides (Th, U, and Np) in aqueous solutions, wasteform cements, and

  16. Method for recovery of actinides from refractory oxides thereof using O.sub. F.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Asprey, Larned B.; Eller, Phillip G.

    1988-01-01

    Method for recovery of actinides from nuclear waste material containing sintered and other oxides thereof using O.sub.2 F.sub.2 to generate the hexafluorides of the actinides present therein. The fluorinating agent, O.sub.2 F.sub.2, has been observed to perform the above-described tasks at sufficiently low temperatures that there is virtually no damage to the containment vessels. Moreover, the resulting actinide hexafluorides are not destroyed by high temperature reactions with the walls of the reaction vessel. Dioxygen difluoride is readily prepared, stored and transferred to the place of reaction.

  17. Flammability Analysis For Actinide Oxides Packaged In 9975 Shipping Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, James E.; Askew, Neal M.; Hensel, Steve J.

    2013-03-21

    Packaging options are evaluated for compliance with safety requirements for shipment of mixed actinide oxides packaged in a 9975 Primary Containment Vessel (PCV). Radiolytic gas generation rates, PCV internal gas pressures, and shipping windows (times to reach unacceptable gas compositions or pressures after closure of the PCV) are calculated for shipment of a 9975 PCV containing a plastic bottle filled with plutonium and uranium oxides with a selected isotopic composition. G-values for radiolytic hydrogen generation from adsorbed moisture are estimated from the results of gas generation tests for plutonium oxide and uranium oxide doped with curium-244. The radiolytic generation of hydrogen from the plastic bottle is calculated using a geometric model for alpha particle deposition in the bottle wall. The temperature of the PCV during shipment is estimated from the results of finite element heat transfer analyses.

  18. Actinides in Hanford Tank Waste Simulants: Chemistry of Selected Species in Oxidizing Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Laszak, Ivan; Borkowski, Marian; Hancock, Melissa; Rao, Linfeng; Reed, Wendy

    2004-03-30

    To enhance removal of selected troublesome nonradioactive matrix elements (P, Cr, Al, S) from the sludges in radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford site, various chemical washing procedures have been evaluated. It is intended that leaching should leave the actinides in the residual sludge phase for direct vitrification. Oxidative treatment with strongly alkaline solutions has emerged as the best approach to accomplishing this feat. However, because the most important actinide ions in the sludge can exist in multiple oxidation states, it is conceivable that changes in actinide oxidation state speciation could interfere with hopes and plans for actinide insolubility. In this presentation, we discuss both the impact of oxidative alkaline leachants on actinide oxidation state speciation and the chemistry of oxidized actinide species in the solution phase. Actinide oxidation does occur during leaching, but the solubility behavior is complex. Mixed ligand complexes may dominate solution phase speciation of actinides under some circumstances. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Offices of Science and Waste Management, Environmental Management Science Program under Contract DEAC03- 76SF0098 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Contract W-31-109- ENG-38 at Argonne National Laboratory.

  19. Fundamental aspects of actinide-zirconium pyrochlore oxides: Systematic comparison of the Pu, Am, Cm, Bk and Cf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haire, R. G.; Raison, P. E.

    2000-07-01

    Zirconium- and hafnium-based oxide materials have gained attraction for various nuclear applications. These materials have features in common with one of the early, well-publicized inorganic ceramics for immobilizing nuclear waste. Our interests have addressed the fundamental structural and chemical properties of these oxide systems. We pursued both the crystal chemical constraints of the oxide matrices, as well as the importance of the chemistry of the f-elements. By incorporating five actinide elements in our studies, we were able to compare systematically the materials science of these materials with the fundamental chemistry and electronic configurations of these actinides employed. It is expected that this basic information will be useful technologically in the realm of tailor-made materials for different applications.

  20. Stabilization of actinides and lanthanides in unusually high oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, P.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical environments can be chosen which stabilize actinides and lanthanides in unusually high or low oxidation states and in unusual coordination. In many cases, one can rationalize the observed species as resulting from strong charge/size influences provided by specific sites in host lattices (e.g., Tb(IV) in BaTbO/sub 3/ or Am(IV) in polytungstate anions). In other cases, the unusual species can be considered from an acid-base viewpoint (e.g., U(III) in AsF/sub 5//HF solution or Pu(VII) in Li/sub 5/PuO/sub 6/). In still other cases, an interplay of steric and redox effects can lead to interesting comparisons (e.g., instability of double fluoride salts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) relative to U, Np, and Am analogues). Generalized ways to rationalize compounds containing actinides and lanthanides in unusual valences (particularly high valences), including the above and numerous other examples, will form the focus of this paper. Recently developed methods for synthesizing high valent f-element fluorides using superoxidizers and superacids at low temperatures will also be described. 65 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Synthesis of Functionalized Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from a Common Precursor and their Application as Heavy Metal and Actinide Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Davidson, Joseph D.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2009-10-12

    We describe the use of a simple and versatile technique to generate a series of ligand stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles containing different functionalities with specificities toward heavy metals and actinides at the periphery of the stabilizing ligand shell from a common, easy to synthesize precursor nanoparticle. The resulting nanoparticles are designed to contain affinity ligands that make them excellent sorbent materials for a variety of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous systems such as river water and ground water as well as actinides from clinical samples such as blood and urine. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles make ideal reagents for extraction of heavy metal and actinide contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. In addition, these engineered nanomaterials have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g) making them ideal sorbent materials for these types of applications

  2. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    DOEpatents

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  3. Magnetic structures of actinide materials by pulsed neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Goldstone, J.A.; Huber, J.G.; Giorgi, A.L.; Conant, J.W.; Severing, A.; Cort, B.; Robinson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We describe some attempts to observe magnetic structure in various actinide (5f-electron) materials. Our experimental technique is neutron powder diffraction as practiced at a spallation (pulsed) neutron source. We will discuss our investigations of {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, {alpha}-UD{sub 3} and {beta}-UD{sub 3}. {beta}-UD{sub 3} is a simple ferromagnet: surprisingly, the moments on the two non-equivalent uranium atoms are the same within experimental error. {alpha}-UD{sub 3}, {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu are non-magnetic, within the limits of our observations. Our work with pulsed neutron diffraction shows that it is a useful technique for research on magnetic materials.

  4. Irradiaton of Metallic and Oxide Fuels for Actinide Transmutation in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Heather J. MacLean; Steven L. Hayes

    2007-09-01

    Metallic fuels containing minor actinides and rare earth additions have been fabricated and are prepared for irradiation in the ATR, scheduled to begin during the summer of 2007. Oxide fuels containing minor actinides are being fabricated and will be ready for irradiation in ATR, scheduled to begin during the summer of 2008. Fabrication and irradiation of these fuels will provide detailed studies of actinide transmutation in support of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. These fuel irradiations include new fuel compositions that have never before been tested. Results from these tests will provide fundamental data on fuel irradiation performance and will advance the state of knowledge for transmutation fuels.

  5. Experimental findings on actinide recovery utilizing oxidation by peroxydisulfate followed by ion exchange: Fuel cycle research & development

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.

    2015-08-31

    Our research seeks to determine if inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective minor actinide (Am, Cm) separation from lanthanides. Previous work has established that a number of inorganic and UMOF ion-exchange materials exhibit varying affinities for actinides and lanthanides, which may be exploited for effective separations. During FY15, experimental work focused on investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric and perchloric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium in dilute nitric acid. Ion-exchange materials tested included a variety of alkali titanates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of AmIII. Experimental findings indicated that CeIII, NpV, and RuII are oxidized by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of CeIII, NpV, and RuII affected the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used.

  6. Experimental findings on actinide recovery utilizing oxidation by peroxydisulfate followed by ion exchange: Fuel cycle research & development

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.

    2015-08-31

    Our research seeks to determine if inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective minor actinide (Am, Cm) separation from lanthanides. Previous work has established that a number of inorganic and UMOF ion-exchange materials exhibit varying affinities for actinides and lanthanides, which may be exploited for effective separations. During FY15, experimental work focused on investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric and perchloric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium in dilute nitric acid. Ion-exchange materials tested included a variety of alkali titanates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of AmIII. Experimental findings indicated that CeIII, NpV, and RuII are oxidized by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of CeIII, NpV, and RuII affected the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used.

  7. METHOD FOR THE PREPARATION OF STABLE ACTINIDE METAL OXIDE-CONTAINING SLURRIES AND OF THE OXIDES THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, R.S.; Minturn, R.E.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with a method of preparing actinide metal oxides of a very fine particle size and of forming stable suspensions therefrom. The process consists of dissolving the nitrate of the actinide element in a combustible organic solvent, converting the solution obtained into a spray, and igniting the spray whereby an oxide powder is obtained. The oxide powder is then slurried in an aqueous soiution of a substance which is adsorbable by said oxides, dspersed in a colloid mill whereby a suspension is obtained, and electrodialyzed until a low spectiic conductance is reached.

  8. Patterns in the stability of the lower oxidation states of the actinides and lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Auerman, L.N.; Ionova, G.V.; Korshunov, B.G.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    The authors compare the first half of the lanthanides and the second half of the actinides by considering the specifics of the electronic structure of the valence atoms of the f-, d-, and s-orbitals, consisting of he following: The lanthanides from praseodymium to europium and from dysprosium to ytterbium, as well as the actinides from californium to nobelium, have the same electronic configuration f /SUP n/ s/sub 2/ in the state of free neutral atoms, which corresponds to their divalent state. On the basis of a consideration of the energy characteristics of the valence orbitals of the elements of the lanthanide and actinide famililies and as a result of an experimental determination of the standard oxidation potential of these elements, the authors consider the profound similarity between the elements of the first half of the lanthanide family and the second half of the actinide family to be established.

  9. 237Np Mössbauer studies on actinide superconductors and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colineau, Eric; Gaczyński, Piotr; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Eloirdi, Rachel; Caciuffo, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Actinide materials play a special role in condensed matter physics, spanning behaviours of itinerant d-electron and localized 4f-electron materials. This duality of the 5f electrons confer to actinide-based intermetallic compounds a broad variety of physical properties such as magnetic or multipolar ordering, heavy fermion behaviour, quantum criticality, unconventional superconductivity... 237Np Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique microscopic tool for gaining information on the electronic and magnetic properties of Np systems.

  10. The Efficacy of Denaturing Actinide Elements as a Means of Decreasing Materials Attractiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Hase, Kevin R.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Robel, Martin; Collins, Brian A.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is an extension to earlier studies that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) and alternate nuclear materials (ANM). This study considers the concept of denaturing as applied to the actinide elements present in spent fuel as a means to reduce materials attractiveness. Highly attractive materials generally have low values of bare critical mass, heat content, and dose.

  11. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  12. SURFACE COMPLEXATION OF ACTINIDES WITH IRON OXIDES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN NEAR-SURFACE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jerden Jr.; A.J. Kropf; Y. Tsai

    2005-08-25

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  13. Strontium and Actinides Removal from Savannah River Site Actual Waste Samples by Freshly Precipitated Manganese Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-10-30

    The authors investigated the performance of freshly precipitated manganese oxide and monosodium titanate (MST) for the removal of strontium (Sr) and actinides from actual high-level waste. Manganese oxide precipitation occurs upon addition of a reductant such as formate (HCO2-) or peroxide (H2O2) to a waste solution containing permanganate (MnO4-). Tests described in this document address the capability of manganese oxide treatment to remove Rs, Pu, and Np from actual high-level waste containing elevated concentrations of Pu. Additionally, tests investigate MST (using two unique batches) performance with the same waste for direct comparison to the manganese oxide performance.

  14. Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOEpatents

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Herman, Connie Cicero; Hobson, Beverly F.; Herman, David Thomas; Curtis, Paul G.; Farmer, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  15. Process for Making a Ceramic Composition for Immobilization of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Curtis, Paul G.; Hobson, Beverly F.; Farmer, Joseph; Herman, Connie Cicero; Herman, David Thomas

    1999-06-22

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  16. Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean - Francois; Ams, David; Richmann, M. K.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J. S.

    2010-12-10

    The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

  17. A Screened Hybrid DFT Study of Actinide Oxides, Nitrides, and Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiaodong; Martin, Richard L.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Rudin, Sven P.; Batista, Enrique R.

    2013-06-27

    A systematic study of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of actinide oxides, nitrides, and carbides (AnX1–2 with X = C, N, O) is performed using the Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional. Our computed results show that the screened hybrid HSE functional gives a good description of the electronic and structural properties of actinide dioxides (strongly correlated insulators) when compared with available experimental data. However, there are still some problems reproducing the electronic properties of actinide nitrides and carbides (strongly correlated metals). In addition, in order to compare with the results by HSE, the structures, electronic, and magnetic properties of these actinide compounds are also investigated in the PBE and PBE+U approximation. Interestingly, the density of states of UN obtained with PBE compares well with the experimental photoemission spectra, in contrast to the hybrid approximation. This is presumably related to the need of additional screening in the Hartree–Fock exchange term of the metallic phases.

  18. Method of loading organic materials with group III plus lanthanide and actinide elements

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W.; Huei-Ho, Chuen; Brown, Gilbert M.; Hurlbut, Charles

    2003-04-08

    Disclosed is a composition of matter comprising a tributyl phosphate complex of a group 3, lanthanide, actinide, or group 13 salt in an organic carrier and a method of making the complex. These materials are suitable for use in solid or liquid organic scintillators, as in x-ray absorption standards, x-ray fluorescence standards, and neutron detector calibration standards.

  19. Analysis and spectral assignments of mixed actinide oxide samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Barefield, James E; Judge, Elizabeth J; Berg, John M; Willson, Stephen P; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we report for the first time the identification and assignments of complex atomic emission spectra of mixed actinide oxides using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Preliminary results of LIBS measurements on samples of uranium dioxide (UO2)/plutonium dioxide (PuO2) and UO2/PuO2/americium dioxide (AmO2)/neptunium dioxide (NpO2) simulated fuel pellets (or mixed actinide oxide samples) are reported and discussed. We have identified and assigned >800 atomic emission lines for a UO2/PuO2/AmO2/NpO2 fuel pellet thus far. The identification and assignments of spectral emission lines for U, Pu, and Am are consistent with wavelength data from the literature. However, only a few emission lines have been assigned with a high degree of confidence for Np compared with atomic emission data from the literature. We also indicate where atomic emission lines for Cm would most likely appear in the spectral regions shown. Finally, we demonstrate that a LIBS system with a resolving power of approximately 20,000 is adequate for analyzing complex mixtures of actinide elements within the same sample. PMID:23601543

  20. Atomistic modeling of the solid-state chemistry of actinide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuller, Lindsay C.

    Materials that incorporate actinides are critical to the nuclear fuel cycle, either as nuclear fuels or nuclear waste forms. In this thesis, I examine four materials: i) ThO2-UO2 solid solutions, ii) binary ThO2-CeO2-ZrO2 solid solutions, iii) Np-doped studtite, iv) Np-doped boltwoodite. Computational methods, particularly density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations, are used to determine the energetics and structures of these actinide-bearing materials. The solid-solution behavior of nuclear fuels and nuclear waste forms indicate the thermodynamic stability of the material, which is important for understanding the in-reactor fuel properties and long-term stability of used fuel. The ThxU1-xO2 and ThxCe 1-xO2 binaries are almost completely miscible; however, DeltaGmix reveals a small tendency for the systems to exsolve (e.g., DeltaEexsoln(Th xU1-xO2) = 0.13 kJ/(mol cations) at 750 K). Kinetic hindrances (e.g., interfacial energy) may inhibit exsolution, especially at the low temperatures necessary to stabilize the nanoscale exsolution lamellae observed in the ThxU1-xO2 and Ce xZr1-xO2 binaries. Miscibility in the Zr-bearing binaries is limited. At 1400 °C, only 3.6 and 0.09 mol% ZrO2 is miscible in CeO2 and ThO2, respectively. The incorporation of minor amounts of Np5+,6+ into uranium alteration phases, e.g., studtite [UO2O2 (H2O)4] or boltwoodite [K(UO2)(SiO 3OH)(H2O)1.5] , may limit the mobility of aqueous neptunyl complexes released from oxidized nuclear fuels. Np6+-incorporation into studtite requires less energy than Np5+-incorporation (e.g., with source/sink = Np2O5/UO 3 DeltaEincorp(Np6+) = 0.42 eV and DeltaEincorp(Np5+) = 1.12 eV). In addition, Np6+ is completely miscible in studtite at room temperature with respect to a hypothetical Np6+-studtite. Electronic structure calculations provide insight into Np-bonding in studtite. The Np 5f orbitals are within the band gap of studtite, resulting in the narrowing of the band gap

  1. Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Jones, V.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements.

  2. Recent progress on minor-actinide-bearing oxide fuel fabrication at CEA Marcoule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Florent; Prieur, Damien; Horlait, Denis; Delahaye, Thibaud; Jankowiak, Aurélien; Léorier, Caroline; Jorion, Frédéric; Gavilan, Elisabeth; Desmoulière, François

    2013-07-01

    Partitioning and transmutation (P&T) of minor actinides (MA: americium, neptunium and curium) in fast neutron reactors or accelerator-driven systems is a route envisaged to reduce nuclear waste inventory. Over the years, several modes of P&T were proposed, each being based on the use of dedicated fuels such as inert-matrix fuels, MA-bearing MOX or MA-bearing blankets. In this context, progress on the manufacturing of such fuels is a key-challenge in order to render P&T viable at the industrial scale. Here, MA-bearing oxide fuel fabrication and characterization conducted in the CEA Marcoule Atalante facility is reviewed. A particular attention is also given to the research conducted on uranium-americium mixed-oxides fuels, which are now considered the reference fuels for MA transmutation in France.

  3. Study of actinide chemistry in saturated potassium fluoride solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Thalmayer, C. E.

    1969-01-01

    Study concerning the chemistry of actinides in saturated KF solution included work with neptunium, uranium, and americium. Solubilities, absorption spectra, oxidation-reduction reactions, and solid compounds which can be produced in KF solution were examined. The information is used for preparation of various materials from salts of the actinides.

  4. On the use of moderating material to enhance the feedback coefficients in SFR cores with high minor actinide content

    SciTech Connect

    Merk, B.; Weiss, F. P.

    2012-07-01

    The use of fine distributed moderating material to enhance the feedback effects and to reduce the sodium void effecting sodium cooled fast reactor cores is described. The influence of the moderating material on the neutron spectrum, the power distribution, and the burnup distribution is shown. The consequences of the use of fine distributed moderating material into fuel assemblies with fuel configurations foreseen for minor actinide transmutation is analyzed and the transmutation efficiency is compared. The degradation of the feedback effects due to the insertion of minor actinides and the compensation by the use of moderating materials is discussed. (authors)

  5. The Thermodynamic Properties of the f-Elements and their Compounds. Part 2. The Lanthanide and Actinide Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Rudy J. M. Beneš, Ondrej; Kovács, Attila; Manara, Dario; Sedmidubský, David; Gorokhov, Lev; Iorish, Vladimir S.; Yungman, Vladimir; Shenyavskaya, E.; Osina, E.

    2014-03-15

    A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic properties of the oxide compounds of the lanthanide and actinide elements is presented. The available literature data for the solid, liquid, and gaseous state have been analysed and recommended values are presented. In case experimental data are missing, estimates have been made based on the trends in the two series, which are extensively discussed.

  6. Effect of oxidation state and ionic strength on sorption of actinides (Th, U, Np, Am) to geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2015-10-30

    The degree of conservatism in the estimated sorption partition coefficients (Kds) used in a performance assessment model is being evaluated based on a complementary batch and column method. The main focus of this work is to investigate the role of ionic strength, solution chemistry, and oxidation state (III-VI) in actinide sorption to dolomite rock. Based on redox conditions and solution chemistry expected at the WIPP, possible actinide species include Pu(III), Pu(IV), U(IV), U(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Am(III), and Th(IV).

  7. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Actinide recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Navratil, James D.; Saba, Mark T.

    1987-07-28

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrenedivinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like.

  9. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  10. Actinides and Rare Earths Topical Conference (Code AC)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2009-11-24

    Actinide and the Rare Earth materials exhibit many unique and diverse physical, chemical and magnetic properties, in large part because of the complexity of their f electronic structure. This Topical Conference will focus upon the chemistry, physics and materials science in Lanthanide and Actinide materials, driven by 4f and 5f electronic structure. Particular emphasis will be placed upon 4f/5f magnetic structure, surface science and thin film properties. For the actinides, fundamental actinide science and its role in resolving technical challenges posed by actinide materials will be stressed. Both basic and applied experimental approaches, including synchrotron-radiation-based investigations, as well as theoretical modeling and computational simulations, are planned to be part of the Topical Conference. Of particular importance are the issues related to the potential renaissance in Nuclear Fuels, including synthesis, oxidation, corrosion, intermixing, stability in extreme environments, prediction of properties via benchmarked simulations, separation science, environmental impact and disposal of waste products.

  11. THEORY FOR THE XPS OF ACTINIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-08-01

    Two aspects of the electronic structure of actinide oxides that significantly affect the XPS spectra are described; these aspects are also important for the materials properties of the oxides. The two aspects considered are: (1) The spin-orbit coupling of the open 5f shell electrons in actinide cations and how this coupling affects the electronic structure. And, (2) the covalent character of the metal oxygen interaction in actinide compounds. Because of this covalent character, there are strong departures from the nominal oxidation states that are significantly larger in core-hole states than in the ground state. The consequences for the XPS of this covalent character are examined. A proper understanding of the way in which they influence the XPS makes it possible to use the XPS to correctly characterize the electronic structure of the oxides.

  12. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB₅O₆(OH)₆][BO(OH)₂]·2.5H₂O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO4- Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topological relationships. Neptunium borates are often mixed-valent and yield rare examples of compounds with one metal in three different oxidation states. Plutonium borates display new coordination chemistry for trivalent actinides. Finally, americium borates show a dramatic departure from plutonium borates, and there are scant examples of families of actinides compounds that extend past plutonium to examine the bonding of later actinides. There are several grand challenges that this work addresses. The foremost of these challenges is the development of structure-property relationships in transuranium materials. A deep understanding of the materials chemistry of actinides will likely lead to the development of advanced waste forms for radionuclides present in nuclear waste that prevent their transport in the environment. This work may have also uncovered the solubility-limiting phases of actinides in some repositories, and allows for measurements on the stability of these materials.

  13. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-10-21

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB(5)O(6)(OH)(6)][BO(OH)(2)]·2.5H(2)O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO(4)(-). Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topological relationships. Neptunium borates are often mixed-valent and yield rare examples of compounds with one metal in three different oxidation states. Plutonium borates display new coordination chemistry for trivalent actinides. Finally, americium borates show a dramatic departure from plutonium borates, and there are scant examples of families of actinides compounds that extend past plutonium to examine the bonding of later actinides. There are several grand challenges that this work addresses. The foremost of these challenges is the development of structure-property relationships in transuranium materials. A deep understanding of the materials chemistry of actinides will likely lead to the development of advanced waste forms for radionuclides present in nuclear waste that prevent their transport in the environment. This work may have also uncovered the solubility-limiting phases of actinides in some repositories, and allows for measurements on the stability of these materials. PMID:21915396

  14. Research in actinide chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH[sup [minus

  15. Nonaqueous actinide hydride dissolution and production of actinide $beta$- diketonates

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a hydride of the actinide material in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol. (auth)

  16. Charged defects during alpha-irradiation of actinide oxides as revealed by Raman and luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohun, R.; Desgranges, L.; Léchelle, J.; Simon, P.; Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Duval, F.; Jegou, C.; Magnin, M.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.; Valot, C.; Vauchy, R.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently evidenced an original Raman signature of alpha irradiation-induced defects in UO2. In this study, we aim to determine whether the same signature also exists in different actinide oxides, namely ThO2 and PuO2. Sintered UO2 and ThO2 were initially irradiated with 21 MeV He2+ ions using a cyclotron device and were subjected to an in situ luminescence experiment followed by Raman analysis. In addition, a PuO2 sample which had accumulated self-irradiation damage due to alpha particles was investigated only by Raman measurement. Results obtained for the initially white ThO2 showed that a blue color appeared in the irradiated areas as well as luminescence signals during irradiation. However, Raman spectroscopic analysis showed the absence of Raman signature in ThO2. In contrast, the irradiated UO2 and PuO2 confirmed the presence of the Raman signature but no luminescence peaks were observed. The proposed mechanism involves electronic defects in ThO2, while a coupling between electronic defects and phonons is required to explain the Raman spectra for UO2 and PuO2.

  17. Special Form Testing of Sealed Source Encapsulation for High-Alpha-Activity Actinide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Oscar A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States all transportation of radioactive material is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Beginning in 2008 a new type of sealed-source encapsulation package was developed and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These packages contain high-alpha-activity actinides and are regulated and transported in accordance with the requirements for DOT Class 7 hazardous material. The DOT provides specific regulations pertaining to special form encapsulation designs. The special form designation indicates that the encapsulated radioactive contents have a very low probability of dispersion even when subjected to significant structural events. The special form designs have been shown to simplify the delivery, transport, acceptance, and receipt processes. It is intended for these sealed-source encapsulations to be shipped to various facilities making it very advantageous for them to be certified as special form. To this end, DOT Certificates of Competent Authority (CoCAs) have been sought for the design suitable for containing high-alpha-activity actinide materials. This design consists of the high-alpha-activity material encapsulated within a triangular zirconia canister, referred to as a ZipCan, tile that is then enclosed by a spherical shell. The spherical shell design, with ZipCan tile inside, was tested for compliance with the special form regulations found in 49 CFR 173.469. The spherical enclosure was subjected to 9-m impact, 1 m percussion, and 10-minute thermal tests at the Packaging Evaluation Facility located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN USA and operated by ORNL. Before and after each test, the test units were subjected to a helium leak check and a bubble test. The ZipCan tiles and core were also subjected to the tests required for ISO 2919:2012(E), including a Class IV impact test and heat test and subsequently subjected to helium leakage rate tests [49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i)]. The impact

  18. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  19. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hobart, D. E.

    1981-06-01

    Simultaneous observation of electrochemical and spectroscopic properties (spectroelectrochemistry) at optically transparent electrodes (OTE's) was used to study some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements. Cyclic voltammetry at microelectrodes was used in conjunction with spectroelectrochemistry for the study of redox couples. Additional analytical techniques were used. The formal reduction potential (E/sup 0/') values of the M(III)/M(II) redox couples in 1 M KCl at pH 6 were -0.34 +- 0.01 V for Eu, -1.18 +- 0.01 V for Yb, and -1.50 +- 0.01 V for Sm. Spectropotentiostatic determination of E/sup 0/' for the Eu(III)/Eu(II) redox couple yielded a value of -0.391 +- 0.005 V. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Ce(IV)/Ce(III) redox couple in concentrated carbonate solution gave E/sup 0/' equal to 0.051 +- 0.005 V, which is about 1.7 V less positive than the E/sup 0/' value in noncomplexing solution. This same difference in potential was observed for the E/sup 0/' values of the Pr(IV)/Pr(III) and Tb(IV)/Tb(III) redox couples in carbonate solution, and thus Pr(IV) and Tb(IV) were stabilized in this medium. The U(VI)/U(V)/U(IV) and U(IV)/U(III) redox couples were studied in 1 M KCl at OTE's. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Np(VI)/Np(V) redox couple in 1 M HClO/sub 4/ gave an E/sup 0/' value of 1.140 +- 0.005 V. An E/sup 0/' value of 0.46 +- 0.01 V for the Np(VII)/Np(VI) couple was found by voltammetry. Oxidation of Am(III) was studied in concentrated carbonate solution, and a reversible cyclic voltammogram for the Am(IV)/Am(III) couple yielded E/sup 0/' = 0.92 +- 0.01 V in this medium; this value was used to estimate the standard reduction potential (E/sup 0/) of the couple as 2.62 +- 0.01 V. Attempts to oxidize Cm(III) in concentrated carbonate solution were not successful which suggests that the predicted E/sup 0/ value for the Cm(IV)/Cm(III) redox couple may be in error.

  20. PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.

    1963-11-01

    A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

  1. Actinide recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

    1985-06-13

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

  2. rapid separation of higher actinide elements by cocrystallization using lower oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenskaya, A.N.; Konovalova, N.A.; Kulyukhin, S.A.; Mikheev, N.B.

    1986-07-01

    An express method has been developed for the separation of higher actinides based on their cocrystallization with alkali metal halides. By carrying out reduction with the dichlorides of europium, ytterbium, and samarium it was possible to separate mendelevium from fermium, einsteinium, and californium, fermium from einsteinium and californium, and californium with einsteinium from trivalent actinides in turn. A practically complete purification from lanthanides was achieved in this way. Separation was carried in aqueous ethanol solutions by cocrystallization with NaCl resulting from salting out with ethanol. The purification coefficient of actinides from accompanying elements was 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/. The yield on separation was about 90%. The duration of the separation process was 3-5 min.

  3. Comparative electronic structure of a lanthanide and actinide diatomic oxide: Nd versus U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, M.; Stevens, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    Using a modified version of the Alchemy electronic structure code and relativistic pseudopotentials, the electronic structure of the ground and low lying excited states of UO, NdO, and NdO + have been calculated at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) levels of theory. Including results from an earlier study of UO + this provides the information for a comparative analysis of a lanthanide and an actinide diatomic oxide. UO and NdO are both described formally as M +2 O -2 and the cations as M +3 O -2 , but the HF and MCSCF calculations show that these systems are considerably less ionic due to large charge back-transfer in the πorbitals. The electronic states putatively arise from the ligand field (oxygen anion) perturbed f 4 , sf 3 , df 3 , sdf 2 , or s 2 f 2 states of M +2 and f 3 , sf 2 or df 2 states of M +3 . Molecular orbital results show a substantial stabilization of the sf 3 or s 2 f 2 configurations relative to the f 4 or df 3 configurations that are the even or odd parity ground states in the M +2 free ion. The compact f and d orbitals are more destabilized by the anion field than the diffuse s orbital. The ground states of the neutral species are dominated by orbitals arising from the M +2 sf 3 term, and all the potential energy curves arising from this configuration are similar, which allows an estimate of the vibrational frequencies for UO and NdO of 862 cm -1 and 836 cm -1 , respectively. For NdO + and UO + the excitation energies for the Ωstates were calculated with a valence configuration interaction method using ab initio effective spin-orbit operators to couple the molecular orbital configurations. The results for NdO + are very comparable with the results for UO + , and show the vibrational and electronic states to be interleaved.

  4. Heavy fermion and actinide materials. Annual technical progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    During this period, 1/N expansions have been systematically applied to the calculation of the properties of highly correlated electron systems. These studies include examinations of (a) the class of materials known as heavy fermion semi-conductors, (b) the high energy spectra of heavy fermion systems, and (c) the doped oxide superconductors.

  5. Actinide Studies with Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the effects of sputtering due to nuclear fission is crucial to the nuclear industry and has wide-reaching applications, including nuclear energy, space science, and national defense. A new program at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center uses ultracold neutrons (UCN) to induce fission in actinides such as uranium and plutonium. UCN are an ideal tool for finely controlling induced fission as a function of depth in an actinide sample. The mechanism for fission-induced surface damage is not well understood, especially regarding the effect of a surface oxide layer. We will discuss our experimental strategy for studies of UCN-induced fission and the ejected material, and present preliminary data from enriched and depleted uranium. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the G. T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science and the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program for this work.

  6. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  7. Dissolution of metal oxides and separation of uranium from lanthanides and actinides in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Quach, D.L.; Wai, C.M.; Mincher, B.J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO{sub 2} and counter current stripping columns is presented. (authors)

  8. Partitioning of actinides from high level waste of PUREX origin using octylphenyl-N,N{prime}-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO)-based supported liquid membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Dudwadkar, N.L.; Chitnis, R.R.; Mathur, J.N.

    1999-06-01

    The present studies deal with the application of the supported liquid membrane (SLM) technique for partitioning of actinides from high level waste of PUREX origin. The process uses a solution of octylphenyl-N,N{prime}-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) in n-dodecane as a carrier with a polytetrafluoroethylene support and a mixture of citric acid, formic acid, and hydrazine hydrate as the receiving phase. The studies involve the investigation of such parameters as carrier concentration in SLM, acidity of the feed, and the feed composition. The studies indicated good transport of actinides like neptunium, americium, and plutonium across the membrane from nitric acid medium. A high concentration of uranium in the feed retards the transport of americium, suggesting the need for prior removal of uranium from the waste. The separation of actinides from uranium-lean simulated samples as well as actual high level waste has been found to be feasible using the above technique.

  9. PROCESS OF PRODUCING ACTINIDE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-07-14

    The preparation of actinide metals in workable, coherent form is described. In general, the objects of the invention are achieved by heating a mixture of an oxide and a halide of an actinide metal such as uranium with an alkali metal on alkaline earth metal reducing agent in the presence of iodine.

  10. Material properties of oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The differences between the old (inter-) metallic superconductors and the new oxide superconductors are not limited to the much higher values of {Tc} attainable in the latter. There are many pervasive differences caused directly by oxide chemistry, quasi-perovskite local coordination configurations, and layered metal-semiconductor-metal{prime}-semiconductor-structures. When these differences are ignored, for instance in theoretical models which make effective medium approximations, many experiments appear to present anomalous results. These anomalies largely disappear when account is taken of the real materials properties of the cuprates and other new oxide superconductors, for instance in theoretical models which treat transport as a partially percolative process. This percolative process directly reflects the fact that the highest values of {Tc}, as well as the most anomalous normal-state transport properties, occur in materials vicinal to a metal-insulator transition. As the metallic and insulating regions alternate even in single-crystal samples, effective medium models, and most effective-medium parameters, lose their significance. Examples of attempts to measure microscopic properties illustrate the importance of filamentary effects on both normal-state and superconductive properties.

  11. Study on Equilibrium Characteristics of Thorium-Plutonium-Minor Actinides Mixed Oxides Fuel in PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Waris, A.; Permana, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Su'ud, Z.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-22

    A study on characteristics of thorium-plutonium-minor actinides utilization in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the equilibrium burnup model has been conducted. For a comprehensive evaluation, several fuel cycles scenario have been included in the present study with the variation of moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (MFR) of PWR core design. The results obviously exhibit that the neutron spectra grow to be harder with decreasing of the MFR. Moreover, the neutron spectra also turn into harder with the rising number of confined heavy nuclides. The required {sup 233}U concentration for criticality of reactor augments with the increasing of MFR for all heavy nuclides confinement and thorium and uranium confinement in PWR.

  12. Study on Equilibrium Characteristics of Thorium-Plutonium-Minor Actinides Mixed Oxides Fuel in PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, A.; Permana, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Su'ud, Z.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    A study on characteristics of thorium-plutonium-minor actinides utilization in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the equilibrium burnup model has been conducted. For a comprehensive evaluation, several fuel cycles scenario have been included in the present study with the variation of moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (MFR) of PWR core design. The results obviously exhibit that the neutron spectra grow to be harder with decreasing of the MFR. Moreover, the neutron spectra also turn into harder with the rising number of confined heavy nuclides. The required 233U concentration for criticality of reactor augments with the increasing of MFR for all heavy nuclides confinement and thorium & uranium confinement in PWR.

  13. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  14. Actinides-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  15. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-06-30

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  16. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-09-04

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

  17. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  18. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  19. Immobilization of actinides in stable mineral type and ceramic materials (high temperature synthesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, O.; Konovalov, E.

    1996-05-01

    Alternative vitrification technologies are being developed in the world for the immobilization of high radioactive waste in materials with improved thermodynamic stability, as well as improved chemical and thermal stability and stability to radiation. Oxides, synthesized in the form of analogs to rock-forming minerals and ceramics, are among those materials that have highly stable properties and are compatible with the environment. In choosing the appropriate material, we need to be guided by its geometric stability, the minimal number of cations in the structure of the material and the presence of structural elements in the mineral that are isomorphs of uranium and thorium, actinoids found in nature. Rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium and calcium are therefore suitable. The minerals listed in the table (with the exception of the zircon) are pegatites by origin, i.e. they are formed towards the end of the magma crystallization of silicates form the residual melt, enriched with Ta, Nb, Ti, Zr, Ce, Y, U and Th. Uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures form part of the lattice of the mineral. These minerals, which are rather simple in composition and structure and are formed under high temperatures, may be viewed as natural physio-chemical systems that are stable and long-lived in natural environments. The similarity of the properties of actinoids and lanthanoids plays an important role in the geochemistry of uranium and thorium; however, uranium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} group of lanthanoids (the yttrium group) while thorium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}light{close_quotes} group (the cerium group). That is why rare earth minerals contain uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures.

  20. Understanding the Chemistry of Uncommon Americium Oxidation States for Application to Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh Martin; Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt

    2007-09-01

    A spectroscopic study of the stability of Am(V) and Am(VI) produced by oxidizing Am(III) with sodium bismuthate is presented, varying the initial americium concentration, temperature and length of the oxidation was seen to have profound effects on the resultant solutions.

  1. Conversion of actinide and RE oxides into nitrates and their recovery into fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bondin, V.V.; Bychkov, S.I.; Efremov, I.G.; Revenko, Y.A.; Babain, V.A.; Murzin, A.A.; Romanovsky, V.N; Fedorov, Y.S.; Shadrin, A.Y.; Ryabkova, N.V.; Li, E.N.

    2007-07-01

    The conditions for uranium oxides completely convert into uranyl nitrate hexahydrate in nitrogen tetra-oxide media (75 deg. C, 0,5-3,0 MPa, [UO{sub x}]:[H{sub 2}O]:[NO{sub 2}]=1:8:6) were found out. The conversion of Pu contained simulator of oxide spent nuclear fuel of thermal reactors was successfully demonstrated. The possibility of uranium recovery up to 95% from TR SNF without plutonium separation from FP is practically showed, what corresponds with Non-proliferation Treaty. (authors)

  2. Sample preparation for actinide solid state research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirlet, J. C.

    1982-09-01

    The actinide elements (5f elements) and their compounds constitute a very interesting group for solid state research. The electronic properties of the 5f elements show intermediate behavior between the well-understood, completely localized 4f system (lanthanides) and the 3d system (transition elements). The possibility of understanding some unexplained properties of the 3d elements through a systematic investigation of the electronic structures of the actinides considerably increased interest in samples with well-defined composition and structure and with well-known purity. In some cases, single crystals of low defect densities and high purity levels are needed to allow sophisticated investigations of physical properties. Actinide compounds are easily obtained at a high purity level by direct synthesis from pure elements using noncontaminating techniques. Examples of these techniques are the reaction of the actinide metal powder with the vapor of an oxidant in a sealed quartz ampoule, leviation melting on a water-cooled pedestal or melting in a Huking crucible. Actinide metals are produced by metallothermic reduction of commercially available oxides or carbides or by the van Arkel purification process. The metals are refined to the desired purity level by evaporation in vacuum for the more volatile elements (Ac, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk) and by the van Arkel process for the metals with low vapor pressure. Single crystals of actinide compounds have been grown by chemical vapor transport methods (oxides, chalcogenides), high temperature solution growth techniques (oxides), and pulling from the melt by the Czochralski method (oxides, intermetallics). Thin solid films have been prepared by vacuum evaporation or by focused ion-beam sputtering. The materials are analyzed for trace-level impurity content by inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy, by spark source mass spectroscopy and by secondary-ion mass spectroscopy. The chemical composition of the compounds is determined by

  3. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  4. Development of Dodecaniobate Keggin Chain Materials as Alternative Sorbents for SR and Actinide Removal from High-Level Nuclear Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May; Bonhomme, Francois

    2004-03-28

    The current baseline sorbent (monosodium titanate) for Sr and actinide removal from Savannah River Site's high level wastes has excellent adsorption capabilities for Sr but poor performance for the actinides. We are currently investigating the development of alternative materials that sorb radionuclides based on chemical affinity and/or size selectivity. The polyoxometalates, negatively-charged metal oxo clusters, have known metal binding properties and are of interest for radionuclide sequestration. We have developed a class of Keggin-ion based materials, where the Keggin ions are linked in 1- dimensional chains separated by hydrated, charge-balancing cations. These Nb-based materials are stable in the highly basic nuclear waste solutions and show good selectivity for Sr and Pu. Synthesis, characterization and structure of these materials in their native forms and Sr-exchanged forms will be presented.

  5. Molecular solids of actinide hexacyanoferrate: Structure and bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupouy, G.; Dumas, T.; Fillaux, C.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Den Auwer, C.; Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E.; Fuster, E. G.; Papalardo, R.; Sanchez Marcos, E.; Hennig, C.; Scheinost, A.; Conradson, S. D.; Shuh, D. K.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2010-03-01

    The hexacyanometallate family is well known in transition metal chemistry because the remarkable electronic delocalization along the metal-cyano-metal bond can be tuned in order to design systems that undergo a reversible and controlled change of their physical properties. We have been working for few years on the description of the molecular and electronic structure of materials formed with [Fe(CN)6]n- building blocks and actinide ions (An = Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) and have compared these new materials to those obtained with lanthanide cations at oxidation state +III. In order to evaluate the influence of the actinide coordination polyhedron on the three-dimensional molecular structure, both atomic number and formal oxidation state have been varied : oxidation states +III, +IV. EXAFS at both iron K edge and actinide LIII edge is the dedicated structural probe to obtain structural information on these systems. Data at both edges have been combined to obtain a three-dimensional model. In addition, qualitative electronic information has been gathered with two spectroscopic tools : UV-Near IR spectrophotometry and low energy XANES data that can probe each atom of the structural unit : Fe, C, N and An. Coupling these spectroscopic tools to theoretical calculations will lead in the future to a better description of bonding in these molecular solids. Of primary interest is the actinide cation ability to form ionic — covalent bonding as 5f orbitals are being filled by modification of oxidation state and/or atomic number.

  6. Actinide behavior in a freshwater pond

    SciTech Connect

    Trabalka, J.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Scott, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    Long-term investigations of solution chemistry in an alkaline freshwater pond have revealed that actinide oxidation state behavior, particularly that of plutonium, is complex. The Pu(V,VI) fraction was predominant in solution, but it varied over the entire range reported from other natural aquatic environments, in this case, as a result of intrinsic biological and chemical cycles (redox and pH-dependent phenomena). A strong positive correlation between plutonium (Pu), but not uranium (U), and hydroxyl ion over the observation period, especially when both were known to be in higher oxidation states, was particularly notable. Coupled with other examples of divergent U and Pu behavior, this result suggests that Pu(V), or perhaps a mixture of Pu(V,VI), was the prevalent oxidation state in solution. Observations of trivalent actinide sorption behavior during an algal bloom, coupled with the association with a high-molecular weight (nominally 6000 to 10,000 mol wt) organic fraction in solution, indicate that solution-detritus cycling of organic carbon, in turn, may be the primary mechanism in amercium-curium (Am-Cm) cycling. Sorption by sedimentary materials appears to predominate over other factors controlling effective actinide solubility and may explain, at least partially, the absence of an expected strong positive correlation between carbonate and dissolved U. 49 references, 6 figures, 12 tables.

  7. Apparatus and method for oxidizing organic materials

    DOEpatents

    Surma, J.E.; Bryan, G.H.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Butner, R.S.

    1998-01-13

    The invention is a method and apparatus using high cerium concentration in the anolyte of an electrochemical cell to oxidize organic materials. The method and apparatus further use an ultrasonic mixer to enhance the oxidation rate of the organic material in the electrochemical cell. 6 figs.

  8. Apparatus and method for oxidizing organic materials

    DOEpatents

    Surma, Jeffrey E.; Bryan, Garry H.; Geeting, John G. H.; Butner, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus using high cerium concentration in the anolyte of an electrochemical cell to oxidize organic materials. The method and apparatus further use an ultrasonic mixer to enhance the oxidation rate of the organic material in the electrochemical cell.

  9. High Precision Isotopic Analysis of Actinide Bearing Materials: Performance of a New Generation of Purpose Built Actinide Multi-Collector ICPMS Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, Gregory C.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Liezers, Martin; Ward, Jesse D.; Robinson, John W.; Hart, Garret L.; Pratt, Sandra H.; Springer, Kellen WE; Carman, April J.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2014-11-14

    Recently, a new class of multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (MC-ICPMS) has been introduced commercially that includes detector arrays purpose built for actinide measurements. These detector arrays significantly enhance the data quality possible for applications encountered in nuclear forensics. Two such instruments are described in this paper, the NeptunePlusTM, developed by Thermo-Fisher (Bremen, Germany), and the NuPlasma2, developed by Nu Instruments (Wrexham, UK). Research results are presented that have been obtained by the authors using the first commercial NeptunePlusTM. This paper also presents performance characteristics and results for traditional liquid introduction, including a means for ultra-trace detection via electrochemical separation prior to solution nebulization, as well as solid sample introduction with femtosecond-laser ablation. We also discuss the advantages and limitations of the current systems for detection of the transient signals associated with these two methods for introducing sample into the plasma.

  10. Staged heating by oxidation of carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Knell, Everett W.; Green, Norman W.

    1978-01-31

    A carbonaceous material is pyrolyzed in the presence of a particulate source of heat obtained by the partial oxidation of a carbon containing solid residue of the carbonaceous material. The heat obtained from the oxidation of the carbon containing solid residue is maximized by preheating the carbon containing solid residue with a hot gas stream obtained by oxidizing the gaseous combustion products of the carbon containing solid residue.

  11. Metal oxide composite dosimeter method and material

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of measuring a radiation dose wherein a radiation responsive material consisting essentially of metal oxide is first exposed to ionizing radiation. The metal oxide is then stimulating with light thereby causing the radiation responsive material to photoluminesce. Photons emitted from the metal oxide as a result of photoluminescence may be counted to provide a measure of the ionizing radiation.

  12. Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.

    2007-07-01

    Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

  13. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, Robert M; Patton, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  14. Basic materials physics of transparent conducting oxides.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P P; Porch, A; Jones, M O; Morgan, D V; Perks, R M

    2004-10-01

    Materials displaying the remarkable combination of high electrical conductivity and optical transparency already from the basis of many important technological applications, including flat panel displays, solar energy capture and other opto-electronic devices. Here we present the basic materials physics of these important materials centred on the nature of the doping process to generate n-type conductivity in transparent conducting oxides, the associated transition to the metallic (conducting) state and the detailed properties of the degenerate itinerant electron gas. The aim is to fully understand the origins of the basic performance limits of known materials and to set the scene for new or improved materials which will breach those limits for new-generation transparent conducting materials, either oxides, or beyond oxides. PMID:15452622

  15. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    Interconnection materials in a solid oxide fuel cell are exposed to both highly oxidizing conditions at the cathode and to highly reducing conditions at the anode. The thermal expansion characteristics of substituted lanthanum and yttrium chromite interconnect materials were evaluated by dilatometry as a function of oxygen partial pressures from 1 atm to 10{sup -18} atm, controlled using a carbon dioxide/hydrogen buffer.

  16. Rapid determination of alpha emitters using Actinide resin.

    PubMed

    Navarro, N; Rodriguez, L; Alvarez, A; Sancho, C

    2004-01-01

    The European Commission has recently published the recommended radiological protection criteria for the clearance of building and building rubble from the dismantling of nuclear installations. Radionuclide specific clearance levels for actinides are very low (between 0.1 and 1 Bq g(-1)). The prevalence of natural radionuclides in rubble materials makes the verification of these levels by direct alpha counting impossible. The capability of Actinide resin (Eichrom Industries, Inc.) for extracting plutonium and americium from rubble samples has been tested in this work. Besides a strong affinity for actinides in the tri, tetra and hexavalent oxidation states, this extraction chromatographic resin presents an easy recovery of absorbed radionuclides. The retention capability was evaluated on rubble samples spiked with certified radionuclide standards (239Pu and 241Am). Samples were leached with nitric acid, passed through a chromatographic column containing the resin and the elution fraction was measured by LSC. Actinide retention varies from 60% to 80%. Based on these results, a rapid method for the verification of clearance levels for actinides in rubble samples is proposed. PMID:15177360

  17. A new materials data compilation can help in actinide phase-diagram research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, P. L.; Calvert, L. D.; Mueller, M. H.; Huang, T. C.; Dann, J. N.; Weissmann, S.

    New metals and alloys (M&A) indexes to the Powder Diffraction File (PDF) were developed. All index data were critically reviewed, and the organization, selection of materials, and use of alphabetical formulae are similar to those of Villars and Calvert. The book contains four indexes. The Permuted-Sort Alphabetical Formula Index collects all entries containing a given element in alphabetical formula order. Within phase diagrams, phases are listed in compositional order. The Structure Type Index has entries arranged in Pearson symbol order. Hence, one can easily find all the materials with a given structure. The Common Names Index links common metallurgical names to PDF data. The Strukturbericht Symbol Index links Strukturbericht symbols to the equivalent Pearson symbols and prototype structures.

  18. FINAL REPORT. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing Al(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (III-VII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation (pH 10-14) of actinides in presence of Al(III) formation of alumi...

  19. Application of powerful oxidizers in the synthesis of new high-oxidation state actinide and related species

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.M.

    1984-11-01

    The fluorinating and oxide scavenging ability of XeF/sub 6/ have been studied by bringing XeF/sub 6/ into interaction with oxide-fluoride compounds of the third-transition-series elements (W, Re and Os) and uranium, in their highest oxidation states. A/sup +/MOF/sub 5//sup -/ and A/sup +/M/sub 2/O/sub 2/F/sub 9//sup -/ (A = K or Cs, M = W or U) were converted to A/sup +/MF/sub 7//sup -/ by XeF/sub 6/, but the rhenium and osmium compounds, K/sup +/ReO/sub 2/F/sub 4//sup -/ and XeF/sub 5//sup +/OsO/sub 3/F/sub 3//sup -/, resisted interaction with XeF/sub 6/. Strong interactions between XeF/sub 2/ or KrF/sub 2/ and the solvent have been observed for their solutions in anhydrous HF. Both XeF/sub 2/ and KrF/sub 2/ are seen to be effective in breaking up the polymeric (HF)/sub n/ chains. Only weak interactions occur between cations and anions of KrF/sup +/AuF/sub 6//sup -/ and Kr/sub 2/F/sub 3//sup +/AuF/sub 6//sup -/ in HF. The AuF/sub 6//sup -/ anions are slightly distorted from O/sub h/ symmetry. Kr/sub 2/F/sub 3//sup +/ cations in HF have the same dissymmetric V-shape which occurs in crystalline salts. A low-temperature orthorhombic form, ..beta..-ReF/sub 6//sup +/SbF/sub 6//sup -/, a high-temperature rhombohedral form, ..cap alpha..-ReF/sub 6//sup +/SbF/sub 6//sup -/, and a ReF/sub 6//sup +/AuF/sub 6//sup -/ have been prepared. These compounds possess only kinetic stability at ambient temperature and at approx. 20/sup 0/C are best represented as ReF/sub 6//sup +/ReF/sub 7/MF/sub 6//sup -/MF/sub 5/. Thermochemical energy evaluations indicate that the ionization potential of ReF/sub 6/ is 261 kcal mole/sup -1/ and that the fluoride-ion affinity of ReF/sub 6//sup +/ is -214 kcal mole/sup -1/. This is more exothermal than the corresponding process for IF/sub 6//sup +/ (-208 kcal mole/sup -1/). In contrast, ReOF/sub 5/ is shown to be a better fluoro-base than IOF/sub 5/ and also is a better base than ReF/sub 7/. ReOF/sub 4//sup +/MF/sub 6//sup -/ (M = Sb, Au and As

  20. Iridium material for hydrothermal oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T.; Zilberstein, Vladimir A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for hydrothermal oxidation of combustible materials in which, during at least a part of the oxidation, corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises iridium, iridium oxide, an iridium alloy, or a base metal overlaid with an iridium coating. Iridium has been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of hydrothermal oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 800.degree. C.

  1. Bacterial Oxidation of Pyritic Materials in Coal.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M P; Rogoff, M H; Wender, I

    1961-11-01

    Applicability of the manometric method for studying the oxidation of pyritic material in the presence of bacteria has been demonstrated. Resting cells of Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans accelerated the oxidation of coal pyrites and coarsely crystalline marcasite, but were inactive on coarsely crystalline pyrite. Resting cells of Thiobacillus thiooxidans were inactive on all pyrites tested. Oxidation rates in the presence of Ferrobacillus were increased by reducing the particle size of pyritic samples, and, in one case, by removing the CaCO(3) from a calcite-containing sample. PMID:16349610

  2. Bacterial Oxidation of Pyritic Materials in Coal

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Melvin P.; Rogoff, Martin H.; Wender, Irving

    1961-01-01

    Applicability of the manometric method for studying the oxidation of pyritic material in the presence of bacteria has been demonstrated. Resting cells of Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans accelerated the oxidation of coal pyrites and coarsely crystalline marcasite, but were inactive on coarsely crystalline pyrite. Resting cells of Thiobacillus thiooxidans were inactive on all pyrites tested. Oxidation rates in the presence of Ferrobacillus were increased by reducing the particle size of pyritic samples, and, in one case, by removing the CaCO3 from a calcite-containing sample. PMID:16349610

  3. Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples

    SciTech Connect

    McKibbin, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

  4. Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples

    DOEpatents

    McKibbin, Terry T.

    1993-01-01

    A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

  5. Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples

    DOEpatents

    McKibbin, T.T.

    1993-03-02

    A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

  6. Gas-phase energetics of actinide oxides: an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K

    2009-11-12

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry. PMID:19725530

  7. Gas-Phase Energetics of Actinide Oxides: An Assessment of Neutral and Cationic Monoxides and Dioxides from Thorium to Curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-09-01

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  8. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  9. Final Project Report for ER15351 “A Study of New Actinide Zintl Ion Materials”

    SciTech Connect

    Peter K. Dorhout

    2007-11-12

    The structural chemistry of actinide main-group metal materials provides the fundamental basis for the understanding of structural coordination chemistry and the formation of materials with desired or predicted structural features. The main-group metal building blocks, comprising sulfur-group, phosphorous-group, or silicon-group elements, have shown versatility in oxidation state, coordination, and bonding preferences. These building blocks have allowed us to elucidate a series of structures that are unique to the actinide elements, although we can find structural relationships to transition metal and 4f-element materials. In the past year, we investigated controlled metathesis and self-propagating reactions between actinide metal halides and alkali metal salts of main-group metal chalcogenides such as K-P-S salts. Ternary plutonium thiophosphates have resulted from these reactions at low temperature in sealed ampules. we have also focused efforts to examine reactions of Th, U, and Pu halide salts with other alkali metal salts such as Na-Ge-S and Na-Si-Se and copper chloride to identify if self-propagating reactions may be used as a viable reaction to prepare new actinide materials and we prepared a series of U and Th copper chalcogenide materials. Magnetic measurements continued to be a focus of actinide materials prepared in our laboratory. We also contributed to the XANES work at Los Alamos by preparing materials for study and for comparison with environmental samples.

  10. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  11. Oxide bipolar electronics: materials, devices and circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Marius; Klüpfel, Fabian; Karsthof, Robert; Schlupp, Peter; Schein, Friedrich-Leonhard; Splith, Daniel; Yang, Chang; Bitter, Sofie; von Wenckstern, Holger

    2016-06-01

    We present the history of, and the latest progress in, the field of bipolar oxide thin film devices. As such we consider primarily pn-junctions in which at least one of the materials is a metal oxide semiconductor. A wide range of n-type and p-type oxides has been explored for the formation of such bipolar diodes. Since most oxide semiconductors are unipolar, challenges and opportunities exist with regard to the formation of heterojunction diodes and band lineups. Recently, various approaches have led to devices with high rectification, namely p-type ZnCo2O4 and NiO on n-type ZnO and amorphous zinc-tin-oxide. Subsequent bipolar devices and applications such as photodetectors, solar cells, junction field-effect transistors and integrated circuits like inverters and ring oscillators are discussed. The tremendous progress shows that bipolar oxide electronics has evolved from the exploration of various materials and heterostructures to the demonstration of functioning integrated circuits. Therefore a viable, facile and high performance technology is ready for further exploitation and performance optimization.

  12. Actinide thermodynamic predictions. 3. Thermodynamics of compounds and aquo ions of the 2+, 3+ and 4+ oxidation states and standard electrode potentials at 298. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Bratsch, S.G.; Lagowski, J.J.

    1986-01-16

    A modified ionic model is applied to selected actinide thermodynamic measurements to allow the evaluation of gas-phase ion thermodynamics across the actinide series. These are used to predict the thermodynamic properties of a number of actinide compounds and aquo ions at 298.15 K. General guidelines are offered for predicting the relative stabilities of actinide(II), -(III), and -(IV) compounds in various chemical environments. 40 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Crystallization of Oxides as Functional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Congting; Song, Shuyan; Xue, Dongfeng; Zhang, Hongjie

    2012-06-01

    Crystallization is essential to the manufacture of functional materials as varies as electronic devices, energy storage and conversion devices, and highly reactive catalysts. As an important part of functional materials, metal oxides possess wide applications and the crystallization of oxide materials has thus received considerable attention from both fundamental and technological perspectives. With particular emphasis on our recent laboratory results, this feature article gives a brief review in the field of crystallization of oxides. On the basis of chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth, we have simulated thermodynamic growth behaviors of various functional oxides such as ZnO, MgO, Cu2O, Nb2O5, V2O5, MnO2, SnO2, NiO, KDP/ADP, LiNbO3, and NaNbO3. Quantitatively analyzing bonding conditions of controllable crystallographic faces enables us to design proper synthesis strategies and optimize growth parameters, consequently obtaining functional oxides with desirable crystallization behaviors.

  14. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF PLUTONIUM AND OTHER ACTINIDES IN TRANSURANIC AND MIXED WASTES.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS,A.J.

    2003-07-06

    The presence of the actinides Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am in transuranic (TRU) and mixed wastes is a major concern because of their potential for migration from the waste repositories and long-term contamination of the environment. The toxicity of the actinide elements and the long half-lives of their isotopes are the primary causes for concern. In addition to the radionuclides the TRU waste consists a variety of organic materials (cellulose, plastic, rubber, chelating agents) and inorganic compounds (nitrate and sulfate). Significant microbial activity is expected in the waste because of the presence of organic compounds and nitrate, which serve as carbon and nitrogen sources and in the absence of oxygen the microbes can use nitrate and sulfate as alternate electron acceptors. Biodegradation of the TRU waste can result in gas generation and pressurization of containment areas, and waste volume reduction and subsidence in the repository. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of actinides have been investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes. Microbial activity could affect the chemical nature of the actinides by altering the speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of actinides in solution. Under appropriate conditions, dissolution or immobilization of actinides is brought about by direct enzymatic or indirect non-enzymatic actions of microorganisms. Dissolution of actinides by microorganisms is brought about by changes in the Eh and pH of the medium, by their production of organic acids, such as citric acid, siderophores and extracellular metabolites. Immobilization or precipitation of actinides is due to changes in the Eh of the environment, enzymatic reductive precipitation (reduction from higher to lower oxidation state), biosorption, bioaccumulation, biotransformation of actinides complexed

  15. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  16. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy.

  17. Raman spectroscopy characterization of actinide oxides (U 1-yPu y)O 2: Resistance to oxidation by the laser beam and examination of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégou, C.; Caraballo, R.; Peuget, S.; Roudil, D.; Desgranges, L.; Magnin, M.

    2010-10-01

    Structural changes in four (U 1-yPu y)O 2 materials with very different plutonium concentrations (0 ⩽ y ⩽ 1) and damage levels (up to 110 dpa) were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The novel experimental approach developed for this purpose consisted in using a laser beam as a heat source to assess the reactivity and structural changes of these materials according to the power supplied locally by the laser. The experiments were carried out in air and in water with or without hydrogen peroxide. As expected, the material response to oxidation in air depends on the plutonium content of the test oxide. At the highest power levels U 3O 8 generally forms with UO 2 whereas no significant change in the spectra indicating oxidation is observed for samples with high plutonium content ( 239PuO 2). Samples containing 25 wt.% plutonium exhibit intermediate behavior, typified mainly by a higher-intensity 632 cm -1 peak and the disappearance of the 1LO peak at 575 cm -1. This can be attributed to the presence of anion sublattice defects without any formation of higher oxides. The range of materials examined also allowed us to distinguish partly the chemical effects of alpha self-irradiation. The results obtained with water and hydrogen peroxide (a water radiolysis product) on a severely damaged 238PuO 2 specimen highlight a specific behavior, observed for the first time.

  18. Sealant materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this work is to complete the development of soft glass-ceramic sealants for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Among other requirements, the materials must soften at the operation temperature of the fuel cell (600-1000{degrees}C) to relieve stresses between stack components, and their thermal expansions must be tailored to match those of the stack materials. Specific objectives included addressing the needs of industrial fuel cell developers, based on their evaluation of samples we supply, as well as working with commercial glass producers to achieve scaled-up production of the materials without changing their properties.

  19. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs. The goal is to modify and improve the current state-of-the-art materials and minimize the total number of cations in each material to avoid negative effects on the materials properties. Materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabricatoin and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions.

  20. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  1. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  2. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  3. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  4. Actinide co-conversion by internal gelation

    SciTech Connect

    Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Dauby, Jacques; Dumont-Shintu, Corinne; Machon, Estelle; Grandjean, Stephane

    2007-07-01

    Suitable microstructures and homogenous microspheres of actinide compounds are of interest for future nuclear fuel or transmutation target concepts to prevent the generation and dispersal of actinide powder. Sol-gel routes are being investigated as one of the possible solutions for producing these compounds. Preliminary work is described involving internal gelation to synthesize mixed compounds including minor actinides, particularly mixed actinide or mixed actinide-inert element compounds. A parameter study is discussed to highlight the importance of the initial broth composition for obtaining gel microspheres without major defects (cracks, craters, etc.). In particular, conditions are defined to produce gel beads from Zr(IV)/Y(III)/Ce(III) or Zr(IV)/An(III) systems. After gelation, the heat treatment of these microspheres is described for the purpose of better understanding the formation of cracks after calcination and verifying the effective synthesis of an oxide solid-solution. (authors)

  5. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  6. High Performance Oxides-Based Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guangkun; Lan, Jinle; Zeng, Chengcheng; Liu, Yaochun; Zhan, Bin; Butt, Sajid; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attracted much attention due to their applications in waste-heat recovery, power generation, and solid state cooling. In comparison with thermoelectric alloys, oxide semiconductors, which are thermally and chemically stable in air at high temperature, are regarded as the candidates for high-temperature thermoelectric applications. However, their figure-of-merit ZT value has remained low, around 0.1-0.4 for more than 20 years. The poor performance in oxides is ascribed to the low electrical conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Since the electrical transport properties in these thermoelectric oxides are strongly correlated, it is difficult to improve both the thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity simultaneously by conventional methods. This review summarizes recent progresses on high-performance oxide-based thermoelectric bulk-materials including n-type ZnO, SrTiO3, and In2O3, and p-type Ca3Co4O9, BiCuSeO, and NiO, enhanced by heavy-element doping, band engineering and nanostructuring.

  7. Status of development of actinide blanket processing flowsheets for accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, H.J.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Schroeder, N.C.; Smith, B.F.; Villarreal, R.; Walker, R.B.; Yarbro, S.L.; Yates, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    An accelerator-driven subcritical nuclear system is briefly described that transmutes actinides and selected long-lived fission products. An application of this accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) concept to spent fuel from a commercial nuclear power plant is presented as an example. The emphasis here is on a possible aqueous processing flowsheet to separate the actinides and selected long-lived fission products from the remaining fission products within the transmutation system. In the proposed system the actinides circulate through the thermal neutron flux as a slurry of oxide particles in heavy water in two loops with different average residence times: one loop for neptunium and plutonium and one for americium and curium. Material from the Np/Pu loop is processed with a short cooling time (5-10 days) because of the need to keep the total actinide inventory, low for this particular ATW application. The high radiation and thermal load from the irradiated material places severe constraints on the separation processes that can be used. The oxide particles are dissolved in nitric acid and a quarternary, ammonium anion exchanger is used to extract neptunium, plutonium, technetium, and palladium. After further cooling (about 90 days), the Am, Cm and higher actinides are extracted using a TALSPEAK-type process. The proposed operations were chosen because they have been successfully tested for processing high-level radioactive fuels or wastes in gram to kilogram quantities.

  8. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  9. Oxide diffusion in innovative SOFC cathode materials.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Thoréton, V; Pirovano, C; Capoen, E; Bogicevic, C; Nuns, N; Mamede, A-S; Dezanneau, G; Vannier, R N

    2014-01-01

    Oxide diffusion was studied in two innovative SOFC cathode materials, Ba(2)Co(9)O(14) and Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ derivatives. Although oxygen diffusion was confirmed in the promising material Ba(2)Co(9)O(14), it was not possible to derive accurate transport parameters because of an oxidation process at the sample surface which has still to be clarified. In contrast, oxygen diffusion in the well-known Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ thermoelectric material was improved when calcium was partly substituted with strontium, likely due to an increase of the volume of the rock salt layers in which the conduction process takes place. Although the diffusion coefficient remains low, interestingly, fast kinetics towards the oxygen molecule dissociation reaction were shown with surface exchange coefficients higher than those reported for the best cathode materials in the field. They increased with the strontium content; the Sr atoms potentially play a key role in the mechanism of oxygen molecule dissociation at the solid surface. PMID:25407246

  10. Nuclear waste forms for actinides

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    1999-01-01

    The disposition of actinides, most recently 239Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons, requires effective containment of waste generated by the nuclear fuel cycle. Because actinides (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np) are long-lived, they have a major impact on risk assessments of geologic repositories. Thus, demonstrable, long-term chemical and mechanical durability are essential properties of waste forms for the immobilization of actinides. Mineralogic and geologic studies provide excellent candidate phases for immobilization and a unique database that cannot be duplicated by a purely materials science approach. The “mineralogic approach” is illustrated by a discussion of zircon as a phase for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium. PMID:10097054

  11. MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES STORED IN STAINLESS STEEL CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.; Bridges, N.; Bronikowski, M.; Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Mcelwee, M.; Missimer, D.; Scogin, J.; Summer, M.; Jurgensen, A.

    2010-02-01

    The destructive examination (DE) of 3013 containers after storage is part of the Surveillance and Monitoring Program based on the Department of Energy's standard for long-term storage of Pu (DOE-STD-3013). The stored, Pu-bearing materials may contain alkali halide contamination that varies from trace amounts of salt to about 50 weight percent, with smaller fractions of other compounds and oxides. These materials were characterized prior to packaging, and surveillance characterizations are conducted to determine the behavior of the materials during long term storage. The surveillance characterization results are generally in agreement with the pre-surveillance data. The predominant phases identified by X-ray diffraction are in agreement with the expected phase assemblages of the as-received materials. The measured densities are in reasonable agreement with the expected densities of materials containing the fraction of salts and actinide oxide specified by the pre-surveillance data. The radiochemical results are generally in good agreement with the pre-surveillance data for mixtures containing 'weapons grade' Pu (nominally 94% {sup 239}Pu and 6% {sup 240}Pu); however, the ICP-MS results from the present investigation generally produce lower concentrations of Pu than the pre-surveillance analyses. For mixtures containing 'fuel grade' Pu (nominally 81-93% {sup 239}Pu and 7-19% {sup 240}Pu), the ICP-MS results from the present investigation appear to be in better agreement with the pre-surveillance data than the radiochemistry results.

  12. Alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnections and electrodes with improved electrical, thermal, and electrochemical properties. A second objective is to develop synthesis and fabrication methods for these materials whereby they can be processed in air into SOFCs. The approach is to (1) develop modifications of the current, state-of-the-art materials used in SOFCs, (2) minimize the number of cations used in the SOFC materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabrication and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions. This paper summarizes a comprehensive study that assessed the effect of ambient oxygen partial pressure on the stability of air-sinterable chromites and the sintering behavior of doped lanthanum manganites.

  13. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  14. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-08-01

    Chromite interconnection materials in an SOFC are exposed to both highly oxidizing conditions at the cathode and to highly reducing conditions at the anode. Because such conditions could lead to component failure, the authors have evaluated thermal, electrical, chemical, and structural stabilities of these materials as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The crystal lattice of the chromites was shown to expand for oxygen partial pressures smaller than 10{sup {minus}10} atm, which could lead to cracking and debonding in an SOFC. Highly substituted lanthanum chromite compositions were the most susceptible to lattice expansion; yttrium chromites showed better dimensional stability by more than a factor of two. New chromite compositions were developed that showed little tendency for lattice expansion under strongly reducing conditions, yet provided a good thermal expansion match to other fuel cell components. Use of these new chromite interconnect compositions should improve long-term SOFC performance, particularly for planar cell configurations. Thermodynamic properties of substituted lanthanum manganite cathode compositions have been determined through measurement of electromotive force as a function of temperature. Critical oxygen decomposition pressures for Sr and Ca-substituted lanthanum manganites were established using cells based on a zirconia electrolyte. Strontium oxide and calcium oxide activities in a lanthanum manganite matrix were determined using cells based on strontium fluoride and calcium fluoride electrolytes, respectively. The compositional range of single-phase behavior of these ABO{sub 3}-type perovskites was established as a function of A/B cation ratios and the extent of acceptor doping. Before this work, very little thermodynamic information was in existence for substituted manganite compositions. Such information is needed to predict the long-term stability of solid oxide fuel cell assemblies.

  15. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  16. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Zwick, Bill D.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Clark, David L.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  17. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  18. Actinide sulfite tetrahydrate and actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, D.; Watt, G.

    1980-07-08

    A compound is prepared that comprises an actinide sulfite tetrahydrate selected from the group consisting of uranium (IV) sulfite tetrahydrate and plutonium (IV) sulfite tetrahydrate. A compound is also prepared that comprises an actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate selected from the group consisting of uranium (IV) oxysulfite tetrahydrate and plutonium (IV) oxysulfite tetrahydrate

  19. Innovative oxide materials for electrochemical energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsman, Eric D.

    2012-02-01

    Research in functional materials has progressed from those materials exhibiting structural to electronic functionality. The study of ion conducting ceramics ushers in a new era of ``chemically functional materials.'' This chemical functionality arises out of the defect equilibria of these materials, and results in the ability to transport chemical species and actively participate in chemical reactions at their surface. Moreover, this chemical functionality provides a promise for the future whereby the harnessing of our natural hydrocarbon energy resources can shift from inefficient and polluting combustion - mechanical methods to direct electrochemical conversion. The unique properties of these materials and their applications will be described. The focus will be on the application of ion conducting ceramics to energy conversion and storage, chemical sensors, chemical separation and conversion, and life support systems. Results presented will include development of record high power density (3 kW/kg) solid oxide fuel cells, NOx/CO species selective solid-state sensors, high yield membrane reactors, and regenerative life support systems that reduce CO2 to O2 and solid C.

  20. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2015-01-09

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  1. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  2. Functional oxide nanobelts - from materials to nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhong; Wang

    2003-11-01

    Nanowire and nanotube based materials have been demonstrated as building blocks for nanocircuits, nanosystems and nano-optoelectronics. Recently, ultra-long belt-like, quasi-one-dimensional nanostructures (so called nanobelts or nanoribbons) have been successfully synthesized for semiconducting oxides of zinc, tin, indium, cadmium and gallium, by simply evaporating the desired commercial metal oxide powders at high temperatures [1]. The as-synthesized oxide nanobelts are pure, structurally uniform, single crystalline and most of them free from dislocations; they have a rectangular-like cross-section with typical widths of 30 - 300 nm, width-to-thickness ratios of 5 - 10 and lengths of up to a few millimeters. The belt-like morphology appears to be a unique and common structural characteristic for the family of semiconducting oxides with cations of different valence states and materials of distinct crystallographic structures. Using the technique demonstrated for measuring the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes based on in-situ transmission electron microscopy [2,3], the bending modulus of the oxide nanobelts has been measured and the nanobelt is shown to be a dual mode nanoresonator for NEMS technology. Field effect transistors [4] and ultra-sensitive nano-size gas sensors [5], nanoresonators and nanocantilevers [6] have also been fabricated based on individual nanobelts. Thermal transport along the nanobelt has also been measured. Nanocantilevers based on nanobelts have been fabricated. Very recently, structurally nanobelts exhibiting piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties have been synthesized, which could be a candidate for nano-scale traducers, actuators and sensors. [1] Z.W. Pan, Z.R. Dai and Z.L. Wang, Science, 209 (2001) 1947. [2] P. Poncharal, Z.L. Wang, D. Ugarte and W.A. de Heer, Science, 283 (1999) 1513; Electron Microscopy of Nanotubes, ed. Z.L. Wang and C. Hui, Kluwer Academic Publisher (2003). [3] R.P. Gao, Z.L. Wang, Z.G. Bai, W. de Heer

  3. Predicting thermo-mechanical behaviour of high minor actinide content composite oxide fuel in a dedicated transmutation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemehov, S. E.; Sobolev, V. P.; Verwerft, M.

    2011-09-01

    The European Facility for Industrial Transmutation (EFIT) of the minor actinides (MA), from LWR spent fuel is being developed in the integrated project EUROTRANS within the 6th Framework Program of EURATOM. Two composite uranium-free fuel systems, containing a large fraction of MA, are proposed as the main candidates: a CERCER with magnesia matrix hosting (Pu,MA)O 2-x particles, and a CERMET with metallic molybdenum matrix. The long-term thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fuel under the expected EFIT operating conditions is one of the critical issues in the core design. To make a reliable prediction of long-term thermo-mechanical behaviour of the hottest fuel rods in the lead-cooled version of EFIT with thermal power of 400 MW, different fuel performance codes have been used. This study describes the main results of modelling the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the hottest CERCER fuel rods with the fuel performance code MACROS which indicate that the CERCER fuel residence time can safely reach at least 4-5 effective full power years.

  4. Extraction studies of selected actinide ions from aqueous solutions with 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C. |; Smith, B.F.

    1991-11-01

    The first measurements of distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cm(III), Bk(III), Cf(III), Es(III), and Fm(III) between aqueous perchlorate solutions and solutions of 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT) and the synergist tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in toluene are reported. Curium-243, berkelium-250, californium-249, einsteinium-254, and fermium-253 were used in these studies. The K{sub d} for {sup 241}Am was also measured and is in agreement with previously published results. Our new results show that the K{sub d}`s decrease gradually with increasing atomic number for the actinides with a dip at Cf. In general, the K{sub d}`s for these actinides are about a factor of 5 to 10 greater than the K{sub d}`s for the homologous lanthanides at a pH of 2.9, a BMPPT concentration of 0.2 M, and a TOPO concentration of 0.04 M. The larger K{sub d}`s for the actinides are consistent with greater covalent bonding between the actinide metal ion and the sulfur bonding site in the ligand.

  5. Extraction studies of selected actinide ions from aqueous solutions with 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry); Smith, B.F. )

    1991-11-01

    The first measurements of distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cm(III), Bk(III), Cf(III), Es(III), and Fm(III) between aqueous perchlorate solutions and solutions of 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT) and the synergist tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in toluene are reported. Curium-243, berkelium-250, californium-249, einsteinium-254, and fermium-253 were used in these studies. The K{sub d} for {sup 241}Am was also measured and is in agreement with previously published results. Our new results show that the K{sub d}'s decrease gradually with increasing atomic number for the actinides with a dip at Cf. In general, the K{sub d}'s for these actinides are about a factor of 5 to 10 greater than the K{sub d}'s for the homologous lanthanides at a pH of 2.9, a BMPPT concentration of 0.2 M, and a TOPO concentration of 0.04 M. The larger K{sub d}'s for the actinides are consistent with greater covalent bonding between the actinide metal ion and the sulfur bonding site in the ligand.

  6. Extraction studies of selected actinide ions from aqueous solutions with 4-benzoyl-2,4-Dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione and Tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C.; Smith, B.F.

    1992-07-01

    The first measurements of distribution coefficients (k{sub d}) for Cm(III), Bk(III), Cf(III), Es(III), and Fm(III) between aqueous perchlorate solutions and solutions of 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT) and the synergist tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in toluene are reported. Curium-243, berkelium-250, californium-249, einsteinium-254, and fermium-253 were used in these studies. The K{sub d} for {sup 241}Am was also measured and is in agreement with previously published results. Our new results show that the K{sub d}`s decrease gradually with increasing atomic number for the actinides with a dip at Cf. In general, the K{sub d}`s for these actinides are about about a factor of 10 greater than the K{sub d}`s for the homologous lanthanides at a pH of 2.9, a BMPPT concentration of 0.2 M, and a TOPO concentration of 0.04 M. The larger K{sub d}`s for the actinides are consistent with greater covalent bonding between the actinide metal ion and the sulfur bonding site in the ligand. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Stability of tetravalent actinides in perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.W.; Morss, L.R.; Choi, I.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the first determination of the enthalpy of formation of a complex actinide(IV) oxide: ..delta..H/sup 0//sub f/ (BaUO/sub 3/, s, 298 K) = -1690 +- 10 kJ mol/sup -1/. The preparation and properties of this and other actinide(IV) complex oxides are described and are compared with other perovskites BaMO/sub 3/. The relative stabilities of tetravalent and hexavalent uranium in various environments are compared in terms of the oxidation-reduction behavior of uranium in geological nuclear waste storage media; in perovskite, uranium(IV) is very unstable in comparison with uranium(VI).

  8. Actinide-ion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X; Jue, Jan-fong; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2015-01-13

    An apparatus for the real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide-ion concentrations. A working electrolyte is positioned within the interior of a container. The working electrolyte is separated from a reference electrolyte by a separator. A working electrode is at least partially in contact with the working electrolyte. A reference electrode is at least partially in contact with the reference electrolyte. A voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide-ion of interest. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide-ion of interest. The separator comprises an actinide, Zr, and Nb. Preferably, the actinide of the separator is Am or Np, more preferably Pu. In one embodiment, the actinide of the separator is the actinide of interest. In another embodiment, the separator further comprises P and O.

  9. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean - Francois; Richmann, Michael K; Reed, Donald T; Khaing, Hnin; Swanson, Juliet

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  10. Redox Bias in Loss on Ignition Moisture Measurement for Relatively Pure Plutonium-Bearing Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, P. G.; Stakebake, J. L.; Cooper, T. D.

    2002-02-26

    This paper evaluates potential analytical bias in application of the Loss on Ignition (LOI) technique for moisture measurement to relatively pure (plutonium assay of 80 wt.% or higher) oxides containing uranium that have been stabilized according to stabilization and storage standard DOE-STD-3013-2000 (STD- 3013). An immediate application is to Rocky Flats (RF) materials derived from high-grade metal hydriding separations subsequently treated by multiple calcination cycles. Specifically evaluated are weight changes due to oxidation/reduction of multivalent impurity oxides that could mask true moisture equivalent content measurement. Process knowledge and characterization of materials representing complex-wide materials to be stabilized and packaged according to STD-3013, and particularly for the immediate RF target stream, indicate that oxides of uranium, iron and gallium are the only potential multivalent constituents expected to be present above 0.5 wt.%. The evaluation show s that of these constituents, with few exceptions, only uranium oxides can be present at a sufficient level to produce weight gain biases significant with respect to the LOI stability test. In general, these formerly high-value, high-actinide content materials are reliably identifiable by process knowledge and measurement. Significant bias also requires that UO2 components remain largely unoxidized after calcination and are largely converted to U3O8 during LOI testing at only slightly higher temperatures. Based on well-established literature, it is judged unlikely that this set of conditions will be realized in practice. We conclude that it is very likely that LOI weight gain bias will be small for the immediate target RF oxide materials containing greater than 80 wt.% plutonium plus a much smaller uranium content. Recommended tests are in progress to confirm these expectations and to provide a more authoritative basis for bounding LOI oxidation/reduction biases. LOI bias evaluation is more

  11. Environmental Impact of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Fate of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Runde, W.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-01-31

    The resurgence of nuclear power as a strategy for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has, in parallel, revived interest in the environmental impact of actinides. Just as GHG emissions are the main environmental impact of the combustion of fossil fuels, the fate of actinides, consumed and produced by nuclear reactions, determines whether nuclear power is viewed as an environmentally “friendly” source of energy. In this article, we summarize the sources of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle, how actinides are separated by chemical processing, the development of actinide-bearing materials, and the behavior of actinides in the environment. At each stage, actinides present a unique and complicated behavior because of the 5f electronic configurations.

  12. Modelling the behaviour of oxide fuels containing minor actinides with urania, thoria and zirconia matrices in an accelerator-driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V.; Lemehov, S.; Messaoudi, N.; Van Uffelen, P.; Aı̈t Abderrahim, H.

    2003-06-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK • CEN, is currently working on the pre-design of the multipurpose accelerator-driven system (ADS) MYRRHA. A demonstration of the possibility of transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products with a realistic design of experimental fuel targets and prognosis of their behaviour under typical ADS conditions is an important task in the MYRRHA project. In the present article, the irradiation behaviour of three different oxide fuel mixtures, containing americium and plutonium - (Am,Pu,U)O 2- x with urania matrix, (Am,Pu,Th)O 2- x with thoria matrix and (Am,Y,Pu,Zr)O 2- x with inert zirconia matrix stabilised by yttria - were simulated with the new fuel performance code MACROS, which is under development and testing at the SCK • CEN. All the fuel rods were considered to be of the same design and sizes: annular fuel pellets, helium bounded with the stainless steel cladding, and a large gas plenum. The liquid lead-bismuth eutectic was used as coolant. Typical irradiation conditions of the hottest fuel assembly of the MYRRHA subcritical core were pre-calculated with the MCNPX code and used in the following calculations as the input data. The results of prediction of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the designed rods with the considered fuels during three irradiation cycles of 90 EFPD are presented and discussed.

  13. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials for solid fuel cell systems

    DOEpatents

    Brinkman, Kyle S

    2015-05-05

    Disclosed are solid fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells and PEM fuel cells that include nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials as a component of the fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can include nanocrystalline cerium oxide as a cathode component and microcrystalline cerium oxide as an electrolyte component, which can prevent mechanical failure and interdiffusion common in other fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can also include nanocrystalline cerium oxide in the anode. A PEM fuel cell can include cerium oxide as a catalyst support in the cathode and optionally also in the anode.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A; Pantoya, M; Jr., J S; Zhao, L; Shea, K; Simpson, R; Clapsaddle, B

    2003-11-18

    In the field of composite energetic materials, properties such as ingredient distribution, particle size, and morphology, affect both sensitivity and performance. Since the reaction kinetics of composite energetic materials are typically controlled by the mass transport rates between reactants, one would anticipate new and potentially exceptional performance from energetic nanocomposites. We have developed a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. A novel sol-gel approach has proven successful in preparing metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites in which the metal oxide is the major component. Two of the metal oxides are tungsten trioxide and iron(III) oxide, both of which are of interest in the field of energetic materials. Furthermore, due to the large availability of organically functionalized silanes, the silicon oxide phase can be used as a unique way of introducing organic additives into the bulk metal oxide materials. As a result, the desired organic functionality is well dispersed throughout the composite material on the nanoscale. By introducing a fuel metal into the metal oxide/silicon oxide matrix, energetic materials based on thermite reactions can be fabricated. The resulting nanoscale distribution of all the ingredients displays energetic properties not seen in its microscale counterparts due to the expected increase of mass transport rates between the reactants. The synthesis and characterization of these metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites and their performance as energetic materials will be discussed.

  15. Performance of Thorium-Based Mixed Oxide Fuels for the Consumption of Plutonium and Minor Actinides in Current and Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

    2002-06-01

    A renewed interest in thorium-based fuels has arisen lately based on the need for proliferation resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup and improved wasteform characteristics. Recent studies have been directed toward homogeneously mixed, heterogeneously mixed, and seed-and-blanket thorium-uranium fuel cycles that rely on "in situ" use of the bred-in U-233. However, due to the higher initial enrichment required to achieve acceptable burnups, these fuels are encountering economic constraints. Thorium can nevertheless play a large role in the nuclear fuel cycle; particularly in the reduction of plutonium. While uranium-based mixedoxide (MOX) fuel will decrease the amount of plutonium, the reduction is limited due to the breeding of more plutonium (and higher actinides) from the U-238. Here we present calculational results and a comparison of the potential burnup of a thorium-based and uranium-based mixed oxide fuel in a light water reactor (LWR). Although the uranium-based fuels outperformed the thorium-based fuels in achievable burnup, a depletion comparison of the initially charged plutonium (both reactor and weapons grade) showed that the thorium-based fuels outperformed the uranium-based fuels by more that a factor of 2; where more than 70% of the total plutonium in the thorium-based fuel is consumed during the cycle. This is significant considering that the achievable burnup of the thorium-based fuels were 1.4 to 4.6 times less than the uranium-based fuels. Furthermore, use of a thorium-based fuel could also be used as a strategy for reducing the amount of long-lived nuclides (including the minor actinides), and thus the radiotoxicity in spent nuclear fuel. Although the breeding of U-233 is a concern, the presence of U-232 and its daughter products can aid in making this fuel self-protecting, and/or enough U-238 can be added to denature the fissile uranium. From these calculations, it appears that thorium-based fuel for plutonium incineration is superior as

  16. Water defluoridation by aluminium oxide-manganese oxide composite material.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Sheta; Mulugeta, Eyobel; Zewge, Feleke; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, aluminium oxide-manganese oxide (AOMO) composite material was synthesized, characterized, and tested for fluoride removal in batch experiments. AOMO was prepared from manganese(II) chloride and aluminium hydroxide. The surface area of AOMO was found to be 30.7m2/g and its specific density was determined as 2.78 g/cm3. Detailed investigation of the adsorbent by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography (for sulphate only) showed that it is composed of Al, Mn, SO4, and Na as major components and Fe, Si, Ca, and Mg as minor components. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to study the thermal behaviour of AOMO. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the adsorbent is poorly crystalline. The point of zero charge was determined as 9.54. Batch experiments (by varying the proportion of MnO, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial F concentration, and raw water pH) showed that fluoride removal efficiency ofAOMO varied significantly with percentage of MnO with an optimum value of about I11% of manganese oxide in the adsorbent. The optimum dose of the adsorbent was 4 g/L which corresponds to the equilibrium adsorption capacity of 4.8 mg F-/g. Both the removal efficiency and adsorption capacity showed an increasing trend with an increase in initial fluoride concentration of the water. The pH for optimum fluoride removal was found to be in the range between 5 and 7. The adsorption data were analysed using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinirn-Radushkevich models. The minimum adsorption capacity obtained from the non-linear Freundlich isotherm model was 4.94 mg F-/g and the maximum capacity from the Langmuir isotherm method was 19.2mg F-/g. The experimental data of fluoride adsorption on AOMO fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption is well described by a non-linear pseudo-second-order reaction model with an average rate constant of 3

  17. Preparation of actinide targets by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, N.; Folger, H.

    1989-10-01

    Actinide targets with varying thicknesses on different substrates have been prepared by electrodeposition either from aqueous solutions or from solutions of their nitrates in isopropyl alcohol. With these techniques the actinides can be deposited almost quantitatively on various backing materials within 15 to 30 min. Targets of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium and californium with areal densities from almost carrier-free up to 1.4 mg/cm 2 on thin beryllium, carbon, titanium, tantalum and platinum foils have been prepared. In most cases, prior to the deposition, the actinides had to be purified chemically and for some of them, due to the limited amount of material available, recycling procedures were required. Applications of actinide targets in heavy-ion reactions are briefly discussed.

  18. Electron microscopy of compound oxide laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, Daniel E.; LeBret, Joel B.; Norton, M. G.; Bahr, David F.; Dumm, John Q.

    2003-06-01

    Oxide single crystals, such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4), are important host crystals for solid-state laser applications. These crystals are often grown by the Czochralski process and are doped with neodymium during growth. The microstructure of the resultant crystal affects the overall laser performance and it is necessary to be able to characterize grown-in defects in the material. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to examine the fracture surfaces of YAG and has shown the presence of microscopic voids, which act as stress concentrators and in some cases appear to be the cause of fracture. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize various defects in both YAG and YVO4 crystals. The defects found depend on the growth conditions, specifically the Nd concentration in the crystal and the position within the boule. One of the most common defects identified in both materials were microscopic spherical particles. In YAG these particles appeared to be located primarily in the core regions and analysis of high resolution images indicate that they are due to regions that are both compositionally and orientationally different from the matrix phase. Direct observation of dislocations in YVO4 was made using TEM. In YAG only indirect evidence for dislocations could be found from the observation of river marks on fracture surfaces.

  19. Separation of actinides from lanthanides

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  20. Separation of actinides from lanthanides

    DOEpatents

    Smith, B.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1988-03-31

    An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form is described. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4- dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  1. Actinide extraction methods

    DOEpatents

    Peterman, Dean R [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D [Pocatello, ID

    2010-09-21

    Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

  2. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  3. Modified lithium vanadium oxide electrode materials products and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kahaian, Arthur J.; Visser, Donald R.; Dees, Dennis W.; Benedek, Roy

    1999-12-21

    A method of improving certain vanadium oxide formulations is presented. The method concerns fluorine doping formulations having a nominal formula of LiV.sub.3 O.sub.8. Preferred average formulations are provided wherein the average oxidation state of the vanadium is at least 4.6. Herein preferred fluorine doped vanadium oxide materials, electrodes using such materials, and batteries including at least one electrode therein comprising such materials are provided.

  4. Apparatus and method for constant flow oxidizing of organic materials

    DOEpatents

    Surma, Jeffrey E.; Nelson, Norvell; Steward, G. Anthony; Bryan, Garry H.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus using high cerium concentration in the anolyte of an electrochemical cell to oxidize organic materials. The method and apparatus further use an ultrasonic mixer to enhance the oxidation rate of the organic material in the electrochemical cell. A reaction vessel provides an advantage of independent reaction temperature control and electrochemical cell temperature control. A separate or independent reaction vessel may be used without an ultrasonic mixer to oxidize gaseous phase organic materials.

  5. Bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction process for actinide recovery and partition

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1976-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery and partitioning of actinide values from acidic nuclear waste aqueous solutions, the actinide values including trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent oxidation states is provided and includes the steps of contacting the aqueous solution with a bidentate organophosphorous extractant to extract essentially all of the actinide values into the organic phase. Thereafter the respective actinide fractions are selectively partitioned into separate aqueous solutions by contact with dilute nitric or nitric-hydrofluoric acid solutions. The hexavalent uranium is finally removed from the organic phase by contact with a dilute sodium carbonate solution.

  6. Actinide chemistry in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichiro; Bell, Thomas James; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article provides an overview of the reported studies on the actinide chemistry in ionic liquids (ILs) with a particular focus on several fundamental chemical aspects: (i) complex formation, (ii) electrochemistry, and (iii) extraction behavior. The majority of investigations have been dedicated to uranium, especially for the 6+ oxidation state (UO2(2+)), because the chemistry of uranium in ordinary solvents has been well investigated and uranium is the most abundant element in the actual nuclear fuel cycles. Other actinides such as thorium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curiumm, although less studied, are also of importance in fully understanding the nuclear fuel engineering process and the safe geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:22873132

  7. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  8. Hybrid functional for correlated electrons in the projector augmented-wave formalism: Study of multiple minima for actinide oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollet, F.; Jomard, G.; Amadon, B.; Crocombette, J. P.; Torumba, D.

    2009-12-01

    Exact (Hartree-Fock) exchange for correlated electrons is implemented to describe correlated orbitals in the projector augmented-waves (PAW) framework, as suggested recently in another context [P. Novák , Phys. Status Solidi B 243, 563 (2006)]. Hartree-Fock exchange energy is applied to strongly correlated electrons only inside the PAW atomic spheres. This allows the use of PBE0 hybrid exchange-correlation functional for correlated electrons. This method is tested on NiO and results agree well with already published results and generalized gradient approximation, GGA+U calculations. It is then applied to plutonium oxides and UO2 for which the results are comparable with the ones of GGA+U calculations but without adjustable parameter. As evidenced in the uranium oxide case, the occurrence of multiple energy minima may lead to very different results depending on the initial electronic configurations and on the symmetries taken into account in the calculation.

  9. Redox bias in loss of ignition moisture measurement for relatively pure plutonium-bearing oxide materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, P. G.; Stakebake, J. L.; Cooper, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper evaluates potential analytical bias in application of the Loss on Ignition (LOI) technique for moisture measurement to relatively pure (plutonium assay of 80 wt.% or higher) oxides containing uranium that have been stabilized according to stabilization and storage standard DOE-STD-3013-2000 (STD-3013). An immediate application is to Rocky Flats (RF) materials derived from highgrade metal hydriding separations subsequently treated by multiple calcination cycles. Specifically evaluated are weight changes due to oxidatiodreduction of multivalent impurity oxides that could mask true moisture equivalent content measurement. Process knowledge and characterization of materials representing complex-wide materials to be stabilized and packaged according to STD-3013, and particularly for the immediate RF target stream, indicate that oxides of uranium, iron and gallium are the only potential multivalent constituents expected to be present above 0.5 wt.%. The evaluation shows that of these constituents, with few exceptions, only uranium oxides can be present at a sufficient level to produce weight gain biases significant with respect to the LO1 stability test. In general, these formerly high-value, high-actinide content materials are reliably identifiable by process knowledge and measurement. Si&icant bias also requires that UO1 components remain largely unoxidized after calcination and are largely converted to U30s clsning LO1 testing at only slightly higher temperatures. Based on wellestablished literature, it is judged unlikely that this set of conditions will be realized in practice. We conclude that it is very likely that LO1 weight gain bias will be small for the immediate target RF oxide materials containing greater than 80 wt.% plutonium plus a much smaller uranium content. Recommended tests are in progress to confum these expectations and to provide a more authoritative basis for bounding LO1 oxidatiodreduction biases. LO1 bias evaluation is more difficult

  10. Actinide sequestration using self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, Glen E; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandy; Birnbaum, Jerome C; Wu, Hong; Kemner, Ken; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometalate anions, and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis, and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental cleanup necessary after 40 years of weapons-grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented. PMID:15787373

  11. Actinide Sequestration Using Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Wu, Hong; Kemner, K. M.; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents, whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometallate anions and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental clean-up necessary after 40 years of weapons grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented.

  12. Molecular forensic science of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxides materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, process history, or transport of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science required to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensics science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  13. Extraction of actinides and fission products by octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide from nitric acid media.

    PubMed

    Mathur, J N; Murali, M S; Natarajan, P R; Badheka, L P; Banerji, A

    1992-05-01

    Extraction of promethium(III), uranium(VI), plutonium(IV), americium(III), zirconium(IV), ruthenium(III), iron(III) and palladium(II) has been carried out with a mixture of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tributyl phosphate (TBP) in dodecane. The effects of nitric acid, TBP and CMPO concentrations on the extraction of these metal ions have been studied. The nature of the species of the above metal ions extracted into the organic phase has been suggested. PMID:18965406

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Clapsaddle, B; Gash, A; Plantier, K; Pantoya, M; Jr., J S; Simpson, R

    2004-04-27

    In the field of composite energetic materials, properties such as ingredient distribution, particle size, and morphology affect both sensitivity and performance. Since the reaction kinetics of composite energetic materials are typically controlled by the mass transport rates between reactants, one would anticipate new and potentially exceptional performance from energetic nanocomposites. We have developed a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. A novel sol-gel approach has proven successful in preparing metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites in which the metal oxide is the major component. By introducing a fuel metal, such as aluminum, into the metal oxide/silicon oxide matrix, energetic materials based on thermite reactions can be fabricated. Two of the metal oxides are tungsten trioxide and iron(III) oxide, both of which are of interest in the field of energetic materials. In addition, due to the large availability of organically functionalized silanes, the silicon oxide phase can be used as a unique way of introducing organic additives into the bulk metal oxide materials. These organic additives can cause the generation of gas upon ignition of the materials, therefore resulting in a composite material that can perform pressure/volume work. Furthermore, the desired organic functionality is well dispersed throughout the composite material on the nanoscale with the other components, and is therefore subject to the same increased reaction kinetics. The resulting nanoscale distribution of all the ingredients displays energetic properties not seen in its microscale counterparts due to the expected increase of mass transport rates between the reactants. The synthesis and characterization of iron(III) oxide/organosilicon oxide nanocomposites and their performance as energetic materials will be discussed.

  15. Graphene oxide - Polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite based electrode material for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Shukla, Shobha; Saxena, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    Supercapacitors are high capacitive energy storage devices and find applications where rapid bursts of power are required. Thus materials offering high specific capacitance are of fundamental interest in development of these electrochemical devices. Graphene oxide based nanocomposites are mechanically robust and have interesting electronic properties. These form potential electrode materials efficient for charge storage in supercapacitors. In this perspective, we investigate low cost graphene oxide based nanocomposites as electrode material for supercapacitor. Nanocomposites of graphene oxide and polyvinyl alcohol were synthesized in solution phase by integrating graphene oxide as filler in polyvinyl alcohol matrix. Structural and optical characterizations suggest the formation of graphene oxide and polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposites. These nanocomposites were found to have high specific capacitance, were cyclable, ecofriendly and economical. Our studies suggest that nanocomposites prepared by adding 0.5% wt/wt of graphene oxide in polyvinyl alcohol can be used an efficient electrode material for supercapacitors.

  16. Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Burns, Peter (Director, Materials Science of Actinides); MSA Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides' was submitted by the EFRC for Materials Science of Actinides (MSA) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. MSA is directed by Peter Burns at the University of Notre Dame, and is a partnership of scientists from ten institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  17. Thermodynamic Properties of Actinides and Actinide Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konings, Rudy J. M.; Morss, Lester R.; Fuger, Jean

    The necessity of obtaining accurate thermodynamic quantities for the actinide elements and their compounds was recognized at the outset of the Manhattan Project, when a dedicated team of scientists and engineers initiated the program to exploit nuclear energy for military purposes. Since the end of World War II, both fundamental and applied objectives have motivated a great deal of further study of actinide thermodynamics. This chapter brings together many research papers and critical reviews on this subject. It also seeks to assess, to systematize, and to predict important properties of the actinide elements, ions, and compounds, especially for species in which there is significant interest and for which there is an experimental basis for the prediction.

  18. Mass spectrometric thermodynamic studies of oxide systems and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarova, V. L.

    2016-01-01

    Progress in methods of synthesis of advanced materials as well as utilization of such materials at high temperatures requires information on the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of oxide systems. The optimal experimental method for these purposes is high-temperature mass spectrometry. This review summarizes and classifies experimental results obtained in mass spectrometric studies of the high-temperature thermodynamic properties of oxide systems and materials carried out in the last two decades. Published data on the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of oxide materials for high-temperature technologies are discussed from the standpoint of acid-base concept and model approaches including statistical thermodynamic methods. The bibliography includes 248 references.

  19. Fundamental thermodynamics of actinide-bearing mineral waste forms. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly, understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpy of formation of actinide substituted zircon, zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stability of these materials. This report summarizes work after eight months of a three year project.'

  20. Fundamental Thermodynamics of Actinide-Bearing Mineral Waste Forms - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Mark A.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2001-03-01

    The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpies of formation of actinide substituted zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stabilities of these materials.

  1. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  2. Simultaneous recovery of all actinides from spent nuclear fuel by carbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide in fluorinated diluents

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, M.; Iwai, T.; Babain, V.; Shadrin, A.

    2008-07-01

    Bifunctional organophosphorus extractants dissolved in polar fluorinated diluents were studied, aiming at directly recovering all f-elements from the dissolver solution of spent nuclear fuel. Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (0{phi}D[iB] CMPO, 0.2-0.8 M) with 30% TBP dissolved in meta-nitrobenzotrifluoride (Fluoropole-732) dramatically expanded its extraction region without splitting out a heterogeneous third phase. Distribution ratios of U, Np, and Pu were sufficiently high for 0.4-0.8 M CMPO in this solvent system. Combination of salt-free, methylamine carbonate (MAC), citric acid, and hydrazine reagents were evaluated to obtain fractional stripping of f-elements such as TRU group and U. Static multistage extraction using artificial FBR dissolver solution supported the process feasibility. When all f-elements are extracted simultaneously, and TRU and U recovered separately with a single extraction cycle, the new extraction process, named ORGA-process, can be expected to be highly proliferation-resistant and systematically and economically advantageous. (authors)

  3. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  4. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  5. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  6. Elevated concentrations of actinides in mono lake.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R F; Bacon, M P; Brewer, P G

    1982-04-30

    Tetravalent thorium, pentavalent protactinium, hexavalent uranium, and plutonium (oxidation state uncertain) are present in much higher concentrations in Mono Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern central California, than in seawater. Low ratios of actinium to protactinium and of americium to plutonium indicate that the concentrations of trivalent actinides are not similarly enhanced. The elevated concentrations of the ordinarily very insoluble actinides are maintained in solution by natural ligands, which inhibit their chemical removal from the water column, rather than by an unusually large rate of supply. PMID:17735740

  7. Elevated concentrations of actinides in Mono Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.F.; Bacon, M.P.; Brewer, P.G.

    1982-04-30

    Tetravalent thorium, pentavalent protactinium, hexavalent uranium, and plutonium (oxidation state uncertain) are present in much higher concentrations in Mono Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern central California, than in seawater. Low ratios of actinium to protactinium and of americium to plutonium indicate that the concentrations of trivalent actinides are not similarly enhanced. The elevated concentrations of the ordinarily very insoluble actinides are maintained in solution by natural ligands, which inhibit their chemical removal from the water column, rather than by an unusually large rate of supply.

  8. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, S. E.; Marston, J. B.

    2011-02-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  9. Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Rofer, Cheryl K.; Buelow, Steven J.; Dyer, Richard B.; Wander, Joseph D.

    1992-01-01

    A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

  10. JOWOG 22/2 - Actinide Chemical Technology (July 9-13, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Jay M.; Lopez, Jacquelyn C.; Wayne, David M.; Schulte, Louis D.; Finstad, Casey C.; Stroud, Mary Ann; Mulford, Roberta Nancy; MacDonald, John M.; Turner, Cameron J.; Lee, Sonya M.

    2012-07-05

    The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate provides world-class, safe, secure, and reliable special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities that support the nation's defense, energy, and environmental needs. We safely and efficiently process plutonium, uranium, and other actinide materials to meet national program requirements, while expanding the scientific and engineering basis of nuclear weapons-based manufacturing, and while producing the next generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. Actinide Process Chemistry (NCO-2) safely and efficiently processes plutonium and other actinide compounds to meet the nation's nuclear defense program needs. All of our processing activities are done in a world class and highly regulated nuclear facility. NCO-2's plutonium processing activities consist of direct oxide reduction, metal chlorination, americium extraction, and electrorefining. In addition, NCO-2 uses hydrochloric and nitric acid dissolutions for both plutonium processing and reduction of hazardous components in the waste streams. Finally, NCO-2 is a key team member in the processing of plutonium oxide from disassembled pits and the subsequent stabilization of plutonium oxide for safe and stable long-term storage.

  11. Materials for Intermediate-Temperature Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilner, John A.; Burriel, Mónica

    2014-07-01

    Solid-oxide fuel cells are devices for the efficient conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy and heat. Research efforts are currently addressed toward the optimization of cells operating at temperatures in the region of 600°C, known as intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells, for which materials requirements are very stringent. In addition to the requirements of mechanical and chemical compatibility, the materials must show a high degree of oxide ion mobility and electrochemical activity at this low temperature. Here we mainly examine the criteria for the development of two key components of intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells: the electrolyte and the cathode. We limit the discussion to novel approaches to materials optimization and focus on the fluorite oxide for electrolytes, principally those based on ceria and zirconia, and on perovskites and perovskite-related families in the case of cathodes.

  12. Preparation of actinide-metal research

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, W.S.; Culpepper, C.A.; Campbell, K.B.

    1986-01-01

    The preparation of actinide-metal research materials is one of many functions of the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) at Oak Ridge National Lab. Research samples of uranium, plutonium, americium, and curium, typically from milligram quantities up to approx. 100 g, are prepared as pure metals or alloys to customer specifications. Larger quantities, up to many kilograms, of the lower activity actinides, such as /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th, are also fabricated into custom research forms. Physical forms of these metals include rolled foils or sheets, castings (ingot, rod, or special shapes), and evaporated or sputtered films.

  13. Methods for making lithium vanadium oxide electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Schutts, Scott M.; Kinney, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A method of making vanadium oxide formulations is presented. In one method of preparing lithium vanadium oxide for use as an electrode material, the method involves: admixing a particulate form of a lithium compound and a particulate form of a vanadium compound; jet milling the particulate admixture of the lithium and vanadium compounds; and heating the jet milled particulate admixture at a temperature below the melting temperature of the admixture to form lithium vanadium oxide.

  14. Research in actinide chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report contains research results on studies of inorganic and organic complexes of actinide and lanthanide elements. Special attention is given to complexes of humic acids and to spectroscopic studies.

  15. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Pederson, L.R.; Stevenson, J.W.; Raney, P.E.

    1995-08-01

    The phase stability and sintering behavior of materials used in SOFCs has been evaluated. The sintering behavior of Ca and Sr doped lanthanum. manganite (the preferred SOFC cathode material) is highly dependent on the relative proportion of A and B site cations in the material. Ca and Sr doped lanthanum chromite (the preferred interconnect material) have been shown to rapidly expand in reducing atmospheres at temperatures as low as 700{degrees}C. This expansion is due to the reduction of Cr{sup 4+} to Cr{sup 3+} in reducing environments.

  16. Thermochemistry of the actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D.

    1993-10-01

    The measurement of equilibria by Knudsen effusion techniques and the enthalpy of formation of the actinide atoms is briefly discussed. Thermochemical data on the sublimation of the actinide fluorides is used to calculate the enthalpies of formation and entropies of the gaseous species. Estimates are made for enthalpies and entropies of the tetrafluorides and trifluorides for those systems where data is not available. The pressure of important species in the tetrafluoride sublimation processes is calculated based on this thermochemical data.

  17. Research in actinide chemistry. Progress report, 1990--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-04-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}, humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements.

  18. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  19. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.

    2015-09-30

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Recycle (STAAR) has made notable progress in FY 2015 toward the overarching goal to develop more efficient separation methods for actinides in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) objective of sustainable fuel cycles. Research in STAAR has been emphasizing the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MAs) to enable closed nuclear fuel recycle options mainly within the paradigm of aqueous reprocessing of used oxide nuclear fuel dissolved in nitric acid. Its major scientific challenge concerns achieving selectivity for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides. Not only is this challenge yielding to research advances, but technology concepts such as ALSEP (Actinide Lanthanide Separation) are maturing toward demonstration readiness. Efforts are organized in five task areas: 1) combining bifunctional neutral extractants with an acidic extractant to form a single process solvent, developing a process flowsheet, and demonstrating it at bench scale; 2) oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) and subsequent separation with other multivalent actinides; 3) developing an effective soft-donor solvent system for An(III) selective extraction using mixed N,O-donor or all-N donor extractants such as triazinyl pyridine compounds; 4) testing of inorganic and hybrid-type ion exchange materials for MA separations; and 5) computer-aided molecular design to identify altogether new extractants and complexants and theory-based experimental data interpretation. Within these tasks, two strategies are employed, one involving oxidation of americium to its pentavalent or hexavalent state and one that seeks to selectively complex trivalent americium either in the aqueous phase or the solvent phase. Solvent extraction represents the primary separation method employed, though ion exchange and crystallization play an important role. Highlights of accomplishments include: Confirmation of the first-ever electrolytic oxidation of Am(III) in a

  20. 256-pixel microcalorimeter array for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy of mixed-actinide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Horansky, R. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    The application of cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors to γ-ray spectroscopy allows for measurements with unprecedented energy resolution. These detectors are ideally suited for γ-ray spectroscopy applications for which the measurement quality is limited by the spectral overlap of many closely spaced transitions using conventional detector technologies. The non-destructive analysis of mixed-isotope Pu materials is one such application where the precision can be potentially improved utilizing microcalorimeter detectors compared to current state-of-the-art high-purity Ge detectors (HPGe). The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer, a 256-pixel microcalorimeter array based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), was recently commissioned and used to collect data on a variety of Pu isotopic standards to characterize the instrument performance. These measurements represent the first time the simultaneous readout of all 256 pixels for measurements of mixed-isotope Pu materials has been achieved. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has demonstrated an average pixel resolution of 55 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV, nearly an order of magnitude better than HPGe detectors. Some challenges of the analysis of many-channel ultra-high resolution data and the techniques used to produce quality spectra for isotopic analysis will be presented. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has also demonstrated stable operation and obtained high resolution measurements at total array event rates beyond 1 kHz. For a total event rate of 1.25 kHz, approximately 5.6 cps/pixel, a 72.2 eV average FWHM for the 103 keV photopeak of 153Gd was achieved.

  1. Super critical water oxidation on energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an innovative process for the destruction of hazardous wastes that occurs above the critical temperature and pressure of water. In this paper we present results for the oxidation of simple organic wastes and the destruction of explosives. We have tested a 50 gal./day mobile tubular reactor using both acetone and hexane as surrogate aqueous wastes in reaction with excess oxygen. For acetone, our results indicate that the fuel and oxidant can be conveniently premixed before heating and the acetone effectively destroyed (>99.999%). By contrast, hexane, and likely other insoluble flammable organics must be separately preheated to above the critical temperature of water to avoid detonation. With regards to the treatment of explosives, we have demonstrated detection-sensitivity-limited destruction (typically >99.9%) of five explosives, HMX, RDX, TNT, NQ, and PETN, in a smaller scale SCWO reactor. Two alternative methods of increasing processing throughput for explosives, which have very low solubility in water at room temperature, were also investigated. They are the use of slurries and the SCWO postprocessing of the products of explosives hydrolyzed in low-temperature, basic solutions.

  2. ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS WASTE TANKS TO IMPROVE ACTINIDE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.; Thompson, M.

    2011-09-20

    Processes for the removal of residual sludge from SRS waste tanks have historically used solutions containing up to 0.9 M oxalic acid to dissolve the remaining material following sludge removal. The selection of this process was based on a comparison of a number of studies performed to evaluate the dissolution of residual sludge. In contrast, the dissolution of the actinide mass, which represents a very small fraction of the waste, has not been extensively studied. The Pu, Np, and Am in the sludge is reported to be present as hydrated and crystalline oxides. To identify aqueous solutions which have the potential to increase the solubility of the actinides, the alkaline and mildly acidic test solutions shown below were selected as candidates for use in a series of solubility experiments. The efficiency of the solutions in solubilizing the actinides was evaluated using a simulated sludge prepared by neutralizing a HNO{sub 3} solution containing Pu, Np, and Am. The hydroxide concentration was adjusted to a 1.2 M excess and the solids were allowed to age for several weeks prior to starting the experiments. The sludge was washed with 0.01 M NaOH to prepare the solids for use. Following the addition of an equal portion of the solids to each test solution, the concentrations of Pu, Np, and Am were measured as a function of time over a 792 h (33 day) period to provide a direct comparison of the efficiency of each solution in solubilizing the actinide elements. Although the composition of the sludge was limited to the hydrated actinide oxides (and did not contain other components of demonstrated importance), the results of the study provides guidance for the selection of solutions which should be evaluated in subsequent tests with a more realistic surrogate sludge and actual tank waste.

  3. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M.

    2013-07-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  4. Kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from sterilized materials.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gisela C; Brandão, Teresa R S; Silva, Cristina L M

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene oxide gas is commonly used to sterilize medical devices, and concerns about using this agent on biological systems are well-established. Medical devices sterilized by ethylene oxide must be properly aerated to remove residual gas and by-products. In this work, kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from different sterilized materials were studied in a range of aeration temperatures. The experimental data were well-described by a Fickian diffusion mass transfer behavior, and diffusivities were estimated for two textile and two polymeric materials within the temperature range of 1.5 to 59.0 degrees C. The results will allow predictions of ethylene oxide desorption, which is a key step for the design of sterilization/aeration processes, contributing to an efficient removal of residual ethylene oxide content. PMID:23513954

  5. Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Hill, Dallas D.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Stewart, Walter F.; Tolt, Thomas L.; Worl, Laura A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

  6. Novel hybrid materials based on the vanadium oxide nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabrodina, G. S.; Makarov, S. G.; Kremlev, K. V.; Yunin, P. A.; Gusev, S. A.; Kaverin, B. S.; Kaverina, L. B.; Ketkov, S. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Novel hybrid materials based on zinc phthalocyanine and nanostructured vanadium oxides have attracted extensive attention for the development of academic research and innovative industrial applications such as flexible electronics, optical sensors and heterogeneous catalysts. Vanadium oxides nanobelts were synthesized via a hydrothermal treatment V2O5·nH2O gel with surfactants (TBAB, CTAB) used as structure-directing agents, where CTAB - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, TBAB - tetrabutylammonium bromide. Hybrid materials were prepared decoration of (CTA)0.33V2O5 flexible nanobelts with cationic zinc phthalocyanine by the ion-exchange route. Investigations of the thermal stability, morphologies and structures of the (CTA)0.33V2O5, (TBA)0.16V2O5 nanobelts and zinc phthalocyanine exchange product were carried out. The hybrid materials based on the nanostructured vanadium oxide and zinc phthalocyanine were tested as photocatalysts for oxidation of citronellol and 2-mercaptoethanol by dioxygen.

  7. Preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Capone, Donald W.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1991-01-01

    A polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0

  8. Graphene oxide as a photocatalytic material

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Mohan, Rajneesh; Kim, S.-J.

    2011-06-13

    The photocatalytic characteristics of graphene oxide (GO) nanostructures synthesized by modified Hummer's method were investigated by measuring reduction rate of resazurin (RZ) into resorufin (RF) as a function of UV irradiation time. The progress of the photocatalytic reaction was monitored by change in color from blue (RZ) into pink (RF) followed by absorption spectra. It exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity, leading to the reduction of RZ in UV irradiation. The fitting of absorbance maximum versus time suggests that the reduction of RZ follow the pseudo first-order reaction kinetics. These results indicate that GO have great potential for use as a photocatalyst.

  9. Metal oxide charge transport material doped with organic molecules

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2016-08-30

    Doping metal oxide charge transport material with an organic molecule lowers electrical resistance while maintaining transparency and thus is optimal for use as charge transport materials in various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaic devices and organic light emitting devices.

  10. Review on anode material development in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siong @ Mahmud, Lily; Muchtar, Andanastuti; Somalu, Mahendra Rao

    2015-05-01

    New developments in technology require highly efficient, affordable, and green electrical energy. The materials to be used must also be reusable and environment friendly. These characteristics are among the major factors that may lead to the production of new and highly efficient power generation systems. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have become major devices in producing electricity that emphasize the advance usage of material science and technological development. As part of the key elements of SOFCs, anodes have the primary function of stimulating the electrochemical oxidation of fuel. In this review, the progress in developing anode materials for SOFCs is briefly discussed.

  11. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Mirtich, Michael; Difilippo, Frank; Hotes, Deborah; Labed, Richard; Dever, Terese; Kussmaul, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for Kapton solar array blanket protection, graphite epoxy structural member protection, and high temperature radiators was performed in an RF plasma asher. Ashing rates for Kapton were correlated with rates measured on STS-8 to determine the exposure time equivalent to one year in low Earth orbit (LEO) at a constant density space station orbital flux. Protective coatings on Kapton from Tekmat, Andus Corporation, and LeRC were evaluated in the plasma asher and mass loss rates per unit area were measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface but ion beam sputter deposited samples of SiO2 and SiO2 with 8% polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) showed no evidence of degradation after 47 hours of exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite epoxy structural members. Mica appears to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen but only offers some limited protection as a paint because the paint vehicles evaluated to date were not resistant to atomic oxygen. Four materials were selected for evaluation as candidate radiator materials: stainless steel, copper, niobium-1% zirconium, and titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium. These materials were surface textured by various means to improve their emittance. Emittances as high as 0.93 at 2.5 microns for stainless steel and 0.89 at 2.5 microns for Nb-1 Zr were obtained from surface texturing. There were no significant changes in emittance after asher exposure.

  12. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  13. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a

  14. Transition Metal Oxide Alloys as Potential Solar Energy Conversion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2013-02-21

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are inexpensive potentia alternative materials for solar energy conversion devices. However, some TMOs, such as manganese(II) oxide, have band gaps that are too large for efficiently absorbing solar energy. Other TMOs, such as iron(II) oxide, have conduction and valence band edges with the same orbital character that may lead to unfavorably high electron–hole recombination rates. Another limitation of iron(II) oxide is that the calculated valence band edge is not positioned well for oxidizing water. We predict that key properties, including band gaps, band edge positions, and possibly electron–hole recombination rates, may be improved by alloying TMOs that have different band alignments. A new metric, the band gap center offset, is introduced for simple screening of potential parent materials. The concept is illustrated by calculating the electronic structure of binary oxide alloys that contain manganese, nickel, iron, zinc, and/or magnesium, within density functional theory (DFT)+U and hybrid DFT theories. We conclude that alloys of iron(II) oxide are worth evaluating further as solar energy conversion materials.

  15. Spin-orbit coupling in actinide cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Knecht, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    The limiting case of Russell-Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin-orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell.

  16. PF-4 actinide disposition strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Margevicius, Robert W

    2010-05-28

    The dwindling amount of Security Category I processing and storage space across the DOE Complex has driven the need for more effective storage of nuclear materials at LANL's Plutonium Facility's (PF-4's) vault. An effort was begun in 2009 to create a strategy, a roadmap, to identify all accountable nuclear material and determine their disposition paths, the PF-4 Actinide Disposition Strategy (PADS). Approximately seventy bins of nuclear materials with similar characteristics - in terms of isotope, chemical form, impurities, disposition location, etc. - were established in a database. The ultimate disposition paths include the material to remain at LANL, disposition to other DOE sites, and disposition to waste. If all the actions described in the document were taken, over half of the containers currently in the PF-4 vault would been eliminated. The actual amount of projected vault space will depend on budget and competing mission requirements, however, clearly a significant portion of the current LANL inventory can be either dispositioned or consolidated.

  17. New density functional theory approaches for enabling prediction of chemical and physical properties of plutonium and other actinides.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    functional the Harmonic Oscillator Gas is providing the necessary reference system for the strong correlation and localization occurring in actinides. Preliminary testing shows that the new Hao-Armiento-Mattsson (HAM) functional gives a trend towards improved results for the crystalline copper oxide test system we have chosen. This test system exhibits the same exchange-correlation physics as the actinide systems do, but without the relativistic effects, giving access to a pure testing ground for functionals. During the work important insights have been gained. An example is that currently available functionals, contrary to common belief, make large errors in so called hybridization regions where electrons from different ions interact and form new states. Together with the new understanding of functional issues, the Dirac implementation into the RSPt code will permit us to gain more fundamental understanding, both quantitatively and qualitatively, of materials of importance for Sandia and the rest of the Nuclear Weapons complex.

  18. The Interface Between Chemical and Oxide Materials in the DSPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Thomas; Alibabaei, Leila; Sherman, Benjamin; Sheridan, Matthew; Ashford, Dennis; Lapides, Alex; Brennaman, Kyle; Nayak, Animesh; Roy, Subhangi

    Significant challenges exist for both chemical and oxide materials in the Dye Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cell (DSPEC) for water oxidation or CO2 reduction. They arise from light absorption, the energetics of electron or hole injection, the accumulation of multiple redox equivalents at catalysts for water oxidation or water/CO2 reduction in competition with back electron transfer, and sustained, long term performance. These challenges are being met by the use of a variety of chromophores (metal complexes, organic dyes, porphyrins), broad application of nanoparticle mesoscopic oxide films, atomic layer deposition (ALD) to prepare core/shell and stabilizing overlayer structures, and recent advances in the molecular catalysis of water oxidation and CO2 reduction. UNC EFRC Center for Solar Fuels, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001011.

  19. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.; Alexander, Charles W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Ezold, Julie G.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Hogle, Susan L.

    2015-06-18

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing the production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.

  20. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberto, J. B.; Alexander, C. W.; Boll, R. A.; Burns, J. D.; Ezold, J. G.; Felker, L. K.; Hogle, S. L.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing the production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.

  1. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roberto, J.; Alexander, Charles W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Ezold, Julie G.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Hogle, Susan L.

    2015-06-18

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing themore » production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.« less

  2. Copper oxide as a high temperature battery cathode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, A. G.; Mullins, A. P.

    1994-10-01

    Copper oxide has been tested as a cathode material for high temperature primary reserve thermal batteries in single cells at 530 to 600 C and at current densities of 0.1 to 0.25 A cm(exp -2) using lithium-aluminium alloy anodes and lithium fluoride-lithium chloride-lithium bromide molten salt electrolytes. Initial on-load voltages were around 2.3 V, falling to 1.5 V after about 0.5 F mol(exp -1) had been withdrawn. Lithium copper oxide, LiCu2O2, and cuprous oxide, Cu2O, were identified as discharge products.

  3. Ion exchange properties of novel hydrous metal oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrous metal oxide (HMO) materials are inorganic ion exchangers which have many desirable characteristics for catalyst support applications, including high cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capability, high surface area, ease of adjustment of acidity and basicity, bulk or thin film preparation, and similar chemistry for preparation of various transition metal oxides. Cation exchange capacity is engineered into these materials through the uniform incorporation of alkali cations via manipulation of alkoxide chemistry. Specific examples of the effects of Na stoichiometry and the addition of SiO{sub 2} to hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) on ion exchange behavior will be given. Acid titration and cationic metal precursor complex exchange will be used to characterize the ion exchange behavior of these novel materials.

  4. Plutonium and ''minor'' actinides: safe sequestration [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    2005-01-01

    The actinides exhibit a number of unique chemical and nuclear properties. Of particular interest are the man-made actinides (Np, Pu, Cm and Am) that are produced in significant enough quantities that they are a source of energy in fission reactions, a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons and of environmental concern because of their long half-lives and radiotoxicity. During the past 50 yr, over 1400 mT of Pu and substantial quantities of the "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these elements: (1) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; (2) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of isometric pyrochlore, A 2B 2O 7 (A=rare earths; B=Ti, Zr, Sn and Hf), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium. Systematic studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B=Zr, Hf) are stable to very high doses of α-decay event damage. The radiation stability of these compositions is closely related to the structural distortions that occur for specific pyrochlore compositions and the electronic structure of the B-site cation. This understanding provides the basis for designing materials for the safe, long-term immobilization and sequestration of actinides.

  5. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  6. Imaging the Formation of High-Energy Dispersion Anomalies in the Actinide UCoGa5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmoy; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Joyce, John J.; Sarrao, John L.; Graf, Matthias J.

    2012-10-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to image the emergence of substantial dispersion and spectral-weight anomalies in the electronic renormalization of the actinide compound UCoGa5 that was presumed to belong to a conventional Fermi-liquid family. Kinks or abrupt breaks in the slope of the quasiparticle dispersion are detected both at low (approximately 130 meV) and high (approximately 1 eV) binding energies below the Fermi energy, ruling out any significant contribution of phonons. We perform numerical calculations to demonstrate that the anomalies are adequately described by coupling between itinerant fermions and spin fluctuations arising from the particle-hole continuum of the spin-orbit-split 5f states of uranium. These anomalies resemble the “waterfall” phenomenon of the high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors, suggesting that spin fluctuations are a generic route toward multiform electronic phases in correlated materials as different as high-temperature superconductors and actinides.

  7. Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1996-03-19

    The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

  8. Thin extractive membrane for monitoring actinides in aqueous streams.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Vivek; Paul, Sumana; Pandey, Ashok K; Kalsi, P C; Goswami, A

    2013-09-15

    Alpha spectrometry and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are used for monitoring ultra-trace amount of alpha emitting actinides in different aqueous streams. However, these techniques have limitations i.e. alpha spectrometry requires a preconcentration step and SSNTDs are not chemically selective. Therefore, a thin polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) supported on silanized glass was developed for preconcentraion and determination of ultra-trace concentration of actinides by α-spectrometry and SSNTDs. PIMs were formed by spin coating on hydrophobic glass slide or solvent casting to form thin and self-supported membranes, respectively. Sorption experiments indicated that uptakes of actinides in the PIM were highly dependent on acidity of solution i.e. Am(III) sorbed up to 0.1 molL(-1) HNO₃, U(VI) up to 0.5 molL(-1) HNO₃ and Pu(IV) from HNO₃ concentration as high as 4 molL(-1). A scheme was developed for selective sorption of target actinide in the PIM by adjusting acidity and oxidation state of actinide. The actinides sorbed in PIMs were quantified by alpha spectrometry and SSNTDs. For SSNTDs, neutron induced fission-fragment tracks and α-particle tracks were registered in Garware polyester and CR-39 for quantifications of natural uranium and α-emitting actinides ((241)Am/(239)Pu/(233)U), respectively. Finally, the membranes were tested to quantify Pu in 4 molL(-1) HNO3 solutions and synthetic urine samples. PMID:23747462

  9. Oxide Thermoelectric Materials: A Structure-Property Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Abanti; Shubha, V.

    2014-04-01

    Recent demand for thermoelectric materials for power harvesting from automobile and industrial waste heat requires oxide materials because of their potential advantages over intermetallic alloys in terms of chemical and thermal stability at high temperatures. Achievement of thermoelectric figure of merit equivalent to unity ( ZT ≈ 1) for transition-metal oxides necessitates a second look at the fundamental theory on the basis of the structure-property relationship giving rise to electron correlation accompanied by spin fluctuation. Promising transition-metal oxides based on wide-bandgap semiconductors, perovskite and layered oxides have been studied as potential candidate n- and p-type materials. This paper reviews the correlation between the crystal structure and thermoelectric properties of transition-metal oxides. The crystal-site-dependent electronic configuration and spin degeneracy to control the thermopower and electron-phonon interaction leading to polaron hopping to control electrical conductivity is discussed. Crystal structure tailoring leading to phonon scattering at interfaces and nanograin domains to achieve low thermal conductivity is also highlighted.

  10. Material combustion in oxidant flows: Self-similar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurenkova, V. V.; Smirnova, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents exact solution for the problem of condensed material surface burning in a flow of oxidant in the case of steady flame over fuel layer. The solution is obtained within the frame of assumption of fuel gasification and gas phase chemical reacting in a diffusion flame. The regression rate of the material surface in the turbulent and laminar flow regimes is studied. The zones corresponding to kinetic and diffusion regime are determined.

  11. Method of preventing oxidation of graphite fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, S.; Suzuki, H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of preventing oxidation of graphite fireproof material is given. A blend of 1 to 33 weight parts alumina and 3 to 19 parts of K2O + Na2O in 100 parts of SiO2 is pulverized followed by addition of 5 to 160 parts of silicon carbide powder in 100 parts of the mixture. This is thoroughly blended and coated on the surface of graphite fireproof material.

  12. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  13. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting.

  14. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1989-05-30

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

  15. Vanadium oxide based materials: Synthesis, characterization and gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayesh, Samar I.

    In recent years, the demand for gas sensors based on safety and process control requirements has been expanding. The reason for such demand sterns from environmental and safety concerns since the toxic gases released from automobile exhausts and chemical plants can directly or indirectly pollute our environment and affect our health. Among the chemicals studied, nitrogen oxide (NOx) gases are among the most dangerous air pollutants. Transition metal oxide clusters (or polyoxometalates) provide an exciting opportunity for the design and synthesis of a new generation of materials for efficient NOx sensing. Polyoxometalates are an important and fast emerging class of compounds that exhibit many remarkable properties. Chapter 1 provides introduction and background of chemical sensors. It describes the need for gas sensors and the current status of research in the area of NOx gas sensors in particular. A description of polyoxmetalates and their relevance as potential novel gas sensor materials is also given. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis and characterization by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, manganometric titration, bond valence sum calculation, temperature dependent magnetic properties studies, electron paramagnetic resonance, and complete single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of newly prepared vanadium oxide based-systems that have been discovered during the course of this work. First, the system containing arrays of decavanadates networked by extensive hydrogen bonding with cyclic nitrogen bases are described. This is followed by the mixed-valence vanadium oxide cluster, [VV 13VIV3O42(Cl)]-7, containing a hitherto unknown vanadium oxide framework structure. Finally the synthesis of 3D-framework materials is described. These compounds have highly symmetrical closely related three-dimensional framework structures consisting vanadium oxide shells {V18O42(XO4)} linked via heterometallic atoms {M' = Cd, Zn} into three

  16. On the suitability of lanthanides as actinide analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza

    2008-07-01

    With the current level of actinide materials used in civilian power generation and the need for safe and efficient methods for the chemical separation of these species from their daughter products and for long-term storage requirements, a detailed understanding of actinide chemistry is of great importance. Due to the unique bonding properties of the f-elements, the lanthanides are commonly used as structural and chemical models for the actinides, but differences in the bonding between these 4f and 5f elements has become a question of immediate applicability to separations technology. This brief overview of actinide coordination chemistry in the Raymond group at UC Berkeley/LBNL examines the validity of using lanthanide analogs as structural models for the actinides, with particular attention paid to single crystal X-ray diffraction structures. Although lanthanides are commonly accepted as reasonable analogs for the actinides, these comparisons suggest the careful study of actinide materials independent of their lanthanide analogs to be of utmost importance to present and future efforts in nuclear industries. (authors)

  17. On the Suitability of Lanthanides as Actinide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-11

    With the current level of actinide materials used in civilian power generation and the need for safe and efficient methods for the chemical separation of these species from their daughter products and for long-term storage requirements, a detailed understanding of actinide chemistry is of great importance. Due to the unique bonding properties of the f-elements, the lanthanides are commonly used as structural and chemical models for the actinides, but differences in the bonding between these 4f and 5f elements has become a question of immediate applicability to separations technology. This brief overview of actinide coordination chemistry in the Raymond group at UC Berkeley/LBNL examines the validity of using lanthanide analogs as structural models for the actinides, with particular attention paid to single crystal X-ray diffraction structures. Although lanthanides are commonly accepted as reasonable analogs for the actinides, these comparisons suggest the careful study of actinide materials independent of their lanthanide analogs to be of utmost importance to present and future efforts in nuclear industries.

  18. Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Aron; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2011-08-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) play an essential role in modern optoelectronic devices through their combination of electrical conductivity and optical transparency. We review recent progress in our understanding of multi-component TCOs formed from solid solutions of ZnO, In2O3, Ga2O3 and Al2O3, with a particular emphasis on the contributions of materials modelling, primarily based on density functional theory. In particular, we highlight three major results from our work: (i) the fundamental principles governing the crystal structures of multi-component oxide structures including (In2O3)(ZnO)n and (In2O3)m(Ga2O3)l(ZnO)n; (ii) the relationship between elemental composition and optical and electrical behaviour, including valence band alignments; (iii) the high performance of amorphous oxide semiconductors. On the basis of these advances, the challenge of the rational design of novel electroceramic materials is discussed.

  19. Research in actinide chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Research continued to be focused broadly on the chemistry of the actinide cations in solution. While the direct concern is the actinide elements, their radioactivity limits the techniques which can be applied to their study. A major area of interest continues to be the thermodynamics of interaction of the f-elements with a broad spectrum of inorganic and organic ligands. Solvent extraction (for tracer levels), potentiometric and calorimetric titration and absorption spectrometry have been used to obtain stability constants and the associated enthalpy and entropy changes for complexation. A number of studies were performed to provide a better data base and a better understanding of the more significant species determining the behavior of actinides in natural waters (e.g., hydrolysis and silicate interaction). A second major area has been kinetics. NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} reduction by hydroxy and carboxylic acids was studied to obtain an understanding of how such functional groups in humic substances may influence actinyl redox. The kinetics of dissociation of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and Ln{sup 3+} (La{sup 3+} = lanthanide element cations) from synthetic polyelectrolytes and humics provided significantly increased understanding of actinide complexation by these macromolecules. A third area of activity used laser induced fluorescence to study the hydration state of Eu(III) in a number of systems. Finally, several other studies, not in these major areas, were conducted. These included investigation of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes, the extraction of Am(III) by MX (M = Li, Na, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +}; X = ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, BrO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) over a concentration range from 0.01 M to saturated and the thermodynamics of synergistic extraction of actinides by crown ethers and {beta}-diketonates. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  20. CHEMICAL REACTIONS OF AQUATIC HUMIC MATERIALS WITH SELECTED OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to identify the specific organic reaction products of natural aquatic humic materials with selected oxidants (KMnO4, HOCl, Cl02, O3 and monochloramine). Reaction products were identified by GC/MS after solvent extraction and derivatization. The two most reac...

  1. Colorful titanium oxides: a new class of photonic materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenzhen; Xin, Yanmei; Zhang, Zhonghai

    2015-12-21

    In this communication, a new class of photonic materials, namely, two-dimensional titanium oxide-based photonic crystals, are proposed and were fabricated with an electrochemical anodization method. The high structural periodicity of the nanostructures, and the feasible variability of the chemical compositions help to realize tunable photonic bandgaps for selective light absorption in broad wavelength regions. PMID:26450687

  2. Rapid actinide-separation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III

    1997-12-31

    New high-speed actinide-separation methods have been developed by the Savannah River Site Central Laboratory that can be applied to nuclear materials process samples, waste solutions and environmental samples. As part of a reengineering effort to improve efficiencies and reduce operating costs, solvent extraction methods (TTA, Hexone, TBP and TIOA) used for over thirty years in the SRS Central Laboratory were replaced with new rapid extraction column methods able to handle a variety of difficult sample matrices and actinide levels. Significant costs savings were realized and costly mixed-waste controls were avoided by using applied vacuum and 50-100 micron particle-size resins from Eichrom Industries. TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, UTEVA Resin{reg_sign}, and TRU Resin{reg_sign} columns are used with flow rates of approximately two to three milliliters per minute to minimize sample turnaround times. Single-column, dual-column and sequential-cartridge methods for plutonium, uranium, neptunium, americium and curium were developed that enable rapid, cost-effective separations prior to alpha-particle counting, thermal ionization and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and laser phosphorescence measurements.

  3. Nickel cobalt oxide nanowire-reduced graphite oxide composite material and its application for high performance supercapacitor electrode material.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Yan, Chaoyi; Sumboja, Afriyanti; Lee, Pooi See

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report a facile synthesis method of mesoporous nickel cobalt oxide (NiCo2O4) nanowire-reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite material by urea induced hydrolysis reaction, followed by sintering at 300 degrees C. P123 was used to stabilize the GO during synthesis, which resulted in a uniform coating of NiCo2O4 nanowire on rGO sheet. The growth mechanism of the composite material is discussed in detail. The NiCo2O4-rGO composite material showed an outstanding electrochemical performance of 873 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and 512 F g(-1) at 40 A g(-1). This method provides a promising approach towards low cost and large scale production of supercapacitor electrode material. PMID:25924377

  4. Cyclic Catalytic Upgrading of Chemical Species Using Metal Oxide Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Schutte, Erick J. (Inventor); Rolfe, Sara L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce(sub x)B(sub y)B'(sub z)B''O(sub gamma; wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01material itself or as a support for said unary or binary metal oxides.

  5. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    White, James H; Schutte, Erick J; Rolfe, Sara L

    2013-05-07

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01material itself or as a support for said unary or binary metal oxides.

  6. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2012-07-01

    A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

  7. Thermoelectric material including conformal oxide layers and method of making the same using atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Jung Young; Ahn, Dongjoon; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2016-06-07

    A thermoelectric material includes a substrate particle and a plurality of conformal oxide layers formed on the substrate particle. The plurality of conformal oxide layers has a total oxide layer thickness ranging from about 2 nm to about 20 nm. The thermoelectric material excludes oxide nanoparticles. A method of making the thermoelectric material is also disclosed herein.

  8. Device for Detecting Actinides, Method for Detecting Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Fred J.; Wilkins-Stevens, Priscilla

    1998-10-29

    A heavy metal detector is provided comprising a first molecule and a second molecule, whereby the first and second molecules interact in a predetermined manner; a first region on the first molecule adapted to interact with an actinide; and a second region on the second molecule adapted to interact with the actinide, whereby the interactions of the actinide with the regions effect the predetermined manner of interaction between the molecules.

  9. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  10. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  11. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore » present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  12. Cross sections for actinide burner reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of burning higher actinides (i.e., transuranium (TRU) elements excluding plutonium) in ad hoc designed reactors (Actinide Burner Reactors: ABR) which, because of their hard neutron spectra, enhance the fission of TRU. The transmutation of long-lived radionuclides into stable or short-lived isotopes reduces considerably the burden of handling high-level waste from either LWR or Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) fuels. Because of the large concentrations of higher actinides in these novel reactor designs the Doppler effect due to TRU materials is the most important temperature coefficient from the point of view of reactor safety. Here we report calculations of energy group-averaged capture and fission cross sections as function of temperature and dilution for higher actinides in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions. The calculations were done with the codes SAMMY in the resolved region and URR in the unresolved regions and compared with an independent calculation. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Oxidation control of fluxes for mixed-valent inorganic oxide materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrier, Marc David

    This dissertation is concerned with controlling the flux synthesis and ensuing physical properties of mixed-valence metal oxides. Molten alkali metal nitrates and hydroxides have been explored to determine and exploit their variable redox chemistries for the synthesis of mixed-valent oxide materials. Cationic and anionic additives have been utilized in these molten salts to control the relative concentrations of the redox-active species present to effectively tune and cap the electrochemical potential of the flux. Atoms like bismuth, copper, and manganese are capable of providing different numbers of electrons for bonding. With appropriate doping near the metal-insulator transition, many of these mixed-valent inorganic metal oxides exhibit extraordinary electronic and magnetic properties. Traditionally, these materials have been prepared by classical high temperature solid state routes where microscopic homogeneity is hard to attain. In these routes, the starting composition dictates the doping level, and in turn, the formal oxidation state achieved. Molten flux syntheses developed in this work have provided the potential for preparing single-phase, homogeneous, and crystalline materials. The redox-active fluxes provide a medium for enhanced doping and mixed-valency control in which the electrochemical potential adjusts the formal oxidation state, and the doping takes place to maintain charge neutrality. The two superconductor systems investigated are: (1) the potassium-doped barium bismuth oxides, and (2) the alkali metal- and alkaline earth metal-doped lanthanum copper oxides. Controlled oxidative doping has been achieved in both systems by two different approaches. The superconducting properties of these materials have been assessed, and the materials have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and e-beam microprobe elemental analyses. In the course of these studies, several other materials have been identified. Analysis of these materials, and the

  14. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Palmer, M.J.

    1997-10-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements.

  15. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    PubMed

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials. PMID:27427893

  16. PREFACE: Workshop on Oxide Materials 2014: Novel Multifunctional Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, M. E.; Lopera, W.

    2015-07-01

    The 2014 Workshop on Oxide Materials: Novel Multifunctional Properties was held in Cali, Colombia, from September 15 to September 19 on the campus of Universidad del Valle. It was a great privilege to have had this workshop in Cali after the first workshop on oxide materials commemorating the first centennial of the discovery of the superconductivity in 2011. The meeting gathered an audience of 80 participants, 10 invited speakers with two or three plenary talks each, 20 short oral contributions, two poster sessions with 20 presentations each. This proceedings volume contains papers reported at the conference. The Proceedings of the 2014 Workshop on Oxide Materials: Novel Multifunctional Properties were edited by Maria Elena Gomez and Wilson Lopera with the assistance of Carlos William Sanchez and Albert Ortiz as copy editor. We are grateful for the financial support from COLCIENCIAS through research project COLCIENCIAS-UNIVALLE contract 002/2013; Universidad de Valle through Professor Ivan Ramos, Rector; the Faculty of Science with Professor Jaime Cantera, Dean; the Center of Excellence on Novel Materials with Professor Pedro Prieto, Director; ICETEX, and INTECO Ltda. Further details about the conference, including details of the invited speakers and plenary sessions are available in the PDF. Maria Elena Gómez, Editor Wilson Lopera, Editor

  17. Mixed metal oxide films as pH sensing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshak, Khalil; Gill, Edric; Korostynska, Olga; Arshak, Arousian

    2007-05-01

    Due to the demand for accurate, reliable and highly sensitive pH sensors, research is being pursued to find novel materials to achieve this goal. Semiconducting metal oxides, such as TiO, SnO and SnO II and insulating oxides such as Nb IIO 5 and Bi IIO 3, and their mixtures in different proportions are being investigated for this purpose. The films of these materials mixtures are used in conjunction with an interdigitated electrode pattern to produce a conductimetric/capacitive pH sensor. The advantages of this approach include straightforward manufacturing, versatility and cost-effectiveness. It was noted that upon contact with a solution, the electrical parameters of the films, such as resistance etc., change. The correlation of these changes with pH values is the basis for the proposed system development. The ultimate goal is to find materials composition, which would have the highest sensitivity towards the pH level of the solutions. It was found that the materials that produced the highest sensitivity either had a long response time or were unstable over a wide pH range. Those exhibiting lower sensitivities were found to be more stable over a wide pH range. All oxide films tested demonstrated a change in electrical parameters upon contact with buffers of known pH value.

  18. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-01

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  19. Novel Separation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R

    2011-02-17

    The separation of actinides and other elements of interest for nuclear forensics and threat reduction is currently performed using decades-old chemistries and ion-exchange columns. We propose to determine the technical feasibility of a novel method for separating actinide ions in solution. This method is based upon isotachophoresis (ITP), which has been applied in the purification of pharmaceuticals and other biochemical applications. This technique has the potential to separate inorganic ions more effectively than existing methods, which is key to analyzing very small samples. We will perform a quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of specific isotachophoretic approaches including predicting the physical and chemical properties, such as ion mobility, of inorganic ions under specific solvent conditions using a combination of ab initio calculations and semi-empirical methods. We expect to obtain a thorough understanding of the analytical systems parameters under which ITP is most effective for the separation of inorganic samples, including the influence of the double layer surrounding actinide ions, the Debye length for different ions and ion complexes, and Debye-Hueckel limits. Inorganic separations are key to nuclear forensics for countering terrorism and nuclear proliferation. If found to be feasible and potentially superior to currently used separation approaches, ITP could provide the conceptual basis for an improved means to separate samples of nuclear explosion debris for nuclear forensic analysis, in support of the Laboratory's missions in homeland and national security.

  20. Copper Oxide Precipitates in NBS Standard Reference Material 482

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Eric S.; Carlton, Robert A.; Gillen, Greg; Wight, Scott A.; Bright, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Copper oxide has been detected in the copper containing alloys of NBS Standard Reference Material (SRM) 482. This occurrence is significant because it represents heterogeneity within a standard reference material that was certified to be homogeneous on a micrometer scale. Oxide occurs as elliptically to spherically shaped precipitates whose size differs with alloy composition. The largest precipitates occur in the Au20-Cu80 alloy and range in size from submicrometer up to 2 μm in diameter. Precipitates are observed using light microscopy, electron microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS has demonstrated that the precipitates are present within all the SRM 482 wires that contain copper. Only the pure gold wire is precipitate free. Initial results from the analysis of the Au20-Cu80 alloy indicate that the percentage of precipitates is less than 1 % by area. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of large (2 μm) precipitates in this same alloy indicates that precipitates are detectable by EPMA and that their composition differs significantly from the certified alloy composition. The small size and low percentage of these oxide precipitates minimizes the impact that they have upon the intended use of this standard for electron probe microanalysis. Heterogeneity caused by these oxide precipitates may however preclude the use of this standard for automated EPMA analyses and other microanalysis techniques. PMID:27446759

  1. Copper Oxide Precipitates in NBS Standard Reference Material 482.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Eric S; Carlton, Robert A; Gillen, Greg; Wight, Scott A; Bright, David S

    2002-01-01

    Copper oxide has been detected in the copper containing alloys of NBS Standard Reference Material (SRM) 482. This occurrence is significant because it represents heterogeneity within a standard reference material that was certified to be homogeneous on a micrometer scale. Oxide occurs as elliptically to spherically shaped precipitates whose size differs with alloy composition. The largest precipitates occur in the Au20-Cu80 alloy and range in size from submicrometer up to 2 μm in diameter. Precipitates are observed using light microscopy, electron microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS has demonstrated that the precipitates are present within all the SRM 482 wires that contain copper. Only the pure gold wire is precipitate free. Initial results from the analysis of the Au20-Cu80 alloy indicate that the percentage of precipitates is less than 1 % by area. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of large (2 μm) precipitates in this same alloy indicates that precipitates are detectable by EPMA and that their composition differs significantly from the certified alloy composition. The small size and low percentage of these oxide precipitates minimizes the impact that they have upon the intended use of this standard for electron probe microanalysis. Heterogeneity caused by these oxide precipitates may however preclude the use of this standard for automated EPMA analyses and other microanalysis techniques. PMID:27446759

  2. Apparatus and method for oxidation and stabilization of polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; White, Terry L [Knoxville, TN; Sherman, Daniel M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of plasma-derived gas containing at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at a selected temperature. The polymer may be directly exposed to the plasma, or alternatively, the plasma may be established in a separate volume from which the reactive species may be extracted and introduced into the vicinity of the polymer. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments.

  3. Apparatus and method for oxidation and stabilization of polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, Felix L; White, Terry L; Sherman, Daniel M

    2010-08-31

    An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of plasma-derived gas containing at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at a selected temperature. The polymer may be directly exposed to the plasma, or alternatively, the plasma may be established in a separate volume from which the reactive species may be extracted and introduced into the vicinity of the polymer. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments.

  4. Apparatus and method for stabilization or oxidation of polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; Sherman, Daniel M [Knoxville, TN

    2010-01-19

    An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere at a selected temperature; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of ozone-containing gas, which decomposes at the selected temperature yielding at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at the selected temperature. The ozone may be generated by a plasma discharge or by various chemical processes. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments as well as to make flame-retardant fabrics.

  5. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  6. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Capone, Donald W.; Dunlap, Bobby D.; Veal, Boyd W.

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

  7. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Capone, D.W.; Dunlap, B.D.; Veal, B.W.

    1990-07-17

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]X] (where 0 < X < 0.5) exhibits superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state. 4 figs.

  8. Graphene oxide supported copper oxide nanoneedles: An efficient hybrid material for removal of toxic azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Rajendiran; Iyer, Sahithya S; Ezhilan, Jayabal; Kumar, S Senthil; Venkatesan, Rengarajan

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report a simple, one step synthesis of hybrid copper oxide nanoneedles on graphene oxide sheets (GO-CuONNs) through sonochemical method. The present method affords a facile mean for controlling effective concentration of the active CuO nanoneedles on the graphene oxide sheets, and also offers the necessary stability to the resulting GO-CuONNs structure for adsorption transformations.Furthermore, this hybrid GO-CuONNs is successfully employed in the removal of a series of hazardous ionic organic dyes namely coomassie brilliant blue, methylene blue, congo red and amidoblack 10B. Through careful investigation of the material, we found that the synergetic effect between CuONNs and GO play a significant role in the adsorption of all the dyes studied. The prepared hybrid material contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic environment which is expected to enhance the electrostatic interaction between the adsorbent and the dye molecules, consequently favouring the adsorption process. PMID:27208759

  9. Graphene oxide supported copper oxide nanoneedles: An efficient hybrid material for removal of toxic azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, Rajendiran; Iyer, Sahithya S.; Ezhilan, Jayabal; Kumar, S. Senthil; Venkatesan, Rengarajan

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report a simple, one step synthesis of hybrid copper oxide nanoneedles on graphene oxide sheets (GO-CuONNs) through sonochemical method. The present method affords a facile mean for controlling effective concentration of the active CuO nanoneedles on the graphene oxide sheets, and also offers the necessary stability to the resulting GO-CuONNs structure for adsorption transformations.Furthermore, this hybrid GO-CuONNs is successfully employed in the removal of a series of hazardous ionic organic dyes namely coomassie brilliant blue, methylene blue, congo red and amidoblack 10B. Through careful investigation of the material, we found that the synergetic effect between CuONNs and GO play a significant role in the adsorption of all the dyes studied. The prepared hybrid material contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic environment which is expected to enhance the electrostatic interaction between the adsorbent and the dye molecules, consequently favouring the adsorption process.

  10. Photochemical route for accessing amorphous metal oxide materials for water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rodney D L; Prévot, Mathieu S; Fagan, Randal D; Zhang, Zhipan; Sedach, Pavel A; Siu, Man Kit Jack; Trudel, Simon; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale electrolysis of water for hydrogen generation requires better catalysts to lower the kinetic barriers associated with the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Although most OER catalysts are based on crystalline mixed-metal oxides, high activities can also be achieved with amorphous phases. Methods for producing amorphous materials, however, are not typically amenable to mixed-metal compositions. We demonstrate that a low-temperature process, photochemical metal-organic deposition, can produce amorphous (mixed) metal oxide films for OER catalysis. The films contain a homogeneous distribution of metals with compositions that can be accurately controlled. The catalytic properties of amorphous iron oxide prepared with this technique are superior to those of hematite, whereas the catalytic properties of a-Fe(100-y-z)Co(y)Ni(z)O(x) are comparable to those of noble metal oxide catalysts currently used in commercial electrolyzers. PMID:23539180

  11. The surface and materials science of tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzill, Matthias; Diebold, Ulrike

    The study of tin oxide is motivated by its applications as a solid state gas sensor material, oxidation catalyst, and transparent conductor. This review describes the physical and chemical properties that make tin oxide a suitable material for these purposes. The emphasis is on surface science studies of single crystal surfaces, but selected studies on powder and polycrystalline films are also incorporated in order to provide connecting points between surface science studies with the broader field of materials science of tin oxide. The key for understanding many aspects of SnO 2 surface properties is the dual valency of Sn. The dual valency facilitates a reversible transformation of the surface composition from stoichiometric surfaces with Sn 4+ surface cations into a reduced surface with Sn 2+ surface cations depending on the oxygen chemical potential of the system. Reduction of the surface modifies the surface electronic structure by formation of Sn 5s derived surface states that lie deep within the band gap and also cause a lowering of the work function. The gas sensing mechanism appears, however, only to be indirectly influenced by the surface composition of SnO 2. Critical for triggering a gas response are not the lattice oxygen concentration but chemisorbed (or ionosorbed) oxygen and other molecules with a net electric charge. Band bending induced by charged molecules cause the increase or decrease in surface conductivity responsible for the gas response signal. In most applications tin oxide is modified by additives to either increase the charge carrier concentration by donor atoms, or to increase the gas sensitivity or the catalytic activity by metal additives. Some of the basic concepts by which additives modify the gas sensing and catalytic properties of SnO 2 are discussed and the few surface science studies of doped SnO 2 are reviewed. Epitaxial SnO 2 films may facilitate the surface science studies of doped films in the future. To this end film growth

  12. Ultra-thin solid oxide fuel cells: Materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, Kian

    alloys and nanoscale compositionally graded membranes that are thermomechanically robust and provide added interfacial functionality. The work in this thesis advances experimental state-of-the-art with respect to solid oxide fuel cell operation temperature, provides fundamental boundaries expected for ultrathin electrolytes, develops the ability to integrate highly dissimilar material (such as oxide-polymer) heterostructures, and introduces nanoscale compositionally graded electrolyte membranes that can lead to monolithic materials having multiple functionalities.

  13. Analysis of the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Design power plant studies were carried out for two applications of the plasma core reactor: (1) As a breeder reactor, (2) As a reactor able to transmute actinides effectively. In addition to the above applications the reactor produced electrical power with a high efficiency. A reactor subsystem was designed for each of the two applications. For the breeder reactor, neutronics calculations were carried out for a U-233 plasma core with a molten salt breeding blanket. A reactor was designed with a low critical mass (less than a few hundred kilograms U-233) and a breeding ratio of 1.01. The plasma core actinide transmutation reactor was designed to transmute the nuclear waste from conventional LWR's. The spent fuel is reprocessed during which 100% of Np, Am, Cm, and higher actinides are separated from the other components. These actinides are then manufactured as oxides into zirconium clad fuel rods and charged as fuel assemblies in the reflector region of the plasma core actinide transmutation reactor. In the equilibrium cycle, about 7% of the actinides are directly fissioned away, while about 31% are removed by reprocessing.

  14. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2005-11-17

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode--electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, the oxygen exchange kinetics of a P2 composition are described in detail. The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) have been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  15. Packaging material and flexible medical tubing containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A packaging material or flexible medical tubing containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: O- bound small polarons in oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, O. F.

    2006-11-01

    Holes bound to acceptor defects in oxide crystals are often localized by lattice distortion at just one of the equivalent oxygen ligands of the defect. Such holes thus form small polarons in symmetric clusters of a few oxygen ions. An overview on mainly the optical manifestations of those clusters is given. The article is essentially divided into two parts: the first one covers the basic features of the phenomena and their explanations, exemplified by several paradigmatic defects; in the second part numerous oxide materials are presented which exhibit bound small polaron optical properties. The first part starts with summaries on the production of bound hole polarons and the identification of their structure. It is demonstrated why they show strong, wide absorption bands, usually visible, based on polaron stabilization energies of typically 1 eV. The basic absorption process is detailed with a fictitious two-well system. Clusters with four, six and twelve equivalent ions are realized in various oxide compounds. In these cases several degenerate optically excited polaron states occur, leading to characteristic final state resonance splittings. The peak energies of the absorption bands as well as the sign of the transfer energy depend on the topology of the clusters. A special section is devoted to the distinction between interpolaron and intrapolaron optical transitions. The latter are usually comparatively weak. The oxide compounds exhibiting bound hole small polaron absorptions include the alkaline earth oxides (e.g. MgO), BeO and ZnO, the perovskites BaTiO3 and KTaO3, quartz, the sillenites (e.g. Bi12TiO20), Al2O3, LiNbO3, topaz and various other materials. There are indications that the magnetic crystals NiO, doped with Li, and LaMnO3, doped with Sr, also show optical features caused by bound hole polarons. Beyond being elementary paradigms for the properties of small polarons in general, the defect species treated can be used to explain radiation and light

  17. [Consistency of zinc oxide-eugenol impression materials].

    PubMed

    Gomes, W L; Santos, J F; Muench, A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work was investigate the consistency of three zinc oxide-eugenol impression pastes, considering its flow. Flow tests were performed based on the AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION-Specification no 16. Setting time was based at that one when should be applied the load to get considered disc diameter; the values were obtained graphically. Considering the results it was possible to conclude: a) the first two materials (Equalizing and Horus) present high initial flow, which however drops down earlier on the second one; b) both materials may be used with non compressive impression technic but the second one has shorter working time; c) the third material (Lysanda) as it presents lower flow and faster setting time, may be used with compressive impression technic. PMID:2135423

  18. Ceramicrete stabilization of U-and Pu-bearing materials

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Maloney, M. David; Thompson, Gary H.

    2007-11-13

    A method of stabilizing nuclear material is disclosed. Oxides or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs) and/or hydrocarbons and/or acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs are treated by adjusting the pH of the nuclear material to not less than about 5 and adding sufficient MgO to convert fluorides present to MgF.sub.2; alumina is added in an amount sufficient to absorb substantially all hydrocarbon liquid present, after which a binder including MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 is added to the treated nuclear material to form a slurry. Additional MgO may be added. A crystalline radioactive material is also disclosed having a binder of the reaction product of calcined MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 and a radioactive material of the oxides and/or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs). Acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs, and/or actinides and/or TRUs with or without oils and/or greases may be encapsulated and stabilized by the binder.

  19. Sensor materials for an intravascular fiber optic nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Stahl, Russell F.

    1996-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory molecule in physiological processes including neurotransmission and the control of blood pressure. It is produced in excess during septic shock, the profound hypotensive state which accompanies severe infections. In-vivo measurement of NO would enhance the understanding of its varied biological roles. Our goal is the development of an intravascular fiber-optic sensor for the continuous measurement of NO. This study evaluated nitric oxide sensitive compounds as potential sensing materials in the presence and absence of oxygen. Using absorption spectroscopy we studied both the Fe II and Fe III forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. The Fe II forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin and the Fe III form of cytochrome-c were found to have the highest sensitivity to NO. Cytochrome c (Fe III) is selective for NO even at high oxygen levels, while myoglobin is selective only under normal oxygen levels. NO concentrations as low as 1 (mu) M can be detected with our fiber-optic spectrometer using cytochrome c, and as low as 300 nM using myoglobin. Either of these materials would be adequate to monitor the increase in nitric oxide production during the onset of septic shock.

  20. Metal-oxide-based energetic materials and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M. , Simpson; Randall L.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2006-01-17

    A method of preparing energetic metal-oxide-based energetic materials using sol-gel chemistry has been invented. The wet chemical sol-gel processing provides an improvement in both safety and performance. Essentially, a metal-oxide oxidizer skeletal structure is prepared from hydrolyzable metals (metal salts or metal alkoxides) with fuel added to the sol prior to gelation or synthesized within the porosity metal-oxide gel matrix. With metal salt precursors a proton scavenger is used to destabilize the sol and induce gelation. With metal alkoxide precursors standard well-known sol-gel hydrolysis and condensation reactions are used. Drying is done by standard sol-gel practices, either by a slow evaporation of the liquid residing within the pores to produce a high density solid nanocomposite, or by supercritical extraction to produce a lower density, high porous nanocomposite. Other ingredients may be added to this basic nanostructure to change physical and chemical properties, which include organic constituents for binders or gas generators during reactions, burn rate modifiers, or spectral emitters.

  1. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Schutte, Erick J. (Inventor); Rolfe, Sara L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having one of the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01

  2. Anisotropy-based crystalline oxide-on-semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor structure and device for use in a semiconductor application utilizes a substrate of semiconductor-based material, such as silicon, and a thin film of a crystalline oxide whose unit cells are capable of exhibiting anisotropic behavior overlying the substrate surface. Within the structure, the unit cells of the crystalline oxide are exposed to an in-plane stain which influences the geometric shape of the unit cells and thereby arranges a directional-dependent quality of the unit cells in a predisposed orientation relative to the substrate. This predisposition of the directional-dependent quality of the unit cells enables the device to take beneficial advantage of characteristics of the structure during operation. For example, in the instance in which the crystalline oxide of the structure is a perovskite, a spinel or an oxide of similarly-related cubic structure, the structure can, within an appropriate semiconductor device, exhibit ferroelectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric, electro-optic, ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, magneto-optic or large dielectric properties that synergistically couple to the underlying semiconductor substrate.

  3. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schutte, Erick J.; Rolfe, Sara L.

    2010-11-02

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having one of the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01

  4. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Hafnium-Praseodymium-Indium Oxide System

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Griffin, C.W.; Weber, W.J.

    1988-06-01

    The HfO/sub 2/-PrO/sub 1.83/-In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system has been studied at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop alternative, highly electrically conducting oxides as electrode and interconnection materials for solid oxide fuel cells. A coprecipitation process was developed for synthesizing single-phase, mixed oxide powders necessary to fabricate powders and dense oxides. A ternary phase diagram was developed, and the phases and structures were related to electrical transport properties. Two new phases, an orthorhombic PrInO/sub 3/ and a rhombohedral Hf/sub 2/In/sub 2/O/sub 7/ phase, were identified. The highest electronic conductivity is related to the presence of a bcc, In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ solid solution (ss) containing HfO/sub 2/ and PrO/sub 1.83/. Compositions containing more than 35 mol % of the In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ss have electrical conductivities greater than 10/sup /minus/1/ (ohm-cm)/sup /minus/1/, and the two or three phase structures that contain this phase appear to exhibit mixed electronic-ionic conduction. The high electrical conductivities and structures similar to the Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/(HfO/sub 2/) electrolyte give these oxides potential for use as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells. 21 refs.

  5. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  6. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Ken; Martin, Leigh; Lumetta, Gregg

    2015-04-02

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of used nuclear fuel is the separation of transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. This separation is essential if actinide transmutation options are to be pursued in advanced fuel cycles, as lanthanides compete with actinides for neutrons in both thermal and fast reactors, thus limiting efficiency. The separation is difficult because the chemistry of Am3+ and Cm3+ is nearly identical to that of the trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). The prior literature teaches that two approaches offer the greatest probability of devising a successful group separation process based on aqueous processes: 1) the application of complexing agents containing ligand donor atoms that are softer than oxygen (N, S, Cl-) or 2) changing the oxidation state of Am to the IV, V, or VI state to increase the essential differences between Am and lanthanide chemistry (an approach utilized in the PUREX process to selectively remove Pu4+ and UO22+ from fission products). The latter approach offers the additional benefit of enabling a separation of Am from Cm, as Cm(III) is resistant to oxidation and so can easily be made to follow the lanthanides. The fundamental limitations of these approaches are that 1) the soft(er) donor atoms that interact more strongly with actinide cations than lanthanides form substantially weaker bonds than oxygen atoms, thus necessitating modification of extraction conditions for adequate phase transfer efficiency, 2) soft donor reagents have been seen to suffer slow phase transfer kinetics and hydro-/radiolytic stability limitations and 3) the upper oxidation states of Am are all moderately strong oxidants, hence of only transient stability in media representative of conventional aqueous separations systems. There are examples in the literature of both approaches having been described. However, it is not clear at present that any extant process is sufficiently robust for application at the scale

  7. Extraction of actinides into aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions from carbonate media in the presence of alizarin complexone

    SciTech Connect

    Molochnikova, N.P.; Frenkel', V.Ya.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Shkinev, V.M.; Spivakov, B.Ya.; Zolotov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Actinide extraction in a two-phase aqueous system based on polyethylene glycol from carbonate solutions of various compositions in presence of alizarin complexone is studied. It is shown that the nature of the alkali metals affects actinide extraction into the polyethylene glycol phase. Tri- and tetravalent actinides are extracted maximally from sodium carbonate solutions. Separation of actinides in different oxidation states is more effective in potassium carbonate solutions. The behavior of americium in different oxidation states in the system carbonate-polyethylene glycol-complexone is studied. The possibility of extraction separation of microamount of americium(V) from curium in carbonate solutions in presence of alizarin complexone is shown.

  8. First principles materials design of novel functional oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Valentino R.; Voas, Brian K.; Bridges, Craig A.; Morris, James R.; Beckman, Scott P.

    2016-05-01

    We review our efforts to develop and implement robust computational approaches for exploring phase stability to facilitate the prediction-to-synthesis process of novel functional oxides. These efforts focus on a synergy between (i) electronic structure calculations for properties predictions, (ii) phenomenological/empirical methods for examining phase stability as related to both phase segregation and temperature-dependent transitions and (iii) experimental validation through synthesis and characterization. We illustrate this philosophy by examining an inaugural study that seeks to discover novel functional oxides with high piezoelectric responses. Our results show progress towards developing a framework through which solid solutions can be studied to predict materials with enhanced properties that can be synthesized and remain active under device relevant conditions.

  9. First principles materials design of novel functional oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cooper, Valentino R.; Voas, Brian K.; Bridges, Craig A.; Morris, James R.; Beckman, Scott P.

    2016-05-31

    We review our efforts to develop and implement robust computational approaches for exploring phase stability to facilitate the prediction-to-synthesis process of novel functional oxides. These efforts focus on a synergy between (i) electronic structure calculations for properties predictions, (ii) phenomenological/empirical methods for examining phase stability as related to both phase segregation and temperature-dependent transitions and (iii) experimental validation through synthesis and characterization. We illustrate this philosophy by examining an inaugural study that seeks to discover novel functional oxides with high piezoelectric responses. Lastly, our results show progress towards developing a framework through which solid solutions can be studied to predictmore » materials with enhanced properties that can be synthesized and remain active under device relevant conditions.« less

  10. Preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials by mechanical means

    DOEpatents

    Capone, D.W.

    1990-11-27

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]X] (where 0 < X < 0.5) is capable of accommodating very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the metal oxide material to accommodate high current densities. The orthorhombic crystalline particles have a tendency to lie down on one of the longer sides, i.e., on the a- or b-direction. Aligning the crystals in this orientation is accomplished by mechanical working of the material such as by extrusion, tape casting or slip casting, provided a single crystal powder is used as a starting material, to provide a highly oriented, e.g., approximately 90% of the crystal particles have a common orientation, superconducting matrix capable of supporting large current densities. 3 figs.

  11. Preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials by mechanical means

    DOEpatents

    Capone, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0<.times.<0.5) is capable of accommodating very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu--O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the metal oxide material to accommodate high current densities. The orthorhombic crystalline particles have a tendency to lie down on one of the longer sides, i.e., on the a- or b-direction. Aligning the crystals in this orientation is accomplished by mechanical working of the material such as by extrusion, tape casting or slip casting, provided a single crystal powder is used as a starting material, to provide a highly oriented, e.g., approximately 90% of the crystal particles have a common orientation, superconducting matrix capable of supporting large current densities.

  12. Studies of layered and pillared manganese oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying

    Synthetic Birnessite, an octahedral layered manganese oxide material called OL-1 was synthesized with Na+, K+, Na +/Mg2+, K+/Mg2+, Na +/K+ ions as interlayer cations by redox reactions between permanganate and alcohols in a strong basic media. Chromia pillared OL-1s were prepared under reflux conditions using trinuclear chromium hydroxyl acetate as a pillaring agent followed by calcination in a N2 atmosphere at 200°C. Vanadium oxide pillared OL-1s were obtained by intercalating neutral vanadyl acetylacetonate (VOacac) or vanadium acetylacetonate (Vacac) into the interlayer of OL-1 and subsequently calcining in air at 300°C. The synthesis procedures were monitored using X-ray diffraction studies. The resultant materials were characterized by XRD, X-ray absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectra, FTIR, UV-VIS, inductively coupled plasma, transmission electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, potentiometric titration, thermal analyses, TPD measurements, BET surface area and pore size distribution measurements. OL-1 materials prepared using this alcohol route showed enhanced thermal stabilities and increased Mg accommodation compared to OL-1s prepared with other methods. Based on the analysis methods developed here, Na-OL-1 exhibited recoverable and reversible structural and surface O2 oxygen species while K-OL-1 showed higher stability. Na-OL-1 had predominantly Bronsted acid sites resulting from OH groups bonded to Mn on Na-OL-1 surfaces, while the Na/Mg-OL-1 had mainly Lewis acid sites. Large porosity was obtained in chromia pillared OL-1 materials with a narrow pore size distribution centered around 18 A. Although these materials remained "amorphous" as determined by XRD after calcination, TEM morphology studies suggest that the materials were still layered. EXAFS studies indicated the formation of Cr-O-Mn bonds in the resultant materials via comer-shared linkages of CrO6 and MnO6 octahedra. Good crystallinity in

  13. Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-03-01

    This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) of actinide particles.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Hans J; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Wilson, Richard E; Werme, Lars; Shuh, David K

    2005-09-01

    A descriptive account is given of our most recent research on the actinide dioxides with the Advanced Light Source Molecular Environmental Science (ALS-MES) Beamline 11.0.2 soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The ALS-MES STXM permits near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and imaging with 30-nm spatial resolution. The first STXM spectromicroscopy NEXAFS spectra at the actinide 4d5/2 edges of the imaged transuranic particles, NpO2 and PuO2, have been obtained. Radiation damage induced by the STXM was observed in the investigation of a mixed oxidation state particle (Np(V,VI)) and was minimized during collection of the actual spectra at the 4d5/2 edge of the Np(V,VI) solid. A plutonium elemental map was obtained from an irregular PuO2 particle with the dimensions of 650 x 650 nm. The Pu 4d5/2 NEXAFS spectra were collected at several different locations from the PuO2 particle and were identical. A representative oxygen K-edge spectrum from UO2 was collected and resembles the oxygen K-edge from the bulk material. The unique and current performance of the ALS-MES STXM at extremely low energies (ca. 100 eV) that may permit the successful measurement of the actinide 5d edge is documented. Finally, the potential of STXM as a tool for actinide investigations is briefly discussed. PMID:16021423

  15. Combinatorial Exploration of Novel Transparent Conducting Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D. S.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Young, D.; Teplin, C. W.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney, M. S.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Keyes, B. M.; To, B.; Perkins, J. D.; Taylor, M. P.; Readey, D.

    2005-11-01

    High-throughput combinatorial approaches have been used for the discovery and optimization of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) materials for PV applications. We report on current investigations in In-Zn-O, In-Ti-O and In-Mo-O systems. The InZnO system is shown to be amorphous in the best conducting range with a conductivity of ~ 3000 Ω-cm-1 for 50%-70% In/Zn. The amorphous InZnO films are very smooth (2..ANG.. rms). In-Ti-O is found to be an excellent high-mobility TCO with mobilities of greater than 80 cm2/v-sec and conductivities of more than 6000 Ω-cm-1 for sputtered thin film materials.

  16. Oxide dispersion hardened mechanically alloyed materials for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, J. S.; Strassburg, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    The procedure of mechanical alloying makes it possible to obtain, with the aid of powder-metallurgy techniques, alloys that consist of a metallic matrix in which very fine oxide particles are dispersed. Mechanically alloyed compound powders can be used for making either forged or hot-rolled semifinished products. For these products, dispersion strengthening and precipitation hardening has been combined. At high temperatures, the strength characteristics of the alloy are determined by both dispersion hardening and by precipitation hardening processes. The effect produced by each process is independent of that due to the other. Attention is given to the principle of mechanical alloying developed by Benjamin (1970, 1976), the strength characteristics of mechanically alloyed materials, the corrosion resistance of mechanically alloyed material at high temperatures, and the preparation and characteristics of the alloy MA 6000 E.

  17. Resilient Sealing Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Signo T. Reis; Richard K. Brow

    2006-09-30

    This report describes the development of ''invert'' glass compositions designed for hermetic seals in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Upon sealing at temperatures compatible with other SOFC materials (generally {le}900 C), these glasses transform to glass-ceramics with desirable thermo-mechanical properties, including coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) over 11 x 10{sup -6}/C. The long-term (>four months) stability of CTE under SOFC operational conditions (e.g., 800 C in wet forming gas or in air) has been evaluated, as have weight losses under similar conditions. The dependence of sealant properties on glass composition are described in this report, as are experiments to develop glass-matrix composites by adding second phases, including Ni and YSZ. This information provides design-guidance to produce desirable sealing materials.

  18. Extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides by ``CMPO-like`` calixarenes

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Simon, N.; Schwing-Weill, M.J.

    1999-04-01

    Extractive properties of calix[4]arenes bearing carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide moieties on their upper rim toward trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations were investigated. The study revealed that these molecules selectively extract light lanthanides and actinides from heavy lanthanides. All parameters present in the extraction system were varied to determine the origin of the selectivity. It was found that this selectivity requires a calix[4]arene platform and acetamidophosphine oxide groups containing phenyl substituents on the four phosphorus atoms.

  19. A conceptual performance assessment model of the dissolved actinide source term for the WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, R.F.; Stockman, C.T.; Wang, Y.; Novak, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a performance assessment model of dissolved actinide concentrations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The model assesses the concentration of each actinide oxidation state and combines these concentrations with an oxidation state distribution. The chemical behavior of actinides in the same oxidation state is presumed to be very similar for almost all situations, but exceptions arising from experimental evidence are accommodated. The code BRAGFLO calculates the gas pressure, brine mass, gas volume, and mass of remaining Fe and cellulosics for each time step and computational cell. The total CO{sub 2} in the repository and dissolved Ca(OH){sub 2} is estimated. Lookup tables are constructed for pmH and f(CO{sub 2}) as a function of brine type and volume, moles of CO{sub 2}, and Ca(OH){sub 2}. Amounts of five soluble complexants are considered. A model based on the formulation of Harvie et al. produces tables of solubilities for each actinide oxidation state as a function of pmH, f(CO{sub 2}), brine composition, and complexant. Experimental data yield lookup tables of fractions of Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am in each oxidation state as a function of f(CO{sub 2}) and complexant. The tables are then used to provide a concentration of a particular actinide at particular values of pmH and f(CO{sub 2}). Under steady-state conditions, the oxidation state of each actinide that is most stable in the particular chemical environment controls the concentration of that actinide in solution. In the absence of steady-state conditions, the oxidation state distribution of interest is that of the dissolved actinide, and the oxidation states may be treated as if they were separate compounds.

  20. Oxidative Decontamination of Tritiated Materials Employing Ozone Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Gentile; John J. Parker; Gregory L. Guttadora

    2001-11-12

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has developed a process by which to significantly reduce surface and near surface tritium contamination from various materials. The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS) reacts gaseous state ozone (accelerated by presence of catalyst), with tritium entrained/deposited on the surface of components (stainless steel, copper, plastics, ceramics, etc.), for the purpose of activity reduction by means of oxidation-reduction chemistry. In addition to removing surface and near surface tritium contamination from (high monetary value) components for reuse in non-tritium environments, the OTDS has the capability of removing tritium from the surfaces of expendable items, which can then be disposed of in a less expensive fashion. The OTDS can be operated in a batch mode by which up to approximately 40 pounds of tritium contaminated (expendable) items can be processed and decontaminated to levels permissible for free release (less than1,000 dpm/100 cm 2). This paper will discuss the OTDS process, the level of tritium surface contamination removed from various materials, and a technique for ''deep scrubbing'' tritium from subsurface layers.

  1. Advances in actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Peter C; Ikeda, Y.; Czerwinski, K.

    2011-01-31

    Actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry has advanced through unexpected results that have further revealed the complex nature of the 5f elements. Nanoscale control of actinide materials is emerging, as shown by the creation of a considerable range of cluster and tubular topologies. Departures from established structural trends for actinyl ions are provided by cation-cation interactions in which an O atom of one actinyl ion is an equatorial ligand of a bipyramid of another actinyl ion. The solid-state structural complexity of actinide materials has been further demonstrated by open framework materials with interesting properties. The U(VI) tetraoxide core has been added to this cation's repertoire of coordination possibilities. The emergence of pentavalent uranium solid-state and coordination chemistry has resulted from the prudent selection of ligands. Finally, analogues of the uranyl ion have challenged our understanding of this normally unreactive functional group.

  2. Influence of oxide reinforcement materials on high-temperatue oxidation resistance of Ni sub 3 A1 matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; McKamey, C.G.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of Ni{sub 3}Al-based metal matrix composites was studied in high-temperature air under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions as a function of the composition and form of oxide reinforcement material. The incorporation of oxide fibers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--ZrO{sub 2} or particles into the Ni{sub 3}Al matrix led to oxidation rates significantly greater than that for the monolithic aluminide. The increase in susceptibility was primarily due to internal oxidation along the fiber- (or particle-) matrix interfaces and depended on the type of reinforcement material and its deposition in the matrix. The results suggest that the choice of reinforcement material and the method of materials processing will be important considerations in the design of oxidation-resistant Ni{sub 3}Al composites. 10 refs, 4 figs.

  3. Screening Evaluation of Sodium Nonatitanate for Strontium and Actinide Removal from Alkaline Salt Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    2001-02-13

    This report describes results from screening tests evaluating strontium and actinide removal characteristics of a sodium titanate material developed by Clearfield and coworkers at Texas A and M University and offered commercially by Honeywell. Sodium nonatitanate may exhibit improved actinide removal kinetics and filtration characteristics compared to MST and thus merit testing.

  4. Understanding the Chemistry of the Actinides in HL Waste Tank Systems: Actinide Speciation in Oxalic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Significant Quantities of Aluminum, Iron, and Manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Sue

    2006-07-30

    The overall goal of this research plan is to provide a thermodynamic basis for describing actinide speciation over a range of tank-like conditions, including elevated temperature, elevated OH- concentrations, and the presence of various organic ligands. With support from DOE�s EMSP program, we have made significant progress towards measuring thermodynamic parameters for actinide complexation as a function of temperature. We have used the needs of the ESP modelers to guide our work to date, and we have made important progress defining the effect of temperature for actinide complexation by organic, and for hydrolysis of the hexa- and pentvalent oxidation states.

  5. FTICR/MS studies of gas-phase actinide ion reactions: fundamental chemical and physical properties of atomic and molecular actinide ions and neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. K.; Haire, R. G.; Marçalo, J.; Santos, M.; Leal, J. P.; Pires de Matos, A.; Tyagi, R.; Mrozik, M. K.; Pitzer, R. M.; Bursten, B. E.

    2007-10-01

    Fundamental aspects of the chemical and physical properties of atomic and molecular actinide ions and neutrals are being examined by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS). To date, gas-phase reactivity studies of bare and ligated An+ and An2+ ions, where An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm, with oxidants and with hydrocarbons have been performed. Among the information that has been deduced from these studies are thermodynamic properties of neutral and ionic actinide oxide molecules and the role of the 5f electrons in actinide chemistry. Parallel theoretical studies of selected actinide molecular ions have also been carried out to substantiate the interpretation of the experimental observations.

  6. Actinide Dioxides in Water: Interactions at the Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitaly; Shvareva, Tatiana Y.; Hayun, Shmuel; Asta, Mark; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-12-15

    A comprehensive understanding of chemical interactions between water and actinide dioxide surfaces is critical for safe operation and storage of nuclear fuels. Despite substantial previous research, understanding the nature of these interactions remains incomplete. In this work, we combine accurate calorimetric measurements with first-principles computational studies to characterize surface energies and adsorption enthalpies of water on two fluorite-structured compounds, ThO₂ and CeO₂, that are relevant for understanding the behavior of water on actinide oxide surfaces more generally. We determine coverage-dependent adsorption enthalpies and demonstrate a mixed molecular and dissociative structure for the first hydration layer. The results show a correlation between the magnitude of the anhydrous surface energy and the water adsorption enthalpy. Further, they suggest a structural model featuring one adsorbed water molecule per one surface cation on the most stable facet that is expected to be a common structural signature of water adsorbed on actinide dioxide compounds.

  7. 49 CFR 173.419 - Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.419 Authorized packages—oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials. (a) An oxidizing Class 7...

  8. 49 CFR 173.419 - Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.419 Authorized packages—oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials. (a) An oxidizing Class 7...

  9. 49 CFR 173.419 - Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.419 Authorized packages—oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials. (a) An oxidizing Class 7...

  10. 49 CFR 173.419 - Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.419 Authorized packages—oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials. (a) An oxidizing Class 7...

  11. 49 CFR 173.419 - Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Authorized packages-oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.419 Authorized packages—oxidizing Class 7 (radioactive) materials. (a) An oxidizing Class 7...

  12. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2005-01-24

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

  13. Environmental research on actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  14. Molecular Characterization of Actinide Oxocations from Protactinium to Plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Auwer, C.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Digandomenico, V.; Le Naour, C.; Trubert, D.; Simoni, E.; Hennig, C.; Scheinost, A.; Conradson, S. D.

    2007-02-01

    This presentation addresses the structural characterization by EXAFS of actinide cations at oxidation states (V) and (VI) as one walks across the periodic table from Z = 91 (protactinium) to Z = 94 (plutonium). A structural comparison between Pa, U, Np and Pu oxocations in aqueous solution at formal oxidation states (V) and (VI) is carried out. These results are corroborated by quantum chemical and molecular dynamics calculations.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Actinide Oxocations from Protactinium to Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Den Auwer, C.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Hennig, C.; Scheinost, A.; Conradson, S. D.

    2007-02-02

    This presentation addresses the structural characterization by EXAFS of actinide cations at oxidation states (V) and (VI) as one walks across the periodic table from Z = 91 (protactinium) to Z = 94 (plutonium). A structural comparison between Pa, U, Np and Pu oxocations in aqueous solution at formal oxidation states (V) and (VI) is carried out. These results are corroborated by quantum chemical and molecular dynamics calculations.

  16. Compatibility studies of metallic materials with lithium-based oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, P.; Dienst, W.

    1988-07-01

    The compatibility of Li 2O, Li 4SiO 4 and Li 2SiO 3 with the cladding materials AISI 316, 1.4914, Hastelloy X and Inconel 625 was investigated at 800-1000°C for annealing times up to 1000 h. A controlled oxygen reactivity was established by adding 1 mol% NiO per mole Li 2O to the Li-based oxides. In addition, some compatibility tests were performed at 600-900°C on Be, which is of interest as a neutron multiplier material, with Li 2SiO 3 as well as AISI 316. Li 2O accounted for the strongest cladding attack, followed by Li 4SiO 4 and Li 2SiO 3. In the absence of NiO, Li 2SiO 3 caused no chemical interactions at all. With respect to the cladding materials, there was no considerable difference in the reaction rates of AISI 316, Hastelloy X and Inconel 625. However, the steel 1.4914 was clearly more heavily attacked at and above 800°C. The compatibility of Be with Li 2SiO 3 or AISI 316 seems to be tolerable up to about 650°C. At higher temperatures a liquid Li suicide phase is formed which results in strong local attack and penetration into Li 2SiO 3.

  17. Oxides for sustainable photovoltaics with earth-abundant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Alexander; Stahl, Mathieu; Ehrhardt, Nikolai; Fahl, Andreas; Ledig, Johannes; Waag, Andreas; Bakin, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    Energy conversion technologies are aiming to extremely high power capacities per year. Nontoxicity and abundance of the materials are the key requirements to a sustainable photovoltaic technology. Oxides are among the key materials to reach these goals. We investigate the influence of thin buffer layers on the performance of an ZnO:Al/buffer/Cu2O solar cells. Introduction of a thin ZnO or Al2O3 buffer layer, grown by thermal ALD, between ZnO:Al and Cu2O resulted in 45% increase of the solar cell efficiency. VPE growth of Cu2O employing elemental copper and pure oxygen as precursor materials is presented. The growth is performed on MgO substrates with the (001) orientation. On- and off- oriented substrates have been employed and the growth results are compared. XRD investigations show the growth of the (110) oriented Cu2O for all temperatures, whereas at a high substrate temperature additional (001) Cu2O growth occurs. An increase of the oxygen partial pressure leads to a more pronounced 2D growth mode, whereby pores between the islands still remain. The implementation of off-axis substrates with 3.5° and 5° does not lead to an improvement of the layer quality. The (110) orientation remains predominant, the grain size decreases and the FWHM of the (220) peak increases. From the AFM images it is concluded, that the (110) surface grows with a tilt angle to the substrate surface.

  18. Selection of actinide chemical analogues for WIPP tests

    SciTech Connect

    Villarreal, R.; Spall, D.

    1995-07-05

    The Department of Energy must demonstrate the effectiveness of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a permanent repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. Performance assessments of the WIPP require that estimates of the transportability and outcome of the radionuclides (actinides) be determined from disposal rooms that may become either partially or completely filled with brine. Federal regulations limit the amount of radioactivity that may be unintentionally released to the accessible environment by any mechanism during the post closure phase up to 10,000 years. Thermodynamic models have been developed to predict the concentrations of actinides in the WIPP disposal rooms under various situations and chemical conditions. These models are based on empirical and theoretical projections of the chemistry that might be present in and around the disposal room zone for both near and long-term periods. The actinides that are known to be present in the TRU wastes (and are included in the model) are Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am. Knowledge of the chemistry that might occur in the disposal rooms when the waste comes in contact with brine is important in understanding the range of oxidation states that might be present under different conditions. There is a need to establish the mechanisms and resultant rate of transport, migration, or effective retardation of actinides beyond the disposal rooms to the boundary of the accessible environment. The influence of the bulk salt rock, clay sediments and other geologic matrices on the transport behavior of actinides must be determined to establish the overall performance and capability of the WIPP in isolating waste from the environment. Tests to determine the capabilities of the WIPP geologic formations in retarding actinide species in several projected oxidation states would provide a means to demonstrate the effectiveness of the WIPP in retaining TRU wastes.

  19. Ferromagnetism in defect-ridden oxides and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P.; Gunning, R. D.; Venkatesan, M.; Paul, K.

    2010-05-01

    The existence of high-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films and nanoparticles of oxides containing small quantities of magnetic dopants remains controversial. Some regard these materials as dilute magnetic semiconductors, while others think they are ferromagnetic only because the magnetic dopants form secondary ferromagnetic impurity phases such as cobalt metal or magnetite. There are also reports in d0 systems and other defective oxides that contain no magnetic ions. Here, we investigate TiO2 (rutile) containing 1-5% of iron cations and find that the room temperature ferromagnetism of films prepared by pulsed-laser deposition is not due to magnetic ordering of the iron. The films are neither dilute magnetic semiconductors nor hosts to an iron-based ferromagnetic impurity phase. A new model is developed for defect-related ferromagnetism, which involves a spin-split defect band populated by charge transfer from a proximate charge reservoir—in the present case a mixture of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions in the oxide lattice. The phase diagram for the model shows how inhomogeneous Stoner ferromagnetism depends on the total number of electrons Ntot, the Stoner exchange integral I and the defect bandwidth W; the band occupancy is governed by the d-d Coulomb interaction U. There are regions of ferromagnetic metal, half-metal and insulator as well as non-magnetic metal and insulator. A characteristic feature of the high-temperature Stoner magnetism is an anhysteretic magnetization curve, which is practically temperature independent below room temperature. This is related to a wandering ferromagnetic axis, which is determined by local dipole fields. The magnetization is limited by the defect concentration, not by the 3d doping. Only 1-2% of the volume of the films is magnetically ordered.

  20. FY2010 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Miller, Erin A.; Hatarik, R.

    2011-01-01

    This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Future work will include a follow-up measurement scheduled for December 2010 at LBNL. Lessons learned from the July 2010 measurements will be incorporated into these new measurements. Analysis of both the July and December experiments will be completed in a few months. A research paper to be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal will be drafted if the conclusions from the measurements warrant publication.

  1. Two-Dimensional Phosphorus Oxides as Energy and Information Materials.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-07-18

    Phosphorene is a rising star in electronics. Recently, 2D phosphorus oxides with higher stability have been synthesized. In this study, we theoretically explored the structures and properties of 2D phosphorus oxides. We found that the structural features of Px Oy vary with the oxygen content. When the oxygen content is low, the most stable Px Oy material can be obtained by the adsorption of O atoms on phosphorene. Otherwise, stable structures are no longer based on phosphorene and will contain P-O-P motifs. We found that P4 O4 has a direct band gap (about 2.24 eV), good optical absorption, and high stability in water, so it may be suitable for photochemical water splitting. P2 O3 adopts two possible stable ferroelectric structures (P2 O3 -I and P2 O3 -II) with electric polarization perpendicular and parallel to the lateral plane, respectively, as the lowest-energy configurations, depending on the layer thickness. We propose that P2 O3 could be used in novel nanoscale multiple-state memory devices. PMID:27383028

  2. Structural silicon nitride materials containing rare earth oxides

    DOEpatents

    Andersson, Clarence A.

    1980-01-01

    A ceramic composition suitable for use as a high-temperature structural material, particularly for use in apparatus exposed to oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures of 400 to 1600.degree. C., is found within the triangular area ABCA of the Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 --SiO.sub.2 --M.sub.2 O.sub.3 ternary diagram depicted in FIG. 1. M is selected from the group of Yb, Dy, Er, Sc, and alloys having Yb, Y, Er, or Dy as one component and Sc, Al, Cr, Ti, (Mg +Zr) or (Ni+Zr) as a second component, said alloy having an effective ionic radius less than 0.89 A.

  3. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy.

  4. HIGH-TEMPEPATURE OXIDATION AND CORROSION OF MATERIALS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of this program is to gain an understanding of the corrosion chemistry and materials behavior in high temperature environments. Of particular interest are the mechanisms of attack in environments containing more than one reactive species, for example sulfur and oxygen. Sulfur is a critical impurity in almost all energy sources and leads to accelerated, and often unacceptable rates of metal degradation. In addition, the competitive formation of potentially more than one phase as a reaction product is an important fundamental problem, and can only be truly understood if the underlying thermodynamic and transport properties of the systems, and their interrelation, are identified. Sulfur can appear in a number of forms. In entirely gaseous environments it can appear as H{sub Z}S when the oxidizing potential of the atmosphere is low, such as might exist in energy conversion systems, or as SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} at higher oxygen potentials, such as those produced by fuel combustion. It may also appear in sulfatic deposits, either as a solid, such as CaSO{sub 4} in fluidized bed combustion systems, as inorganic and organic sulfur compounds in coal char, or as a liquid alkali-metal sulfate in coal-ash, or turbine-blade deposits. This last year has been spent primarily in establishing the typical behavioral patterns of common materials in these types of environments, and identifying the common mechanisms. In addition, development of definitive models of alloy reactions with single oxidants has continued. The individual projects are described.

  5. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-09-30

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study were perovskite oxides based on substituted LaFeO{sub 3} (P1 compositions), where significant data in single cell tests exist at PNNL for example, for La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ. The materials selection was then extended to La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions (K1 compositions), and then in a longer range task we evaluated the possibility of completely unexplored group of materials that are also perovskite related, the ABM{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}. A key component of the research strategy was to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. In the initial phase, we did this in parallel with

  6. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  7. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  8. DOE nuclear material packaging manual: storage container requirements for plutonium oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, D Kirk

    2009-01-01

    Loss of containment of nuclear material stored in containers such as food-pack cans, paint cans, or taped slip lid cans has generated concern about packaging requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials in working facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In response, DOE has recently issued DOE M 441.1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual' with encouragement from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. A unique feature compared to transportation containers is the allowance of filters to vent flammable gases during storage. Defining commonly used concepts such as maximum allowable working pressure and He leak rate criteria become problematic when considering vented containers. Los Alamos has developed a set of container requirements that are in compliance with 441.1 based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide. The pre and post drop-test He leak rates depend upon container size as well as the material contents. For containers that are routinely handled, ease of handling and weight are a major consideration. Relatively thin-walled containers with flat bottoms are desired yet they cannot be He leak tested at a differential pressure of one atmosphere due to the potential for plastic deformation of the flat bottom during testing. The He leak rates and He leak testing configuration for containers designed for plutonium bearing materials will be presented. The approach to meeting the other manual requirements such as corrosion and thermal degradation resistance will be addressed. The information presented can be used by other sites to evaluate if their conditions are bounded by LANL requirements when considering procurement of 441.1 compliant containers.

  9. Photocatalytic oxidation of VOC, nitrogen oxide and atrazine using titanium dioxide modified with perovskite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajifdar, Kayzad Jimmy

    Photocatalysis utilizes near-UV or visible light to break down organic pollutants into innocuous compounds at room temperatures and has gained much attention in air and water pollution control. Chapter 1 introduces the use of semiconducting optical crystals as an additive to a photocatalyst. The perovskite optical material BaTiO3 (band gap of 3.7-3.8 eV) is found to increase VOC destruction when black light is used. The best composition found is 0.1 wt% BaTiO3 with the balance being TiO2. This photocatalyst increases perchloroethylene (PCE) conversion by 12% to 32% for space times between 1.4 and 17.2 seconds and inlet concentrations of 40 to 130 ppm with a 4 W black light. The average enhancement is approximately 25%. For butyraldehyde conversion the maximum enhancement is 20% at 130 ppm in 3.6 seconds. The UV/Vis spectroscopy data indicate a lower absorbance with the additive. The reaction parameters studied are space velocity, inlet concentration and light source. Oxidation by-products are identified using a GCMS. Chapter 2 introduces photocatalysis as an emerging green technology for environmental protection to oxidize NOx. The experimental results indicate that the coating of photocatalytic materials on concrete pavements can harvest the light energy for NOx pollution control. The photocatalytic coating has the potential to reduce NOx concentration in the atmosphere economically, nearly maintenance-free. NOx will be oxidized to nitric acid, neutralized by the alkaline base materials in concrete, and washed away by rain. The reduction in the number of high ozone days can be significant to allow sustainable economic developments in the many ozone-non-attainment areas worldwide. One of the foci will be pavement coated with photocatalysts enhanced with perovskites/ferroelectric optical crystals such as BaTiO3 via increased transmission/scattering and electron-hole pair stabilization. The developed technology can be transferred to the cement and coating industries

  10. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Mark R.; Soderholm, Lynda

    The recent availability of synchrotron radiation has revolutionized actinide chemistry. This is particularly true in environmental studies, where heterogeneous samples add to the already multifaceted chemistry exhibited by these ions. Environmental samples are often inhomogeneous, chemically diverse, and amorphous or poorly crystalline. Even surrogates prepared in the laboratory to simplify the natural complexity are plagued by multiple oxidation state and varied coordination polyhedra that are a reflection of inherent 5f chemistry. For example, plutonium can be found as Pu3+ Pu4+ Pu(V)O2 +, and Pu(VI)O2 2 + within naturally occurring pH-Eh conditions, consequently complex equilibria are found between these oxidation states in one solution. In addition, dissolved actinides have significant affinities for various mineral surfaces, to which they can adsorb with or without concomitant reduction-oxidation (redox) activity, depending on details of the solution and surface conditions.

  11. Actinide chemistry in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, M. T.; Burnett, D. S.

    1987-04-01

    Fission track radiography is used to investigate the U and Th microscale distribution in a set of Allende-meteorite Ca-Al-rich inclusions. In the Type B inclusions, the major phases melilite and fassaite are important actinide host phases, and on the rims of Type B inclusions and throughout all other inclusions studied, perovskite is the dominant actinide host phase. Results suggest that neither alteration nor loss or gain of an actinide-rich phase appears to have been an important Th/U fractionation mechanism, and that volatility differences may be the dominant factor. Th/U and rare earth element abundance patterns for the spinel and perovskite rim suggest rim formation by volatilization of interior material, and within the constraints of the brief time scale required for this heating, several mechanisms for spinel-perovskite rim formation are possible.

  12. Actinide chemistry in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrell, M. T.; Burnett, D. S.

    1987-01-01

    Fission track radiography is used to investigate the U and Th microscale distribution in a set of Allende-meteorite Ca-Al-rich inclusions. In the Type B inclusions, the major phases melilite and fassaite are important actinide host phases, and on the rims of Type B inclusions and throughout all other inclusions studied, perovskite is the dominant actinide host phase. Results suggest that neither alteration nor loss or gain of an actinide-rich phase appears to have been an important Th/U fractionation mechanism, and that volatility differences may be the dominant factor. Th/U and rare earth element abundance patterns for the spinel and perovskite rim suggest rim formation by volatilization of interior material, and within the constraints of the brief time scale required for this heating, several mechanisms for spinel-perovskite rim formation are possible.

  13. Experimental study of compatibility of reduced metal oxides with thermal energy storage lining materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Danish, Syed Noman; Al-Ansary, Hany; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    Solid particles have been shown to be able to operate at temperatures higher than 1000 °C in concentrated solar power (CSP) systems with thermal energy storage (TES). Thermochemical energy storage (TCES) using metal oxides have also found to be advantageous over sensible and latent heat storage concepts. This paper investigates the compatibility of the inner lining material of a TES tank with the reduced metal oxide. Two candidate metal oxides are investigated against six candidate lining materials. XRD results for both the materials are investigated and compared before and after the reduction of metal oxide at 1000°C in the presence of lining material. It is found that the lining material rich in zirconia is suitable for such application. Silicon Carbide is also found non-reacting with one of the metal oxides so it needs to be further investigated with other candidate metal oxides.

  14. Features of the Thermodynamics of Trivalent Lanthanide/Actinide Distribution Reactions by Tri-n-Octylphosphine Oxide and Bis(2-EthylHexyl) Phosphoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Travis S. Grimes; Peter R. Zalupski

    2014-11-01

    A new methodology has been developed to study the thermochemical features of the biphasic transfer reactions of trisnitrato complexes of lanthanides and americium by a mono-functional solvating ligand (tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide - TOPO). Stability constants for successive nitrato complexes (M(NO3)x3-x (aq) where M is Eu3+, Am3+ or Cm3+) were determined to assist in the calculation of the extraction constant, Kex, for the metal ions under study. Enthalpies of extraction (?Hextr) for the lanthanide series (excluding Pm3+) and Am3+ by TOPO have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The observed ?Hextr were found to be constant at ~29 kJ mol-1across the series from La3+-Er3+, with a slight decrease observed from Tm3+-Lu3+. These heats were found to be consistent with enthalpies determined using van ’t Hoff analysis of temperature dependent extraction studies. A complete set of thermodynamic parameters (?G, ?H, ?S) was calculated for Eu(NO3)3, Am(NO3)3 and Cm(NO3)3 extraction by TOPO and Am3+ and Cm3+ extraction by bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP). A discussion comparing the energetics of these systems is offered. The measured biphasic extraction heats for the transplutonium elements, ?Hextr, presented in these studies are the first ever direct measurements offered using two-phase calorimetric techniques.

  15. Actinides and Life's Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uranium- and thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3rd by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  16. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  17. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald T.

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  18. Evaluation of actinide biosorption by microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional methods for removing metals from aqueous solutions include chemical precipitation, chemical oxidation or reduction, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrochemical treatment and evaporation. The removal of radionuclides from aqueous waste streams has largely relied on ion exchange methods which can be prohibitively costly given increasingly stringent regulatory effluent limits. The use of microbial cells as biosorbants for heavy metals offers a potential alternative to existing methods for decontamination or recovery of heavy metals from a variety of industrial waste streams and contaminated ground waters. The toxicity and the extreme and variable conditions present in many radionuclide containing waste streams may preclude the use of living microorganisms and favor the use of non-living biomass for the removal of actinides from these waste streams. In the work presented here, we have examined the biosorption of uranium by non-living, non-metabolizing microbial biomass thus avoiding the problems associated with living systems. We are investigating biosorption with the long term goal of developing microbial technologies for the remediation of actinides.

  19. Ethylene oxide-block-butylene oxide copolymer uptake by silicone hydrogel contact lens materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yuchen; Ketelson, Howard; Perry, Scott S.

    2013-05-01

    Four major types of silicone hydrogel contact lens material have been investigated following treatments in aqueous solutions containing poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(butylenes oxide) block copolymer (EO-BO). The extent of lens surface modification by EO-BO and the degree of bulk uptake were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), respectively. The experimental results suggest that different interaction models exist for the lenses, highlighting the influence of both surface and bulk composition, which greatly differs between the lenses examined. Specifically, lenses with hydrophilic surface treatments, i.e., PureVision® (balafilcon A) and O2OPTIX (lotrafilcon B), demonstrated strong evidence of preferential surface adsorption within the near-surface region. In comparison, surface adsorption on ACUVUE® Oasys® (senofilcon A) and Biofinity® (comfilcon A) was limited. As for bulk absorption, the amount of EO-BO uptake was the greatest for balafilcon A and comfilcon A, and least for lotrafilcon B. These findings confirm the presence of molecular concentration gradients within the silicone hydrogel lenses following exposure to EO-BO solutions, with the nature of such concentration gradients found to be lens-specific. Together, the results suggest opportunities for compositional modifications of lenses for improved performance via solution treatments containing surface-active agents.

  20. Features of the thermodynamics of trivalent lanthanide/actinide distribution reactions by tri-n-octylphosphine oxide and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Travis S; Zalupski, Peter R; Martin, Leigh R

    2014-11-01

    A new methodology has been developed to study the thermochemical features of the biphasic transfer reactions of trisnitrato complexes of lanthanides and americium by a monofunctional solvating ligand (tri-n-octylphosphine oxide, TOPO). Stability constants for successive nitrato complexes (M(NO3)x(3-x)(aq) where M is Eu(3+), Am(3+), or Cm(3+)) were determined to assist in the calculation of the extraction constant, K(ex), for the metal ions under study. Enthalpies of extraction (ΔH(extr)) for the lanthanide series (excluding Pm(3+)) and Am(3+) by TOPO have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The observed ΔH(extr) were found to be constant at ~29 kJ mol(-1) across the series from La(3+) to Er(3+), with a slight decrease observed from Tm(3+) to Lu(3+). These heats were found to be consistent with enthalpies determined using van't Hoff analysis of temperature dependent extraction studies. A complete set of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) was calculated for Eu(NO3)3, Am(NO3)3, and Cm(NO3)3 extraction by TOPO and Am(3+) and Cm(3+) extraction by bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP). A discussion comparing the energetics of these systems is offered. The measured biphasic extraction heats for the transplutonium elements, ΔH(extr), presented in these studies are the first ever direct measurements offered using two-phase calorimetric techniques. PMID:25315891

  1. Oxidation and degradation of graphitic materials by naphthalene-degrading bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Zhu, Chunlin; Fan, Mengmeng; Chen, Chuntao; Huang, Yang; Hao, Qingli; Yang, Jiazhi; Wang, Haiyan; Sun, Dongping

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, biologically oxidizing graphitic materials is of great importance for practical applications as an eco-friendly and low-cost method. In this work, a bacterial strain is isolated from the contaminated soil in a graphite mine and its ability to oxidize graphite, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is confirmed. After being cultivated with bacteria, graphite is inhomogeneously oxidized, and moreover oxidized sheets exfoliated from graphite are detected in the medium. RGO shows a higher degree of oxidation compared to graphite owing to more original defects, while GO breaks into small pieces and becomes full of holes. Both the holes in GO and the exfoliated sheets from graphite caused by bacteria have a size of below 1 μm, in agreement with the size of bacterial cells. Besides, the preliminary mechanism of the bacterial oxidation is explored, suggesting that the contact between bacterial cells and materials promotes the oxidation of graphitic materials. The ability of naphthalene-degrading bacteria to oxidize and degrade the graphitic materials shows the potential for producing GO in an eco-friendly way and degrading carbon nanomaterials in the environment.Nowadays, biologically oxidizing graphitic materials is of great importance for practical applications as an eco-friendly and low-cost method. In this work, a bacterial strain is isolated from the contaminated soil in a graphite mine and its ability to oxidize graphite, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is confirmed. After being cultivated with bacteria, graphite is inhomogeneously oxidized, and moreover oxidized sheets exfoliated from graphite are detected in the medium. RGO shows a higher degree of oxidation compared to graphite owing to more original defects, while GO breaks into small pieces and becomes full of holes. Both the holes in GO and the exfoliated sheets from graphite caused by bacteria have a size of below 1 μm, in agreement with the size of bacterial

  2. FINAL REPORT. ACTINIDE-SPECIFIC INTERFACIAL CHEMISTRY OF MONOLAYER COATED MESOPOROUS CERAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program was the design, synthesis and evaluation of high-efficiency, high-capacity sorbent materials capable of selectively sequestering actinides and other radionuclides from complex aqueous mixtures. Self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS)...

  3. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  4. Investigation of the reactivity of carbonaceous materials in liquid and gaseous oxidizing media

    SciTech Connect

    Cherednik, E.M.; Butyrin, G.M.; Chirkina, A.P.; Mashkovich, L.A.; Kuteinikov, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Constructional materials based on carbon are being used even more widely in various sectors of science and technology where they are subjected to the action of high temperatures, and also to aggressive liquid and gaseous media. The tendency of carbonaceous materials, especially synthetic graphites, to undergo oxidation frequently determines the possibility of their employment under concrete conditions of use. In the reported study, a comparative analysis has been made of experimental results on the liquid- and gas-phase oxidation of a wide range of carbon-containing materials with different porosities and chemical structures. Some general laws of the oxidation of carbon by various oxidizing agents have been deduced. 17 refs.

  5. New cubic structure compounds as actinide host phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Livshits, T. S.

    2010-03-01

    structure oxide as an extra phase have leach and radiation resistance similar to the other well-known actinide waste forms.

  6. Actinide Speciation and Solubility in a Salt Repository (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D.; Borkowski, M.; Richmann, M.; Lucchini, J.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J.

    2009-12-01

    The use of bedded salt deposits for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste continues to receive much attention in the United States and internationally. This is largely based on the highly successful Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transuranic waste repository that was opened in 1999 in Southeastern New Mexico. A bedded salt formation, such as the one in which the WIPP is located, has many advantages that make it an ideal geology for permanent disposal of nuclear waste. This includes well established mining techniques, self-sealing that lead to a naturally-induced geologic isolation, a relatively dry environment, and a favorable chemistry. Herein we report on recent progress in our investigations, as part of ongoing recertification effort for the operating WIPP repository, to establish the redox distribution and overall solubility of actinides in brine. The overall ranking of actinides, from the perspective of potential contribution to release from the WIPP, is: Pu ~ Am >>U > Th >> Np, Cm. Our recent research emphasis has centered on the redox chemistry of multivalent actinides (e.g., U, Pu and Np) with the use of oxidation-state-invariant analogs (Th and Nd) to establish the solubilities. Under a wide range of conditions investigated, the predominant oxidation states established are Pu(III) and Pu(IV) for plutonium, U(IV) and U(VI) for uranium, and Am (III) for americium. Reduction pathways for plutonium include reaction with organics, reaction with reduced iron, and bioreduction by halophiles under anaerobic conditions. Uranium(VI) can also be reduced to U(IV) by reduced iron and microbial processes. Solubility data for neodymium (+3 analog), Uranium (+6 analog) and thorium (+4 analog) in brine are also reported. These data extend our past understanding of WIPP-specific actinide chemistry and show the WIPP, and salt-based repositories in general, to be a robust repository design from the perspective of actinide containment and immobilization.

  7. Cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2014-01-28

    Novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials are disclosed that operate at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes based on oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  8. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-04-28

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  9. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2014-09-16

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  10. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-22

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  11. High-temperature oxidation and corrosion of materials program

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    Research progress is reported in the behavior of metals and alloys in gas mixtures at high temperature, corrosion mechanisms in complex environments of low oxidizing potential, hot corrosion of nickel-base alloys at intermediate temperatures, corrosion of solid sulfate deposits, adherence of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide films, oxidation behavior of a two-phase alloy Fe-44% Cu, and formation of subscales of varying composition. (FS)

  12. Metal Oxide/Graphene Composites for Supercapacitive Electrode Materials.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Baek, Seungmin; Lee, Seungyeol; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2016-04-01

    Graphene composites with metal or metal oxide nanoparticles have been extensively investigated owing to their potential applications in the fields of fuel cells, batteries, sensing, solar cells, and catalysis. Among them, much research has focused on supercapacitor applications and have come close to realization. Composites include monometal oxides of cobalt, nickel, manganese, and iron, as well as their binary and ternary oxides. In addition, their morphological control and hybrid systems of carbon nanotubes have also been investigated. This review presents the current trends in research on metal oxide/graphene composites for supercapacitors. Furthermore, methods are suggested to improve the properties of electrochemical capacitor electrodes. PMID:27061763

  13. Alloy Films Deposited by Electroplating as Precursors for Protective Oxide Coatings on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Metallic Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher; Gemmen, R.S.; Cross, Caleb

    2006-10-01

    The successful development of stainless steel interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) may be the materials breakthrough that makes SOFC technology truly commercial. Many of the ferritic stainless steels, however, suffer from a relatively high area specific resistance (ASR) after long exposure times at temperature and the Cr in the native oxide can evaporate and contaminate other cell components. Conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. In the present study electrochemical deposition of binary alloys followed by oxidation of the alloy to form protective and conductive oxide layers is examined. Results are presented for the deposition of Mn/Co and Fe/Ni alloys via electroplating to form a precursor for spinel oxide coating formation. Analysis of the alloy coatings is done by SEM, EDS and XRD.

  14. Electrically conducting ternary amorphous fully oxidized materials and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giauque, Pierre (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc (Inventor); Gasser, Stefan M. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta A. (Inventor); Cherry, Hillary (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Electrically active devices are formed using a special conducting material of the form Tm--Ox mixed with SiO2 where the materials are immiscible. The immiscible materials are forced together by using high energy process to form an amorphous phase of the two materials. The amorphous combination of the two materials is electrically conducting but forms an effective barrier.

  15. Increased corrosion resistance of stent materials by converting current surface film of polycrystalline oxide into amorphous oxide.

    PubMed

    Shih, C C; Lin, S J; Chung, K H; Chen, Y L; Su, Y Y

    2000-11-01

    Current efforts of new stent technology have been aimed largely at the improvement of intravascular stent biocompatibility. Among the chemical characteristics of metallic stents, surface oxide corrosion properties are paramount. Using our unique technique, the currently marketed 316 L stainless steel and nitinol stent wires covered with polycrystalline oxide were chemically etched and then passivated to form amorphous oxide. Excellent metallic-stent corrosion resistance with an amorphous oxide surface was demonstrated in our previous in vitro study. For in vivo validation, we compared the corrosion behavior of different oxide surfaces on various forms of test wires in the abdominal aorta of mongrel dogs using open-circuit potential and cyclic anodic polarization measurements. After conduction, the retrieved test wires were observed under scanning electron microscope. No passivity breakdown was found for wires covered with amorphous oxide, while wires with polycrystalline oxide showed breakdown at potentials between +0.2 to + 0.6 V. It has been proven that severe pitting or crevice corrosion occurred on the surface of polycrystalline oxide, while the surface of amorphous oxide was free of degradations in our experiment. We have demonstrated that this amorphous oxide coating on metallic material provides better corrosion resistance, not only in vitro but also in vivo, and it is superior not only in strength safety but also in medical device biocompatibility. PMID:10951371

  16. Internal contamination by actinides after wounding: a robust rodent model for assessment of local and distant actinide retention.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, N M; Wilk, J C; Abram, M C; Renault, D; Chau, Q; Helfer, N; Guichet, C; Van der Meeren, A

    2012-08-01

    Internal contamination by actinides following wounding may occur in nuclear fuel industry workers or subsequent to terrorist activities, causing dissemination of radioactive elements. Contamination by alpha particle emitting actinides can result in pathological effects, either local or distant from the site of entry. The objective of the present study was to develop a robust experimental approach in the rat for short- and long- term actinide contamination following wounding by incision of the skin and muscles of the hind limb. Anesthetized rats were contaminated with Mixed OXide (MOX, uranium, plutonium oxides containing 7.1% plutonium) or plutonium nitrate (Pu nitrate) following wounding by deep incision of the hind leg. Actinide excretion and tissue levels were measured as well as histological changes from 2 h to 3 mo. Humid swabs were used for rapid evaluation of contamination levels and proved to be an initial guide for contamination levels. Although the activity transferred from wound to blood is higher after contamination with a moderately soluble form of plutonium (nitrate), at 7 d most of the MOX (98%) or Pu nitrate (87%) was retained at the wound site. Rapid actinide retention in liver and bone was observed within 24 h, which increased up to 3 mo. After MOX contamination, a more rapid initial urinary excretion of americium was observed compared with plutonium. At 3 mo, around 95% of activity remained at the wound site, and excretion of Pu and Am was extremely low. This experimental approach could be applied to other situations involving contamination following wounding including rupture of the dermal, vascular, and muscle barriers. PMID:22951478

  17. Separations of actinides, lanthanides and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ensor, Dale D.

    1995-01-01

    An organic extracting solution comprised of a bis(acylpyrazolone or a substituted bis(acylpyrazolone) and an extraction method useful for separating certain elements of the actinide series of the periodic table having a valence of four from one other, and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also useful for separating hexavalent actinides from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals.

  18. Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1996-01-27

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale.

  19. Characterization of actinide metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K.; Sueki, K.; Zhao, Y.-L.; Haba, H.; Tsukada, K.; Kodama, T.; Kikuchi, K.; Ohtsuki, T.; Nagame, Y.; Nakahara, H.; Katada, M.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, the characterization of a number of actinoid metallofullerenes is reported. From the similarity of the HPLC elution behavior and identification by mass spectroscopy we observe that the electronic structures of U, Np, and Am metallofullerenes are extremely similar to that of Ce@C82 and that the oxidation states of encapsulated Th and Pa have the value +3 or 4.

  20. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M. J.; Bruycker, F. De; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R. J. M.; Manara, D.

    2012-06-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs remote laser heating under controlled atmosphere and fast pyrometry. This technique circumvents problems encountered by more traditional heating techniques, in particular, the reaction between sample and containment at temperatures beyond 2500 K. In addition, only a small amount of sample material is required, which is an advantage with respect to the radioactivity and limited availability of neptunium. The NpO2 melting/freezing temperature has been measured to be 3070 K ± 62 K, much higher than previous values (around 2830 K) obtained by more traditional thermal analysis methods. The large amount of experimental data collected allowed a consistent statistical analysis. It seems likely, although not fully evident from the present results, that the high oxygen potential at temperatures around melting leads to a slightly hypo-stoichiometric congruent melting composition, as already observed in other actinide (ThO2, PuO2) and lanthanide oxides (e.g., CeO2). Finally, a recently developed phase-field model was used for the simulation of the observed thermograms, allowing a deeper insight in material properties that are difficult to directly measure. For example, a polaron contribution to the high-temperature thermal conductivity, well accepted for the commonly studied actinide oxide UO2, is shown here to likely be present in NpO2.

  1. Zinc-oxide-based nanostructured materials for heterostructure solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A. Somov, P. A.; Terukov, E. I.

    2015-10-15

    Results obtained in the deposition of nanostructured zinc-oxide layers by hydrothermal synthesis as the basic method are presented. The possibility of controlling the structure and morphology of the layers is demonstrated. The important role of the procedure employed to form the nucleating layer is noted. The faceted hexagonal nanoprisms obtained are promising for the fabrication of solar cells based on oxide heterostructures, and aluminum-doped zinc-oxide layers with petal morphology, for the deposition of an antireflection layer. The results are compatible and promising for application in flexible electronics.

  2. Method of making bearing materials. [self-lubricating, oxidation resistant composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for making a composite material which provides low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact. The composite material which is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure and a fluorine salt component which provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  3. Aqueous processing of actinides at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    A number of changes affecting the DP-Complex are having an impact on operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In order for SRS to continue as a major contributor within the DP-Complex and remain in position to respond to requests based on new initiatives, programs aimed at redirecting the actinide processing activities have been started. One area undergoing process modifications is F-Canyon, where most of the plutonium feedstocks are processed. Programs already underway that are affecting the dissolution of plutonium materials in canyon dissolvers and the purification of aqueous streams in the second plutonium solvent extraction cycle are discussed. Issues influencing program direction involve environmental concerns, waste minimization, health protection, storage limitations, and material recycle. Each of these issues is discussed in relation to operations in F-Canyon and results based on initial development studies are presented.

  4. Electrochemical decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Lugo, J.L.; Wedman, D.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1997-12-31

    Electrochemical technology for the decontamination of metallic surfaces has been successfully demonstrated. Highly enriched uranium and stainless steel surfaces are readily decontaminated to Low Level Waste (LLW) criteria using this process. This process is similar to electropolishing and utilizes the anodic dissolution of the substrate material to generate a clean surface. The surface contaminants are thus removed and collected along with the stripped substrate material as a compact precipitate. This separation allows the electrolyte to be recycled indefinitely. Using an alkaline Sodium Sulfate electrolyte solution, we are able to decontaminate to low levels of alpha activity, gloveboxes previously used in Actinide processing. Surfaces with contamination levels > 1,000,000 cpm alpha activity have been decontaminated to levels as low as 7,000. The process is rapid with decontamination occurring at a rate of over 3 square cm/sec.

  5. Alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Processing and interactions of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Armstrong, T.R.; Chick, L.A.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnections and electrodes with improved electrical, thermal, and electrochemical properties. The overall approach for this research and development is to: minimize the number of cations in the electrode, electrolyte, and interconnection by developing yttrium compounds, such as Y(Ca)CrO{sub 3} as the interconnection, and Y(M{prime})MnO{sub 3} as the air electrode; develop advanced synthesis and fabrication processes for air sintering, below 1,500 C, of chromite interconnections through (1) the use of sintering aids; and (2) the synthesis of submicrometer powders; establish methods for the simultaneous processing and consolidation of air-sinterable powders; electrochemically evaluate interface reactions (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) for both the alternate and state-of-the-art materials and cell components developed under this program; and evaluate the chemical reactivity and interdiffusion effects that take place between the various fuel cell components: electrolyte/cathode, interconnect/cathode, and interconnect/anode. This paper describes a comprehensive study that assessed the processing of air-sinterable chromites, the sintering mechanism of chromites, and the chemical reactivity and interdiffusional effects between the interconnect, air, and fuel electrodes. Materials evaluated were La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.31}CrO{sub 3}, La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.29}CrO{sub 3}, (Y{sub 0.6}Ca{sub 0.4}){sub 1.05}Cr{sub 0.95}O{sub 3}, La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}, La{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}, Y{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}, and Y{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}.

  6. Acceleration factors for oxidative aging of polymeric materials by oxygen detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Skutnik, Julie Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Three methods that were used to measure the chemical changes associated with oxidative degradation of polymeric materials are presented. The first method is based on the nuclear activation of {sup 18}O in an elastomer that was thermally aged in an {sup 18}O{sub 2} atmosphere. Second, the alcohol groups in a thermally aged elastomer were derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and their concentration measured via {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy. Finally, a respirometer was used to directly measure the oxidative rates of a polyurethane foam as a function of aging temperature. The measurement of the oxidation rates enabled acceleration factors for oxidative degradation of these materials to be calculated.

  7. Fabrication of superconducting metal-oxide textiles by heating impregnated polymeric material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Sype, J.S.

    1993-07-13

    A process is described for producing crystalline fibers, textiles or shapes comprised of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] where x varies from about 0 to about 0.4, said process comprising: (a) impregnating a preformed organic polymeric material with three metal compounds to provide metal elements in said material in substantially the atomic ratio occurring in said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; (b) heating said impregnated material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere containing from about 0.05% to about 2% oxygen by volume to a temperature sufficiently high to at least partially pyrolize and oxidize said organic material and at least partially oxidize said metal compounds substantially without ignition of said organic material and without formation of a molten phase or reaching a decomposition temperature of said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; and (c) cooling the resulting material in at least a moderately oxidizing atmosphere to room temperature so as to obtain said fibers, textiles or shapes.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-11-20

    In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

  9. Novel diluted magnetic semiconductor materials based on zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Deepayan

    The primary aim of this work was to develop a ZnO based diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) materials system which displays ferromagnetism above room temperature and to understand the origin of long-range ferromagnetic ordering in these systems. Recent developments in the field of spintronics (spin based electronics) have led to an extensive search for materials in which semiconducting properties can be integrated with magnetic properties to realize the objective of successful fabrication of spin-based devices. For these devices we require a high efficiency of spin current injection at room temperature. Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) can serve this role, but they should not only display room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) but also be capable of generating spin polarized carriers. Transition metal doped ZnO has proved to be a potential candidate as a DMS showing RTFM. The origin of ferromagnetic ordering in ZnO is still under debate. However, the presence of magnetic secondary phases, composition fluctuations and nanoclusters could also explain the observation of ferromagnetism in the DMS samples. This encouraged us to investigate Cu-doped(+ spin in the 2+ valence state) ZnO system as a probable candidate exhibiting RTFM because neither metallic Cu nor its oxides (Cu2O or CuO) are ferromagnetic. The role of defects and free carriers on the ferromagnetic ordering of Cu-doped ZnO thin films was studied to ascertain the origin of ferromagnetism in this system. A novel non-equilibrium Pulsed Laser Deposition technique has been used to grow high quality epitaxial thin films of Cu:ZnO and (Co,Cu):ZnO on c-plane Sapphire by domain matching epitxay. Both the systems showed ferromagnetic ordering above 300K but Cu ions showed a much stronger ferromagnetic ordering than Co, especially at low concentrations (1-2%) of Cu where we realized near 100% polarization. But, the incorporation of Cu resulted in a 2-order of magnitude rise in the resistivity from 10-1 to 101

  10. Silicon carbide as an oxidation-resistant high-temperature material. 1: Oxidation and heat corrosion behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, J.

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation and corrosion behavior of SiC (in the form of a SiC powder) and hot-pressed and reaction-bound material were studied. The excellent stability of SiC in an oxidizing atmosphere is due to the development of protective SiO2 coatings. Any changes in these protective layers (e.g., due to impurities, reaction with corrosive media, high porosity of SiC, etc.) lead in most cases to increased rates of oxidation and thus restrict the field of SiC application.

  11. Localized photoelectrochemistry on a tungsten oxide-iron oxide thin film material library.

    PubMed

    Kollender, Jan Philipp; Mardare, Andrei Ionut; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2013-12-01

    A WO3-Fe2O3 thin film combinatorial library was fabricated using a vapor phase co-deposition method followed by a combined thermal annealing and oxidation process. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the library microstructure combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations suggested that α-Fe2O3 grains preferentially grow from boundaries of domains, containing finer grains of WO3 and Fe2WO6, forming filiform networks on the surface. The surface density of the hematite networks depends on the amount of Fe present in the library. Photocurrents measured at different applied biases using Photo Electrochemical Scanning Droplet Cell Microscopy (PE-SDCM) were analyzed and mapped along the entire compositional spread. A distinctive photocurrent peak was detected at 21.9 atom % Fe, and its appearance was correlated to the higher amount of hematite present in the library at this specific composition together with a specific WO3 crystallographic orientation ((222) orthorhombic or (400) monoclinic). This finding is confirmed by qualitative and quantitative XPS surface analysis at the photocurrent peak position in the material library. Thus the enhancement of the photocurrent cannot be exclusively attributed to certain surface modifications since only hematite was found on the library surface at the peak composition. PMID:24151796

  12. High temperature materials synthesis without heat: Oxide layer growth on electronic materials using high-kinetic-energy atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffbauer, M.A.; Cross, J.B.; Archuleta, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors examined thin-film materials-synthesis processes in which chemical reactions are initiated using high-kinetic-energy neutral atomic species instead of high temperatures. The research is aimed at producing device-quality insulating oxide layers on semiconductor materials. Thick, uniform, and fully oxidized insulating layers of unprecedented quality are formed on gallium arsenide by exposure of wafer substrates to a high kinetic-energy ({approximately}3eV) neutral atomic-oxygen beam. The nonthermal oxidation process does not disrupt the crystalline order of the substrate and no detectable elemental arsenic is produced at the oxide/gallium arsenide interface.

  13. Recent Developments in p-Type Oxide Semiconductor Materials and Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenwei; Nayak, Pradipta K; Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus A; Alshareef, Husam N

    2016-05-01

    The development of transparent p-type oxide semiconductors with good performance may be a true enabler for a variety of applications where transparency, power efficiency, and greater circuit complexity are needed. Such applications include transparent electronics, displays, sensors, photovoltaics, memristors, and electrochromics. Hence, here, recent developments in materials and devices based on p-type oxide semiconductors are reviewed, including ternary Cu-bearing oxides, binary copper oxides, tin monoxide, spinel oxides, and nickel oxides. The crystal and electronic structures of these materials are discussed, along with approaches to enhance valence-band dispersion to reduce effective mass and increase mobility. Strategies to reduce interfacial defects, off-state current, and material instability are suggested. Furthermore, it is shown that promising progress has been made in the performance of various types of devices based on p-type oxides. Several innovative approaches exist to fabricate transparent complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, including novel device fabrication schemes and utilization of surface chemistry effects, resulting in good inverter gains. However, despite recent developments, p-type oxides still lag in performance behind their n-type counterparts, which have entered volume production in the display market. Recent successes along with the hurdles that stand in the way of commercial success of p-type oxide semiconductors are presented. PMID:26879813

  14. "Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes"

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2007-03-07

    We will present our recent studies on computational actinide chemistry of complexes which are not only interesting from the standpoint of actinide coordination chemistry but also of relevance to environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes. We will be discussing our recent collaborative efforts with Professor Heino Nitsche of LBNL whose research group has been actively carrying out experimental studies on these species. Computations of actinide complexes are also quintessential to our understanding of the complexes found in geochemical, biochemical environments and actinide chemistry relevant to advanced nuclear systems. In particular we have been studying uranyl, plutonyl, and Cm(III) complexes are in aqueous solution. These studies are made with a variety of relativistic methods such as coupled cluster methods, DFT, and complete active space multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by large-scale CI computations and relativistic CI (RCI) computations up to 60 million configurations. Our computational studies on actinide complexes were motivated by ongoing EXAFS studies of speciated complexes in geo and biochemical environments carried out by Prof Heino Nitsche's group at Berkeley, Dr. David Clark at Los Alamos and Dr. Gibson's work on small actinide molecules at ORNL. The hydrolysis reactions of urnayl, neputyl and plutonyl complexes have received considerable attention due to their geochemical and biochemical importance but the results of free energies in solution and the mechanism of deprotonation have been topic of considerable uncertainty. We have computed deprotonating and migration of one water molecule from the first solvation shell to the second shell in UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}NpO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup +}, and PuO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} complexes. Our computed Gibbs free energy(7.27 kcal/m) in solution for the first time agrees with the experiment (7.1 kcal

  15. Studies on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy-Silicon Oxide Hybrid Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Kumar, Kaushal; Kumar, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasonic dual mixing (UDM) process involving ultrasonic vibration with simultaneous stirring is used to prepare epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials with inorganic nanoscale building blocks by incorporating nanoscale silicon oxide network in epoxy matrix. The silicon oxide network is obtained from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) by using the in situ sol-gel process. Same epoxy-silica hybrid materials were also prepared by mixing with simple impeller stirring, and its properties were compared with the material of same composition prepared by the UDM process. The epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials are characterized by using FT-IR, DSC, FESEM, and XRD techniques. The glass transition temperature, tensile strength, and elastic modulus of the epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials treated by UDM process are found comparatively better than those of the materials processed by a rotating impeller. FESEM studies confirm that amount of TEOS varies the distribution and size of silicon oxide network, which remains relatively finer at lower content of TEOS. Significant improvement of thermal and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy is noted in the presence of 3.05 wt.% TEOS content in it is giving rise to the formation of inorganic building block of silicon oxide of size 88 ± 45 nm in the matrix. In this regard, the use of UDM process is found superior to mixing by simple impeller stirring for enhancement of properties of epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials. Lowering of properties of the epoxy-silicon oxide hybrid materials with TEOS addition beyond 3.05 wt.% up to 6.1 wt.% occurs primarily due to increase of amount and size (up to 170 ± 82 nm) of the inorganic building block in the matrix.

  16. Modified nickel oxides as cathode materials for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daza, L.; Rangel, C. M.; Baranda, J.; Casais, M. T.; Martínez, M. J.; Alonso, J. A.

    The preparation and subsequent oxidation of nickel cathodes modified by impregnation with cerium were evaluated by surface and bulk analysis. The cerium impregnated cathodes showed the same pore size distribution curve types and the same morphology as the reference nickel cathode. The measured nickel oxide dissolution rate in the molten carbonate mixture indicated that a minimum corrosion was evident for cathodes with 0.3-1 wt.% cerium oxide content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed in the cathode characterization. As can be seen by SEM, the corrosion treatments produce marked modifications on the sample surfaces that appear more prominent for the cerium-free sample. The results also show that the lithiation process is a very significant factor that can improve the efficiency of the cell, but needs to be controlled because it can also produce very damaging effects such as the modification of the cathode volume by the formation on new compounds.

  17. Porous graphene-based material as an efficient metal free catalyst for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiangyong; Liu, Hongyang; Wang, Jia; Feng, Zhenbao; Chen, Tong; Miao, Changxi; Yang, Weimin; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-02-25

    Reduced porous graphene oxide as a metal free catalyst was selected for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene. It showed the best catalytic performance compared with other carbon materials (routinely reduced graphene oxide, graphite powder and oxidized carbon nanotubes) and commercial iron oxide. PMID:25625943

  18. Actinide Oxidation State and O/M Ratio in Hypostoichiometric Uranium-Plutonium-Americium U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x Mixed Oxides.

    PubMed

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Lebreton, Florent; Aufore, Laurence; Scheinost, Andreas C; Martin, Philippe M

    2016-03-01

    Innovative americium-bearing uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x are envisioned as nuclear fuel for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs). The oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio, directly related to the oxidation state of cations, affects many of the fuel properties. Thus, a thorough knowledge of its variation with the sintering conditions is essential. The aim of this work is to follow the oxidation state of uranium, plutonium, and americium, and so the O/M ratio, in U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x samples sintered for 4 h at 2023 K in various Ar + 5% H2 + z vpm H2O (z = ∼ 15, ∼ 90, and ∼ 200) gas mixtures. The O/M ratios were determined by gravimetry, XAS, and XRD and evidenced a partial oxidation of the samples at room temperature. Finally, by comparing XANES and EXAFS results to that of a previous study, we demonstrate that the presence of uranium does not influence the interactions between americium and plutonium and that the differences in the O/M ratio between the investigated conditions is controlled by the reduction of plutonium. We also discuss the role of the homogeneity of cation distribution, as determined by EPMA, on the mechanisms involved in the reduction process. PMID:26907589

  19. Process for recovering actinide values

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Mason, George W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for rendering actinide values recoverable from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorous extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N,N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECAMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is preferably made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant is recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution.

  20. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  1. Design of molecular oxide auxetic materials and their effect on energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Stuart R.

    Auxetic materials are substances exhibiting negative compressibility or negative Poisson ratios. It has been theorized that this phenomenon occurs in ceramic materials via a method of rotating polyhedrons. We hypothesize that these rotating polyhedrons lead to higher stability of materials in electrochemical systems and that this same mechanism allows for greater energy storage capacity. From molecular modeling simulations, we determined zirconium tungstate (ZrW 2O8) to be a promising candidate for experimentation. Mixed oxide nanostructured arrays were formed on the surface of the material by anodization. Several tests including cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky analysis were performed on the mixed oxide to characterize the material and its capacitance. Several annealing temperatures, two different anodization potentials, three different electrolytes, and a process involving cycling the material one thousand times were all conditions used to determine the best method of production that would lead to the greatest capacitance of the mixed oxide.

  2. An instrument for the investigation of actinides with spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.-W.; Tobin, J. G.; Chung, B. W.

    2011-01-01

    A new system for spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the investigation of the electronic structure of the actinides.Actinide materials are very toxic and radioactive and therefore cannot be brought to most general user facilities for spectroscopic studies. The technical details of the new system and preliminary data obtained therein will be presented and discussed.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, C.C.; Nelson, P.A.; Dees, D.W.

    1994-07-19

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed there between, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material. 9 figs.

  4. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  5. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  6. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  7. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  8. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  9. Development of oxidation/corrosion-resistant composite materials and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Shanmugham, S.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed for high temperature structural applications, many of which are in oxidative environments. Such composites are attractive since they are light-weight and possess the desired mechanical properties at elevated temperature and in aggressive environments. The most significant advantage is their toughness and their non-catastrophic failure behavior. The mechanical properties of CFCCs have been characteristically linked with the nature of the interfacial bond between the fibers and the matrix. Weakly bonded fiber-matrix intefaces allow an impinging matrix crack to be deflected such that the fracture process occurs through several stages: Crack deflection, debonding at the interface, fiber slip and pull-out, and ultimately fiber failure. Such a composite will fail in a graceful manner and exhibit substantial fracture toughness. Currently, carbon interface coatings are used to appropriately tailor interface properties, however their poor oxidation resistance has required a search of an appropriate replacement. Generally, metal oxides are inherently stable to oxidation and possess thermal expansion coefficients relatively close to those of Nicalon and SiC. However, the metal oxides must also be chemically compatible with the fiber and matrix. If the fiber/interface/matrix system is chemically compatible, then the interfacial bonding stress is influenced by the thermal residual stresses that are generated as the composite is cooled from processing to room temperature. In the current work, thermomechanical computational results were obtained from a finite element model (FEM) for calculating the thermal residual stresses. This was followed by experimental evaluation of Nicalon/SiC composites with carbon, alumina, and mullite interfacial coatings.

  10. Selection of Actinide Chemical Analogues for WIPP Tests: Potential Nonradioactive Sorbing and Nonsorbing Tracers for Study of Ion Transport in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Spall; Robert Villarreal

    1998-08-01

    Chemical characteristics of the actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) have been studied relative to nonradioactive chemical elements that have similar characteristics in an attempt to identify a group of actinide chemical analogues that are nonradioactive. In general, the chemistries of the actinides, especially U, Np, Pu, and Am, are very complex and attempts to identify a single chemical analogue for each oxidation state were not successful. However, the rationale for selecting a group of chemical analogues that would mimic the actinides as a group is provided. The categorization of possible chemical analogues (tracers) with similar chemical properties was based on the following criteria. Categorization was studied according.

  11. Materials identification and surveillance project item evaluation: Items, impure plutonium oxide (ATL27960) and pure plutonium oxide (PEOR3258)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.; Appert, Q.; Davis, C.

    1997-03-01

    In this report, Los Alamos scientists characterize properties relevant to storage of an impure plutonium oxide (74 mass % plutonium) in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-3013-96. This oxide is of interest because it is the first impure plutonium oxide sample to be evaluated and it is similar to other materials that must be stored. Methods used to characterize the oxide at certain points during calcination include surface-area analyses, mass loss-on-ignition (LOI) measurements, elemental analysis, moisture-adsorption measurements, and quantitative supercritical-CO{sub 2} extraction of adsorbed water. Significant decreases in the LOI and surface area occurred as the oxide was calcined at progressively increasing temperatures. Studies indicate that supercritical-CO{sub 2} extraction is an effective method for removing adsorbed water from oxides. We extracted the water from powdered oxides (high-purity ZrO{sub 2}, pure PuO{sub 2}, and impure plutonium oxide) using CO{sub 2} at 3000 psi pressure and 75{degrees}C, and we quantitatively determined it by using gravimetric and dew-point procedures. The effectiveness of the extraction method is demonstrated by good agreement between the amounts of water extracted from pure zirconium and plutonium dioxides and the mass changes obtained from LOI analyses. However, the amount of moisture (0.025 mass %) extracted from the impure plutonium oxide after it had been calcined at 950{degrees}C and stored for a period of months is much less than the LOI value (0.97 mass %). These results imply that the impure plutonium oxide is free of adsorbed water after calcination at 950{degrees}C, even though the sample does not satisfy the LOI requirement of <0.50 mass % for storage.

  12. NEW APPROACH TO ADDRESSING GAS GENERATION IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R; Leduc, D; Askew, N

    2009-06-25

    Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP) document why the transportation of radioactive material is safe in Type A(F) and Type B shipping containers. The content evaluation of certain actinide materials require that the gas generation characteristics be addressed. Most packages used to transport actinides impose extremely restrictive limits on moisture content and oxide stabilization to control or prevent flammable gas generation. These requirements prevent some users from using a shipping container even though the material to be shipped is fully compliant with the remaining content envelope including isotopic distribution. To avoid these restrictions, gas generation issues have to be addressed on a case by case basis rather than a one size fits all approach. In addition, SARP applicants and review groups may not have the knowledge and experience with actinide chemistry and other factors affecting gas generation, which facility experts in actinide material processing have obtained in the last sixty years. This paper will address a proposal to create a Gas Generation Evaluation Committee to evaluate gas generation issues associated with Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging material contents. The committee charter could include reviews of both SARP approved contents and new contents not previously evaluated in a SARP.

  13. Optical determination of the oxygen stoichiometry of nanophase metal-oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.C. ); Siegel, R.W. )

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview and assessment of the use optical techniques, primarily Raman scattering, for analyzing the composition and stoichiometry of nanophase metal-oxide ceramics. Raman scattering has been shown to be a useful technique for evaluating the oxygen stoichiometry of some metal oxide materials. However, it is essential for nanophase materials that grain size effects are considered since their ultrafine grain sizes can produce large shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Research Update: Towards designed functionalities in oxide-based electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rondinelli, James M.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Zunger, Alex

    2015-08-01

    One of the grand challenges facing materials-by-design approaches for complex oxide deployment in electronic devices is how to balance transformative first-principles based predictions with experimental feasibility. Here, we briefly review the functionality-driven approach (inverse design) for materials discovery, encapsulated in three modalities for materials discovery (m{sup 3}D) that integrate experimental feedback. We compare it to both traditional theoretical and high-throughput database-directed approaches aimed at advancing oxide-based materials into technologies.

  15. Improved Actinide Neutron Capture Cross Sections Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Collon, P.; Paul, M.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2014-09-01

    The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are developing a technique to inject solid material into the ECR with laser ablation. With laser ablation, we can better control material injection and potentially increase efficiency in the ECR, thus creating less contamination in the source and reducing cross talk. I will present work on the laser ablation system and preliminary results from our AMS measurements. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are

  16. Paving the way for the synthesis of a series of divalent actinide complexes: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q-Y; Lan, J-H; Wang, C-Z; Cheng, Z-P; Chai, Z-F; Gibson, J K; Shi, W-Q

    2016-02-21

    Recently, the +2 formal oxidation state in soluble molecular complexes for lanthanides (La-Nd, Sm-Lu) and actinides (Th and U) has been discovered [W. J. Evans, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 15914; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 8420; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 13310; Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 517]. To explore the nature of the bonding and stabilities of the low-valent actinide complexes, a series of divalent actinide species, [AnCp'3](-) (An[double bond, length as m-dash]Th-Am, Cp' = [η(5)-C5H4(SiMe3)](-)) have been investigated in THF solution using scalar relativistic density functional theory. The electronic structures and electron affinity properties were systematically studied to identify the interactions between the +2 actinide ions and Cp' ligands. The ground state electron configurations for the [AnCp'3](-) species are [ThCp'3](-) 6d(2), [PaCp'3](-) 5f(2)6d(1), [UCp'3](-) 5f(3)6d(1), [NpCp'3](-) 5f(5), [PuCp'3](-) 5f(6), and [AmCp'3](-) 5f(7), respectively, according to the MO analysis. The total bonding energy decreases from the Th- to the Am-complex and the electrostatic interactions mainly dominate the bonding between the actinide atom and ligands. The electron affinity analysis suggests that the reduction reaction of AnCp'3→ [AnCp'3](-) should become increasingly facile across the actinide series from Th to Am, in accord with the known An(iii/ii) reduction potentials. This work expands the knowledge on the low oxidation state chemistry of actinides, and further motivates and guides the synthesis of related low oxidation state compounds of 5f elements. PMID:26777518

  17. Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f/sup 14/7s/sup 2/7p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable.

  18. Leaching of oxidic zinc materials with chlorine and chlorine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. K.; Fray, D. J.

    1981-06-01

    Low grade zinc ores and residues were leached in chlorine water and chlorine hydrate water mixtures. It was found that the rate of leaching Adrar ore and Electric Arc Furnace dust obeyed a shrinking core diffusion model, whereas, the rate of leaching of Turkish ore appeared to be controlled by a surface reaction. In all cases, lead leached with the zinc but the iron oxides remained virtually undissolved.

  19. Solution synthesis and characterization of lithium manganese oxide cathode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Doughty, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    A nonaqueous coprecipitation process has been developed to prepare controlled stoichiometry lithium manganese oxalate precipitates. The process involved mixing a methanolic Li-Mn nitrate solution with a methanolic solution containing tetramethylammonium oxalate as the precipitating agent. The resulting oxalates were readily converted to a variety of phase pure lithium manganese oxides at moderate temperatures ({le}600{degrees}C), where the phase formed was determined by the initial Li/Mn ratio in the starting solution. Metal cation dopants have been incorporated into the oxalate precipitate by dissolving the appropriate metal nitrate in the Li-Mn precursor solution The various starting solutions, oxalate precipitates, and calcined oxides have been extensively characterized using a variety of techniques, including {sup 7}Li NMR, TGA/DTA, SEM, and XRD. Results indicate that a strong interaction occurs between Li and Mn in the nitrate solution which carries over into the oxalate phase during precipitation. The morphology and the crystallite size of the oxide powders were shown to be controlled by the morphology of the oxalate precursor and the oxalate calcination temperature, respectively. The results of initial cathode performance tests with respect to dopant type (Al, Ni, Co) and concentration for LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} are also reported.

  20. Research in actinide chemistry. Final report, March 1, 1993--February 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G R

    1997-01-01

    The present three-year grant period has been a fruitful one for the laboratory as research entered some new areas while continuing in others in which the group has been successful. As in past grant periods, the principal focus has been on complexation of actinide elements with inorganic and organic ligands. The ligands to study have been chosen for their value (known or potential) in actinide separations or for their potential role in environmental behavior of the actinides. Since the radioactivity of some actinides limits the variety of techniques which can be used in their study, we have used {open_quotes}oxidation state analogs{close_quotes}. These analogs have the same oxidation state and very similar chemical behavior but are stable or very long-lived. Also, the analogs are chosen for their redox stability to avoid uncertainties in interpretation of systems in which several oxidations may coexist (e.g., in the case of Pu). Examples of such analogs which we have used are: Nd(III), Eu(III) for Pu(III), Am(III), Cm(III); Th(IV) for U(IV), Pu(IV); NpO{sub 2}{sup +} for PuO{sub 2}{sup +}; UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. These analogs have allowed use of techniques which can increase significantly our understanding of actinide complexation.

  1. The INE-Beamline for actinide science at ANKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, J.; Butorin, S.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Löble, M.; Metz, V.; Seibert, A.; Steppert, M.; Vitova, T.; Walther, C.; Geckeis, H.

    2012-04-01

    Since its inauguration in 2005, the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA (KIT North Campus) provides dedicated instrumentation for x-ray spectroscopic characterization of actinide samples and other radioactive materials. R&D work at the beamline focuses on various aspects of nuclear waste disposal within INE's mission to provide the scientific basis for assessing long-term safety of a final nuclear waste repository. The INE-Beamline is accessible for the actinide and radiochemistry community through the ANKA proposal system and the European Union Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3. Experiments with activities up to 1 × 10+6 times the European exemption limit are feasible within a safe but flexible containment concept. Measurements with monochromatic radiation are performed at photon energies varying between ˜2.1 keV (P K-edge) and ˜25 keV (Pd K-edge), including the lanthanide L-edges and the actinide M- and L3-edges up to Cf. The close proximity of the INE-Beamline to INE controlled area labs offers infrastructure unique in Europe for the spectroscopic and microscopic characterization of actinide samples. The modular beamline design enables sufficient flexibility to adapt sample environments and detection systems to many scientific questions. The well-established bulk techniques x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy in transmission and fluorescence mode have been augmented by advanced methods using a microfocused beam, including (confocal) XAFS/x-ray fluorescence detection and a combination of (micro-)XAFS and (micro-)x-ray diffraction. Additional instrumentation for high energy-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy has been successfully developed and tested.

  2. Actinide partitioning processes for fuel reprocessing and refabrication plant wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, B.C.; Tedder, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical processing methods have been developed on a laboratory scale to partition the actinides from the liquid and solid fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) and refabrication plant (FFP) wastes. It was envisioned that these processes would be incorporated into separate waste treatment facilities (WTFs) that are adjacent to, but not integrated with, the fuel reprocessing and refabrication plants. Engineering equipment and material balance flowsheets have been developed for WTFs in support of a 2000-MTHM/year FRP and a 660-MTHM/year MOX-FFP. The processing subsystems incorporated in the FRP-WTF are: High-Level Solid Waste Treatment, High-Level Liquid Waste Treatment, Solid Alpha Waste Treatment, Cation Exchange Chromatography, Salt Waste Treatment, Actinide Recovery, Solvent Cleanup and recycle, Off-Gas Treatment, Actinide Product Concentration, and Acid and Water Recycle. The WTF supporting a fuel refabrication facility, although similar, does not contain subsystems (1) and (2). Based on the results of the laboratory and hot-cell experimental work, we believe that the processes and flowsheets offer the potential to reduce the total unrecovered actinides in FRP and FFP wastes to less than or equal to 0.25%. The actinide partitioning processes and the WTF concept represent advanced technology that would require substantial work before commercialization. It is estimated that an orderly development program would require 15 to 20 years to complete and would cost about 700 million 1979 dollars. It is estimated that the capital cost and annual operating cost, in mid-1979 dollars, for the FRP-WTF are $1035 million and $71.5 million/year, and for the FFP-WTF are $436 million and $25.6 million/year, respectively.

  3. The INE-Beamline for actinide science at ANKA

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, J.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Loeble, M.; Metz, V.; Steppert, M.; Vitova, T.; Geckeis, H.; Butorin, S.; Seibert, A.; Walther, C.

    2012-04-15

    Since its inauguration in 2005, the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA (KIT North Campus) provides dedicated instrumentation for x-ray spectroscopic characterization of actinide samples and other radioactive materials. R and D work at the beamline focuses on various aspects of nuclear waste disposal within INE's mission to provide the scientific basis for assessing long-term safety of a final nuclear waste repository. The INE-Beamline is accessible for the actinide and radiochemistry community through the ANKA proposal system and the European Union Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3. Experiments with activities up to 1 x 10{sup +6} times the European exemption limit are feasible within a safe but flexible containment concept. Measurements with monochromatic radiation are performed at photon energies varying between {approx}2.1 keV (P K-edge) and {approx}25 keV (Pd K-edge), including the lanthanide L-edges and the actinide M- and L3-edges up to Cf. The close proximity of the INE-Beamline to INE controlled area labs offers infrastructure unique in Europe for the spectroscopic and microscopic characterization of actinide samples. The modular beamline design enables sufficient flexibility to adapt sample environments and detection systems to many scientific questions. The well-established bulk techniques x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy in transmission and fluorescence mode have been augmented by advanced methods using a microfocused beam, including (confocal) XAFS/x-ray fluorescence detection and a combination of (micro-)XAFS and (micro-)x-ray diffraction. Additional instrumentation for high energy-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy has been successfully developed and tested.

  4. A Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Designed to Transmute Minor Actinide Actinide Waste Isotopes into Plutonium Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel E. Bays

    2011-02-01

    An axial heterogeneous sodium fast reactor design is developed for converting minor actinide waste isotopes into plutonium fuel. The reactor design incorporates zirconium hydride moderating rods in an axial blanket above the active core. The blanket design traps the active core’s axial leakage for the purpose of transmuting Am-241 into Pu-238. This Pu-238 is then co-recycled with the spent driver fuel to make new driver fuel. Because Pu-238 is significantly more fissile than Am-241 in a fast neutron spectrum, the fissile worth of the initial minor actinide material is upgraded by its preconditioning via transmutation in the axial targets. Because, the Am-241 neutron capture worth is significantly stronger in a moderated epithermal spectrum than the fast spectrum, the axial targets serve as a neutron trap which recovers the axial leakage lost by the active core. The sodium fast reactor proposed by this work is designed as an overall transuranic burner. Therefore, a low transuranic conversion ratio is achieved by a degree of core flattening which increases axial leakage. Unlike a traditional “pancake” design, neutron leakage is recovered by the axial target/blanket system. This heterogeneous core design is constrained to have sodium void and Doppler reactivity worth similar to that of an equivalent homogeneous design. Because minor actinides are irradiated only once in the axial target region; elemental partitioning is not required. This fact enables the use of metal targets with electrochemical reprocessing. Therefore, the irradiation environment of both drivers and targets was constrained to ensure applicability of the established experience database for metal alloy sodium fast reactor fuels.

  5. MATERIALS SYSTEM FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2004-02-15

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted on symmetrical cells of the type [gas, electrode/LSGM electrolyte/electrode, gas]. The electrode materials were slurry-coated on both sides of the LSGM electrolyte support. The electrodes selected for this investigation are candidate materials for SOFC electrodes. Cathode materials include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM + doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF + LSGM. Pt metal electrodes were also used for the purpose of comparison. Anode material investigated was the Ni + GDC composite. The study revealed important details pertaining to the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrodes. The information obtained can be used to design electrodes for intermediate temperature SOFCs based on LSGM electrolyte.

  6. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE DURABILITY OF MATERIALS FOR INTERCONNECTS IN SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2003-06-30

    This report describes the result of the first eight months of effort on a project directed at improving metallic interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results include cyclic oxidation studies of a group of ferritic alloys, which are candidate interconnect materials. The exposures have been carried out in simulated fuel cell atmospheres. The oxidation morphologies have been characterized and the ASR has been measured for the oxide scales. The effect of fuel cell electric current density on chromia growth rates has been considered The thermomechanical behavior of the scales has been investigated by stress measurements using x-ray diffraction and interfacial fracture toughness measurements using indentation. The ultimate goal of this thrust is to use knowledge of changes in oxide thickness, stress and adhesion to develop accelerated testing methods for evaluating SOFC interconnect alloys. Finally a theoretical assessment of the potential for use of ''new'' metallic materials as interconnect materials has been conducted and is presented in this report. Alloys being considered include materials based on pure nickel, materials based on the ''Invar'' concept, and coated materials to optimize properties in both the anode and cathode gases.

  7. Smart nickel oxide materials for the applications of energy efficiency and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Feng

    The present dissertation studies nickel oxide-based materials for the application of electrochromic windows and lithium-air batteries. The materials were fabricated via radio frequency magnetron sputtering and subsequently post-treated with thermal evaporation and ozone exposure. The strategies to improve electrochromic performance of nickel oxide materials were investigated including compositional control, morphology tuning, modification of electronic structure and interface engineering (i.e., Li2O 2, graphene). The electrochemical properties of the resulting materials were characterized in lithium ion electrolytes. Extremely high performing nickel oxide-based electrochromic materials were obtained in terms of optical modulation, switching kinetics, bleached-state transparency and durability, which promise the implementation of these materials for practical smart windows. With the aid of advanced synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy, it is reported for the first time that the electrochromic effect in multicomponent nickel oxide-based materials arises from the reversible formation of hole states in the NiO6 cluster accompanying with the reversible formation of Li2O2. The reversible formation of Li2O 2 was successfully leveraged with the study of electro-catalysts and cathode materials for lithium-air batteries. The reversibility of Li 2O2 was thoroughly investigated using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and theoretical simulation, which substantiates the promise of using electrochromic films as electro-catalysts and/or cathode materials in lithium-air batteries.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid materials containing iron oxide for removal of sulfides from water.

    PubMed

    Jacukowicz-Sobala, Irena; Wilk, Łukasz J; Drabent, Krzysztof; Kociołek-Balawejder, Elżbieta

    2015-12-15

    Hybrid materials containing iron oxides based on macroporous and gel-type sulfonic and carboxylic cation exchangers as supporting materials were obtained. Multiple factors, including the kind of functional groups, ion exchange capacity, and polymer matrix type (chemical constitution and porous structure), affected the amount of iron oxides introduced into their matrix (7.8-35.2% Fe). Products containing the highest iron content were obtained using carboxylic cation exchangers, with their inorganic deposit being mostly a mixture of iron(III) oxides, including maghemite. Obtained hybrid polymers were used for removal of sulfides from anoxic aqueous solutions (50-200mgS(2-)/dm(3)). The research showed that the form (Na(+) or H(+)) of ionic groups of hybrid materials had a crucial impact on the sulfide removal process. Due to high iron oxide content (35% Fe), advantageous chemical constitution and porous structure, the highest removal efficiency (60mgS(2-)/g) was exhibited by a hybrid polymer obtained using a macroporous carboxylic cation exchanger as the host material. The process of sulfide removal was very complex and proceeded with heterogeneous oxidation, iron(III) oxide reductive dissolution and formation of sulfide oxidation and precipitation products such as iron(II) sulfides, thiosulfates and polysulfides. PMID:26319332

  9. High-Capacity, High-Voltage Composite Oxide Cathode Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagh, Nader M.

    2015-01-01

    This SBIR project integrates theoretical and experimental work to enable a new generation of high-capacity, high-voltage cathode materials that will lead to high-performance, robust energy storage systems. At low operating temperatures, commercially available electrode materials for lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries do not meet energy and power requirements for NASA's planned exploration activities. NEI Corporation, in partnership with the University of California, San Diego, has developed layered composite cathode materials that increase power and energy densities at temperatures as low as 0 degC and considerably reduce the overall volume and weight of battery packs. In Phase I of the project, through innovations in the structure and morphology of composite electrode particles, the partners successfully demonstrated an energy density exceeding 1,000 Wh/kg at 4 V at room temperature. In Phase II, the team enhanced the kinetics of Li-ion transport and electronic conductivity at 0 degC. An important feature of the composite cathode is that it has at least two components that are structurally integrated. The layered material is electrochemically inactive; however, upon structural integration with a spinel material, the layered material can be electrochemically activated and deliver a large amount of energy with stable cycling.

  10. Mixed monofunctional extractants for trivalent actinide/lanthanide separations: TALSPEAK-MME

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Aaron T.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2015-08-20

    The basic features of an f-element extraction process based on a solvent composed of equimolar mixtures of Cyanex-923 (a mixed trialkyl phosphine oxide) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) extractants in n-dodecane are investigated in this report. This system, which combines features of the TRPO and TALSPEAK processes, is based on co-extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides from 0.1 to 1.0 M HNO3 followed by application of a buffered aminopolycarboxylate solution strip to accomplish a Reverse TALSPEAK selective removal of actinides. This mixed-extractant medium could enable a simplified approach to selective trivalent f-element extraction and actinide partitioning in a singlemore » process. As compared with other combined process applications in development for more compact actinide partitioning processes (DIAMEX-SANEX, GANEX, TRUSPEAK, ALSEP), this combination features only monofunctional extractants with high solubility limits and comparatively low molar mass. Selective actinide stripping from the loaded extractant phase is done using a glycine-buffered solution containing N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or triethylenetetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid (TTHA). Lastly, the results reported provide evidence for simplified interactions between the two extractants and demonstrate a pathway toward using mixed monofunctional extractants to separate trivalent actinides (An) from fission product lanthanides (Ln).« less

  11. Mixed monofunctional extractants for trivalent actinide/lanthanide separations: TALSPEAK-MME

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Aaron T.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2015-08-20

    The basic features of an f-element extraction process based on a solvent composed of equimolar mixtures of Cyanex-923 (a mixed trialkyl phosphine oxide) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) extractants in n-dodecane are investigated in this report. This system, which combines features of the TRPO and TALSPEAK processes, is based on co-extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides from 0.1 to 1.0 M HNO3 followed by application of a buffered aminopolycarboxylate solution strip to accomplish a Reverse TALSPEAK selective removal of actinides. This mixed-extractant medium could enable a simplified approach to selective trivalent f-element extraction and actinide partitioning in a single process. As compared with other combined process applications in development for more compact actinide partitioning processes (DIAMEX-SANEX, GANEX, TRUSPEAK, ALSEP), this combination features only monofunctional extractants with high solubility limits and comparatively low molar mass. Selective actinide stripping from the loaded extractant phase is done using a glycine-buffered solution containing N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or triethylenetetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid (TTHA). Lastly, the results reported provide evidence for simplified interactions between the two extractants and demonstrate a pathway toward using mixed monofunctional extractants to separate trivalent actinides (An) from fission product lanthanides (Ln).

  12. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe Morana, Bruno; Forte, Salvatore; Sarro, Pasqualina Maria

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000 °C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000 °C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000 °C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900 °C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000 °C compared to uncoated devices.

  13. Nanostructured oxide materials and modules for high-temperature power generation from waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo Van, Nong; Pryds, Nini

    2013-06-01

    A large amount of thermal energy emitted from many industrial processes is available as waste heat. Thermoelectric (TE) power generators that convert heat directly into electricity can offer a very promising means of waste heat recovery. However, the requirements for this task place in the materials are not easily satisfied by conventional TE materials. Not only must they possess a sufficient TE performance, but they should also be stable at high temperatures, nontoxic and have low-cost comprising elements, and must be also able to be processed and shaped cheaply. Oxides are among the strongest candidate materials for this purpose. In this review, the progress in the development of two representative p- and n-type novel oxide materials based on Ca3Co4O9 and doped-ZnO is presented. TE modules built up from these oxides were fabricated, tested at high temperatures, and compared with other similar oxide modules reported in the literature. A maximum power density of 45.3 mW cm-2 was obtained for an oxide module comprising eight p-n couples at a temperature difference of 496 K, an encouraging result in the context of the present high-temperature oxide modules. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2012, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  14. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dominic S

    2008-01-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study we compare 30 cm long, 4.6 mm ID columns to capillary columns (750 {micro}m ID) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}pU, {sup 241}Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as for automated separations of actinide materials.

  15. Spin-on metal oxide materials with high etch selectivity and wet strippability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huirong; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; McKenzie, Douglas; Rahman, Dalil; Cho, JoonYeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna; Petermann, Claire; Hong, SungEun; Her, YoungJun

    2016-03-01

    Metal oxide or metal nitride films are used as hard mask materials in semiconductor industry for patterning purposes due to their excellent etch resistances against the plasma etches. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques are usually used to deposit the metal containing materials on substrates or underlying films, which uses specialized equipment and can lead to high cost-of-ownership and low throughput. We have reported novel spin-on coatings that provide simple and cost effective method to generate metal oxide films possessing good etch selectivity and can be removed by chemical agents. In this paper, new spin-on Al oxide and Zr oxide hard mask formulations are reported. The new metal oxide formulations provide higher metal content compared to previously reported material of specific metal oxides under similar processing conditions. These metal oxide films demonstrate ultra-high etch selectivity and good pattern transfer capability. The cured films can be removed by various chemical agents such as developer, solvents or wet etchants/strippers commonly used in the fab environment. With high metal MHM material as an underlayer, the pattern transfer process is simplified by reducing the number of layers in the stack and the size of the nano structure is minimized by replacement of a thicker film ACL. Therefore, these novel AZ® spinon metal oxide hard mask materials can potentially be used to replace any CVD or ALD metal, metal oxide, metal nitride or spin-on silicon-containing hard mask films in 193 nm or EUV process.

  16. Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

    2013-09-17

    This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS�) and determined to have high

  17. Development of graphene oxide materials with controllably modified optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Anton; Galande, Charudatta; Mohite, Aditya; Ajayan, Pulickel; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2015-03-01

    One of the major current goals in graphene research is modifying its optical and electronic properties through controllable generation of band gaps. To achieve this, we have studied the changes in optical properties of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) in water suspension upon the exposure to ozone. Ozonation for the periods of 5 to 35 minutes has caused a dramatic bleaching of its absorption and the concurrent appearance of strong visible fluorescence in previously nonemissive samples. These observed spectral changes suggest a functionalization-induced band gap opening. The sample fluorescence induced by ozonation was found to be highly pH-dependent: sharp and structured emission features resembling the spectra of molecular fluorophores were present at basic pH values, but this emission reversibly broadened and red-shifted in acidic conditions. These findings are consistent with excited state protonation of the emitting species in acidic media. Oxygen-containing addends resulting from the ozonation were detected by XPS and FTIR spectroscopy and related to optical transitions in localized graphene oxide fluorophores by computational modeling. Further research will be directed toward producing graphene-based optoelectronic devices with tailored and controllable optical properties.

  18. Acoustic plane wave preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Tolt, Thomas L.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1991-01-01

    A polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0oxide in the form of a ceramic slip which has not yet set, orientation of the crystal basal planes parallel with the direction of desired current flow is accomplished by an applied acoustic plane wave in the acoustic or ultrasonic frequency range (either progressive or standing) in applying a torque to each crystal particle. The ceramic slip is then set and fired by conventional methods to produce a conductor with preferentially oriented grains and substantially enhanced current carrying capacity.

  19. Novel complexing agents for the efficient separation of actinides and remediation of actinide-contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, P.; Kadkhodayan, B.

    1996-03-15

    Research into the coordination chemistry of transactinide elements should provide us with new fundamental knowledge about structure, geometry, and stability of these metal complexes. Our approach involves the design, synthesis, and characterization of {open_quotes}expanded porphyrin{close_quotes} macrocyclic ligands which coordinate the actinide metal cations with high thermodynamic affinity and kinetic stability. We can use the knowledge from understanding the fundamental coordination chemistry of these elements as a stepping stone to heavy metal detoxification, radioactive waste cleanup, and possibly radioactive isotope separation. The critical components of this research endeavor, along with the viability of metal complex formation, will be correlated to ring size and core geometry of the ligand and, the atomic radius, oxidation state, coordination geometry and coordination number of the transactinium metal ion. These chelating agents may have certain applications to the solution of some radioactive waste problems if they can be attached to polymer supports and used to chemically separate the radioactive components in waste.

  20. Method for characterization of the rate of movement of an oxidation front in cementitious materials

    DOEpatents

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2016-03-01

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize a redox active transition metal indicator that is present in the cementitious material and exhibits variable solubility depending upon the oxidation state of the indicator. When the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions, the presence or absence of the indicator in the leachate can be utilized to determine the redox condition of and location of the oxidation front in the material that has been subjected to the leaching process.

  1. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    DOEpatents

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod L.

    2009-03-24

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  2. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; Kornilov, N. V.; Lestone, J. P.; Litaize, O.; Morillon, B.; Neudecker, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Ohsawa, T.; et al

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  3. Minor Actinides Recycling in PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Delpech, M.; Golfier, H.; Vasile, A.; Varaine, F.; Boucher, L.; Greneche, D.

    2006-07-01

    Recycling of minor actinides in current and near future PWR is considered as one of the options of the general waste management strategy. This paper presents the analysis of this option both from the core physics and fuel cycle point of view. A first indicator of the efficiency of different neutron spectra for transmutation purposes is the capture to fission cross sections ratio which is less favourable by a factor between 5 to 10 in PWRs compared to fast reactors. Another indicator presented is the production of high ranking isotopes like Curium, Berkelium or Californium in the thermal or epithermal spectrum conditions of PWR cores by successive neutron captures. The impact of the accumulation of this elements on the fabrication process of such PWR fuels strongly penalizes this option. The main constraint on minor actinides loadings in PWR (or fast reactors) fuels are related to their direct impact (or the impact of their transmutation products) on the reactivity coefficients, the reactivity control means and the core kinetics parameters. The main fuel cycle physical parameters like the neutron source, the alpha decay power, the gamma and neutrons dose rate and the criticality aspects are also affected. Recent neutronic calculations based on a reference core of the Evolutionary Pressurized Reactor (EPR), indicates typical maximum values of 1 % loadings. Different fuel design options for minor actinides transmutation purposes in PWRs are presented: UOX and MOX, homogeneous and heterogeneous assemblies. In this later case, Americium loading is concentrated in specific pins of a standard UOX assembly. Recycling of Neptunium in UOX and MOX fuels was also studied to improve the proliferation resistance of the fuel. The impact on the core physics and penalties on Uranium enrichment were underlined in this case. (authors)

  4. Design, synthesis, and characterization of materials for controlled line deposition, environmental remediation, and doping of porous manganese oxide material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Craig A.

    This thesis covers three topics: (1) coatings formed from sol-gel phases, (2) environmental remediation, and (3) doping of a porous manganese oxide. Synthesis, characterization, and application were investigated for each topic. Line-formations were formed spontaneously by self-assembly from vanadium sol-gels and other metal containing solutions on glass substrates. The solutions were prepared by the dissolution of metal oxide or salt in water. A more straightforward method is proposed than used in previous work. Analyses using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and infrared spectroscopy showed discreet lines whose deposition could be controlled by varying the concentration. A mechanism was developed from the observed results. Microwave heating, the addition of graphite rods, and oxidants, can enhance HCB remediation from soil. To achieve remediation, a TeflonRTM vessel open to the atmosphere along with an oxidant, potassium persulfate (PerS) or potassium hydroxide, along with uncoated or aluminum oxide coated, graphite rods were heated in a research grade microwave oven. Microwave heating was used to decrease the heating time, and graphite rods were used to increase the absorption of the microwave energy by providing thermal centers. The results showed that the percent HCB removed was increased by adding graphite rods and oxidants. Tungsten, silver, and sulfur were investigated as doping agents for K--OMS-2. The synthesis of these materials was carried out with a reflux method. The doping of K--OMS-2 led to changes in the properties of a tungsten doped K--OMS-2 had an increased resistivity, the silver doped material showed improved epoxidation of trans-stilbene, and the addition of sulfur produced a paper-like material. Rietveld refinement of the tungsten doped K--OMS-2 showed that the tungsten was doped into the framework.

  5. Novel Solar Energy Conversion Materials by Design of Mn(II) Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Lany, S.; Peng, H.; Ndione, P.; Zakutayev, A.; Ginley, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy conversion materials need to fulfill simultaneously a number of requirements in regard of their band-structure, optical properties, carrier transport, and doping. Despite their desirable chemical properties, e.g., for photo-electrocatalysis, transition-metal oxides usually do not have desirable semiconducting properties. Instead, oxides with open cation d-shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties, resulting from large effective electron/hole masses or from carrier self-trapping. Based on the notion that the electronic structure features (p-d interaction) supporting the p-type conductivity in d10 oxides like Cu2O and CuAlO2 occurs in a similar fashion also in the d5 (high-spin) oxides, we recently studied theoretically the band-structure and transport properties of the prototypical binary d5 oxides MnO and Fe2O3 [PRB 85, 201202(R)]. We found that MnO tends to self-trap holes by forming Mn+III, whereas Fe2O3 self-traps electrons by forming Fe+II. However, the self-trapping of holes is suppressed by when Mn is tetrahedrally coordinated, which suggests specific routes to design novel solar conversion materials by considering ternary Mn(II) oxides or oxide alloys. We are presenting theory, synthesis, and initial characterization for these novel energy materials.

  6. Oxidation and hydration of U3O8 materials following controlled exposure to temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Tamasi, Alison L; Boland, Kevin S; Czerwinski, Kenneth; Ellis, Jason K; Kozimor, Stosh A; Martin, Richard L; Pugmire, Alison L; Reilly, Dallas; Scott, Brian L; Sutton, Andrew D; Wagner, Gregory L; Walensky, Justin R; Wilkerson, Marianne P

    2015-04-21

    Chemical signatures correlated with uranium oxide processing are of interest to forensic science for inferring sample provenance. Identification of temporal changes in chemical structures of process uranium materials as a function of controlled temperatures and relative humidities may provide additional information regarding sample history. In this study, a high-purity α-U3O8 sample and three other uranium oxide samples synthesized from reaction routes used in nuclear conversion processes were stored under controlled conditions over 2-3.5 years, and powder X-ray diffraction analysis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize chemical speciation. Signatures measured from the α-U3O8 sample indicated that the material oxidized and hydrated after storage under high humidity conditions over time. Impurities, such as uranyl fluoride or schoepites, were initially detectable in the other uranium oxide samples. After storage under controlled conditions, the analyses of the samples revealed oxidation over time, although the signature of the uranyl fluoride impurity diminished. The presence of schoepite phases in older uranium oxide material is likely indicative of storage under high humidity and should be taken into account for assessing sample history. The absence of a signature from a chemical impurity, such as uranyl fluoride hydrate, in an older material may not preclude its presence at the initial time of production. LA-UR-15-21495. PMID:25786096

  7. Reduction and persulfate oxidation of nitro explosives in contaminated soils using Fe-bearing materials.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Su; Jeong, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang Don; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-07-13

    The oxidative and reductive transformation of nitro explosives in contaminated soils with Fe-bearing materials and persulfate (S2O8(2-)) was examined via batch experiments. Zero-valent cast iron [Fe(0)], steel dust from a steel manufacturing plant, and FeS rapidly reduced 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in soil under anaerobic conditions as long as a sufficient amount of water was present. The Fe-bearing materials also effectively activated persulfate to enhance the oxidative transformation of TNT and RDX in soil-water systems. Kinetically, reductive and oxidative transformations removed more than 90% of the explosives from a soil-water system within 5 h under the given conditions. Pseudo-first-order rates in the range of 0.7-23.4 h(-1) were observed. By increasing the concentration of persulfate or Fe-bearing materials, the oxidative transformation could be promoted. Treated soils via redox reactions using the Fe-bearing materials did not show significant toxicity, except for the case of TNT-contaminated soils oxidized by FeS-assisted persulfate. Considering the kinetics of explosive degradation and the toxicity of treated wastewaters and soils, Fe(0) or steel dust-assisted persulfate oxidation may be a safe option as an ex situ remediation process for the treatment of explosive-contaminated soils. PMID:27327861

  8. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Carroll, S.A.

    1993-10-01

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage.

  9. Actinide ion sensor for pyroprocess monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Jue, Jan-fong; Li, Shelly X.

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide ion concentrations which comprises a working electrode, a reference electrode, a container, a working electrolyte, a separator, a reference electrolyte, and a voltmeter. The container holds the working electrolyte. The voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode and measures the voltage between those electrodes. The working electrode contacts the working electrolyte. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide ion of interest. The reference electrode contacts the reference electrolyte. The reference electrolyte is separated from the working electrolyte by the separator. The separator contacts both the working electrolyte and the reference electrolyte. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide ion of interest. The reference electrolyte comprises a known concentration of the actinide ion of interest. The separator comprises a beta double prime alumina exchanged with the actinide ion of interest.

  10. Vitrification of actinide solutions in SRS separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Minichan, R.L.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1995-09-01

    The actinide vitrification system being developed at SRS provides the capability to convert specialized or unique forms of nuclear material into a stable solid glass product that can be safely shipped, stored or reprocessed according to the DOE complex mission. This project is an application of technology developed through funds from the Office of Technology Development (OTD). This technology is ideally suited for vitrifying relatively small quantities of fissile or special nuclear material since it is designed to be critically safe. Successful demonstration of this system to safely vitrify radioactive material could open up numerous opportunities for transferring this technology to applications throughout the DOE complex.

  11. Radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability in oxide dispersion strengthened materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribis, J.; Bordas, E.; Trocellier, P.; Serruys, Y.; de Carlan, Y.; Legris, A.

    2015-12-01

    ODS materials constitute a new promising class of structural materials for advanced fission and fusion energy application. These Fe-Cr based ferritic steels contain ultra-high density of dispersion-strengthening nanoclusters conferring excellent mechanical properties to the alloy. Hence, guarantee the nanocluster stability under irradiation remain a critical issue. Nanoclusters are non-equilibrium multicomponent compounds (YTiCrO) forming through a complex nucleation pathway during the elaboration process. In this paper, it is proposed to observe the response of these nanoclusters when the system is placed far from equilibrium by means of ion beam. The results indicate that the Y, Ti, O and Cr atoms self-organized so that nanoclusters coarsened but maintain their non-equilibrium chemical composition. It is discussed that the radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability emerges from cooperative effects: radiation-induced Ostwald ripening, permanent creation of vacancies in the clusters, and fast Cr diffusion mediated by interstitials.

  12. Fabrication of GaN nanotubular material using MOCVD with aluminum oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Gwang; Jung, Se-Hyuck; Kung, Patrick; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2006-02-01

    GaN nanotubular material is fabricated with aluminum oxide membrane in MOCVD. SEM, XRD, TEM and PL are employed to characterize the fabricated GaN nanotubular material. An aluminum oxide membrane with ordered nano holes is used as template. Gallium nitride is deposited at the inner wall of the nano holes in aluminum oxide template, and the nanotubular material with high aspect ratio is synthesized using the precursors of TMG and ammonia gas. Optimal synthesis condition in MOCVD is obtained successfully for the gallium nitride nanotubular material in this research. The diameter of GaN nanotube fabricated is approximately 200 ~ 250 nm and the wall thickness is about 40 ~ 50 nm. GaN nanotubular material consists of numerous fine GaN particulates with sizes ranging 15 to 30 nm. The composition of gallium nitride is confirmed to be stoichiometrically 1:1 for Ga and N by EDS. XRD and TEM analyses indicate that grains in GaN nanotubular material have nano-crystalline structure. No blue shift is found in the PL spectrum on the GaN nanotubular material fabricated in aluminum oxide template.

  13. Fabrication of GaN nanotubular material using MOCVD with an aluminium oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Gwang; Jung, Se-Hyuck; Kung, Patrick; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2006-01-01

    GaN nanotubular material is fabricated with an aluminium oxide membrane in MOCVD. SEM, XRD, TEM and PL are employed to characterize the fabricated GaN nanotubular material. An aluminium oxide membrane with ordered nanoholes is used as a template. Gallium nitride is deposited at the inner wall of the nanoholes in the aluminium oxide template, and the nanotubular material with high aspect ratio is synthesized using the precursors of TMG and ammonia gas. Optimal synthesis conditions in MOCVD are obtained successfully for the gallium nitride nanotubular material in this research. The diameter of the GaN nanotube fabricated is approximately 200-250 nm and the wall thickness is about 40-50 nm. GaN nanotubular material consists of numerous fine GaN particulates with size range 15-30 nm. The composition of gallium nitride is confirmed to be stoichiometrically 1:1 for Ga and N by EDS. XRD and TEM analyses indicate that the grains in GaN nanotubular material have a nano-crystalline structure. No blue shift is found in the PL spectrum on the GaN nanotubular material fabricated in an aluminium oxide template.

  14. Theoretical Studies of the Electronic Structure of the Compounds of the Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Li, Jun; Blaudeau, Jean-Philippe; Bursten, Bruce E.

    2006-02-02

    In this chapter, we will present an overview of the theoretical and computational developments that have increased our understanding of the electronic structure of actinide-containing molecules and ions. The application of modern electronic structure methodologies to actinide systems remains one of the great challenges in quantum chemistry; indeed, as will be discussed below, there is no other portion of the periodic table that leads to the confluence of complexity with respect to the calculation of ground- and excited-state energies, bonding descriptions, and molecular properties. But there is also no place in the periodic table in which effective computational modeling of electronic structure can be more useful. The difficulties in creating, isolating, and handling many of the actinide elements provide an opportunity for computational chemistry to be an unusually important partner in developing the chemistry of these elements. The importance of actinide electronic structure begins with the earliest studies of uranium chemistry and predates the discovery of quantum mechanics. The fluorescence of uranyl compounds was observed as early as 1833 (Jørgensen and Reisfeld, 1983), a presage of the development of actinometry as a tool for measuring photochemical quantum yields. Interest in nuclear fuels has stimulated tremendous interest in understanding the properties, including electronic properties, of small actinide-containing molecules and ions, especially the oxides and halides of uranium and plutonium. The synthesis of uranocene in 1968 (Streitwieser and Mu¨ ller-Westerhoff, 1968) led to the flurry of activity in the organometallic chemistry of the actinides that continues today. Actinide organometallics (or organoactinides) are nearly always molecular systems and are often volatile, which makes them amenable to an arsenal of experimental probes of molecular and electronic structure (Marks and Fischer, 1979). Theoretical and computational studies of the electronic

  15. Final Technical Report for DE-SC0001878 [Theory and Simulation of Defects in Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chelikowsky, James R.

    2014-04-14

    We explored a wide variety of oxide materials and related problems, including materials at the nanoscale and generic problems associated with oxide materials such as the development of more efficient computational tools to examine these materials. We developed and implemented methods to understand the optical and structural properties of oxides. For ground state properties, our work is predominantly based on pseudopotentials and density functional theory (DFT), including new functionals and going beyond the local density approximation (LDA): LDA+U. To study excited state properties (quasiparticle and optical excitations), we use time dependent density functional theory, the GW approach, and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) methods based on a many-body Green function approaches. Our work focused on the structural, electronic, optical and magnetic properties of defects (such as oxygen vacancies) in hafnium oxide, titanium oxide (both bulk and clusters) and related materials. We calculated the quasiparticle defect states and charge transition levels of oxygen vacancies in monoclinic hafnia. we presented a milestone G0W0 study of two of the crystalline phases of dye-sensitized TiO{sub 2} clusters. We employed hybrid density functional theory to examine the electronic structure of sexithiophene/ZnO interfaces. To identify the possible effect of epitaxial strain on stabilization of the ferromagnetic state of LaCoO{sub 3} (LCO), we compare the total energy of the magnetic and nonmagnetic states of the strained theoretical bulk structure.

  16. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials.

    PubMed

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm(-3), reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1), covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1) and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of

  17. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity

  18. Toward laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Paul, M.; Collon, P.; Deibel, C.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Fonnesbeck, J.; Imel, G.

    2013-01-01

    A project to measure neutron capture cross sections of a number of actinides in a reactor environment by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory is underway. This project will require the precise and accurate measurement of produced actinide isotopes in many (>30) samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory with neutron fluxes having different energy distributions. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly-charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac and mass-to-charge (m/q) measurement at the focus of the Fragment Mass Analyzer. Laser ablation was selected as the method of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we expect it will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than either the oven or sputtering techniques, because of a much narrower angular distribution of emitted material. In addition, a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between samples and a computer-controlled routine allowing fast tuning of the accelerator for different beams, are being developed. An initial test run studying backgrounds, detector response, and accelerator scaling repeatability was conducted in December 2010. The project design, schedule, and results of the initial test run to study backgrounds are discussed.

  19. Oxidation rate of graphitic matrix material in the kinetic regime for VHTR air ingress accident scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jo Jo; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2014-08-01

    Data on oxidation rates of matrix-grade graphite in the kinetically-controlled temperature regime of graphite oxidation are needed for safety analysis of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors and Very High Temperature Reactors. In this work, the oxidation rate of graphitic matrix material GKrS was measured thermogravimetrically for various oxygen concentrations and with temperatures from 873 to 1873 K. A semi-empirical Arrhenius rate equation was also developed for this temperature range. The activation energy of the graphitic material is found to be about 111.5 kJ/mol. The order of reaction was found to be about 0.89. The surface of oxidized GKrS was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  20. System Design and New Materials for Reversible, Solid-Oxide, High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, J.A.

    2007-12-20

    High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer high electrical efficiency and a potential path to large scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide technology is capable of both power generation and hydrogen production. That makes it possible for the development of a reversible solid-oxide system that can respond to market conditions to produce electricity or hydrogen on demand. New high-temperature electrolyzer cell materials are needed to enable cost-effective hydrogen production system designs based on reversible steam electrolysis. Two test methods were established for the eventual development of the reversible, durable electrode materials: the button cell test and the oxygen electrode test. The button cell test is capable of evaluating the performance and degradation of full solid oxide cells with dual atmosphere of air and hydrogen-steam. The oxygen electrode test is capable of isolating the performance and degradation of the oxygen electrode. It has higher throughput and sensitivity than the button cell test.

  1. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  2. Porous structured vanadium oxide electrode material for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Ravinder N.; Reddy, Ramana G.

    A nano porous vanadium oxide (V 2O 5) was prepared by sol-gel method. The preparation involved elutriation of aqueous sodium meta vanadate over a cation exchange resin. The product was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, surface area analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Electrochemical characterization was done using cyclic voltammetry in a three electrode system consisting of a saturated calomel electrode as reference electrode, platinum mesh as a counter electrode, and V 2O 5 mounted on Ti mesh as the working electrode. Two molars of aqueous KCl, NaCl and LiCl were used as electrolytes. A maximum capacitance of 214 F g -1 was obtained at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 in 2 M KCl. The effect of different electrolytes and the effect of concentration of KCl on the specific capacitance of V 2O 5 were studied. Specific capacitance faded rapidly over 100 cycles in 2 M KCl at a 5 mV s -1 scan rate.

  3. A model for thermal oxidation of Si and SiC including material expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, T. Ioannidis, A.; Winkelmann, C.

    2015-02-28

    A model based on drift-diffusion-reaction kinetics for Si and SiC oxidation is discussed, which takes the material expansion into account with an additional convection term. The associated velocity field is determined self-consistently from the local reaction rate. The approach allows a calculation of the densities of volatile species in an nm-resolution at the oxidation front. The model is illustrated with simulation results for the growth and impurity redistribution during Si oxidation and for carbon and silicon emission during SiC oxidation. The approach can be useful for the prediction of Si and/or C interstitial distribution, which is particularly relevant for the quality of metal-oxide-semiconductor electronic devices.

  4. Noncovalent Functionalization of Graphene and Graphene Oxide for Energy Materials, Biosensing, Catalytic, and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Georgakilas, Vasilios; Tiwari, Jitendra N; Kemp, K Christian; Perman, Jason A; Bourlinos, Athanasios B; Kim, Kwang S; Zboril, Radek

    2016-05-11

    This Review focuses on noncovalent functionalization of graphene and graphene oxide with various species involving biomolecules, polymers, drugs, metals and metal oxide-based nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanostructures, other carbon allotropes (fullerenes, nanodiamonds, and carbon nanotubes), and graphene analogues (MoS2, WS2). A brief description of π-π interactions, van der Waals forces, ionic interactions, and hydrogen bonding allowing noncovalent modification of graphene and graphene oxide is first given. The main part of this Review is devoted to tailored functionalization for applications in drug delivery, energy materials, solar cells, water splitting, biosensing, bioimaging, environmental, catalytic, photocatalytic, and biomedical technologies. A significant part of this Review explores the possibilities of graphene/graphene oxide-based 3D superstructures and their use in lithium-ion batteries. This Review ends with a look at challenges and future prospects of noncovalently modified graphene and graphene oxide. PMID:27033639

  5. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.; Wilson, J. N.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Guillemin, P.; Ivanov, E.; Méplan, O.; Nuttin, A.; Siem, S.

    2012-02-01

    The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U) is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX) and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  6. Actinide solubility-controlling phases during the dissolution of phosphate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Fou de Kerdaniel, E.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.; Terra, O.; Podor, R.

    2007-05-01

    Phosphate ceramics (britholites, monazite/brabantite solid solutions, thorium phosphate diphosphate, i.e. β-TPD, and associated β-TPD/monazite composites) are often considered as potential candidates to immobilize tri- and tetravalent actinides. In order to study the properties of such materials on the retention of actinides during aqueous alteration, phosphate-based neoformed phases were prepared using under- and over-saturation processes then extensively characterized (involving grazing XRD, EPMA, μ-Raman, IR or SEM). In over-saturation conditions, lanthanides (used as surrogates of trivalent actinides) are quickly precipitated as three hydrated forms (monazite, rhabdophane or xenotime) depending on the temperature, the heating time and the ionic radius of the element. Moreover, as already described for thorium, tetravalent actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu) are more often immobilized as phosphate hydrogenphosphate compounds. However, samples of (Ln,Ca,Th)-rhabdophane can also precipitate in the presence of large concentrations of calcium. Such neoformed phases were also precipitated at the surface of leached phosphate-based ceramics during under-saturation experiments. The associated thermodynamic solubility constants at infinite dilution were estimated. Due to their rapid precipitation and their very low solubility constants, these actinide phosphate solubility-controlling phases appear of significant interest in the field of the evaluation of the long-term performance of actinide-doped phosphate ceramics.

  7. Introduction of Metal Oxides into Mg2Si Thermoelectric Materials by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiameni, S.; Famengo, A.; Boldrini, S.; Battiston, S.; Saleemi, M.; Stingaciu, M.; Jhonsson, M.; Barison, S.; Fabrizio, M.

    2013-07-01

    Oxide incorporation into thermoelectric Mg2Si-based materials was performed starting from commercial Mg2Si and commercial metal oxides by applying ball milling and spark plasma sintering (SPS) processing. The SPS conditions, such as sintering temperature, pressure, and holding time, were optimized with the aim of obtaining both full densification and oxide incorporation. Thermoelectric characterizations, such as Seebeck coefficient and electrical and thermal conductivity, were carried out and related to the pellet compositions. The morphology, composition, and crystallographic structure of the samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction analyses, respectively.

  8. Investigation of the properties of Sb doping on tin oxide SNO2 materials for technological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachoun, Z.; Ouerdane, A.; Bouslama, M.; Ghaffour, M.; Abdellaoui, A.; Caudano, Y.; benamara, A. Ali

    2016-04-01

    The conductivities of the oxide SnO2 is dependent on the nature of the surrounding gas. This property stems from the adsorption or desorption on the surface of oxide grains. These phenomena are usually accompanied by electronic transfer between the adsorbed molecule and the semiconductor material, changing its conductivity. Tin oxidation and Sb doping were realized without and with heating process. The XPS technique and the TEM microscopy showed the synthesized nanocrystals. Simulated Monte Carlo program Casino is used for a scanning its profile. The surface characteristics are highlighted in the aim to be used as spatial gas sensors.

  9. Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Zinc Oxide Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin

    The present dissertation investigates the relationship between the structure and thermoelectric properties of ZnO based materials, with a focus on trivalent element doping on engineering the microstructure and altering the electrical and thermal transport properties. Within the solubility range, the addition of trivalent elements, such as In3+, Fe 3+ and Ga3+, is observed to increase the electrical conductivity of ZnO and decrease the thermal conductivity. As the solubility is exceeded, the consequent structure and thermoelectric properties varies with dopant species. The ZnO-In2O3 binary system, which we have chosen as one of the model systems, is of particular interests as it contains a variety of phase equilibria and microstructures. The In2O3(ZnO)k superlattice structures, which form as the indium solubility is reached, are observed to strongly scatter phonons while relatively permissive to electrons, resulting in a low thermal conductivity of about 2 W/mK and improved electrical conductivity. The thermal (Kapitza) resistance of In2O3(ZnO)k superlattice interfaces is found to be 5.0 +/- 0.6 x 10-10 m 2K/W by fitting the modified Klemens-Callaway's thermal conductivity model to the experimental data. Across the phase diagram, the materials behave as n-type free-electron semiconductors at high temperatures. An effective medium approximation model is for the first time successfully tested on the thermoelectrics of two-phase regions. Both Fe2O3-ZnO and Ga2O3-ZnO binary systems are also investigated. In the Fe doped ZnO system, a highly Fe concentrated ZnO solid solution phase as well as the significant grain refinement are observed after high temperature annealing. The Ga2O 3(ZnO)9 homologous superlattices in Ga2O 3-ZnO system is also found to strongly scatter phonons and induces a drastic reduction in thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity, as one of the key factors in thermoelectrics, is highly sensitive to material defects. In this dissertation, I also

  10. Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2005-06-01

    Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the

  11. Pb scavenging from a freshwater lake by Mn oxides in heterogeneous surface coating materials.

    PubMed

    Dong, Deming; Derry, Louis A; Lion, Leonard W

    2003-04-01

    Selective extraction techniques were used to assay the importance of specific solid phases in Pb binding by heterogeneous surface coating materials (biofilms) in Cayuga Lake, NY. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride (NH(2)OH.HC1) was used to extract easily reducible Mn oxides, and sodium dithionite (Na(2)S(2)O(4)) was used to extract Mn and Fe oxides in two sets of biofilm samples retrieved from the lake. Pb remaining after extraction was removed by extraction with 10% HNO(3), determined by analysis of Pb(208) using a sector field mass spectrometer with an inductively coupled plasma ion source (ICP-MS), and compared to the total extractable Pb. The results indicate that the greatest contribution to total Pb binding to the heterogeneous surface coating materials was from Mn oxides. Pb adsorption capacity of Mn oxides exceeded that of Fe oxides on a molar basis by approximately an order of magnitude. The high reactivity observed for natural Mn oxides indicates that they are biogenic in origin, consistent with expectations based on the relative biotic and abiotic rates of Mn(II) oxidation under circumneutral conditions. Collectively, these results confirm expectations based on prior observations of adsorption of added Pb by Cayuga Lake biofilms before and after selective extraction, and also confirm predictions for Pb phase association in the lake based on the behavior of laboratory surrogates for adsorptive surfaces. PMID:12600395

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During sludge washing procedures associated with tank waste remediation, actinide ions are expected to remain with the insoluble metal oxide/hydroxide residue as the sludges are scrubbed to remove Cr, P, Al, S, and thus to be transmitted conveniently to the vitrification plant. ...

  13. Local structure in solid solutions of stabilised zirconia with actinide dioxides (UO{sub 2}, NpO{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Marcus; Somers, Joseph; Bouexiere, Daniel; Rothe, Joerg

    2011-04-15

    The local structure of (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y,Np)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions has been investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Samples were prepared by mixing reactive (Zr,Lu)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y)O{sub 2-x} precursor materials with the actinide oxide powders, respectively. Sintering at 1600 {sup o}C in Ar/H{sub 2} yields a fluorite structure with U(IV) and Np(IV). As typical for stabilised zirconia the metal-oxygen and metal-metal distances are characteristic for the different metal ions. The bond lengths increase with actinide concentration, whereas highest adaptation to the bulk stabilised zirconia structure was observed for U---O and Np---O bonds. The Zr---O bond shows only a slight increase from 2.14 A at 6 mol% actinide to 2.18 A at infinite dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. The short interatomic distance between Zr and the surrounding oxygen and metal atoms indicate a low relaxation of Zr with respect to the bulk structure, i.e. a strong Pauling behaviour. -- Graphical abstract: Metal-oxygen bond distances in (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions with different oxygen vacancy concentrations (Lu/Zr=1 and Lu/Zr=0.5). Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} EXAFS indicates high U and Np adaption to the bulk structure of stabilised zirconia. {yields} Zr---O bond length is 2.18 A at infinite Zr dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. {yields} Low relaxation (strong Pauling behaviour) of Zr explains its low solubility in UO{sub 2}.

  14. Strengthening of oxidation resistant materials for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, D. R.; Kirchner, H. P.; Gruver, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Compressive surface layers were formed on hot-pressed silicon carbide and nitride. The objective of these treatments was to improve the impact resistance of these materials at 1590 K (2400 F). Quenching was used to form compressive surface layers on silicon carbide. The presence of the compressive stresses was demonstrated by slotted rod tests. Compressive stresses were retained at elevated temperatures. Improvements in impact resistance at 1590 K (2400 F) and flexural strength at room temperature were achieved using cylindrical rods 3.3 mm (0.13 in.) in diameter. Carburizing treatments were used to form the surface layers on silicon nitride. In a few cases using rectangular bars improvements in impact resistance at 1590 K (2400 F) were observed.

  15. Method of making nanopatterns and nanostructures and nanopatterned functional oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Dravid, Vinayak P; Donthu, Suresh K; Pan, Zixiao

    2014-02-11

    Method for nanopatterning of inorganic materials, such as ceramic (e.g. metal oxide) materials, and organic materials, such as polymer materials, on a variety of substrates to form nanopatterns and/or nanostructures with control of dimensions and location, all without the need for etching the materials and without the need for re-alignment between multiple patterning steps in forming nanostructures, such as heterostructures comprising multiple materials. The method involves patterning a resist-coated substrate using electron beam lithography, removing a portion of the resist to provide a patterned resist-coated substrate, and spin coating the patterned resist-coated substrate with a liquid precursor, such as a sol precursor, of the inorganic or organic material. The remaining resist is removed and the spin coated substrate is heated at an elevated temperature to crystallize the deposited precursor material.

  16. Materials compatibility with oxidizer-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of oxygen compatibility and resistance to ignition of candidate materials for use in a liquid rocket engine designed to incorporate an oxidizer rich preburner-LOX turbopump configuration was discussed. The program was divided into two basic tasks. The first task was to develop a preliminary design of an oxidizer turbopump preburner section complete with thermal and MS Parameter analyses and to develop a conceptual design of the main injector with a preliminary engine specification as the final product. The second task was directed totally at testing materials in oxygen-rich environments.

  17. Oxidation of plutonium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Vitos, Levente; Andersson, David A; Johansson, Börje

    2004-04-01

    The physics and chemistry of the actinide elements form the scientific basis for rational handling of nuclear materials. In recent experiments, most unexpectedly, plutonium dioxide has been found to react with water to form higher oxides up to PuO(2.27), whereas PuO(2) had always been thought to be the highest stable oxide of plutonium. We perform a theoretical analysis of this complicated situation on the basis of total energies calculated within density functional theory combined with well-established thermodynamic data. The reactions of PuO(2) with either O(2) or H(2)O to form PuO(2+delta) are calculated to be endothermic: that is, in order to occur they require a supply of energy. However, our calculations show that PuO(2+delta) can be formed, as an intermediate product, by reactions with the products of radiolysis of water, such as H(2)O(2). PMID:15034561

  18. Sol gel synthesis and characterization of tin oxide and doped-tin oxide nanosized materials used for gas-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei

    SnO2-based gas sensors have been shown to be convenient tools for detecting inflammable or toxic gases diluted in air. Grain size reduction and mixed tin oxidation states are two of the main factors enhancing sensor properties of undoped and doped tin oxides. Two tin(II) halide precursors were utilized along with variations in solvent, aging times, drying atmosphere and annealing temperatures to synthesize SnO, SnO2 or the SnO/SnO2 mixed powders by a modified sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction and UV-Visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy were the primary techniques used to characterize powder structure and properties. It has been found that SnCl2 is a suitable precursor for synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed Sn(II)/Sn(IV) oxide powders. The ratio of SnO to SnO2 can be adjusted by sintering/annealing of the SnO/SnO 2 mixture in air. A rarely observed form of Sn3O4 and another intermediate phase, orthorhombic SnO2, can be generated at the range of 500--600°C. SnBr2 and SnBr4 can be used as precursors for an efficient low-temperature, atmospheric pressure vapor deposition of nanocrystalline SnO2, most likely via a partially hydrolyzed Sn(IV) bromide intermediate. As vapor-deposited, the average SnO 2 crystallite size is approximately 3 nm, and can be increased systematically from 3 nm to 16 nm by annealing in air. The presence of amorphous material and the remaining hydroxyl groups in the SnO2 crystals are possible causes of the crystalline deformation of SnO/SnO2 materials precipitated from SnCl2. SnO 2 obtained from the SnO/SnO2 mixture are more disordered than that from tin(H) oxyhydroxide and from SnO2 gel heated at the same sintering temperature. The more disordered material has lower band gaps and bigger Urbach energies. Coprecipitation of a second metal, such as Cr, Fe, Zn, Co, K and Cu, results in variations in SnO2 crystallite growth patterns, depending on identity of the added dopant. Metal oxide materials mixed with polypyrrole were tested as composite

  19. Synthesis of nanostructured manganese oxides based materials and application for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung Dang, Trung; Le, Thi Thu Hang; Bich Thuy Hoang, Thi; Mai, Thanh Tung

    2015-01-01

    Manganese oxides are important materials with a variety of applications in different fields such as chemical sensing devices, magnetic devices, field-emission devices, catalysis, ion-sieves, rechargeable batteries, hydrogen storage media and microelectronics. To open up new applications of manganese oxides, novel morphologies or nanostructures are required to be developed. Via sol—gel and anodic electrodeposition methods, M (Co, Fe) doped manganese oxides were prepared. On the other hand, nanostructured (nanoparticles, nanorods and hollow nanotubes) manganese oxides were synthesized via a process including a chemical reaction with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) templates followed by heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for characterization of the prepared materials. The influence of chemical reaction conditions, heat treatment and template present on the morphology, structure, chemical and electrochemical properties of the prepared materials were investigated. Chronopotentiometry (CP) and CV results show high specific capacitance of 186.2 to 298.4 F g-1 and the charge/discharge stability of the prepared materials and the ideal pseudocapacitive behaviors were observed. These results give an opening and promising application of these materials in advanced energy storage applications.

  20. Dry Blending to Achieve Isotopic Dilution of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Roger Neil; Chipman, Nathan Alan; Rajamani, R. K.

    2001-04-01

    The end of the cold war produced large amounts of excess fissile materials in the United States and Russia. The Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies for disposition of these excess materials. To date, many of these planning strategies have included isotopic dilution of highly enriched uranium as a means of reducing the proliferation and safety risks. Isotopic dilution by dry blending highly enriched uranium with natural and/or depleted uranium has been identified as one non-aqueous method to achieve these risk (proliferation and criticality safety) reductions. This paper reviews the technology of dry blending as applied to free flowing oxide materials.

  1. Actinides in Solution: Disproportionation, Strong Correlations, and Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Brad; Horowitz, Steven

    2010-03-01

    Plutonium in acid solutions can be found in oxidation states III through VI. There is a striking near perfect degeneracy of the reduction-oxidation (redox) potentials, each being about 1 volt. Neptunium is the only other element that approaches this degree of degeneracy. One consequence of the redox degeneracy is a marked tendency of plutonium ions to disproportionate; up to four different oxidation states can coexist simultaneously in the same solution, greatly complicating the environmental chemistry of the element. While the degeneracy could simply be a coincidence, it could also be the manifestation of a higher-level organizing principle at work. Other systems that exhibit disproportionation raise the possibility of an emergent negative-U attractive interaction. The hypothesis is tested by combining first-principles relativistic density-functional calculations using the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) package with exact diagonalizations of Hubbard-like models of the strong correlations between the actinide 5f electrons.

  2. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1984-05-21

    A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  3. Moessbauer search for ferric oxide phases in lunar materials and simulated lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forester, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were carried out on lunar fines and on simulated lunar glasses containing magnetic-like precipitates with the primary objective of determining how much, if any, ferric oxide is present in the lunar soils. Although unambiguous evidence of lunar Fe(3+) phases was not obtained, an upper limit was estimated from different portions of the Moessbauer spectra to be between 0.1 and 0.4 wt.% (as Fe3O4). A smaller than 62 microns fraction of 15021,118 showed 0.5 wt.% ferromagnetic iron at 300 K in as-returned condition. After heating to 650 C in an evacuated, sealed quartz tube for 1400 hours, the same sample exhibited 1 wt.% ferromagnetic iron at room temperature. An accompanying decrease in excess absorption area near zero velocity was noted. Thus, the result of the vacuum heat treatment was to convert fine grained iron to larger particles, apparently without the oxidation effects commonly reported.

  4. Kinetics of sorption and abiotic oxidation of arsenic(III) by aquifer materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amirbahman, A.; Kent, D.B.; Curtis, G.P.; Davis, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends largely on its interaction with mineral surfaces. We investigated the kinetics of As(III) oxidation by aquifer materials collected from the USGS research site at Cape Cod, MA, USA, by conducting laboratory experiments. Five different solid samples with similar specific surface areas (0.6-0.9 m2 g-1) and reductively extractable iron contents (18-26 ??mol m-2), but with varying total manganese contents (0.5-3.5 ??mol m-2) were used. Both dissolved and adsorbed As(III) and As(V) concentrations were measured with time up to 250 h. The As(III) removal rate from solution increased with increasing solid manganese content, suggesting that manganese oxide is responsible for the oxidation of As(III). Under all conditions, dissolved As(V) concentrations were very low. A quantitative model was developed to simulate the extent and kinetics of arsenic transformation by aquifer materials. The model included: (1) reversible rate-limited adsorption of As(III) onto both oxidative and non-oxidative (adsorptive) sites, (2) irreversible rate-limited oxidation of As(III), and (3) equilibrium adsorption of As(V) onto adsorptive sites. Rate constants for these processes, as well as the total oxidative site densities were used as the fitting parameters. The total adsorptive site densities were estimated based on the measured specific surface area of each material. The best fit was provided by considering one fast and one slow site for each adsorptive and oxidative site. The fitting parameters were obtained using the kinetic data for the most reactive aquifer material at different initial As(III) concentrations. Using the same parameters to simulate As(III) and As(V) surface reactions, the model predictions were compared to observations for aquifer materials with different manganese contents. The model simulated the experimental data very well for all materials at all initial As(III) concentrations. The As(V) production rate was related to the

  5. Kinetics of sorption and abiotic oxidation of arsenic(III) by aquifer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirbahman, Aria; Kent, Douglas B.; Curtis, Gary P.; Davis, James A.

    2006-02-01

    The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends largely on its interaction with mineral surfaces. We investigated the kinetics of As(III) oxidation by aquifer materials collected from the USGS research site at Cape Cod, MA, USA, by conducting laboratory experiments. Five different solid samples with similar specific surface areas (0.6-0.9 m 2 g -1) and reductively extractable iron contents (18-26 μmol m -2), but with varying total manganese contents (0.5-3.5 μmol m -2) were used. Both dissolved and adsorbed As(III) and As(V) concentrations were measured with time up to 250 h. The As(III) removal rate from solution increased with increasing solid manganese content, suggesting that manganese oxide is responsible for the oxidation of As(III). Under all conditions, dissolved As(V) concentrations were very low. A quantitative model was developed to simulate the extent and kinetics of arsenic transformation by aquifer materials. The model included: (1) reversible rate-limited adsorption of As(III) onto both oxidative and non-oxidative (adsorptive) sites, (2) irreversible rate-limited oxidation of As(III), and (3) equilibrium adsorption of As(V) onto adsorptive sites. Rate constants for these processes, as well as the total oxidative site densities were used as the fitting parameters. The total adsorptive site densities were estimated based on the measured specific surface area of each material. The best fit was provided by considering one fast and one slow site for each adsorptive and oxidative site. The fitting parameters were obtained using the kinetic data for the most reactive aquifer material at different initial As(III) concentrations. Using the same parameters to simulate As(III) and As(V) surface reactions, the model predictions were compared to observations for aquifer materials with different manganese contents. The model simulated the experimental data very well for all materials at all initial As(III) concentrations. The As(V) production rate was related to the

  6. Semiconducting large bandgap oxides as potential thermoelectric materials for high-temperature power generation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus-Ricoult, M.; Rustad, J.; Moore, L.; Smith, C.; Brown, J.

    2014-08-01

    Semiconducting large bandgap oxides are considered as interesting candidates for high-temperature thermoelectric power generation (700-1,200 °C) due to their stability, lack of toxicity and low cost, but so far they have not reached sufficient performance for extended application. In this review, we summarize recent progress on thermoelectric oxides, analyze concepts for tuning semiconductor thermoelectric properties with view of their applicability to oxides and determine key drivers and limitations for electrical and thermal transport properties in oxides based on our own experimental work and literature results. For our experimental assessment, we have selected representative multicomponent oxides that range from materials with highly symmetric crystal structure (SrTiO3 perovskite) over oxides with large densities of planar crystallographic defects (Ti n O2 n-1 Magnéli phases with a single type of shear plane, NbO x block structures with intersecting shear planes and WO3- x with more defective block and channel structures) to layered superstructures (Ca3Co4O9 and double perovskites) and also include a wide range of their composites with a variety of second phases. Crystallographic or microstructural features of these oxides are in 0.3-2 nm size range, so that oxide phonons can efficiently interact with them. We explore in our experiments the effects of doping, grain size, crystallographic defects, superstructures, second phases, texturing and (to a limited extend) processing on electric conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity and figure of merit. Jonker and lattice-versus-electrical conductivity plots are used to compare specific materials and material families and extract levers for future improvement of oxide thermoelectrics. We show in our work that oxygen vacancy doping (reduction) is a more powerful driver for improving the power factor for SrTiO3, TiO2 and NbO x than heterovalent doping. Based on our Seebeck-conductivity plots, we derived

  7. Predictions of Actinide Solubilities under Near-Field Conditions Expected in the WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, L. H.; Xiong, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository in southeast New Mexico for defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The repository, which opened in March 1999, is located at a subsurface depth of 655 m (2150 ft) in the Salado Fm., a Permian bedded-salt formation. The repository will eventually contain the equivalent of 844,000 208 L (55 gal) drums of TRU waste. After filling the rooms and access drifts and installing panel closures, creep closure of the salt will crush the steel waste containers in most cases and encapsulate the waste. The WIPP actinide source term model used for long-term performance assessment (PA) of the repository comprises dissolved and suspended submodels (solubilities and colloids). This presentation will describe the solubilities. From the standpoint of long-term PA, the order of importance of the radioelements in the TRU waste to be emplaced in the WIPP is Pu ~ Am >> U > Th >> Np ~ Cm and fission products. The DOE has included all of these actinides, but not fission products, in the WIPP Actinide Source Term Program (ASTP). Anoxic corrosion of Fe- and Al-base metals and microbial consumption of cellulosic, plastic, and rubber materials will produce gas and create strongly reducing conditions in the WIPP after closure. The use of MgO as an engineered barrier to consume microbially produced CO2 will result in low fCO2 and basic pH. Under these conditions, Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am will speciate essentially entirely as Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III), and Am(III); or Th(IV), U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), and Am(III). The DOE has developed thermodynamic speciation-and-solubility models for +III, +IV, and +V actinides in brines. Experimental data for Nd, Am, and Cm species were used to parameterize the +III Pitzer activity-coefficient model; data for Th species were used for the +IV model; and data for Np(V) species were used for the +V model. These models include the effects of the organic ligands acetate, citrate

  8. A novel composite material based on antimony(III) oxide and amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Zemnukhova, Ludmila A.; Panasenko, Alexander E.

    2013-05-01

    The composite material nSb₂O₃·mSiO₂·xH₂O was prepared by hydrolysis of SbCl₃ and Na₂SiO₃ in an aqueous medium. It has been shown that the composition of the material is influenced by the ratio of the initial components and the acidity of the reaction medium. The morphology of the material particles and its specific surface area have been determined. The thermal and optic properties were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Novel composite material containing amorphous silica and crystal antimony(III) oxide has been synthesized by hydrolysis of SbCl₃ and Na₂SiO₃ in an aqueous medium. Highlights: • The composite material nSb₂O₃·mSiO₂·xH₂O was prepared in an aqueous medium. • The composition of the material is controllable by a synthesis conditions. • The morphology of the material and its optic properties have been determined.

  9. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian, Waris, Abdul; Ismail, Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by convertion rasio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loding scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  10. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul; Ismail; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-30

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by conversion ratio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loading scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  11. Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1994-05-01

    A series of static leach tests was conducted using glasses developed for vitrifying tank wastes at the Savannah River Site to monitor the disposition of actinide elements upon corrosion of the glasses. In these tests, glasses produced from SRL 131 and SRL 202 frits were corroded at 90{degrees}C in a tuff groundwater. Tests were conducted using crushed glass at different glass surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) ratios to assess the effect of the S/V on the solution chemistry, the corrosion of the glass, and the disposition of actinide elements. Observations regarding the effects of the S/V on the solution chemistry and the corrosion of the glass matrix have been reported previously. This paper highlights the solution analyses performed to assess how the S/V used in a static leach test affects the disposition of actinide elements between fractions that are suspended or dissolved in the solution, and retained by the altered glass or other materials.

  12. Molecular receptors in metal oxide sol-gel materials prepared via molecular imprinting

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Daitch, Charles E.; Shea, Kenneth J.; Rush, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for molecularly imprinting the surface of a sol-gel material, by forming a solution comprised of a sol-gel material, a solvent, an imprinting molecule, and a functionalizing siloxane monomer of the form Si(OR).sub.3-n X.sub.n, wherein n is an integer between zero and three and X is a functional group capable of reacting with the imprinting molecule, evaporating the solvent, and removing the imprinting molecule to form the molecularly imprinted metal oxide sol-gel material. The use of metal oxide sol-gels allows the material porosity, pore size, density, surface area, hardness, electrostatic charge, polarity, optical density, and surface hydrophobicity to be tailored and be employed as sensors and in catalytic and separations operations.

  13. Ordered mesoporous ternary mixed oxide materials as potential adsorbent of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Nabanita; Bhaumik, Asim

    2012-05-01

    Designing a suitable mesoporous framework material for the selective adsorption or immobilization of biomolecules is a very challenging area of research. Mesoporous ternary Co-Si-Al oxide materials with large mesopore and their nanoscale ordering have been reported. The synthesis of these ternary oxides are accomplished through evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method using Pluronic non-ionic surfactant F127 under non-aqueous sol-gel route. N2 sorption study revealed high BET surface areas for these materials. These materials exhibited very efficient and selective adsorption for the essential biomolecules like vitamin C (ascorbic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) and vitamin B3 (nicotinic acid) from their respective aqueous solutions.

  14. Design Principles for Metal Oxide Redox Materials for Solar-Driven Isothermal Fuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Ronald; Botu, Venkatesh; Hargus, Cory M; Peterson, Andrew A; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The performance of metal oxides as redox materials is limited by their oxygen conductivity and thermochemical stability. Predicting these properties from the electronic structure can support the screening of advanced metal oxides and accelerate their development for clean energy applications. Specifically, reducible metal oxide catalysts and potential redox materials for the solar-thermochemical splitting of CO2 and H2O via an isothermal redox cycle are examined. A volcano-type correlation is developed from available experimental data and density functional theory. It is found that the energy of the oxygen-vacancy formation at the most stable surfaces of TiO2, Ti2O3, Cu2O, ZnO, ZrO2, MoO3, Ag2O, CeO2, yttria-stabilized zirconia, and three perovskites scales with the Gibbs free energy of formation of the bulk oxides. Analogously, the experimental oxygen self-diffusion constants correlate with the transition-state energy of oxygen conduction. A simple descriptor is derived for rapid screening of oxygen-diffusion trends across a large set of metal oxide compositions. These general trends are rationalized with the electronic charge localized at the lattice oxygen and can be utilized to predict the surface activity, the free energy of complex bulk metal oxides, and their oxygen conductivity. PMID:26855639

  15. Investigation of oxidation resistance of carbon based first-wall liner materials of fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moormann, R.; Hinssen, H. K.; Krüssenberg, A.-K.; Stauch, B.; Wu, C. H.

    1994-09-01

    One important aspect in selection of carbon based first-wall liner materials in fusion reactors is a sufficient oxidation resistance against steam and oxygen; this is because during accidents like loss of coolant into vacuum or loss of vacuum these oxidizing media can enter the vacuum vessel and may cause some corrosion of carbon followed by release of adsorbed tritium; in addition other consequences of oxidation like formation of burnable gases and their explosions have to be examined. Based on extensive experience on nuclear graphite oxidation in HTRs KFA has started in cooperation with NET some experimental investigations on oxidation of fusion reactor carbons. Results of first experiments on CFCs, Ti- and Si-doped carbons and graphites in steam (1273-1423 K) and oxygen (973 K) are reported. It was found that most materials have a similar reactivity as HTR nuclear graphites (which is much smaller than those of usual technical carbons); Si-doped CFCs however have a remarkably better oxidation resistance than those, which is probably due to the formation of a protecting layer of SiO 2. The measured kinetic data will be used in safety analyses for above mentioned accidents.

  16. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Green, Thomas D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; DePrince, A. Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J.; Van Cleve, Shelley M.; House, Jane H.; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A.; Dixon, David A.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2015-04-16

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. As a result, the metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence.

  17. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Green, Thomas D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; et al

    2015-04-16

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, andmore » show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. As a result, the metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence.« less

  18. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series.

    PubMed

    Cary, Samantha K; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E; Stritzinger, Jared T; Green, Thomas D; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A; DePrince, A Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J; Van Cleve, Shelley M; House, Jane H; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A; Dixon, David A; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. The metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence. PMID:25880116

  19. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Green, Thomas D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; DePrince, A. Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J.; Van Cleve, Shelley M.; House, Jane H.; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A.; Dixon, David A.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. The metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence. PMID:25880116

  20. Dynamics of Wet Oxidation of High-AL-Content III-V Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.

    1999-01-27

    Oxidation of layers of high-Al-content III-V materials by water vapor has become the enabling process for high-efficiency vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) and has potential applications for reducing substrate current leakage in GaAs-on-insulator (GOI) MESFETS. Because of the established importance of wet oxidation in optoelectronic devices and its potential applications in electronic devices, it has become increasingly important to understand the mechanism of wet oxidation and how it might be expected to affect both the fabrication and subsequent operation of devices that have been made using this technique. The mechanism of wet oxidation and the consequence of this mechanism for heterostructure design and ultimate device operation are discussed here.

  1. Oxide-ion and proton conducting electrolyte materials for clean energy applications: structural and mechanistic features.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo; Fisher, Craig A J; Islam, M Saiful

    2010-11-01

    This critical review presents an overview of the various classes of oxide materials exhibiting fast oxide-ion or proton conductivity for use as solid electrolytes in clean energy applications such as solid oxide fuel cells. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between structural and mechanistic features of the crystalline materials and their ion conduction properties. After describing well-established classes such as fluorite- and perovskite-based oxides, new materials and structure-types are presented. These include a variety of molybdate, gallate, apatite silicate/germanate and niobate systems, many of which contain flexible structural networks, and exhibit different defect properties and transport mechanisms to the conventional materials. It is concluded that the rich chemistry of these important systems provides diverse possibilities for developing superior ionic conductors for use as solid electrolytes in fuel cells and related applications. In most cases, a greater atomic-level understanding of the structures, defects and conduction mechanisms is achieved through a combination of experimental and computational techniques (217 references). PMID:20848015

  2. Progress in spin-on metal oxide hardmask materials for filling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huirong; Dioses, Alberto D.; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; McKenzie, Douglas; Rahman, Dalil; Cho, JoonYeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna; Petermann, Claire; Her, YoungJun; Cao, Yi

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that metal oxide films are useful as hard mask material in semiconductor industry for their excellent etch resistance against plasma etches. In the advanced lithography processes, in addition to good etch resistance, they also need to possess good wet removability, fill capability, in high aspect ratio contacts or trenches. Conventional metal containing materials can be applied by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). Films derived from these techniques have difficulty in controlling wet etch, have low throughput and need special equipment. This leads to high costs. Therefore it is desirable to develop simple spin-on coating materials to generate metal oxide hard masks that have good trench or via filling performances using spin track friendly processing conditions. In this report, novel spin-on type inorganic formulations providing Ti, W, Hf and Zr oxide hard masks will be described. The new materials have demonstrated high etch selectivity, good filling performances, wet removal capability, low trace metals and good shelf-life stability. These novel AZ® Spin-on metal hard mask formulations can be used in several new applications and can potentially replace any metal, metal oxide, metal nitride or silicon-containing hard mask films currently deposited using CVD process in the semiconductor manufacturing process.

  3. 78 FR 27374 - Workshop To Review Initial Draft Materials for the Nitrogen Oxides (NOX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ...As part of the review of the air quality criteria for nitrogen oxides (NOX) and primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), EPA is announcing a workshop to evaluate preliminary draft materials that will inform the development of the NOX Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for health effects. The workshop is......

  4. Oxidation and creep behavior of Mo*5*Si*3* based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.

    1995-06-19

    Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} shows promise as a high temperature creep resistant material. The high temperature oxidation resistance of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} has been found to be poor, however, limiting its use in oxidizing atmospheres. Undoped Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} exhibits mass loss in the temperature range 800{degrees}-1200{degrees}C due to volatilization of molybdenum oxide, indicating that the silica scale does not provide a passivating layer. The addition of boron results in protective scale formation and parabolic oxidation kinetics in the temperature range of 1050{degrees}-1300{degrees}C. The oxidation rate of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was decreased by 5 orders of magnitude at 1200{degrees}C by doping with less than two weight percent boron. Boron doping eliminates catastrophic {open_quote}pest{close_quote} oxidation at 800{degrees}C. The mechanism for improved oxidation resistance of boron doped Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} is due to scale modification by boron.

  5. Chemical reduction of actinides probed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Shuh, David K; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Guo, Jinghua; Werme, Lars; Nordgren, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    The study addresses the possibilities of immobilizing the mobile species of actinides in the geosphere using metallic iron. Sorption on corroding iron is well-known, but there have been uncertainties with regard to the possibilities of reducing the actinyl species to sparingly soluble oxides and, thereby, permanently immobilizing them. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the actinide 5d edges on Fe foils exposed to uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) solutions in groundwater unambigiously indicate reduction of actinides to, respectively, uranium(IV) and neptunium(IV) on iron surfaces. The reduction manifests itself in an appearance of distinct specific signatures of uranium(IV) and neptunium(IV) in the RIXS profile of 5f-5f excitations. Such signatures and RIXS intensity/cross-section behavior with varying energy of incident photons can be reproduced by model atomic-multiplet calculations of the RIXS spectra. By normalizing the RIXS signal of corresponding 5f-5f excitations to core-to-core 6p-to-5d characteristic fluorescence transitions of actinides, their reduction rates on Fe samples with different exposure to actinide solutions can be estimated. Observed reduction implies similar processes in the nuclear waste canister thus suggesting reduced probability of nuclear waste release with ground waters from the canister. PMID:24187957

  6. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

  7. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  8. CMOS compatible electrode materials selection in oxide-based memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, V. Y.-Q.; Li, M.; Guo, Y.; Wang, W.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Robertson, J.

    2016-07-01

    Electrode materials selection guidelines for oxide-based memory devices are constructed from the combined knowledge of observed device operation characteristics, ab-initio calculations, and nano-material characterization. It is demonstrated that changing the top electrode material from Ge to Cr to Ta in the Ta2O5-based memory devices resulted in a reduction of the operation voltages and current. Energy Dispersed X-ray (EDX) Spectrometer analysis clearly shows that the different top electrode materials scavenge oxygen ions from the Ta2O5 memory layer at various degrees, leading to different oxygen vacancy concentrations within the Ta2O5, thus the observed trends in the device performance. Replacing the Pt bottom electrode material with CMOS compatible materials (Ru and Ir) further reduces the power consumption and can be attributed to the modification of the Schottky barrier height and oxygen vacancy concentration at the electrode/oxide interface. Both trends in the device performance and EDX results are corroborated by the ab-initio calculations which reveal that the electrode material tunes the oxygen vacancy concentration via the oxygen chemical potential and defect formation energy. This experimental-theoretical approach strongly suggests that the proper selection of CMOS compatible electrode materials will create the critical oxygen vacancy concentration to attain low power memory performance.

  9. Alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Factors affecting air-sintering of chromite interconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, L.A.; Bates, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnections and electrodes with improved electrical, thermal and electrochemical properties. Another objective is to develop synthesis and fabrication processes for these materials whereby they can be consolidated in air into SOFCs. The approach is to (1) develop modifications of the current, state-of-the-art materials used in SOFCs, (2) minimize the number of cations used in the SOFC materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabrication and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component compositions and processing on those reactions.

  10. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides. PMID:16604724

  11. Synergism of trivalent actinides and lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The synergism of trivalent actinides and lanthanides has been reviewed critically. Different systems including ..beta..-di-ketones and several other chelating agents with various neutral donors have been discussed. The thermodynamic parameters, effect of diluents, auto-synergism and synergism with eutectic mixtures have been discussed in the case of trivalent actinides and lanthanides. Also the mechanism of synergism and the various possible uses of this phenomenon have been referred to with the possible data available. 160 references, 4 tables.

  12. Safe management of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle: Role of mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    2011-02-01

    During the past 60 years, more than 1800 metric tonnes of Pu, and substantial quantities of the "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranium elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., 239Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np), and of environmental concern because of their long-half lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these heavy elements: (1) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; (2) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, especially isometric pyrochlore, A 2B 2O 7 (A = rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium, both as inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. Systematic studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high doses of alpha-decay event damage. Recent developments in our understanding of the properties of heavy element solids have opened up new possibilities for the design of advanced nuclear fuels and waste forms.

  13. Rapid determination of actinides in seawater samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2014-03-09

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The actinides can be measured by alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The new method employs novel pre-concentration steps to collect the actinide isotopes quickly from 80 L or more of seawater. Actinides are co-precipitated using an iron hydroxide co-precipitation step enhanced with Ti+3 reductant, followed by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Stacked TEVA Resin and TRU Resin cartridges are used to rapidly separate Pu, U, and Np isotopes from seawater samples. TEVA Resin and DGA Resin were used tomore » separate and measure Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in seawater volumes up to 80 L. This robust method is ideal for emergency seawater samples following a radiological incident. It can also be used, however, for the routine analysis of seawater samples for oceanographic studies to enhance efficiency and productivity. In contrast, many current methods to determine actinides in seawater can take 1–2 weeks and provide chemical yields of ~30–60 %. This new sample preparation method can be performed in 4–8 h with tracer yields of ~85–95 %. By employing a rapid, robust sample preparation method with high chemical yields, less seawater is needed to achieve lower or comparable detection limits for actinide isotopes with less time and effort.« less

  14. Rapid determination of actinides in seawater samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2014-03-09

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The actinides can be measured by alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The new method employs novel pre-concentration steps to collect the actinide isotopes quickly from 80 L or more of seawater. Actinides are co-precipitated using an iron hydroxide co-precipitation step enhanced with Ti+3 reductant, followed by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Stacked TEVA Resin and TRU Resin cartridges are used to rapidly separate Pu, U, and Np isotopes from seawater samples. TEVA Resin and DGA Resin were used to separate and measure Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in seawater volumes up to 80 L. This robust method is ideal for emergency seawater samples following a radiological incident. It can also be used, however, for the routine analysis of seawater samples for oceanographic studies to enhance efficiency and productivity. In contrast, many current methods to determine actinides in seawater can take 1–2 weeks and provide chemical yields of ~30–60 %. This new sample preparation method can be performed in 4–8 h with tracer yields of ~85–95 %. By employing a rapid, robust sample preparation method with high chemical yields, less seawater is needed to achieve lower or comparable detection limits for actinide isotopes with less time and effort.

  15. CO oxidation over gold supported on Cs, Li and Ti-doped cryptomelane materials.

    PubMed

    Carabineiro, Sónia A C; Santos, Vera P; Pereira, M Fernando R; Órfão, José J M; Figueiredo, José L

    2016-10-15

    Cryptomelane-type manganese oxides were synthesized by redox reaction under acid and reflux conditions. Different metals (cesium, lithium and titanium) were incorporated into the tunnel structure by the ion-exchange technique. Gold was loaded onto these materials (1wt%) by a double impregnation method. The obtained catalysts were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and temperature-programmed reduction. The catalytic activity of these materials was evaluated in the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The incorporation of Cs, Li or Ti into cryptomelane was detrimental in terms of catalytic activity. Further addition of gold to cryptomelane doped materials significantly improved the catalytic performance, especially for Cs-K-OMS-2 and Li-K-OMS-2 (to a smaller extent). Addition of gold to the Ti containing material did not show a significant improvement. The observed trends are related to the effect of gold on samples reducibility and to the gold particle size. The lattice oxygen can also be considered accountable for the activity of the materials, since the most active cryptomelane catalysts are those with higher lattice oxygen donating ability for the oxidation of the CO molecule. PMID:27399615

  16. Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2010-02-24

    A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

  17. Boiler materials for ultra-supercritical coal power plants - steamside oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, R.; Sarver, J.; Tanzosh, J.M.

    2006-06-15

    The corrosion behavior of tubing materials carrying steam at high temperature is of great concern to fossil power plant operators. This is due to the fact that the oxide films formed on the steam side can lead to major failures and consequently to reduced plant availability. The wall loss of the pressure boundary caused by oxidation can increase the hoop stresses and cause premature creep failures; second, the increased insulation of the tubes due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide film can lead to increased metal temperature, thereby exacerbating the fireside corrosion as well as creep problems. The third concern is that thicker oxides may spall more easily when the plant is cooled down. On restart, the spalled material may lodge somewhere in the system with the potential for causing tube blockages, or it may be swept out with the working fluid and enter the steam turbine causing erosion damage to the turbine nozzles and blades. Failures of tubing and turbine components by these mechanisms have been widely reported in the United States. In view of the importance of the steamside oxidation, a major study of the phenomenon is being carried out as part of a major national program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office. As a prelude to the experimental work, a literature survey was performed to document the state of the art. Results of the review are reported here.

  18. Computational Thermodynamics for Interpreting Oxidation of Structural Materials in Supercritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the advanced nuclear reactors being developed to meet the soaring energy demand. The corrosion resistance of structural materials used in SCWR becomes one of the major concerns as the operation conditions being raised up to {approx}600 C and {approx}25 MPa. Oxidation has been observed as the major corrosion behavior. To mitigate the oxidation corrosion, stabilities of metals and oxides need to be understood with respect to environmental temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Computational thermodynamics provides a practical approach to assess phase stabilities of such multi-component multi-variable systems. In this study, calculated phase stability diagrams of alloys and corresponding oxides were used to guide the interpretation of oxidation behaviors of SCW-exposed structural materials. Examples include ferritic-martensitic steel, austenitic steels and Ni-base alloy, e.g., HCM12A (Fe-12Cr), D9 (Fe-15Cr-15Ni), 800H (Fe-21Cr-32Ni), and 690 (Ni-30Cr-10Fe). Calculated results are in good overall consistence with the experimental data.

  19. NERI FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, DE-FC07-O5ID14647, OPTIMIZATION OF OXIDE COMPOUNDS FOR ADVANCED INERT MATRIX MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    PI: JUAN C. NINO, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

    2009-01-11

    In order to reduce the current excesses of plutonium (both weapon grade and reactor grade) and other transuranium elements, a concept of inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been proposed for an uranium free transmutation of fissile actinides which excludes continuous uranium-plutonium conversion in thermal reactors and advanced systems. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising candidate for inert matrix (IM) materials due to its high melting point (2827 C), high thermal conductivity (13 W/K {center_dot} m at 1000 C), good neutronic properties, and irradiation stability However, MgO reacts with water and hydrates easily, which prevents it from being used in light water reactors (LWRs) as an IM. To improve the hydration resistance of MgO-based inert matrix materials, Medvedev and coworkers have recently investigated the introduction of a secondary phase that acts as a hydration barrier. An MgO-ZrO{sub 2} composite was specifically studied and the results showed that the composite exhibited improved hydration resistance than pure MgO. However, ZrO{sub 2} is insoluble in most acids except HF, which is undesirable for fuel reprocessing. Moreover, the thermal conductivity of ZrO{sub 2} is low and typically less than 3 W {center_dot} m{sup -1} {center_dot} K{sup -1} at 1000 C. In search for an alternative composite strategy, Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, an oxide compound with pyrochlore structure, has been proposed recently as a corrosion resistant phase, and MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composites have been investigated as potential IM materials. An adequate thermal conductivity of 6 W {center_dot} m{sup -} 1 {center_dot} K{sup -1} at 1000 C for the MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composite with 90 vol% MgO was recently calculated and reported. Other simulations proposed that the MgO-pyrochlore composites could exhibit higher radiation stability than previously reported. Final optimization of the composite microstructure was performed on the 70 vol% MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7

  20. Optical Study of Cuprous Oxide and Ferric Oxide Based Materials for Applications in Low Cost Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Than, Thi Cuc; Bui, Bao Thoa; Wegmuller, Benjamin; Nguyen, Minh Hieu; Hoang Ngoc, Lam Huong; Bui, Van Diep; Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Hoang, Chi Hieu; Nguyen-Tran, Thuat

    2016-05-01

    One of the interesting forms of cuprous oxide and ferric oxide based materials is CuFeO2 which can be a delafossite-type compound and is a well known p-type semiconductor. This compound makes up an interesting family of materials for technological applications. CuFeO2 thin films recently gained renewed interest for potential applications in solar cell devices especially as absorption layers. One of the interesting facts is that CuFeO2 is made from cheap materials such as copper and iron. In this study, CuFeO2 thin films are intentionally deposited on corning glass and silicon substrates by the radio-frequency and direct current sputtering method with complicated and well developed co-sputtering recipes. The deposition was performed at room temperature which leads to an amorphous phase with extremely low roughness and high density. The films also were annealed at 500°C in 5% H2 in Ar for the passivation. A detailed optical study was performed on these thin films by spectroscopic ellipsometry and by ultra-violet visible near infrared spectroscopy. Depending on sputtering conditions, the direct band gap was extrapolated to be from 1.96 eV to 2.2 eV and 2.92 eV to 2.96 eV and the indirect band gap is about 1.22 eV to 1.42 eV. A good electrical conduction is also observed which is suitable for solar cell applications. In future more study on the structural properties will be carried out in order to fully understand these materials.