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Sample records for actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae pasteurella

  1. Experimental model of swine pneumonic pasteurellosis using crude Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae cytotoxin and Pasteurella multocida given endobronchially.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, W B; Bäckström, L R; Collins, M T

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to develop and characterize a swine pneumonic pasteurellosis model by concurrent introduction of Pasteurella multocida type A and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae crude cytotoxin. After a series of preliminary experiments, a combination of 4 x 10(9) P. multocida and 4,000 toxic units of A. pleuropneumoniae crude cytotoxin was determined to produce optimal results. A total of 48 pigs were divided into four groups of 12 pigs each. The control group received buffered saline only. Four pigs from each group were randomly selected for necropsy 3, 7 and 14 days postinoculation (PI). Inoculation of pigs with P. multocida and A. pleuropneumoniae cytotoxin (group 1) resulted in moderate to severe pneumonia. Pasteurella multocida was isolated from pneumonic lesions, grossly normal lung, and bronchial lymph nodes of all group 1 pigs throughout the 14 day experimental period. Pathological changes typical of field cases of swine pneumonic pasteurellosis were produced. Pigs inoculated with P. multocida alone (group 2) had pneumonic lesions and P. multocida was reisolated from lungs at three days PI. Pasteurella multocida was not isolated from these pigs at 7 and 14 days PI, except for one pig in which an abscess developed in the thorax. Pulmonary lesions induced by A. pleuropneumoniae crude cytotoxin alone (group 3) were transient and resolved by seven days PI. Group 1 pigs had significantly greater lung lesion volumes than group 2 and 3 pigs at 3, 7 and 14 days PI. Statistical analysis indicated a significant interactive effect of P. multocida and A. pleuropneumoniae cytotoxin on the development of lung lesion volumes at 7 and 14 days PI (p < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. PMID:8143249

  2. Minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoints and disk diffusion inhibitory zone interpretive criteria for tilmicosin susceptibility testing against Pasteurella multocida and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae associated with porcine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Shryock, Thomas R; Staples, J Mitchell; DeRosa, David C

    2002-09-01

    Tilmicosin is a novel macrolide antibiotic developed for exclusive use in veterinary medicine. Tilmicosin has been approved as a feed premix to control porcine respiratory disease associated with Pasteurella multocida and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The development of antimicrobial susceptibility testing guidelines for tilmicosin was predicated on the relationship of clinical efficacy studies that demonstrated a favorable therapeutic outcome, on pharmacokinetic data, and on in vitro test data, as recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). The approved breakpoints for the minimum inhibitory concentration dilution testing for both species are resistant, > or = 32 microg/ml, and susceptible, < or = 16 microg/ml. The zone of inhibition interpretive criteria for disk diffusion testing with a 15-microg tilmicosin disk are resistant, < or = 10 mm, and susceptible, > or = 11 mm.

  3. Hemolysin patterns of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Nicolet, J

    1990-01-01

    The secreted hemolytic activities produced by the reference strains and field isolates of the 12 serotypes and 2 subtypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were analyzed. Serotype 1 produced a Ca2(+)-inducible hemolysin, which was previously characterized as a 105-kilodalton protein and was named hemolysin I (HlyI). Serotypes 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8 produced a different hemolytic activity that was not inducible by Ca2+ but required this ion for its activity. The hemolytic activity produced by these serotypes was much weaker than that found in serotype 1 and was not neutralized by rabbit antibodies against HlyI. It was, however, neutralized by serum from pigs that were experimentally infected with a serotype 2 strain and was called hemolysin II (HlyII). Serotypes 5a, 5b, 9, 10, and 11 produced both HlyI and HlyII. In these strains, HlyI was the major contributor to the hemolytic activity. The remaining serotypes, 3 and 12, produced a very weak hemolytic activity, which was not further analyzed. Immunoblot analysis of the culture supernatants from all 12 serotypes with rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against HlyI revealed reactions with a protein in the 105-kilodalton size range for all serotypes, indicating that HlyI and HlyII might be serologically related. Strains producing active HlyI seem to belong to serotypes that are generally considered to be virulent types and that are frequently isolated from pigs in severe pleuropneumonia outbreaks. Images PMID:2312671

  4. Analysis of major antigens of Haemophilus (Actinobacillus) pleuropneumoniae and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    MacInnes, J I; Rosendal, S

    1987-01-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP)-enriched extracts and whole-cell protein preparations of Haemophilus (Actinobacillus) pleuropneumoniae and related organisms were examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Both the OMP-enriched and whole-cell protein profiles of Actinobacillus suis, A. pleuropneumoniae (NAD-independent biovar), A. lignieresii, and Pasteurella haemolytica were very similar to those of H. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 to 8. Antisera prepared against H. pleuropneumoniae typically recognized three major OMP antigens with approximate molecular weights of 17,000 (17K), 32K, and 42K in immunoblots of H. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 to 8, Actinobacillus spp., and P. haemolytica. Antisera prepared against Actinobacillus spp. and Haemophilus sp. "minor group" also recognized these 17K, 32K, and 42K antigens. Using absorbed sera, we demonstrated that the 17K antigen had an epitope (or epitopes) common to all the gram-negative organisms examined, including Escherichia coli. The 32K and 42K antigens had epitopes common to members of the family Pasteurellaceae but, in the case of the 32K antigen, also contained unique epitopes. These results provide a basis for understanding the lack of specificity of serodiagnostic tests for H. pleuropneumoniae infection and provide another line of evidence for the association of H. pleuropneumoniae with the genus Actinobacillus. Images PMID:3298061

  5. Detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in drinking water from pig farms.

    PubMed

    Loera-Muro, Victor M; Jacques, Mario; Tremblay, Yannick D N; Avelar-González, Francisco J; Loera Muro, Abraham; Ramírez-López, Elsa M; Medina-Figueroa, Alejandra; González-Reynaga, Higinio M; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma L

    2013-03-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the aetiological agent of porcine pleuropneumonia and is normally transmitted by aerosols and direct contact between animals. A. pleuropneumoniae has traditionally been considered an obligate pathogen of pigs and its presence in the environment has yet to be investigated. Here, the presence of A. pleuropneumoniae was detected in drinking water of pig farms in Mexico using a PCR specific for the RTX toxin gene, apxIV. The presence of A. pleuropneumoniae in farm drinking water was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence using an A. pleuropneumoniae-specific polyclonal antibody and by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Viable bacteria from the farm drinking water were detected using the Live/Dead BacLight stain. Additionally, viable A. pleuropneumoniae was selected and isolated using the cAMP test and the identity of the isolated bacteria were confirmed by Gram staining, a specific polyclonal antibody and an A. pleuropneumoniae-specific PCR. Furthermore, biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy in A. pleuropneumoniae-positive samples. In conclusion, our data suggest that viable A. pleuropneumoniae is present in the drinking water of swine farms and may use biofilm as a strategy to survive in the environment.

  6. A 24-kDa cloned zinc metalloprotease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is common to all serotypes and cleaves actin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, C; Montañez, C; Tenorio, V; Reyes-Esparza, J; Durán, M J; Negrete, E; Guerrero, A; de la Garza, M

    2000-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia in swine. This bacterium secretes proteases that degrade porcine hemoglobin and IgA in vitro. To further characterize A. pleuropneumoniae proteases, we constructed a genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and selected a clone that showed proteolytic activity. The recombinant plasmid carries an 800-base pair A. pleuropneumoniae gene sequence that.codes for a 24-kDa polypeptide. A 350-base pair PstI fragment from the sequence hybridized at high stringency with DNA from 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae, but not with DNA from Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida A or D, or E. coli DH5alpha, thus showing specificity for A. pleuropneumoniae. The expressed polypeptide was recognized as an antigen by convalescent-phase pig sera. Furthermore, a polyclonal antiserum developed against the purified polypeptide recognized an A. pleuropneumoniae oligomeric protein in both crude-extract and cell-free culture media. This recombinant polypeptide cleaved azocoll, gelatin, and actin. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity by diethylpyrocarbonate suggests that this polypeptide is a zinc metalloprotease. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:10805246

  7. Antibiofilm activity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Karwacki, Michael T; Kadouri, Daniel E; Bendaoud, Meriem; Izano, Era A; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Inzana, Thomas J; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free extracts isolated from colony biofilms of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, but not by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 itself, in a 96-well microtiter plate assay. Physical and chemical analyses indicated that the antibiofilm activity in the extract was due to high-molecular-weight polysaccharide. Extracts isolated from a mutant strain deficient in the production of serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide did not exhibit antibiofilm activity. A plasmid harboring the serotype 5 capsule genes restored the antibiofilm activity in the mutant extract. Purified serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide also exhibited antibiofilm activity against S. aureus. A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts did not inhibit S. aureus growth, but did inhibit S. aureus intercellular adhesion and binding of S. aureus cells to stainless steel surfaces. Furthermore, polystyrene surfaces coated with A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts, but not with capsule-mutant extracts, resisted S. aureus biofilm formation. Our findings suggest that the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsule inhibits cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions of other bacteria. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit broad-spectrum, nonbiocidal antibiofilm activity. Future studies on these antibiofilm polysaccharides may uncover novel functions for bacterial polysaccharides in nature, and may lead to the development of new classes of antibiofilm agents for industrial and clinical applications. PMID:23691104

  8. Antibiofilm Activity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotype 5 Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Karwacki, Michael T.; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Bendaoud, Meriem; Izano, Era A.; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Inzana, Thomas J.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free extracts isolated from colony biofilms of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, but not by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 itself, in a 96-well microtiter plate assay. Physical and chemical analyses indicated that the antibiofilm activity in the extract was due to high-molecular-weight polysaccharide. Extracts isolated from a mutant strain deficient in the production of serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide did not exhibit antibiofilm activity. A plasmid harboring the serotype 5 capsule genes restored the antibiofilm activity in the mutant extract. Purified serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide also exhibited antibiofilm activity against S. aureus. A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts did not inhibit S. aureus growth, but did inhibit S. aureus intercellular adhesion and binding of S. aureus cells to stainless steel surfaces. Furthermore, polystyrene surfaces coated with A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts, but not with capsule-mutant extracts, resisted S. aureus biofilm formation. Our findings suggest that the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsule inhibits cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions of other bacteria. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit broad-spectrum, nonbiocidal antibiofilm activity. Future studies on these antibiofilm polysaccharides may uncover novel functions for bacterial polysaccharides in nature, and may lead to the development of new classes of antibiofilm agents for industrial and clinical applications. PMID:23691104

  9. Experimental aerosol transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jobert, J L; Savoye, C; Cariolet, R; Kobisch, M; Madec, F

    2000-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the possible role of aerosol in the transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an experiment including 18 specific pathogen-free (SPF), 10-week-old piglets, randomly distributed into 2 adjacent units, was carried out. In these facilities, air was forced through absolute filters to prevent any contact with infectious agents. During the first 6 d post inoculation, the 2 units were connected by a rectangular opening and the air circulation was forced by the ventilation system from unit A (inoculated pigs) to unit B (non-inoculated pigs). The A. pleuropneumoniae strain (biovar 1 serovar 9) was isolated in France from an outbreak of porcine pleuropneumonia. Two different infecting doses, 10(7) cfu/animal and 10(8) cfu/animal, were inoculated by intranasal route in 6 pigs of unit A. The infection spread quickly from the inoculated pigs to the non-inoculated pigs. Clinical signs were acute during the 4 d post inoculation: hyperthermia, respiratory distress and, sometimes, death (6 pigs of the unit A and 2 pigs of the unit B). All pigs seroconverted against A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 9 within 2 weeks. Lung lesions were severe: fibrinous pleurisy and lung hemorrhages in the acute stage, pleural adherences and focal pulmonary necrosis in the chronic stage. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was isolated from the tonsils and/or lungs in 16 animals. It could be also isolated from the air of the experimental unit. This study showed that A. pleuropneumoniae was readily transmitted through aerosol over a distance of at least 2.5 m. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10680652

  10. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, M; Larivière, S; Higgins, R; Martineau, G P

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial agents using a microdilution method for the minimal inhibitory concentration determinations. These results confirmed the high prevalence of A. pleuropneumoniae strains resistant to antibiotics as reported earlier using the disc diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer method). While 36% of the isolates were resistant to the penicillins, 47% were resistant to chloramphenicol and 68% were resistant to tetracycline. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for the resistant isolates were approximately 32 times higher than those for the susceptible isolates to the above antibacterial agents. The isolates were in general weakly susceptible or resistant to spectinomycin, lincomycin, tiamulin and spiramycin whereas most of them were susceptible to gentamicin, trimethoprim and erythromycin. The susceptibility pattern was similar throughout the 1980 to 1984 period. The 14 serotype 5 isolates were more resistant to tetracycline but less resistant to chloramphenicol and the penicillins than the 28 serotype 1 isolates. PMID:3167716

  11. Immune response to an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae vaccine in swine

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Paul; Assaf, Robert; Boulay, Gaston; Désy, Marie

    1988-01-01

    Piglets vaccinated with an inactivated tetravalent vaccine (Pleurovac 4) against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 2, 5 and 7, produced circulating antibodies after a first intramuscular injection and showed an anamnestic reaction after a second. The rise in antibody levels in vaccinated piglets was statistically significant when compared with those of the control group. The administration of 1 or 2 mL of vaccine did not lead to significantly different antibody levels. The specificity of the immune response is demonstrated by an increase in titer to all four serotypes in pigs given the tetravalent vaccine, but an increase in titer to only two serotypes in pigs given a bivalent vaccine (Pleurovac). PMID:17423199

  12. Effects of growth conditions on biofilm formation by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Pelletier-Jacques, Geneviève; Deslandes, Vincent; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Auger, Eliane; Nash, John H.E.; Jacques, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm formation is an important virulence trait of many bacterial pathogens. It has been reported in the literature that only two of the reference strains of the swine pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, representing serotypes 5b and 11, were able to form biofilm in vitro. In this study, we compared biofilm formation by the serotype 1 reference strain S4074 of A. pleuropneumoniae grown in five different culture media. We observed that strain S4074 of A. pleuropneumoniae is able to form biofilms after growth in one of the culture conditions tested brain heart infusion (BHI medium, supplier B). Confocal laser scanning microscopy using a fluorescent probe specific to the poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) polysaccharide further confirmed biofilm formation. In accordance, biofilm formation was susceptible to dispersin B, a PGA hydrolase. Transcriptional profiles of A. pleuropneumoniae S4074 following growth in BHI-B, which allowed a robust biofilm formation, and in BHI-A, in which only a slight biofilm formation was observed, were compared. Genes such as tadC, tadD, genes with homology to autotransporter adhesins as well as genes pgaABC involved in PGA biosynthesis and genes involved in zinc transport were up-regulated after growth in BHI-B. Interestingly, biofilm formation was inhibited by zinc, which was found to be more present in BHI-A (no or slight biofilm) than in BHI-B. We also observed biofilm formation in reference strains representing serotypes 3, 4, 5a, 12 and 14 as well as in 20 of the 37 fresh field isolates tested. Our data indicate that A. pleuropneumoniae has the ability to form biofilms under appropriate growth conditions and transition from a biofilm-positive to a biofilm-negative phenotype was reversible. PMID:19737507

  13. Blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, R; Plambeck, T; Foged, N T

    1991-01-01

    A blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), based upon a polyclonal rabbit antiserum specific to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2, was developed for the detection of antibodies to A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 in pigs. By testing sera from pigs experimentally infected with the 11 recognized serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae, the assay was proven to be specific for A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. With field sera from herds infected with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2, the assay was found to be more sensitive than the complement fixation test. Positive results were not observed with field sera from herds known to be free from Actinobacillus infection or with sera from two herds infected with either A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 6 or 8. The high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the blocking ELISA will make it useful in field diagnostic work. PMID:1890179

  14. Characterization of bifunctional L-glutathione synthetases from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Actinobacillus succinogenes for efficient glutathione biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhua; Li, Wei; Wang, Dezheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH), an important bioactive substance, is widely applied in pharmaceutical and food industries. In this work, two bifunctional L-glutathione synthetases (GshF) from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (GshFAp) and Actinobacillus succinogenes (GshFAs) were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3). Similar to the GshF from Streptococcus thermophilus (GshFSt), GshFAp and GshFAs can be applied for high titer GSH production because they are less sensitive to end-product inhibition (Ki values 33 and 43 mM, respectively). The active catalytic forms of GshFAs and GshFAp are dimers, consistent with those of GshFPm (GshF from Pasteurella multocida) and GshFSa (GshF from Streptococcus agalactiae), but are different from GshFSt (GshF from S. thermophilus) which is an active monomer. The analysis of the protein sequences and three dimensional structures of GshFs suggested that the binding sites of GshFs for substrates, L-cysteine, L-glutamate, γ-glutamylcysteine, adenosine-triphosphate, and glycine are highly conserved with only very few differences. With sufficient supply of the precursors, the recombinant strains BL-21(DE3)/pET28a-gshFas and BL-21(DE3)/pET28a-gshFap were able to produce 36.6 and 34.1 mM GSH, with the molar yield of 0.92 and 0.85 mol/mol, respectively, based on the added L-cysteine. The results showed that GshFAp and GshFAs are potentially good candidates for industrial GSH production. PMID:26996628

  15. The antibacterial mechanism of berberine against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shuai; Li, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Chen, Zhenzhen; Peng, Lianci; Qu, Jing; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lai, Xin; Wang, Guangxi; Liang, Xiaoxia; He, Changliang; Yin, Lizi

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrated berberine to be a potential natural compound against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Liquid doubling dilution, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SDS-PAGE and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining were employed to elucidate the antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine. The minimal inhibitory concentration of berberine was 0.3125 mg/mL, and time-kill curves showed concentration and time dependence. The TEM micrographs displayed damaged cell wall, concentrated cytoplasm, cytoplasmic content leakage and cell death. SDS-PAGE and DAPI assays revealed that berberine can restrain DNA and protein syntheses. Berberine inhibited the synthesis of proteins associated with the growth and cleavage of bacteria and then blocked the division and development of bacteria. The compound ultimately induced cytoplasm pyknosis and bacterial death.

  16. Pathogenesis of porcine Actinobacillus pleuropneumonia: Part I. Effects of surface components of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H; Potter, A A; Campos, M; Leighton, F A; Willson, P J; Yates, W D

    1998-01-01

    To understand the role of non-secreted components of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in virulence, we investigated in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo pulmonary changes in pigs due to various A. pleuropneumoniae (serotype 1) fractions. Following 1.5 h incubation, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 2 crude extracts and bacterial culture supernatant (BCS) at high concentrations were cytotoxic to porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes, neutrophils and a cultured porcine bone marrow cell line. Heat-killed bacteria were cytotoxic to PAM after 24 h incubation. The 2 crude extracts were prepared by shaking either intact bacteria after removing culture supernatants (crude surface extract, CSE), or whole bacterial culture (crude surface plus culture supernatant extract, CSSE) with glass beads in saline at 60 degrees C. Further experiments showed that proteins from the bacterial membrane were partially involved in cytotoxicities of these 2 extracts. Both BCS and CSSE caused multivocal hemorrhage and neutrophil infiltration when inoculated into porcine lungs, but CSE did not. The lung:whole body weight ratios of the pigs treated with CSSE were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of pigs treated with BCS, CSE, or control solution. It is concluded that beside the secreted proteins, bacterial surface components including LPS and non-secreted proteins were cytotoxic in vitro; and secreted and non-secreted components act synergistically to cause lung lesions. PMID:9553707

  17. Prevalence of seroreactors to the 104-kilodalton hemolysin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in swine herds.

    PubMed Central

    Devenish, J; Rosendal, S; Bossé, J T; Wilkie, B N; Johnson, R

    1990-01-01

    A rabbit homologous polyclonal antiserum to the 104-kilodalton hemolysin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 strain CM-5 was specifically produced and used in an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect swine serum antibodies to this potentially important virulence factor. Sera from pigs experimentally infected with the most common disease-producing serotypes (serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 7) of A. pleuropneumoniae produced positive results in this ELISA. Of 144 serum samples collected from 10 herds free of pleuropneumonia and 155 serum samples from 11 herds with a history of the disease, 68 (47%) and 148 (95%), respectively, were found positive by the ELISA. In addition, pigs naturally infected with Actinobacillus suis produced antibodies which seroreacted in this ELISA. The results indicated that a high proportion of swine have antibodies seroreactive with the 104-kilodalton hemolysin produced by A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:2332472

  18. Specific Humoral Immune Response Induced by Propionibacterium acnes Can Prevent Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Ma, Qiuyue; Huang, Jing; Ji, Qun; Zhai, Ruidong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yu; Li, Linxi; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Han, Wenyu

    2014-01-01

    Porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, has a major impact on economics, ecology, and animal welfare in the pig-rearing industry. Propionibacterium acnes, a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive corynebacterium, exists widely in normal healthy adult animals. We have shown previously that P. acnes can prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infections in mice and pigs. To elucidate the mechanism of this effect and to identify novel A. pleuropneumoniae vaccines, the role of anti-P. acnes antibodies in preventing infection was analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence and opsonophagocytosis assays in vitro. The role of the specific humoral immune response induced by P. acnes was confirmed in a B cell depletion mouse model. The survival rates of mice challenged with A. pleuropneumoniae exhibited a highly significant positive rank correlation with the levels of anti-P. acnes antibodies. The specific antibodies induced by P. acnes had the ability to combine with A. pleuropneumoniae and increase opsonization of A. pleuropneumoniae for phagocytosis. Furthermore, analysis in the murine B cell depletion model confirmed that the humoral immune response induced by P. acnes played an important role in resistance to A. pleuropneumoniae infection. In this study, we further elucidated the reasons that P. acnes can prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infection, which provides useful evidence for the development of heterologous vaccines for the control of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia. PMID:24429068

  19. RTX toxin genotypes and phenotypes in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae field strains.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, M; van den Bosch, J F; Jongenelen, I M; Loeffen, P L; Nielsen, R; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype reference strains and 204 A. pleuropneumoniae field strains representing all 12 serotypes and both biovars 1 and 2, obtained from laboratories from various countries worldwide, were analyzed for the presence of the toxin genes apxIC, apxIA, apxIB, apxID, apxIIC, apxIIA, apxIIIC, apxIIIA, apxIIIB, and apxIIID by DNA-DNA hybridization with specific gene probes. Expression of the toxins ApxI, ApxII, and ApxIII was assessed by immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. The results show that the patterns of apx genes and those of the expressed Apx toxins in biovar 1 field strains are the same as those of the genes and toxins of corresponding serotype reference strain. We found only three strains which had certain apx genes missing compared with the genes in their serotype reference strains. Analysis of the expression of the three toxins showed that nearly all strains expressed their apx genes and produced the same Apx toxins as their serotype reference strain. We found only one strain that did not produce ApxI, although it contained the apxICABD genes, and one strain which did not express ApxII but which contained apxIICA. Several field strains which initially showed that their serotype did not correspond to the apx gene profile of the reference strain and which had an unexpected virulence for the given serotype revealed that their initial serotyping was erroneous. We show that the apx gene profiles are inherent to a given serotype. The method cannot differentiate between all 12 serotypes. However, it allowed us to distinguish five groups of toxin gene patterns which showed pathological, toxicological, and epidemiological significance. None of the biovar 2 strains contained apxIII genes. The apxI and apxII genes in the biovar 2 strains, however, were the same as those found in the serotype reference strains of biovar 1. PMID:7852567

  20. The genetic organization of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    The genetic organization of the gene involved in the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 has been determined. The DNA region for the CPS biosynthesis of serotype 14 (cps14) comprised 9 open reading frames, designated as cps14AB1B2B3CDEFG genes, encoding Cps14A to Cps14G protein, respectively. Cps14A was similar to CpsA of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12; the Cps14B1 and Cps14B2 were similar to CpsB of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12, suggesting that CPS structure of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 would belong to Group I including A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4, 12 and 15. Surprisingly, the overall nucleotide sequence, deduced amino acid sequence, and the genetic organization of the cps14 were nearly identical to those of Actinobacillus suis. This study will provide the molecular basic knowledge for development of diagnostics and vaccine of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14. PMID:25648373

  1. Efficacy of tilmicosin in the control of experimentally induced Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in swine.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Marie-Anne; Vessie, Gordon H; Merrill, John K; Dick, C Paul; Moore, Camille; Charbonneau, George; Gottschalk, M; MacInnes, Janet I; Higgins, Robert; Mittal, K R; Girard, C; Aramini, Jeffery J; Wilson, Jeffrey B

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of tilmicosin administered in the feed to control Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infections in pigs was evaluated through a multisite, multitrial study. For each of 6 trials, 48 pigs (stratified by weight and sex) were randomly assigned to 6 to 8 pens. Medicated feed containing tilmicosin (200 g/t) and unmedicated feed were randomly assigned at the pen level and were provided ad libitum from day -7 to trial termination (day 14). Seeder pigs (inoculated intranasally with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 and showing signs of clinical disease) were introduced to each pen on day 0. Rates of death, gross lesions, and culture of A. pleuropneumoniae at necropsy, clinical scores, average daily gain in weight, and average body temperature were compared between the medicated and unmedicated pigs. Compared with the unmedicated pigs, significantly fewer (P < 0.05) pigs given tilmicosin had lesions typical of A. pleuropneumoniae or had A. pleuropneumoniae isolated from their tissues at necropsy. Together with a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the average percentage of pneumonic lung involvement (both visually and by weight), there were reductions in the numbers of pigs with moderate and severe pneumonic lung lesions and with A. pleuropneumoniae associated mortality. With tilmicosin treatment, the average daily weight gain, daily temperature, abdominal appearance, attitude, and respiration were also significantly better (P < 0.05). The results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effectiveness of tilmicosin (200 g/t) in controlling pleuropneumonia among swine experimentally infected with A. pleuropneumoniae.

  2. Influence of Serum and Glucose Additives on Survival of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Aerosolized from the Freeze-Dried State.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A

    1994-06-01

    Serum and/or glucose added to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae suspensions before freeze-drying significantly increased survival rates of bacteria in aerosols. Aerosols with predictable numbers of viable bacteria can be made as required in an aerosol infection model. Sucrose supplementation of impinger fluids increased recovery of viable A. pleuropneumoniae.

  3. Detection and Identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotype 5 by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Terry M.; Ward, Christine K.; Inzana, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is based on detection of the serotype-specific capsular antigen. However, not all isolates can be serotyped, and some may cross-react with multiple serotyping reagents. To improve sensitivity and specificity of serotyping and for early detection, a multiplex PCR assay was developed for detection of A. pleuropneumoniae and identification of serotype 5 isolates. DNA sequences specific to the conserved export and serotype-specific biosynthesis regions of the capsular polysaccharide of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 were used as primers to amplify 0.7- and 1.1-kb DNA fragments, respectively. The 0.7-kb fragment was amplified from all strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested with the exception of serotype 4. The 0.7-kb fragment was not amplified from any heterologous species that are also common pathogens or commensals of swine. In contrast, the 1.1-kb fragment was amplified from all serotype 5 strains only. The assay was capable of amplifying DNA from less than 102 CFU. The A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsular DNA products were readily amplified from lung tissues obtained from infected swine, although the 1.1-kb product was not amplified from some tissues stored frozen for 6 years. The multiplex PCR assay enabled us to detect A. pleuropneumoniae rapidly and to distinguish serotype 5 strains from other serotypes. The use of primers specific to the biosynthesis regions of other A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes would expand the diagnostic and epidemiologic capabilities of this assay. PMID:9620404

  4. Identification of QTL affecting resistance/susceptibility to acute Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in swine.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Gerald; Bertsch, Natalie; Hoeltig, Doris; Selke, Martin; Willems, Hermann; Gerlach, Gerald Friedrich; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Probst, Inga; Herwig, Ralf; Drungowski, Mario; Waldmann, Karl Heinz

    2014-04-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is among the most important pathogens worldwide in pig production. The agent can cause severe economic losses due to decreased performance, acute or chronic pleuropneumonia and an increased incidence of death. Therapeutics cannot be used in a sustainable manner, and vaccination is not always available, but discovering more about host defence and disease mechanisms might lead to new methods of prophylaxis. The aim of the present study was to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with resistance/susceptibility to A. pleuropneumoniae. Under controlled conditions, 170 F2 animals of a Hampshire/Landrace family, with known differences in founder populations regarding A. pleuropneumoniae resistance, were challenged with an A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 7 aerosol followed by a detailed clinical, radiographic, ultrasonographic, pathological and bacteriological examination. F2 pigs were genotyped with 159 microsatellite markers. Significant QTL were identified on Sus scrofa chromosomes (SSC) 2, 6, 12, 13, 16, 17 and 18. They explained 6-22% of phenotypic variance. One QTL on SSC2 reached significance on a genome-wide level for five associated phenotypic traits. A multiple regression analysis revealed a combinatory effect of markers SWR345 (SSC2) and S0143 (SSC12) on Respiratory Health Score, Clinical Score and the occurrence of death. The results indicate the genetic background of A. pleuropneumoniae resistance in swine and provide new insights into the genetic architecture of resistance/susceptibility to porcine pleuropneumonia. The results will be helpful in identifying the underlying genes and mechanisms.

  5. Characterisation of a mobilisable plasmid conferring florfenicol and chloramphenicol resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Janine T; Li, Yanwen; Atherton, Tom G; Walker, Stephanie; Williamson, Susanna M; Rogers, Jon; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Weinert, Lucy A; Holden, Matthew T G; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N; Langford, Paul R

    2015-08-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a 7.7kb mobilisable plasmid (pM3446F), isolated from a florfenicol resistant isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, showed extended similarity to plasmids found in other members of the Pasteurellaceae containing the floR gene as well as replication and mobilisation genes. Mobilisation into other Pasteurellaceae species confirmed that this plasmid can be transferred horizontally. PMID:26049592

  6. Characterisation of a mobilisable plasmid conferring florfenicol and chloramphenicol resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Janine T; Li, Yanwen; Atherton, Tom G; Walker, Stephanie; Williamson, Susanna M; Rogers, Jon; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Weinert, Lucy A; Holden, Matthew TG; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N; Langford, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a 7.7 kb mobilisable plasmid (pM3446F), isolated from a florfenicol resistant isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, showed extended similarity to plasmids found in other members of the Pasteurellaceae containing the floR gene as well as replication and mobilisation genes. Mobilisation into other Pasteurellaceae species confirmed that this plasmid can be transferred horizontally. PMID:26049592

  7. Preparation, characterization, and immunogenicity of conjugate vaccines directed against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae virulence determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, W; Kadis, S

    1992-01-01

    Conjugate vaccines were prepared in an attempt to protect pigs against swine pleuropneumonia induced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (SPAP). Two subunit conjugates were prepared by coupling the A. pleuropneumoniae 4074 serotype 1 capsular polysaccharide (CP) to the hemolysin protein (HP) and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the HP. Adipic acid dihydrazide was used as a spacer to facilitate the conjugation in a carbodiimide-mediated reaction. The CP and the LPS were found to be covalently coupled to the HP in the conjugates as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and detergent gel chromatography analyses. Following a booster vaccination, pigs exhibited significantly high (P less than 0.05) immunoglobulin G antibodies against CP, LPS, and HP. The anti-CP and anti-LPS immunoglobulin G antibodies were found to function as opsonins in the phagocytosis of A. pleuropneumoniae by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, whereas antibodies to the HP neutralized the cytotoxic effect of the HP on polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No killing of A. pleuropneumoniae was observed when the effects of the antibodies were tested in the presence of complement. Thus, polysaccharide-protein A. pleuropneumoniae conjugates elicit significant antibody responses against each component of each conjugate, which could be instrumental in protecting swine against SPAP. Images PMID:1639471

  8. Preparation, characterization, and immunogenicity of conjugate vaccines directed against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Byrd, W; Kadis, S

    1992-08-01

    Conjugate vaccines were prepared in an attempt to protect pigs against swine pleuropneumonia induced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (SPAP). Two subunit conjugates were prepared by coupling the A. pleuropneumoniae 4074 serotype 1 capsular polysaccharide (CP) to the hemolysin protein (HP) and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the HP. Adipic acid dihydrazide was used as a spacer to facilitate the conjugation in a carbodiimide-mediated reaction. The CP and the LPS were found to be covalently coupled to the HP in the conjugates as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and detergent gel chromatography analyses. Following a booster vaccination, pigs exhibited significantly high (P less than 0.05) immunoglobulin G antibodies against CP, LPS, and HP. The anti-CP and anti-LPS immunoglobulin G antibodies were found to function as opsonins in the phagocytosis of A. pleuropneumoniae by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, whereas antibodies to the HP neutralized the cytotoxic effect of the HP on polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No killing of A. pleuropneumoniae was observed when the effects of the antibodies were tested in the presence of complement. Thus, polysaccharide-protein A. pleuropneumoniae conjugates elicit significant antibody responses against each component of each conjugate, which could be instrumental in protecting swine against SPAP. PMID:1639471

  9. Electron microscopic examination of capsular material from various serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, M; Foiry, B; Higgins, R; Mittal, K R

    1988-01-01

    The capsular material on PPLO broth-grown cells of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae representing serotypes 1 to 10 was visualized by transmission electron microscopy after polycationic ferritin labeling and also after stabilization with specific antibodies. All the isolates examined were covered with a layer of capsular material whose thickness varied between 80 to 90 nm and 210 to 230 nm when examined by immunostabilization. We were also able to visualize A. pleuropneumoniae in lungs of infected pigs and to estimate the amount of capsular material covering the cells. Our results indicate that differences in capsular structure exist among the different A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes, and this result may explain in part why the serotypes are not equally virulent. Images PMID:3384814

  10. Role of (p)ppGpp in Viability and Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae S8.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Yanhe; Bossé, Janine T; Langford, Paul R; Wang, Chunlai

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and the cause of porcine pleuropneumonia. When the bacterium encounters nutritional starvation, the relA-dependent (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is activated. The modified nucleotides guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5'-triphosphate 3'-diphosphate (pppGpp) are known to be signaling molecules in other prokaryotes. Here, to investigate the role of (p)ppGpp in A. pleuropneumoniae, we created a mutant A. pleuropneumoniae strain, S8ΔrelA, which lacks the (p)ppGpp-synthesizing enzyme RelA, and investigated its phenotype in vitro. S8ΔrelA did not survive after stationary phase (starvation condition) and grew exclusively as non-extended cells. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain, the S8ΔrelA mutant had an increased ability to form a biofilm. Transcriptional profiles of early stationary phase cultures revealed that a total of 405 bacterial genes were differentially expressed (including 380 up-regulated and 25 down-regulated genes) in S8ΔrelA as compared with the WT strain. Most of the up-regulated genes are involved in ribosomal structure and biogenesis, amino acid transport and metabolism, translation cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis. The data indicate that (p)ppGpp coordinates the growth, viability, morphology, biofilm formation and metabolic ability of A. pleuropneumoniae in starvation conditions. Furthermore, S8ΔrelA could not use certain sugars nor produce urease which has been associated with the virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, suggesting that (p)ppGpp may directly or indirectly affect the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae during the infection process. In summary, (p)ppGpp signaling represents an essential component of the regulatory network governing stress adaptation and virulence in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:26509499

  11. Role of (p)ppGpp in Viability and Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae S8.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Yanhe; Bossé, Janine T; Langford, Paul R; Wang, Chunlai

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and the cause of porcine pleuropneumonia. When the bacterium encounters nutritional starvation, the relA-dependent (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is activated. The modified nucleotides guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5'-triphosphate 3'-diphosphate (pppGpp) are known to be signaling molecules in other prokaryotes. Here, to investigate the role of (p)ppGpp in A. pleuropneumoniae, we created a mutant A. pleuropneumoniae strain, S8ΔrelA, which lacks the (p)ppGpp-synthesizing enzyme RelA, and investigated its phenotype in vitro. S8ΔrelA did not survive after stationary phase (starvation condition) and grew exclusively as non-extended cells. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain, the S8ΔrelA mutant had an increased ability to form a biofilm. Transcriptional profiles of early stationary phase cultures revealed that a total of 405 bacterial genes were differentially expressed (including 380 up-regulated and 25 down-regulated genes) in S8ΔrelA as compared with the WT strain. Most of the up-regulated genes are involved in ribosomal structure and biogenesis, amino acid transport and metabolism, translation cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis. The data indicate that (p)ppGpp coordinates the growth, viability, morphology, biofilm formation and metabolic ability of A. pleuropneumoniae in starvation conditions. Furthermore, S8ΔrelA could not use certain sugars nor produce urease which has been associated with the virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, suggesting that (p)ppGpp may directly or indirectly affect the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae during the infection process. In summary, (p)ppGpp signaling represents an essential component of the regulatory network governing stress adaptation and virulence in A. pleuropneumoniae.

  12. Role of (p)ppGpp in Viability and Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae S8

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Yanhe; Bossé, Janine T.; Langford, Paul R.; Wang, Chunlai

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and the cause of porcine pleuropneumonia. When the bacterium encounters nutritional starvation, the relA-dependent (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is activated. The modified nucleotides guanosine 5’-diphosphate 3’-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5’-triphosphate 3’-diphosphate (pppGpp) are known to be signaling molecules in other prokaryotes. Here, to investigate the role of (p)ppGpp in A. pleuropneumoniae, we created a mutant A. pleuropneumoniae strain, S8ΔrelA, which lacks the (p)ppGpp-synthesizing enzyme RelA, and investigated its phenotype in vitro. S8ΔrelA did not survive after stationary phase (starvation condition) and grew exclusively as non-extended cells. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain, the S8ΔrelA mutant had an increased ability to form a biofilm. Transcriptional profiles of early stationary phase cultures revealed that a total of 405 bacterial genes were differentially expressed (including 380 up-regulated and 25 down-regulated genes) in S8ΔrelA as compared with the WT strain. Most of the up-regulated genes are involved in ribosomal structure and biogenesis, amino acid transport and metabolism, translation cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis. The data indicate that (p)ppGpp coordinates the growth, viability, morphology, biofilm formation and metabolic ability of A. pleuropneumoniae in starvation conditions. Furthermore, S8ΔrelA could not use certain sugars nor produce urease which has been associated with the virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, suggesting that (p)ppGpp may directly or indirectly affect the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae during the infection process. In summary, (p)ppGpp signaling represents an essential component of the regulatory network governing stress adaptation and virulence in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:26509499

  13. Expression and phylogenetic relationships of a novel lacZ homologue from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T J; MacInnes, J I

    1997-07-01

    To learn more about the genetics and physiology of the important swine pathogen, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, we cloned the lacZ gene by complementation of an Escherichia coli delta lac mutant. The A. pleuropneumoniae lacZ gene has an open reading frame of 3015 bp which could encode a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 117022. The deduced protein shares 26.8-34.8% identity with beta-galactosidases from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Sequences with homology to seven regions commonly found in beta-galactosidases are present and amino acids corresponding to active site residues Tyr-503 and Glu-537 in E. coli LacZ are also conserved; however, there is a leucine in the place of Gly-794, a residue which has been implicated in substrate recognition. The sequences flanking the A. pleuropneumoniae lacZ gene do not share homology with known transport or regulatory genes nor do they share homology with cAMP receptor protein (CRP) or LacI binding sites. Low levels of beta-galactosidase activity could be detected when the protein was expressed from a multicopy plasmid in E. coli delta lac and when it was measured in A. pleuropneumoniae. The level of activity was not markedly reduced in the presence of glucose. Although the A. pleuropneumoniae LacZ shares some features with other beta-galactosidases, its constitutive expression and an unusual active site residue suggest that it may have a unique function. PMID:9228778

  14. Growth of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is promoted by exogenous hydroxamate and catechol siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, M S; Dolence, J A; Dolence, E K; Darwish, I; Miller, M J; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1996-01-01

    Siderophores bind ferric ions and are involved in receptor-specific iron transport into bacteria. Six types of siderophores were tested against strains representing the 12 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Ferrichrome and bis-catechol-based siderophores showed strong growth-promoting activities for A. pleuropneumoniae in a disk diffusion assay. Most strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested were able to use ferrichrome (21 of 22 or 95%), ferrichrome A (20 of 22 or 90%), and lysine-based bis-catechol (20 of 22 or 90%), while growth of 36% (8 of 22) was promoted by a synthetic hydroxamate, N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strain FMV 87-682) and serotype 5 (strain 2245) exhibited a distinct yellow halo around colonies on Chrome Azurol S agar plates, suggesting that both strains can produce an iron chelator (siderophore) in response to iron stress. The siderophore was found to be neither a phenolate nor a hydroxamate by the chemical tests of Arnow and Csaky, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the production of an iron chelator and the use of exogenous siderophores by A. pleuropneumoniae. A spermidine-based bis-catechol siderophore conjugated to a carbacephalosporin was shown to inhibit growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. A siderophore-antibiotic-resistant strain was isolated and shown to have lost the ability to use ferrichrome, synthetic hydroxamate, or catechol-based siderophores when grown under conditions of iron restriction. This observation indicated that a common iron uptake pathway, or a common intermediate, for hydroxamate- and catechol-based siderophores may exist in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:8975614

  15. Oral immunization against porcine pleuropneumonia using the cubic phase of monoolein and purified toxins of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Bermudez, Jorge; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Lara Puente, Horacio; Tórtora Perez, Jorge; Suárez Güemez, Francisco; Ciprián Carrasco, Abel; Mendoza Elvira, Susana

    2014-11-28

    The main goal of this work was to obtain an orally administered immunogen that would protect against infections by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The Apx I, II and III toxins were obtained from the supernatants of cultures of serotypes 1 and 3 of A. pleuropneumoniae. The capacity of monoolein gel to trap and protect the Apx toxins, and the effect of their incorporation on the stability of the cubic phase were evaluated. The gel was capable of trapping a 400-μg/ml concentration of the antigen with no effects on its structure. Approximately 60% of the protein molecules were released from the gel within 4h. Four experimental groups were formed, each one with four pigs. All challenges were conducted in a nebulization chamber. Group A: Control (-) not vaccinated and not challenged; Group B: Control (+) not vaccinated but challenged; Group C: vaccinated twice intramuscularly with ToxCom (a commercial toxoid) at an interval of 15 days and then challenged; and Group D: vaccinated orally twice a week for 4 weeks with ToxOral (an oral toxoid) and challenged on day 28 of the experiment with a same dose of 2.0 × 10(4) UFC of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 3. The lesions found in group B covered 27.7-43.1% of the lungs; the pigs in group C had lesions over 12.3-28%; and those in group D over 15.4-32.3%. No lesions were found in the Group A pigs. A. pleuropneumoniae induced macroscopic lesions characteristic of infection by and lesions microscopic detected by histopathology. The etiologic agent was recovered from the infected lungs, tonsils and spleen. The serotypes identified were 1 and 3. An indirect ELISA test identified the antibodies against the Apx toxins in the serum of the animals immunized orally.

  16. Absence of TolC Impairs Biofilm Formation in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by Reducing Initial Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianlin; Lau, Gee W.; Wen, Yiping; Wu, Rui; Zhao, Qin; Huang, Xiaobo; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Wen, Xintian

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiologic agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, a major cause of economic loss in swine industry worldwide. TolC, the key component of multidrug efflux pumps and type I secretion systems, has been well-studied as an exit duct for numerous substances in many Gram-negative bacteria. By contrast, little is known on the role of TolC in biofilm formation. In this study, a ΔtolC mutant was used to examine the importance of TolC in biofilm formation of A. pleuropneumoniae. Surface attachment assays demonstrated the essential role of TolC in initial attachment of biofilm cells. The loss of TolC function altered surface hydrophobicity, and resulted in greatly reduced autoaggregation in ΔtolC. Using both enzymatic treatments and confocal microscopy, biofilm composition and architecture were characterized. When compared against the wild-type strain, the poly-β-1, 6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), an important biofilm matrix component of A. pleuropneumoniae, was significantly reduced at the initial attachment stage in ΔtolC. These results were confirmed by mRNA level using quantitative RT-PCR. Additionally, defective secretion systems in ΔtolC may also contribute to the deficiency in biofilm formation. Taken together, the current study demonstrated the importance of TolC in the initial biofilm formation stage in A. pleuropneumoniae. These findings could have important clinical implications in developing new treatments against biofilm-related infections by A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:27681876

  17. Clonal analysis of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae population in a geographically restricted area by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Møller, K; Nielsen, R; Andersen, L V; Kilian, M

    1992-01-01

    The genetic diversity among 250 isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from lungs of pigs with pleuropneumonia and from tonsils of apparently healthy pigs at slaughter was estimated by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The Danish strains were derived from both specific-pathogen-free and conventional herds. Sixty-six percent of the isolates belonged to three electrophoretic types (ETs) of a total of 37 ETs detected. While five biotype 2 isolates constituted a separate ET closely related to biotype 1 isolates, the type strain of the species (Shope 4074) belonged to its own ET, with a genetic distance of 0.30 from its nearest neighbor. Isolates of serotypes traditionally considered to have less pathogenic potential (serotypes 6, 10, and 12) from herds with acute outbreaks of pleuropneumonia belonged to the same ETs as isolates from apparently healthy pigs, suggesting that factors such as cross immunity and management may lead to divergent clinical results. Isolates from four herds harboring more than one serotype showed distinct profiles between the serotypes, indicating no or only limited chromosomal recombination among clones. Isolates from tonsils belonged to the same ET as isolates from lungs. The same ET was isolated from widely different parts of the world. Evidence from this study indicates that multilocus enzyme electrophoresis may be a valuable tool for the epidemiological analysis of A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:1551979

  18. Apa is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae responsible for autoagglutination and host cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Longwen; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Du, ChongTao; Gao, Yu; Ji, Qun; Yang, Shuxin; Wang, Yu; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2012-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, and adherence to host cells is a key step in the pathogenic process. Although trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) were identified in many pathogenic bacteria in recent years, none in A. pleuropneumoniae have been characterized. In this study, we identified a TAA from A. pleuropneumoniae, Apa, and characterized the contribution of its amino acid residues to the adhesion process. Sequence analysis of the C-terminal amino acid residues of Apa revealed the presence of a putative translocator domain and six conserved HsfBD1-like or HsfBD2-like binding domains. Western blot analysis revealed that the 126 C-terminal amino acids of Apa could form trimeric molecules. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, one of these six domains (ApaBD3) was determined to mediate adherence to epithelial cells. Adherence assays and adherence inhibition assays using a recombinant E. coli- ApaBD3 strain which expressed ApaBD3 on the surface of E. coli confirmed that this domain was responsible for the adhesion activity. Moreover, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that ApaBD3 mediated high-level adherence to epithelial cell lines. Intriguingly, autoagglutination was observed with the E. coli- ApaBD3 strain, and this phenomenon was dependent upon the association of the expressed ApaBD3 with the C-terminal translocator domain.

  19. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification targeting the apxIVA gene for detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang; Pin, Chen; Haibing, Guo; Yang, Chen; Hui, Liu; Qigai, He

    2009-11-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification method performed under isothermal conditions with high specificity and efficiency. We developed a diagnostic method based on LAMP for detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Using six specific primers targeting the apxIVA gene, the LAMP assay rapidly amplified the target gene within 30 min, requiring only a laboratory water bath for the reaction to occur. The resulting amplificon was visualized by adding SYBR Green I to the mixture. The results obtained from testing 15 A. pleuropneumoniae reference strains and other seven bacterial species strains showed that the LAMP was as specific as and 10 times more sensitive than nested PCR. Sixty-five tonsil samples were collected from 65 healthy pigs. All the samples were negative for A. pleuropneumoniae by immunomagnetic separation-based (IMS) bacterial isolation, nested PCR and LAMP, respectively. Meanwhile, 115 tonsil samples were also collected from 115 pigs with apparent respiratory problems. Twenty-two were positive by IMS bacterial isolation. All the samples that were positive by IMS bacterial isolation were also positive by nested PCR and LAMP. The LAMP assay demonstrated exceptionally higher sensitivity than nested PCR by picking up 14 additional positive cases (chi(2) test, P<0.0001); we concluded that LAMP was a highly sensitive and reliable method for detection of A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  20. A computational strategy for the search of regulatory small RNAs in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ciro C.; Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Witney, Adam A.; Gould, Kate A.; Langford, Paul R.; Bazzolli, Denise M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) play important roles in gene regulation and are frequently connected to the expression of virulence factors in diverse bacteria. Only a few sRNAs have been described for Pasteurellaceae pathogens and no in-depth analysis of sRNAs has been described for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, responsible for considerable losses in the swine industry. To search for sRNAs in A. pleuropneumoniae, we developed a strategy for the computational analysis of the bacterial genome by using four algorithms with different approaches, followed by experimental validation. The coding strand and expression of 17 out of 23 RNA candidates were confirmed by Northern blotting, RT-PCR, and RNA sequencing. Among them, two are likely riboswitches, three are housekeeping regulatory RNAs, two are the widely studied GcvB and 6S sRNAs, and 10 are putative novel trans-acting sRNAs, never before described for any bacteria. The latter group has several potential mRNA targets, many of which are involved with virulence, stress resistance, or metabolism, and connect the sRNAs in a complex gene regulatory network. The sRNAs identified are well conserved among the Pasteurellaceae that are evolutionarily closer to A. pleuropneumoniae and/or share the same host. Our results show that the combination of newly developed computational programs can be successfully utilized for the discovery of novel sRNAs and indicate an intricate system of gene regulation through sRNAs in A. pleuropneumoniae and in other Pasteurellaceae, thus providing clues for novel aspects of virulence that will be explored in further studies. PMID:27402897

  1. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  2. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, S; Hancock, M A; Bossé, J T; Langford, P R; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  3. A Transcriptome Map of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Deep RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhipeng; Zhu, Jiawen; Xu, Zhuofei; Xiao, Ran; Zhou, Rui; Li, Lu; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the pathogen of porcine contagious pleuropneumoniae, a highly contagious respiratory disease of swine. Although the genome of A. pleuropneumoniae was sequenced several years ago, limited information is available on the genome-wide transcriptional analysis to accurately annotate the gene structures and regulatory elements. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has been applied to study the transcriptional landscape of bacteria, which can efficiently and accurately identify gene expression regions and unknown transcriptional units, especially small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), UTRs and regulatory regions. The aim of this study is to comprehensively analyze the transcriptome of A. pleuropneumoniae by RNA-seq in order to improve the existing genome annotation and promote our understanding of A. pleuropneumoniae gene structures and RNA-based regulation. In this study, we utilized RNA-seq to construct a single nucleotide resolution transcriptome map of A. pleuropneumoniae. More than 3.8 million high-quality reads (average length ~90 bp) from a cDNA library were generated and aligned to the reference genome. We identified 32 open reading frames encoding novel proteins that were mis-annotated in the previous genome annotations. The start sites for 35 genes based on the current genome annotation were corrected. Furthermore, 51 sRNAs in the A. pleuropneumoniae genome were discovered, of which 40 sRNAs were never reported in previous studies. The transcriptome map also enabled visualization of 5'- and 3'-UTR regions, in which contained 11 sRNAs. In addition, 351 operons covering 1230 genes throughout the whole genome were identified. The RNA-Seq based transcriptome map validated annotated genes and corrected annotations of open reading frames in the genome, and led to the identification of many functional elements (e.g. regions encoding novel proteins, non-coding sRNAs and operon structures). The transcriptional units described in this study

  4. A Transcriptome Map of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Deep RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhipeng; Zhu, Jiawen; Xu, Zhuofei; Xiao, Ran; Zhou, Rui; Li, Lu; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the pathogen of porcine contagious pleuropneumoniae, a highly contagious respiratory disease of swine. Although the genome of A. pleuropneumoniae was sequenced several years ago, limited information is available on the genome-wide transcriptional analysis to accurately annotate the gene structures and regulatory elements. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has been applied to study the transcriptional landscape of bacteria, which can efficiently and accurately identify gene expression regions and unknown transcriptional units, especially small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), UTRs and regulatory regions. The aim of this study is to comprehensively analyze the transcriptome of A. pleuropneumoniae by RNA-seq in order to improve the existing genome annotation and promote our understanding of A. pleuropneumoniae gene structures and RNA-based regulation. In this study, we utilized RNA-seq to construct a single nucleotide resolution transcriptome map of A. pleuropneumoniae. More than 3.8 million high-quality reads (average length ~90 bp) from a cDNA library were generated and aligned to the reference genome. We identified 32 open reading frames encoding novel proteins that were mis-annotated in the previous genome annotations. The start sites for 35 genes based on the current genome annotation were corrected. Furthermore, 51 sRNAs in the A. pleuropneumoniae genome were discovered, of which 40 sRNAs were never reported in previous studies. The transcriptome map also enabled visualization of 5'- and 3'-UTR regions, in which contained 11 sRNAs. In addition, 351 operons covering 1230 genes throughout the whole genome were identified. The RNA-Seq based transcriptome map validated annotated genes and corrected annotations of open reading frames in the genome, and led to the identification of many functional elements (e.g. regions encoding novel proteins, non-coding sRNAs and operon structures). The transcriptional units described in this study

  5. Risk assessment of transmission of capsule-deficient, recombinant Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Thomas J; Glindemann, Gretchen; Fenwick, Bradley; Longstreth, Janice; Ward, Daniel

    2004-11-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiologic agent of swine pleuropneumonia. Live, non-encapsulated vaccine strains have been shown to be efficacious in preventing acute disease in pigs. Recombinant DNA technology has the advantage of generating defined mutants that are safe, but maintain critical immunoprotective components. However, some recombinant strains have the disadvantage of containing antibiotic resistance genes that could be transferred to the animal's normal bacterial flora. Using DNA allelic exchange we have constructed attenuated, capsule-deficient mutants of A. pleuropneumoniae that contain a kanamycin resistance (Kn(R)) gene within the capsule locus of the genome. Following intranasal or intratracheal challenge of pigs the encapsulated parent strains colonized the challenge pigs, and were transmitted to contact pigs. In contrast, the capsule-deficient mutants were recovered only from the challenged pigs and not from contact pigs. Each kanamycin-resistant colony type recovered from the respiratory or gastrointestinal tracts of pigs challenged with the recombinant strain was screened with a probe specific for the Kn(R) gene. All probe-positive colonies were assayed for the specific Kn(R) gene by amplification of a 0.9 kb fragment of the antibiotic resistance gene by PCR. The 0.9 kb fragment was amplified from the recombinant A. pleuropneumoniae colonies, but not from any of the heterologous bacteria, indicating there was no evidence of transmission of the Kn(R) gene to resident bacteria. Following aerosol exposure of 276 pigs with recombinant, non-encapsulated A. pleuropneumoniae the recombinant bacteria were not recovered from any nasal swabs of 75 pigs tested or environmental samples 18 h after challenge. Statistical risk analysis, based on the number of kanamycin-resistant colonies screened, indicated that undetected transmission of the Kn(R) gene could still have occurred in at most 1.36% of kanamycin-resistant bacteria in contact with

  6. Cloning and expression of a cohemolysin, the CAMP factor of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Perrin, J; Nicolet, J

    1989-01-01

    The genetic determinant of the cohemolysin which is responsible for the CAMP phenomenon, a cohemolysis, of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was cloned in Escherichia coli. Total DNA from the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 type strain 4074 was used to construct a gene library in plasmid pUC18 in E. coli JM83. A total of 10,500 clones containing recombinant plasmids have been screened for hemolysis on blood plates. Fifty-five clones which showed a weak hemolytic response after 24 to 48 h of incubation were screened for the CAMP reaction with Staphylococcus aureus. This led to the identification of one clone which showed a positive CAMP reaction. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the recombinant strain expressed a protein with a molecular mass of 27,000 daltons, similar in size to the CAMP protein of the group B streptococci. Rabbit antibodies against the CAMP+ clone neutralized the CAMP reaction mediated by the E. coli strain containing the cloned CAMP gene as well as that of A. pleuropneumoniae. Antibodies raised against the cloned CAMP cohemolysin cross-reacted with Streptococcus agalactiae protein B. We designate the 27,000-dalton molecule CAMP factor protein and name its corresponding gene cfp. Images PMID:2659534

  7. Assessment of the efficacy of tilmicosin phosphate to eliminate Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from carrier pigs.

    PubMed

    Fittipaldi, N; Klopfenstein, C; Gottschalk, M; Broes, A; Paradis, M A; Dick, C P

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of in-feed medication with tilmicosin phosphate in order to eliminate or reduce the carriage of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in the tonsils of carrier pigs. Two groups of 6 carrier animals received either a non-medicated feed (control group) or feed medicated with 400 ppm of tilmicosin phosphate (treated group) for 30 d. Three sentinel pigs were then introduced in each group and left for 29 d. The presence of A. pleuropneumoniae in tonsils was monitored using several techniques, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR). At the end of the treatment all of the control animals, but only 1 treated pig, were positive by PCR from tonsillar surface material. However, at necropsy, all control and most treated animals, as well as 1 sentinel animal, in both groups were positive by PCR from whole tonsils. In conclusion, under the experimental conditions, in-feed treatment with 400 ppm of tilmicosin phosphate significantly reduced the presence of A. pleuropneumoniae on the surface of tonsils but was unable to completely eliminate the organism from deeper tonsillar tissues and to prevent bacterial shedding by carrier animals.

  8. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G induce biofilm formation by field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, S; Fontaine-Gosselin, S-È; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2015-09-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. This is a highly contagious disease that causes important economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Penicillins are extensively used in swine production and these antibiotics are associated with high systemic clearance and low oral bioavailability. This may expose A. pleuropneumoniae to sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G when the antibiotic is administered orally. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of penicillin G on the biofilm formation of A. pleuropneumoniae. Biofilm production of 13 field isolates from serotypes 1, 5a, 7 and 15 was tested in the presence of sub-MIC of penicillin G using a polystyrene microtiter plate assay. Using microscopy techniques and enzymatic digestion, biofilm architecture and composition were also characterized after exposure to sub-MIC of penicillin G. Sub-MIC of penicillin G significantly induced biofilm formation of nine isolates. The penicillin G-induced biofilms contained more poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), extracellular DNA and proteins when compared to control biofilms grown without penicillin G. Additionally, penicillin G-induced biofilms were sensitive to DNase which was not observed with the untreated controls. Furthermore, sub-MIC of penicillin G up-regulated the expression of pgaA, which encodes a protein involved in PGA synthesis, and the genes encoding the envelope-stress sensing two-component regulatory system CpxRA. In conclusion, sub-MICs of penicillin G significantly induce biofilm formation and this is likely the result of a cell envelope stress sensed by the CpxRA system resulting in an increased production of PGA and other matrix components.

  9. Evaluation and Field Validation of PCR Tests for Detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Subclinically Infected Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Broes, André; Harel, Josée; Kobisch, Marylène; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    Eight PCR tests were evaluated for their abilities to detect Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in swine tonsils. At first they were compared regarding their specificities by using A. pleuropneumoniae and related bacterial species and their analytical sensitivities by using tonsils experimentally infected in vitro. PCRs were carried out both directly with tonsil homogenates (direct PCR) and after culture of the sample (after-culture PCR). Most tests demonstrated good specificities; however, some tests gave false-positive results with some non-A. pleuropneumoniae species. High degrees of variation in the analytical sensitivities among the tests were observed for the direct PCRs (109 to 102 CFU/g of tonsil), whereas those of most of the after-culture PCRs were similar (102 CFU/g of tonsil). In a second phase, the effects of sample storage time and storage conditions were evaluated by using tonsils from experimentally infected animals. Storage at −20°C allowed the detection of the organism for at least 4 months. Finally, the omlA PCR test described by Savoye et al. (C. Savoye et al., Vet. Microbiol. 73:337-347, 2000) and the commercially available Adiavet App PCR test were further validated with field samples. Their effectiveness was compared to those of standard and immunomagnetic separation-based methods of bacterial isolation. In addition, a comparison of tonsil biopsy specimens (from living animals) and whole tonsils (collected at the slaughterhouse) was also conducted. A. pleuropneumoniae was neither isolated nor detected by PCR from a herd serologically negative for A. pleuropneumoniae. PCR was more sensitive than the standard isolation method with whole tonsils from three infected herds. After-culture PCR offered the highest degree of sensitivity (93 and 83% for the omlA and Adiavet App PCRs, respectively). The PCR detection rate was higher with whole tonsils than with tonsil biopsy specimens. Good agreement (κ = 0.65) was found between the presence of A

  10. A PCR assay used to study aerosol transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from samples of live pigs under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Savoye, C; Jobert, J L; Berthelot-Hérault, F; Keribin, A M; Cariolet, R; Morvan, H; Madec, F; Kobisch, M

    2000-05-11

    The study describes a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The test is based on the amplification of the omlA gene coding for an outer membrane protein of A. pleuropneumoniae. To test the specificity of the reaction, 19 other bacterial species related to A. pleuropneumoniae or isolated from pigs were assayed. They were all found negative in the PCR assay. The detection threshold of the test was 10(2) A. pleuropneumoniae CFU/assay. The test was then applied to the detection of A. pleuropneumoniae from tonsillar biopsies and tracheobronchial lavage fluids of pigs without a culture step. The detection of A. pleuropneumoniae in these samples was performed by PCR, by conventional culture and by bacteriology with immunomagnetic beads. The number of samples that were found positive by PCR was almost three times higher than the number of samples from which A. pleuropneumoniae was isolated by both bacteriological techniques. The detection of A. pleuropneumoniae in these samples allowed us to demonstrate its aerosol transmission to pigs under experimental conditions. The trial involved 18 specific pathogen free pigs. Six pigs, infected with A. pleuropneumoniae, were located in a unit A, together with four non-infected animals (contact pigs). Eight non-infected pigs (reporter pigs) were located in a unit B, adjacent to A. We detected A. pleuropneumoniae in samples from infected animals but also from 'contact' (unit A) and 'reporter' (unit B) pigs. The results of this study show that the simple preparation of the samples followed by the PCR assay may be a useful tool for epidemiological studies. PMID:10781732

  11. Serotyping reanalysis of unserotypable Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates by agar gel diffusion test

    PubMed Central

    MORIOKA, Ayako; SHIMAZAKI, Yoko; UCHIYAMA, Mariko; SUZUKI, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    We observed increasing unserotypable (UT) Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates using agar gel diffusion (AGD) test. To reanalyze their serovar, we performed rapid slide agglutination (RSA) test and multiplex PCR for 47 UT isolates. Of these, 25 were serovar 1 (UT-serovar 1), 20 were serovar 2 (UT-serovar 2) and 2 were serovar 15 (UT-serovar 15). We examined serotyping antigen extraction temperature to determine heat influence. UT-serovar 1 and 15 were influenced by heat, because their precipitation lines were observed in the case of low antigen extraction temperature. To investigate the relationship between antigenicity and genotype, we performed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis using UT-serovar 2 and 15. The predominant PFGE pattern of UT-serovar 2 was identical to that of serovar 2. PMID:26726101

  12. Proteomic and immunoproteomic characterization of a DIVA subunit vaccine against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protection of pigs by vaccination against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, is hampered by the presence of 15 different serotypes. A DIVA subunit vaccine comprised of detergent-released proteins from A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 2 and 5 has been developed and shown to protect pigs from clinical symptoms upon homologous and heterologous challenge. This vaccine has not been characterized in-depth so far. Thus we performed i) mass spectrometry in order to identify the exact protein content of the vaccine and ii) cross-serotype 2-D immunoblotting in order to discover cross-reactive antigens. By these approaches we expected to gain results enabling us to argue about the reasons for the efficacy of the analyzed vaccine. Results We identified 75 different proteins in the vaccine. Using the PSORTb algorithm these proteins were classified according to their cellular localization. Highly enriched proteins are outer membrane-associated lipoproteins like OmlA and TbpB, integral outer membrane proteins like FrpB, TbpA, OmpA1, OmpA2, HgbA and OmpP2, and secreted Apx toxins. The subunit vaccine also contained large amounts of the ApxIVA toxin so far thought to be expressed only during infection. Applying two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) we showed different isoforms and variations in expression levels of several proteins among the strains used for vaccine production. For detection of cross-reactive antigens we used detergent released proteins of serotype 7. Sera of pigs vaccinated with the detergent-released proteins of serotypes 1, 2, and 5 detected seven different proteins of serotype 7, and convalescent sera of pigs surviving experimental infection with serotype 7 reacted with 13 different proteins of the detergent-released proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 2, and 5. Conclusions A detergent extraction-based subunit vaccine of A. pleuropneumoniae was characterized by mass

  13. Isolation and genetic characterization of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovar K12:O3 strain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    An atypical Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovar 12 strain, termed QAS106, was isolated from a clinical case of porcine pleuropneumonia in Japan. An immunodiffusion (ID) test identified the strain as serovar 12. However, the ID test also demonstrated that strain QAS106 shared antigenic determinants with both the serovar 3 and 15 reference strains. Strain QAS106 was positive in the capsular serovar 12-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, while the PCR toxin gene profiling and omlA PCR typing assays indicated that strain QAS106 was similar to serovar 3. The nucleotide sequence of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of strain QAS106 was identical with that of serovars 3 and 12, but it showed 99.7% identity with that of serovar 15. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that genes involved in biosynthesis of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of strain QAS106 were identical to those of serovar 12 at the amino acid level. On the other hand, strain QAS106 would express putative proteins involved in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide (O-PS), the amino acid sequences of which were identical or nearly identical to those of serovars 3 and 15. In conclusion, strain QAS106 should be recognized as K12:O3, even though typical serovar 12 strains are K12:O12. The emergence of an atypical A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 12 strain expressing a rare combination of CPS and O-PS antigens would hamper precise serodiagnosis by the use of either CPS- or LPS-based serodiagnostic methodology alone. PMID:25387844

  14. ICEApl1, an Integrative Conjugative Element Related to ICEHin1056, Identified in the Pig Pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Janine T; Li, Yanwen; Fernandez Crespo, Roberto; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Rogers, Jon; Holden, Matthew T G; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N; Langford, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    ICEApl1 was identified in the whole genome sequence of MIDG2331, a tetracycline-resistant (MIC = 8 mg/L) serovar 8 clinical isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. PCR amplification of virB4, one of the core genes involved in conjugation, was used to identify other A. pleuropneumoniae isolates potentially carrying ICEApl1. MICs for tetracycline were determined for virB4 positive isolates, and shotgun whole genome sequence analysis was used to confirm presence of the complete ICEApl1. The sequence of ICEApl1 is 56083 bp long and contains 67 genes including a Tn10 element encoding tetracycline resistance. Comparative sequence analysis was performed with similar integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) found in other members of the Pasteurellaceae. ICEApl1 is most similar to the 59393 bp ICEHin1056, from Haemophilus influenzae strain 1056. Although initially identified only in serovar 8 isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae (31 from the UK and 1 from Cyprus), conjugal transfer of ICEApl1 to representative isolates of other serovars was confirmed. All isolates carrying ICEApl1 had a MIC for tetracycline of 8 mg/L. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ICE in A. pleuropneumoniae, and the first report of a member of the ICEHin1056 subfamily in a non-human pathogen. ICEApl1 confers resistance to tetracycline, currently one of the more commonly used antibiotics for treatment and control of porcine pleuropneumonia. PMID:27379024

  15. Identification and characterization of a DNA region involved in the export of capsular polysaccharide by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, C K; Inzana, T J

    1997-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae synthesizes a serotype-specific capsular polysaccharide that acts as a protective barrier to phagocytosis and complement-mediated killing. To begin understanding the role of A. pleuropneumoniae capsule in virulence, we sought to identify the genes involved in capsular polysaccharide export and biosynthesis. A 5.3-kb XbaI fragment of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a J45 genomic DNA that hybridized with DNA probes specific for the Haemophilus influenzae type b cap export region was cloned and sequenced. This A. pleuropneumoniae DNA fragment encoded four open reading frames, designated cpxDCBA. The nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of cpxDCBA contained a high degree of homology to the capsule export genes of H. influenzae type b bexDCBA, Neisseria meningitidis group B ctrABCD, and, to a lesser extent, Escherichia coli K1 and K5 kpsE and kpsMT. When present in trans, the cpxDCBA gene cluster complemented kpsM::TnphoA or kpsT::TnphoA mutations, determined by enzyme immunoassay and by restored sensitivity to a K5-specific bacteriophage. A cpxCB probe hybridized to genomic DNA from all A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes tested, indicating that this DNA was conserved among serotypes. These data suggest that A. pleuropneumoniae produces a group II family capsule similar to those of related mucosal pathogens. PMID:9169799

  16. ICEApl1, an Integrative Conjugative Element Related to ICEHin1056, Identified in the Pig Pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Fernandez Crespo, Roberto; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Rogers, Jon; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Wren, Brendan W.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Langford, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    ICEApl1 was identified in the whole genome sequence of MIDG2331, a tetracycline-resistant (MIC = 8 mg/L) serovar 8 clinical isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. PCR amplification of virB4, one of the core genes involved in conjugation, was used to identify other A. pleuropneumoniae isolates potentially carrying ICEApl1. MICs for tetracycline were determined for virB4 positive isolates, and shotgun whole genome sequence analysis was used to confirm presence of the complete ICEApl1. The sequence of ICEApl1 is 56083 bp long and contains 67 genes including a Tn10 element encoding tetracycline resistance. Comparative sequence analysis was performed with similar integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) found in other members of the Pasteurellaceae. ICEApl1 is most similar to the 59393 bp ICEHin1056, from Haemophilus influenzae strain 1056. Although initially identified only in serovar 8 isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae (31 from the UK and 1 from Cyprus), conjugal transfer of ICEApl1 to representative isolates of other serovars was confirmed. All isolates carrying ICEApl1 had a MIC for tetracycline of 8 mg/L. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ICE in A. pleuropneumoniae, and the first report of a member of the ICEHin1056 subfamily in a non-human pathogen. ICEApl1 confers resistance to tetracycline, currently one of the more commonly used antibiotics for treatment and control of porcine pleuropneumonia. PMID:27379024

  17. Changes in gene expression of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in response to anaerobic stress reveal induction of central metabolism and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Zhu, Jiawen; Yang, Kui; Xu, Zhuofei; Liu, Ziduo; Zhou, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an important porcine respiratory pathogen causing great economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. Oxygen deprivation is a stress that A. pleuropneumoniae will encounter during both early infection and the later, persistent stage. To understand modulation of A. pleuropneumoniae gene expression in response to the stress caused by anaerobic conditions, gene expression profiles under anaerobic and aerobic conditions were compared in this study. The microarray results showed that 631 genes (27.7% of the total ORFs) were differentially expressed in anaerobic conditions. Many genes encoding proteins involved in glycolysis, carbon source uptake systems, pyruvate metabolism, fermentation and the electron respiration transport chain were up-regulated. These changes led to an increased amount of pyruvate, lactate, ethanol and acetate in the bacterial cells as confirmed by metabolite detection. Genes encoding proteins involved in cell surface structures, especially biofilm formation, peptidoglycan biosynthesis and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were up-regulated as well. Biofilm formation was significantly enhanced under anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that induction of central metabolism is important for basic survival of A. pleuropneumoniae after a shift to an anaerobic environment. Enhanced biofilm formation may contribute to the persistence of this pathogen in the damaged anaerobic host tissue and also in the early colonization stage. These discoveries give new insights into adaptation mechanisms of A. pleuropneumoniae in response to environmental stress.

  18. Microarray-based comparative genomic profiling of reference strains and selected Canadian field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gouré, Julien; Findlay, Wendy A; Deslandes, Vincent; Bouevitch, Anne; Foote, Simon J; MacInnes, Janet I; Coulton, James W; Nash, John HE; Jacques, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, is a highly contagious respiratory pathogen that causes severe losses to the swine industry worldwide. Current commercially-available vaccines are of limited value because they do not induce cross-serovar immunity and do not prevent development of the carrier state. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridizations (M-CGH) were used to estimate whole genomic diversity of representative Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains. Our goal was to identify conserved genes, especially those predicted to encode outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins because of their potential for the development of more effective vaccines. Results Using hierarchical clustering, our M-CGH results showed that the majority of the genes in the genome of the serovar 5 A. pleuropneumoniae L20 strain were conserved in the reference strains of all 15 serovars and in representative field isolates. Fifty-eight conserved genes predicted to encode for outer membrane proteins or lipoproteins were identified. As well, there were several clusters of diverged or absent genes including those associated with capsule biosynthesis, toxin production as well as genes typically associated with mobile elements. Conclusion Although A. pleuropneumoniae strains are essentially clonal, M-CGH analysis of the reference strains of the fifteen serovars and representative field isolates revealed several classes of genes that were divergent or absent. Not surprisingly, these included genes associated with capsule biosynthesis as the capsule is associated with sero-specificity. Several of the conserved genes were identified as candidates for vaccine development, and we conclude that M-CGH is a valuable tool for reverse vaccinology. PMID:19239696

  19. Tissue reaction and immunity in swine immunized with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae vaccines.

    PubMed

    Willson, P J; Rossi-Campos, A; Potter, A A

    1995-10-01

    These studies were done to develop a subunit vaccine for swine that would protect against disease, but not create unacceptable tissue reactions at the immunization site. Swine were used to evaluate the local effects of subunit vaccines prepared from extracts of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 containing one of a wide variety of adjuvants. The antigen was an anionic fraction of a saline extract of A. pleuropneumoniae (ANEX). The adjuvants used were vegetable oils (peanut, sesame, canola, or corn oils, vitamin E, or Lipposyn II emulsion); mineral oil (Marcol-52) and other materials (aluminum hydroxide, polyethylene glycol, Quil-A, Amphigen, or Emulsigen-Plus). Two types of experiments were done. In the 1st set of experiments, pigs were given multiple simultaneous injections in different sites and euthanized on days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, or 28. Tissues were examined for gross and histopathological lesions. In the 2nd set of experiments, 48 pigs were allocated to 6 groups and vaccinated twice with a vaccine containing ANEX antigen combined with one of various adjuvants. Antibody responses and protection from challenge were evaluated. Among the adjuvants that were tested, mineral oils induced protective immunity, although the mineral oil Marcol-52 resulted in severe tissue reactions. The vegetable oils induced little protective immunity, and some of them were quite irritating. The response to the other materials ranged from little irritation or protection induced by the vaccine containing aluminum hydroxide to effective protection without irritation after vaccination with ANEX/Amphigen or ANEX/Emulsigen-Plus combinations. In conclusion, swine were protected against disease by a subunit vaccine that did not create unacceptable tissue reaction at the immunization site.

  20. Tissue reaction and immunity in swine immunized with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Willson, P J; Rossi-Campos, A; Potter, A A

    1995-01-01

    These studies were done to develop a subunit vaccine for swine that would protect against disease, but not create unacceptable tissue reactions at the immunization site. Swine were used to evaluate the local effects of subunit vaccines prepared from extracts of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 containing one of a wide variety of adjuvants. The antigen was an anionic fraction of a saline extract of A. pleuropneumoniae (ANEX). The adjuvants used were vegetable oils (peanut, sesame, canola, or corn oils, vitamin E, or Lipposyn II emulsion); mineral oil (Marcol-52) and other materials (aluminum hydroxide, polyethylene glycol, Quil-A, Amphigen, or Emulsigen-Plus). Two types of experiments were done. In the 1st set of experiments, pigs were given multiple simultaneous injections in different sites and euthanized on days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, or 28. Tissues were examined for gross and histopathological lesions. In the 2nd set of experiments, 48 pigs were allocated to 6 groups and vaccinated twice with a vaccine containing ANEX antigen combined with one of various adjuvants. Antibody responses and protection from challenge were evaluated. Among the adjuvants that were tested, mineral oils induced protective immunity, although the mineral oil Marcol-52 resulted in severe tissue reactions. The vegetable oils induced little protective immunity, and some of them were quite irritating. The response to the other materials ranged from little irritation or protection induced by the vaccine containing aluminum hydroxide to effective protection without irritation after vaccination with ANEX/Amphigen or ANEX/Emulsigen-Plus combinations. In conclusion, swine were protected against disease by a subunit vaccine that did not create unacceptable tissue reaction at the immunization site. PMID:8548692

  1. Secreted proteases from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 degrade porcine gelatin, hemoglobin and immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Serrano, J J; Garcia, C; de la Garza, M

    1994-01-01

    It was found that 48 hour cultures of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae secreted proteases into the medium. Electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels (10%) copolymerized with porcine gelatin (0.1%), of the 70% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate from the culture supernatants, displayed protease activities of different molecular weights: > 200, 200, 90, 80, 70 and 50 kDa. They had activity over a broad range of pHs (4-8), with an optimal pH of 6-7. All were inhibited by 10 mM EDTA, and reactivated by 10 mM calcium. They were stable at -20 degrees C for more than a month. The proteases also degraded porcine IgA and porcine, human, and bovine hemoglobin, although they appeared to be less active against the hemoglobins. The IgA was totally cleaved in 48 h, using supernatants concentrated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone or the 70% (NH4)2SO4. Extracellular proteases could play a role in virulence. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:8004545

  2. [Generation of nalidixic acid-resistant strains and signature-tagged mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Shang, Lin; Li, Wei; Li, Liangjun; Li, Lu; Zhang, Sihua; Li, Tingting; Li, Yaokun; Liu, Lei; Guo, Zhiwei; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2008-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a very important respiratory pathogen for swine and causes great economic losses in pig industry worldwide. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is an effective method to identify virulence genes in bacteria. In this study, we selected nalidixic acid-resistant strains of APP serotypes 1 and 3 by in vitro cultivation, and used as receipt strains for constructing transposon mutants by mating with E. coli CC 118 lambdapir or S17-1 lambdapir containing mini-Tn10 tag plasmids pLOF/TAG1-48, with or without the help of E. coli DH5alpha (pRK2073). We screened mutant strains by antibiotics selection, PCR and Southern blot identification. Our data revealed that nalidixic acid-resistance of APP strains could easily be induced in vitro and the resistance was due to the mutation in the DNA gyrase A subunit gene gyrA. In the mating experiments, the bi-parental mating was more effective and easier than tri-parental mating. Different APP strains showed a different mating and transposon efficiency in the bi-parental mating, with the strains of serotype 1 much higher than serotype 3 and the reference strain of serotype 3 higher than the field strains. These data were helpful for the construction of STM mutants and pickup of virulence genes of APP. PMID:18338580

  3. Analysis of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ArcA regulon identifies fumarate reductase as a determinant of virulence.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Falk F R; Bendallah, Ibrahim M; Bosse, Janine T; Dreckmann, Karla; Nash, John H E; Langford, Paul R; Gerlach, Gerald-F

    2008-06-01

    The ability of the bacterial pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to grow anaerobically allows the bacterium to persist in the lung. The ArcAB two-component system is crucial for metabolic adaptation in response to anaerobic conditions, and we recently showed that an A. pleuropneumoniae arcA mutant had reduced virulence compared to the wild type (F. F. Buettner, A. Maas, and G.-F. Gerlach, Vet. Microbiol. 127:106-115, 2008). In order to understand the attenuated phenotype, we investigated the ArcA regulon of A. pleuropneumoniae by using a combination of transcriptome (microarray) and proteome (two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and subsequent mass spectrometry) analyses. We show that ArcA negatively regulates the expression of many genes, including those encoding enzymes which consume intermediates during fumarate synthesis. Simultaneously, the expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a component of the respiratory chain serving as a direct reduction equivalent for fumarate reductase, was upregulated. This result, together with the in silico analysis finding that A. pleuropneumoniae has no oxidative branch of the citric acid cycle, led to the hypothesis that fumarate reductase might be crucial for virulence by providing (i) energy via fumarate respiration and (ii) succinate and other essential metabolic intermediates via the reductive branch of the citric acid cycle. To test this hypothesis, an isogenic A. pleuropneumoniae fumarate reductase deletion mutant was constructed and studied by using a pig aerosol infection model. The mutant was shown to be significantly attenuated, thereby strongly supporting a crucial role for fumarate reductase in the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  4. Transcriptional Portrait of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae during Acute Disease - Potential Strategies for Survival and Persistence in the Host

    PubMed Central

    Klitgaard, Kirstine; Friis, Carsten; Jensen, Tim K.; Angen, Øystein; Boye, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiles of bacteria in their natural hosts can provide novel insight into the host-pathogen interactions and molecular determinants of bacterial infections. In the present study, the transcriptional profile of the porcine lung pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was monitored during the acute phase of infection in its natural host. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacterial expression profiles of A. pleuropneumoniae isolated from lung lesions of 25 infected pigs were compared in samples taken 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours post experimental challenge. Within 6 hours, focal, fibrino hemorrhagic lesions could be observed in the pig lungs, indicating that A. pleuropneumoniae had managed to establish itself successfully in the host. We identified 237 differentially regulated genes likely to encode functions required by the bacteria for colonization and survival in the host. This group was dominated by genes involved in various aspects of energy metabolism, especially anaerobic respiration and carbohydrate metabolism. Remodeling of the bacterial envelope and modifications of posttranslational processing of proteins also appeared to be of importance during early infection. The results suggested that A. pleuropneumoniae is using various strategies to increase its fitness, such as applying Na+ pumps as an alternative way of gaining energy. Furthermore, the transcriptional data provided potential clues as to how A. pleuropneumoniae is able to circumvent host immune factors and survive within the hostile environment of host macrophages. This persistence within macrophages may be related to urease activity, mobilization of various stress responses and active evasion of the host defenses by cell surface sialylation. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here highlight the importance of metabolic adjustments to host conditions as virulence factors of infecting microorganisms and help to provide insight into the mechanisms behind the efficient

  5. Characterization of the omlA gene from different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae: A new insight into an old approach

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ciro César; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; Bazzolli, Denise Mara Soares

    2013-01-01

    The OmlA protein is a virulence factor of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important pathogen in pigs. The polymorphisms present in the omlA gene sequence of 15 reference serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae and non-serotypable isolates were assessed to determine the possible evolutionary relationship among them and to validate the importance of this gene as a molecular marker for the characterization of this bacterium. Divergence among the 15 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae probably resulted initially from two major evolutionary events that led to subsequent differentiation into nine groups. This differentiation makes it possible to characterize most of the serotypes by using bionformatics, thereby avoiding problems with immunological cross-reactivity. A conserved α-helix common to all the serotypes was most likely involved in connecting the protein to the outer membrane and acting as a signal peptide. A previously unknown gene duplication was also identified and could contribute to the genetic variability that makes it difficult to serotype some isolates. Our data support the importance of the omlA gene in the biology of A. pleuropneumoniae and provide a new area of research into the OmlA protein. PMID:23885207

  6. The genetic organisation of the capsule biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 6, 7, and 12.

    PubMed

    Jessing, Stine G; Ahrens, Peter; Inzana, Thomas J; Angen, Øystein

    2008-06-22

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the organisation of the genes (cps) involved in biosynthesis the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 6, 7, and 12 and to compare these to the corresponding genes previously described in other A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes. In serotypes 6 and 7 the sequenced DNA regions comprised five and four open reading frames, respectively, designated cps6ABCDE and cps7ABCD, whereas the sequenced DNA region in serotype 12 comprised only two open reading frames designated cps12AB. At the amino acid level, CpsA, CpsB, and CpsC of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 6, 7, and 8 contained a high degree of homology. At the amino acid level Cps6D revealed a high degree of homology to Cps8D, whereas Cps7D contained a high degree of homology to the Cps2D. The deduced gene product of the partially sequenced cps6E gene showed no homology to any deduced gene products of any cps genes of A. pleuropneumoniae investigated so far. None of the deduced gene products of the cps genes involved in encapsulation of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 6, 7, and 8 revealed homology to the deduced gene products of the cps genes of serotypes 1, 5A, and 12. For some genes, a local homology was found to genes probably involved in teichoic acid synthesis in other bacteria. The results obtained revealed a high degree of homology among the genes involved in CPS biosynthesis for serotypes 2, 6, 7, and 8 and a different group of homologous cps genes for serotypes 1 and 12. In some serotype 7 strains, including the serotype 7 reference strain, WF83, the cps genes were not located adjacent to the genes responsible for CPS export (cpx), probably due to genetic rearrangements.

  7. The Adh adhesin domain is required for trimeric autotransporter Apa1-mediated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae adhesion, autoaggregation, biofilm formation and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Yang, Shuxin; Zhai, Ruidong; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Pan, Fengguang; Ji, Qun; Wang, Yu; Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-05-15

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, which is a highly contagious endemic disease of pigs. Adhesion is a critical first step in the infection process. Trimeric autotransporter adhesions (TAAs) have been identified as novel virulence factors; however, little is known on their roles in A. pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity. Here, our data show that YadA-like head region (Adh) of Apa1 was the optimal adhesion functional domain via segment expression and adhesion assays in vitro. Additionally, Adh induced partial protection against A. pleuropneumoniae 5b L20 and serotypes 1, 3, and 5a in mice. The deletion of Adh gene significantly decreased autoaggregation, biofilm formation and adherence to host cells in vitro. Furthermore, with delaying of clinical symptoms, reducing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lessening the lung injury after infection, Adh deletion strain (5bϕAdh) significantly reduced the pathogenicity to piglets. To elucidate the mechanism of lung injury, the differentially expressed genes in the lung tissues of piglets infected with the 5b L20 or 5bϕAdh strains were investigated using microarray analysis and validated by qRT-PCR. Compared with the 5b L20 infected piglets, 495 genes were differentially expressed in 5bϕAdh infected lung tissue (221 upregulated and 274 downregulated). Especially, the antigen processing and presentation gene IFI30 was increased following infection with the 5bϕAdh strain. Thus, Adh may enhance pathogenicity by depressing host immune recognition. We conclude that the head domain of the A. pleuropneumoniae trimeric autotransporter Apa1 regulates autoagglutination, biofilm formation, adhesion to host cells and pathogenicity.

  8. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  9. Experimental Identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Strains L20 and JL03 Heptosyltransferases, Evidence for a New Heptosyltransferase Signature Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally identified the activities of six predicted heptosyltransferases in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae genome serotype 5b strain L20 and serotype 3 strain JL03. The initial identification was based on a bioinformatic analysis of the amino acid similarity between these putative heptosyltrasferases with others of known function from enteric bacteria and Aeromonas. The putative functions of all the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae heptosyltrasferases were determined by using surrogate LPS acceptor molecules from well-defined A. hydrophyla AH-3 and A. salmonicida A450 mutants. Our results show that heptosyltransferases APL_0981 and APJL_1001 are responsible for the transfer of the terminal outer core D-glycero-D-manno-heptose (D,D-Hep) residue although they are not currently included in the CAZY glycosyltransferase 9 family. The WahF heptosyltransferase group signature sequence [S(T/S)(GA)XXH] differs from the heptosyltransferases consensus signature sequence [D(TS)(GA)XXH], because of the substitution of D261 for S261, being unique. PMID:23383222

  10. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae genes expression in biofilms cultured under static conditions and in a drip-flow apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the Gram-negative bacterium responsible for porcine pleuropneumonia. This respiratory infection is highly contagious and characterized by high morbidity and mortality. The objectives of our study were to study the transcriptome of A. pleuropneumoniae biofilms at different stages and to develop a protocol to grow an A. pleuropneumoniae biofilm in a drip-flow apparatus. This biofilm reactor is a system with an air-liquid interface modeling lung-like environment. Bacteria attached to a surface (biofilm) and free floating bacteria (plankton) were harvested for RNA isolation. Labelled cDNA was hybridized to a microarray to compare the expression profiles of planktonic cells and biofilm cells. Results It was observed that 47 genes were differentially expressed (22 up, 25 down) in a 4 h-static growing/maturing biofilm and 117 genes were differentially expressed (49 up, 68 down) in a 6h-static dispersing biofilm. The transcriptomes of a 4 h biofilm and a 6 h biofilm were also compared and 456 genes (235 up, 221 down) were identified as differently expressed. Among the genes identified in the 4 h vs 6h biofilm experiment, several regulators of stress response were down-regulated and energy metabolism associated genes were up-regulated. Biofilm bacteria cultured using the drip-flow apparatus differentially expressed 161 genes (68 up, 93 down) compared to the effluent bacteria. Cross-referencing of differentially transcribed genes in the different assays revealed that drip-flow biofilms shared few differentially expressed genes with static biofilms (4 h or 6 h) but shared several differentially expressed genes with natural or experimental infections in pigs. Conclusion The formation of a static biofilm by A. pleuropneumoniae strain S4074 is a rapid process and transcriptional analysis indicated that dispersal observed at 6 h is driven by nutritional stresses. Furthermore, A. pleuropneumoniae can form a biofilm under low

  11. Viability of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in frozen pig lung samples and comparison of different methods of direct diagnosis in fresh samples.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, C B; Rodriguez Barbosa, J I; Gonzalez, O R; Tascon, R I; Rodriguez Ferri, E F

    1992-04-01

    A comparative study on different methods of diagnosis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from both fresh and frozen pig lungs is described. A total of 196 lung tissues with pneumonic lesions were examined for culture isolation on chocolate blood agar, as well as for antigen detection by means of the coagglutination test, the immunodiffusion test and the indirect ELISA. These samples were subsequently frozen for 1 yr and then they were recultured. A. pleuropneumoniae was recovered from fresh lung specimens in 30 cases (15.3%) and from frozen samples in only two cases (0.9%). Such a different degree of isolation demonstrates that long freezing had an adverse effect on the viability of this organism in lung samples. A pleuropneumoniae detection was positive in 134 samples (68.4%) by at least one of the immunological techniques examined. The indirect ELISA was the most sensitive and specific test, with antigen detected in 125 lungs (63.8%). In comparison with the coagglutination and immunodiffusion tests, the sensitivities of the indirect ELISA were 95.8 and 93.7%, and the specificities were 67.0 and 63.4%, respectively.

  12. Antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae-infected and bacterin-vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Furesz, S E; Mallard, B A; Bossé, J T; Rosendal, S; Wilkie, B N; MacInnes, J I

    1997-01-01

    Current porcine pleuropneumonia bacterins afford only partial protection by decreasing mortality but not morbidity. In order to better understand the type(s) of immune response associated with protection, antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses (CMIR) were compared for piglets before and after administration of a commercial bacterin, which confers partial protection, or a low-dose (10(5) CFU/ml) aerosol challenge with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae CM5 (LD), which induces complete protection. Control groups received phosphate-buffered saline or adjuvant. Serum antibody response, antibody avidity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), and lymphocyte blastogenic responses were measured and compared among treatment groups to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capsular polysaccharide (CPS), hemolysin (HLY), and outer membrane proteins (OMP) of A. pleuropneumoniae. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and sera were collected prior to and following primary and secondary immunization-infection and high-dose A. pleuropneumoniae CM5 (10(7) CFU/ml) aerosol challenge. Serum antibody and DTH, particularly that to HLY, differed significantly between treatment groups, and increases were associated with protection. LD-infected piglets had higher antibody responses (P < or = 0.01) and antibody avidity (P < or = 0.10) than bacterin-vaccinated and control groups. Anti-HLY antibodies were consistently associated with protection, whereas anti-LPS and anti-CPS antibodies were not. LD-infected animals had higher DTH responses, particularly to HLY, than bacterin-vaccinated pigs (P < or = 0.03). The LD-infected group maintained consistent blastogenic responses to HLY, LPS, CPS, and OMP over the course of infection, unlike the bacterin-vaccinated and control animals. These data suggest that the immune responses induced by a commercial bacterin are very different from those induced by LD aerosol infection and that current bacterins may be modified, for instance, by addition of HLY, so as to

  13. Purification and characterization of a protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, an antigen common to all the serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Guerrero, A L; García, R M; Reyes, M E; de la Garza, M

    1998-01-01

    A high molecular-mass proteolytic enzyme of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, was purified from culture supernatants (CSN) by using DEAE-cellulose and sepharose-4B-gelatin chromatography. In 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with porcine gelatin, the protease showed a single band of activity of > 200 kDa. However, minor molecular-mass proteolytic bands were observed when the protease was electrophoresed in the presence of either 5% beta-mercaptoethanol, 50 mM dithiothreitol, or 0.25 M urea. Furthermore, when the > 200-kDa purified protein was passed through a sucrose gradient, several bands with proteolytic activity were found: 62, 90, 190, and 540 kDa. The proteolytic activity was increased in the presence of calcium or zinc and was not affected after being heated at 90 degrees C for 5 min. Proteolytic activities were also observed in CSN from all A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes and biotypes. The purified protease hydrolyzed porcine IgA and IgG in vitro. In addition, by immunoblot the protease was recognized by serum of naturally infected pigs with serotypes 1 and 5, and by serum of pigs experimentally infected with serotypes 1, 2, 8, or 9. Serum of a pig vaccinated with CSN of a serotype 3 strain also recognized the protease, but not sera of pigs vaccinated with a bacterin (serotype 1). Proteins from CSN of all the serotypes, which were precipitated with 70% (NH4)2SO4, were recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised against the purified protease. Taken together these results indicate that an antigenic protease is produced in vivo by all the serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. The results indicate that proteases could have a role in the disease and in the immune response of pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae. Images Figure 2A. Figure 2B. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5A. Figure 5B. Figure 6A. Figure 6B. PMID:9684047

  14. Molecular Analysis of an Alternative N-Glycosylation Machinery by Functional Transfer from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Naegeli, Andreas; Neupert, Christine; Fan, Yao-Yun; Lin, Chia-Wei; Poljak, Kristina; Papini, Anna Maria; Schwarz, Flavio; Aebi, Markus

    2014-01-01

    N-Linked protein glycosylation is a frequent post-translational modification that can be found in all three domains of life. In a canonical, highly conserved pathway, an oligosaccharide is transferred by a membrane-bound oligosaccharyltransferase from a lipid donor to asparagines in the sequon NX(S/T) of secreted polypeptides. The δ-proteobacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae encodes an unusual pathway for N-linked protein glycosylation. This pathway takes place in the cytoplasm and is mediated by a soluble N-glycosyltransferase (NGT) that uses nucleotide-activated monosaccharides to glycosylate asparagine residues. To characterize the process of cytoplasmic N-glycosylation in more detail, we studied the glycosylation in A. pleuropneumoniae and functionally transferred the glycosylation system to Escherichia coli. N-Linked glucose specific human sera were used for the analysis of the glycosylation process. We identified autotransporter adhesins as the preferred protein substrate of NGT in vivo, and in depth analysis of the modified sites in E. coli revealed a surprisingly relaxed peptide substrate specificity. Although NX(S/T) is the preferred acceptor sequon, we detected glycosylation of alternative sequons, including modification of glutamine and serine residues. We also demonstrate the use of NGT to glycosylate heterologous proteins. Therefore, our study could provide the basis for a novel route for the engineering of N-glycoproteins in bacteria. PMID:24275653

  15. Susceptibility testing of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Denmark. Evaluation of three different media of MIC-determinations and tablet diffusion tests.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Jensen, N E

    1999-02-12

    This study was conducted to compare the applicability of three different media in sensitivity testing of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by means of MIC and tablet diffusion tests. The media used were: modified PPLO agar, chocolatized Mueller-Hinton-II and Columbia agar supplemented with NAD. Seven antimicrobial agents were tested: ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, penicillin, spectinomycin, tiamulin, trimethoprim + sulfadiazine and tylosin, against 40 randomly selected A. pleuropneumoniae isolates. In general, good agreement was found between results obtained with all combinations of media, most antimicrobials tested and the two-test systems. Some variations between media were observed for spectinomycin, tiamulin and tylosin. For ceftiofur and trimethoprim + sulfadiazine some isolates with low MIC-values were classified as resistant using tablet diffusion, indicating that the break points of resistance for these antimicrobials using the tablet diffusion tests need adjustment. Using current break points for resistance with MIC-determinations, all isolates tested susceptible to ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, penicillin, tiamulin and trimethoprim + sulfadiazine. A larger number of isolates tested resistant to spectinomycin and tylosin on all three media using both MIC determinations and tablet diffusion. PMID:10063535

  16. Genomic relatedness among Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae field strains of sterotypes 1 and 5 isolated from healthy and diseased pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Chatellier, S; Harel, J; Dugourd, D; Chevallier, B; Kobisch, M; Gottschalk, M

    1999-01-01

    Forty-four Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates recovered from both healthy and diseased pigs were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD), pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and apx toxin gene typing. Nine RAPD types and 14 PFGE patterns were identified. No common RAPD or PFGE patterns were found between strains of serotype 1 and those of serotype 5. The RAPD analysis indicated that the 15 serotype 1 strains isolated from diseased pigs were assigned to 4 RAPD types, with 66% of strains characterized by the same RAPD type. By contrast, the 5 strains of serotype 1 isolated from healthy carriers were dispersed in 4 RAPD types. These data suggest that the diversity of strains isolated from healthy pigs could be higher than that of strains recovered from diseased pigs. In addition, all serotype 5 strains exhibited a unique RAPD type. Unlike RAPD, PFGE analysis allowed discrimination among isolates of serotype 1 and among those of serotype 5. All but 3 isolates showed the same apx genotype as their respective serotype reference strain. These data indicate that RAPD analysis is a valuable rapid tool for routine subtyping of strains of serotype 1. For strains of serotype 5, a combination of several typing methods, such as PFGE and apx gene typing, is needed to provide useful information on the molecular epidemiology of swine pleuropneumonia. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:10480458

  17. Nasal immunization with major epitope-containing ApxIIA toxin fragment induces protective immunity against challenge infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ki-Weon; Kim, Sae-Hae; Park, Jisang; Son, Youngok; Yoo, Han Sang; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2013-01-15

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an infective agent that leads to porcine pleuropneumonia, a disease that causes severe economic losses in the swine industry. Based on the fact that the respiratory tract is the primary site for bacterial infection, it has been suggested that bacterial exclusion in the respiratory tract through mucosal immune induction is the most effective disease prevention strategy. ApxIIA is a vaccine candidate against A. pleuropneumoniae infection, and fragment #5 (aa. 439-801) of ApxIIA contains the major epitopes for effective vaccination. In this study, we used mice to verify the efficacy of intranasal immunization with fragment #5 in the induction of protective immunity against nasal challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae and compared its efficacy with that of subcutaneous immunization. Intranasal immunization of the fragment induced significantly higher systemic and mucosal immune responses measured at the levels of antigen-specific antibodies, cytokine-secreting cells after antigen exposure, and antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation. Intranasal immunization not only efficiently inhibited the bacterial colonization in respiratory organs, but also prevented alveolar tissue damage in infectious condition similar to that of a contaminated pig. Moreover, intranasal immunization with fragment #5 provided acquired protective immunity against intranasal challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. In addition, it conferred cross-protection against serotype 5, a heterologous pathogen that causes severe disease by ApxI and ApxII secretion. Collectively, intranasal immunization with fragment #5 of ApxIIA can be considered an efficient protective immunization procedure against A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  18. Characterization of Biofilm Formation in [Pasteurella] pneumotropica and [Actinobacillus] muris Isolates of Mouse Origin.

    PubMed

    Sager, Martin; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Benga, Laurentiu

    2015-01-01

    [Pasteurella] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl and [Actinobacillus] muris are the most prevalent Pasteurellaceae species isolated from laboratory mouse. However, mechanisms contributing to their high prevalence such as the ability to form biofilms have not been studied yet. In the present investigation we analyze if these bacterial species can produce biofilms in vitro and investigate whether proteins, extracellular DNA and polysaccharides are involved in the biofilm formation and structure by inhibition and dispersal assays using proteinase K, DNase I and sodium periodate. Finally, the capacity of the biofilms to confer resistance to antibiotics is examined. We demonstrate that both [P.] pneumotropica biotypes but not [A.] muris are able to form robust biofilms in vitro, a phenotype which is widely spread among the field isolates. The biofilm inhibition and dispersal assays by proteinase and DNase lead to a strong inhibition in biofilm formation when added at the initiation of the biofilm formation and dispersed pre-formed [P.] pneumotropica biofilms, revealing thus that proteins and extracellular DNA are essential in biofilm formation and structure. Sodium periodate inhibited the bacterial growth when added at the beginning of the biofilm formation assay, making difficult the assessment of the role of β-1,6-linked polysaccharides in the biofilm formation, and had a biofilm stimulating effect when added on pre-established mature biofilms of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl and a majority of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz strains, suggesting that the presence of β-1,6-linked polysaccharides on the bacterial surface might attenuate the biofilm production. Conversely, no effect or a decrease in the biofilm quantity was observed by biofilm dispersal using sodium periodate on further biotype Jawetz isolates, suggesting that polysaccharides might be incorporated in the biofilm structure. We additionally show that [P.] pneumotropica cells enclosed in biofilms

  19. Characterization of Biofilm Formation in [Pasteurella] pneumotropica and [Actinobacillus] muris Isolates of Mouse Origin

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Martin; Benten, W. Peter M.; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Benga, Laurentiu

    2015-01-01

    [Pasteurella] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl and [Actinobacillus] muris are the most prevalent Pasteurellaceae species isolated from laboratory mouse. However, mechanisms contributing to their high prevalence such as the ability to form biofilms have not been studied yet. In the present investigation we analyze if these bacterial species can produce biofilms in vitro and investigate whether proteins, extracellular DNA and polysaccharides are involved in the biofilm formation and structure by inhibition and dispersal assays using proteinase K, DNase I and sodium periodate. Finally, the capacity of the biofilms to confer resistance to antibiotics is examined. We demonstrate that both [P.] pneumotropica biotypes but not [A.] muris are able to form robust biofilms in vitro, a phenotype which is widely spread among the field isolates. The biofilm inhibition and dispersal assays by proteinase and DNase lead to a strong inhibition in biofilm formation when added at the initiation of the biofilm formation and dispersed pre-formed [P.] pneumotropica biofilms, revealing thus that proteins and extracellular DNA are essential in biofilm formation and structure. Sodium periodate inhibited the bacterial growth when added at the beginning of the biofilm formation assay, making difficult the assessment of the role of β-1,6-linked polysaccharides in the biofilm formation, and had a biofilm stimulating effect when added on pre-established mature biofilms of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl and a majority of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz strains, suggesting that the presence of β-1,6-linked polysaccharides on the bacterial surface might attenuate the biofilm production. Conversely, no effect or a decrease in the biofilm quantity was observed by biofilm dispersal using sodium periodate on further biotype Jawetz isolates, suggesting that polysaccharides might be incorporated in the biofilm structure. We additionally show that [P.] pneumotropica cells enclosed in biofilms

  20. Cloning and characterization of the gene coding for NADPH-sulfite reductase hemoprotein from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and use of the protein product as a vaccine.

    PubMed

    Willson, P J; Gerlach, G F; Klashinsky, S; Potter, A A

    2001-10-01

    An expression library was constructed from an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 clinical isolate and screened with serum produced in pigs that had been vaccinated with the anionic fraction of a sodium chloride extract. One E. coli transformant was isolated that produced a large amount of a protein with an electrophoretic mobility of about 67,000 molecular mass. The A. pleuropneumoniae-derived DNA encoding the protein was localized and characterized by restriction enzyme digestion and nucleotide sequence analysis which showed strong homology with the cysI gene of E. coli. One open reading frame of 1764 bases in length was detected which encoded a cysI protein from serotype 1, with a calculated molecular mass of 66,678. The DNA encoding the protein was labeled with radio-isotope and the homologous gene was isolated from an A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a library. The serotype 5a gene was the same length, but the cysI protein from serotype 5a was slightly larger (66,849) due to 8 substitutions in the amino acid sequence. Expression plasmids containing cysI from either serotype of A. pleuropneumoniae complemented an E. coli cysI mutant. Pigs vaccinated with the recombinant cysI were protected from challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae of the homologous serotype.

  1. Immunoprotective Efficacy of Six In vivo-Induced Antigens against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae as Potential Vaccine Candidates in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fei; Cao, Sanjie; Zhu, Zhuang; Yang, Yusheng; Wen, Xintian; Chang, Yung-Fu; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Wen, Yiping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Ma, Xiaoping; Zhao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Six in vivo-induced (IVI) antigens—RnhB, GalU, GalT, Apl_1061, Apl_1166, and HflX were selected for a vaccine trial in a mouse model. The results showed that the IgG levels in each immune group was significantly higher than that of the negative control (P < 0.001). Except rRnhB group, proliferation of splenocytes was observed in all immunized groups and a relatively higher proliferation activity was observed in rGalU and rGalT groups (P < 0.05). In the rGalT vaccinated group, the proportion of CD4+ T cells in spleen was significant higher than that of negative control (P < 0.05). Moreover, proportions of CD4+ T cells in other vaccinated groups were all up-regulated to varying degrees. Up-regulation of both Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines were detected. A survival rate of 87.5, 62.5, and 62.5% were obtained among rGalT, rAPL_1166, and rHflX group, respectively while the remaining three groups was only 25%. Histopathological analyses of lungs indicated that surviving animals from the vaccinated groups showed relatively normal pulmonary structure alveoli. These findings confirm that IVI antigens used as vaccine candidates provide partial protection against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in a mouse model, which could be used as potential vaccine candidates in piglets.

  2. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to a 110,000-molecular-weight hemolysin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J N; Inzana, T J

    1990-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect swine antibody to a 110,000-molecular-weight hemolysin (110K hemolysin) of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal immunoglobulin G to the hemolysin of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 strain J45, followed by hemolysin-rich concentrated culture supernatant, was used to bind swine antibody to hemolysin to microdilution plates. Sixty-nine serum samples from swine that were clinically normal, presented with clinical evidence of pleuropneumonia, were experimentally immunized or challenged, or were free of pleuropneumonia were tested, and their ELISA titers were compared with complement fixation (CF) titers. On the basis of serum samples from swine that were clinically normal and negative by CF, an ELISA titer of 1:320 or greater was considered positive. In comparison with CF, the sensitivity of the ELISA was 98.1% and the specificity was 90%. The two samples negative by CF and positive by indirect ELISA were, however, also positive for antibody to serotype 5 capsule by ELISA. Immunization of normal pigs with whole cells or purified hemolysin boosted titers 4- to 128-fold within 4 weeks. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the affinity-purified immunoglobulin G to hemolysin used for capture in the assay recognized only a 110K protein of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 to 7, although the reactivity was quantitatively variable between serotypes. Therefore, the indirect ELISA is capable of identifying animals infected with or exposed to most, if not all, serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. If an indirect ELISA titer of 1:320 or greater is considered positive, the assay can be a valuable diagnostic tool in both clinical and research laboratories. Images PMID:2380363

  3. Aerosol exposure of pigs to viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 induces antibodies in bronchoalveolar lining fluids and serum, and protects against homologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Ganter, M; Petzoldt, K

    1995-11-01

    A dose-defined nose-only inhalation system for pigs was used to study the immunogenic and protective potentials of a single aerosol application of viable or killed Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9. Respiratory volumes were measured for each pig to calculate inhaled individual doses. Eight pigs inhaled 107 CFU A. pleuropneumoniae CVI 13261 reference strain for serotype 9. Another eight pigs received an identical dose of killed actinobacilli. After three weeks the pigs and nonexposed controls were challenged with 108 CFU of the homologous strain by aerosol. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) in pigs was performed during the experiment to obtain lavage samples for assessment of local antibodies. Isotype-specific antibody responses in serum and BAL fluids were measured by ELISAs based on whole-cell antigens. The protective efficacy of aerosol immunization was evaluated by clinical and post-mortem examinations. The controls developed fever and severe pleuropneumonia, whereas previously exposed pigs had less fever and less extensive gross pulmonary lesions. After the first aerosol exposure pulmonary IgM, and IgG antibodies reactive with A. pleuropneumoniae increased significantly in both aerosol exposed groups. IgA in BALF and serum concentrations of each Ig class were significantly increased in the group exposed to viable bacteria when compared to the non-exposed controls. After aerosol challenge a pronounced increase of systemic and pulmonary IgA, IgM, and IgG antibodies was detected in both exposure groups. Aerosol application of whole-cell A. pleuropneumoniae bacterins induced similar protective effects against aerosol challenge infection as administration of an identical dose of viable bacteria. Inhalation of A. pleuropneumoniae may lead to asymptomatic carriers in some pigs that could spread the disease under field conditions.

  4. The Lon protease homologue LonA, not LonC, contributes to the stress tolerance and biofilm formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Yanhe; Zhou, Long; Liu, Shuanghong; Liu, Siguo; Wang, Chunlai

    2016-04-01

    Lon proteases are a family of ATP-dependent proteases that are involved in the degradation of abnormal proteins in bacteria exposed to adverse environmental stress. An analysis of the genome sequence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae revealed the unusual presence of two putative ATP-dependent Lon homologues, LonA and LonC. Sequence comparisons indicated that LonA has the classical domain organization of the LonA subfamily, which includes the N-terminal domain, central ATPase (AAA) domain, and C-terminal proteolytic (P) domain. LonC belongs to the recently classified LonC subfamily, which includes Lon proteases that contain neither the N-terminal domain of LonA nor the transmembrane region that is present only in LonB subfamily members. To investigate the roles of LonA and LonC in A. pleuropneumoniae, mutants with deletions in the lonA and lonC genes were constructed. The impaired growth of the △lonA mutant exposed to low and high temperatures and osmotic and oxidative stress conditions indicates that the LonA protease is required for the stress tolerance of A. pleuropneumoniae. Furthermore, the △lonA mutant exhibited significantly reduced biofilm formation compared to the wild-type strain. However, no significant differences in stress responses or biofilm formation were observed between the △lonC mutant and the wild-type strain. The △lonA mutant exhibited reduced colonization ability and attenuated virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae in the BALB/c mouse model compared to the wild-type strain. Disruption of lonC gene did not significantly influence the colonization and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae. The data presented in this study illustrate that the LonA protease, but not the LonC protease, is required for the stress tolerance, biofilm formation and pathogenicity of A. pleuropneumoniae.

  5. Immunological study of an attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium expressing ApxIA, ApxIIA, ApxIIIA and OmpA of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang-Youel; Choi, Yoonyoung; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium strain expressing the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae antigens, ApxIA, ApxIIA, ApxIIIA and OmpA, was previously constructed as a vaccine candidate for porcine pleuropneumonia. This strain was a live attenuated (∆lon∆cpxR∆asd)Salmonella as a delivery host and contained a vector containing asd. An immunological study of lymphocyte proliferation, T-lymphocyte subsets and cytokines in the splenocytes of a mouse model was carried out after stimulation with the candidate Salmonella Typhimurium by intranasal inoculation. The splenic lymphocyte proliferation and the levels of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-12 of the inoculated mice were significantly increased, and the T- and B-cell populations were also elevated. Collectively, the candidate may efficiently induce the Th1- and Th2-type immune responses.

  6. Oral and aerosol immunization with viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bacteria: antibody response to capsular polysaccharides in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) and sera of pigs.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Pabst, R; Bunka, S; Petzoldt, K

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the antibody response after local application of lung-pathogenic bacteria, pigs were immunized with viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by the oral and aerogenous route. After 3 weeks class-specific immunoglobulins against purified A. pleuropneumoniae capsular polysaccharides (CP) were determined in serum and BALF by ELISA. A significant increase of IgA antibodies was found in BALF but not in sera of all immunized pigs. Oral immunization with viable A. pleuropneumoniae and aerosol immunization with either viable or inactivated bacteria resulted in a significant increase of IgG antibodies to the CP antigen in BALF, whereas only aerosol exposure to viable bacteria resulted in a significant increase in IgG antibodies in serum. A significant increase in anti-CP IgM in BALF was observed after aerosol exposure but not after oral immunization. IgM antibodies towards CP increased significantly by both routes of immunization with viable bacteria. The anti-CP activity of all three isotypes in sera and BALF was low in all groups compared with the positive controls, although inoculation of viable A. pleuropneumoniae led to higher levels of antibody concentration than inactivated bacteria. Our results indicate a traffic of primed lymphocytes from the gut into the bronchoalveolar airways and further support the hypothesis that polysaccharide-specific B cells may functionally mature at the mucosal surfaces.

  7. Adh enhances Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity by binding to OR5M11 and activating p38 which induces apoptosis of PAMs and IL-8 release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Zhang, Jing; Bao, Chuntong; Zhang, Hu; Che, Yanyi; Sun, Changjiang; Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Richard, Paul Langford; Lei, Liancheng

    2016-04-05

    Members of the Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin (TAA) family play a crucial role in the adhesion of Gram-negative pathogens to host cells, but the immunopathogenesis of TAAs remains unknown. Our previous studies demonstrated that Adh from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) is required for full bacterial pathogenicity. Alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense against respiratory infections. This study compared the interactions between porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae (5b WT) or an Adh-deletion strain (5b ΔAdh) via gene microarray, immunoprecipitation and other technologies. We found that Adh was shown to interact with the PAMs membrane protein OR5M11, an olfactory receptor, resulting in the high-level secretion of IL-8 by activation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Subsequently, PAMs apoptosis via the activation of the Fax and Bax signaling pathways was observed, followed by activation of caspases 8, 9, and 3. The immunological pathogenic roles of Adh were also confirmed in both murine and piglets infectious models in vivo. These results identify a novel immunological strategy for TAAs to boost the pathogenicity of A. pleuropneumoniae. Together, these datas reveal the high versatility of the Adh protein as a virulence factor and provide novel insight into the immunological pathogenic role of TAAs.

  8. Adh enhances Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity by binding to OR5M11 and activating p38 which induces apoptosis of PAMs and IL-8 release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Zhang, Jing; Bao, Chuntong; Zhang, Hu; Che, Yanyi; Sun, Changjiang; Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Richard, Paul Langford; Lei, Liancheng

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin (TAA) family play a crucial role in the adhesion of Gram-negative pathogens to host cells, but the immunopathogenesis of TAAs remains unknown. Our previous studies demonstrated that Adh from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) is required for full bacterial pathogenicity. Alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense against respiratory infections. This study compared the interactions between porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae (5b WT) or an Adh-deletion strain (5b ΔAdh) via gene microarray, immunoprecipitation and other technologies. We found that Adh was shown to interact with the PAMs membrane protein OR5M11, an olfactory receptor, resulting in the high-level secretion of IL-8 by activation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Subsequently, PAMs apoptosis via the activation of the Fax and Bax signaling pathways was observed, followed by activation of caspases 8, 9, and 3. The immunological pathogenic roles of Adh were also confirmed in both murine and piglets infectious models in vivo. These results identify a novel immunological strategy for TAAs to boost the pathogenicity of A. pleuropneumoniae. Together, these datas reveal the high versatility of the Adh protein as a virulence factor and provide novel insight into the immunological pathogenic role of TAAs. PMID:27046446

  9. Pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin in porcine plasma, lung tissue, and bronchial fluid and effects of test conditions on in vitro activity against reference strains and field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Rose, M; Menge, M; Bohland, C; Zschiesche, E; Wilhelm, C; Kilp, S; Metz, W; Allan, M; Röpke, R; Nürnberger, M

    2013-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin (Zuprevo(®) 40 mg/mL solution for injection for pigs), a novel 16-membered-ring macrolide for the treatment for swine respiratory disease (SRD), was investigated in studies collecting blood plasma and postmortem samples of lung tissue and bronchial fluid (BF) from swine. In view of factors influencing the in vitro activity of macrolides, and for the interpretation of tildipirosin pharmacokinetics in relation to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC), additional experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, carbon dioxide-enriched atmosphere, buffers, and serum on tildipirosin MICs for various reference strains and Actinobacillus (A.) pleuropneumoniae field isolates. After single intramuscular (i.m.) injection at 4 mg/kg body weight, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) was 0.9 μg/mL observed within 23 min (Tmax ). Mean residence time from the time of dosing to the time of last measurable concentration (MRTlast) and terminal half-life (T1/2) both were about 4 days. A dose-response relationship with no significant sex effect is observed for area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the last sampling time with a quantifiable drug concentration (AUClast) over the range of doses up to 6 mg/kg. However, linear dose proportionality could not be proven with statistical methods. The time-concentration profile of tildipirosin in BF and lung far exceeded that in blood plasma. In lung, tildipirosin concentrations reached 3.1 μg/g at 2 h, peaked at 4.3 μg/g at day 1, and slowly declined to 0.8 μg/g at day 17. In BF, tildipirosin levels were 14.3, 7.0, and 6.5 μg/g at days 5, 10, and 14. T1/2 in lung was ∼7 days. Tildipirosin is rapidly and extensively distributed to the respiratory tract followed by slow elimination. Culture media pH and carbon dioxide-enriched atmosphere (CO2 -EA) had a marked impact on in vitro activity of tildipirosin in reference strains of various rapidly growing aerobic and

  10. Oral immunization of pigs with viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 induces pulmonary and systemic antibodies and protects against homologous aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Petzoldt, K; Lubitz, W

    1995-08-01

    A dose-defined aerosol infection of pigs was used to study the immunogenic and protective potentials of oral immunization with dead or live Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 reference strain CVI 13261 against an aerogenic challenge. Pigs were vaccinated with a single dose of 10(11) CFU of viable (n = 8) or inactivated (n = 8) A. pleuropneumoniae given orally in a gelatin capsule. After 3 weeks, vaccinated pigs and nonvaccinated controls were challenged aerogenically with a dose of 10(8) CFU of A. pleuropneumoniae CVI 13261. The protective efficacy of oral immunization was evaluated by clinical and postmortem examinations. Bronchoalveolar lavage in pigs was performed during the experiment to obtain lavage samples for assessment of local antibodies. Isotype-specific antibody responses in sera and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on whole-cell antigen. Oral immunization did not induce clinical side effects. After aerosol challenge, two animals of both vaccinated groups (25% in each case) showed a moderate fever for 2 days, whereas all four pigs (100%) of the nonvaccinated control group developed severe fever. In contrast to the controls, which developed severe pleuropneumonia, the vaccinated pigs had only mild pulmonary lesions. Three weeks after challenge, 13 of 16 vaccinated pigs (81%) were found to be free of pathomorphological changes of the lungs. From two of these pigs immunized with live bacteria we were able to reisolate A. pleuropneumoniae. A significant systemic and pulmonary increase in the concentrations of immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG antibodies reactive with A. pleuropneumoniae was detectable after aerosol challenge in both vaccinated groups. Immunization with viable bacteria was found to induce significantly higher concentrations of each Ig isotype in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and sera than immunization with inactivated A. pleuropneumoniae. These serological findings were

  11. Optimization and standardization of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocol for serodiagnosis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5.

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Y L; Wright, P F; Larivière, S

    1992-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocol has been optimized with special emphasis given to assay standardization and quality control. Technical aspects such as choice of a microplate, antigen immobilization, buffer composition, optimal screening dilution of sera, and kinetics of the enzymatic reaction were studied and evaluated in order to design a standard protocol offering maximal analytical sensitivity and specificity, as well as to obtain minimal within- and between-plate variability. Among the 27 plates tested, the Nunc 475-094 and 269-620 immunoplates were found to be the best in terms of high positive-to-negative ratio and low variability. No significant differences in antigen immobilization were found by using buffers of various compositions or pHs; however, the presence of magnesium ions (Mg2+; 0.02 M) resulted in a twofold increase in nonspecific background. An optimal screening dilution of sera was established at 1:200. A 1-h incubation period for test serum was found to be optimal. Maximum enzymatic activity for peroxidase was obtained by adjusting both substrate (H2O2) and hydrogen donor [2,2' -azinobis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline sulfonic acid)] concentrations to 4 and 1 mM, respectively. To control between-plate variability, a timing protocol was adopted. Within-plate variability was also controlled by using a sample placement configuration pattern. Sliding scales were determined by repeated testing of a cross section of samples to set acceptance limits for both within- and between-plate variability. These limits were used in a quality control program to monitor assay performance. The results obtained suggest that this standardized protocol might be useful in the serodiagnosis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. PMID:1734068

  12. Comparison of four lung scoring systems for the assessment of the pathological outcomes derived from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae experimental infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, four lung lesion scoring methods (Slaughterhouse Pleurisy Evaluation System [SPES], Consolidation Lung Lesion Score [LLS], Image analyses [IA] and Ratio of lung weight/body weight [LW/BW]) were compared for the assessment of the different pathological outcomes derived from an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) experimental infection model. Moreover, pathological data was coupled with clinical (fever, inappetence and clinical score), production (average daily weigh gain [ADWG]) and diagnostic (PCR, ELISA and bacterial isolation) parameters within the four infection outcomes (peracute, acute, subclinically infected and non-infected). Results From the 61 inoculated animals, 9 were classified as peracute (presence of severe App-like clinical signs and lesions and sudden death or euthanasia shortly after inoculation), 31 as acutely affected (presence of App-like clinical signs and lesions and survival until the end of the experiment), 12 as subclinically infected (very mild or no clinical signs but App infection confirmed) and 9 as non-infected animals (lack of App-like clinical signs and lack of evidence of App infection). A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was found with the exception of SPES score versus LW/BW. SPES showed a statistically significant association with all clinical, production and diagnostic (with the exception of PCR detection of App in the tonsil) variables assessed. LLS and IA showed similar statistically significant associations as SPES, with the exception of seroconversion against App at necropsy. In contrast, LW/BW was statistically associated only with App isolation in lungs, presence of App-like lesions and ELISA OD values at necropsy. Conclusions In conclusion, SPES, LLS and IA are economic, fast and easy-to-perform lung scoring methods that, in combination with different clinical and diagnostic parameters, allow the characterization of different outcomes after App infection. PMID

  13. Porcine mononuclear phagocyte subpopulations in the lung, blood and bone marrow: dynamics during inflammation induced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ondrackova, Petra; Nechvatalova, Katerina; Kucerova, Zdenka; Leva, Lenka; Dominguez, Javier; Faldyna, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP) are cells of nonspecific immunity, playing an essential role in defense against bacterial pathogens. Although various MP subpopulations have been described in the pig, relations among these populations in vivo are unknown to date. The present study was aimed at describing porcine MP subpopulations infiltrating inflamed tissue of pigs under in vivo conditions. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) infection was used to induce an inflammatory response. CD172α, CD14, CD163, MHCII and CD203α cell surface molecules were used to identify MP by flow cytometry. Changes in MP subpopulations in the peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) compartments along with the analysis of MP appearing in the inflamed lungs were assessed to elucidate the possible origin and maturation stages of the infiltrating MP. The MP population migrating to the inflamed lungs was phenotype CD14+ CD163+ CD203α+/− MHCII+/−. Concomitantly, after APP infection there was an increase in the PB MP CD14+ CD163+ CD203α− MHC II− population, suggesting that these cells give rise to inflammatory monocytes/macrophages. The CD203α and MHCII molecules appear on these cells after leaving the PB. In healthy animals, the BM MP precursors were represented by CD14− CD163− cells maturing directly into CD14+ CD163− that were then released into the PB. After infection, an altered maturation pathway of MP precursors appeared, represented by CD14− CD163− CD203α− MHCII− MP directly switching into CD14+ CD163+ CD203α− MHCII− MP. In conclusion, two different MP maturation pathways were suggested in pigs. The use of these pathways differs under inflammatory and noninflammatory conditions. PMID:20519113

  14. Genetic and antigenic characteristics of ApxIIA and ApxIIIA from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 15.

    PubMed

    To, Ho; Nagai, Shinya; Iwata, Akira; Koyama, Tomohiro; Oshima, Atsushi; Tsutsumi, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    Apx toxins produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae are essential components of new generation vaccines. In this study, apxIIA and apxIIIA genes of serovars 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 15 were cloned and sequenced. Amino acid sequences of ApxIIA proteins of serovars 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 15 were almost identical to those of serovars 1, 5, 7, 9 and 11-13. Immunoblot analysis showed that rApxIIA from serovars 2 and 15 reacts strongly with sera from animals infected with various serovars. Sequence analysis revealed that ApxIIIA proteins has two variants, one in strains of serovar 2 and the other in strains of serovars 3, 4, 6, 8 and 15. A mouse cross-protection study showed that mice actively immunized with rApxIIIA/2 or rApxIIIA/15 are protected against challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae strains of serovars 3, 4, 6, 8, 15, and 2 expressing ApxIII/15 and ApxIII/2, respectively. Similarly, mice passively immunized with rabbit anti-rApxIIIA/2 or anti-rApxIIIA/15 sera were found to be protected against challenge with strains of serovars 2 and 15. Our study revealed antigenic and sequence similarities within ApxIIA and ApxIIIA proteins, which may help in the development of effective vaccines against disease caused by A. pleuropneumoniae.

  15. Detection of antibodies against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 using an inhibition enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Stenbaek, E I; De LaSalle, F; Gottschalk, M

    1997-01-01

    An inhibition enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for detection of antibodies against A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 (App-5) in pig sera, based on the inhibition of the binding of an App-5 specific monoclonal antibody was established. The monoclonal antibody (MAb 210-F11) was found to be directed against an epitope on the O-chain of App-5 LPS. In the inhibition EIA, highly purified App-5 LPS was used to coat microtitre plates. Serial dilutions of pig sera were added to the plates prior to the addition of the MAb 210-F11. The degree of binding of App-5 antibodies from pig sera was determined as the percentage inhibition of the MAb 210-F11. Pig serum from specific pathogen free (SPF) herds, from experimentally infected animals, and from acutely and chronically infected herds were tested. A serum dilution of 1/30 was found to be optimal, when using 50% inhibition as the discriminating inhibition percentage. No cross-reactivity was observed with serum from pigs infected with other App serotypes or bacteria isolated from the respiratory tract, such as A. suis and H. parasuis. The inhibition EIA will be used for surveillance of App-5 antibodies in SPF and conventional herds. Images Figure 1. PMID:9008793

  16. Pigs aerogenously immunized with genetically inactivated (ghosts) or irradiated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae are protected against a homologous aerosol challenge despite differing in pulmonary cellular and antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Katinger, A; Lubitz, W; Szostak, M P; Stadler, M; Klein, R; Indra, A; Huter, V; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Aerosol immunization is a safe way to induce complete protection against pleuropneumonia in pigs caused by the lung pathogenic bacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. In order to determine the local immune responses of vaccinees in concomitant with protection, lung lining fluid before and 3 weeks after immunization from pigs immunized three times with aerosols of either genetically inactivated ghosts which represent whole cell envelope preparations, or irradiated bacteria were examined following an homologous aerosol challenge. Specific antibody isotypes in the bronchoalveolar lavage were assayed by whole cell ELISAs. Total and relative numbers of cells including lymphocyte subsets were determined. In both vaccinated groups a net influx of plasma cells and lymphocytes, as well as a significant increase of specific IgG occurred. Concurrently, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio was found to increase after aerosol immunization. The lymphocyte subsets of IgG+ and IgA+ cells were found significantly higher in the group immunized with irradiated bacteria when compared to pigs immunized with bacterial ghosts. The latter group showed a significant increase of IgA, IgM, and a net influx of lymphoid blasts and granulocytes in the bronchoalveolar lining fluid. Although differences between the local immune responses of both immunized groups occurred, a significant increase of specific IgG and a net influx of plasma cells and lymphocytes were found to be associated with complete protection against a homologous aerosol challenge infection.

  17. 21 CFR 520.445b - Chlortetracycline powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Pasteurella spp., Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Hemophilus spp.), and Klebsiella spp. (2) Limitations...) associated with Pasteurella spp., A. pleuropneumoniae (Hemophilus spp.), and Klebsiella spp. (2) Limitations... Pasteurella spp., Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Hemophilus spp.), and Klebsiella spp. (C)...

  18. The Live Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Triple-Deletion Mutant ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1 Strain, SLW05, Immunizes Pigs against Lethal Challenge with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulin; Ou, Jiwen; Zhang, Minmin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Huazhen; Liu, Jinlin; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae both belong to the family Pasteurellaceae and are major respiratory pathogens that cause large economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. We previously constructed an attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 live vaccine prototype, SLW05 (ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1), which is able to produce nontoxic but immunogenic ApxIA, ApxIIA, and ApxIVA. This triple-deletion mutant strain was shown to elicit protective immunity against virulent A. pleuropneumoniae. In the present study, we investigated whether immunization with SLW05 could also protect against lethal challenge with virulent H. parasuis SH0165 (serovar 5) or MD0322 (serovar 4). The SLW05 strain was found to elicit a strong humoral antibody response in pigs and to confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of H. parasuis SH0165 or MD0322. IgG subtype analysis revealed that SLW05 induces a bias toward a Th1-type immune response and stimulates interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production. Moreover, antisera from SLW05-vaccinated pigs efficiently inhibited both A. pleuropneumoniae and H. parasuis growth in a whole-blood assay. This is the first report that a live attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae vaccine with SLW05 can protect against lethal H. parasuis infection, which provides a novel approach for developing an attenuated H. parasuis vaccine. PMID:23220998

  19. Efficacy of tilmicosin phosphate (Pulmotil premix) in feed for the treatment of a clinical outbreak of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Hoflack, G; Maes, D; Mateusen, B; Verdonck, M; de Kruif, A

    2001-11-01

    A double-blind randomized clinical trial was carried out to investigate the efficacy of tilmicosin (Pulmotil premix) for the treatment of a clinical outbreak of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in growing-finishing pigs. The effects of tilmicosin administration in the feed at 400 mg/kg and an injection therapy of clinically diseased pigs with long-acting oxytetracycline (Terramycine LA) at 20 mg/kg bodyweight were compared. Both groups, totalling 147 pigs, were compared during a medication period of 15 days and a post-medication period of 11 days by means of different clinical and performance parameters. During the medication period, the tilmicosin group showed a significant advantage with respect to the number of new disease cases (P < 0.01), and a non-significant advantage regarding the number of removed pigs (P = 0.16), the number of sick pigs that recovered (P = 0.27) and the time to recovery (P = 0.42). During the post-medication period, the pigs of the tilmicosin group showed numerical non-significant benefits (P > 0.05) with respect to the clinical parameters. During the overall study period (26 days), the average daily gain and the feed conversion ratio were both significantly (P < 0.01) better in pigs from the tilmicosin group compared with pigs from the oxytetracycline group. This study demonstrated that in-feed medication of tilmicosin at a dosage of 400 mg/kg is efficacious for the treatment of a clinical respiratory disease outbreak of A. pleuropneumoniae infection in growing-finishing pigs. Compared with oxytetracycline injection of clinically diseased pigs, the tilmicosin treatment is particularly beneficial in the prevention of new disease cases while increasing or maintaining the performance of the pigs.

  20. Enriched Housing Reduces Disease Susceptibility to Co-Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Virus (PRRSV) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    van Dixhoorn, Ingrid D. E.; Reimert, Inonge; Middelkoop, Jenny; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Wisselink, Henk J.; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G.; Kemp, Bas; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Until today, anti-microbial drugs have been the therapy of choice to combat bacterial diseases. Resistance against antibiotics is of growing concern in man and animals. Stress, caused by demanding environmental conditions, can reduce immune protection in the host, influencing the onset and outcome of infectious diseases. Therefore psychoneuro-immunological intervention may prove to be a successful approach to diminish the impact of diseases and antibiotics use. This study was designed to investigate the effect of social and environmental enrichment on the impact of disease, referred to as “disease susceptibility”, in pigs using a co-infection model of PRRSV and A. pleuropneumoniae. Twenty-eight pigs were raised in four pens under barren conditions and twenty-eight other pigs were raised in four pens under enriched conditions. In the enriched pens a combination of established social and environmental enrichment factors were introduced. Two pens of the barren (BH) and two pens of the enriched housed (EH) pigs were infected with PRRSV followed by A. pleuropneumoniae, the other two pens in each housing treatment served as control groups. We tested if differences in disease susceptibility in terms of pathological and clinical outcome were related to the different housing regimes and if this was reflected in differences in behavioural and immunological states of the animals. Enriched housed pigs showed a faster clearance of viral PRRSV RNA in blood serum (p = 0.014) and histologically 2.8 fold less interstitial pneumonia signs in the lungs (p = 0.014). More barren housed than enriched housed pigs developed lesions in the lungs (OR = 19.2, p = 0.048) and the lesions in the barren housed pigs showed a higher total pathologic tissue damage score (p<0.001) than those in enriched housed pigs. EH pigs showed less stress-related behaviour and differed immunologically and clinically from BH pigs. We conclude that enriched housing management reduces disease susceptibility to

  1. Enriched Housing Reduces Disease Susceptibility to Co-Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Virus (PRRSV) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) in Young Pigs.

    PubMed

    van Dixhoorn, Ingrid D E; Reimert, Inonge; Middelkoop, Jenny; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Wisselink, Henk J; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W G; Kemp, Bas; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Until today, anti-microbial drugs have been the therapy of choice to combat bacterial diseases. Resistance against antibiotics is of growing concern in man and animals. Stress, caused by demanding environmental conditions, can reduce immune protection in the host, influencing the onset and outcome of infectious diseases. Therefore psychoneuro-immunological intervention may prove to be a successful approach to diminish the impact of diseases and antibiotics use. This study was designed to investigate the effect of social and environmental enrichment on the impact of disease, referred to as "disease susceptibility", in pigs using a co-infection model of PRRSV and A. pleuropneumoniae. Twenty-eight pigs were raised in four pens under barren conditions and twenty-eight other pigs were raised in four pens under enriched conditions. In the enriched pens a combination of established social and environmental enrichment factors were introduced. Two pens of the barren (BH) and two pens of the enriched housed (EH) pigs were infected with PRRSV followed by A. pleuropneumoniae, the other two pens in each housing treatment served as control groups. We tested if differences in disease susceptibility in terms of pathological and clinical outcome were related to the different housing regimes and if this was reflected in differences in behavioural and immunological states of the animals. Enriched housed pigs showed a faster clearance of viral PRRSV RNA in blood serum (p = 0.014) and histologically 2.8 fold less interstitial pneumonia signs in the lungs (p = 0.014). More barren housed than enriched housed pigs developed lesions in the lungs (OR = 19.2, p = 0.048) and the lesions in the barren housed pigs showed a higher total pathologic tissue damage score (p<0.001) than those in enriched housed pigs. EH pigs showed less stress-related behaviour and differed immunologically and clinically from BH pigs. We conclude that enriched housing management reduces disease susceptibility to co

  2. The Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae HMW1C-Like Glycosyltransferase Mediates N-Linked Glycosylation of the Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Grass, Susan; Paek, Seonghee; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    The Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 adhesin is an important virulence exoprotein that is secreted via the two-partner secretion pathway and is glycosylated at multiple asparagine residues in consensus N-linked sequons. Unlike the heavily branched glycans found in eukaryotic N-linked glycoproteins, the modifying glycan structures in HMW1 are mono-hexoses or di-hexoses. Recent work demonstrated that the H. influenzae HMW1C protein is the glycosyltransferase responsible for transferring glucose and galactose to the acceptor sites of HMW1. An Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae protein designated ApHMW1C shares high-level homology with HMW1C and has been assigned to the GT41 family, which otherwise contains only O-glycosyltransferases. In this study, we demonstrated that ApHMW1C has N-glycosyltransferase activity and is able to transfer glucose and galactose to known asparagine sites in HMW1. In addition, we found that ApHMW1C is able to complement a deficiency of HMW1C and mediate HMW1 glycosylation and adhesive activity in whole bacteria. Initial structure-function studies suggested that ApHMW1C consists of two domains, including a 15-kDa N-terminal domain and a 55-kDa C-terminal domain harboring glycosyltransferase activity. These findings suggest a new subfamily of HMW1C-like glycosyltransferases distinct from other GT41 family O-glycosyltransferases. PMID:21209858

  3. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of marbofloxacin in the treatment of Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infections in nursery and fattener pigs using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Vilalta, C; Giboin, H; Schneider, M; El Garch, F; Fraile, L

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the theoretical clinical outcome of three marbofloxacin posology regimens in two groups of pigs (weaners and fatteners) for the treatment of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and Haemophilus parasuis (Hp) infection and the appearance of resistant bacteria due to the antibiotic treatment. The probability of target attainment (PTA) for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) ratios associated with clinical efficacy and with the appearance of antimicrobial resistance for fluoroquinolones at each minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) or mutant prevention concentration (MPC) were calculated, respectively. The cumulative fraction of response (CFR) was calculated for the three posology regimens against App and they ranged from 91.12% to 96.37% in weaners and from 93% to 97.43% in fatteners, respectively. In the case of Hp, they ranged from 80.52% to 85.14% in weaners and from 82.01% to 88.49% in fatteners, respectively. Regarding the PTA of the PK/PD threshold associated with the appearance of antimicrobial resistance, results showed that marbofloxacin would prevent resistances in most of the animals up to the MPC value of 1 μg/mL.

  4. Magnetic beads-based enzymatic spectrofluorometric assay for rapid and sensitive detection of antibody against ApxIVA of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Li, Fang; Yang, Huicui; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Kaihong; Zhou, Rui; Hu, Yonggang

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, a simple, easily-operated and enzyme-amplified fluorescence immunoassay method using magnetic particles for the detection of antibody against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) has been presented. The A protein of APP Repeats-in-Toxin IV (ApxIVA) with high specificity to the APP species was immobilized onto the magnetic bead surfaces. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP), which can catalyze the substrate 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (p-HPA), generating fluorescent bi-p, p'-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (DBDA), was selected as an enzymatic-amplified tracer. The ApxIVA antibody was detected for the presence of APP infection by measuring the fluorescence intensity of DBDA. Under optimal conditions, the calibration plot obtained for standard positive serum was approximately linear within the dilution range 1:160-1:5120. The limit of detection (LOD) for the assay was 1:10240, considerably lower than that of ApxIVA-ELISA (1:320) (S/N=3). A series of repeatability measurements of using 1:320-fold diluted standard positive serum gave reproducible results with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.8% (n=11). The ability of the immunosensor to analyze clinical samples was tested on porcine sera. The immunosensor yielded an efficiency of 89.7%, sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 89.3% compared with ApxIVA-ELISA.

  5. Mutation in the LPS outer core biosynthesis gene, galU, affects LPS interaction with the RTX toxins ApxI and ApxII and cytolytic activity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Cox, Andrew D; Hancock, Mark A; Mourez, Michael; Labrie, Josée; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Jacques, Mario

    2008-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and Apx toxins are major virulence factors of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, a pathogen of the respiratory tract of pigs. Here, we evaluated the effect of LPS core truncation in haemolytic and cytotoxic activities of this microorganism. We previously generated a highly attenuated galU mutant of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 that has an LPS molecule lacking the GalNAc-Gal II-Gal I outer core residues. Our results demonstrate that this mutant exhibits wild-type haemolytic activity but is significantly less cytotoxic to porcine alveolar macrophages. However, no differences were found in gene expression and secretion of the haemolytic and cytotoxic toxins ApxI and ApxII, both secreted by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. This suggests that the outer core truncation mediated by the galU mutation affects the toxins in their cytotoxic activities. Using both ELISA and surface plasmon resonance binding assays, we demonstrate a novel interaction between LPS and the ApxI and ApxII toxins via the core oligosaccharide. Our results indicate that the GalNAc-Gal II-Gal I trisaccharide of the outer core is fundamental to mediating LPS/Apx interactions. The present study suggests that a lack of binding between LPS and ApxI/II affects the cytotoxicity and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:18713318

  6. Activity of antibodies against Salmonella dublin, Toxoplasma gondii, or Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in sera after treatment with electron beam irradiation or binary ethylenimine.

    PubMed Central

    Kyvsgaard, N C; Lind, P; Preuss, T; Kamstrup, S; Lei, J C; Bøgh, H O; Nansen, P

    1996-01-01

    Viral contamination of biological material may constitute a risk when samples are exchanged between countries, and it may be necessary to subject the material to an inactivation treatment. The present study investigated possible adverse effects on antibody activity subsequent to either electron beam irradiation or binary ethylenimine (BEI) treatment. The treatments were performed with sera obtained from pigs or cattle. For each treatment level, the posttreatment activity was plotted against the pretreatment activity, and regression analyses were carried out. The slope of the regression line was used as an estimate for the relative posttreatment activity. For a Toxoplasma gondii indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agglutination assay as well as for a Salmonella dublin indirect ELISA, the posttreatment activity was more than 89% of the pretreatment activity when the samples were irradiated in the frozen state (on dry ice) with up to 46. kGy or when they were treated with 5 or 10 mM BEI for up to 48 h. The samples were more sensitive to irradiation in the liquid state. Thus, samples irradiated with 22.6 kGy retained 98% of their activity in the indirect ELISA when they were irradiated in the frozen state on dry ice but only 35% of their activity when they were irradiated in the liquid state at 0 degrees C. The patterns seen in an S. dublin blocking ELISA and an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae complement fixation assay differed in that samples with a low level of pretreatment activity were subject to a relatively greater decrease in activity than samples with a high level of pretreatment activity. The complement fixation assay was particularly sensitive to irradiation of serum. It is concluded that serum samples retain sufficient activity by both methods of virus inactivation, especially when used in indirect ELISA or in the T. gondii agglutination assay. PMID:8914750

  7. 21 CFR 522.313b - Ceftiofur hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... bacterial pneumonia) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Salmonella... treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD, shipping fever, pneumonia) associated with...

  8. Outer membrane vesicles of Pasteurella multocida contain virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rojas, Miguel A; Vaca, Sergio; Reyes-López, Magda; de la Garza, Mireya; Aguilar-Romero, Francisco; Zenteno, Edgar; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (Pm) is a gram-negative bacterium able to infect different animal species, including human beings. This bacterium causes economic losses to the livestock industry because of its high morbidity and mortality in animals. In this work, we report the characterization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released into the culture medium by different Pm serogroups. Purified OMVs in the range of 50–300 nm were observed by electron microscopy. Serum obtained from chickens infected with Pm recognized several proteins from Pm OMVs. Additionally, rabbit antiserum directed against a secreted protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae recognized a similar protein in the Pm OVMs, suggesting that OMVs from these bacterial species contain common immunogenic proteins. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was identified in OMVs from different Pm serogroups, and its concentration was twofold higher in OMVs from Pm serogroups B and D than in OMVs from other serogroups. Three outer membrane proteins were also identified: OmpH, OmpW, and transferrin-binding protein. Three bands of 65, 110, and 250 kDa with proteolytic activity were detected in Pm OMVs of serogroups A and E. Additionally, β-lactamase activity was detected only in OMVs from Pm 12945 Ampr (serogroup A). Pm OMVs may be involved in different aspects of disease pathogenesis. PMID:25065983

  9. Pasteurella multocida produces a protein with homology to the P6 outer membrane protein of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, R W; Hansen, L M; Hinojoza, J; Bieber, D; Ruehl, W W; Hirsh, D C

    1995-01-01

    An antibody specific for a 16-kDa outer membrane protein of a rabbit strain of Pasteurella multocida was used to probe representatives of all 16 somatic serotypes of P. multocida, as well as the vaccine strains CU and M9, and all were shown to express the protein. The gene encoding this protein was cloned and sequenced and found to have extensive sequence homology with the gene encoding the P6 protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The protein in P. multocida has been designated P6-like. The gene encoding the P6-like protein was used to probe members of the family Pasteurellaceae and other gram-negative bacteria. Representatives of all 16 somatic serotypes (as well as the vaccine strains CU and M9) of P. multocida hybridized with the P6-like gene under conditions of high stringency. The DNA from H. influenzae hybridized weakly with the P6-like gene under these conditions, but Pasteurella haemolytica (representatives of A and T biotypes), Bordetella bronchiseptica, B. avium, Actinobacillus suis, A. suis-like, A. lignieresii, A. ureae, A. rossii, A. pleuropneumoniae, A. equuli, and various members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella typhimurium) did not hybridize detectably. Under conditions of lower stringency, the P6-like gene also hybridized strongly with DNA from P. multocida, H. influenzae, and A. rossii but weakly with DNA from P. haemolytica and members of the genus Actinobacillus. These results suggest that the P6-like protein of P. multocida might be useful as an immunizing product to protect poultry from avian cholera. This suggestion stems from (i) our finding that the P6-like protein in P. multocida is widely distributed among all the somatic serotypes and (ii) the previous work of others demonstrating that the P6 protein of H. influenzae elicits a protective immune response in animal models of human disease. PMID:7868272

  10. 21 CFR 558.261 - Florfenicol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... disease (SRD) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Streptococcus suis... streptococcal septicemia associated with Streptococcus iniae Feed as a sole ration for 10 consecutive days...

  11. 21 CFR 558.261 - Florfenicol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... disease (SRD) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Streptococcus suis... septicemia associated with Streptococcus iniae Feed as a sole ration for 10 consecutive days to deliver 15...

  12. 21 CFR 522.812 - Enrofloxacin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis, Streptococcus..., Haemophilus parasuis, and Streptococcus suis. (iii) Limitations. Animals intended for human consumption...

  13. 21 CFR 522.313a - Ceftiofur crystalline free acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis, and Streptococcus suis. For the... strains of Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus. (iii) Limitations. Do not use in horses intended...

  14. Genetic and Immunologic Analyses of PlpE, a Lipoprotein Important in Complement-Mediated Killing of Pasteurella haemolytica Serotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Pandher, Karamjeet; Confer, Anthony W.; Murphy, George L.

    1998-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 1 is the bacterium most commonly associated with bovine shipping fever. The presence of antibodies against P. haemolytica outer membrane proteins (OMPs) correlates statistically with resistance to experimental P. haemolytica challenge in cattle. Until now, specific P. haemolytica OMPs which elicit antibodies that function in host defense mechanisms have not been identified. In this study, we have cloned and sequenced the gene encoding one such protein, PlpE. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed that PlpE is a lipoprotein and that it is similar to an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae lipoprotein, OmlA. Affinity-purified, anti-PlpE antibodies recognize a protein in all serotypes of P. haemolytica except serotype 11. We found that intact P. haemolytica and recombinant E. coli expressing PlpE are capable of absorbing anti-PlpE antibodies from bovine immune serum, indicating that PlpE is surface exposed in P. haemolytica and assumes a similar surface-exposed conformation in E. coli. In complement-mediated killing assays, we observed a significant reduction in killing of P. haemolytica when bovine immune serum that was depleted of anti-PlpE antibodies was used as the source of antibody. Our data suggest that PlpE is surface exposed and immunogenic in cattle and that antibodies against PlpE contribute to host defense against P. haemolytica. PMID:9826333

  15. 21 CFR 520.445b - Chlortetracycline powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....445b, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed... Pasteurella spp., Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Hemophilus spp.), and Klebsiella spp. (2) Limitations...) associated with Pasteurella spp., A. pleuropneumoniae (Hemophilus spp.), and Klebsiella spp. (2)...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  17. Use of 16S rRNA Sequencing for Identification of Actinobacillus ureae Isolated from a Cerebrospinal Fluid Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, A. C.; Shankland, I. M.; Elisha, B. G.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus ureae, previously Pasteurella ureae, has on rare occasions been described as a cause of human infection. Owing to its rarity, it may not be easily identified in clinical microbiology laboratories by standard tests. This report describes a patient with acute bacterial meningitis due to A. ureae. The identity of the isolate was determined by means of DNA sequence analysis of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:11825992

  18. Pasteurella multocida liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Cortez, J C; Shapiro, M; Awe, R J

    1986-08-01

    A previously healthy 61-year-old woman was seen with an abnormal chest roentgenogram and a 3-week history of fever, chills, malaise, and right upper quadrant pain. Blood cultures revealed Pasteurella multocida sensitive to penicillin. Liver spleen radioisotope scan and CT scan revealed space occupying lesions in the right lobe of the liver. The patient was a gardener with no pets or animal exposure. This case illustrates P. multocida septicemia and a liver abscess in a patient without animal exposure. In addition, the possibility of soil as another reservoir of infection is raised. PMID:3487981

  19. Actinobacillus suis strains isolated from healthy and diseased swine are clonal and carry apxICABDvar. suis and apxIICAvar. suis toxin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Van Ostaaijen, J; Frey, J; Rosendal, S; MacInnes, J I

    1997-01-01

    Actinobacillus suis isolates recovered from both healthy and diseased pigs were characterized by biochemical testing, serotyping, restriction endonuclease fingerprinting, and apx toxin gene typing. The clinical isolates analyzed were collected over a 10-year period from approximately 40 different locations in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Little variation in the biochemical profiles of these isolates was seen, and all isolates reacted strongly with rabbit antisera prepared against one of the strains. Similarly, by using BamHI and BglII for restriction endonuclease fingerprinting (REF) analysis, all isolates were found to belong to a single REF group. Minor variations could be detected, especially in the BglII fingerprints, but overall the patterns were remarkably similar. Sequences that could be amplified by PCR with primers to the apxICA and apxIICA genes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were detected in all strains. Although no amplification was obtained with primers to the A. pleuropneumoniae apxIBD genes, sequences with homology to apxIBD were detected by hybridization. There was no evidence of apxIII homologs. Taken together, these data suggest that A. suis isolates are genotypically and phenotypically very similar, regardless of their source, and that they contain genes similar to, but not identical to, the apxICABD and apxIICA genes of A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:9114394

  20. Pasteurella gallinarum neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, K; Sein, P P; Shahnawaz, M; Hoosen, A A

    2002-01-01

    A 4-day-old baby weighing 1.7 kg was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, Pretoria, with a history of apneic attacks. On examination there was an umbilical sepsis and the neonate was septicemic. The baby had been delivered at home and the umbilical cord had been cut by the grandmother using unclean scissors and chimney soot applied to the umbilical stump. On admission, a septic screen was done and antibiotic treatment was started with penicillin and amikacin. The investigations showed that the baby was slightly anemic, with hemoglobin levels of 10.0 g/dL (14.9-23.7 g/dL), and a pure growth of a Gram-negative bacillus was obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid, blood culture and suprapubic aspirate urine specimens. The Gram-negative bacillus was catalase and oxidase positive and it was identified as Pasteurella gallinarum. Antimicrobial profiling showed the organism to be susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin and amikacin. Despite having received antimicrobial agents to which the etiological agent was susceptible, the neonate died within 5 days of admission. The cause of death was postulated to be due to overwhelming sepsis which resulted in septic shock. PMID:11906503

  1. Septicaemia due to Pasteurella pneumotropica

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Bogumila T.; Anderson, J. C.; Palmer, Cynthia A.; Henderson, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    The literature concerning Pasteurella pneumotropica infection in animals and man is briefly reviewed and a case presented in which the organism was the cause of septicaemia in a patient receiving chemotherapy for myeloid leukaemia. Bacteriological findings are recorded and compared with those of other authors. PMID:4352465

  2. Pleural effusion associated with acute and chronic pleuropneumonia and pleuritis secondary to thoracic wounds in horses: 43 cases (1982-1992).

    PubMed

    Collins, M B; Hodgson, D R; Hutchins, D R

    1994-12-15

    Case records of 43 horses with pleural effusion associated with acute pleuropneumonia, chronic pleuropneumonia, or pleuritis secondary to a penetrating thoracic wound were reviewed to determine the predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition. Acute pleuropneumonia was diagnosed in 36 horses, the majority of which were Thoroughbreds (89%). Of 22 (61%) horses that were in race training at the onset of illness, 11 (31%) had been recently transported a long distance and 4 (11%) had evidence of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Physical examination findings and hematologic data were nonspecific. The most consistent abnormality was hyperfibrino-genemia. Affected horses were treated with antibiotics, thoracic drainage, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and supportive care. Twenty-two (61%) horses were discharged from the hospital, with the mean duration of hospitalization for those discharged being 23 days. Nine (25%) horses were euthanatized and 5 (14%) died. Bacterial culturing of thoracic fluid resulted in growth in 30 of the 36 (83%) horses. The finding of anaerobic bacteria in thoracic fluid was not associated with a lower survival rate (62%) than the overall survival rate (61%). Four horses with chronic pleuropneumonia had a history of lethargy and inappetence for > 2 weeks. Actinobacillus equuli was isolated, either alone or in combination with other bacteria, from thoracic fluid of these 4 horses. Each horse was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and made a rapid recovery. Three horses with acute pleuritis secondary to penetrating thoracic wounds also had nonspecific clinical signs, apart from the wound and a large volume of pleural effusion. Bacteriologic isolates from these horses differed slightly from those of horses with acute pleuropneumonia. PMID:7744650

  3. Antibody response of swine to outer membrane components of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, V J; Ross, R F

    1986-01-01

    Sera from pigs infected with Haemophilus (Actinobacillus) pleuropneumoniae were tested for antibodies to outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of the organism by immunoblotting. Convalescent sera were produced in naturally born, colostrum-fed pigs and in cesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived pigs given H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 intranasally twice at 5-week intervals. Sera, collected at weekly intervals, were reacted with Sarkosyl-insoluble, OMP-enriched preparations of H. pleuropneumoniae which had been separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose. Antibodies were detected to OMPs with an apparent molecular weight of 16,500 (16.5K OMP); to 29K, 38.5K, 43.5K, 45K, 49.5K, and 66.5K OMPs; and to several high-molecular-weight (greater than or equal to 94,000) OMPs, but not to the major 42K OMP. Antibodies to the heat-modifiable OMP (29K/43.5K) and the 38.5K OMP were detected in sera from noninfected pigs. Antibodies were also detected to two broad 54,000- and 95,000-molecular-weight bands which did not stain with Coomassie blue, stained with silver nitrate, resisted proteinase K digestion, and were eliminated by oxidation with sodium metaperiodate. This indicates that the 54,000- and 95,000-molecular-weight bands represent polysaccharide, possibly capsular or lipopolysaccharide immunogens. Adsorption of sera with cells from the homologous serotype 5 strain removed antibodies to the 45K, 49.5K, 66.5K, and greater than or equal to 94K OMPs and to the two polysaccharide bands, indicating that these antibodies were directed primarily to surface-exposed epitopes. When tested with OMP preparations from other serotype 5 strains, heterogeneity was apparent, both in the reactions with OMPs and with the polysaccharide bands. Silver staining of proteinase K-treated, whole-cell lysates from serotype 5 strains also indicated variable expression of the polysaccharide bands. Sera also reacted with OMPs from

  4. [Unusual pneumonia by Pasteurella multocida].

    PubMed

    Duhautois, J; Chabrol, J; Terce, G; Ampere, A; Bart, F; Wallaert, B

    2013-02-01

    Pasteurellosis is an infection caused by inoculation usually through bites or scratches. Pasteurella multocida is involved in 50 to 60% of cases. Cats are the main vectors of the pathogen. Immunodepression increases the risk of systemic disease. We report a case of Pasteurella multocida pneumonia in an 81-year-old patient who had no cutaneous portal of entry. The patient had a past medical history of rectal neoplasia and prostate neoplasia treated with brachytherapy and hormonal therapy respectively. He had an environmental risk factor (the presence of a cat at home). The diagnosis was confirmed by repeated blood cultures. Antimicrobial therapy resulted in clinical, biological and radiological improvement. This case report raises the question of a possible pathogenesis different from the commonly described "inoculation". PMID:23333046

  5. Hematogenous Pasteurella multocida brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.; Lipsky, B.A.

    1985-10-01

    A case of hematogenously acquired brain abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida is described. CT scans of the head revealed the lesions in a 67 year old man with mild alcoholic liver disease and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ultrasound examinations of the abdomen and chest and an echocardiogram failed to reveal a source for the abscess. On autopsy examination three encapsulated brain abscesses were found. 34 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  6. Infective Exacerbation of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mayumi; Elshimy, Noha; Abusriwil, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old lady presented with a one-day history of shortness of breath as well as a cough productive of brown sputum. Her medical history was significant for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). She was in severe type one respiratory failure and blood tests revealed markedly raised inflammatory markers; however her chest X-ray was clear. On examination there was bronchial breathing with widespread crepitations and wheeze. She was treated as per an infective exacerbation of COPD. Subsequent blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a common commensal in the oropharynx of domesticated animals. The patient was then asked about any contact with animals, after which she revealed she had a dog and was bitten on her left hand the day before admission. We should not forget to enquire about recent history of injuries or animal bites when patients present acutely unwell. She made a complete recovery after treatment with penicillin. PMID:26942025

  7. Infective Exacerbation of Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mayumi; Elshimy, Noha; Abusriwil, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old lady presented with a one-day history of shortness of breath as well as a cough productive of brown sputum. Her medical history was significant for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). She was in severe type one respiratory failure and blood tests revealed markedly raised inflammatory markers; however her chest X-ray was clear. On examination there was bronchial breathing with widespread crepitations and wheeze. She was treated as per an infective exacerbation of COPD. Subsequent blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a common commensal in the oropharynx of domesticated animals. The patient was then asked about any contact with animals, after which she revealed she had a dog and was bitten on her left hand the day before admission. We should not forget to enquire about recent history of injuries or animal bites when patients present acutely unwell. She made a complete recovery after treatment with penicillin. PMID:26942025

  8. Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, V J; Munson, R S; Ross, R F

    1986-01-01

    Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Cells were disrupted by sonication, and outer membrane-enriched fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation and selective solubilization of the inner membrane with sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate. Colony type, growth medium, time of harvest, and in vitro or in vivo passage had no appreciable effect on the protein profiles of the strains examined. Seven patterns were distinguished among the reference strains of the nine capsular serotypes. These patterns were based on the mobility of the major outer membrane proteins migrating in the 39,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight region of the gel, a 16K to 16.5K protein, and a heat-modifiable 29K protein. Strains of serotypes 1 and 9 had identical outer membrane protein profiles, as did strains of serotypes 2 and 6. The reference strains of the remaining five serotypes each had a distinct pattern. The outer membrane protein profiles of 95 field isolates belonging to serotypes 1, 5, 7, and 9 from swine in the midwestern United States were determined and compared with the reference patterns. The results indicate that the population of H. pleuropneumoniae is clonal, with three predominant clones distinguished by both serotype and outer membrane protein profile responsible for the majority of H. pleuropneumoniae disease occurring in swine in the United States. Images PMID:3699889

  9. Identification of an immunogenic protein of Actinobacillus seminis that is present in microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Actinobacillus seminis is a gram-negative bacterium of the Pasteurellaceae family that is involved in ovine epididymitis. Looking for a protein specific to this species, we determined the protein profile of subcellular fractions of A. seminis (American Type Culture Collection number 15768): proteins from the outer membrane (OMPs), inner membrane (IMPs), and cytoplasm (CPs). These profiles provide the first data, to our knowledge, regarding subcellular fractions of A. seminis. In the OMP fraction, we identified a protein with a molecular mass of 75 kDa that proved to be immunogenic and apparently specific for A. seminis. This conclusion was based on the reaction of hyperimmune serum of rabbits inoculated with whole cells of A. seminis that was tested against sonicated complete cells of reference strains and field isolates of Brucella ovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. No protein of these bacteria cross-reacted with the 75-kDa protein of A. seminis. Furthermore, when each type of hyperimmune serum was tested against the sonicated cells and each of the subcellular fractions of A. seminis, it did not recognize the A. seminis 75-kDa protein. We also isolated and identified this protein in microvesicles released to the culture supernatant. The results suggest that the 75-kDa protein could be used to establish a diagnostic test specific for ovine epididymitis caused by A. seminis. PMID:16548331

  10. Genomic characterization of Pasteurella multocida HB01, a serotype A bovine isolate from China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhong; Liang, Wan; Liu, Wenjing; Wu, Bin; Tang, Biao; Tan, Chen; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-04-25

    Pasteurella multocida infects various domestic and feral animals, generally causing clinical disease. To investigate P. multocida disease in cattle, we sequenced the complete genome of P. multocida HB01 (GenBank accession CP006976), a serotype A organism isolated from a cow in China. The genome is composed of a single circular chromosome of 2,416,068 base pairs containing 2212 protein-coding sequences, 6 ribosomal rRNA operons, and 56 tRNA genes. The present study confirms that P. multocida HB01 possesses a more complete metabolic pathway with an intact trichloroacetic acid cycle for anabolism compared with A. pleuropneumoniae and Haemophilus parasuis. This is the first time that this metabolic mechanism of P. multocida has been described. We also identified a full spectrum of genes related to known virulence factors of P. multocida. The differences in virulence factors between strains of different serotypes and origins were also compared. This comprehensive comparative genome analysis will help in further studies of the metabolic pathways, genetic basis of serotype, and virulence of P. multocida. PMID:26827796

  11. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  12. Pasteurella multocida pathogenesis: 125 years after Pasteur.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D; Adler, Ben

    2006-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida was first shown to be the causative agent of fowl cholera by Louis Pasteur in 1881. Since then, this Gram-negative bacterium has been identified as the causative agent of many other economically important diseases in a wide range of hosts. The mechanisms by which these bacteria can invade the mucosa, evade innate immunity and cause systemic disease are slowly being elucidated. Key virulence factors identified to date include capsule and lipopolysaccharide. The capsule is clearly involved in bacterial avoidance of phagocytosis and resistance to complement, while complete lipopolysaccharide is critical for bacterial survival in the host. A number of other virulence factors have been identified by both directed and random mutagenesis, including Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), putative surface adhesins and iron acquisition proteins. However, it is likely that many key virulence factors are yet to be identified, including those required for initial attachment and invasion of host cells and for persistence in a relatively nutrient poor and hostile environment.

  13. Pasteurella multocida: from Zoonosis to Cellular Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mengfei

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In a world where most emerging and reemerging infectious diseases are zoonotic in nature and our contacts with both domestic and wild animals abound, there is growing awareness of the potential for human acquisition of animal diseases. Like other Pasteurellaceae, Pasteurella species are highly prevalent among animal populations, where they are often found as part of the normal microbiota of the oral, nasopharyngeal, and upper respiratory tracts. Many Pasteurella species are opportunistic pathogens that can cause endemic disease and are associated increasingly with epizootic outbreaks. Zoonotic transmission to humans usually occurs through animal bites or contact with nasal secretions, with P. multocida being the most prevalent isolate observed in human infections. Here we review recent comparative genomics and molecular pathogenesis studies that have advanced our understanding of the multiple virulence mechanisms employed by Pasteurella species to establish acute and chronic infections. We also summarize efforts being explored to enhance our ability to rapidly and accurately identify and distinguish among clinical isolates and to control pasteurellosis by improved development of new vaccines and treatment regimens. PMID:23824375

  14. Epidemiology of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection in pigs: a survey of Ontario Pork Producers, 1981.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendal, S; Mitchell, W R

    1983-01-01

    Information about factors associated with the spread and the effect of pleuropneumonia was obtained from 418 pork producers in Ontario, who returned a mailed questionnaire. The overall herd prevalence of pleuropneumonia was 23.2%. The prevalence among herds with feeder pigs only was 34.3% and 16% among sow herds. The chance of pleuropneumonia breaking out in a herd was increased with increased traffic of pigs into the herd. The source of supplementary stock had an important effect on the chance of pleuropneumonia occurring. The highest risk resulted from introducing stock from salesbarns and the lowest from stock of health status known to the purchaser and supplied by one breeder only. Mortality, primarily among feeder pigs, and unthriftiness were the major effects of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection. Stress, such as crowding or inclement climatic conditions, was associated with outbreaks of pleuropneumonia. This would suggest that the infection with H. pleuropneumoniae can be subclinical until stress precipitates the disease. PMID:6831302

  15. Nonspecific Adherence by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Requires Genes Widespread in Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Kachlany, Scott C.; Planet, Paul J.; Bhattacharjee, Mrinal K.; Kollia, Evyenia; DeSalle, Rob; Fine, Daniel H.; Figurski, David H.

    2000-01-01

    The gram-negative coccobacillus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, is the putative agent for localized juvenile periodontitis, a particularly destructive form of periodontal disease in adolescents. This bacterium has also been isolated from a variety of other infections, notably endocarditis. Fresh clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans form tenacious biofilms, a property likely to be critical for colonization of teeth and other surfaces. Here we report the identification of a locus of seven genes required for nonspecific adherence of A. actinomycetemcomitans to surfaces. The recently developed transposon IS903φkan was used to isolate mutants of the rough clinical isolate CU1000 that are defective in tight adherence to surfaces (Tad−). Unlike wild-type cells, Tad− mutant cells adhere poorly to surfaces, fail to form large autoaggregates, and lack long, bundled fibrils. Nucleotide sequencing and genetic complementation analysis revealed a 6.7-kb region of the genome with seven adjacent genes (tadABCDEFG) required for tight adherence. The predicted TadA polypeptide is similar to VirB11, an ATPase involved in macromolecular transport. The predicted amino acid sequences of the other Tad polypeptides indicate membrane localization but no obvious functions. We suggest that the tad genes are involved in secretion of factors required for tight adherence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Remarkably, complete and highly conserved tad gene clusters are present in the genomes of the bubonic plague bacillus Yersinia pestis and the human and animal pathogen Pasteurella multocida. Partial tad loci also occur in strikingly diverse Bacteria and Archaea. Our results show that the tad genes are required for tight adherence of A. actinomycetemcomitans to surfaces and are therefore likely to be essential for colonization and pathogenesis. The occurrence of similar genes in a wide array of microorganisms indicates that they have important functions. We propose that tad

  16. Occupationally acquired Pasteurella multocida pneumonia in a healthy abattoir worker.

    PubMed

    Pradeepan, Shyamala; Tun Min, Sandy; Lai, Katy

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy male abbatoir worker presented to his general practitioner with acute hypoxemia due to bronchopneumonia. His only occupational exposure was cleaning cow carcasses being prepared for consumption. Blood cultures were eventually positive for Pasteurella multocida. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Pasteurella multocida pneumonia in an abattoir worker, and illustrates the importance of considering this infection in patients with animal exposures. PMID:27536550

  17. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Kushner, M E; Tsai, C C

    1982-01-01

    We have examined soluble sonic extracts of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans for their ability to alter human and murine fibroblast proliferation. We found that extracts of all A. actinomycetemcomitans strains examined (both leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of both murine and human fibroblast proliferation as assessed by DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation). Addition of sonic extract simultaneously with [3H]thymidine had no effect on incorporation, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was also paralleled by decreased RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation) and by a decrease in cell growth as assessed by direct cell counts; there was no effect on cell viability. The suppressive factor(s) is heat labile; preliminary purification and characterization studies indicate that it is a distinct and separate moiety from other A. actinomycetemcomitans mediators previously reported, including leukotoxin, immune suppressive factor, and endotoxin. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, we propose that one aspect of the pathogenicity of this organism rests in its ability to inhibit fibroblast growth, which in turn could contribute to the collagen loss associated with certain forms of periodontal disease, in particular juvenile periodontitis. PMID:7152684

  18. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  19. Isolation of Actinobacillus suis from a cat's lung.

    PubMed Central

    Daignault, D; Chouinard, L; Møller, K; Ahrens, P; Messier, S; Higgins, R

    1999-01-01

    Actinobacillus suis has been isolated from the lungs of 9-month-old cat. The bacterium was characterized biochemically as well as genetically, and its sensitivity profile to different antimicrobial agents was established. The role of this isolate in the cat's condition is discussed. PMID:9919368

  20. Characteristics and biotypes of Pasteurella multocida isolated from humans.

    PubMed

    Oberhofer, T R

    1981-03-01

    Fifty-two isolates of Pasteurella (48 strains of Pasteurella multocida and 4 strains of atypical Pasteurella) were identified by conventional and commercial test systems. All strains fermented glucose, sucrose, and fructose in purple broth base (Difco Laboratories) with bromocresol purple as indicator, although the atypical Pasteurella produced fermentation reactions that were barely perceptible. Eleven different biotypes were identified by fermentation reactions in maltose, mannitol, xylose, sorbitol, and trehalose media. There was a correlation of biotypes to cat bites, with 61% of cat bite isolates falling into biotype A and B. A correlation of biotype and dog bite isolates was not seen. The choice of medium used for fermentation tests was critical as evidenced by the inability of the organisms to grow in a second commercially purchased preparation of purple broth base. The reliability of commercial test systems in identifying Pasteurella was 81% for Oxi/Ferm (Roche Diagnostics, Div. Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc., Nutley, N.J.), 68% for API (Analytab Products, Plainview, N.Y.), and 11% for Minitek (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, MD.).

  1. Isolation of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, M; Sharma, B; Petras, S F; Reese, C P; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M

    1995-01-01

    Two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 that do not produce leukotoxin were isolated. Following mutagenesis, colonies were screened with antiserum by a filter assay for absence of the secreted leukotoxin. The two mutants both appeared to produce normal amounts of other antigens, as judged by reactivity with polyclonal serum from an animal with pasteurellosis, and were not altered in beta-hemolytic activity as seen on blood agar plates. There was no evidence of either cell-associated or secreted leukotoxin protein when Western blots (immunoblots) were carried out with the polyclonal serum or with a monoclonal antibody directed against the leukotoxin. Southern blots revealed that both mutants show the wild-type restriction pattern at the leukotoxin locus, although the strain with the lktA2 mutation showed differences in other regions of the chromosome on analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The strain with the lktA2 mutation grew more slowly than did the wild-type strain, while the strain with the lktA1 mutation was indistinguishable from the wild-type strain in its growth properties. The strain with the lktA1 mutation should be valuable in determining the role of the leukotoxin in virulence as well as in identifying other virulence factors of P. haemolytica. PMID:7868223

  2. Classification of avian haemolytic Actinobacillus-like organisms (Bisgaard taxon 26) associated with anseriforme birds as Actinobacillus anseriformium sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Bisgaard, M; Christensen, H

    2012-02-01

    Avian haemolytic Actinobacillus-like organisms have tentatively been named Bisgaard taxon 26. Phenotypic information has been published on 65 strains of this taxon. In the current study, 31 isolates were selected for genotypic characterization. Thirty strains had the same rpoB sequence and only one strain diverged in 1 nt. The highest rpoB similarity to members of other taxa was 89.7 % to the type strain of Actinobacillus equuli subsp. haemolyticus and the similarity to the type strain of the type species, Actinobacillus lignieresii, was 88.2 %. The lowest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strains of the group was determined in previous investigations to be 99.6 % and the highest similarities of 96.4 and 96.2 % outside the group were obtained to the reference strain of Actinobacillus genomospecies 2 and to the type strain of A. equuli subsp. equuli, respectively; 95.8-95.3 % similarity was obtained with the type strain of A. lignieresii. recN gene sequence similarities within the group were from 99.5 % (strains F66(T) and F64) to 99.8 % (strains F66(T) and F67) corresponding to genome similarities of 93.9-94.6 %, which are near the upper limit for species compared with other members of the Pasteurellaceae. The highest recN similarity outside the group (83.4 %) was observed to the type strain of Actinobacillus capsulatus, whereas the similarity to the type strain of A. lignieresii was 80.9 %, corresponding to genome similarities of 57.7 and 52.0 %, respectively. All isolates meet the phenotypic characters outlined for Actinobacillus (urease-, phosphatase- and porphyrin-positive, indole-negative, acid production from fructose, sucrose, maltose and dextrin). β-Haemolysis of bovine blood is observed and isolates may demonstrate in vitro satellitic growth, referred to as V-factor or NAD requirement. Isolates have been obtained from the upper respiratory tract of web-footed birds in which they may cause sinusitis, conjunctivitis and

  3. [Study of Dermanyssus gallinae as a carrier of Pasteurella multocida].

    PubMed

    Petrov, D

    1975-01-01

    Microbiologic studies and biologic experiments revealed that Pasteurella multocida persists in the body of Dermanyssus gallinae mites after these engorge with blood from infected birds. Depending on the temperature of the environment the carrier status was shown to last from 42 to 64 days. It is reported that the red mite acts as a vector and does not transmit Pasteurellae directly. However, the parasite is potentially hazardous in maintaining and passing on the infection through other indirect routes. Carrier status has been established in naturally infected Dermanyssus gallinae mites.

  4. First isolation of Actinobacillus genomospecies 2 in Japan

    PubMed Central

    MURAKAMI, Miyuki; SHIMONISHI, Yoshimasa; HOBO, Seiji; NIWA, Hidekazu; ITO, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the first isolation of Actinobacillus genomospecies 2 in Japan. The isolate was found in a septicemic foal and characterized by phenotypic and genetic analyses, with the latter consisting of 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence analysis plus multilocus sequence analysis using three housekeeping genes, recN, rpoA and thdF, that have been proposed for use as a genomic tool in place of DNA-DNA hybridization. PMID:26668165

  5. CAPACITY OF PLEUROPNEUMONIA-LIKE MICROORGANISMS TO GROW ON CHORIOALLANTOIC MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Homer F.

    1941-01-01

    1. Among eight strains or variants, included in four different immunological types of pleuropneumonia-like microorganisms, all grew on chorioallantoic membranes; those belonging to Klieneberger's Type L5 (Sabin Type A) grew very poorly; and those included in three other types grew with varying degrees of vigor. 2. In all instances, strains of pleuropneumonia-like microorganisms tested grew better on dead sterile chorioallantoic membranes than on living membranes. 3. None of the strains tested was in itself lethal for chick embryos. 4. No constant macroscopic lesion developed as a result of inoculating chorioallantoic membranes with pleuropneumonia-like microorganisms. PMID:19871155

  6. Identification of Pasteurella multocida CHAPS-soluble outer membrane proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fowl cholera continues to be of concern to the poultry industry, especially for turkey growers. This disease costs the turkey industry millions of dollars annually. In order to gain a better understanding of Pasteurella multocida virulence factors involved in colonization and pathogenesis, the outer...

  7. Aortic Endograft Infection by Pasteurella multocida: A Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Jayakrishnan, Thejus T; Keyashian, Brian; Amene, Juliet; Malinowski, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Infection of an aortic endograft is a rare complication following endovascular aneurysm repair. These patients have been treated with explantation of the graft to obtain source control followed by an extra-anatomic bypass to restore circulation. The present case study describes an interesting case of Pasteurella infection involving an aortic endograft managed nonoperatively by percutaneous drainage and graft preservation. PMID:27581225

  8. Pasteurella multocida corneal ulcer following a baseball injury.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J D; Kosoko, O; Mason, R P; Cowan, C L

    1989-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida is an ubiquitous organism that can be isolated from a variety of animals and birds. It is an infrequent ocular pathogen but can cause infection as a result of injury or animal exposure. This article reports a case of P multocida corneal ulcer following a baseball injury.

  9. Hamster bite peritonitis: Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Campos, A; Taylor, J H; Campbell, M

    2000-11-01

    We report the first case of Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient. This rare infection was the result of contamination of the dialysis tubing by a pet hamster. We stress the importance of household pets as a source of infection in the peritoneal dialysis population. PMID:11095007

  10. Pasteurella Multocida Peritonitis After Cat Scratch in a Patient with Cirrhotic Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Gunathilake, Roshan; Verma, Ajay; Caffery, Michael; Sowden, Sowden

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a zoonotic agent transmitted by canines and felines, has been very rarely reported to cause bacterial peritonitis in humans. Pasteurella multocida peritonitis is associated with high mortality even with appropriate treatment, therefore its early recognition is essential. We report a case of Pasteurella multocida peritonitis following cat scratch in a patient with Child Pugh Class C alcoholic cirrhosis, culminating in multiple organ failure and death PMID:26294953

  11. Application of enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin disks approved in Japan for susceptibility testing of representative veterinary respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Usui, Masaru; Asai, Tetsuo

    2014-10-01

    In this study, susceptibilities of Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin were tested using an agar diffusion method with the commercial disks and a broth microdilution method. Good correlation between the 2 methods for enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin was observed for P. multocida (r = -0.743 and -0.818, respectively), M. haemolytica (r = -0.739 and -0.800, respectively) and A. pleuropneumoniae (r = -0.785 and -0.809, respectively). Based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute interpretive criteria for enrofloxacin, high-level categorical agreement between the 2 methods was found for P. multocida (97.9%), M. haemolytica (93.8%) and A. pleuropneumoniae (92.0%). Our findings indicate that the tested commercial disks can be applied for susceptibility testing of veterinary respiratory pathogens.

  12. Application of Enrofloxacin and Orbifloxacin Disks Approved in Japan for Susceptibility Testing of Representative Veterinary Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    HARADA, Kazuki; USUI, Masaru; ASAI, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, susceptibilities of Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin were tested using an agar diffusion method with the commercial disks and a broth microdilution method. Good correlation between the 2 methods for enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin was observed for P. multocida (r = −0.743 and −0.818, respectively), M. haemolytica (r = −0.739 and −0.800, respectively) and A. pleuropneumoniae (r = −0.785 and −0.809, respectively). Based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute interpretive criteria for enrofloxacin, high-level categorical agreement between the 2 methods was found for P. multocida (97.9%), M. haemolytica (93.8%) and A. pleuropneumoniae (92.0%). Our findings indicate that the tested commercial disks can be applied for susceptibility testing of veterinary respiratory pathogens. PMID:25008965

  13. Pasteurella multocida bacterial meningitis caused by contact with pigs

    PubMed Central

    López, C.; Sanchez-Rubio, P.; Betrán, A.; Terré, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida belongs to the normal flora of the respiratory and digestive tract of many animals. Animal exposure is a considerable risk factor for Pasteurella infection. P. multocida is the most common cause of local infection after an animal bite but is an unusual cause of meningitis. We present a case of bacterial meningitis by P. multocida in a 37-year-old man who worked in a pig farm and was bitten by a pig. The patient had a defect located in the lamina cribosa and this lesion could be the gateway of the infection, although in this case the infection could also be acquired through the pig bite. The bacteria was identified as P. multocida with the biochemical test API 20E (bioMérieux). In agreement with findings in the literature, the strain was susceptible in vitro to penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, imipenem and tetracycline. PMID:24294240

  14. A cryopreservation method for Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Melody K.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    A cryopreservation method and improved isolation techniques for detection of Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples were developed. Wetland water samples were collected in the field, diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, final concentration 10%), and frozen at -180 C in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipper. Frozen samples were transported to the laboratory where they were subsequently thawed and processed in Pasteurella multocida selective broth (PMSB) to isolate P. multocida. This method allowed for consistent isolation of 2 to 18 organisms/ml from water seeded with known concentrations of P. multocida. The method compared favorably with the standard mouse inoculation method and allowed for preservation of the samples until they could be processed in the laboratory.

  15. A longitudinal microbiological investigation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, R L

    1984-01-01

    Longitudinal clinical and microbiological monitoring of subjects with localized juvenile periodontitis indicated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens were significantly associated (P less than 0.05) with active tissue destruction. PMID:6381313

  16. Cellular fatty acid and soluble protein composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoon, D A; Mayberry, W R; Slots, J

    1981-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid and protein content of twenty-five representative strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetecomitans isolated from juvenile and adult periodontitis patients was compared to that of 15 reference strains of oral and nonoral Actinobacillus species and Haemophilus aphrophilus. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of the fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The predominant fatty acids of all 40 strains examined were 14:0, 3-OH 14:0, 16 delta, and 16:0. Actinobacillus seminis (ATCC 15768) was unlike the other strains examined because of a greater amount of 14:0 detected. The soluble protein analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that A. actinomycetemcomitans, H. aphrophilus, and nonoral Actinobacillus species possessed distinct protein profiles attesting to the validity of separating these organisms into different species. Established biotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans could not be differentiated on the basis of fatty acid or protein profiles. PMID:7287893

  17. Host Response in Rabbits to Infection with Pasteurella multocida Serogroup F Strains Originating from Fowl Cholera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of two avian Pasteurella multocida serogroup F strains to induce disease in rabbits was investigated in this study. Two groups of 18 Pasteurella-free rabbits each were intranasally challenged with strains isolated from chicken and turkey, respectively. Half the animals in each challenge ...

  18. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... units of virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain X-73, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification)...

  19. 9 CFR 113.118 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 3 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated turkeys... virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain P-1059, Type 3 (Little and Lyons Classification) and observed...

  20. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... units of virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain X-73, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification)...

  1. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... units of virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain X-73, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification)...

  2. 9 CFR 113.118 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 3 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated turkeys... virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain P-1059, Type 3 (Little and Lyons Classification) and observed...

  3. 9 CFR 113.118 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 3 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated turkeys... virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain P-1059, Type 3 (Little and Lyons Classification) and observed...

  4. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... units of virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain X-73, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification)...

  5. 9 CFR 113.118 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 3 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated turkeys... virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain P-1059, Type 3 (Little and Lyons Classification) and observed...

  6. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in § 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... units of virulent Pasteurella multocida, Strain X-73, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification)...

  7. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-06-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  8. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  9. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans contamination of toothbrushes from patients harbouring the organism.

    PubMed

    Müller, H P; Lange, D E; Müller, R F

    1989-07-01

    The main ecological niche of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.) seems to be the periodontal pocket, but it can also be isolated from supragingival plaque, buccal and tongue mucosa, or saliva. We examined toothbrushes from 21 patients, all identified as harbouring moderate to large numbers of A.a. in subgingival plaque, for contamination with this organism. 29% of the toothbrushes presented by our patients yielded detectable numbers of A.a. Immediately after toothbrushing this figure rose to 62%, but dropped to 50% after 1 h. Numbers of isolated A.a. on toothbrushes were weakly correlated with the degree of periodontal destruction, and significantly more numbers of A.a. on toothbrushes could be detected if the organism was found on mucous membranes or in saliva. There was no association with gingival inflammation, supragingival plaque nor mean numbers of isolated subgingival A.a. PMID:2760252

  10. Hydrogen peroxide as an effective disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2014-07-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida.

  11. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 isolated from a lesser snow goose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, D.R.; Shadduck, D.J.; Price, J.I.; Cooch, E.G.

    1997-01-01

    Pharyngeal swabs were collected from 298 lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) at Banks Island (Northwest Territories. Canada) in the summer of 1994. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 was isolated from an adult male bird and P. multocida serotype 3 was isolated from an adult female goose. Pathogenicity of the serotype 1 isolate was confirmed by inoculation in Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). The serotype 3 isolate was non-pathogenic in Pekin ducks. This is the first documented isolation of pathogenic P. multocida serotype 1 from apparently healthy wild snow geese.

  12. Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia: new aspects of an old disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, R; Churchward, C

    2012-06-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, is a serious OIE-listed disease affecting goats in the Middle East, north and east Africa and Asia. Mortality and morbidity rates can be as high as 60% and 90%, respectively, when the disease first enters a territory, invariably through carrier animals. Recent detections of CCPP in Pakistan and Tajikistan are probably the result of improved diagnosis as the disease has been suspected there for many years, while those in Thrace in 2003 and Mauritius in 2009 represent new outbreaks. CCPP was thought to be highly host specific until recent outbreaks in wildlife species including gazelles and gerenuks show that the causative mycoplasma has broader specificity. Diagnosis was hampered by the fastidiousness of the causative mycoplasma but molecular-based tests like PCR have greatly improved detection. Rapid latex agglutination tests that can be performed at the penside are also available for antibody detection. Clinically affected animals respond to a range of antibiotics although it is unlikely that this results in complete elimination of the mycoplasma. Vaccines consisting of saponized organisms have been shown to be protective but the quality and efficacy may be variable. PMID:21951488

  13. Molecular Analysis of Tetracycline Resistance in Pasteurella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Schwarz, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    Tetracycline-resistant Pasteurella aerogenes isolates obtained from the intestinal tract of swine were investigated for their tet genes by PCR analysis and hybridization experiments. In contrast to Pasteurella isolates from the respiratory tract, tet(H) genes were detected in the chromosomal DNA of only 2 of the 24 isolates, one of which also carried two copies of a tet(B) gene. All other P. aerogenes isolates carried tet(B) genes, which are the predominant tet genes among Enterobacteriaceae. A single isolate harbored a tet(B) gene as part of a truncated Tn10 element on the 4.8-kb plasmid pPAT2. Comparative analysis of the pPAT2 sequence suggested that the Tn10 relic on plasmid pPAT2 is the result of several illegitimate recombination events. The remaining 21 P. aerogenes isolates carried one or two copies of the tet(B) gene in their chromosomal DNA. In the majority of the cases, these tet(B) genes were associated with copies of Tn10 as confirmed by their SfuI and BamHI hybridization patterns. No correlation between the number of tet gene copies and the MICs of tetracycline, doxycyline and minocycline was observed. PMID:11557485

  14. Combination of medical and surgical therapy for pleuropneumonia in a horse.

    PubMed Central

    Dechan, J

    1997-01-01

    Medical management was unable to prevent the development of an extrapulmonary abscess in a 10-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with anaerobic pleuropneumonia. Intercostal thoracostomy achieved drainage of the abscess. Resolution of the abscess and subsequent bronchopleural fistulas was monitored by ultrasonography and video-endoscopy. The horse returned to training 4 mo after discharge. PMID:9262860

  15. Pasteurella multocida infected total knee arthroplasty: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, KB; Bharadwaj, R; MacDonald, A; Syme, B

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of prosthetic joint infection. This infection generally follows significant animal contact, usually licks and scratches. We report a case of P multocida infection that was treated with linezolid with salvage of the implant. Linezolid is generally active against Gram-positive organisms only with the exception of Pasteurella, which is Gram-negative. We extensively review the previous reported cases of implant infection with P multocida. PMID:24780653

  16. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using an EDTA-extracted antigen for the serology of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nicolet, J; Paroz, P; Krawinkler, M; Baumgartner, A

    1981-12-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was proposed as an alternative to the complement-fixation test (CF) for the detection of antibodies of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae, agent of the pleuropneumonia in pigs. In tests done with different antigen-extraction procedures (including Tween 20, sodium dodecyl sulfate, aqueous phenol, sonification, and heat treatment at 120 C), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) provided a satisfactorily reactive antigen. Chromatography purification on Sephacryl S200 improved the specificity of this antigen. Using hyperimmune rabbit sera, we investigated the specificity and the sensitivity of the ELISA with the EDTA-purified antigen of the different serotypes of H pleuropneumoniae on selected swine sera in herds with confirmed H pleuropneumoniae infection, from specific-pathogen-free animals showing doubtful CF reactions. The ELISA proved to be highly specific and more sensitive than the CF test. Furthermore, evidence of cross-reactions with H parasuis, a common bacteria isolated in swine populations, was not found.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides T1/44, a Vaccine Strain against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gourgues, Géraldine; Barré, Aurélien; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Weber, Johann; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Barbe, Valérie; Schieck, Elise; Jores, Joerg; Vashee, Sanjay; Blanchard, Alain; Lartigue, Carole; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoidessubsp.mycoidesis the etiologic agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. We report here the complete genome sequence of the strain T1/44, which is widely used as a live vaccine in Africa. PMID:27081135

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides T1/44, a Vaccine Strain against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gourgues, Géraldine; Barré, Aurélien; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Weber, Johann; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Barbe, Valérie; Schieck, Elise; Jores, Joerg; Vashee, Sanjay; Blanchard, Alain; Lartigue, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is the etiologic agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. We report here the complete genome sequence of the strain T1/44, which is widely used as a live vaccine in Africa. PMID:27081135

  19. Serotype specificity and immunogenicity of the capsular polymer of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5.

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Mathison, B

    1987-01-01

    Serotyping of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae and serologic assays for detection of serotype-specific antibody are problematic due to the potential cross-reactivity of the crude antigens used for raising immune serum or for serology. The capsular polymer (CP) of H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 was investigated for serotype-specific activity with antiserum to whole cells or with antiserum made monospecific to CP by adsorption with a capsule-deficient mutant. When antiserum to whole cells or monospecific antiserum to CP was tested against purified CP from serotypes 1 to 7 by immunodiffusion or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, only capsules of serotype 5 were reactive. In addition, only encapsulated serotype 5 cells reacted with serum monospecific to CP in an indirect immunofluorescent-antibody assay. Serotype-specific antibody was completely inhibited in each assay by preincubation of purified CP with the serum. Antiserum to whole cells of H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 contained antibodies to proteins and lipopolysaccharide; these antibodies cross-reacted with antigens of heterologous serotypes by dot-blot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting. The antigenic activity of CP was stable after heating for at least 30 min at 100 degrees C. High titers of antibody to CP were present in the sera of rabbits immunized intravenously with whole log-phase cells or in the convalescent sera of pigs experimentally infected with H. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. However, the purified CP was poorly immunogenic in rabbits and swine. Our results indicate that the capsule is the serotype-specific antigen of H. pleuropneumoniae and that a monospecific antiserum to capsule or purified capsule should be used for serotyping or serologic assays, respectively. Images PMID:3110066

  20. Immunosuppressive factor from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans down regulates cytokine production.

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, T; Ochiai, K

    1996-01-01

    A cytoplasmic soluble fraction of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was isolated and characterized as suppressing mitogen-stimulated proliferation of and cytokine production by C3H/HeN mouse splenic T cells. This factor, designated suppressive factor 1 (SF1), was isolated from the supernatant of sonicated whole bacteria and purified by Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography, DEAE-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography, hydroxyapatite high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and Protein Pack 300 & 125 gel filtration HPLC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the purified SF1 migrated as a single band corresponding to a molecular mass of 14 kDa. This molecule was protease labile, heat resistant, and noncytotoxic. N'-terminal sequence analysis revealed no homology with any known peptides of periodontopathic bacteria or with any host-derived growth factors. Purified SF1 suppressed the proliferation of mouse splenic T cells which had been stimulated with concanavalin A, as well as suppressing the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon, IL-4, and IL-5 from CD4+ T cells as 0.1 microgram/ml or more. These data suggest that SF1 produced by the periodontal pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans functions as a virulence factor by down regulating T-cell proliferation and cytokine production at local defense sites. PMID:8557373

  1. Economical succinic acid production from cane molasses by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Peng; Zheng, Pu; Sun, Zhi-Hao; Ni, Ye; Dong, Jin-Jun; Zhu, Lei-Lei

    2008-04-01

    In this work, production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes CGMCC1593 using cane molasses as a low cost carbon source was developed. In anaerobic bottles fermentation, succinic acid concentration of 50.6+/-0.9 g l(-1) was attained at 60 h using an optimum medium containing molasses pretreated with sulfuric acid, resulting in a succinic acid yield of 79.5+/-1.1% and sugar utilization of 97.1+/-0.6%. When batch fermentation was carried out in a 5-l stirred bioreactor with pretreated molasses, 46.4 g l(-1) of succinic acid was attained at 48 h and faster cells growth was also observed. Fed batch fermentation was performed to minimize the substrate (sugar) inhibition effect, giving 55.2 g l(-1) of succinic acid and 1.15 g l(-1)h(-1) of productivity at 48 h. The present study suggests that the inexpensive cane molasses could be utilized for the economical and efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes.

  2. Identification of Fur-regulated genes in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Jordan, Shawn F; Zambon, Joseph J

    2006-03-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an oral pathogen that causes aggressive periodontitis as well as sometimes life-threatening, extra-oral infections. Iron regulation is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections and, consistent with this hypothesis, the fur gene has recently been identified and characterized in A. actinomycetemcomitans. In this study, 14 putatively Fur-regulated genes were identified by Fur titration assay (Furta) in A. actinomycetemcomitans, including afuA, dgt, eno, hemA, tbpA, recO and yfe - some of which are known to be Fur regulated in other species. A fur mutant A. actinomycetemcomitans strain was created by selecting for manganese resistance in order to study the Fur regulon. Comparisons between the fur gene sequences revealed that nucleotide 66 changed from C in the wild-type to T in the mutant strain, changing leucine to isoleucine. The fur mutant strain expressed a nonfunctional Fur protein as determined by Escherichia coli-based ferric uptake assays and Western blotting. It was also more sensitive to acid stress and expressed higher levels of minC than the wild-type strain. minC, which inhibits cell division in other bacterial species and whose regulation by iron has not been previously described, was found to be Fur regulated in A. actinomycetemcomitans by Furta, by gel shift assays, and by RT-qPCR assays for gene expression. PMID:16514158

  3. Continuous succinic acid production from xylose by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, Michael F A; Nicol, Willie

    2016-02-01

    Continuous, anaerobic fermentations of D-xylose were performed by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z in a custom, biofilm reactor at dilution rates of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.30 h(-1). Succinic acid yields on xylose (0.55-0.68 g g(-1)), titres (10.9-29.4 g L(-1)) and productivities (1.5-3.4 g L(-1) h(-1)) were lower than those of a previous study on glucose, but product ratios (succinic acid/acetic acid = 3.0-5.0 g g(-1)) and carbohydrate consumption rates were similar. Also, mass balance closures on xylose were up to 18.2 % lower than those on glucose. A modified HPLC method revealed pyruvic acid excretion at appreciable concentrations (1.2-1.9 g L(-1)) which improved the mass balance closure by up to 16.8 %. Furthermore, redox balances based on the accounted xylose consumed and the excreted metabolites, indicated an overproduction of reducing power. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was shown to be a plausible source of the additional reducing power. PMID:26610345

  4. Development of a Markerless Knockout Method for Actinobacillus succinogenes

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajasi V.; Schindler, Bryan D.; McPherson, Nikolas R.; Tiwari, Kanupriya

    2014-01-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes is one of the best natural succinate-producing organisms, but it still needs engineering to further increase succinate yield and productivity. In this study, we developed a markerless knockout method for A. succinogenes using natural transformation or electroporation. The Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase gene with flanking flippase recognition target sites was used as the positive selection marker, making use of A. succinogenes's auxotrophy for glutamate to select for growth on isocitrate. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flippase recombinase (Flp) was used to remove the selection marker, allowing its reuse. Finally, the plasmid expressing flp was cured using acridine orange. We demonstrate that at least two consecutive deletions can be introduced into the same strain using this approach, that no more than a total of 1 kb of DNA is needed on each side of the selection cassette to protect from exonuclease activity during transformation, and that no more than 200 bp of homologous DNA is needed on each side for efficient recombination. We also demonstrate that electroporation can be used as an alternative transformation method to obtain knockout mutants and that an enriched defined medium can be used for direct selection of knockout mutants on agar plates with high efficiency. Single-knockout mutants of the fumarate reductase and of the pyruvate formate lyase-encoding genes were obtained using this knockout strategy. Double-knockout mutants were also obtained by deleting the citrate lyase-, β-galactosidase-, and aconitase-encoding genes in the pyruvate formate lyase knockout mutant strain. PMID:24610845

  5. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Caused by Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Vranis, Neil; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Christian, Matthew; Joshi, Manjari; Pensy, Raymond A

    2015-07-01

    This report presents a case of progressive septic arthritis and osteomyelitis caused by a rare pathogen, Pasteurella multocida, thought to be provoked by the use of systemic corticosteroids. Despite initial improvement after antibiotics and surgical procedure, the patient returned with new, associated symptoms 1 month later. This concurrent set of circumstances leading to a life-threatening condition has not been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Physicians aware of such a case will be better prepared to diagnose, treat, and educate their patients. Additionally, the diagnostic challenge presented by this case report emphasizes the need for vigilance and thoroughness in obtaining histories from patients presenting with seemingly benign complaints, especially in vulnerable populations, such as infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised adults.

  6. Experimental infection of sheep with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Buddle, B M; Herceg, M; Davies, D H

    1984-10-01

    A group of Caesarian-derived, colostrum-deprived lambs was inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with a virulent Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae isolate selected from ovine mammary studies and propagated in an ovine mammary gland. Other groups of lambs were inoculated with M. ovipneumoniae in combination with Pasteurella haemolytica type Al or P. haemolytica alone. The M. ovipneumoniae isolate alone did not induce any specific pneumonic lesions in the lambs and when combined with P. haemolytica type Al did not increase the severity of the P. haemolytica-type lesions. Fifty percent of lambs inoculated with P. haemolytica developed a purulent and exudative bronchopneumonia with pleurisy and high titres of P. haemolytica were recovered from these lesions.

  7. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  8. Characterization of leukotoxin from a clinical strain of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roger; Ghofaily, Lourdes Al; Patel, Jigna; Balashova, Nataliya V; Freitas, Anna C; Labib, Irene; Kachlany, Scott C

    2006-02-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram negative pathogen that is the etiologic agent of localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP), a rapidly progressing and severe disease of the oral cavity that affects predominantly adolescents. A. actinomycetemcomitans is also found in extraoral infections including infective endocarditis. As one of its many virulence determinants, A. actinomycetemcomitans produces the RTX (repeats in toxin) exotoxin, leukotoxin (LtxA). LtxA specifically kills leukocytes of humans and Old World Monkeys. All of our current knowledge of A. actinomycetemcomitans LtxA is based on the protein from strain JP2, a nonadherent laboratory isolate. Because laboratory isolates can lose virulence properties, we wished to examine LtxA from a clinical isolate, NJ4500. We show that localization patterns of LtxA do not differ between the strains. Subcellular localization studies with NJ4500 revealed that LtxA localizes to the outer membrane and that the interaction between LtxA and the surface of cells is specific. Surface localized LtxA was not removed with NaCl treatment and protease protection experiments revealed that approximately 10 kDa of LtxA is exposed. We purified secreted LtxA from NJ4500 and found that the specific activity of this toxin was greater than that of secreted LtxA from JP2. For other RTX toxins, fatty acid modification affects toxin activity, and A. actinomycetemcomitans LtxA is predicted to be modified. We show by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis that NJ4500 LtxA is more highly modified than JP2 LtxA, suggesting that the difference in activities could be due to differential modification. Studies of A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis should therefore consider LtxA from clinical isolates.

  9. Introns in the Cytolethal Distending Toxin Gene of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kai Soo; Ong, Grace; Song, Keang Peng

    2005-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genes are interrupted by intervening sequences called introns. Introns are transcribed as part of a precursor RNA that is subsequently removed by splicing, giving rise to mature mRNA. However, introns are rarely found in bacteria. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a periodontal pathogen implicated in aggressive forms of periodontal disease. This organism has been shown to produce cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), which causes sensitive eukaryotic cells to become irreversibly blocked at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. In this study, we report the presence of introns within the cdt gene of A. actinomycetemcomitans. By use of reverse transcription-PCR, cdt transcripts of 2.123, 1.572, and 0.882 kb (RTA1, RTA2, and RTA3, respectively) were detected. In contrast, a single 2.123-kb amplicon was obtained by PCR with the genomic DNA. Similar results were obtained when a plasmid carrying cdt was cloned into Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis of RTA1, RTA2, and RTA3 revealed that RTA1 had undergone splicing, giving rise to RTA2 and RTA3. Two exon-intron boundaries, or splice sites, were identified at positions 863 to 868 and 1553 to 1558 of RTA1. Site-directed and deletion mutation studies of the splice site sequence indicated that sequence conservation was important in order for accurate splicing to occur. The catalytic region of the cdt RNA was located within the cdtC gene. This 0.56-kb RNA behaved independently as a catalytically active RNA molecule (a ribozyme) in vitro, capable of splicing heterologous RNA in both cis and trans configurations. PMID:15629928

  10. The gingival immune response to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hall, E R; Falkler, W A; Martin, S A; Suzuki, J B

    1991-12-01

    The established and advanced lesions of juvenile periodontitis-localized form (JP) are predominated by B-lymphocytes and plasma cells. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.) is implicated as a primary etiologic agent in JP. An in vitro gingival explant culture system was utilized to study the specificity of immunoglobulins produced by diseased JP tissues. A dot-immunobinding assay demonstrated that 46% of the supernatant fluids (SF) from explant cultures of diseased tissues (n = 39) were positive for the presence of antibody to A.a. Y4, while 61% of autologous JP sera (n = 39) tested positive. For rapidly progressive (RP) and adult periodontitis (AP) SF, 50% and 40% were positive for A.a. Y4, respectively. Seventeen percent of SF from healthy tissue were positive for A.a. Y4. There was no significant difference between JP SF reactivities to A.a. Y4 when compared to reactivities of SF from AP and RP patients. Only 10% of JP SF were positive for Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, a non-oral control microorganism. The de novo biosynthesis of antibody in JP tissue, reactive with A.a. Y4, was demonstrated with Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG (SPAG) and the use of a dot-immunobinding assay and autoradiography. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of the synthesis and specificity of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients. PMID:1765941

  11. Interaction of Pasteurella multocida with free-living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Matthew J; Ruffolo, Carmel G

    2005-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a highly infectious, facultative intracellular bacterium which causes fowl cholera in birds. This study reports, for the first time, the observed interaction between P. multocida and free-living amoebae. Amoebal trophozoites were coinfected with fowl-cholera-causing P. multocida strain X-73 that expressed the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, GFP expressing X-73 was located within the trophozoite. Transmission electron microscopy of coinfection preparations revealed clusters of intact X-73 cells in membrane-bound vacuoles within the trophozoite cytoplasm. A coinfection assay employing gentamicin to kill extracellular bacteria was used to assess the survival and replication of P. multocida within amoebae. In the presence of amoebae, the number of recoverable intracellular X-73 cells increased over a 24-h period; in contrast, X-73 cultured alone in assay medium showed a consistent decline in growth. Cytotoxicity assays and microscopy showed that X-73 was able to lyse and exit the amoebal cells approximately 18 h after coinfection. The observed interaction between P. multocida and amoebae can be considered as an infective process as the bacterium was able to invade, survive, replicate, and lyse the amoebal host. This raises the possibility that similar interactions occur in vivo between P. multocida and host cells. Free-living amoebae are ubiquitous within water and soil environments, and P. multocida has been observed to survive within these same ecosystems. Thus, our findings suggest that the interaction between P. multocida and amoebae may occur within the natural environment.

  12. Persistence of Pasteurella multocida in wetlands following avian cholera outbreaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, D.R.; Shadduck, D.J.; Lehr, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Avian cholera, caused by Pasteurella multocida, affects waterbirds across North America and occurs worldwide among various avian species. Once an epizootic begins, contamination of the wetland environment likely facilitates the transmission of P. multocida to susceptible birds. To evaluate the ability of P. multocida serotype-1, the most common serotype associated with avian cholera in waterfowl in western and central North America, to persist in wetlands and to identify environmental factors associated with its persistence, we collected water and sediment samples from 23 wetlands during winters and springs of 1996a??99. These samples were collected during avian cholera outbreaks and for up to 13 wk following initial sampling. We recovered P. multocida from six wetlands that were sampled following the initial outbreaks, but no P. multocida was isolated later than 7 wk after the initial outbreak sampling. We found no significant relationship between the probability of recovery of P. multocida during resampling and the abundance of the bacterium recovered during initial sampling, the substrate from which isolates were collected, isolate virulence, or water quality conditions previously suggested to be related to the abundance or survival of P. multocida. Our results indicate that wetlands are unlikely to serve as a long-term reservoir for P. multocida because the bacterium does not persist in wetlands for long time periods following avian cholera outbreaks.

  13. Pasteurella multocida Involved in Respiratory Disease of Wild Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Köndgen, Sophie; Leider, Michaela; Lankester, Felix; Bethe, Astrid; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ewers, Christa

    2011-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida can cause a variety of diseases in various species of mammals and birds throughout the world but nothing is known about its importance for wild great apes. In this study we isolated P. multocida from wild living, habituated chimpanzees from Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. Isolates originated from two chimpanzees that died during a respiratory disease outbreak in 2004 as well as from one individual that developed chronic air-sacculitis following this outbreak. Four isolates were subjected to a full phenotypic and molecular characterisation. Two different clones were identified using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) enabled the identification of previous unknown alleles and two new sequence types, ST68 and ST69, were assigned. Phylogenetic analysis of the superoxide dismutase (sodA) gene and concatenated sequences from seven MLST-housekeeping genes showed close clustering within known P. multocida isolated from various hosts and geographic locations. Due to the clinical relevance of the strains described here, these results make an important contribution to our knowledge of pathogens involved in lethal disease outbreaks among endangered great apes. PMID:21931664

  14. Comparison of methods to detect Pasteurella multocida in carrier waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Johnson, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted laboratory challenge trials using mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) to compare methods for detecting carriers of Pasteurella multocida, the bacterium that causes avian cholera, in wild birds. Birds that survived the initial infection were euthanized at 2-4 wk intervals up to 14 wk post challenge. Isolates of P. multocida were obtained at necropsy from 23% of the birds that survived initial infection. We found that swab samples (oral, cloacal, nasal, eye, and leg joint) were most effective for detecting carrier birds up to 14 wk post infection. No detectable differences in isolation were observed for samples stored in either 10% dimethysulfoxide or brain heart infusion broth. The frequency of detecting carriers in our challenge trials appeared to be related to mortality rates observed during the trial, but was not related to a number of other factors including time after challenge, time delays in collecting tissues postmortem, and route of infection. In our trials, there was little association between antibody levels and carrier status. We concluded that swabs samples collected from recently dead birds, stored in liquid nitrogen, and processed using selective broth provide a feasible field method for detecting P. multocida carriers in wild waterfowl.

  15. Binding of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin to bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J F; Leite, F; Czuprynski, C J

    1997-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is the principal bacterial pathogen in the bovine respiratory disease complex. This organism produces an exotoxin (referred to as leukotoxin) during logarithmic-phase growth that is a potent leukocyte-modulating agent. At low concentrations, it activates neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes to release inflammatory mediators, while at the same time making these cells destined to undergo apoptotic cell death. At higher concentrations, the toxin causes rapid swelling and loss of cell viability. In this study, we demonstrated that toxin binding can be directly evaluated by flow cytometry with biologically active biotinylated leukotoxin. Leukotoxin binding was blocked by the addition of a neutralizing anti-leukotoxin monoclonal antibody and was not detected when bovine leukocytes were incubated with culture filtrates from a mutant strain of P. haemolytica that does not produce biologically active leukotoxin. In addition, treatment of bovine leukocytes with protease K eliminated subsequent binding of leukotoxin, suggesting that there is a protein on the leukocyte surface that is either a leukotoxin binding site or is required for stabilization of leukotoxin binding. We did not detect binding of biotinylated leukotoxin to porcine or human leukocytes, which have been reported previously to be resistant to the lytic effects of the leukotoxin. These findings suggest that there may be a specific binding site for P. haemolytica leukotoxin on bovine but not on porcine or human leukocytes and that it might be involved in the activation and lytic activities of the leukotoxin. PMID:9284143

  16. Pasteurella haemolytica antigens associated with resistance to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Simons, K R; Confer, A W; Panciera, R J; Clinkenbeard, K D

    1989-01-01

    Antigens associated with whole Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A serotype 1, a capsular carbohydrate-protein extract of the organism, and P. haemolytica leukotoxin were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antigens of the electrophoresed preparations were detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with sera from cattle which were either nonvaccinated or vaccinated with live or killed P. haemolytica vaccines and had variable degrees of resistance to experimental pneumonic pasteurellosis. Distinct, easily recognizable antigens of these preparations were identified, and the antibody responses to these antigens were quantified by densitometry. To determine their importance to disease resistance, we then compared antibody responses with experimental lesion scores. Antibody reactivity to surface antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and present in two or more of the preparations were detected at 86, 66, 51, 49, 34, 31, and 16 kilodaltons (kDa). Of these, antibody responses to antigens at 86, 49, and 31 kDa appeared most important based on their concentration and significance levels. Antibody reactivity to leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and common with important surface antigens were detected at 86, 66, and 49 kDa. Antibody responses to unique leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance were present at 92 and 58 kDa. Images PMID:2917783

  17. Antigenic and virulence properties of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Petras, S F; Chidambaram, M; Illyes, E F; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M; Reese, C P

    1995-01-01

    Antigenic properties of two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica, strains 59B0071 and 59B0072, that do not produce detectable leukotoxin were investigated. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with a number of polyclonal sera from animals recovering from pasteurellosis revealed that both mutants secreted a variety of antigens that were also present in cultures of several wild-type strains. These antigens ranged from about 100 to 15 kDa. Mutant strain 59B0071 was found to be totally deficient in leukotoxin, as judged not only by Western blotting but also by cytotoxicity assays with bovine lymphoma (BL-3) cells or bovine polymorphonuclear cells as targets. The mutant strain 59B0071 had normal levels of a secreted sialylglycoprotease, however. When strains were tested for virulence in goat and cattle challenge experiments, a reduction in mortality and lung lesions was observed with the mutant 59B0071 in comparison with results obtained with wild-type strains. These results are consistent with an important role for leukotoxin in P. haemolytica virulence and suggest that leukotoxin-negative mutants may be useful tools in the investigation of other virulence properties involved in P. haemolytica infections. PMID:7868224

  18. Pasteurella haemolytica bacteriophage: identification, partial characterization, and relationship of temperate bacteriophages from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, A.B.; Renshaw, H.W.; Sneed, L.W.

    1985-05-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) isolates (n = 15) from the upper respiratory tract of clinically normal cattle, as well as from lung lesions from cases of fatal bovine pasteurellosis, were examined for the presence of bacteriophage after irradiation with UV light. Treatment of all P haemolytica isolates with UV irradiation resulted in lysis of bacteria due to the induction of vegetative development of bacteriophages. The extent of growth inhibition and bacterial lysis in irradiated cultures was UV dose-dependent. Bacterial cultures exposed to UV light for 20 s reached peak culture density between 60 and 70 minutes after irradiation; thereafter, culture density declined rapidly, so that by 120 minutes, it was approximately 60% of the original value. When examined ultrastructurally, lytic cultures from each isolate revealed bacteriophages with an overall length of approximately 200 nm and that appeared to have a head with icosahedral symmetry and a contractile tail. Cell-free filtrate from each noninduced bacterial isolate was inoculated onto the other bacterial isolates in a cross-culture sensitivity assay for the presence of phages lytic for the host bacterial isolates. Zones of lysis (plaques) did not develop when bacterial lawns grown from the different isolates were inoculated with filtrates from the heterologous isolates.

  19. Morphology and ultrastructure of oral strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Selected human oral and nonoral strains of the genera Actinobacillus and Haemophilus were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The strains examined were morphologically identical to recognized Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus. By transmission electron microscopy, the cells were typically gram negative in morphology, with several strains possessing some extracellular ruthenium red-staining polymeric material. Numerous vesicular structures, morphologically identical to lipopolysaccharide vesicles, were seen to originate from and be continuous with the surface of the outer membrane. Large numbers of these vesicles were also found in the external environment. Scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that both actinobacilli and haemophili possessed surface projections and an amorphous surface material which connected and covered adjacent cells. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:7439996

  20. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Pasteurella multocida Infection

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Antonio; Dincman, Toros; Clyburn, Benjamin E.; Steed, Lisa L.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pasteurella multocida, a zoonotic infectious organism, has most often been described in patients after an animal bite. Here, we characterize the clinical features and outcomes of P multocida infection in a large cohort of patients according to the presence or absence of an animal bite. We retrospectively searched MUSC's laboratory information system for all patients with positive P multocida cultures from 2000 to 2014. Extensive data were abstracted, including clinical and outcome data. The Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was used to assess comorbidities among patients. We identified 44 patients with P multocida infections, including 25 with an animal bite. The average age was 64 years and the majority of patients were women (N = 30). There was no difference in age and sex distribution among those with and without a bite (P = 0.38 and 0.75, respectively). A CCI ≥1 was significantly associated with the absence of a bite (P = 0.006). Patients presenting without a bite were more frequently bacteremic (37% vs 4%, respectively, P = 0.001), and were hospitalized more often (84% vs 44%, respectively, P = 0.012). Of the 8 patients who required intensive care unit (ICU)-based care, 7 were non-bite-related. There were 4 deaths, all occurring in patients not bitten. P multocida infections not associated with an animal bite were often associated with bacteremia, severe comorbidity(ies), immune-incompetent states, the need for ICU management, and were associated with substantial mortality. PMID:26356688

  1. Regulation of expression of the Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Strathdee, C A; Lo, R Y

    1989-01-01

    The Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin determinant is composed of four contiguous genes encoded on the same DNA strand and denoted lktCABD, in the order of their genetic organization. To gain a better understanding of the expression and regulation of the leukotoxin, the transcripts and promoters of the lkt determinant were mapped. Northern (RNA) blot analysis revealed two sets of transcripts. One set was 3.7 and 3.4 kilobases long, encoded lktCA, and comprised approximately 90% of the transcripts, whereas the other set was 7.4 and 7.1 kilobases long and encoded lktCABD. Two promoters were present, and each had features similar to the Escherichia coli consensus promoter sequences. Both promoters were located upstream from lktC; they were separated by 258 base pairs, as mapped by primer extension analysis. These results suggest a mechanism of expression similar to that of the related E. coli hemolysin. Transcription initiated upstream from lktC at either promoter and continued through lktC and lktA to a rho-independent transcriptional termination signal in the lktA-lktB intercistronic region. This signal attenuated expression by terminating 90% of transcription to generate the 3.7- and 3.4-kilobase lktCA transcripts. The remaining readthrough transcription generated full-length 7.4- and 7.1-kilobase lktCABD transcripts. Expression of the leukotoxin was greatly reduced by growth at 30 degrees C, pH 6.5, and Fe2+ limitation. These conditions also modulated the expression of a number of other secreted proteins, which suggests that all of these secreted proteins are controlled by the same regulatory mechanism. Images PMID:2478522

  2. 9 CFR 113.116 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in 9 CFR 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 4 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... (Little and Lyons classification) and observed daily for a 14-day postchallenge period. Only dead...

  3. 9 CFR 113.116 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in 9 CFR 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 4 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... (Little and Lyons classification) and observed daily for a 14-day postchallenge period. Only dead...

  4. 9 CFR 113.116 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in 9 CFR 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 4 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... (Little and Lyons classification) and observed daily for a 14-day postchallenge period. Only dead...

  5. 9 CFR 113.116 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... viable bacteria and fungi as provided in 9 CFR 113.26. (b) Safety test. Observation of the vaccinated... Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 4 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated... (Little and Lyons classification) and observed daily for a 14-day postchallenge period. Only dead...

  6. Pasteurella species peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis: Household pets as a risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Poliquin, Philippe Guillaume; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Verrelli, Mauro; Allen, David W; Embil, John M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pasteurella species are Gram-negative coccobacilli that are a part of the normal oropharyngeal flora of numerous domestic animals. They have been recognized as a rare but significant cause of peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). A consensus about management strategies for PD-associated peritonitis caused by Pasteurella species currently does not exist. METHODS: The microbiological database serving the Manitoba Renal Program was searched from 1997 to 2013 for cases of Pasteurella species PD-associated peritonitis, and charts were reviewed. PubMed was searched for case reports and data were abstracted. RESULTS: Seven new local cases and 30 previously reported cases were analyzed. This infection is clinically similar to other forms of PD peritonitis, with household pet exposure appearing to be the strongest risk factor. Cats are the most commonly implicated pet. Direct contact between the pet and the equipment was commonly reported (25 of 37 patients) but was not necessary for infection to develop. The mean duration of treatment was 15 days. Complication rates were low, with only 11% of patients requiring PD catheter removal. There was no mortality reported. CONCLUSION: Pasteurella species are a rare cause of PD-associated peritonitis that can be successfully treated with a two-week course of intraperitoneal antibiotics with a high likelihood of catheter salvage. PMID:25798157

  7. Proximity-dependent inhibition of growth of mannheimia haemolytica by pasteurella multocida.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. hae...

  8. Combination fibrinolytic therapy in the treatment of chronic septic pleuropneumonia in a Thoroughbred gelding.

    PubMed

    Rendle, D I; Armstrong, S K; Hughes, K J

    2012-09-01

    This report documents the treatment of a case of chronic pleuropneumonia in a 3-year-old Thoroughbred gelding. A recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tenecteplase) and a recombinant deoxyribonucleic acidase (alphadornase) were infused into the pleural cavity as adjunctive therapy in the early stages of treatment. Instillation of fibrinolytic drugs was associated with a subjective reduction in the amount of fibrin deposition and decreased fluid accumulation within the pleural cavities. Fibrinolytic therapy may be a useful adjunctive therapy in selected cases of intrapleural disease in horses. PMID:22928684

  9. Antigenic properties of pleuropneumonia-like organisms from tissue cell cultures and the human genital area.

    PubMed

    BAILEY, J S; CLARK, H W; FELTS, W R; FOWLER, R C; BROWN, T M

    1961-10-01

    Bailey, Jack S. (George Washington University, Washington, D. C.), Harold W. Clark, William R. Felts, Richard C. Fowler, and Thomas McP. Brown. Antigenic properties of pleuropneumonia-like organisms from tissue cell cultures and the human genital area. J. Bacteriol. 82:542-547. 1961.-Antigens were prepared from several tissue culture and human genital strains of pleuropneumonia-like organisms (PPLO) by a method utilizing continuous agitation of the incubating cultures. Antisera were produced in rabbits by intravenous injection of suspensions of these organisms standardized turbidimetrically. The antigenic properties of the selected strains were compared by agglutination techniques supplemented by a test based upon the inhibition of growth of PPLO by specific antisera.The majority of tissue culture strains of PPLO studied, including contaminants from several HeLa cell lines, appeared to be antigenically similar to the human type 1 strains. However, one strain (Sp-1) from a HeLa cell line was found to be related to the human type 2 PPLO.

  10. Pasteurella multocida: a nightmare for a replaced joint and the challenge to save it.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Felipe A; Laboy Ortíz, Iván Enrique; López, Reynaldo; Sánchez, Alfredo; Colón, Miguel; Hernán Martínez, José

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida a small gram-negative coccobacilli is primarily found as normal flora of cats and dogs. These organisms can cause a variety of infections in humans, usually the result of scratches, bites and licks by percutaneous inoculation of the organism. Most cases of septic arthritis involve a cat or dog bite distal to the involved joint without direct penetrating injury to the joint. On scenarios were Pasteurella infection is suspected within a prosthetic joint, aggressive surgical debridement and/or removal of the prosthesis with intravenous antibiotics is recommended. Prosthetic joint infections secondary to animal bites are an extremely rare complication and few cases have been reported in the literature. This is a case report of a patient that suffered a cat's bite of his right prosthetic knee and against all odd was able to save it without surgical intervention.

  11. Effect of Aerosol Age on the Infectivity of Airborne Pasteurella tularensis for Macaca mulatta and Man

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, William D.; Jemski, Joseph V.; Hogge, Arthur L.; Eigelsbach, Henry T.; Wolfe, Elwood K.; Dangerfield, Harry G.; Gochenour, William S.; Crozier, Dan

    1966-01-01

    Sawyer, William D. (U.S. Army Medical Unit, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Joseph V. Jemski, Arthur L. Hogge, Jr., Henry T. Eigelsbach, Elwood K. Wolfe, Harry G. Dangerfield, William S. Gochenour, Jr., and Dan Crozier. Effect of aerosol age on the infectivity of airborne Pasteurella tularensis for Macaca mulatta and man. J. Bacteriol. 91:2180–2184. 1966.—In aging aerosols of Pasteurella tularensis SCHU-S4, the respiratory infectivity for man and Macaca mulatta decreased more rapidly than the viability of the organisms. Infectivity was diminished after 120 min, and was reduced 10-fold after 180 min. These findings confirmed previous observations made in mice and guinea pigs, and also revealed that smaller losses of infectivity were detectable in the primate hosts. PMID:4957611

  12. In Vitro Activities of Garenoxacin (BMS-284756) against 170 Clinical Isolates of Nine Pasteurella Species

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

    2002-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 170 clinical isolates plus 12 American Type Culture Collection strains of Pasteurella species comprising nine species and three Pasteurella multocida subspecies were studied by an agar dilution method. Garenoxacin (BMS-284756), a new des-fluoro(6) quinolone, was active at ≤0.06 μg/ml against all isolates, including four β-lactamase-producing strains, with >90% of the strains susceptible to ≤0.008 μg/ml. Garenoxacin was generally 1 to 2 dilutions more active than levofloxacin and moxifloxacin and was the most active agent tested. Cefoxitin required 1 μg/ml for inhibition of 51 of 182 (29%) of strains, and 3 strains (also β-lactamase producers) were resistant to doxycycline. PMID:12183274

  13. Recovery of Pasteurella hemolytica from aerosols at differing temperature and humidity.

    PubMed Central

    Jericho, K W; Langford, E V; Pantekoek, J

    1977-01-01

    A Pasteurella hemolytica suspension with fetal calf serum was aerosolized in a standard system with ambient temperature of 30 or 2 degrees C and relative humidity conditions of 90 or 60%. The number of organisms sprayed in five minutes and the number recovered from one third of the aerosol during these five minutes was determined. Recoveries were influenced by temperature difference between aerosol and collecting fluid. Recoveries ranged between 0.059--0.94%. Images Fig. 1. PMID:861840

  14. A new selective enrichment procedure for isolating Pasteurella multocida from avian and environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.K.; Cicnjak-Chubbs, L.; Gates, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    A selective enrichment procedure, using two new selective media, was developed to isolate Pasteurella multocida from wild birds and environmental samples. These media were developed by testing 15 selective agents with six isolates of P. multocida from wild avian origin and seven other bacteria representing genera frequently found in environmental and avian samples. The resulting media—Pasteurella multocida selective enrichment broth and Pasteurella multocida selective agar—consisted of a blood agar medium at pH 10 containing gentamicin, potassium tellurite, and amphotericin B. Media were tested to determine: 1) selectivity when attempting isolation from pond water and avian carcasses, 2) sensitivity for detection of low numbers of P. multocida from pure and mixed cultures, 3) host range specificity of the media, and 4) performance compared with standard blood agar. With the new selective enrichment procedure, P. multocida was isolated from inoculated (60 organisms/ml) pond water 84% of the time, whereas when standard blood agar was used, the recovery rate was 0%.

  15. Production of succinic acid from oil palm empty fruit bunch cellulose using Actinobacillus succinogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasma, Satriani Aga; Daik, Rusli; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof

    2013-11-01

    Succinic acid is a common metabolite in plants, animals and microorganisms. It has been used widely in agricultural, food and pharmaceutical industries. Enzymatic hydrolysate glucose from oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) cellulose was used as a substrate for succinic acid production using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Using cellulose extraction from OPEFB can enhance the production of glucose as a main substrate for succinic acid production. The highest concentration of glucose produced from enzymatic hydrolysis is 167 mg/mL and the sugar recovery is 0.73 g/g of OPEFB. By optimizing the culture medium for succinic acid fermentation with enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose, the nitrogen sources could be reduced to just only 2.5 g yeast extract and 2.5 g corn step liquor. Batch fermentation was carried out using enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose with yeast extract, corn steep liquor and the salts mixture, 23.5 g/L succinic acid was obtained with consumption of 72 g/L glucose in enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose at 38 hours and 37°C. This study suggests that enzymatic hydrolysate of OPEFB cellulose maybe an alternative substrate for the efficient production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Shunfu; Xu, Yongbin; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2008-05-01

    A periplasmic membrane-fusion protein MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria, was crystallized. Periplasmic membrane-fusion proteins (MFPs) are an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. They play a crucial role in bridging the outer membrane porin TolC and two distinct types of inner membrane transporters. The MFP MacA bridges the inner membrane ABC-type multidrug transporter MacB and the outer membrane porin TolC. MacA from the pathogenic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was expressed in Escherichia coli B834 (DE3) and the recombinant protein was purified using Ni–NTA affinity, Q anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The purified MacA protein was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A MAD diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å at 100 K. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.2, c = 255.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and contains one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  17. Fatal transmission of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia to an Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx).

    PubMed

    Chaber, A L; Lignereux, L; Al Qassimi, M; Saegerman, C; Manso-Silván, L; Dupuy, V; Thiaucourt, F

    2014-09-17

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is an infectious respiratory disease mainly affecting domestic goats. As CCPP has never been documented in grazing antelopes (subfamily hippotraginae), they were not considered susceptible. Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) was isolated from pleural liquid collected during the necropsy of a severely emaciated Arabian oryx with mild nasal discharge. The Mccp isolate was then genotyped using a multilocus sequence scheme; the sequence type was identical to the Mccp strain previously identified in a sand gazelle from a nearby enclosure. This case shows for the first time that members of the hippotraginae subfamily, here the Arabian oryx, can be affected by CCPP. In addition, genotyping shows that the oryx was most probably infected, at a distance, by sand gazelles.

  18. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Streptococcus halichoeri from a European badger (Meles meles) with pyogranulomatous pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, B; Bolea, R; Morales, M; Martín-Burriel, I; González, Ch; Badiola, J J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies in European badgers (Meles meles) are limited. Badgers play a significant role in the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in some countries and an accurate diagnosis is needed for this infection. However, the lesions of bovine TB are similar to those associated with other pathogens, making pathological diagnosis difficult. In the present study, Streptococcus halichoeri was isolated from a European badger with pyogranulomatous pleuropneumonia and suspected of having tuberculosis. TB and other pathogens able to induce similar lesions were ruled out. Comparative 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing studies showed an identity of 99.51% and 98.28%, respectively, with S. halichoeri. This report represents the third description of this bacterium and the first in an animal species other than the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus). It also shows that S. halichoeri can be associated with a pathological process characterized by granulomatous inflammation and resembling tuberculosis.

  19. Fatal transmission of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia to an Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx).

    PubMed

    Chaber, A L; Lignereux, L; Al Qassimi, M; Saegerman, C; Manso-Silván, L; Dupuy, V; Thiaucourt, F

    2014-09-17

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is an infectious respiratory disease mainly affecting domestic goats. As CCPP has never been documented in grazing antelopes (subfamily hippotraginae), they were not considered susceptible. Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) was isolated from pleural liquid collected during the necropsy of a severely emaciated Arabian oryx with mild nasal discharge. The Mccp isolate was then genotyped using a multilocus sequence scheme; the sequence type was identical to the Mccp strain previously identified in a sand gazelle from a nearby enclosure. This case shows for the first time that members of the hippotraginae subfamily, here the Arabian oryx, can be affected by CCPP. In addition, genotyping shows that the oryx was most probably infected, at a distance, by sand gazelles. PMID:25069622

  20. Evaluation of the xerovac process for the preparation of heat tolerant contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Litamoi, J K; Ayelet, G; Rweyemamu, M M

    2005-04-01

    The study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the xerovac process as a method for preparing contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) vaccine with increased heat resistance. The thermo-protective effects of various concentrations of trehalose in mycoplasma growth medium, various concentrations of trehalose in the dehydration stabilizer and the importance of some divalent cations were assessed. The results obtained indicate that a rapid dehydration of CBPP vaccine following the xerovac method and in an excipient composed of a high concentration of trehalose, renders the product more heat tolerant than a similar vaccine prepared using a regular or an extended freeze drying regime. It was also demonstrated that the addition of chitosan as a mycoplasma precipitating agent conferred additional heat resistance to the vaccine. It is suggested that the application of the xerovac process in the dehydration of CBPP vaccine offers the advantages of a faster, cheaper and easier process over the conventional dehydration methods like freeze drying.

  1. Phylogeny of 54 representative strains of species in the family Pasteurellaceae as determined by comparison of 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, F E; Paster, B J; Olsen, I; Fraser, G J

    1992-01-01

    Virtually complete 16S rRNA sequences were determined for 54 representative strains of species in the family Pasteurellaceae. Of these strains, 15 were Pasteurella, 16 were Actinobacillus, and 23 were Haemophilus. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on sequence similarity, using the Neighbor-Joining method. Fifty-three of the strains fell within four large clusters. The first cluster included the type strains of Haemophilus influenzae, H. aegyptius, H. aphrophilus, H. haemolyticus, H. paraphrophilus, H. segnis, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. This cluster also contained A. actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4, ATCC 29522, ATCC 29523, and ATCC 29524 and H. aphrophilus NCTC 7901. The second cluster included the type strains of A. seminis and Pasteurella aerogenes and H. somnus OVCG 43826. The third cluster was composed of the type strains of Pasteurella multocida, P. anatis, P. avium, P. canis, P. dagmatis, P. gallinarum, P. langaa, P. stomatis, P. volantium, H. haemoglobinophilus, H. parasuis, H. paracuniculus, H. paragallinarum, and A. capsulatus. This cluster also contained Pasteurella species A CCUG 18782, Pasteurella species B CCUG 19974, Haemophilus taxon C CAPM 5111, H. parasuis type 5 Nagasaki, P. volantium (H. parainfluenzae) NCTC 4101, and P. trehalosi NCTC 10624. The fourth cluster included the type strains of Actinobacillus lignieresii, A. equuli, A. pleuropneumoniae, A. suis, A. ureae, H. parahaemolyticus, H. parainfluenzae, H. paraphrohaemolyticus, H. ducreyi, and P. haemolytica. This cluster also contained Actinobacillus species strain CCUG 19799 (Bisgaard taxon 11), A. suis ATCC 15557, H. ducreyi ATCC 27722 and HD 35000, Haemophilus minor group strain 202, and H. parainfluenzae ATCC 29242. The type strain of P. pneumotropica branched alone to form a fifth group. The branching of the Pasteurellaceae family tree was quite complex. The four major clusters contained multiple subclusters. The clusters contained both rapidly and slowly evolving

  2. Characterization of an outer membrane protein of Pasteurella multocida belonging to the OmpA family.

    PubMed

    Marandi, M; Mittal, K R

    1996-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicle and N-lauroylsarcosine-insoluble protein preparations of Pasteurella multocida 656 were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A major outer membrane protein (OMP) was found to be heat-modifiable, having a molecular mass of 28 kDa when the OMP preparation was solubilized at 60 degrees C and a molecular mass of 37 kDa when it was solubilized at 100 degrees C. A monoclonal antibody, designated mAb MT4.1, was generated against heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida. This mAb reacted with the heat-modifiable OMP irrespective of the temperature at which it was solubilized, as demonstrated by immunoblot results. The heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida showed a significant N-terminal amino acid sequence homology with OmpA family. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that the mAb Mt4.1 epitope was not surface exposed on the intact bacterium. The mAb MT4.1 reacted with all the reference strains of 5 capsular and 16 somatic serotypes, as well as with 75 field strains of P. multocida in immunoblot assay. This mAb MT4.1 also reacted with strains of various other Pasteurella species such as P. stomatis, P. aerogenes P. gallinarum, P. betti, P. sp, B, P. SP-g and P. canis, but not with strains of 12 other Gram-negative bacteria. These results indicated that this protein carried a genus-specific epitope and mAb MT4.1 may be useful for identification of Pasteurella species. This is the first report in which a major heat-modifiable OMP has been identified and characterized using a mAb, and has been shown belonging to the OmpA family. PMID:9008341

  3. Detection of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica antigens by an immunoperoxidase technique in pneumonic ovine lungs.

    PubMed

    Haziroglu, R; Diker, K S; Turkarslan, J; Gulbahar, M Y

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred twenty pneumonic lungs from lambs were examined for Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica by an immunoperoxidase technique using an extravidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Histologic examination of tissue sections revealed strong positive reactions in 60.9% and 68.3% of the lungs against M. ovipneumoniae and P. haemolytica, respectively. M. ovipneumoniae and P. haemolytica antigens were observed at the surface and/or within the epithelial cells, macrophages, leucocytes, and bronchiolar exudate. The location of M. ovipneumoniae in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells and P. haemolytica in the neutrophils was detected immunohistochemically.

  4. Backbone and side-chain resonance assignments of the membrane localization domain from Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Geissler, Brett; Hisao, Grant S; Satchell, Karla J F; Wilson, Brenda A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2014-04-01

    (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments are presented for the isolated four-helical bundle membrane localization domain (MLD) from Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) in its solution state. We have assigned 99% of all backbone and side-chain carbon atoms, including 99% of all backbone residues excluding proline amide nitrogens. Secondary chemical shift analysis using TALOS+ demonstrates four helices, which align with those observed within the MLD in the crystal structure of the C-terminus of PMT (PDB 2EBF) and confirm the use of the available crystal structures as templates for the isolated MLDs.

  5. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 isolated from a lesser snow goose: evidence of a carrier state.

    PubMed

    Samuel, M D; Goldberg, D R; Shadduck, D J; Price, J I; Cooch, E G

    1997-04-01

    Pharyngeal swabs were collected from 298 lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) at Banks Island (Northwest Territories. Canada) in the summer of 1994. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 was isolated from an adult male bird and P. multocida serotype 3 was isolated from an adult female goose. Pathogenicity of the serotype 1 isolate was confirmed by inoculation in Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). The serotype 3 isolate was non-pathogenic in Pekin ducks. This is the first documented isolation of pathogenic P. multocida serotype 1 from apparently healthy wild snow geese. PMID:9131570

  6. Pasteurella anatipestifer as a cause of mortality in captive wild waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Karstad, L; Lusis, P; Long, J R

    1970-10-01

    An outbreak of Pasteurella anatipestifer infection in young wild waterfowl at the Niska Waterfowl Research Center resulted in losses of approximately 100 Blue and Snow Geese, one White-fronted Goose, five Mandarin Ducks, one Black Duck and one Wood Duck. Clinical signs included diarrhea, paralysis and tremors. Gross lesions were fibrin deposits on serosal surfaces, hemorrhages on the epicardium, consolidation of the lungs, cloudy or flaky deposits on the air sacs, and dark, swollen spleens. Microscopic lesions included fibrinous meningitis, pneumonitis, air saculitis and serositis. Swollen leg and foot joints were seen in some cases. Chloramphenicol treatment seemed to be of benefit in controlling the outbreak. PMID:16512147

  7. Production and characterization of streptomycin dependent mutants of Pasteurella multocida from bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    de Alwis, M C; Carter, G R; Chengappa, M M

    1980-01-01

    A large number of streptomycin dependent mutants were produced from bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia strains of Pasteurella multocida. The mutants required a minimum concentration of 25-50 microgram/mL streptomycin for growth and tolerated a concentration of 200 mg/mL. These mutants were avirulent to mice, when inoculated alone, but some mutants killed mice when inoculated with streptomycin. Biochemically all mutants were uniform and similar to the wild type. Most mutants were stable, but a few produced streptomycin independent revertants. The rate of reversion varied with each mutant. Most revertants were highly virulent for mice, some totally avirulant and a few relatively avirulent. PMID:6778598

  8. Evaluation of three oil-adjuvant vaccines against Pasteurella multocida in buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Muneer, R; Akhtar, S; Afzal, M

    1994-09-01

    Three oil-adjuvant vaccines of Pasteurella multocida 6:B were evaluated with respect to the level and duration of the humoral immune response produced in buffalo calves. Preparation 1 was a water-in-oil emulsion containing Marcol 52, Montanide 888 and antigen at a ratio of 6:1:3. Preparation 2 was a double emulsion containing Marcol 52, Arlacel A and Tween 80 in addition to antigen. Preparation 3 contained alpha-d-tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E), Montanide 888 and antigen. All three preparations induced a similar sustained immune response in buffalo calves beyond 270 days post-vaccination.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Actinobacillus equuli subspecies equuli ATCC 19392T

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus equuli subsp. equuli is a member of the family Pasteurellaceae that is a common resident of the oral cavity and alimentary tract of healthy horses. At the same time, it can also cause a fatal septicemia in foals, commonly known as sleepy foal disease or joint ill disease. In addition, A. equuli subsp. equuli has recently been reported to act as a primary pathogen in breeding sows and piglets. To better understand how A. equuli subsp. equuli can cause disease, the genome of the type strain of A. equuli subsp. equuli, ATCC 19392T, was sequenced using the PacBio RSII sequencing system. Its genome is comprised of 2,431,533 bp and is predicted to encode 2,264 proteins and 82 RNAs. PMID:26203343

  10. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in Brazilian insulin-dependent individuals with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, A C; de Uzeda, M; Novaes, A B

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in subgingival plaque specimens from 26 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients, 11-25 years of age, was determined between January 1987 and December 1989. One hundred and thirty subgingival plaque samples were collected with sterile periodontal curettes. The specimens were weighted, diluted, inoculated on trypticase-soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin agar medium (TSBV) and incubated under microacrophilic conditions. Aa was isolated from 2.3% of healthy periodontal areas in these patients, while the microorganism was found in 12.5% of the sites with gingivitis and in 2.6% of the periodontal pockets examined. Although biochemical tests used for the characterization of Aa strains showed homogeneous results, different biotypes were isolated from one or more periodontal sites in the same patient.

  11. Characterization of the lipopolysaccharide from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and N27.

    PubMed Central

    Kiley, P; Holt, S C

    1980-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 was isolated by the phenol-water procedure. Morphologically, the molecule consisted of ribbon and branched filaments which comprised 3% of the cellular dry weight. Chemical analysis of the isolated and purified LPSs of both strains showed them to consist of carbohydrate, lipid, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, heptose, hexosamine, and phosphate. The major fatty acids of the lipid A moiety were saturated C14 and beta-OH C14 compounds. Rhamnose, fucose, galactose, glucose, heptose, glucosamine, and galactosamine comprised the monosaccharide portion of the LPS. Biological activity studies revealed both LPS molecules to be active in the Schwartzman reaction and in in vitro 45Ca bone resorption, as well as in macrophage activation and lethality and in platelet aggregation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7228391

  12. Succinic acid production from duckweed (Landoltia punctata) hydrolysate by batch fermentation of Actinobacillus succinogenes GXAS137.

    PubMed

    Shen, Naikun; Wang, Qingyan; Zhu, Jing; Qin, Yan; Liao, Siming; Li, Yi; Zhu, Qixia; Jin, Yanling; Du, Liqin; Huang, Ribo

    2016-07-01

    Duckweed is potentially an ideal succinic acid (SA) feedstock due to its high proportion of starch and low lignin content. Pretreatment methods, substrate content and nitrogen source were investigated to enhance the bioconversion of duckweed to SA and to reduce the costs of production. Results showed that acid hydrolysis was an effective pretreatment method because of its high SA yield. The optimum substrate concentration was 140g/L. The optimum substrate concentration was 140g/L. Corn steep liquor powder could be considered a feasible and inexpensive alternative to yeast extract as a nitrogen source. Approximately 57.85g/L of SA was produced when batch fermentation was conducted in a 1.3L stirred bioreactor. Therefore, inexpensive duckweed can be a promising feedstock for the economical and efficient production of SA through fermentation by Actinobacillus succinogenes GXAS137. PMID:27023386

  13. Succinic acid production from duckweed (Landoltia punctata) hydrolysate by batch fermentation of Actinobacillus succinogenes GXAS137.

    PubMed

    Shen, Naikun; Wang, Qingyan; Zhu, Jing; Qin, Yan; Liao, Siming; Li, Yi; Zhu, Qixia; Jin, Yanling; Du, Liqin; Huang, Ribo

    2016-07-01

    Duckweed is potentially an ideal succinic acid (SA) feedstock due to its high proportion of starch and low lignin content. Pretreatment methods, substrate content and nitrogen source were investigated to enhance the bioconversion of duckweed to SA and to reduce the costs of production. Results showed that acid hydrolysis was an effective pretreatment method because of its high SA yield. The optimum substrate concentration was 140g/L. The optimum substrate concentration was 140g/L. Corn steep liquor powder could be considered a feasible and inexpensive alternative to yeast extract as a nitrogen source. Approximately 57.85g/L of SA was produced when batch fermentation was conducted in a 1.3L stirred bioreactor. Therefore, inexpensive duckweed can be a promising feedstock for the economical and efficient production of SA through fermentation by Actinobacillus succinogenes GXAS137.

  14. Succinic acid production from corn stover by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Pu; Fang, Lin; Xu, Yan; Dong, Jin-Jun; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhi-Hao

    2010-10-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) technique was applied for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes in a 5-l stirred bioreactor with corn stover as the raw material. The process parameters of SSF, including corn stover pretreatment condition, substrate concentration, enzyme loading and fermentation temperature were investigated. Results indicated that pretreating corn stover with diluted alkaline was beneficial for the succinic acid production, and succinic acid yield could be significantly increased when adding the cellulase supplemented with cellobiase. The maximal succinic acid concentration and yield could reach 47.4 g/l and 0.72 g/g-substrate, respectively. The corresponding operation conditions were summarized as follows: SSF operation at 38 °C for 48 h, diluted alkaline pretreated corn stover as substrate with concentration of 70 g/l, enzyme loading of 20FPU cellulase and 10 U cellobiase per gram substrate. This result suggested an industrial potential of succinic acid production by using SSF and corn stover.

  15. Isolation of Actinobacillus seminis from a goat with clinical epididymo-orchitis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Fabrine Alexandre; de Azevedo, Edísio Oliveira; de Azevedo, Sérgio Santos; Júnior, Felício Garino; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; de Cássia Peixoto Kim, Pomy; Gomes, Ana Lisa Vale; Alves, Clebert José

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports the first isolation of Actinobacillus seminis from a goat in Brazil. A four-year-old Moxotó breeding goat in a flock of 70 goats and 65 sheep reared together in the county of Patos, semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil, showed clinical signs of unilateral orchitis and epididymitis. Diagnosis of A. seminis infection was confirmed by association of clinical findings, bacterial isolation and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This result suggests that A. seminis may be an additional cause of infertility in goats, and that sheep may be the source of infection because the mixed farming system allows the contact between sheep and goats in the semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil. PMID:24948932

  16. Iron-Chelating Activity of Tetracyclines and Its Impact on the Susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to These Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Daniel; Huot, Marie-Pierre; Mayrand, Denis

    2000-01-01

    Three tetracyclines (tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline) were found to possess iron-chelating activity in a colorimetric siderophore assay. Determination of MICs indicated that the activity of doxycycline against the periodontopathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was only slightly influenced by the presence of an excess of iron that likely saturates the antibiotic. On the other hand, the MICs of doxycycline and minocycline were significantly lower for A. actinomycetemcomitans cultivated under iron-poor conditions than under iron-rich conditions. PMID:10681353

  17. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria associated with porcine respiratory disease in Australia.

    PubMed

    Dayao, Denise Ann E; Gibson, Justine S; Blackall, Patrick J; Turni, Conny

    2014-06-25

    The porcine respiratory disease complex greatly affects the health and production of pigs. While antimicrobial agents are used to treat the respiratory infections caused by bacterial pathogens, there is no current information on antimicrobial resistance in Australian pig respiratory bacterial isolates. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profiles, by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of nine antimicrobial agents for 71 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, 51 Pasteurella multocida and 18 Bordetella bronchiseptica cultured from Australian pigs. The majority of A. pleuropneumoniae isolates were resistant to erythromycin (89%) and tetracycline (75%). Resistance to ampicillin (8.5%), penicillin (8.5%) and tilmicosin (25%) was also identified. The P. multocida isolates exhibited resistance to co-trimoxazole (2%), florfenicol (2%), ampicillin (4%), penicillin (4%), erythromycin (14%) and tetracycline (28%). While all the B. bronchiseptica isolates showed resistance to beta-lactams (ampicillin, ceftiofur and penicillin), some were resistant to erythromycin (94%), florfenicol (6%), tilmicosin (22%) and tetracycline (39%). The incidence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) varied across the species - in B. bronchiseptica, 27.8% of resistant isolates showed MDR, while 9.1% of the resistant isolates in A. pleuropneumoniae, and 4.8% in P. multocida showed MDR. This study illustrated that Australian pig strains of bacterial respiratory pathogens exhibited low levels of resistance to antimicrobial agents commonly used in the pig industry.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria associated with porcine respiratory disease in Australia.

    PubMed

    Dayao, Denise Ann E; Gibson, Justine S; Blackall, Patrick J; Turni, Conny

    2014-06-25

    The porcine respiratory disease complex greatly affects the health and production of pigs. While antimicrobial agents are used to treat the respiratory infections caused by bacterial pathogens, there is no current information on antimicrobial resistance in Australian pig respiratory bacterial isolates. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profiles, by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of nine antimicrobial agents for 71 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, 51 Pasteurella multocida and 18 Bordetella bronchiseptica cultured from Australian pigs. The majority of A. pleuropneumoniae isolates were resistant to erythromycin (89%) and tetracycline (75%). Resistance to ampicillin (8.5%), penicillin (8.5%) and tilmicosin (25%) was also identified. The P. multocida isolates exhibited resistance to co-trimoxazole (2%), florfenicol (2%), ampicillin (4%), penicillin (4%), erythromycin (14%) and tetracycline (28%). While all the B. bronchiseptica isolates showed resistance to beta-lactams (ampicillin, ceftiofur and penicillin), some were resistant to erythromycin (94%), florfenicol (6%), tilmicosin (22%) and tetracycline (39%). The incidence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) varied across the species - in B. bronchiseptica, 27.8% of resistant isolates showed MDR, while 9.1% of the resistant isolates in A. pleuropneumoniae, and 4.8% in P. multocida showed MDR. This study illustrated that Australian pig strains of bacterial respiratory pathogens exhibited low levels of resistance to antimicrobial agents commonly used in the pig industry. PMID:24726505

  19. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis to differentiate isolates of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blehert, D.S.; Jefferson, K.L.; Heisey, D.M.; Samuel, M.D.; Berlowski, B.M.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Avian cholera, an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida, kills thousands of North American wild waterfowl annually. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 isolates cultured during a laboratory challenge study of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and collected from wild birds and environmental samples during avian cholera outbreaks were characterized using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, a whole-genome DNA fingerprinting technique. Comparison of the AFLP profiles of 53 isolates from the laboratory challenge demonstrated that P. multocida underwent genetic changes during a 3-mo period. Analysis of 120 P. multocida serotype 1 isolates collected from wild birds and environmental samples revealed that isolates were distinguishable from one another based on regional and temporal genetic characteristics. Thus, AFLP analysis had the ability to distinguish P. multocida isolates of the same serotype by detecting spatiotemporal genetic changes and provides a tool to advance the study of avian cholera epidemiology. Further application of AFLP technology to the examination of wild bird avian cholera outbreaks may facilitate more effective management of this disease by providing the potential to investigate correlations between virulence and P. multocida genotypes, to identify affiliations between bird species and bacterial genotypes, and to elucidate the role of specific bird species in disease transmission. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  20. The effects of Pasteurella haemolytica lipopolysaccharide on bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the potential role of Pasteurella haemolytica Al lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the pathogenesis of the vascular lesions of pneumonic pasteurellosis. Bovine pulmonary artery endothelia cells (BPAEC) were the test model. The direct toxic potential of P. Haemolytica LPS on BPAEC was examined by cell detachment assays, morphologic alterations, and membrane damage as reflected in the leakage of large internal molecules such as LDH and {sup 51}Cr-labeled molecules. LPS-induced effects having potential for causing indirect vascular damage were studied and included neutrophil-adherence to and arachidonic acid-release from BPAEC. Several substances were examined for their ability to inhibit the LPS-induced cytotoxicity. Pasteurella haemolytica LPS caused direct toxic effects in BPAEC. Cell-detachment, LDH-leakage, {sup 51}Cr-leakage, and {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid-release proceeded with similar time- and dose-dependency after exposure of BPAEC to LPS. Morphologic alterations were observed as early as one-half hour after LPS-exposure and became collectively more severe with time. Neutrophil adherence to BPAEC was increased by LPS through independent effects on both cells types. The adherence required protein synthesis in both cell types.

  1. Challenges of controlling contagious bovine pleuropneumonia in sub-Saharan Africa: a Zambian perspective.

    PubMed

    Muuka, Geoffrey; Songolo, Nadi; Kabilika, Swithine; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Nalubamba, King S; Muma, John B

    2013-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a disease of economic importance that is widely distributed in sub-Saharan African and contributes significantly to cattle morbidity and mortality. Control of CBPP offers a number of challenges as a result many developing countries in Africa are still struggling with this disease. In this study, we look at the challenges encountered in CBPP control in sub-Saharan Africa from the Zambian perspective. In conducting this study, we reviewed scientific literature and reports from the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock and related animal institutions, and also made interviews with experts and key government officials involved in CBPP control in Zambia. Among the challenges identified for the successful control of CBPP were as follows: failure in the delivery of veterinary services, lack of a cattle identification system, natural phenomenon, livestock husbandry systems in the traditional sector, human movements, traditional practices among cattle farmers and cattle marketing systems. It was seen that the epidemiology of CBPP in Zambia is influenced by both ecological and anthological factors. Therefore, design and implementation of any control or eradication programme should be area/regional-dependent taking into account the different factors influencing disease transmission and maintenance.

  2. Demonstration of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. Capripneumoniae and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, small colony type in outbreaks of caprine pleuropneumonia in eastern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kusiluka, L J; Semuguruka, W D; Kazwala, R R; Ojeniy, B; Friis, N F

    2000-01-01

    An outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia involving about 1200 goats in the Coast and Morogoro regions of eastern Tanzania is reported. The major clinical findings were severe respiratory distress, fever, mucopurulent nasal discharge and high mortality involving all age groups and both sexes of goats. The morbidity and mortality rates were 45%-90% and 14%-50%, respectively. The principal pathological lesions were confined to the thoracic cavity and comprised hydrothorax and serofibrinous pleuropneumonia. The histopathological features consisted of a necrotizing fibrinous pleuropneumonia characterized by different degrees of vasculitis, and fibrinocellular exudation into the alveolar septae and lumina, and into interlobular septae and pleura. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were isolated from some of the examined goats including a case with a sequestrum which yielded Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type. This work reports the first description of an outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia in Tanzania in which M. capripneumoniae and M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type were concurrently isolated.

  3. Significance of CO2 donor on the production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Succinic acid is a building-block chemical which could be used as the precursor of many industrial products. The dissolved CO2 concentration in the fermentation broth could strongly regulate the metabolic flux of carbon and the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase, which are the important committed steps for the biosynthesis of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes. Previous reports showed that succinic acid production could be promoted by regulating the supply of CO2 donor in the fermentation broth. Therefore, the effects of dissolved CO2 concentration and MgCO3 on the fermentation process should be investigated. In this article, we studied the impacts of gaseous CO2 partial pressure, dissolved CO2 concentration, and the addition amount of MgCO3 on succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618. We also demonstrated that gaseous CO2 could be removed when MgCO3 was fully supplied. Results An effective CO2 quantitative mathematical model was developed to calculate the dissolved CO2 concentration in the fermentation broth. The highest succinic acid production of 61.92 g/L was obtained at 159.22 mM dissolved CO2 concentration, which was supplied by 40 g/L MgCO3 at the CO2 partial pressure of 101.33 kPa. When MgCO3 was used as the only CO2 donor, a maximal succinic acid production of 56.1 g/L was obtained, which was just decreased by 7.03% compared with that obtained under the supply of gaseous CO2 and MgCO3. Conclusions Besides the high dissolved CO2 concentration, the excessive addition of MgCO3 was beneficial to promote the succinic acid synthesis. This was the first report investigating the replaceable of gaseous CO2 in the fermentation of succinic acid. The results obtained in this study may be useful for reducing the cost of succinic acid fermentation process. PMID:22040346

  4. Identification, purification, and characterization of the type 4 fimbriae of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Ruffolo, C G; Tennent, J M; Michalski, W P; Adler, B

    1997-01-01

    The presence of fimbriae on Pasteurella multocida has been reported, but there have been no prior studies aimed at conclusively characterizing these structures. We now report on the identification and characterization of type 4 fimbriae on serogroup A, B, and D strains of P. multocida. Under microaerophilic conditions P. multocida showed an increased expression of the fimbriae, which were observed to form bundles. Fimbriae purified by high-performance reverse-phase liquid chromatography constituted a single 18-kDa subunit, the first 21 amino acids of which shared very high similarity with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of other type 4 fimbrial subunits. Antiserum against the P. multocida 18-kDa protein immunostained the type 4 fimbrial subunit of Moraxella bovis and Dichelobacter nodosus. Based on these observations we conclude that P. multocida possesses type 4 fimbriae and have designated the P. multocida fimbrial subunit PtfA. PMID:8975936

  5. Persistence of Pasteurella multocida in Nebraska (USA) wetlands under epizootic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, J.I.; Brand, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Gleason Basin, a marsh located in the western part of the Rainwater Basin in Nebraska, was selected during the 1980 spring waterfowl migration as a study site to determine the presence and persistence of virulent Pasteurella multocida. Avian cholera mortality in migratory waterfowl using the Basin increased during a 2-wk period of a die-off beginning the first week of March when 2,409 carcasses were collected from the marsh. Study sites within the marsh were established for sampling water associated with and not associated with intact and scavenged carcasses. Isolations of virulent P. multocida were made from five of six study sites associated with either intact or scavenged carcasses for 3 days and from three of five non-carcass-associated study sites for 2 days. Recovery of these bacteria from this environment suggested a possible source of infection for susceptible waterfowl using the contaminated site.

  6. The origin of Pasteurella multocida impacts pathology and inflammation when assessed in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pors, Susanne E; Chadfield, Mark S; Sørensen, Dorte B; Offenberg, Hanne; Bisgaard, Magne; Jensen, Henrik E

    2016-04-01

    Host-pathogen interactions of Pasteurella multocida isolates of different origin were studied in a mouse model, focusing on pathology, bacterial load and expression of the metalloproteinase MMP9 and its inhibitor TIMP1. Intranasal inoculation with one of three doses (10(6), 10(4), 10(2)CFU) of an isolate from porcine pneumonia or fowl cholera showed marked differences between the two isolates. The avian isolate was highly pathogenic with severe signs of necrotizing pneumonia, liver necrosis and high bacterial load in lung and liver. Clinical signs and pathology related to the porcine isolate were dose dependent and consisted of exudative bronchopneumonia, abscess formation in liver and a lower bacterial load in lung and liver. Both isolates caused increased expression of MMP9 and TIMP1. In conclusion, evaluation and comparison of pathogenicity and host-pathogen interaction of P. multocida isolates from different hosts is possible in the intranasal murine model. PMID:27033923

  7. Deadly case of Pasteurella multocida aortitis and mycotic aneurysm following a cat bite

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dennis Dane; Berliner, Yaniv; Carr, David

    2016-01-01

    Animal bites are frequently encountered in the emergency department (ED). Aortitis leading to mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare and potentially deadly complication of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) following an animal bite. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who presented to the ED after falling at home. He complained of weakness and abdominal pain. He was in septic shock and was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous fluids. He reported previous antibiotic treatment of a cellulitis secondary to a cat bite injury to his right thumb four weeks prior. Abdominal ultrasound and subsequent computed tomography scan revealed a leaking mycotic abdominal aneurysm that was surgically repaired. Blood cultures and aortic wall tissue cultures grew P. multocida. Given how common animal bite presentations are in the ED, this case highlights the need to consider aortitis and mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm in an unwell patient with an animal bite. PMID:27326399

  8. Characteristics of Pasteurella multocida isolated from waterfowl and associated avian species in California.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, D C; Jessup, D A; Snipes, K P; Carpenter, T E; Hird, D W; McCapes, R H

    1990-04-01

    Characteristics of Pasteurella multocida isolated from tissues of dead waterfowl and associated avian species found at 23 sites located in northern and central California, from January 1986 through January 1988 are reported. Two hundred ninety five isolates of P. multocida were obtained from 23 avian species. Most of the isolates belonged to the subspecies P. multocida multocida (63%), followed by P. multocida gallicida (37%), and by P. multocida septica (less than 1%). There appeared to be a higher prevalence of P. multocida multocida in Ross' geese (Chen rossi) and Snow geese (Chen coeruleus). All of the isolates belonged to somatic serotype 1, possessed the A capsule type and were susceptible to the 8 antimicrobial agents tested. None contained plasmid DNA. PMID:2338724

  9. Pasteurella multocida Infective Endocarditis: A Possible Link with Primary Upper Respiratory Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Branch, Joel; Kakutani, Takuya; Kuroda, Shun; Shiba, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese man presented with fever and upper respiratory tract symptoms that required urgent inpatient admission. A physical examination revealed conjunctival hemorrhages and peripheral embolic phenomena. Blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, and an echocardiography revealed a mitral valve vegetation suggestive of infective endocarditis (IE), which was confirmed using the Modified Duke Criteria. After several antibiotic regimens proved ineffective, valve replacement was performed, with a good eventual outcome. P. multocida IE is rare and may sometimes have no preceding risk factors. P. multocida infections of the upper respiratory tract are unusual but may be an inciting event for IE. It is essential to check blood cultures and to repeat the performance of physical examinations to appreciate the developing features of IE.

  10. Efficacy of recombinant leukotoxin in protection against pneumonic challenge with live Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J A; Shewen, P E; Lo, R Y

    1991-01-01

    The recombinant leukotoxin (rLKT) of the bacterium Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was examined for its ability to protect cattle from experimental challenge with logarithmic-phase P. haemolytica. Six different vaccines were utilized in the experiment: P. haemolytica culture supernatant, P. haemolytica culture supernatant enriched with rLKT, rLKT alone, P. haemolytica culture supernatant enriched with Escherichia coli supernatant not containing LKT, E. coli supernatant alone, and phosphate-buffered saline. rLKT alone showed no protective capacity against development of clinical signs of respiratory disease or against development of postmortem lung lesions after experimental challenge. It was, however, shown to enhance the efficacy of the culture supernatant vaccine and decrease clinical signs and pneumonic lesions. The complexity of protective immunity in this disease is emphasized in this study, and, although LKT is an important virulence factor of the organism, an immune response to LKT alone does not protect animals against disease. PMID:1987075

  11. Biodegradation of dimethyl terephthalate by Pasteurella multocida Sa follows an alternative biochemical pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaxi; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2006-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida Sa, a bacterial strain isolated from mangrove sediment by enrichment technique, was capable of transforming dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). Biodegradation of DMT was shown to take place as a series of sequential steps involving the hydrolysis of two ester linkages between the carboxyl groups of the terephthalate and the methyl side-chain initially to produce mono-methyl terephthalate (MMT) and then terephthalic acid (TA), respectively. However, with ethanol as the carrying solvent, there was a formation of one metabolite previously not observed. The two metabolites were characterized by high performance-liquid chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry as MMT and mono-ethyl terephthalate (MET), suggesting the existence of an alternative biochemical pathway in the degradation of DMT by P. multocida Sa. Since the presence of MMT and ethanol in culture inoculated with P. multocida Sa was prerequisites for the formation of MET, biologically mediated trans-esterification was proposed as a mechanism for the novel biochemical process observed.

  12. Toll-like receptor 4-positive macrophages protect mice from Pasteurella pneumotropica-induced pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Marcia L.; Mosier, Derek A.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-positive macrophages in early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacteria. TLR4 is a trans-membrane receptor that is the primary recognition molecule for lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria. The TLR4(Lps-del) mouse strains C57BL10/ScN (B10) and STOCK Abb(tm1) TLR4(Lps-del) Slc11a1(s)(B10 x C2D) are susceptible to pulmonary infections and develop pneumonia when naturally or experimentally infected by the opportunistic bacterium Pasteurella pneumotropica. Since these mice have the TLR4(Lps-del) genotype, we hypothesized that reconstitution of mice with TLR4-positive macrophages would provide resistance to this bacterium. A cultured macrophage cell line (C2D macrophages) and bone marrow cells from C2D mice were adoptively transferred to B10 and B10 x C2D mice by intraperitoneal injection. C2D macrophages increased B10 and B10 x C2D mouse resistance to P. pneumotropica. In C2D-recipient mice there was earlier transcription of tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemokines JE and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) in the lungs of B10 and B10 x C2D mice, and there was earlier transcription of KC and MIP-1alpha in B10 x C2D mice. In addition, the course of inflammation following experimental Pasteurella challenge was altered in C2D recipients. C2D macrophages also protected B10 x C2D mice, which lack CD4(+) T cells. These data indicate that macrophages are critical for pulmonary immunity and can provide host resistance to P. pneumotropica. This study indicates that TLR4-positive macrophages are important for early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacterial infections.

  13. Expression of a truncated Pasteurella multocida toxin antigen in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Sreekumari; Nair, Rajeev V; Kania, Stephen A; Bemis, David A

    2003-07-30

    Mild or subclinical respiratory infections caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica are widespread in pigs despite multiple control efforts. Infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica strains is a common risk factor in the establishment of toxin-producing strains of Pasteurella multocida in the nasal cavity of pigs leading to the disease, atrophic rhinitis (AR). This study was designed to explore the possibility of expressing a protective epitope of P. multocida toxin (PMT) in B. bronchiseptica to create single-component mucosal vaccine to control atrophic rhinitis in pigs. To achieve this, a P. multocida toxin fragment (PMTCE), that was non-toxic and protective against lethal challenge in mice, was cloned into a broad-host-range plasmid, PBBR1MCS2, and introduced into B. bronchiseptica by electroporation. The Pasteurella gene construct was placed under the regulatory control of a promoter region that was separately isolated from B. bronchiseptica and appears to be part of the heat shock protein gene family. B. bronchiseptica harboring the plasmid under antibiotic selection expressed the 80kDa PMTCE as determined by PAGE and Western blot with a PMT-specific monoclonal antibody. When introduced into the respiratory tracts of mice, B. bronchiseptica harboring the plasmid construct was reisolated in declining numbers for 72h post-inoculation. Antibody responses (IgM, IgA and IgG) to B. bronchiseptica were detected in serum and respiratory lavage, but PMTCE-specific antibodies were not detected. While further refinements of PMT expression in B. bronchiseptica are necessary, this study provides a basis for the development of a single-component, live-attenuated vaccine against atrophic rhinitis.

  14. Cloning of a serotype-specific antigen from Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rayos, C; Lo, R Y; Shewen, P E; Beveridge, T J

    1986-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids coding for a soluble (or surface) antigen of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 were identified. Two plasmids, both containing the same 5.4 kilobase pairs of insert DNA, were recovered independently by screening a clone band of P. haemolytica A1 genomic DNA in Escherichia coli for the expression of P. haemolytica A1 soluble antigens (R. Y. C. Lo and L.A. Cameron, Can. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 64:73-76, 1986). E. coli cells carrying the plasmids were found to be agglutinated by an antiserum raised against the P. haemolytica A1 soluble antigens. Analysis of the E. coli clones by electron microscopy revealed patches of amorphous material on the surface of the cells which were not present on the controls. Further characterization with protein A-colloidal gold labeled both these patches and the outer membranes of these cloned cells pretreated with the specific antiserum. These results indicated that the cloned antigen was expressed on the surface of the E. coli cells. The cloned antigen was found to be specific for serotype 1 when tested by slide agglutination against a collection of P. haemolytica typing antisera. Southern blot hybridization, using the cloned DNA as a probe, labeled the genomic DNA from P. haemolytica serotype 1 as well as the cross-agglutinating serotypes 2 and 7, but not DNA from the non-cross-agglutinating serotypes 3 and 4 and Pasteurella multocida. These results demonstrated that serotype specificity could be attributed to the particular antigenic determinants in the genome of the organism. Images PMID:3527985

  15. Estimation of impact of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia on pastoralists in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Onono, J O; Wieland, B; Rushton, J

    2014-08-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is an infectious disease which impacts cattle production in sub-Saharan Africa. To adequately allocate resources for its control, there is a need to assess its impact on cattle producers. The present study estimated the impact of CBPP on pastoralists through analysis of various strategies employed for its control in cattle herds including: preventive vaccination, antimicrobial treatment, slaughter of clinical cases and other combinations of these control strategies. The assessment was based on a loss-expenditure frontier framework to identify a control strategy with minimum cost from both expenditures on control strategies and output losses due to mortalities, reduced milk yield, reduced weight gain and reduced fertility rate. The analysis was undertaken in a stochastic spreadsheet model. The control strategy with minimum cost per herd was preventive vaccination with an estimated cost of US$ 193 (90% CI; 170-215) per 100 cows per year, while slaughter of clinical cases had an estimated cost of US$ 912 (90% CI; 775-1055) per 100 cows per year. The impact of CBPP to the nation was estimated at US$ 7.6 (90% CI; 6.5-8.7) million per year. Yet, if all pastoralists whose cattle are at high risk of infection adopted preventive vaccination, the aggregate national impact would be US$ 3.3 (90% CI; 2.9-3.7) million per year, with savings amounting to US$ 4.3 million through reallocation of control expenditures. The analysis predicted that control of CBPP in Kenya is profitable through preventive vaccination. However, further research is recommended for the technical and financial feasibility of implementing a vaccine delivery system in pastoral areas where CBPP is endemic.

  16. The use of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP).

    PubMed

    Thiaucourt, F; Bölske, G; Libeau, G; Le Goff, C; Lefèvre, P C

    1994-08-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is a severe disease affecting goats in Eastern Africa and the Middle East, caused by Mycoplasma sp. type F38. Its exact geographical distribution is however not exactly known due to the lack of specificity of the available serological tests and the difficulty in cultivating M. sp. F38. A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was produced, using crude or membrane proteins antigens from type F38 strains to immunize mice. The reactivity of the mAbs was tested by an immunobinding assay with crude mycoplasma antigens spotted on nitrocellulose filters. One hundred and twelve antigens, standardized at 0.5 mg protein/ml, were used. Mycoplasma strains were chosen among closely related species of the "mycoides cluster", M. capricolum, Group 7 of Leach, M. mycoides mycoides LC, M. mycoides mycoides SC, M. mycoides capri, as well as among species that are isolated from goat lungs, M. arginini, M. ovipneumoniae, M. putrefaciens, M. agalactiae. Out of 60 mAbs, 4 were chosen to build an identification test for mycoplasmas of the "mycoides cluster". Controls showed that accurate identification could be hampered by antigenic heterogeneity within the M. capricolum species. One mAb was used for the direct detection of M. sp. F38 antigen in pleural fluid from goats suspected of CCPP. The sensitivity of the test can be estimated at 0.5 micrograms protein/ml. Comparison with isolation results show a 74% agreement between the two methods. The same mAb was used to build a blocking ELISA. This serological test was strictly specific for CCPP. It detects antibodies in sera of naturally infected or artificially immunized animals while it remained negative with hyperimmune sera to related strains such as PG 50. Direct antigen detection and blocking ELISA are tools that may enable a better assessment of CCPP distribution.

  17. A meta-analysis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Asmare, Kassahun; Abayneh, Takele; Mekuria, Solomon; Ayelet, Gelagay; Sibhat, Berhanu; Skjerve, Eystein; Szonyi, Barbara; Wieland, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    This systematic literature review was initiated due to lack of comprehensive information on the status and distribution of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) in Ethiopia. The objectives of the review were thus to provide a pooled prevalence estimate of CCPP in the country and asses the level of in between study variance among the available reports. Manual and electronic search was conducted between 8th of January and 25th of June 2015. A total of twelve published articles and one MSc thesis was retrieved from 19 initially identified studies. Twenty five animal level datasets were extracted at regional level considering some hypothesized predictors. The retrieved data were summarized in a meta-analytical approach. Accordingly, the pooled prevalence estimate of CCPP was 25.7% (95% CI:20.9,31.0). The inverse variance square (I(2)) that explains the variation in effect size attributed to reports true heterogeneity was 95.7%.The sub-group analysis was also computed for assumed predictors including, age, sex, type of study population, production systems and regional states. Among these predictors, study population type revealed statistically significant difference (P<0.05). Accordingly, the prevalence estimate for samples collected at abattoir was 39.2%, while that of samples collected at field level was 22.4%. In the final model, type of study population fitted the multivariable meta-regression model accounting for 22.87% of the explainable proportion of heterogeneity among the presumed predictors. Evidence on isolation and confirmation of Mycoplasma capricolum subspp. capripneumonie in the country was obtained from five regional states. In conclusion, it is recommended to further investigate facilities related with transportation and collection premises along with potential role of sheep in the epidemiology of CCPP. Finally, the review emphasizes the need for monitoring the ongoing CCPP control intervention and introduces amendments based on the findings

  18. [Problems in the use of radioactively marked bacteria in animal experiments. 1. Labeling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica and Salmonella dublin with eH, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, 125J1].

    PubMed

    Flossmann, K D; Rohrmann, B; Hubald, J; Finsterbusch, L

    1977-01-01

    Several methods are suggested by which to use the radionuclides 3H, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, and 125J for labelling or doublelabelling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, and Salmonella dublin, with particular reference being made to labelling ofr animal experiments. Suitable radioactive substrates for internal labelling in chemically defined or partially defined nutritive media include 3H-thymin, 3H-thymidine, 14C-glucose, 14C-mannose, 14C-aspartic acid, as well as 3H-uracil, 3H-uridine, 3H-orotic acid, 14C-orotic acid, 59Fe-III-citrate or chloride, and Na2H32PO4. The choise of the nuclide and substrate should by governed by the problem at hand. PMID:849104

  19. Improving succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from raw industrial carob pods.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-10-01

    Carob pods are an inexpensive by-product of locust bean gum industry that can be used as renewable feedstock for bio-based succinic acid. Here, for the first time, unprocessed raw carob pods were used to extract a highly enriched sugar solution, afterwards used as substrate to produce succinic acid using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Batch fermentations containing 30g/L sugars resulted in a production rate of 1.67gSA/L.h and a yield of 0.39gSA/g sugars. Taking advantage of A. succinogenes' metabolism, uncoupling cell growth from succinic acid production, a fed-batch mode was implemented to increase succinic acid yield and reduce by-products formation. This strategy resulted in a succinic acid yield of 0.94gSA/g sugars, the highest yield reported in the literature for fed-batch and continuous experiments, while maintaining by-products at residual values. Results demonstrate that raw carob pods are a highly efficient feedstock for bio-based succinic acid production.

  20. Carob pod water extracts as feedstock for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-10-01

    Carob pods are a by-product of locust bean gum industry containing more than 50% (w/w) sucrose, glucose and fructose. In this work, carob pod water extracts were used, for the first time, for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z. Kinetic studies of glucose, fructose and sucrose consumption as individual carbon sources till 30g/L showed no inhibition on cell growth, sugar consumption and SA production rates. Sugar extraction from carob pods was optimized varying solid/liquid ratio and extraction time, maximizing sugar recovery while minimizing the extraction of polyphenols. Batch fermentations containing 10-15g/L total sugars resulted in a maximum specific SA production rate of 0.61Cmol/Cmol X.h, with a yield of 0.55Cmol SA/Cmol sugar and a volumetric productivity of 1.61g SA/L.h. Results demonstrate that carob pods can be a promising low cost feedstock for bio-based SA production.

  1. Succinic Acid Production from Cheese Whey using Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Xiu, Shuangning

    Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z was used to produce succinic acid from cheese whey in this study. At the presence of external CO2 supply, the effects of initial cheese whey concentration, pH, and inoculum size on the succinic acid production were studied. The by-product formation during the fermentation process was also analyzed. The highest succinic acid yield of 0.57 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, while the highest succinic acid productivity of 0.58 g h-1 L-1 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 100 g/L. Increase in pH and inoculum size caused higher succinic acid yield and productivity. At the preferred fermentation condition of pH 6.8, inoculum size of 5% and initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, succinic acid yield of 0.57, and productivity of 0.44 g h-1 L-1 were obtained. Acetic acid and formic acid were the main by-products throughout the fermentation run of 48 h. It is feasible to produce succinic acid using lactose from cheese whey as carbon resource by A. succinogenes 130 Z.

  2. Purification and characterization of the serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Miyasaki, K; Linzer, R; Cohen, R; Levine, M; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    The serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was purified with fractional ethanol precipitation of cell-free culture supernatant, sequential ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The preparation obtained demonstrated a single precipitin line in immunodiffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis when rabbit antisera to serotype c whole bacterial cells were used. No immunological reaction was detected with antisera to serotype c lipopolysaccharide, indicating that lipopolysaccharide was not present in the preparation. The serotype c antigen was composed of 95% carbohydrate, 2% protein, and 3.1% phosphate. Gas chromatographic analysis of the antigen obtained from growth in either complex or chemically defined media revealed that the carbohydrate constituent was composed of 84 to 90.1% mannose, 4.8 to 16% glucose, 1.9% N-acetylglucosamine, 1.4% fucose, and 0.2% galactose. The present data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c antigen is predominantly a mannose-containing carbohydrate suggestive of a mannan. Images PMID:6423542

  3. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Keratitis After Glaucoma Infiltration Surgery: A Clinical Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiaxu; Xu, Jianjiang; Cao, Wenjun; Ji, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans infection is a rare and easily misdiagnosed ocular disease. In this article, the authors report a chronic, purulent, and difficult-to-treat case of A actinomycetemcomitans keratitis following a glaucoma infiltration surgery.A 56-year-old man with a long-standing history of open-angle glaucoma in both eyes presented with a 12-week history of ocular pain, redness, and blurred vision in his right eye. He underwent a glaucoma infiltration surgery in his right eye 6 months ago. Three months postoperatively, he developed peripheral corneal stromal opacities associated with a white, thin, cystic bleb, and conjunctival injection. These opacities grew despite topical treatment with topical tobramycin, levofloxacin, natamycin, amikacin, and metronidazole eye drops.Multiple corneal scrapings revealed no organisms, and no organisms grew on aerobic, anaerobic, fungal, or mycobacterial cultures. The patient's right eye developed a severe purulent corneal ulcer with a dense hypopyon and required a corneal transplantation. Histopathologic analysis and 16S ribosomalribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction sequencing revealed A actinomycetemcomitans as the causative organism. Postoperatively, treatment was initiated with topical levofloxacin and cyclosporine, as well as oral levofloxacin and cyclosporine. Graft and host corneal transparency were maintained at the checkup 1 month after surgery.Although it is a rare cause of corneal disease, A actinomycetemcomitans should be suspected in patients with keratitis refractory to topical antibiotic therapy. Delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment can result in vision loss. PMID:26817919

  4. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Keratitis After Glaucoma Infiltration Surgery: A Clinical Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiaxu; Xu, Jianjiang; Cao, Wenjun; Ji, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans infection is a rare and easily misdiagnosed ocular disease. In this article, the authors report a chronic, purulent, and difficult-to-treat case of A actinomycetemcomitans keratitis following a glaucoma infiltration surgery.A 56-year-old man with a long-standing history of open-angle glaucoma in both eyes presented with a 12-week history of ocular pain, redness, and blurred vision in his right eye. He underwent a glaucoma infiltration surgery in his right eye 6 months ago. Three months postoperatively, he developed peripheral corneal stromal opacities associated with a white, thin, cystic bleb, and conjunctival injection. These opacities grew despite topical treatment with topical tobramycin, levofloxacin, natamycin, amikacin, and metronidazole eye drops.Multiple corneal scrapings revealed no organisms, and no organisms grew on aerobic, anaerobic, fungal, or mycobacterial cultures. The patient's right eye developed a severe purulent corneal ulcer with a dense hypopyon and required a corneal transplantation. Histopathologic analysis and 16S ribosomalribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction sequencing revealed A actinomycetemcomitans as the causative organism. Postoperatively, treatment was initiated with topical levofloxacin and cyclosporine, as well as oral levofloxacin and cyclosporine. Graft and host corneal transparency were maintained at the checkup 1 month after surgery.Although it is a rare cause of corneal disease, A actinomycetemcomitans should be suspected in patients with keratitis refractory to topical antibiotic therapy. Delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment can result in vision loss.

  5. In vitro activity of azithromycin compared with that of erythromycin against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Pajukanta, R; Asikainen, S; Saarela, M; Alaluusua, S; Jousimies-Somer, H

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to azithromycin, a new macrolide antibiotic of a new class known as azalides, was compared with that of erythromycin by the agar dilution method on Mueller-Hinton Haemophilus test medium. Eighty-two A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, 79 recent clinical isolates obtained from 40 periodontally healthy or diseased subjects, and 3 type strains were included in the study. Erythromycin showed poor in vitro activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Azithromycin, however, was highly effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans: all strains were inhibited at 2.0 micrograms/ml. Azithromycin exhibited the best in vitro activity against the serotype a subpopulation of A. actinomycetemcomitans: 100% of the strains were inhibited at 1.0 micrograms/ml. The lowest MICs were, however, recorded by serotype b strains. Since azithromycin has favorable pharmacokinetic properties, including excellent distribution into tissues, it could be expected to pass into gingival crevicular fluid at levels sufficient to inhibit A. actinomycetemcomitans in vivo. Therefore, it is a good candidate for future clinical trials in A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis. PMID:1329617

  6. Expression cloning of a periodontitis-associated apoptotic effector, cagE homologue, in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yen-Tung A; Hu, Wenqi

    2003-04-18

    To study anti-bacterial immunity and to identify critical bacterial antigens associated with specific periodontal infection, we screened the genomic library of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a major Gram(-) anaerobe causing human periodontitis, by expression cloning using disease-associated periodontal CD4(+)T cells derived from HuPBL-engrafted NOD/SCID mice. Here, we report one of the novel genes identified and designated, cagE homologue (in short: cagE) of A. actinomycetemcomitans, which encodes a putative bacterial type IV secretion system with significant homology to Helicobacter pylori CagE and Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB4. All serum samples from A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected periodontitis patients, but not from the healthy controls, readily recognized CagE by ELISA and Western blot, suggesting its biological and clinical significance. The CagE protein, upon secretion, elicited significant apoptosis on primary human epithelia, endothelia, osteoblasts, and T cells by 4-12h in vitro. Importantly, both cagE(-) mutant strain and N-terminus truncated CagE protein drastically reduced (p<0.001) the induction of apoptosis on human epithelia in vitro. These data strongly suggest that a novel effector protein, CagE in A. actinomycetemcomitans, induces apoptosis of human cells and destructive immunity, thereby it may play an important role in the pathogenesis of A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated infections. PMID:12684047

  7. Succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes using hydrolysates of spent yeast cells and corn fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Quan; Li, Jian; Ma, Jiang-Feng; Jiang, Min; Wei, Ping; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ying, Han-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysate of spent yeast cells was evaluated as a nitrogen source for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes NJ113, using corn fiber hydrolysate as a carbon source. When spent yeast cell hydrolysate was used directly as a nitrogen source, a maximum succinic acid concentration of 35.5 g/l was obtained from a glucose concentration of 50 g/l, with a glucose utilization of 95.2%. Supplementation with individual vitamins showed that biotin was the most likely factor to be limiting for succinic acid production with spent yeast cell hydrolysate. After supplementing spent yeast cell hydrolysate and 90 g/l of glucose with 150 μg/l of biotin, cell growth increased 32.5%, glucose utilization increased 37.6%, and succinic acid concentration was enhanced 49.0%. As a result, when biotin-supplemented spent yeast cell hydrolysate was used with corn fiber hydrolysate, a succinic acid yield of 67.7% was obtained from 70.3 g/l of total sugar concentration, with a productivity of 0.63 g/(l h). Our results suggest that biotin-supplemented spent yeast cell hydrolysate may be an alternative nitrogen source for the efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes NJ113, using renewable resources. PMID:20801644

  8. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  9. Immunodominant antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 in high-responder patients.

    PubMed Central

    Califano, J V; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to look for characteristics of the immunodominant antigen(s) of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 that might help explain the high antibody titers in periodontitis patients. Radioimmunoassays (RIA) were performed on sera from 481 patients; sera from the 32 patients with the highest anti-Y4 titers (above 128,000 RIA U/ml) were further analyzed. Y4 antigen was boiled for 45 min or treated with papain, and antibody responses were analyzed by RIA and Western blotting (immunoblotting). In addition, carbohydrate was purified from Y4 and examined by Western blotting. The results indicated that the immunodominant antigen of Y4 in high responders was stable after papain treatment or boiling for 45 min. Papain or boiling eliminated protein bands but a large diffuse band persisted on Western blots. With increasing dilutions of sera, bands on Western blots corresponding to protein antigens disappeared, while the large diffuse band resembling that of carbohydrate persisted. Partially purified Y4 carbohydrate contained the large diffuse band. Double-immunodiffusion analysis indicated that rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum and patient sera recognized the same antigen. When the carbohydrate extract was passed over a lipid A-binding column to remove lipopolysaccharide, the smear corresponding to the immunodominant antigen was still present on Western blots. The immunodominant antigen of Y4 in high-responder individuals appears to be a carbohydrate and is possibly the capsular polysaccharide. Images PMID:2496034

  10. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans toxin induces both cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ohguchi, M; Ishisaki, A; Okahashi, N; Koide, M; Koseki, T; Yamato, K; Noguchi, T; Nishihara, T

    1998-12-01

    We found that the culture supernatant of the periodontopathic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans had a cytotoxic effect on several cell lines. In this study, we purified the toxin from the culture supernatant of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by a four-step procedure: ammonium sulfate precipitation, POROS HQ/M column chromatography, polymyxin B matrix column chromatography, and Mono-Q column chromatography. The purified toxin gave two major bands of protein with molecular masses of 80 and 85 kDa upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The mechanism of cell death of the B-cell hybridoma cell line HS-72 was examined by observing changes in nuclear morphology, an increase in the proportion of fragmented DNA, and the typical ladder pattern of degraded chromosomal DNA, indicating the induction of apoptosis. Overexpression of human Bcl-2 suppressed apoptosis in HS-72 cells, indicating that the toxin from A. actinomycetemcomitans induces apoptosis by a Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the toxin caused cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis in HS-72 cells. In addition, aurintricarboxylic acid, a DNA endonuclease inhibitor, markedly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells but had no effect on cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Taken together, these findings suggest that the toxin from A. actinomycetemcomitans could mediate the development of periodontal diseases through cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis in B lymphocytes of periodontal tissue. PMID:9826381

  11. Improving succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from raw industrial carob pods.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-10-01

    Carob pods are an inexpensive by-product of locust bean gum industry that can be used as renewable feedstock for bio-based succinic acid. Here, for the first time, unprocessed raw carob pods were used to extract a highly enriched sugar solution, afterwards used as substrate to produce succinic acid using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Batch fermentations containing 30g/L sugars resulted in a production rate of 1.67gSA/L.h and a yield of 0.39gSA/g sugars. Taking advantage of A. succinogenes' metabolism, uncoupling cell growth from succinic acid production, a fed-batch mode was implemented to increase succinic acid yield and reduce by-products formation. This strategy resulted in a succinic acid yield of 0.94gSA/g sugars, the highest yield reported in the literature for fed-batch and continuous experiments, while maintaining by-products at residual values. Results demonstrate that raw carob pods are a highly efficient feedstock for bio-based succinic acid production. PMID:27394995

  12. Carob pod water extracts as feedstock for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-10-01

    Carob pods are a by-product of locust bean gum industry containing more than 50% (w/w) sucrose, glucose and fructose. In this work, carob pod water extracts were used, for the first time, for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z. Kinetic studies of glucose, fructose and sucrose consumption as individual carbon sources till 30g/L showed no inhibition on cell growth, sugar consumption and SA production rates. Sugar extraction from carob pods was optimized varying solid/liquid ratio and extraction time, maximizing sugar recovery while minimizing the extraction of polyphenols. Batch fermentations containing 10-15g/L total sugars resulted in a maximum specific SA production rate of 0.61Cmol/Cmol X.h, with a yield of 0.55Cmol SA/Cmol sugar and a volumetric productivity of 1.61g SA/L.h. Results demonstrate that carob pods can be a promising low cost feedstock for bio-based SA production. PMID:25164341

  13. Postantibiotic and physiological effects of tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin at subminimal and suprainhibitory concentrations on some swine and bovine respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Diarra, M S; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1999-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin on some important gram-negative swine and bovine pathogens namely, Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were studied in vitro. The effect of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and sub-MICs (1/4, 1/2 MIC) on bacterial growth was evaluated. The presence of tilmicosin, tylosin and apramycin in the medium decreased the rate of growth of the bacterial strains tested using drug concentrations as low as 1/4 MIC. The postantibiotic effect (PAE) which is the suppression of optimal bacterial growth that persists after a short exposure (2 h) of microorganisms to an antibiotic was studied by exposure of bacteria to drugs at 1/4, 1/2, 1, 4 and 8 times MIC. The duration of PAEs increased with rising concentration for all drugs tested but at concentrations below the MIC, tilmicosin showed more significant PAEs than tylosin or apramycin against P. multocida and A. pleuropneumoniae. Tilmicosin and tylosin caused PAEs of up to 8 h when used at 8 times the MIC, while apramycin caused PAEs of up to 5 h when used at this concentration. Sub-MICs of either tilmicosin, tylosin, or apramycin had no effect on P. multocida dermonecrotic toxin production. However sub-MICs of tylosin, or apramycin significantly reduced the haemolytic activity of A. pleuropneumoniae and affected the capsular material production of this isolate and of one isolate of P. multocida (type A). The in vitro effect of tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin (even when used at sub-MIC levels) on growth, production of capsular material, and haemolytic activity might impair the virulence of some of the microorganisms studied. In addition to the effects of these drugs on some putative virulence factors, we suggest that the strong PAEs caused by tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin may also contribute to the in vivo efficacy of these drugs. PMID:10461841

  14. Postantibiotic and physiological effects of tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin at subminimal and suprainhibitory concentrations on some swine and bovine respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Diarra, M S; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1999-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin on some important gram-negative swine and bovine pathogens namely, Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were studied in vitro. The effect of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and sub-MICs (1/4, 1/2 MIC) on bacterial growth was evaluated. The presence of tilmicosin, tylosin and apramycin in the medium decreased the rate of growth of the bacterial strains tested using drug concentrations as low as 1/4 MIC. The postantibiotic effect (PAE) which is the suppression of optimal bacterial growth that persists after a short exposure (2 h) of microorganisms to an antibiotic was studied by exposure of bacteria to drugs at 1/4, 1/2, 1, 4 and 8 times MIC. The duration of PAEs increased with rising concentration for all drugs tested but at concentrations below the MIC, tilmicosin showed more significant PAEs than tylosin or apramycin against P. multocida and A. pleuropneumoniae. Tilmicosin and tylosin caused PAEs of up to 8 h when used at 8 times the MIC, while apramycin caused PAEs of up to 5 h when used at this concentration. Sub-MICs of either tilmicosin, tylosin, or apramycin had no effect on P. multocida dermonecrotic toxin production. However sub-MICs of tylosin, or apramycin significantly reduced the haemolytic activity of A. pleuropneumoniae and affected the capsular material production of this isolate and of one isolate of P. multocida (type A). The in vitro effect of tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin (even when used at sub-MIC levels) on growth, production of capsular material, and haemolytic activity might impair the virulence of some of the microorganisms studied. In addition to the effects of these drugs on some putative virulence factors, we suggest that the strong PAEs caused by tilmicosin, tylosin, and apramycin may also contribute to the in vivo efficacy of these drugs.

  15. Exploring farmer preferences for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia vaccination: a case study of Narok District of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kairu-Wanyoike, Salome W; Kaitibie, Simeon; Taylor, Nick M; Gitau, George K; Heffernan, Claire; Schnier, Christian; Kiara, Henry; Taracha, Evans; McKeever, Declan

    2013-07-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is an economically important disease in most of sub-Saharan Africa. A conjoint analysis and ordered probit regression models were used to measure the preferences of farmers for CBPP vaccine and vaccination attributes. This was with regard to inclusion or not of an indicator in the vaccine, vaccine safety, vaccine stability as well as frequency of vaccination, vaccine administration and the nature of vaccination. The analysis was carried out in 190 households in Narok District of Kenya between October and December 2006 using structured questionnaires, 16 attribute profiles and a five-point Likert scale. The factors affecting attribute valuation were shown through a two-way location interaction model. The study also demonstrated the relative importance (RI) of attributes and the compensation value of attribute levels. The attribute coefficient estimates showed that farmers prefer a vaccine that has an indicator, is 100% safe and is administered by the government (p<0.0001). The preferences for the vaccine attributes were consistent with expectations. Preferences for stability, frequency of vaccination and nature of vaccination differed amongst farmers (p>0.05). While inclusion of an indicator in the vaccine was the most important attribute (RI=43.6%), price was the least important (RI=0.5%). Of the 22 household factors considered, 15 affected attribute valuation. The compensation values for a change from non inclusion to inclusion of an indicator, 95-100% safety, 2h to greater than 2h stability and from compulsory to elective vaccination were positive while those for a change from annual to biannual vaccination and from government to private administration were negative. The study concluded that the farmers in Narok District had preferences for specific vaccine and vaccination attributes. These preferences were conditioned by various household characteristics and disease risk factors. On average the farmers would need to be

  16. Quantitative risk assessment of entry of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia through live cattle imported from northwestern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Woube, Yilkal Asfaw; Dibaba, Asseged Bogale; Tameru, Berhanu; Fite, Richard; Nganwa, David; Robnett, Vinaida; Demisse, Amsalu; Habtemariam, Tsegaye

    2015-11-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a highly contagious bacterial disease of cattle caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides small colony (SC) bovine biotype (MmmSC). It has been eradicated from many countries; however, the disease persists in many parts of Africa and Asia. CBPP is one of the major trade-restricting diseases of cattle in Ethiopia. In this quantitative risk assessment the OIE concept of zoning was adopted to assess the entry of CBPP into an importing country when up to 280,000 live cattle are exported every year from the northwestern proposed disease free zone (DFZ) of Ethiopia. To estimate the level of risk, a six-tiered risk pathway (scenario tree) was developed, evidences collected and equations generated. The probability of occurrence of the hazard at each node was modelled as a probability distribution using Monte Carlo simulation (@RISK software) at 10,000 iterations to account for uncertainty and variability. The uncertainty and variability of data points surrounding the risk estimate were further quantified by sensitivity analysis. In this study a single animal destined for export from the northwestern DFZ of Ethiopia has a CBPP infection probability of 4.76×10(-6) (95% CI=7.25×10(-8) 1.92×10(-5)). The probability that at least one infected animal enters an importing country in one year is 0.53 (90% CI=0.042-0.97). The expected number of CBPP infected animals exported any given year is 1.28 (95% CI=0.021-5.42). According to the risk estimate, an average of 2.73×10(6) animals (90% CI=10,674-5.9×10(6)) must be exported to get the first infected case. By this account it would, on average, take 10.15 years (90% CI=0.24-23.18) for the first infected animal to be included in the consignment. Sensitivity analysis revealed that prevalence and vaccination had the highest impact on the uncertainty and variability of the overall risk.

  17. Exploring farmer preferences for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia vaccination: a case study of Narok District of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kairu-Wanyoike, Salome W; Kaitibie, Simeon; Taylor, Nick M; Gitau, George K; Heffernan, Claire; Schnier, Christian; Kiara, Henry; Taracha, Evans; McKeever, Declan

    2013-07-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is an economically important disease in most of sub-Saharan Africa. A conjoint analysis and ordered probit regression models were used to measure the preferences of farmers for CBPP vaccine and vaccination attributes. This was with regard to inclusion or not of an indicator in the vaccine, vaccine safety, vaccine stability as well as frequency of vaccination, vaccine administration and the nature of vaccination. The analysis was carried out in 190 households in Narok District of Kenya between October and December 2006 using structured questionnaires, 16 attribute profiles and a five-point Likert scale. The factors affecting attribute valuation were shown through a two-way location interaction model. The study also demonstrated the relative importance (RI) of attributes and the compensation value of attribute levels. The attribute coefficient estimates showed that farmers prefer a vaccine that has an indicator, is 100% safe and is administered by the government (p<0.0001). The preferences for the vaccine attributes were consistent with expectations. Preferences for stability, frequency of vaccination and nature of vaccination differed amongst farmers (p>0.05). While inclusion of an indicator in the vaccine was the most important attribute (RI=43.6%), price was the least important (RI=0.5%). Of the 22 household factors considered, 15 affected attribute valuation. The compensation values for a change from non inclusion to inclusion of an indicator, 95-100% safety, 2h to greater than 2h stability and from compulsory to elective vaccination were positive while those for a change from annual to biannual vaccination and from government to private administration were negative. The study concluded that the farmers in Narok District had preferences for specific vaccine and vaccination attributes. These preferences were conditioned by various household characteristics and disease risk factors. On average the farmers would need to be

  18. Role of high-avidity binding of human neutrophil myeloperoxidase in the killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Zambon, J J; Jones, C A; Wilson, M E

    1987-01-01

    The binding of the neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) to microbial surfaces is believed to be the first step in its microbicidal activity. The MPO-H2O2-Cl- system is responsible for most oxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils. There appear to be three forms of MPO (MPO I, II, and III), all of which can kill this organism in the presence of H2O2 and chloride. In this study, we characterized the binding of native human neutrophil MPO to A. actinomycetemcomitans by an elution procedure dependent on the cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Binding of native MPO was rapid and reached apparent equilibrium within 1 min. A proportion of binding under equilibrium conditions was saturable and highly avid, with a capacity of 4,500 sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 7.9 X 10(-10) M. At equal protein concentrations, more MPO III bound than MPO II, and more MPO II bound than MPO I. The high-avidity interaction was inhibitable with yeast mannan and with the serotype-defining mannan of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Binding was also partially reversible with yeast mannan. MPO bound to the high-avidity sites did not oxidize guaiacol but oxidized chloride, as detected by the chlorination of taurine. MPO bound to the high-avidity sites was incapable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans alone in the presence of H2O2 and Cl-, but potentiated killing when sufficient additional MPO was provided. The killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by the MPO-H2O2-Cl- system was inhibited by yeast mannan and a serotype-defining mannan of A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that high-avidity binding of MPO to the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans is a mannan-specific interaction and that MPO bound to the high-avidity sites is essential but not alone sufficient to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:3032796

  19. In vitro activity of antibiotics alone and in combination against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yogev, R; Shulman, D; Shulman, S T; Glogowski, W G

    1986-01-01

    The MICs for 90% of the organisms tested (MIC90S) of 11 antibiotics against 24 clinical isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were determined by the MIC 2000 system. The lowest MIC90S (16 micrograms/ml) were observed with ceftriaxone and rifampin. The next lowest MIC90S were found with cephapirin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol (3.12 micrograms/ml). The MIC90S of penicillin, ampicillin, ticarcillin, piperacillin, and amikacin were each greater than or equal to 12.5 micrograms/ml. Antibiotic synergy was studied by the killing curve method and was defined as a greater than or equal to 2 log10 reduction in CFU when two antibiotics were used in combination at one-fourth the MBC for each compared with the effect of each antibiotic alone at one-half the MBC. Synergism between rifampin and penicillin, cephapirin, or ceftriaxone was tested for with 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. In 7 of 37 instances, synergism was demonstrated for the combinations rifampin plus ceftriaxone (n = 3) or rifampin plus penicillin (n = 4); in 9 instances, an additive effect was noted, and impaired killing with drug combinations compared with the effect of a single antibiotic was suggested in 4 strains. The majority of strains were indifferent to the combinations. Similarly, variable results were observed when the combination of trimethoprim and cephapirin was tested against eight A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Our data suggest that rifampin and cephapirin are the most active of the 11 antibiotics studied against A. actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, in vitro synergism between rifampin and other antibiotics or between trimethoprim and cephapirin was not consistently demonstrable.

  20. Succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from batch fermentation of mixed sugars.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Henrik; Pateraki, Chrysanthi; Alexandri, Maria; Koutinas, Apostolis; Lidén, Gunnar

    2016-08-01

    Succinic acid production from the monosaccharides xylose, arabinose, glucose, mannose and galactose was studied using the bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes. In Duran bottle cultures, containing 10 g/L of each of sugar, succinic acid was produced from all sugars except for galactose. The highest succinate yield, 0.56 g/g, was obtained with glucose, whereas the succinate yield was 0.42, 0.38 and 0.44 g/g for xylose, mannose and arabinose, respectively. The specific succinate productivity was 0.7 g/g h for glucose, but below 0.2 g/g h for the other sugars. Batch bioreactor fermentations were carried out using a sugar mixture of the five sugars giving a total concentration of 50 g/L, mimicking the distribution of sugars in spent sulfite liquor (SSL) from Eucalyptus which is rich in xylose. In this mixture, an almost complete conversion of all sugars (except galactose) was achieved resulting in a final succinate concentration of 21.8-26.8 g/L and a total yield of 0.59-0.68 g/g. There was evidence of co-consumption of glucose and xylose, whereas mannose was consumed after glucose. The main by-products were acetate 0.14-0.20 g/g and formate 0.08-0.13 g/g. NADH balance calculations suggested that NADH required for succinate production was not met solely from formate and acetate production, but other means of NADH production was necessary. Results from mixed sugar fermentations were verified using SSL as substrate resulting in a succinate yield of 0.60 g/g. In addition, it was found that CO2 sparging could replace carbonate supply in the form of MgCO3 without affecting the succinate yield. PMID:27255975

  1. Evolutionary genetics of Pasteurella haemolytica isolates recovered from cattle and sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R L; Arkinsaw, S; Selander, R K

    1997-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships among 194 Pasteurella haemolytica isolates, which were recovered predominantly from cattle (39%) and sheep (58%) suffering from pneumonic pasteurellosis in the United Kingdom, Germany, and the United States, were estimated by examination of allelic variation at 18 enzyme-encoding loci detected by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The isolates formed two major divisions. One included 178 Pasteurella haemolytica sensu stricto strains representing serotypes A1, A2, A5 to A9, A12 to A14, and A16; the other was composed of 16 isolates belonging to the A11 taxon. P. haemolytica isolates were classified into 22 electrophoretic types (ETs) that formed three primary phylogenetic lineages. One lineage was represented by ovine serotype A2 isolates, a second lineage consisted of bovine serotype A2, together with serotype A7 and A13 isolates, and the third lineage included isolates representing all of the other serotypes, as well as a second group of serotype A7 strains. Electrophoretic types were nonrandomly associated with specific capsular serotypes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) types, outer membrane protein (OMP) types, and host species. Bovine isolates were represented by only three serotypes (A1, A2, and A6) in 5 ETs, whereas ovine isolates were represented by all of the serotypes in 19 ETs. The majority (76%) of bovine isolates were of serotypes A1 or A6 and belonged to a single ET that marked a virulent, cattle-specific clonal group. Among the ovine isolates, 40% were of serotype A2 and belonged to two ETs that represented two virulent, sheep-specific clonal groups. Bovine A1 and A6 isolates and bovine A2 isolates were phylogenetically distinct from ovine isolates of the same serotypes, indicating that different subpopulations of these serotypes are associated with disease in cattle and sheep. Consistent differences in the OMP profiles of strains of the bovine and ovine lineages of these three serotypes suggest that certain OMPs are

  2. Field study of pneumonia in vaccinated cattle associated with incorrect vaccination and Pasteurella multocida infection.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, W M; Caldow, G L

    2015-04-25

    This field study used data on the vaccine courses against bovine respiratory disease sold by one pharmaceutical company in conjunction with pharmacovigilance data to explore reported suspected lack of expected efficacy and the reasons for this. The study ran from May 1, 2007, to April 30, 2010, and covered vaccines sold in Scotland and part of Northumberland. In total, 83 groups of cattle reported suspected lack of expected efficacy, representing 1.6 per cent of the 804,618 vaccine courses sold. It was possible to investigate 45 of these outbreaks in depth using a standard questionnaire and diagnostic protocol. Vaccine usage outwith the specific product characteristics (SPC) occurred in 47 per cent of cases (21/45). The proportion of vaccination courses used where a pathogen contained in the vaccine was detected in the diseased cattle and vaccine use was consistent with the SPC was estimated at 0.12 per cent of the courses sold. Pasteurella multocida was the most common pathogen detected and was found in 21 of the outbreaks. For outbreaks where a pathogen contained in the vaccine was detected, P. multocida was found at a significantly greater frequency (P=0.03) where vaccine use was compliant with the SPC (five of six outbreaks) compared with outbreaks where vaccine use had not been compliant with the SPC (one of seven outbreaks). The limitations of the study, including the diagnostic tests employed and definition of vaccination outwith the SPC, are discussed.

  3. Associations between water quality, Pasteurella multocida, and avian cholera at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehr, M.A.; Botzler, R.G.; Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied patterns in avian cholera mortality, the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the water or sediment, and water chemistry characteristics in 10 wetlands at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (California, USA), an area of recurrent avian cholera epizootics, during the winters of 1997 and 1998. Avian cholera outbreaks (a?Y50 dead birds) occurred on two wetlands during the winter of 1997, but no P. multocida were recovered from 390 water and 390 sediment samples from any of the 10 wetlands. No mortality events were observed on study wetlands during the winter of 1998; however, P. multocida was recovered from water and sediment samples in six of the 10 study wetlands. The pH levels were higher for wetlands experiencing outbreaks during the winter of 1997 than for nonoutbreak wetlands, and aluminum concentrations were higher in wetlands from which P. multocida were recovered during the winter of 1998. Water chemistry parameters (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and dissolved protein) previously linked with P. multocida and avian cholera mortality were not associated with the occurrence of avian cholera outbreaks or the presence of P. multocida in our study wetlands. Overall, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that wetland characteristics facilitate the presence of P. multocida and, thereby, allow some wetlands to serve as long-term sources (reservoirs) for P. multocida.

  4. Antibodies against Pasteurella multocida in snow geese in the western arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Baranyuk, V.; Sileo, L.; Price, J.I.

    1999-01-01

    To determine if lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) are a potential reservoir for the Pasteurella multocida bacterium that causes avian cholera, serum samples and/or pharyngeal swabs were collected from > 3,400 adult geese breeding on Wrangel Island (Russia) and Banks Island (Canada) during 1993-1996. Pharyngeal swab sampling rarely (> 0.1%) detected birds that were exposed to P. multocida in these populations. Geese with serum antibody levels indicating recent infection with P. multocida were found at both breeding colonies. Prevalence of seropositive birds was 3.5% at Wrangel Island, an area that has no recorded history of avian cholera epizootics. Prevalence of seropositive birds was 2.8% at Banks Island in 1994, but increased to 8.2% during 1995 and 1996 when an estimated 40,000-60,000 snow geese were infected. Approximately 50% of the infected birds died during the epizootic and a portion of the surviving birds may have become carriers of the disease. This pattern of prevalence indicated that enzootic levels of infection with P. multocida occurred at both breeding colonies. When no avian cholera epizootics occurred (Wrangel Island, Banks Island in 1994), female snow geese (4.7%) had higher antibody prevalence than males (2.0%).

  5. Cloning and expression of the Pasteurella multocida toxin gene, toxA, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, S K; Foged, N T

    1989-01-01

    A chromosomal DNA library of a toxigenic type D strain of Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida was established in Escherichia coli. From this library two clones, SPE308 and SPE312, were identified by using a monoclonal antibody against the osteoclast-stimulating P. multocida toxin (PMT). Extracts of these clones showed cytopathic activity identical to that of extracts of toxigenic P. multocida. The recombinant plasmids, pSPE308 and pSPE312, directed the synthesis of a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 143,000 which could be specifically detected by anti-PMT antibody. The recombinant toxin, which was located in the cytoplasm of E. coli, was purified by affinity chromatography with immobilized monoclonal antibody and was shown to react in a manner identical to that of PMT in a quantitative structural test using a series of monoclonal antibodies as well as in all quantitative functional tests used, i.e., tests for dermonecrotic activity and mouse lethality and the embryonic bovine lung cell test for cytopathic activity. The gene encoding this toxic activity was named toxA and was found to be present in the chromosome of toxigenic strains only of P. multocida. A probe spanning the toxA gene therefore has potential in the diagnosis and surveillance of progressive atrophic rhinitis in pigs. Images PMID:2680987

  6. Virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Pasteurella multocida isolated from poultry and swine.

    PubMed

    Furian, Thales Quedi; Borges, Karen Apellanis; Laviniki, Vanessa; Rocha, Silvio Luis da Silveira; de Almeida, Camila Neves; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro; Salle, Carlos Tadeu Pippi; Moraes, Hamilton Luiz de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida causes atrophic rhinitis in swine and fowl cholera in birds, and is a secondary agent in respiratory syndromes. Pathogenesis and virulence factors involved are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to detect 22 virulence-associated genes by PCR, including capsular serogroups A, B and D genes and to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of P. multocida strains from poultry and swine. ompH, oma87, plpB, psl, exbD-tonB, fur, hgbA, nanB, sodA, sodC, ptfA were detected in more than 90% of the strains of both hosts. 91% and 92% of avian and swine strains, respectively, were classified in serogroup A. toxA and hsf-1 showed a significant association to serogroup D; pmHAS and pfhA to serogroup A. Gentamicin and amoxicillin were the most effective drugs with susceptibility higher than 97%; however, 76.79% of poultry strains and 85% of swine strains were resistant to sulphonamides. Furthermore, 19.64% and 36.58% of avian and swine strains, respectively, were multi-resistant. Virulence genes studied were not specific to a host and may be the result of horizontal transmission throughout evolution. High multidrug resistance demonstrates the need for responsible use of antimicrobials in animals intended for human consumption, in addition to antimicrobial susceptibility testing to P. multocida. PMID:26887247

  7. Selective Membrane Redistribution and Depletion of Gαq-Protein by Pasteurella multocida Toxin.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Nathan C; Luo, Shuhong; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A

    2016-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), the major virulence factor responsible for zoonotic atrophic rhinitis, is a protein deamidase that activates the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Initial activation of G alpha-q-coupled phospholipase C-beta-1 signaling by PMT is followed by uncoupling of G alpha-q-dependent signaling, causing downregulation of downstream calcium and mitogenic signaling pathways. Here, we show that PMT decreases endogenous and exogenously expressed G alpha-q protein content in host cell plasma membranes and in detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fractions. This membrane depletion of G alpha-q protein was dependent upon the catalytic activity of PMT. Results indicate that PMT-modified G alpha-q redistributes within the host cell membrane from the DRM fraction into the soluble membrane and cytosolic fractions. In contrast, PMT had no affect on G alpha-s or G beta protein levels, which are not substrate targets of PMT. PMT also had no affect on G alpha-11 levels, even though G alpha-11 can serve as a substrate for deamidation by PMT, suggesting that membrane depletion of PMT-modified G-alpha-q has specificity.

  8. Ultrastructural Comparison of the Nasal Epithelia of Healthy and Naturally Affected Rabbits with Pasteurella multocida A

    PubMed Central

    Esquinas, Paula; Botero, Lucía; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An ultrastructural comparison between the nasal cavities of healthy rabbits and those suffering from two forms of spontaneous infection with Pasteurella multocida was undertaken. Twelve commercially produced rabbits of different ages and respiratory health status were divided into four groups: healthy from 0 to 21 days (G1, n = 2); healthy from 23 to 49 days (G2, n = 2); healthy from 51 to 69 days (G3, n = 2); diseased rabbits with septicemia and the rhinitic form of P. multocida infection (G4, n = 3). The main ultrastructural changes observed were a widening of the interepithelial spaces, increased activity and number of goblet cells, the formation of two types of vacuoles in epithelial cells, the degranulation and migration of heterophils between the epithelial cells, and the association of this migration with some of the other changes. No bacteria were observed adhering to the epithelium, and very few were observed free in the mucus. Scant inter-epithelial spaces were found in healthy rabbits, but they were not as large and numerous as those found in diseased animals. We discuss the origin and meaning of these changes but, we focus on the significance of the inter-epithelial spaces and goblet cells for the defense of the upper respiratory airways against the bacterium and its lipopolysaccharide. PMID:23577280

  9. Characterization of Pasteurella multocida isolates from wetland ecosystems during 1996 to 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Wilson, M.A.; Joly, D.O.; Lehr, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We cultured 126 Pasteurella multocida isolates, 92 from water and 34 from sediment samples collected from wetlands in the Pacific and Central flyways of the United States between 1996 and 1999. Most (121) of the isolates were P. multocida serotype 1, but serotypes 3, 3/4, 10, and 11 were also found. Many (82) of the isolates were further characterized by DNA fingerprinting procedures and tested in Pekin ducks for virulence. Almost all the serotype 1 isolates we tested caused mortality in Pekin ducks. Serotype 1 isolates varied in virulence, but the most consistent pattern was higher mortality in male ducks than in females. We found no evidence that isolates found in sediment vs. water, between Pacific and Central flyways, or during El Nino years had consistently different virulence. We also found a number of non-serotype 1 isolates that were avirulent in Pekin ducks. Isolates had DNA fingerprint profiles similar to those found in birds that died during avian cholera outbreaks.

  10. Plasmid and restriction endonuclease patterns in Pasteurella multocida isolated from a swine pyramid.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, Xavier; Casal, Jordi; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and plasmid profile were used to study the epidemiology of Pasteurella multocida in a swine pyramid structure. The studied pyramid was comprised of a group of 12 swine farrow-to-finish farms related by unidirectional animal movement. P. multocida isolates were obtained from the lungs of 275 slaughtered pigs. Serotyping was performed by hyaluronidase sensitivity test and toxicity was investigated by the ELISA test. HpaII was used to cleave the P. multocida extracted DNA. REA patterns relationships were studied using the Sokal-Michener coefficients, and the dendrogram was built using the UPGMA system. The 218 P. multocida isolates obtained were distributed in 17 REA patterns. In 9 of the 12 farms studied only 2-3 REA patterns were detected, with one clearly predominant pattern. The 81 strains with plasmids were assigned to six plasmid profiles. REA and plasmid profiles proved to be good epidemiological tools for identifying different strains of P. multocida with the same phenotype.

  11. Selective Membrane Redistribution and Depletion of Gαq-Protein by Pasteurella multocida Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, Nathan C.; Luo, Shuhong; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), the major virulence factor responsible for zoonotic atrophic rhinitis, is a protein deamidase that activates the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Initial activation of G alpha-q-coupled phospholipase C-beta-1 signaling by PMT is followed by uncoupling of G alpha-q-dependent signaling, causing downregulation of downstream calcium and mitogenic signaling pathways. Here, we show that PMT decreases endogenous and exogenously expressed G alpha-q protein content in host cell plasma membranes and in detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fractions. This membrane depletion of G alpha-q protein was dependent upon the catalytic activity of PMT. Results indicate that PMT-modified G alpha-q redistributes within the host cell membrane from the DRM fraction into the soluble membrane and cytosolic fractions. In contrast, PMT had no affect on G alpha-s or G beta protein levels, which are not substrate targets of PMT. PMT also had no affect on G alpha-11 levels, even though G alpha-11 can serve as a substrate for deamidation by PMT, suggesting that membrane depletion of PMT-modified G-alpha-q has specificity. PMID:27490568

  12. Selective Membrane Redistribution and Depletion of Gαq-Protein by Pasteurella multocida Toxin.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Nathan C; Luo, Shuhong; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), the major virulence factor responsible for zoonotic atrophic rhinitis, is a protein deamidase that activates the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Initial activation of G alpha-q-coupled phospholipase C-beta-1 signaling by PMT is followed by uncoupling of G alpha-q-dependent signaling, causing downregulation of downstream calcium and mitogenic signaling pathways. Here, we show that PMT decreases endogenous and exogenously expressed G alpha-q protein content in host cell plasma membranes and in detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fractions. This membrane depletion of G alpha-q protein was dependent upon the catalytic activity of PMT. Results indicate that PMT-modified G alpha-q redistributes within the host cell membrane from the DRM fraction into the soluble membrane and cytosolic fractions. In contrast, PMT had no affect on G alpha-s or G beta protein levels, which are not substrate targets of PMT. PMT also had no affect on G alpha-11 levels, even though G alpha-11 can serve as a substrate for deamidation by PMT, suggesting that membrane depletion of PMT-modified G-alpha-q has specificity. PMID:27490568

  13. Regeneration of toxigenic Pasteurella multocida induced severe turbinate atrophy in pigs detected by computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophic rhinitis is a widely prevalent infectious disease of swine caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica and Pasteurella multocida. The course of the disease is considered to be different depending on the principal aetiological agents distinguishing B. bronchiseptica induced non-progressive and toxigenic P. multocida produced progressive forms. In order to compare the pathological events of the two forms of the disease, the development of nasal lesions has longitudinally been studied in pigs infected by either B. bronchiseptica alone or B. bronchiseptica and toxigenic P. multocida together using computed tomography to visualise the nasal structures. Results B. bronchiseptica infection alone caused moderately severe nasal turbinate atrophy and these lesions completely regenerated by the time of slaughter. Unexpectedly, complete regeneration of the bony structures of the nasal cavity was also observed in pigs infected by B. bronchiseptica and toxigenic P. multocida together in spite of seeing severe turbinate atrophy in most of the infected animals around the age of six weeks. Conclusions B. bronchiseptica mono-infection has been confirmed to cause only mild to moderate and transient lesions, at least in high health status pigs. Even severe turbinate atrophy induced by B. bronchiseptica and toxigenic P. multocida combined infection is able to be reorganised to their normal anatomical structure. Computed tomography has further been verified to be a useful tool to examine the pathological events of atrophic rhinitis in a longitudinal manner. PMID:24171824

  14. Experimental Study of the Pathogenicity of Pasteurella multocida Capsular Type B in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Katoch, S; Verma, L; Sharma, M; Asrani, R K; Kumar, S; Chahota, R; Verma, S

    2015-01-01

    The increased frequency of isolation of Pasteurella multocida capsular type B from rabbitries in north-western India prompted this investigation into the role of this organism in inducing disease in rabbits. Ten rabbits were divided into two groups of five animals. Group I rabbits were infected intranasally (IN) with 1 ml of inoculum containing 2 × 10(5) colony forming units/ml, while rabbits in group II were given 1 ml phosphate buffered saline IN. The rabbits in group I developed respiratory distress, increased rectal temperature and severe dyspnoea, with death occurring 24-48 h post infection. The main pathological findings were severe congestion and haemorrhage in the trachea, fibrinopurulent pneumonia, bacteraemia and septicaemia. The nasal secretions of all group I animals contained P. multocida. These observations indicate that in addition to P. multocida capsular types A and D, P. multocida capsular type B can also be highly pathogenic for rabbits.

  15. Serotypes and DNA fingerprint profiles of Pasteurella multocida isolated from raptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Duncan, R.M.; Nordholm, G.E.; Berlowski, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida isolates from 21 raptors were examined by DNA fingerprint profile and serotyping methods. Isolates were obtained from noncaptive birds of prey found in 11 states from November 28, 1979, through February 10, 1993. Nine isolates were from bald eagles, and the remaining isolates were from hawks, falcons, and owls. Seven isolates were members of capsule group A, and 14 were nonencapsulated. One isolate was identified as somatic type 3, and another was type 3,4,7; both had unique HhaI DNA fingerprint profiles. Nineteen isolates expressed somatic type 1 antigen; HhaI profiles of all type 1 isolates were identical to each other and to the HhaI profile of the reference somatic type 1, strain X-73. The 19 type 1 isolates were differentiated by sequential digestion of DNA with HpaII; four HpaII fingerprint profiles were obtained. The HpaII profile of one isolate was identical to the HpaII profile of strain X-73. Incidence of P. multocida somatic type 1 in raptors suggests that this type may be prevalent in other wildlife or wildlife environments.

  16. Expression, purification and crystallization of class C acid phosphatases from Francisella tularensis and Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harkewal; Felts, Richard L.; Ma, Li; Malinski, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Class C nonspecific acid phosphatases are bacterial enzymes that are secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and hydrolyze a variety of phosphomono­esters at acidic pH. These enzymes are of interest for the development of improved vaccines and clinical diagnostic methods. In one case, the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis, the class C phosphatase plays a role in bacterial fitness. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization methods for the class C acid phosphatases from F. tularensis and Pasteurella multocida are reported. Crystals of the F. tularensis enzyme diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with one enzyme molecule in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of the P. multocida enzyme diffracted to 1.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with three molecules in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction patterns from crystals of the P. multocida enzyme exhibited multiple interpenetrating reciprocal-space lattices, indicating epitaxial twinning. Despite this aberrance, autoindexing was robust and the data could be satisfactorily processed to 1.85 Å resolution using MOSFLM and SCALA. PMID:19255471

  17. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Pasteurella multocida isolated from chickens and japanese quails in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rigobelo, Everlon Cid; Blackall, Patrick Joseph; Maluta, Renato Pariz; de Ávila, Fernando Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A study was performed to verify the presence of Pasteurella multocida in eight different poultry groups of 90 birds each. Groups I to IV were chickens (I being > 6 weeks of age with a history of respiratory illness, II > 6 weeks of age and free of respiratory illness, III < 6 weeks of age with respiratory illness and IV being < 6 weeks of age and with no respiratory illness. Groups V to VIII had the matching characteristics of Groups I to V but consisted of Japanese Quails. The P. multocida isolation rate from the groups was as follows; Group I 56/90 (62.3%) Group II 18/90 (20.0%), Group III 12/90 (13.3%), Group IV 3/90 (3.33%), Group V 8/90 (8.88%), Group VI 2/90 (2.22%) Group VII 2/90 (2.22%) and Group VIII 1/90 (1.11%). These isolation rates were not significantly different within the groups of a bird type but the overall chicken isolation rate was significantly higher than the quail isolation rate (p < 0.01). All isolates were examined for their sensitivity to four antimicrobial agents. The results showed only low levels of resistance to the agents tested. The highest level of resistance detected was to cephalothin (5.1% of isolates) followed by amikacin (3.4%). PMID:24159299

  18. Immunoelectrophoresis employing avian antisera for the detection and quantitation of Pasteurella multocida antigens.

    PubMed

    McKinney, K L; Rimler, R B

    1981-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis with various buffer systems at high and low pH was examined for suitability to detect and quantitate Pasteurella multocida antigens with turkey or chicken anti-P. multocida sera. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis was used to develop a buffer system for one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The effects of pH, buffer, and molarity on resolution of immunoprecipitates were determined; 0.05 M sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer at pH 5.6 was the most suitable buffer. This buffer could be used in counterimmunoelectrophoresis with turkey or chicken sera to detect minute amounts of P. multocida protein antigens (4.3 ng/test) or lipopolysaccharide (3.12 micrograms/test). One-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis with the acetate buffer system required treatment of the gels with a 17% NaCl solution to induce immunoprecipitation of P. multocida lipopolysaccharide. Other techniques using the acetate buffer system did not require the high salt treatment. In two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, antisera migrated in the second dimension at pH 8.6, but did not migrate at pH 5.6. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis with the acetate buffer system was effective for quantitating P. multocida antigens.

  19. Plasmid and restriction endonuclease patterns in Pasteurella multocida isolated from a swine pyramid.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, Xavier; Casal, Jordi; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and plasmid profile were used to study the epidemiology of Pasteurella multocida in a swine pyramid structure. The studied pyramid was comprised of a group of 12 swine farrow-to-finish farms related by unidirectional animal movement. P. multocida isolates were obtained from the lungs of 275 slaughtered pigs. Serotyping was performed by hyaluronidase sensitivity test and toxicity was investigated by the ELISA test. HpaII was used to cleave the P. multocida extracted DNA. REA patterns relationships were studied using the Sokal-Michener coefficients, and the dendrogram was built using the UPGMA system. The 218 P. multocida isolates obtained were distributed in 17 REA patterns. In 9 of the 12 farms studied only 2-3 REA patterns were detected, with one clearly predominant pattern. The 81 strains with plasmids were assigned to six plasmid profiles. REA and plasmid profiles proved to be good epidemiological tools for identifying different strains of P. multocida with the same phenotype. PMID:11731160

  20. Blood bactericidal assay (Pasteurella haemolytica) comparison of morbidity in marketed feeder calves.

    PubMed

    Purdy, C W; Richards, A B; Foster, G S

    1989-02-01

    An in vitro bactericidal assay that used bovine heparinized blood was investigated for its usefulness in detecting differences in the bactericidal immunity of calves against Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 1 (Ph1). Greater than 90% of killing occurred within 30 minutes. The substitution of fetal calf serum for autologous calf plasma caused loss of bactericidal activity of the blood. Decomplemented calf serum also was low in bactericidal activity. The blood bactericidal assay appears to be opsonin antibody-dependent and complement-dependent. The coefficient of variation (CV) that can be expected with this assay was established by use of a group of 8 calves; within-day CV maximum was 0.9, and between-day CV maximum was 2.1. The blood bactericidal assay was used to evaluate 30 calves under typical market stress from 4 farms in eastern Tennessee. All calves had decreased bactericidal activity, as they moved into a feedyard in Texas. The bactericidal activity was reduced among sick calves, based on the severity of clinical signs. Morbidity was highest during the first 14 days in the feedlot. During this period, healthy calves had a decreased bactericidal index (BI) of 4 points, and calves with clinical signs of bovine respiratory tract disease for 3 days had a decreased BI of 8 points. The average reduction in the BI of calves with clinical signs of bovine respiratory tract disease for 6 or more days was 14 points. PMID:2719384

  1. Inhibition of Pasteurella multocida Adhesion to Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium Using Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Magda Patricia; Martinez, Nhora María; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a panel of lectins to inhibit the ability of Pasteurella multocida to adhere to and affect the rabbit respiratory epithelium. Nasal septa from rabbit fetuses were cultured with various lectins before the addition of P. multocida. The percentage of bacteria adhering to the epithelium was evaluated semiquantitatively by indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP) staining. The goblet cells (GCs) were counted in semithin sections stained with toluidine blue and served as the main morphological criterion to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the lectins. The lectins PNA, WGA, RCA120, and DBA significantly inhibited the adhesion of P. multocida to the ciliated epithelium (P < 0.05) and prevented the pathogen-induced increase in the number of GCs (P < 0.05) compared with those of positive control tissues. In addition, VVA, SJA, UEA I, DSL, SBA, and ECL significantly inhibited the increase in GCs compared with that of the control tissues. The results suggest that less aggressive therapeutic strategies, such as treatment with lectins, may represent alternative approaches to control bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:25810949

  2. Exposure of calves to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, P D; Maxie, M G; Wilkie, B N; Savan, M; Valli, V E; Johnson, J A

    1983-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether sequential exposure to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus followed by Pasteurella haemolytica, or P. haemolytica followed by parainfluenza-3 virus, could lead to the production of pulmonary lesions in conventionally-raised calves. Twenty male calves with low serum antibody titres to both organisms were placed in five equal groups. Synergism of parainfluenza-3 virus and P. haemolytica was not demonstrated in any of the sequentially infected groups and pulmonary lesions were mild in all challenged calves. Clinical signs of disease were not present after exposure to parainfluenza-3 virus although the virus was repeatedly isolated from nasal secretions of all inoculated calves. Exposure to P. haemolytica produced a transient response which consisted of increased rectal temperatures and respiratory rates, with a mild neutrophilic leukocytosis and a mild left shift present six hours postinoculation and returning to normal within 24 hours. Results from this study suggest, although do not confirm, that reduced pulmonary clearance of inhaled P. haemolytica in parainfluenza-3 virus infected calves does not necessarily lead to production of severe pulmonary lesions and that previous exposure to aerosols of P. haemolytica may not enhance secondary parainfluenza-3 virus infection. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:6320999

  3. In vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida in a tissue cage model in calves

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Changfu; Qu, Ying; Sun, Meizhen; Qiu, Zhenzhen; Huang, Xianhui; Huai, Binbin; Lu, Yan; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Marbofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone specially developed for use in veterinary medicine with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. The objective of our study was to re-evaluate in vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida using subcutaneously implanted tissue cages in calves. Calves were infected by direct injection into tissue cages with P. multocida(type B, serotype 2), then intramuscularly received a range of marbofloxacin doses 24 h after inoculation. The ratio of 24 h area under the concentration-time curve divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration or the mutant prevention concentration (AUC24 h/MIC or AUC24 h/MPC) was the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index that best described the effectiveness of marbofloxacin against P. multocida (R2 = 0.8514) by non-linear regression analysis. Marbofloxacin exhibited a good antimicrobial activity in vivo. The levels of AUC24 h/MIC and AUC24 h/MPC that produced 50% (1.5log10 CFU/mL reduction) and 90% (3log10 CFU/mL reduction) of maximum response were 18.60 and 50.65 h, 4.67 and 12.89 h by using sigmoid Emax model WINNONLIN software, respectively. The in vivo PK/PD integrated methods by tissue cage model display the advantage of the evaluation of antimicrobial activity and the optimization of the dosage regimen for antibiotics in the presence of the host defenses, especially in target animal of veterinary interest. PMID:26257726

  4. Development of OMP based indirect ELISA to gauge the antibody titers in bovines against Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, V; Verma, S; Singh, G; Wani, A. H; Chahota, R; Dhar, P; Verma, L; Sharma, M

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) is an important pathogen of various domestic animals. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) play a major role in pathogenesis and immunogenicity of P. multocida. The aim of the study was to develop indirect enzyme linked immuno sorbant assay (ELISA) based on OMPs to ascertain the antibody titers in animals post-infection or to gauge the potency of vaccine. The OMPs were extracted and purified from P. multocida P:52 (vaccine strain) and P. multocida B:2 isolated from natural outbreak of Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) and analyzed on SDS PAGE and through western blot. The OMPs profile of the vaccine strain and the isolate from the natural outbreak of HS were found to be similar. Optimization of various components viz. coating antigens, anti-species conjugate, etc. were carried out against both anti-P. multocida hyper immune and pre immune serum. Validation of OMP based indirect ELISA assay to measure immune response against P. multocida in bovine revealed 91% diagnostic sensitivity (DSN) and about 100% diagnostic specificity (DSP) at 25% cut off. OMP based indirect ELISA was found to be more specific, but less sensitive as compared to WCL based assay. PMID:27175202

  5. Antibodies against Pasteurella multocida in snow geese in the western Arctic.

    PubMed

    Samuel, M D; Shadduck, D J; Goldberg, D R; Baranyuk, V; Sileo, L; Price, J I

    1999-07-01

    To determine if lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) are a potential reservoir for the Pasteurella multocida bacterium that causes avian cholera, serum samples and/or pharyngeal swabs were collected from > 3,400 adult geese breeding on Wrangel Island (Russia) and Banks Island (Canada) during 1993-1996. Pharyngeal swab sampling rarely (> 0.1%) detected birds that were exposed to P. multocida in these populations. Geese with serum antibody levels indicating recent infection with P. multocida were found at both breeding colonies. Prevalence of seropositive birds was 3.5% at Wrangel Island, an area that has no recorded history of avian cholera epizootics. Prevalence of seropositive birds was 2.8% at Banks Island in 1994, but increased to 8.2% during 1995 and 1996 when an estimated 40,000-60,000 snow geese were infected. Approximately 50% of the infected birds died during the epizootic and a portion of the surviving birds may have become carriers of the disease. This pattern of prevalence indicated that enzootic levels of infection with P. multocida occurred at both breeding colonies. When no avian cholera epizootics occurred (Wrangel Island, Banks Island in 1994), female snow geese (4.7%) had higher antibody prevalence than males (2.0%). PMID:10479077

  6. Partial Characterization of R-Plasmids from Pasteurella multocida Isolated from Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Stephen M.; Hirsh, Dwight C.

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, isolated from turkeys during an outbreak of septicemic disease (“fowl cholera”), was found to be resistant to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfonamides. Agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of DNA from these isolates indicated the presence of extrachromosomal elements. Plasmid DNA was isolated by cesium chloride-ethidium bromide density centrifugation. Escherichia coli was transformed to antimicrobic resistance with this DNA. Two plasmids were isolated. One of these plasmids had a buoyant density of 1.7158 g/cm3 (56.9 mol% guanine plus cytosine) and a molecular weight of 4.4 × 106 and conferred resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfonamides. The other, having a buoyant density of 1.7198 g/cm3 (61 mol% guanine plus cytosine) and a molecular weight of 3.44 × 106, conferred resistance to streptomycin and sulfonamides. Streptomycin resistance was mediated by streptomycin phosphotransferase. Compatibility group testing indicated that neither plasmid belonged to any of 13 compatibility groups (of conjugal plasmids). Both plasmids were also found to be compatible with three small, nonconjugative resistance plasmids. Images PMID:708012

  7. Linalool attenuates lung inflammation induced by Pasteurella multocida via activating Nrf-2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianchao; Yu, Lijun; Qiu, Jiaming; Shen, Bingyu; Wang, Di; Soromou, Lanan Wassy; Feng, Haihua

    2014-08-01

    Pasteurellosis caused by Pasteurella multocida manifest often as respiratory infection in farmed small ruminants. Although the incidence of pasteurellosis due to P. multocida mainly takes the form of pneumonia, there is limited information on host factors that play a role in disease pathogenesis in the milieu of host-pathogen interactions. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2), a critical regulator for various inflammatory and immune responses by controlling oxidative stress, may play an important role in the processes of inflammation induced by P. multocida. In this study, linalool, a natural compound of the essential oils in several aromatic plant species, elevated nuclear Nrf-2 protein translocation in the A549 lung cell line and in vivo. The P. multocida-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines expression was abrogated by Nrf-2 siRNA. Postponed treatment with linalool decreased lung neutrophil accumulation and enhanced clearance of P. multocida. Furthermore, linalool significantly increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes regulated by Nrf-2 and diminished lung tissue levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. In addition, animals treated with linalool had a marked improvement in survival. These findings have uncovered that linalool acts as a novel Nrf-2 activator for a novel therapeutic strategy in pathogen-mediated lung inflammation.

  8. In vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida in a tissue cage model in calves.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changfu; Qu, Ying; Sun, Meizhen; Qiu, Zhenzhen; Huang, Xianhui; Huai, Binbin; Lu, Yan; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Marbofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone specially developed for use in veterinary medicine with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. The objective of our study was to re-evaluate in vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida using subcutaneously implanted tissue cages in calves. Calves were infected by direct injection into tissue cages with P. multocida(type B, serotype 2), then intramuscularly received a range of marbofloxacin doses 24 h after inoculation. The ratio of 24 h area under the concentration-time curve divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration or the mutant prevention concentration (AUC24 h/MIC or AUC24 h/MPC) was the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index that best described the effectiveness of marbofloxacin against P. multocida (R (2) = 0.8514) by non-linear regression analysis. Marbofloxacin exhibited a good antimicrobial activity in vivo. The levels of AUC24 h/MIC and AUC24 h/MPC that produced 50% (1.5log10 CFU/mL reduction) and 90% (3log10 CFU/mL reduction) of maximum response were 18.60 and 50.65 h, 4.67 and 12.89 h by using sigmoid Emax model WINNONLIN software, respectively. The in vivo PK/PD integrated methods by tissue cage model display the advantage of the evaluation of antimicrobial activity and the optimization of the dosage regimen for antibiotics in the presence of the host defenses, especially in target animal of veterinary interest.

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of marbofloxacin in calves for Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Potter, T; Illambas, J; Pelligand, L; Rycroft, A; Lees, P

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of marbofloxacin were established in calves for six strains of each of the pneumonia pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. The distribution of marbofloxacin into inflamed (exudate) and non-inflamed (transudate) tissue cage fluids allowed comparison with the serum concentration-time profile. To establish the PD profile, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and calf serum. Moderately higher MICs were obtained for serum compared to MHB. An initial integration of PK-PD data established C(max)/MIC ratios of 45.0 and AUC(24h)/MIC values of 174.7 h, based on serum MICs, for both bacterial species. Using bacterial time-kill curves, generated ex vivo for serum marbofloxacin concentrations, PK-PD modelling established three levels of growth inhibition: AUC(24 h)/MIC ratios for no reduction, 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count from the initial inoculum count were 41.9, 59.5 and 68.0 h for M. haemolytica and 48.6, 64.9 and 74.8 h for P. multocida, on average respectively. Inter-strain variability for 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count was smaller for P. multocida than for M. haemolytica. In conjunction with literature data on MIC(90) values, the present results allowed prediction of dosages for efficacy for each organism for the three levels of growth inhibition.

  10. Pasteurella multocida Toxin as a Transporter of Non-Cell-Permeating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Stefan; Jehle, Doris; Schwan, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The protein toxin Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is the causative agent of atrophic rhinitis in pigs, leading to atrophy of the nasal turbinate bones by affecting osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The mechanism of PMT-induced intoxication is a deamidation of α-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, including Gαq, Gα13, and Gαi, thereby causing persistent activation of the G proteins. Here we utilized PMT as a transporter of the non-cell-permeating A domain of diphtheria toxin (DTa). Fusion proteins of PMT and DTa ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2, the natural target of diphtheria toxin, leading to cell toxicity. PMT-DTa effects were competed by PMT, indicating binding to the same cell surface receptor. Fluorescently labeled PMT-DTa and PMT colocalized with specific markers of early and late endosomes. Bafilomycin A, which inhibits vacuolar H+-ATPase, blocked PMT-DTa-induced intoxication of HEK-293 cells. By constructing various PMT-DTa chimeras, we identified a minimal region of PMT necessary for uptake of DTa. The data suggest that PMT is able to transport cargo proteins into eukaryotic cells by utilizing the PMT-specific uptake route. PMID:23630953

  11. Identification procedure for Pasteurella pneumotropica in microbiologic monitoring of laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Aiba, Takeshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Kato, Megumi; Kawamoto, Eiichi; Kiyokawa, Sumito; Morichika, Yoko; Muraguchi, Takehiko; Narita, Teruo; Okajima, Yasuo; Takakura, Akira; Itoh, Toshio

    2005-04-01

    Discrepancies have been recognized in the identification of Pasteurella pneumotropica between testing laboratories. To determine the causes of the differences and to propose a reliable identification procedure for P. pneumotropica, a working group was organized and 69 isolates identified or suspected as P. pneumotropica were collected from 8 laboratories in Japan. These isolates were examined by colony morphology, Gram-staining, the slide agglutination test using two antisera (ATCC35149 and MaR), two commercially available biochemical test kits (ID test, API20NE) and two primer sets of PCR tests (Wang PCR, CIEA PCR). The 69 isolates and two reference strains were divided into 10 groups by test results. No single procedure for P. pneumotropica identification was found. Among tested isolates, large differences were not observed by colony morphology and Gram-straining except for colony colors that depended on their biotypes. Sixty-eight out of 69 isolates were positive by the slide agglutination test using two antisera except for one isolate that tested with one antiserum. The ID test identified 61 out of 69 isolates as P. pneumotropica and there was no large difference from the results of CIEA PCR. From these results, we recommend the combination of colony observation, Gram-straining, the slide agglutination tests with two antisera and biochemical test using the ID test for practical and reliable identification of this organism.

  12. Molecular studies of Ssa1, a serotype-specific antigen of Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, R Y; Strathdee, C A; Shewen, P E; Cooney, B J

    1991-01-01

    A serotype-specific antigen of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 encoded on the recombinant plasmid pSSA1 is characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the insert DNA in pSSA1 identified the gene ssaI, which codes for a protein of approximately 100 kDa. In vivo labeling of pSSA1-encoded protein in Escherichia coli maxicells showed the expression of a 100-kDa protein from the insert DNA on the recombinant plasmid. Northern blot and primer extension analyses were used to identify the mRNA transcript in P. haemolytica A1 and the putative promoter of ssaI. The antigen (designated Ssa1) could be localized to the outer membrane of P. haemolytica A1 and E. coli clones carrying pSSA1. A rabbit serum against Ssa1 was produced by using whole cells of E. coli expressing Ssa1 on the surface as the immunogen, demonstrating that Ssa1 is immunogenic in rabbits. The results from colony immunoblot analysis with calf serum from animals that were resistant to P. haemolytica A1-induced pneumonia suggest indirectly that Ssa1 is also immunogenic in the animals. Images PMID:1840576

  13. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the Pasteurella haemolytica A1 glycoprotease gene.

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, K M; Lo, R Y; Mellors, A

    1991-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 secretes a glycoprotease which is specific for O-sialoglycoproteins such as glycophorin A. The gene encoding the glycoprotease enzyme has been cloned in the recombinant plasmid pH1, and its nucleotide sequence has been determined. The gene (designated gcp) codes for a protein of 35.2 kDa, and an active enzyme protein of this molecular mass can be observed in Escherichia coli clones carrying pPH1. In vivo labeling of plasmid-encoded proteins in E. coli maxicells demonstrated the expression of a 35-kDa protein from pPH1. The amino-terminal sequence of the heterologously expressed protein corresponds to that predicted from the nucleotide sequence. The glycoprotease is a neutral metalloprotease, and the predicted amino acid sequence of the glycoprotease contains a putative zinc-binding site. The gene shows no significant homology with the genes for other proteases of procaryotic or eucaryotic origin. However, there is substantial homology between gcp and an E. coli gene, orfX, whose product is believed to function in the regulation of macromolecule biosynthesis. Images PMID:1885539

  14. Sialoglycoprotease of Pasteurella haemolytica A1: detection of antisialoglycoprotease antibodies in sera of calves.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Shewen, P E; Cladman, W M; Conlon, J A; Mellors, A; Lo, R Y

    1994-01-01

    Log phase culture supernate from Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A, serotype 1 contains a proteolytic enzyme specific for O-sialoglycoproteins. Using two methods, Western immunoblotting and enzyme neutralization assay, it was demonstrated that certain bovine sera from two previous P. haemolytica A1 vaccination and challenge trials contained antibodies (Ab) (isotypes IgG1 and IgG2 on Western immunoblot) to the sialoglycoprotease (Gcp). In these trials, selected calves were vaccinated twice with either the commercial culture supernate vaccine Presponse or given phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). One trial was conducted during spring, P. haem XIX, and the other during the winter, P. haem XXI. Although there was no clear evidence for induction of anti-Gcp in response to vaccination, several calves seroconverted following intrapulmonary challenge with live P. haemolytica A1. This is the first report of anti-Gcp Ab in bovine sera. The results indicated that the Gcp is immunogenic and that the bacterium produces the enzyme in vivo. Further, animals with an anti-Gcp response had less pneumonia at necropsy, suggesting the Gcp may induce protective immunity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:8004547

  15. Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 2 contains the gene for a noncapsular serotype 1-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, C T; Maheswaran, S K; Murtaugh, M P

    1995-01-01

    An ssa1-homologous genomic fragment cloned from Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 2 (ST2) enabled transformation of Escherichia coli DH5 alpha to a serotype 1 (ST1) phenotype through expression of the ST1-specific antigen (Ssa1). The Ssa1 protein expressed by ssa1-transformed E. coli was susceptible to heat and protease treatment and was distinct from P. haemolytica ST1-specific capsular polysaccharide. Electrophoretic analysis of in vitro-translated proteins, as well as the predicted amino acid sequence, demonstrated that Ssa1 proteins encoded from either ST1- or ST2-derived ssa1 genes were essentially identical. A comparison of the nucleotide sequences of ssa1 genes derived from P. haemolytica ST1 and ST2 revealed greater than 99% homology. Amino acid sequence homology of the predicted products of ST1- and ST2-derived ssa1 genes was greater than 98%. Northern (RNA) blot studies revealed that the presence of an increased level of ssa1 transcript in P. haemolytica ST1 grown as surface-adherent cultures on solid medium was correlated with a serologically detectable Ssa1 protein. Expression of the ssa1 transcript in ST1 was similarly upregulated by a high iron concentration in the growth medium. PMID:7890392

  16. In vitro and in vivo pathogenicity studies of Pasteurella multocida strains harbouring different ompA.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Shailja; Sharma, Mandeep; Patil, R D; Kumar, Sandeep; Verma, Subhash

    2014-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a pathogenic, Gram-negative bacterium that is commonly found as normal flora in nasopharynx of variety of wild and domestic animals. Numerous virulence factors have been described for P. multocida isolates which include adherence and colonization factors, iron-regulated and acquisition proteins, extracellular enzymes such as neuraminidase, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capsule and a variety of outer membrane proteins (Omp). OmpA has a significant role in stabilizing the cell envelope structure by providing physical linkage between the outer membrane & peptidoglycan. It has been shown to mediate P. multocida -host cells interaction via heparin and/or fibronectin binding and therefore act as an important invasive molecule which could determine the final outcome of initial infection. Comparative nucleotide sequence analysis of ompA gene of P. multocida has revealed that despite extensive genetic diversity in ompA of P. multocida, most sequences could be classified into two major allele classes namely ompA allele (I) and allele (II). The P. multocida recovered from nasal cavity of bovine and belonging to two ompA classes were tested for their differential virulence. In vitro pathogenicity studies on Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell line employing adhesion and invasion assays indicated that P. multocida strain with ompA (I) is more invasive than P. multocida strain with ompA (II). In vivo studies in mice further reiterated that the isolates harbouring ompA(I) were comparatively more virulent to isolates harbouring ompA (II).

  17. Multiplex PCR To Identify Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance to these drugs. Macrolide resistance in members of the family Pasteurellaceae is conferred by combinations of at least three genes: erm(42), which encodes a monomethyltransferase and confers a type I MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype; msr(E), which encodes a macrolide efflux pump; and mph(E), which encodes a macrolide-inactivating phosphotransferase. Here, we describe a multiplex PCR assay that detects the presence of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) and differentiates between these genes. In addition, the assay distinguishes P. multocida from M. haemolytica by amplifying distinctive fragments of the 23S rRNA (rrl) genes. One rrl fragment acts as a general indicator of gammaproteobacterial species and confirms whether the PCR assay has functioned as intended on strains that are negative for erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E). The multiplex system has been tested on more than 40 selected isolates of P. multocida and M. haemolytica and correlated with MICs for the veterinary macrolides tulathromycin and tilmicosin, and the newer compounds gamithromycin and tildipirosin. The multiplex PCR system gives a rapid and robustly accurate determination of macrolide resistance genotypes and bacterial genus, matching results from microbiological methods and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:22564832

  18. The survival rate of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bacteroides forsythus following 4 randomized treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Shiloah, J; Patters, M R; Dean, J W; Bland, P; Toledo, G

    1997-08-01

    The overall goal of this clinical study was to determine the short-term anti-infective effects of four randomized treatment modalities on Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), and Bacteroides forsythus (Bf) and determine the effects of bacterial survival on treatment outcomes in patients with adult periodontitis. Twelve adult patients requiring therapy for moderate periodontitis were selected for this study. All patients had at least one tooth in each quadrant that had an inflamed pocket of probing depth > or =5 mm with probing attachment loss that harbored at least one of the following three periodontal pathogens: Aa, Pg, or Bf. The number of target organisms per site was determined pre-operatively, at 1 week, and 1 month and 3 months postoperatively utilizing DNA probes. One quadrant in each patient was randomly assigned to each one of the following four treatment groups: 1) scaling and root planing (SRP group); 2) pocket reduction through osseous surgery and apically-positioned flap (OS group); 3) modified Widman flap (MWF group); and 4) modified Widman flap and topical application of saturated citric acid at pH 1 for 3 minutes (CA group). The 4 treatment modalities were performed in one appointment. No postoperative antibiotics were used. Patients were instructed to supplement their daily oral hygiene with chlorohexidine oral rinse during the study. The results of this investigation indicated that: 1) none of the treatment modalities was effective in eliminating the target species; 2) the incidence of infected sites for all groups was 100% preoperatively; 62.5%, 33.3%, and 31.3% at 1 week, and 1 and 3 months postoperatively, respectively; 3) these infected sites lost 1.1 +/- 0.4 mm of probing attachment compared to gain of 0.0 +/- 0.3 mm for uninfected sites; 4) the infected sites had higher plaque and bleeding on probing 0.9 +/- 0.3, 73 +/- 12%, respectively, compared to 0.3 +/- 0.1 and 30 +/- 8% for the uninfected sites

  19. Site-specific subgingival colonization by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, M; Festa, F; di Placido, G; D'Attilio, M; Catamo, G; Piccolomini, R

    1999-04-01

    A high prevalence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in subgingival plaque in patients for orthodontia already has been observed. The present study had the following aims: 1) to ascertain a direct relationship between the orthodontic appliance placement and the subgingival colonization by Aa, and 2) to determine whether the Aa growth specifically occurred on teeth with braces attached or whether the presence of orthodontic appliances could also cause the isolation of Aa in teeth free from therapeutic appliances. Twenty-four young systemically and periodontally healthy subjects with malaligned and crowded teeth in the anterior sextants of both dental arches participated in this study. After 1 session of ultrasonic scaling with oral hygiene instructions during the first experimental session, the mesiobuccal sites of the first molars and the distobuccal sites of the lateral incisors in both dental arches in each participant were subjected to clinical and microbiologic examination for the recovery of Aa. Clinical examination consisted of recording the presence of plaque and the examination of gingival bleeding on probing and probing depth. Microbiologic sampling was obtained with the insertion of 3 sterile paper points at the deepest part of each gingival sulcus. Altogether, 192 periodontal sites were examined. After the examinations, the patients received fixed orthodontic appliances in only 1 dental arch (test sites) and the other one was left free from appliances (control sites). Clinical examination and microbiologic sampling were repeated in the same experimental test and control sites after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. At the 12-week session, the orthodontic appliance was removed from the test arch, and, 4 weeks later, a further clinical and microbiologic examination was performed. The results showed that, during the period with orthodontic appliances, the presence of plaque scores and the gingival bleeding on probing scores were increased significantly and that

  20. Willingness to pay for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia vaccination in Narok South District of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kairu-Wanyoike, Salome W; Kaitibie, Simeon; Heffernan, Claire; Taylor, Nick M; Gitau, George K; Kiara, Henry; McKeever, Declan

    2014-08-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is an economically important trans-boundary cattle disease which affects food security and livelihoods. A conjoint analysis-contingent valuation was carried out on 190 households in Narok South District of Kenya to measure willingness to pay (WTP) and demand for CBPP vaccine and vaccination as well as factors affecting WTP. The mean WTP was calculated at Kenya Shillings (KSh) 212.48 (USD 3.03) for vaccination using a vaccine with the characteristics that were preferred by the farmers (preferred vaccine and vaccination) and KSh -71.45 (USD -1.02) for the currently used vaccine and vaccination. The proportion of farmers willing to pay an amount greater than zero was 66.7% and 34.4% for the preferred and current vaccine and vaccination respectively. About one third (33.3%) of farmers would need to be compensated an average amount of KSh 1162.62 (USD 13.68) per animal to allow their cattle to be vaccinated against CBPP using the preferred vaccine and vaccination. About two-thirds (65.6%) of farmers would need to be compensated an average amount of KSh 853.72 (USD 12.20) per animal to allow their cattle to be vaccinated against CBPP using the current vaccine and vaccination. The total amount of compensation would be KSh 61.39 million (USD 0.88 million) for the preferred vaccine and vaccination and KSh 90.15 million (USD 1.29 million) for the current vaccine and vaccination. Demand curves drawn from individual WTP demonstrated that only 59% and 27% of cattle owners with a WTP greater than zero were willing to pay a benchmark cost of KSh 34.60 for the preferred and current vaccine respectively. WTP was negatively influenced by the attitude about household economic situation (p=0.0078), presence of cross breeds in the herd (p<0.0001) and years since CBPP had been experienced in the herd (p=0.0375). It was positively influenced by education (p=0.0251) and the practice of treating against CBPP (p=0.0432). The benefit cost ratio (BCR

  1. An occurrence of equine transport pneumonia caused by mixed infection with Pasteurella caballi, Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Y; Komae, H; Ide, H; Nakagawa, H; Yoshida, Y; Kamada, M; Kataoka, Y; Nakazawa, M

    1993-06-01

    An acute death occurred in a racehorse with pneumonia after long-distance transportation in December, 1990. Pasteurella caballi, Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus zooepidemicus were isolated from the lung at high rate. Specific antigens of these bacteria were also demonstrated immunohistologically in the pneumonic lesion. These findings indicated that the disease is equine transport pneumonia caused by a mixed infection of the three bacterial species. This is the first report on the isolation of P. caballi and S. suis from a racehorse in Japan. PMID:8357920

  2. Identification of Pasteurella multocida capsular types isolated from rabbits and other domestic animals in Mexico with respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Vega-Sánchez, Vicente; Zamora-Espinosa, José Luis; Acosta-Dibarrat, Jorge; Aguilar-Romero, Francisco; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2012-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of pasteurellosis, a major disease in most domestic animals and livestock. In this study, a total of 34 isolates of P. multocida from rabbits and other domestic animals from Mexico with respiratory diseases underwent polymerase chain reaction-based capsular typing. One sheep isolate was found to belong to capsular serogroup D, whereas the rest of the rabbit, sheep, cattle, pig, goat, and duck isolates belonged to capsular serogroup A of P. multocida. This is the first report of capsular type A in P. multocida isolates from rabbits and duck origin in Mexico.

  3. Conjugal transfer of broad-host-range incompatibility group P and Q plasmids from Escherichia coli to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Goncharoff, P; Yip, J K; Wang, H; Schreiner, H C; Pai, J A; Furgang, D; Stevens, R H; Figurski, D H; Fine, D H

    1993-01-01

    The first example of conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is presented. Derivatives of the incompatibility group P (IncP) plasmid RK2 successfully transferred from an E. coli donor to an A. actinomycetemcomitans recipient. The resulting A. actinomycetemcomitans transconjugants transferred the plasmids back to E. coli recipients. The IncP transfer functions were also used in trans to mobilize the IncQ plasmid pBK1 from E. coli to A. actinomycetemcomitans. The IncP and IncQ plasmids both transferred into A. actinomycetemcomitans at high frequencies (0.3 to 0.5 transconjugants per donor) and showed no gross deletions, insertions, or rearrangements. Determinations of MICs of various antibiotics for the A. actinomycetemcomitans transconjugant strains demonstrated the expression of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin resistance determinants. Images PMID:8335386

  4. Genetic and Functional Analyses of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans AfeABCD Siderophore-Independent Iron Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Eric R.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; McGillivary, Glen; Connerly, Pamela L.; Actis, Luis A.

    2005-01-01

    The Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans afeABCD iron transport system, the expression of which is controlled by iron and Fur, was identified in three different isolates. The protein products of this locus are related to bacterial ABC transporters involved in metal transport. Transformation of the Escherichia coli 1017 iron acquisition mutant with a plasmid harboring afeABCD promoted cell growth under iron-chelated conditions. However, insertion disruption of each of the afeABCD coding regions abolished this growth-relieving effect. The replacement of the parental afeA allele with the derivative afeA::EZ::TN drastically reduced the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans cells to grow under iron-chelated conditions. PMID:15908408

  5. Molecular Characterization of an Outer Membrane Protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Belonging to the OmpA Family

    PubMed Central

    White, Peter A.; Nair, Sean P.; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Wilson, Michael; Henderson, Brian

    1998-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (OMP) of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an OmpA homolog that demonstrates electrophoretic heat modifiability. The gene encoding this protein was isolated from a genomic library of A. actinomycetemcomitans NCTC 9710 by immunoscreening with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis. Expression of the cloned gene in Escherichia coli and subsequent Western blot analysis revealed a protein with an approximate molecular mass of 34 kDa. The amino acid sequence predicted from the cloned gene demonstrated that the mature protein had a molecular mass of 34,911 Da and significant identity to members of the OmpA family of proteins. We have named the major OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans Omp34, and its corresponding gene has been named omp34. PMID:9423883

  6. Inhibition of growth and alteration of host cell interactions of Pasteurella multocida with natural byproducts.

    PubMed

    Salaheen, S; Almario, J A; Biswas, D

    2014-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a leading cause of fowl cholera in both free-range pasture and conventional/commercially raised poultry. Its infection is a serious threat to poultry health and overall flock viability. Organic poultry is comparatively more vulnerable to this pathogen. It is a significant cause of production loss and price increase of poultry products, specifically organic poultry products. Some plant products are well documented as sources of natural antimicrobials such as polyphenols found in different berry pomaces and citrus oil. Pomace, a byproduct (primarily of seeds and skins) of fruits used for juice and wine production, and citrus oil, the byproduct of citrus juice production, show promising antimicrobial activity against various pathogens. Here, we showed for the first time that blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts and citrus oil inhibited P. multocida growth. Minimum bactericidal concentrations were determined as 0.3 and 0.4 mg/mL gallic acid equivalent for blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts, respectively. Similarly, only 0.05% citrus oil (vol/vol) completely inhibited P. multocida growth. Under shaking conditions, the antimicrobial activity of both pomace extracts and citrus oil was more intensive. Even citrus oil vapor also significantly reduced the growth of P. multocida. In addition, cell surface hydrophobicity of P. multocida was increased by 2- to 3-fold and its adherence to chicken fibroblast (DF1) and bovine mammary gland (MacT) cells was reduced significantly in the presence of pomace extracts only. This study indicates that these natural products might be good alternatives to conventional antimicrobial agents, and hence, may be used as feed or water supplements to control fowl cholera and reduce production loss caused by P. multocida. PMID:24879687

  7. Proximity-Dependent Inhibition of Growth of Mannheimia haemolytica by Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Dassanayake, Rohana P.; Kugadas, Abirami; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Call, Douglas R.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. haemolytica has been isolated by culture less frequently than the other bacteria. We hypothesized that the growth of M. haemolytica is inhibited by other bacteria in the lungs of BHS. The objective of this study was to determine whether P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica. Although in monoculture both bacteria exhibited similar growth characteristics, in coculture with P. multocida there was a clear inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica. The inhibition was detected at mid-log phase and continued through the stationary phase. When cultured in the same medium, the growth of M. haemolytica was inhibited when both bacteria were separated by a membrane that allowed contact (pore size, 8.0 μm) but not when they were separated by a membrane that limited contact (pore size, 0.4 μm). Lytic bacteriophages or bactericidal compounds could not be detected in the culture supernatant fluid from monocultures of P. multocida or from P. multocida-M. haemolytica cocultures. These results indicate that P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica by a contact- or proximity-dependent mechanism. If the inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica by P. multocida occurs in vivo as well, it could explain the inconsistent isolation of M. haemolytica from the lungs of pneumonic BHS. PMID:22798357

  8. The effect of concurrent infections with Pasteurella multocida and Ascaridia galli on free range chickens.

    PubMed

    Dahl, C; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Bisgaard, M; Muhairwa, A P; Petersen, K M D; Poulsen, J S D; Jensen, A L

    2002-05-24

    Pasteurella multocida and Ascaridia galli are observed with high prevalences in free range chickens in Denmark, but the impact is unknown. A study was carried out to examine the interaction between A. galli and P. multocida in chickens and the impact on production. Five groups, each with 20 18-week-old Lohmann Brown chickens were infected. Group 1 was orally infected with 1000+/-50 embryonated A. galli eggs. Group 2 received 10(4) cfu P. multocida intratracheally. Group 3 was infected with A. galli and subsequently with P. multocida. Group 4 was infected with P. multocida followed by A. galli. Group 5 was the control. The study ran for 11 weeks where clinical manifestations, weight gain and egg production were recorded. Excretion of P. multocida was determined on individual basis and blood smears were made for differential counts. At the end of the study pathological lesions and the number of adult worms, larvae and eggs in the faeces were recorded. The birds were more severely affected when infected with both pathogens compared to single infections with A. galli or P. multocida, respectively. A lower weight gain and egg production was observed with dual infections. A. galli infection followed by a secondary P. multocida infection resulted in more birds with pathological lesions and continued P. multocida excretion. In conclusion a negative interaction between A. galli and P. multocida was observed and it is postulated that free range chickens are at higher risk of being subjected to outbreaks of fowl cholera when they are infected with A. galli.

  9. Comparative pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin in healthy and Pasteurella multocida infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Tohamy, M A

    2011-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic aspects of orbifloxacin were studied in both healthy and naturally diseased ducks after a single intravenous and intramuscular dose of 5 mg kg⁻¹ body weight. The serum concentrations of orbifloxacin following single intravenous and intramuscular injections were higher in diseased than in healthy ducks. The disposition of orbifloxacin after a single intravenous injection was described by a two-compartment open model in both healthy and diseased ducks. Orbifloxacin was distributed and eliminated at a significantly slower rate in diseased than in healthy ducks. The total body clearance (Cl(B)) was lower in diseased (0·131 l kg⁻¹h⁻¹) than healthy ducks (0·191 l kg⁻¹h⁻¹). Following intramuscular administration of orbifloxacin, the peak serum concentration (C(max)) was higher in diseased than in healthy ducks, and this was achieved at a maximum time (t(max)) of 1·114 and 0·993 h, respectively. The drug was eliminated at a significant slower rate in diseased ducks (elimination half-life t (0·5(el))= 5·07 h) than in healthy ducks (elimination half-life t (0·5(el))= 4·18 h). These results indicate that drug elimination patterns in healthy and diseased ducks are not the same. The pharmacokinetic profile of the drug is altered in diseased ducks due to the increased serum orbifloxacin concentrations compared with clinically healthy ducks. In conclusion, 5 mg kg⁻¹ body weight of orbifloxacin administered as a single dose once daily could be useful in the treatment of disease caused by Pasteurella multocida pathogen in ducks.

  10. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Smith, Susan R.; Miyamoto, Amy; Shadduck, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 × 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  11. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Miyamoto, A.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 ?? 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  12. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  13. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Smith, Susan R; Miyamoto, Amy; Shadduck, Daniel J

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 x 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission. PMID:12061646

  14. Pasteurella multocida in scavenging family chickens and ducks: carrier status, age susceptibility and transmission between species.

    PubMed

    Mbuthia, P G; Njagi, L W; Nyaga, P N; Bebora, L C; Minga, U; Kamundia, J; Olsen, J E

    2008-02-01

    Pasteurella multocida causes fowl cholera, a highly contagious and severe disease in chickens and water fowls. The disease is not well described in less intensive production systems, including scavenging family poultry production in developing countries. P. multocida was isolated from 25.9% of healthy-looking ducks and 6.2% of chickens from free-range family poultry farms and at slaughter slabs at market. On experimental infection with 1.2 to 2.0 x 10(8) organisms of the P. multocida type strain (NCTC 10322(T)), 12-week-old chickens expressed fowl cholera clinical signs significantly more times (372 signs) than those of 4-week-old, 8-week-old and 16-week-old chickens (173, 272 and 187 signs) and more signs were severe. In family ducks the 8-week-old birds expressed clinical signs significantly more times (188 signs) than those of the other age groups (117, 80, and 83 signs, respectively) and severe signs were more frequent. P. multocida transmitted from seeder birds (n=12) to sentinel birds (n=30), which developed clinical signs, and in some cases lesions of fowl cholera allowed bacterial re-isolation, whether infected ducks served as seeders for chickens or chickens served as seeder for ducks. This study has documented the occurrence of P. multocida among healthy-appearing family poultry in a tropical setting, and demonstrated that age susceptibility is highest in 12-week-old family chickens and 8-week-old family ducks when challenged with a low-virulent strain of P. multocida. It has further demonstrated that cross-transmission of fowl cholera may happen between family ducks and chickens, and vice versa. PMID:18202950

  15. Phenotypic, antigenic, and molecular characterization of Pasteurella piscicida strains isolated from fish.

    PubMed Central

    Magariños, B; Romalde, J L; Bandín, I; Fouz, B; Toranzo, A E

    1992-01-01

    We compared Pasteurella piscicida strains isolated from different fish species in several European countries with strains isolated in Japan and the United States. The taxonomic analysis revealed that, regardless of the geographic origin and source of isolation, all the strains exhibited the same biochemical and physiological characteristics. Serological assays with different rabbit antisera demonstrated a high level of antigenic similarity among strains, with cross-agglutination titers of 20,480 to 40,960. This serological homogeneity was supported by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and membrane protein profiles. All the P. piscicida strains had the same electrophoretic LPS pattern, showing O side chains with a ladder-like structure, and shared at least four major outer membrane proteins, of 20, 30, 42, and 53 kDa. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with LPS and protein indicated that all the P. piscicida strains are immunologically related. In addition, the chromosomal DNA fingerprint patterns obtained for the European strains with the enzymes EcoRI and BamHI were practically identical to those of the Japanese and U.S. strains. Although some differences were found in the plasmid profiles of P. piscicida, a large number of strains possessed in common plasmid bands of 20 and 7 MDa. In addition, a plasmid of 50 MDa was present in the majority of the European strains. Restriction endonuclease analysis demonstrated the genetic homology of the plasmid bands shared by most of the European strains. All the P. piscicida strains had the same drug resistance patterns, indicating that a correlation between plasmid carriage and resistance to a specific antimicrobial agent cannot be established. The high levels of phenotypic, serological, and genetic homogeneity found among the P. piscicida strains should facilitate the development of DNA probes with diagnostic purposes as well as the design of effective vaccines. Images PMID:1444366

  16. Florfenicol As a Modulator Enhancing Antimicrobial Activity: Example Using Combination with Thiamphenicol against Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chia-Fong; Shien, Jui-Hung; Chang, Shao-Kuang; Chou, Chi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Synergistic effects between the same class of antibiotics are rarely reported. Our previous study found synergistic-like interaction between florfenicol (FFC) and thiamphenicol (TAP) against Staphylococcus aureus. Here, the enhanced antimicrobial activity was evaluated in 97 clinical isolates of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Susceptible strains were initially identified by checkerboard microdilution assay (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] ≤ 0.625), followed by confirmation of synergism using the time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). In all, 43% of Pasteurella multocida tested were susceptible to the enhanced bactericidal effect. In chicken fowl cholera models, FFC and TAP combination at much lower dosage that is correspondent to their MIC deduction provided maximum protection in vivo. Furthermore, synergistic combination of FFC with oxytetracycline (OTC) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro was also demonstrated. Based on the enhanced uptake of TAP and OTC, FFC presumably elicits enhanced antimicrobial activity in an orderly manner through alteration of bacterial membrane permeability or efflux systems and subsequent increase of intracellular concentration of the antibiotics used in combination. Results of ethidium bromide accumulation assay and RNA-seq showed little evidence for the involvement of efflux pumps in the synergy but further investigation is required. This study suggests the potentiality of a novel combination regimen involving FFC as an initiating modulator effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria depending on the antibiotics that are combined. The observed improvement of bacteriostatic effect to bactericidal, and the extended effectiveness against FFC-resistant bacterial strains warrant further studies. PMID:27065961

  17. Capsular serotyping of Pasteurella multocida from various animal hosts - a comparison of phenotypic and genotypic methods.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, N D; Ajam, N; Blackall, P J; Asiah, N M; Ramlan, M; Maria, J; Yuslan, S; Thong, K L

    2011-04-01

    One hundred and fourteen strains of Pasteurella multocida were isolated from different domestic animals species (cattle, buffalo, sheep, goat, pig, rabbit, dog, cat), avian species (chicken, duck, turkey) and wild animals (deer, tiger, orang utan, marmoset). The serogroups of P. multocida were determined by both conventional capsular serotyping and a multiplex PCR assay targeting specific capsular genes. Based on the conventional serotyping method, the 114 strains of P. multocida were subtyped into 55 species-specific (untypeable strains) P. multocida, 15 serogroup A, 23 serogroup B and 21 serogroup D. Based on the multiplex PCR assay on the specific capsular genes associated with each serogroup, the 114 strains were further divided to 22 species-specific P. multocida (KMT1 - 460 bp), 53 serogroup A (A - 1,044 bp), 33 serogroup B (B - 760 bp) and 6 serogroup D (D - 657 bp). No serogroup E (511 bp) or F (851 bp) was detected among the Malaysian P. multocida. PCR-based typing was more discriminative and could further subtype the previously untypeable strains. Overall, there was a significant and positive correlation between both methods in serogrouping P. multocida (r = 0.7935; p<0.4893). Various serogroups of P. multocida were present among the livestock with 75% of the strains belonging to serogroups A or B. PCR serotyping was therefore a highly species-specific, sensitive and robust method for detection and differentiation of P. multocida serogroups compared to conventional serotyping. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from Malaysia of the application of a PCR to rapidly define the species-specific P. multocida and its serogroups as an important zoonotic pathogen in Malaysia.

  18. Combinations of Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Field Isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida▿

    PubMed Central

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Rose, Simon; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections in cattle are commonly associated with the bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. These infections can generally be successfully treated in the field with one of several groups of antibiotics, including macrolides. A few recent isolates of these species exhibit resistance to veterinary macrolides with phenotypes that fall into three distinct classes. The first class has type I macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotic resistance and, consistent with this, the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 is monomethylated by the enzyme product of the erm(42) gene. The second class shows no lincosamide resistance and lacks erm(42) and concomitant 23S rRNA methylation. Sequencing of the genome of a representative strain from this class, P. multocida 3361, revealed macrolide efflux and phosphotransferase genes [respectively termed msr(E) and mph(E)] that are arranged in tandem and presumably expressed from the same promoter. The third class exhibits the most marked drug phenotype, with high resistance to all of the macrolides tested, and possesses all three resistance determinants. The combinations of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) are chromosomally encoded and intermingled with other exogenous genes, many of which appear to have been transferred from other members of the Pasteurellaceae. The presence of some of the exogenous genes explains recent reports of resistance to additional drug classes. We have expressed recombinant versions of the erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) genes within an isogenic Escherichia coli background to assess their individually contributions to resistance. Our findings indicate what types of compounds might have driven the selection for these resistance determinants. PMID:21709086

  19. Une arthrite septique sur prothèse totale de genou à Pasteurella multocida: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Kouevidjin, Biova Teko; Bassinga, Jonathan Sylvanus

    2015-01-01

    Une arthrite septique sur PTG est due essentiellement au Staphylococcus aureus suivie des staphylocoques à coagulase négative, et les streptocoques. Au cours de ses 40 dernières années très peu de cas d'infection sur arthroplastie à Pasteurella multocida ont été rapporté. La présentation clinique n'a rien de spécifique.la contamination survient après une morsure, griffure ou léchage d'un chat. L'interrogatoire et l'examen bactériologique est la clé du diagnostique. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente de 84 ans qui présente une infection a Pasteurella multocida suite à une morsure du chat 06 jours au paravent. Elle a bénéficié d'une prise en charge chirurgicale par lavage et synovectomie et une bi-antibiothérapie avec bonne évolution. PMID:26523162

  20. Comparative genome analysis of an avirulent and two virulent strains of avian Pasteurella multocida reveals candidate genes involved in fitness and pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fowl cholera is a highly contagious systemic disease affecting wild and domestic birds, frequently resulting in high morbidity and mortality. The causative agent is Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida). The completed genome of P. multocida strain Pm70 has been available for over eleven years and has...

  1. Microbial ecology of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Müller, H P; Heinecke, A; Borneff, M; Knopf, A; Kiencke, C; Pohl, S

    1997-08-01

    Information on intraoral distribution of putative periodontal pathogens might be essential for controlling different forms of periodontal disease. Colonization may be either promoted or impeded by other bacteria competing in the subgingival ecosystem. In recent investigations microbial associations between dental organisms have been determined in a multitude of subgingival plaque samples within multiple patients and described by odds ratios, in most circumstances without taking into account the correlated structure of the observations within a single individual. The present investigation had 3 major objectives: (i) to describe the intraoral distribution of some facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative rods, i.e. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens-like organisms and Capnocytophaga spp., in a multitude of subgingival and extracrevicular samples of 10 adult subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis; (ii) to analyse possible inconsistencies of microbial associations between these periodontal organisms; and (iii) to determine factors increasing the likelihood of isolating these bacteria in a given subgingival site by employing Generalized Estimation Equation (GEE) methods. Clinical examinations were carried out at 6 sites of every tooth present. In each subject, 13 extracrevicular (2 cheek mucosa, 3 tongue, 4 gingival, 2 tonsillar samples, 1 palatinal, 1 saliva sample) and between 22 and 44 subgingival samples from deepest sites of every tooth present (n = 296) were selectively cultivated for A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. In extracrevicular material, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp. and E. corrodens were isolated in 9, 10 and 6 patients, and from 65, 82 and 15% samples, respectively. The organisms were recovered from 51, 62 and 27% subgingival plaque samples, respectively. Heterogeneity tests did not reveal significant inconsistencies of microbial associations between bacteria in

  2. Multi-locus sequence analysis of mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae for the molecular epidemiology of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) is the causative agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), a devastating disease of domestic goats. The exact distribution of CCPP is not known but it is present in Africa and the Middle East and represents a significant threat to many disease-free areas including Europe. Furthermore, CCPP has been recently identified in Tajikistan and China. A typing method with an improved resolution based on Multi-Locus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) has been developed to trace new epidemics and to elucidate whether the recently identified cases in continental Asia were due to recent importation of Mccp. The H2 locus, a polymorphic region already in use as a molecular marker for Mccp evolution, was complemented with seven new loci selected according to the analysis of polymorphisms observed among the genome sequences of three Mccp strains. A total of 25 strains, including the two new strains from Asia, were analysed by MLSA resulting in the discrimination of 15 sequence types based on 53 polymorphic positions. A distance tree inferred from the concatenated sequences of the eight selected loci revealed two evolutionary lineages comprising five groups, which showed good correlation with geographic origins. The presence of a distinct Asian cluster strongly indicates that CCPP was not recently imported to continental Asia. It is more likely that the disease has been endemic in the area for a long time, as supported by historical clinical descriptions. In conclusion, this MLSA strategy constitutes a highly discriminative tool for the molecular epidemiology of CCPP. PMID:21756321

  3. Blood values of captive beira antelope (Dorcatragus megalotis) prior to and during an outbreak of fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome (FPPS).

    PubMed

    Gull, Jessica M; Hebel, Christiana; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Clauss, Marcus; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Hammer, Sven

    2014-12-01

    Currently the only captive population of beira antelope (Dorcatragus megalotis) is held at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, Qatar. An outbreak of a severe respiratory disease--fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome, most likely caused by Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae--led to a marked population decline. Reactive systemic inflammatory (AA) amyloidosis was noted as a chronic manifestation of the disease. Blood samples had been collected for biochemistry and hematology baseline values prior to the outbreak. Population-level changes were analyzed before and during the course of the outbreak in selected blood parameters (white blood cells [WBC], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], and creatinine). The annual population WBC increased and decreased concurrently with the population size, with a significant correlation between the two measures (R = 0.92; P = 0.001). Both BUN and creatinine values were higher during the outbreak. These values peaked at the same time as mortality, which was 1 yr after the WBC peak. These changes were interpreted as the transition from an acute disease with a primary respiratory manifestation into a chronic condition where renal amyloidosis led to chronic renal failure and death. Also, elevated liver values in diseased animals were attributed to amyloidosis. Parallels to a literature report on a lung disease complex caused by M. ovipneumoniae in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were found. Trends in population-level blood values of the beira antelopes implicate amyloidosis as a significant, long-term consequence of the putative Mycoplasma infection. PMID:25632657

  4. Characterization of the in vitro core surface proteome of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Ivanka; Liljander, Anne; Fischer, Anne; Smith, David G E; Inglis, Neil F; Scacchia, Massimo; Pini, Attilio; Jores, Joerg; Sacchini, Flavio

    2014-01-10

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is a severe cattle disease, present in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The development of improved diagnostic tests and vaccines for CBPP control remains a research priority. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to characterize the Triton X-114 soluble proteome of nine Mmm strains isolated from Europe or Africa. Of a total of 250 proteins detected, 67 were present in all strains investigated. Of these, 44 were predicted to be lipoproteins or cytoplasmic membrane-associated proteins and are thus likely to be members of the core in vitro surface membrane-associated proteome of Mmm. Moreover, the presence of all identified proteins in other ruminant Mycoplasma pathogens were investigated. Two proteins of the core proteome were identified only in other cattle pathogens of the genus Mycoplasma pointing towards a role in host-pathogen interactions. The data generated will facilitate the identification and prioritization of candidate Mycoplasma antigens for improved control measures, as it is likely that surface-exposed membrane proteins will include those that are involved in host-pathogen interactions.

  5. Diagnosis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by detection and identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae by PCR and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bölske, G; Mattsson, J G; Bascuñana, C R; Bergström, K; Wesonga, H; Johansson, K E

    1996-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), one of the most serious and dramatic diseases of goats, is caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (M. capripneumoniae). This organism is very difficult to isolate and to correctly identify. In a previous report we described a method for the rapid detection and identification of M. capripneumoniae. This method is based on a PCR system by which a segment of the 16S rRNA gene from all mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster can be amplified. The PCR product is then analyzed by restriction enzyme cleavage for the identification of M. capripneumoniae DNA. This system has now been further evaluated with respect to specificity and diagnostic efficacy for the identification and direct detection of the organism in clinical material. Identification by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified DNA from mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster was verified for 55 strains, among which were 15 strains of M. capripneumoniae. The PCR was applied to clinical samples from the nose, ear, pharynx, pleural fluid, and lung tissue containing M. capripneumoniae or other mycoplasmas. As expected, mycoplasmas belonging to the M. mycoides cluster could be detected by the PCR. Restriction enzyme analysis of the PCR products could then be applied for the identification of M. capripneumoniae. Clinical samples and cultures containing M. capripneumoniae were dried on filter paper, to try an easier sample transport method, and were tested by PCR. M. capripneumoniae DNA could be detected in the dried specimens, but the sensitivity of the PCR test was reduced. PMID:8815084

  6. Blood values of captive beira antelope (Dorcatragus megalotis) prior to and during an outbreak of fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome (FPPS).

    PubMed

    Gull, Jessica M; Hebel, Christiana; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Clauss, Marcus; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Hammer, Sven

    2014-12-01

    Currently the only captive population of beira antelope (Dorcatragus megalotis) is held at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, Qatar. An outbreak of a severe respiratory disease--fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome, most likely caused by Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae--led to a marked population decline. Reactive systemic inflammatory (AA) amyloidosis was noted as a chronic manifestation of the disease. Blood samples had been collected for biochemistry and hematology baseline values prior to the outbreak. Population-level changes were analyzed before and during the course of the outbreak in selected blood parameters (white blood cells [WBC], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], and creatinine). The annual population WBC increased and decreased concurrently with the population size, with a significant correlation between the two measures (R = 0.92; P = 0.001). Both BUN and creatinine values were higher during the outbreak. These values peaked at the same time as mortality, which was 1 yr after the WBC peak. These changes were interpreted as the transition from an acute disease with a primary respiratory manifestation into a chronic condition where renal amyloidosis led to chronic renal failure and death. Also, elevated liver values in diseased animals were attributed to amyloidosis. Parallels to a literature report on a lung disease complex caused by M. ovipneumoniae in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were found. Trends in population-level blood values of the beira antelopes implicate amyloidosis as a significant, long-term consequence of the putative Mycoplasma infection.

  7. Mathematical modelling of the transmission dynamics of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia reveals minimal target profiles for improved vaccines and diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Ssematimba, Amos; Jores, Joerg; Mariner, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a cattle disease that has hampered the development of the livestock sector in sub-Saharan Africa. Currently, vaccination with a live vaccine strain is its recommended control measure although unofficial antimicrobial use is widely practiced. Here, modelling techniques are used to assess the potential impact of early elimination of infected cattle via accurate diagnosis on CBPP dynamics. A herd-level stochastic epidemiological model explicitly incorporating test sensitivity and specificity is developed. Interventions by annual vaccination, annual testing and elimination and a combination of both are implemented in a stepwise manner and their effectiveness compared by running 1000 simulations per intervention over ten years. The model predicts that among the simulated interventions, the ones likely to eliminate the disease from an isolated herd all involved annual vaccination of more than 75% of the animals with a vaccine that protects for at least 18 months combined with annual testing (and elimination of positive reactors) of 75% of the animals every six months after vaccination. The highest probability of disease elimination was 97.5% and this could occur within a median of 2.3 years. Generally, our model predicts that regular testing and elimination of positive reactors using improved tests will play a significant role in minimizing CBPP burden especially in the current situation where improved vaccines are yet to be developed.

  8. Comparative clinicopathological changes in buffalo and cattle following infection by Pasteurella multocida B:2.

    PubMed

    Annas, S; Zamri-Saad, M; Jesse, F F A; Zunita, Z

    2015-11-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute, septicaemic disease of cattle and buffalo of Asia and Africa caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 or E:2. Buffaloes are believed to be more susceptible than cattle. In this study, 9 buffaloes of 8 months old were divided equally into 3 groups (Groups 1, 3, 5). Similarly, 9 cattle of 8 months old were equally divided into 3 groups (Groups 2, 4, 6). Animals of Groups 1 and 2 were inoculated with PBS while Groups 3 and 4 were inoculated subcutaneously with 10(5) cfu/ml of P. multocida B:2. Animals of Groups 5 and 6 were inoculated intranasally with the same inoculum. Both buffaloes and cattle that were inoculated subcutaneously succumbed to the infection at 16 h and 18 h, respectively. Two buffaloes that were inoculated intranasally (Group 5) succumbed at 68 h while the remaining cattle and buffaloes survived the 72-h study period. Endotoxin was detected in the blood of infected cattle (Group 4) and buffaloes (Groups 3 and 5) prior to the detection of P. multocida B:2 in the blood. The endotoxin was detected in the blood of buffaloes of Group 3 and cattle of Group 4 at 0.5 h post-inoculation while buffaloes of Group 5 and cattle of Group 6 at 1.5 h. On the other hand, bacteraemia was detected at 2.5 h in buffaloes of Group 3 and cattle of Group 4 and at 12 h in buffaloes of Group 5 and cattle of Group 6. Affected cattle and buffaloes showed lesions typical of haemorrhagic septicaemia. These included congestion and haemorrhages in the organs of respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts with evidence of acute inflammatory reactions. The severity of gross and histopathology lesions in cattle and buffalo calves that succumbed to the infection showed insignificant (p > 0.05) difference. However, inoculated buffalo and cattle that survived the infection showed significantly (p < 0.05) less severe gross and histopathological changes than those that succumbed. In general, cattle are more resistant to intranasal infection by P

  9. Induction of CD18-mediated passage of neutrophils by Pasteurella haemolytica in pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A; Florance, A F; Kehrli, M E

    1999-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is an important respiratory pathogen of cattle that incites extensive infiltrates of neutrophils into the lung. In addition to the parenchymal damage caused by factors released by P. haemolytica, neutrophils contribute to the pathologic changes in the lungs. Molecules which mediate neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during P. haemolytica pneumonia are poorly characterized. To determine whether the CD18 family (beta2-integrin) of leukocyte adhesion molecules mediates initial passage of neutrophils into the pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles of lungs infected with P. haemolytica, three Holstein calves homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) (CD18-deficient neutrophils), and three age- and breed-matched control calves (normal CD18 expression) were inoculated with P. haemolytica A1 via a fiberoptic bronchoscope and euthanized at 2 h postinoculation. Sections of lung were stained for neutrophils, and the intensity of neutrophilic infiltration was determined by computerized image analysis. Significantly fewer (P < 0.05) neutrophils infiltrated the lumen, epithelium, and adventitia of bronchioles and bronchi in lungs of calves with BLAD compared to normal calves, which had dense infiltrates within these sites at 2 h postinoculation. The reduced infiltration in calves with BLAD occurred despite the presence of an extremely large number of neutrophils in peripheral blood that is typical for these calves. The large number of neutrophils in the blood of calves with BLAD is probably a physiologic response that can occur without microbial colonization, since one calf with BLAD that was raised under germ-free conditions had large numbers of neutrophils in the blood that were similar to those in a calf with BLAD that was raised conventionally. Neutrophil counts in the germ-free and conventionally reared calves with BLAD were much higher than those in the three normal calves raised under germ-free conditions. The work in this study

  10. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 is a receptor for Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin in bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, S; Hsuan, S L; Kannan, M S; Walcheck, B; Wang, J F; Kehrli, M E; Lally, E T; Sieck, G C; Maheswaran, S K

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica leukotoxin (Lkt) causes cell type- and species-specific effects in ruminant leukocytes. Recent studies indicate that P. haemolytica Lkt binds to bovine CD18, the common subunit of all beta2 integrins. We designed experiments with the following objectives: to identify which member of the beta2 integrins is a receptor for Lkt; to determine whether Lkt binding to the receptor is target cell (bovine leukocytes) specific; to define the relationships between Lkt binding to the receptor, calcium elevation, and cytolysis; and to determine whether a correlation exists between Lkt receptor expression and the magnitude of target cell cytolysis. We compared Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils from control calves and from calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), because neutrophils from BLAD-homozygous calves exhibit reduced beta2 integrin expression. The results demonstrate for the first time that Lkt binds to bovine CD11a and CD18 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]). The binding was abolished by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb). Lkt-induced calcium elevation in bovine alveolar macrophages (BAMs) was inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb (65 to 94% and 37 to 98%, respectively, at 5 and 50 Lkt units per ml; P < 0.05). Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils and BAMs was also inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb in a concentration-dependent manner. Lkt bound to porcine LFA-1 but did not induce calcium elevation or cytolysis. In neutrophils from BLAD calves, Lkt-induced cytolysis was decreased by 44% compared to that of neutrophils from control calves (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LFA-1 is a Lkt receptor, Lkt binding to LFA-1 is not target cell specific, Lkt binding to bovine LFA-1 correlates with calcium elevation and cytolysis, and bovine LFA-1 expression correlates with the magnitude of Lkt-induced target cell cytolysis. PMID:10603370

  11. Invasive Pasteurella multocida Infections - Report of Five Cases at a Minnesota Hospital, 2014.

    PubMed

    Talley, P; Snippes-Vagnone, P; Smith, K

    2016-09-01

    During October 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health was notified of five Hospital A patients with Pasteurella multocida bacteraemia; three had died. Human soft tissue infection with P. multocida typically results from cat or dog bites or scratches. Invasive infection, defined as a P. multocida isolate from a usually sterile site, is rare. We evaluated P. multocida isolations at Hospital A, compared with other Minnesota hospitals to understand invasive infection trends. A case was defined as clinically confirmed P. multocida in a Minnesota resident during 2012-2014. All hospital laboratories were queried; Fisher's exact test was used for comparison. Medical charts were reviewed for 2014 Hospital A patients with P. multocida infections. The Minnesota clinical laboratories survey response rate was 79% (63/80). At Hospital A, proportion of P. multocida isolates from usually sterile sites increased from 0% (0/2) during 2012 to 11% (1/9) during 2013, and to 86% (5/6) during 2014. The proportion of patients with P. multocida isolated from sterile sites was 35% (6/17) at Hospital A compared with 10% (58/583) statewide during 2012-2014 combined (P < 0.05). Among 2014 Hospital A patients with invasive P. multocida infection, all five were men; median age was 70 (range: 44-78) years. Four were temporally clustered within a 33-day period; three of those had bacteraemia on admission, making hospital acquisition possible in only one. Among five bacteraemia patients, four had cirrhosis and/or skin ulcerations, and three died. The proportion of invasive P. multocida cases was substantially higher at Hospital A during 2014. No epidemiologic links between patients were found. Three had known pet exposure. Collaborative educational efforts of chronically ill pet owners by physicians and veterinarians can acknowledge the health benefits of pet ownership, while minimizing risk for serious invasive zoonotic infections, including those caused by P. multocida.

  12. Invasive Pasteurella multocida Infections - Report of Five Cases at a Minnesota Hospital, 2014.

    PubMed

    Talley, P; Snippes-Vagnone, P; Smith, K

    2016-09-01

    During October 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health was notified of five Hospital A patients with Pasteurella multocida bacteraemia; three had died. Human soft tissue infection with P. multocida typically results from cat or dog bites or scratches. Invasive infection, defined as a P. multocida isolate from a usually sterile site, is rare. We evaluated P. multocida isolations at Hospital A, compared with other Minnesota hospitals to understand invasive infection trends. A case was defined as clinically confirmed P. multocida in a Minnesota resident during 2012-2014. All hospital laboratories were queried; Fisher's exact test was used for comparison. Medical charts were reviewed for 2014 Hospital A patients with P. multocida infections. The Minnesota clinical laboratories survey response rate was 79% (63/80). At Hospital A, proportion of P. multocida isolates from usually sterile sites increased from 0% (0/2) during 2012 to 11% (1/9) during 2013, and to 86% (5/6) during 2014. The proportion of patients with P. multocida isolated from sterile sites was 35% (6/17) at Hospital A compared with 10% (58/583) statewide during 2012-2014 combined (P < 0.05). Among 2014 Hospital A patients with invasive P. multocida infection, all five were men; median age was 70 (range: 44-78) years. Four were temporally clustered within a 33-day period; three of those had bacteraemia on admission, making hospital acquisition possible in only one. Among five bacteraemia patients, four had cirrhosis and/or skin ulcerations, and three died. The proportion of invasive P. multocida cases was substantially higher at Hospital A during 2014. No epidemiologic links between patients were found. Three had known pet exposure. Collaborative educational efforts of chronically ill pet owners by physicians and veterinarians can acknowledge the health benefits of pet ownership, while minimizing risk for serious invasive zoonotic infections, including those caused by P. multocida. PMID

  13. Purification and characterization of protein H, the major porin of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, G; Duclohier, H; Thomas, D; Shechter, E; Wróblewski, H

    1993-01-01

    Protein H (B. Lugtenberg, R. van Boxtel, D. Evenberg, M. de Jong, P. Storm, and J. Frik, Infect. Immun. 52:175-182, 1986) is the major polypeptide of the outer membrane of Pasteurella multocida, a bacterium pathogenic for humans and animals. We have purified this protein to homogeneity by size exclusion chromatography after selective extraction with surfactants and demonstrated its pore-forming ability after reincorporation into planar lipid bilayers. In these experiments, the current through the pores was a linear function of the applied voltage in the range of -50 to +50 mV. Voltages beyond +/- 50 mV tended to partially close the channels, giving rise to apparent negative resistances. These observations suggest that protein H channels are probably not voltage regulated in vivo. With the patch clamp technique, single-channel conductance fluctuations of 0.33 nS were recorded in 1 M KCl. Electrophoretic and circular dichroism analyses showed that protein H forms homotrimers stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate at room temperature, with a high content of beta-sheet secondary structure. Upon boiling, the trimers were fully dissociated into monomers with an increase of alpha helix and irregular structure, at the expense of beta sheets. The apparent molecular mass of fully denatured monomers ranged between 37 and 41.8 kDa, depending on the electrophoretic system used for analysis. The trimeric arrangement of protein H was confirmed by image analysis of negatively stained, two-dimensional crystal arrays. This morphological study revealed, in agreement with electrophoretical data, a trimeric structure with an overall diameter of 7.7 nm. Each monomer appeared to contain a pore with an average diameter of 1 nm. Quantitative comparisons revealed that the amino acid composition (hydropathy index of -0.40) and the N-terminal sequence (determined over 36 residues) of protein H are similar to those of bacterial general porins, notably porin P2 of Haemophilus influenzae. We conclude

  14. Proteomic characterization of pleural effusion, a specific host niche of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from cattle with contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP).

    PubMed

    Weldearegay, Yenehiwot B; Pich, Andreas; Schieck, Elise; Liljander, Anne; Gicheru, Nimmo; Wesonga, Hezron; Thiaucourt, Francois; Kiirika, Leonard M; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Jores, Joerg; Meens, Jochen

    2016-01-10

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a severe pleuropneumonia in cattle. The abnormal accumulation of pleural fluid, called pleural effusion (PE), is one of the characteristics of this disease. We performed a proteomic analysis of seven PE samples from experimentally infected cattle and characterized their composition with respect to bovine and Mmm proteins. We detected a total of 963 different bovine proteins. Further analysis indicated a strong enrichment of proteins involved in antigen processing, platelet activation and degranulation and apoptosis and an increased abundance of acute phase proteins.With regard to the pathogen, up to 108 viable mycoplasma cells per ml were detected in the PE supernatant. The proteomic analysis revealed 350 mycoplasma proteins, including proteins involved in virulence-associated processes like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and capsule synthesis. The bovine proteins detected will aid to characterize the inflammasome during an acute pleuropneumonia in cattle and the identified mycoplasma proteins will serve as baseline data to be compared with in vitro studies to improve our understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Based on our results, we named the pleural effusion an “in vivo niche” of Mmm during the acute phase of CBPP. Biological significance: This is the first study on bovine pleural effusions derived from an infectious disease and the first approach to characterize the proteome of Mycoplasma mycoides in vivo. This study revealed a high number of viable Mmm cells in the pleural effusion. The bovine pleural effusion proteome during Mmm infection is qualitatively similar to plasma, but differs with respect to high abundance of acute phase proteins. On the other hand,Mmm in its natural host produces proteins involved in capsule synthesis, H2O2 production and induction of inflammatory response, supporting previous knowledge on mechanisms underlying

  15. Proteomic characterization of pleural effusion, a specific host niche of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from cattle with contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP).

    PubMed

    Weldearegay, Yenehiwot B; Pich, Andreas; Schieck, Elise; Liljander, Anne; Gicheru, Nimmo; Wesonga, Hezron; Thiaucourt, Francois; Kiirika, Leonard M; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Jores, Joerg; Meens, Jochen

    2016-01-10

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a severe pleuropneumonia in cattle. The abnormal accumulation of pleural fluid, called pleural effusion (PE), is one of the characteristics of this disease. We performed a proteomic analysis of seven PE samples from experimentally infected cattle and characterized their composition with respect to bovine and Mmm proteins. We detected a total of 963 different bovine proteins. Further analysis indicated a strong enrichment of proteins involved in antigen processing, platelet activation and degranulation and apoptosis and an increased abundance of acute phase proteins.With regard to the pathogen, up to 108 viable mycoplasma cells per ml were detected in the PE supernatant. The proteomic analysis revealed 350 mycoplasma proteins, including proteins involved in virulence-associated processes like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and capsule synthesis. The bovine proteins detected will aid to characterize the inflammasome during an acute pleuropneumonia in cattle and the identified mycoplasma proteins will serve as baseline data to be compared with in vitro studies to improve our understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Based on our results, we named the pleural effusion an “in vivo niche” of Mmm during the acute phase of CBPP. Biological significance: This is the first study on bovine pleural effusions derived from an infectious disease and the first approach to characterize the proteome of Mycoplasma mycoides in vivo. This study revealed a high number of viable Mmm cells in the pleural effusion. The bovine pleural effusion proteome during Mmm infection is qualitatively similar to plasma, but differs with respect to high abundance of acute phase proteins. On the other hand,Mmm in its natural host produces proteins involved in capsule synthesis, H2O2 production and induction of inflammatory response, supporting previous knowledge on mechanisms underlying

  16. Enhanced Recovery of Airborne T3 Coliphage and Pasteurella pestis Bacteriophage by Means of a Presampling Humidification Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M. T.; Warren, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    This paper reports a series of experiments in which two methods of collecting airborne bacteriophage particles were compared. A standard aerosol sampler, the AGI-30, was evaluated for its competence in measuring the content of bacteriophage aerosols. It was used alone or with a prewetting or humidification device (humidifier bulb) to recover T3 coliphage and Pasteurella pestis bacteriophage particles from aerosols maintained at 21 C and varied relative humidity. Collection of bacteriophage particles via the humidifier bulb altered both the initial recovery level and the apparent biological decay. Sampling airborne bacteriophage particles by the AGI-30 alone yielded data that apparently underestimated the maximal number of potentially viable particles within the aerosol, sometimes by as much as 3 logs. PMID:4891719

  17. Viral-bacterial pneumonia in calves: duration of the interaction between bovine herpesvirus 1 and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W D; Babiuk, L A; Jericho, K W

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen six to eight month old beef calves were exposed individually to a five minute aerosol of bovine herpesvirus 1, isolate 108. Aerosol exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) was administered individually for five minutes at either four, ten, 20 or 30 days after the virus. Fibrinous pneumonia and pleuritis occurred in all four groups but were most extensive and severe in those exposed to the virus and bacterium four days apart (the positive controls). Fibrinous pneumonia was associated with persistence of bovine herpesvirus 1 in the respiratory tract despite resolution of virus-induced necrotic lesions of the respiratory mucosa. The results presented here suggest that, although the severity of viral-bacterial synergism may be influenced by virus-induced morphological changes, the continued presence of viral antigens after the resolution of respiratory mucosal lesions may continue to exert some effect on host defenses and disease processes. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6315196

  18. Computational Prediction of Immunodominant Epitopes on Outer Membrane Protein (Omp) H of Pasteurella multocida Toward Designing of a Peptide Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary vaccine design necessitates discrimination between the immunogenic and non-immunogenic components within a pathogen. To successfully target a humoral immune response, the vaccine antigen should contain not only B-cell epitopes but abounding Th-cell agretopes and MHC-II binding regions as well. No single computational method is available that allows the identification of such regions on antigens with good reliability. A consensus approach based on several prediction methods can be adopted to overcome this problem.Targeting the outer membrane protein (Omp) H as a candidate, a comprehensive work flow is described for the computational identification of immunodominant epitopes toward the designing of a peptide vaccine against Pasteurella multocida. PMID:27076289

  19. Dietary L-glutamine supplementation increases Pasteurella multocida burden and the expression of its major virulence factors in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Shuping; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Fengmei; Li, Nengzhang; Yin, Jie; Peng, Yuanyi; Wu, Li; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of graded doses of L-glutamine supplementation on the replication and distribution of Pasteurella multocida, and the expression of its major virulence factors in mouse model. Mice were randomly assigned to the basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 % glutamine. Pasteurella multocida burden was detected in the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney after 12 h of P. multocida infection. The expression of major virulence factors, toll-like receptors (TLRs), proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) and anti-oxidative factors (GPX1 and CuZnSOD) was analyzed in the lung and spleen. Dietary 0.5 % glutamine supplementation has little significant effect on these parameters, compared to those with basal diet. However, results showed that a high dose of glutamine supplementation increased the P. multocida burden (P < 0.001) and the expression of its major virulence factors (P < 0.05) as compared to those with a lower dose of supplementation. In the lung, high dose of glutamine supplementation inhibited the proinflammatory responses (P < 0.05) and TLRs signaling (P < 0.05). In the spleen, the effect of glutamine supplementation on different components in TLR signaling depends on glutamine concentration, and high dose of glutamine supplementation activated the proinflammatory response. In conclusion, glutamine supplementation increased P. multocida burden and the expression of its major virulence factors, while affecting the functions of the lung and spleen.

  20. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of acid-pretreated rapeseed meal for succinic acid production using Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kequan; Zhang, Han; Miao, Yelian; Wei, Ping; Chen, Jieyu

    2011-04-01

    Rapeseed meal was evaluated for succinic acid production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618. Diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment and subsequent hydrolysis with pectinase was used to release sugars from rapeseed meal. The effects of culture pH, pectinase loading and yeast extract concentration on succinic acid production were investigated. When simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of diluted acid pretreated rapeseed meal with a dry matter content of 12.5% (w/v) was performed at pH 6.4 and a pectinase loading of 2% (w/w, on dry matter) without supplementation of yeast extract, a succinic acid concentration of 15.5 g/L was obtained at a yield of 12.4 g/100g dry matter. Fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was carried out with supplementation of concentrated pretreated rapeseed meal and pectinase at 18 and 28 h to yield a final dry matter content of 20.5% and pectinase loading of 2%, with the succinic acid concentration enhanced to 23.4 g/L at a yield of 11.5 g/100g dry matter and a productivity of 0.33 g/(Lh). This study suggests that rapeseed meal may be an alternative substrate for the efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes without requiring nitrogen source supplementation.

  1. Bacteriocin production by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the oral cavity of humans with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets.

    PubMed

    Lúcia, Lima Francisca; Farias, Flávio F; Eustáquio, Costa José; Auxiliadora, Maria; Carvalho, R; Alviano, Celuta S; Farias, Luiz M

    2002-01-01

    The ability of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to produce bacteriocin has rarely been reported. Antagonistic substance production may confer an important ecological advantage for the producer microorganisms, especially in a competitive ecosystem such as the oral cavity. In the present study, 75 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains isolated from the oral cavity of human patients with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets, as well as two reference strains (A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and FDC Y4) were evaluated for auto-, iso-, and heteroantagonistic activity. Fifty-one (68.00%) strains exhibited antagonistic activity; heteroantagonism was observed more often than isoantagonism. Isolated strains antagonized 17 different species of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria from the oral and nonoral microbiota. Sensitivity to heat and to proteolytic enzymes constituted strong evidence that the antagonistic substance has a proteic nature. Taken together, our data enabled us to confirm that the antagonistic substance detected was a bacteriocin. The wide spectrum of activity indicates the possibility that more than one antagonistic substance is produced and that these substances play an important role in the ecological balance of the oral ecosystem.

  2. Use of corn steep liquor as an economical nitrogen source for biosuccinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. P.; Jahim, J. M.; Wu, T. Y.; Harun, S.; Mumtaz, T.

    2016-06-01

    Expensive raw materials are the driving force that leads to the shifting of the petroleum-based succinic acid production into bio-based succinic acid production by microorganisms. Cost of fermentation medium is among the main factors contributing to the total production cost of bio-succinic acid. After carbon source, nitrogen source is the second largest component of the fermentation medium, the cost of which has been overlooked for the past years. The current study aimed at replacing yeast extract- a costly nitrogen source with corn steep liquor for economical production of bio-succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z. In this study, a final succinic acid concentration of 20.6 g/L was obtained from the use of corn steep liquor as the nitrogen source, which was comparable with the use of yeast extract as the nitrogen source that had a final succinate concentration of 21.4 g/l. In terms of economical wise, corn steep liquor was priced at 200 /ton, which was one fifth of the cost of yeast extract at 1000 /ton. Therefore, corn steep liquor can be considered as a potential nitrogen source in biochemical industries instead of the costly yeast extract.

  3. 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in determining proportions of coexisting Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Ihalin, Riikka; Asikainen, Sirkka

    2006-06-01

    Certain serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans seem to prefer coexistence in vivo. The 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was tested for its capability to distinguish coexisting A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of different serotypes or genetic lineages and to determine their proportions in vitro. The migration pattern of the PCR amplicon from serotype c differed from those of the other serotypes. Contrary to the strains of serotypes c, d, and e, strains of serotypes a, b, and f consistently demonstrated intra-serotype migration patterns similar to each other. Since the migration patterns differed between serotype c and b strains a strain of each was used to determine their proportional representation in a strain mixture. The strains were distinguishable from each other above the 5% PCR-DGGE detection level (12.5 ng DNA/1.5 x 10(6) cells). DGGE provides a promising tool for in vitro studies on the coexistence of different genetic lineages of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  4. Bagasse hydrolyzates from Agave tequilana as substrates for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes in batch and repeated batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Varela-Almanza, Karla María; Arriola-Guevara, Enrique; Martínez-Gómez, Álvaro de Jesús; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos; Toriz, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain fermentable sugars by enzymatic or acid hydrolyses of Agave tequilana Weber bagasse in order to produce succinic acid with Actinobacillus succinogenes. Hydrolyses were carried out with mineral acids (sulfuric and hydrochloric acids) or a commercial cellulolytic enzyme, and were optimized statistically by a response surface methodology, having as factors the concentration of acid/enzyme and time of hydrolysis. The concentration of sugars obtained at optimal conditions for each hydrolysis were 21.7, 22.4y 19.8g/L for H2SO4, HCl and the enzymatic preparation respectively. Concerning succinic acid production, the enzymatic hydrolyzates resulted in the highest yield (0.446g/g) and productivity (0.57g/Lh) using A. succinogenes in a batch reactor system. Repeated batch fermentation with immobilized A. succinogenes in agar and with the enzymatic hydrolyzates resulted in a maximum concentration of succinic acid of 33.6g/L from 87.2g/L monosaccharides after 5 cycles in 40h, obtaining a productivity of 1.32g/Lh.

  5. Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 Fermentation Medium Optimization for the Production of Succinic Acid by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Wan, Duan-Ji; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2012-01-01

    As a potential intermediary feedstock, succinic acid takes an important place in bulk chemical productions. For the first time, a method combining Plackett-Burman design (PBD), steepest ascent method (SA), and Box-Behnken design (BBD) was developed to optimize Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 fermentation medium. First, glucose, yeast extract, and MgCO3 were identified to be key medium components by PBD. Second, preliminary optimization was run by SA method to access the optimal region of the key medium components. Finally, the responses, that is, the production of succinic acid, were optimized simultaneously by using BBD, and the optimal concentration was located to be 84.6 g L−1 of glucose, 14.5 g L−1 of yeast extract, and 64.7 g L−1 of MgCO3. Verification experiment indicated that the maximal succinic acid production of 52.7 ± 0.8 g L−1 was obtained under the identified optimal conditions. The result agreed with the predicted value well. Compared with that of the basic medium, the production of succinic acid and yield of succinic acid against glucose were enhanced by 67.3% and 111.1%, respectively. The results obtained in this study may be useful for the industrial commercial production of succinic acid. PMID:23093852

  6. Bagasse hydrolyzates from Agave tequilana as substrates for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes in batch and repeated batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Varela-Almanza, Karla María; Arriola-Guevara, Enrique; Martínez-Gómez, Álvaro de Jesús; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos; Toriz, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain fermentable sugars by enzymatic or acid hydrolyses of Agave tequilana Weber bagasse in order to produce succinic acid with Actinobacillus succinogenes. Hydrolyses were carried out with mineral acids (sulfuric and hydrochloric acids) or a commercial cellulolytic enzyme, and were optimized statistically by a response surface methodology, having as factors the concentration of acid/enzyme and time of hydrolysis. The concentration of sugars obtained at optimal conditions for each hydrolysis were 21.7, 22.4y 19.8g/L for H2SO4, HCl and the enzymatic preparation respectively. Concerning succinic acid production, the enzymatic hydrolyzates resulted in the highest yield (0.446g/g) and productivity (0.57g/Lh) using A. succinogenes in a batch reactor system. Repeated batch fermentation with immobilized A. succinogenes in agar and with the enzymatic hydrolyzates resulted in a maximum concentration of succinic acid of 33.6g/L from 87.2g/L monosaccharides after 5 cycles in 40h, obtaining a productivity of 1.32g/Lh. PMID:26802183

  7. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen stimulates production of chemotactic factors and inflammatory cytokines by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, N; Yamashita, Y; Ikeda, D; Koga, T

    1996-01-01

    Serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen (SPA) was extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300. SPA induced the release of monocyte and leukocyte chemotactic factors by human monocytes. Polymyxin B had almost no effect on the release of monocyte chemotactic factor, but a monoclonal antibody against SPA markedly inhibited it. Human monocytes stimulated with SPA exhibited the increased mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and a neutrophil chemotactic factor, interleukin-8 (IL-8). On the other hand, SPA induced the release of IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and enhanced the expression of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Human monocytes expressed MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNAs when stimulated by human recombinant IL-1alpha, I1-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, suggesting that these inflammatory cytokines induced by SPA might participate in the production of chemotactic factors in human monocytes. PMID:8698480

  8. Utilization of CO2 fixating bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z for simultaneous biogas upgrading and biosuccinic acid production.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-10-21

    Biogas is an attractive renewable energy carrier. However, it contains CO2 which limits its use for certain applications. Here we report a novel approach for removing CO2 from biogas and capturing it as a biochemical through a biological process. This approach entails converting CO2 into biosuccinic acid using the bacterial strain Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z, and simultaneously producing high-purity CH4 (> 95%). Results showed that when pressure during fermentation was increased from 101.325 to 140 kPa, higher CO2 solubility was achieved, thereby positively affecting final succinic acid yield and titer, CO2 consumption rate, and CH4 purity. When using biogas as the only CO2 source at 140 kPa, the CO2 consumption rate corresponded to 2.59 L CO2 L(-1) d(-1) with a final succinic acid titer of 14.4 g L(-1). Under this pressure condition, the highest succinic acid yield and biogas quality reached corresponded to 0.635 g g(-1) and 95.4% (v v(-1)) CH4 content, respectively, after 24 h fermentation. This work represents the first successful attempt to develop a system capable of upgrading biogas to vehicle fuel/gas grid quality and simultaneously produce biosuccinic acid, a valuable building block with large market potential in the near term.

  9. Evidence that the serotype b antigenic determinant of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 resides in the polysaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Schifferle, R E

    1991-04-01

    A high-molecular-weight polysaccharide-containing antigen was isolated from a phenol-water extract of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 (formerly Y4) by gel permeation chromatography in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-disaggregating buffer. The polysaccharide antigen formed a precipitin band with rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum but not with rabbit antisera to serotype a or c. Electroblotted serotype b antigen was probed with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), resulting in a diffuse "smear" in the upper region of the lane. By utilizing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, it was demonstrated that the geometric mean immunoglobulin G antibody titer to the serotype b polysaccharide was significantly higher in sera from LJP patients than in sera from periodontally healthy individuals. Moreover, LJP antibody titers to the serotype b polysaccharide exhibited age-dependent variation. Double immunodiffusion analysis revealed that the serotype b antigen formed a line of identity with low-molecular-weight LPS following reaction with serotype b-specific antiserum. Incubation of LJP serum in the presence of a lipid-free polysaccharide moiety obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 markedly reduced immunoglobulin G titer to the serotype b antigen. In contrast, solubilized lipid A was only weakly inhibitory. The results of this study indicate that the serotype b-specific determinant of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in the polysaccharide moiety of LPS and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in serum of LJP subjects colonized by this organism.

  10. An international collaborative study to determine the prevalence of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by monoclonal antibody-based cELISA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Few serological tests are available for detecting antibodies against Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, the causal agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP). The complement fixation test, the test prescribed for international trade purposes, uses a crude antigen that cross-reacts with all the other mycoplasma species of the “mycoides cluster” frequently infecting goat herds. The lack of a more specific test has been a real obstacle to the evaluation of the prevalence and economic impact of CCPP worldwide. A new competitive ELISA kit for CCPP, based on a previous blocking ELISA, was formatted at CIRAD and used to evaluate the prevalence of CCPP in some regions of Kenya, Ethiopia, Mauritius, Tajikistan and Pakistan in an international collaborative study. Results The strict specificity of the test was confirmed in CCPP-free goat herds exposed to other mycoplasma species of the “mycoides cluster”. Prevalence studies were performed across the enzootic range of the disease in Africa and Asia. Seroprevalence was estimated at 14.6% in the Afar region of Ethiopia, whereas all the herds presented for CCPP vaccination in Kenya tested positive (individual seroprevalence varied from 6 to 90% within each herd). In Mauritius, where CCPP emerged in 2009, nine of 62 herds tested positive. In Central Asia, where the disease was confirmed only recently, no positive animals were detected in the Wakhan District of Afghanistan or across the border in neighboring areas of Tajikistan, whereas seroprevalence varied between 2.7% and 44.2% in the other districts investigated and in northern Pakistan. The test was also used to monitor seroconversion in vaccinated animals. Conclusions This newly formatted CCPP cELISA kit has retained the high specificity of the original kit. It can therefore be used to evaluate the prevalence of CCPP in countries or regions without vaccination programs. It could also be used to monitor the efficacy of vaccination

  11. Sero-prevalence of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in bulls originated from Borena pastoral area of Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, Gezahegn; Leta, Samson; Hailu, Berhanu

    2015-06-01

    Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a highly infectious cattle disease, which is widespread in pastoral areas of Africa, and it imposes a major problem on Ethiopian livestock export market. Cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 on bulls originated from Borena pastoral area to determine seroprevalence of CBPP. Forty batches of bulls containing 38,187 Borana bulls were tested using c-ELISA. Of the total 40 batches tested for the presence of antibodies, 25 (62.5 %) of them contained at least one seropositive bull. From the total of 38,187 bulls tested, 150 (0.4 %) bulls were positive. The number of seropositive animals increases as the herd size increases (P < 0.05). Both at herd and individual level, the highest CBPP prevalence was recorded in herd size >1000, and the difference was found statistically significant (P < 0.05). There was statistically significant (χ (2) = 23.73, df = 9, P = 0.005) difference of CBPP prevalence between months of the year. The present low prevalence of CBPP in the cattle feedlots indicates that the disease is decreasing progressively in Borena pastoral area, this might be associated with the ongoing mass vaccination campaign against economically important livestock diseases in pastoral areas. The decrease in the prevalence of CBPP offered a great opportunity to livestock producers and live animal and meat exporters by improving the demand of Ethiopian livestock on international market. Regular reintroduction of infected cattle from neighboring countries or herds where the disease remains endemic may change the disease dynamics again. Therefore, mass blanket vaccinations coupled with prompt diagnosis, isolation and stamping out of the outbreaks, intensive surveillance, followed by strict cattle movement control should be implemented by concerned parties.

  12. A large-scale genomic approach affords unprecedented resolution for the molecular epidemiology and evolutionary history of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Virginie; Verdier, Axel; Thiaucourt, François; Manso-Silván, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp), is a devastating disease of domestic goats and of some wild ungulate species. The disease is currently spreading in Africa and Asia and poses a serious threat to disease-free areas. A comprehensive view of the evolutionary history and dynamics of Mccp is essential to understand the epidemiology of CCPP. Yet, analysing the diversity of genetically monomorphic pathogens, such as Mccp, is complicated due to their low variability. In this study, the molecular epidemiology and evolution of CCPP was investigated using a large-scale genomic approach based on next-generation sequencing technologies, applied to a sample of strains representing the global distribution of this disease. A highly discriminatory multigene typing system was developed, allowing the differentiation of 24 haplotypes among 25 Mccp strains distributed in six genotyping groups, which showed some correlation with geographic origin. A Bayesian approach was used to infer the first robust phylogeny of the species and to date the principal events of its evolutionary history. The emergence of Mccp was estimated only at about 270 years ago, which explains the low genetic diversity of this species despite its high mutation rate, evaluated at 1.3 × 10(-6) substitutions per site per year. Finally, plausible scenarios were proposed to elucidate the evolution and dynamics of CCPP in Asia and Africa, though limited by the paucity of Mccp strains, particularly in Asia. This study shows how combining large-scale genomic data with spatial and temporal data makes it possible to obtain a comprehensive view of the epidemiology of CCPP, a precondition for the development of improved disease surveillance and control measures. PMID:26149260

  13. Cell cycle-specific growth inhibitory effect on human gingival fibroblasts of a toxin isolated from the culture medium of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Helgeland, K; Nordby, O

    1993-05-01

    A toxin isolated from the growth medium of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by ammonium sulfate precipitation was shown to inhibit irreversibly the multiplication of human gingival fibroblasts. DNA histograms from flow cytometric measurements showed that the cells accumulated preferentially in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Such cells exhibited sheetlike protrusions, and an increased frequency of micronuclei was evident in cells treated with low concentrations of the toxin. Toxin-treated cells were viable for several weeks, as shown by staining with trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate, and the general cell metabolism as measured by oxygen consumption was unimpaired. PMID:8496779

  14. A study on Ovine pneumonic pasteurellosis: Isolation and Identification of Pasteurellae and their antibiogram susceptibility pattern in Haramaya District, Eastern Hararghe, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sheep constitute the second major component of livestock in Ethiopia. However, efficient utilization of this potential resource is hampered by combination of health problems, poor management and feed shortage. Haramaya district is one of the remote settings in Ethiopia where information about the livestock disease is not well documented. Hence this study was conducted to determine the causative agents and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial Pasteurella isolates among pneumonic ovine in Haramaya district, Eastern Hararghe, Ethiopia. Results Out of 256 samples examined, Pasterurella was isolated in 64 (25%), of which 38 (59.4%) were from lungs and 26 (40.6%) were from nasal cavities. 87.5% of the isolates were Mannheimia haemolytica and 12.5% were Pasteurella multocida. All of the isolates from the lungs were Mannheimia haemolytica whereas 69% of the isolates from nasals cavities were Mannheimia haemolytica. Age and body temperature were significantly associated with Pasteurella isolates from clinic (P < 0.05). Despite diverse in the site of origins, the isolates exhibited uniformity in sensitivity to a majority of the antibacterial agents. The most effective drug was Cholramphenicol (100%) followed by Sulfamethoxazole (89.1%) and Tetracycline (84.4%). Both species were completely resistant to Gentamycin and Vancomycin. Conclusion Mannheimia haemolytica is the most common cause of ovine pneumonic pasteurellosis in the study area. The isolates were susceptible to limited antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the antimicrobial susceptibility test should be conducted before treatment, except for critical cases. PMID:24289236

  15. Specific Detection of Pasteurella multocida in Chickens with Fowl Cholera and in Pig Lung Tissues Using Fluorescent rRNA In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Mbuthia, Paul Gichohi; Christensen, Henrik; Boye, Mette; Petersen, Kamille Majken Dumong; Bisgaard, Magne; Nyaga, Phillip Njeru; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2001-01-01

    A Pasteurella multocida species-specific oligonucleotide probe, pmhyb449, targeting 16S rRNA was designed and evaluated by whole-cell hybridization against 22 selected reference strains in animal tissues. It differentiated P. multocida from other bacterial species of the families Pasteurellaceae and Enterobacteriaceae and also from divergent species of the order Cytophagales (except biovar 2 strains of Pasteurella avium and Pasteurella canis, which have high 16S rRNA similarity to P. multocida). The potential of the probe for specific identification and differentiation of P. multocida was further detected in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lung tissues from experimental fowl cholera in chickens and infections in pigs. In chicken lung tissues P. multocida cells were detected singly, in pairs, as microcolonies, and as massive colonies within air capillaries (septa and lumen), parabronchial septa, and blood vessels (wall and lumen). In pig lung, postmortem-injected P. multocida was detected in the alveoli (lumen and wall), and in both animals the bacterial cells were seen in the bronchi. The results showed that with the oligonucleotide probe pmhyb449, fluorescent in situ hybridization is a suitable and fast method for specific detection of P. multocida in histological formalin-fixed tissues. The test was replicable and reproducible and is recommended as a supplementary test for diagnosis and as a tool in pathogenesis studies of fowl cholera and respiratory tract infections in pigs due to P. multocida. PMID:11427580

  16. 21 CFR 522.1660b - Oxytetracycline solution, 300 milligrams/milliliter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Escherichia coli, wooden tongue caused by Actinobacillus lignieresii, leptospirosis caused by Leptospira... by Pasteurella multocida, and leptospirosis caused by Leptospira pomona. (C) 9 mg/lb BW as a...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1660b - Oxytetracycline solution, 300 milligrams/milliliter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Escherichia coli, wooden tongue caused by Actinobacillus lignieresii, leptospirosis caused by Leptospira... by Pasteurella multocida, and leptospirosis caused by Leptospira pomona. (C) 9 mg/lb BW as a...

  18. Immunoglobulin allotypes and immunoglobulin G subclass responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in early-onset periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, J I; Ha, M H; Kim, J H; Kim, S J

    1996-01-01

    The present study was performed to estimate the observed frequencies of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Gm) and light-chain (Km) allotypes among patients with early-onset periodontitis (EOP) and their effect on the IgG2 subclass responses against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and Porphyromonas gingivalis 381, respectively. Sixty-nine EOP patients, including 11 with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), 19 who had LJP, 15 with LJP-rapidly progressing periodontitis (RPP), and 24 with RPP, were examined for the Gm and Km allotypes by a hemagglutination inhibition test. Levels of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) antibodies against the two organisms were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fifty race- and age-matched, periodontally healthy subjects were also included as a control group. The observed frequencies of the Gm haplotype afnb and Km(1) were significantly higher in the RPP and LJP groups, respectively. The G2m(n)+ group of those with RPP and the Km(1)+ group of those with LJP had significantly higher levels of IgG2 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, respectively. The results indicate that linkage disequilibrium of the G2m(n) locus in RPP patients or the Km(1) locus in LJP patients may be associated with high IgG2 antibody responses to the respective bacteria. It was reasoned that the IgG2 antibody responses are associated with the immunoglobulin allotypes. The function of IgG2 antibodies in their reaction to different bacterial antigens may be interpreted as either protective or nonprotective in the two different types of EOP (i.e., LJP and RPP). PMID:8926092

  19. Sero-positivity and associated risk factors for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia under two cattle production systems in North Central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alhaji, Nma Bida; Babalobi, Olutayo Olajide

    2016-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey of 765 cattle in 125 nomadic and 375 cattle in 125 sedentary herds was conducted to investigate prevalence and risk factors for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in the two production systems of Niger State in North Central Nigeria, between January and August 2013. Data on herd characteristics were collected using structured questionnaires administered on herd owners. Serological analysis was conducted using competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) test. Descriptive, univariate, and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted with OpenEpi version 2.3.1 software. Statistical significance was held at P < 0.05. CBPP sero-prevalence in nomadic cattle was 16.2 % (confidence interval (CI) 13.7-19.0) and 9.6 % (CI 6.9-12.9) in sedentary cattle. The overall cattle-level sero-prevalence for two the cattle production systems was 14.0 % (CI 12.1-16.1). Age and agro-ecological zones were significantly (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively) associated with sero-positivity to Mmm in nomadic production. Agro-ecological zone C had the highest sero-prevalence (25.3 %, CI 20.2-31.0). No significant cattle factors were detected in sedentary production. Factors significantly associated with CBPP occurrence at herd-level were contacts with other herds during grazing (P < 0.001) and at watering points (P < 0.001). Others were introduction of new cattle into herd (P < 0.001), outbreaks of CBPP in an area (P < 0.001), socio-cultural factors of cattle gifts and dowry payment (P < 0.001), herd composition of keeping cattle and small ruminants together (P < 0.001), and long trekking during migrations (P = 0.0009). This study had shown the burden of CBPP in the two production systems. Sero-diagnosis and risk factor identification should be institutionalized as elements of epidemio-surveillance and control strategies for CBPP, especially in resource-poor pastoralists' settlements in Nigeria.

  20. Coinfection by Ureaplasma spp., Photobacterium damselae and an Actinomyces-like microorganism in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with pleuropneumonia stranded along the Adriatic coast of Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Gabriella; Cammà, Cesare; Curini, Valentina; Mazzariol, Sandro; Proietto, Umberto; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Ferri, Nicola; Di Provvido, Andrea; Di Guardo, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    A case of pleuropneumonia is reported in an adult male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) found stranded in 2014 along the Central Adriatic coast of Italy. A severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia and thoracic lymphadenopathy were present at necropsy. Numerous Splendore-Hoeppli bodies were found microscopically scattered throughout the lung. Histochemical evidence of Actinomyces-like organisms was obtained from the pulmonary parenchyma, with a strain of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and Ureaplasma spp. being also isolated from the same tissue. For the latter, a genome fragment of approximately 1400 bp from the 16s rDNA was amplified and sequenced. BLAST analysis revealed 100% identity with an uncultured Ureaplasma spp. (JQ193826.1).

  1. Coinfection by Ureaplasma spp., Photobacterium damselae and an Actinomyces-like microorganism in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with pleuropneumonia stranded along the Adriatic coast of Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Gabriella; Cammà, Cesare; Curini, Valentina; Mazzariol, Sandro; Proietto, Umberto; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Ferri, Nicola; Di Provvido, Andrea; Di Guardo, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    A case of pleuropneumonia is reported in an adult male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) found stranded in 2014 along the Central Adriatic coast of Italy. A severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia and thoracic lymphadenopathy were present at necropsy. Numerous Splendore-Hoeppli bodies were found microscopically scattered throughout the lung. Histochemical evidence of Actinomyces-like organisms was obtained from the pulmonary parenchyma, with a strain of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and Ureaplasma spp. being also isolated from the same tissue. For the latter, a genome fragment of approximately 1400 bp from the 16s rDNA was amplified and sequenced. BLAST analysis revealed 100% identity with an uncultured Ureaplasma spp. (JQ193826.1). PMID:27033917

  2. First report on the molecular prevalence of Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) in goats the cause of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) in Balochistan province of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Awan, Mohammad Arif; Abbas, Ferhat; Yasinzai, Masoom; Nicholas, Robin A J; Babar, Shakeel; Ayling, Roger D; Attique, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmed, Zafar; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Faisal Ameer

    2010-10-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) is a disease of goats which causes high morbidity and mortality and is reported in many countries of the world. There are probably no reports on the molecular prevalence of Mccp, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc) and Mycoplasma putrefaciens (Mp) in Balochistan and any other part of Pakistan. Thirty goats (n = 30) with marked respiratory symptoms were selected and procured from forty goat flocks in Pishin district of Balochistan in 2008. The genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from the lung samples (n = 30) of the slaughtered goats was purified and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the presence of Mycoplasma mycoides cluster members and Mp. The PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) was also used to further confirm the Mccp. Of the thirty lung samples 17 (56.67%) were positive for the molecular prevalence of Mcc, Mccp and Mp. In total the molecular prevalence was observed as 17.65% for Mccp (n = 3), 70.59% for Mcc (n = 12) and 11.76% for Mp (n = 2). The RFLP profile has also validated the PCR results of Mccp by yielding two bands of 190 and 126 bp. The results of PCR-RFLP coupled with the presence of fibrinous pleuropneumonia and pleurisy during postmortem of goats (n = 3) strongly indicated the prevalence of CCPP in this part of world. Moreover the prevalence of Mcc and Mp is also alarming in the study area. We report for the very first time the molecular prevalence of Mcc, Mccp, and Mp in the lung tissues of goats in the Pishin district of Balochistan, Pakistan.

  3. Wetland environmental conditions associated with the risk of avian cholera outbreaks and the abundance of Pasteurella multocida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, Michael D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Shadduck, Daniel J.; Creekmore, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Avian cholera is a significant infectious disease affecting waterfowl across North America and occurs worldwide among various avian species. Despite the importance of this disease, little is known about the factors that cause avian cholera outbreaks and what management strategies might be used to reduce disease mortality. Previous studies indicated that wetland water conditions may affect survival and transmission of Pasteurella multocida, the agent that causes avian cholera. These studies hypothesized that water conditions affect the likelihood that avian cholera outbreaks will occur in specific wetlands. To test these predictions, we collected data from avian cholera outbreak and non-outbreak (control) wetlands throughout North America (wintera??spring 1995a??1996 to 1998a??1999) to evaluate whether water conditions were associated with outbreaks. Conditional logistic regression analysis on paired outbreak and non-outbreak wetlands indicated no significant association between water conditions and the risk of avian cholera outbreaks. For wetlands where avian cholera outbreaks occurred, linear regression showed that increased eutrophic nutrient concentrations (Potassium [K], nitrate [NO3], phosphorus [P], and phosphate [PO3]) were positively related to the abundance of P. multocida recovered from water and sediment samples. Wetland protein concentration and an El Ni??o event were also associated with P. multocida abundance. Our results indicate that wetland water conditions are not strongly associated with the risk of avian cholera outbreaks; however, some variables may play a role in the abundance of P. multocida bacteria and might be important in reducing the severity of avian cholera outbreaks.

  4. Rapid identification of Pasteurella multocida organisms responsible for haemorrhagic septicaemia using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, H J; Johnson, R B; Spencer, T L; Patten, B E

    1990-11-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is caused by specific serotypes of Pasteurella multocida and is one of the major economic diseases of cattle and buffalo in South East Asia. Definitive diagnosis of the disease-causing organism with the available methods is labour intensive and not totally reliable, consequently, an ELISA system to identify P multocida organisms which cause HS was developed. One hundred and twenty-four P multocida isolates were tested, 58 were type strains and 66 were field isolates. Analysis of these strains indicated the assay had a specificity of 99 per cent and sensitivity of at least 86 per cent. The sensitivity could be an underestimate, as five isolates assumed to be false negative reactions may not all be HS-causing strains. The HS ELISA provides a rapid, simple, accurate and inexpensive diagnostic assay for identification of HS causing organisms but does not represent a new typing system for P multocida. This assay will also enable countries to assess the impact of HS more accurately.

  5. Genome sequencing of a virulent avian Pasteurella multocida strain GX-Pm reveals the candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chengjie; Sizhu, Suolang; Luo, Qingping; Xu, Xuewen; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Anding

    2016-04-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) was first shown to be the causative agent of fowl cholera by Louis Pasteur in 1881. First genomic study was performed on an avirulent avian strain Pm70, and until 2013, two genomes of virulent avian strains X73 and P1059 were sequenced. Comparative genome study supplied important information for further study on the pathogenesis of fowl cholera. In the previous study, a capsular serotype A strain GX-Pm was isolated from the liver of a chicken, which died during an outbreak of fowl cholera in 2011. The strain showed multiple drug resistance and was highly virulent to chickens. Therefore, the present study performed the genome sequencing and a comparative genomic analysis to reveal the candidate genes involved in virulence of P. multocida. Sequenced draft genome sequence of GX-Pm was 2,292,886 bp, contained 2941 protein-coding genes, 5 genomic islands, 4 IS elements and 2 prophage regions. Notability, all the predicted drug-resistance genes were included in predicted genomic islands. A comparative genome study on virulent avian strains P1059, X73 and GX-Pm with the avirulent avian strain Pm 70 indicated that 475 unique genes were only identified in either of virulent strains but absent in the avirulent strain. Among these genes, 20 genes were contained within genomes of all three virulent strains, including a few of putative virulence genes. Further characterization of the pathogenic functions of these genes would benefit the understanding of pathogenesis of fowl cholera.

  6. Lysates of turkey-grown Pasteurella multocida: effects of solubilizing agents on the immunologic properties of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Brogden, K A; Rimler, R B

    1983-03-01

    Membrane vesicles from lysed suspensions of turkey-grown Pasteurella multocida were treated with various solubilizing agents to release protein that may contain cross-protection factor. Potassium thiocyanate, NaOH-glycine, lithium diiodosalicylate, guanidine hydrochloride, n-butanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, Triton X-100, and sodium lauryl sarcosinate were each tested as solubilizing agents. Vaccines made from combining solubilized membrane vesicles with complete lysate supernatant fluid produced various degrees of protection against challenge exposure with a heterologous serotype of P multocida in turkeys. Only vaccines prepared from membranes that were solubilized with potassium thiocyanate and sodium lauryl sarcosinate protected as well as complete lysate from turkey-grown P multocida. The amount of protein in each vaccine did not relate to protection. Distinct chemical differences were observed between lysates prepared from turkey-grown P multocida and lysates prepared from 41 C broth-grown P multocida. The external morphology of P multocida, after treatment with lysozyme and EDTA, was similar whether grown in broth or in turkeys.

  7. An ST11 clone of Pasteurella multocida, widely spread among farmed rabbits in the Iberian Peninsula, demonstrates respiratory niche association.

    PubMed

    García-Alvarez, Andrés; Chaves, Fernando; Fernández, Ana; Sanz, Celia; Borobia, Marta; Cid, Dolores

    2015-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a veterinary pathogen causing diseases with considerable economic repercussions in a wide range of animal hosts. In rabbits, P. multocida infections cause a variety of clinical manifestations including rhinitis, pneumonia, septicemia, abscesses, mastitis, and pyometra. In this study, 100 P. multocida isolates from different commercial rabbit farms located throughout the Iberian Peninsula were molecularly characterized by capsular typing, detection of four virulence-associated genes (tbpA, toxA, hgbB, and pfhA), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Rabbit P. multocida isolates belonged to three different capsular types: A (47.0%), D (28.0%), and F (25.0%). One group of P. multocida isolates of capsular type D and positive for the hgbB gene was significantly associated with the clinical presentation of respiratory disease (OR 5.91; 95%CI, 1.63-21.38). These isolates belonged to same sequence type, ST11, in the P. multocida Multi-host MLST database. The ST11 clone also includes isolates from porcine and avian pneumonia. This clonal group of epidemiologically unrelated P. multocida isolates could be a virulent clone with some degree of specificity for respiratory disease. These findings could be relevant in the development of vaccines for pasteurellosis prevention, especially respiratory disease.

  8. Identification of a virulence determinant that is conserved in the Jawetz and Heyl biotypes of [Pasteurella] pneumotropica.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiraku; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Terayama, Hayato; Asano, Ryoki; Kawamoto, Eiichi; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Boot, Ron

    2016-08-01

    [Pasteurella] pneumotropica is a ubiquitous bacterium frequently isolated from laboratory rodents. Although this bacterium causes various diseases in immunosuppressed animals, little is known about major virulence factors and their roles in pathogenicity. To identify virulence factors, we sequenced the genome of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl strain ATCC 12555, and compared the resulting non-contiguous draft genome sequence with the genome of biotype Jawetz strain ATCC 35149. Among a large number of genes encoding virulence-associated factors in both strains, four genes encoding for YadA-like proteins, which are known virulence factors that function in host cell adherence and invasion in many pathogens. In this study, we assessed YadA distribution and biological activity as an example of one of virulence-associated factor shared, with biotype Jawetz and Heyl. More than half of mouse isolates were found to have at least one of these genes; whereas, the majority of rat isolates did not. Autoagglutination activity, and ability to bind to mouse collagen type IV and mouse fibroblast cells, was significantly higher in YadA-positive than YadA-negative strains. To conclude, we identified a large number of candidate genes predicted to influence [P.] pneumotropica pathogenesis. PMID:27402782

  9. Identification of novel glycosyltransferases required for assembly of the Pasteurella multocida A:1 lipopolysaccharide and their involvement in virulence.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John D; Harper, Marina; St Michael, Frank; John, Marietta; Aubry, Annie; Parnas, Henrietta; Logan, Susan M; Wilkie, Ian W; Ford, Mark; Cox, Andrew D; Adler, Ben

    2009-04-01

    We previously determined the structure of the Pasteurella multocida Heddleston type 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule and characterized some of the transferases essential for LPS biosynthesis. We also showed that P. multocida strains expressing truncated LPS display reduced virulence. Here, we have identified all of the remaining glycosyltransferases required for synthesis of the oligosaccharide extension of the P. multocida Heddleston type 1 LPS, including a novel alpha-1,6 glucosyltransferase, a beta-1,4 glucosyltransferase, a putative bifunctional galactosyltransferase, and two heptosyltransferases. In addition, we identified a novel oligosaccharide extension expressed only in a heptosyltransferase (hptE) mutant background. All of the analyzed mutants expressing LPS with a truncated main oligosaccharide extension displayed reduced virulence, but those expressing LPS with an intact heptose side chain were able to persist for long periods in muscle tissue. The hptC mutant, which expressed LPS with the shortest oligosaccharide extension and no heptose side chain, was unable to persist on the muscle or cause any disease. Furthermore, all of the mutants displayed increased sensitivity to the chicken antimicrobial peptide fowlicidin 1, with mutants expressing highly truncated LPS being the most sensitive. PMID:19168738

  10. Virulence gene profiling and antibiotic resistance pattern of Indian isolates of Pasteurella multocida of small ruminant origin.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, Laxmi N; Thomas, P; Gupta, S K; Priyadarshini, A; Kumar, S; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara; Kumar, A; Singh, Vijendra P

    2015-02-01

    Pasteurellosis in small ruminants affects the livelihood of small and marginal farmers of India. The present study was undertaken to understand the trends in gene carriage and antibiotic resistance pattern of Pasteurella multocida isolates recovered from small ruminants over a period of 10 years in India. A total of 88 P. multocida isolates of small ruminant origin were subjected to virulence gene profiling for 19 genes by PCR and antibiogram study employing 17 different antibiotics. Virulence genes like exbB, exbD, tonB, oma87, sodA, sodC, nanB and plpB (100% prevalence) and ptfA and hsf-2 (>90% prevalence) were found to be uniformly distributed among isolates. Unexpectedly, a very high prevalence (95.45%) of pfhA gene was observed in the present study. Dermonecrotoxin gene (toxA) was observed in 48.9% of isolates with highest occurrence among serotype A isolates and interestingly, one of each isolate of serotype B and F were found to carry this gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed 17.04% isolates to be multidrug resistant. Amongst all the antibiotics tested, most of the P. multocida isolates were found to be susceptible to enrofloxacin and chloramphenicol. This study highlights novel epidemiological information on frequency and occurrence of virulence genes among Indian isolates from small ruminants.

  11. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanism of Clinical Isolates and Selected Mutants of Pasteurella multocida from Bovine Respiratory Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    KONG, Ling-Cong; GAO, Duo; GAO, Yun-Hang; LIU, Shu-Ming; MA, Hong-Xia

    2014-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), mutation prevention concentrations (MPCs) and contribution of quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations to fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin) susceptibility in 23 Pasteurella multocida (Pm) isolates were investigated. Fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates (MICs ≤0.25 µg/ml, 9 isolates) had no QRDR mutations, and their respective MPCs were low. Fluoroquinolone-intermediate isolates (MICs=0.5 µg/ml, 14 isolates) had QRDR mutations (Asp87 to Asn or Ala84 to Pro in gyrA), and their respective MPCs were high (4–32 µg/ml). First-step mutants (n=5) and laboratory-derived highly resistant fluoroquinolone mutants (n=5) also had QRDR mutations. The MICs of fluoroquinolones for mutant-derived strains were decreased in the presence of efflux inhibitors. The results indicated that the fluoroquinolone resistance of Pm is mainly due to multiple target gene mutations in gyrA and parC and the overexpression of efflux pump genes. PMID:25649952

  12. Fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism of clinical isolates and selected mutants of Pasteurella multocida from bovine respiratory disease in China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Cong; Gao, Duo; Gao, Yun-Hang; Liu, Shu-Ming; Ma, Hong-Xia

    2014-12-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), mutation prevention concentrations (MPCs) and contribution of quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations to fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin) susceptibility in 23 Pasteurella multocida (Pm) isolates were investigated. Fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates (MICs ≤0.25 µg/ml, 9 isolates) had no QRDR mutations, and their respective MPCs were low. Fluoroquinolone-intermediate isolates (MICs=0.5 µg/ml, 14 isolates) had QRDR mutations (Asp87 to Asn or Ala84 to Pro in gyrA), and their respective MPCs were high (4-32 µg/ml). First-step mutants (n=5) and laboratory-derived highly resistant fluoroquinolone mutants (n=5) also had QRDR mutations. The MICs of fluoroquinolones for mutant-derived strains were decreased in the presence of efflux inhibitors. The results indicated that the fluoroquinolone resistance of Pm is mainly due to multiple target gene mutations in gyrA and parC and the overexpression of efflux pump genes.

  13. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  14. Novel adhesin from Pasteurella multocida that binds to the integrin-binding fibronectin FnIII9-10 repeats.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Lisa M; Nair, Sean P; Ward, John M; Rycroft, Andrew N; Williams, Rachel J; Robertson, Giles; Mordan, Nicky J; Henderson, Brian

    2008-03-01

    Phage display screening with fragmented genomic DNA from the animal pathogen Pasteurella multocida has identified a gene encoding a putative fibronectin binding protein (19). Homologues of this gene (PM1665) are found in all other sequenced members of the Pasteurellaceae. Gene PM1665 has been cloned, and the protein has been expressed. Recombinant PM1665 protein binds to both soluble and immobilized fibronectin and is unique in that it interacts with the integrin-binding fibronectin type III (FnIII) repeats FnIII(9-10) and not, as is the case for almost all other fibronectin adhesins, to the N-terminal type I repeats. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a complex binding mechanism with a K(D) (equilibrium dissociation constant) of 150 nM +/- 70 nM. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that the PM1665 protein contains two helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motifs, and truncation mutation studies have identified the binding site in the protein as a combination of these two HhH motifs in conjunction with a conserved amino acid motif, VNINTA. We have shown that the PM1665 protein is on the cell surface and that binding of P. multocida to fibronectin is almost completely inhibited by anti-PM1665 antiserum. These results support the hypothesis that the PM1665 protein is a member of a new family of fibronectin binding adhesins that are important in the adhesion of P. multocida to fibronectin. PMID:18160478

  15. Tilmicosin does not inhibit interleukin-8 gene expression in the bovine lung experimentally infected with Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Goubau, S; Morck, D W; Buret, A

    2000-10-01

    The expression of the interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene was examined by in situ hybridization in lung tissues from calves experimentally infected with Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica and treated with tilmicosin. Interleukin-8 mRNA expression was detected in alveolar areas, particularly along interlobular septa, in the lumen, and in the epithelial cells of some bronchioles. In lesional lung tissues from animals that had received tilmicosin, we found large areas with limited inflammation. There was no staining for IL-8 mRNA in these areas. In contrast, in strongly inflamed areas, the same patterns and intensities of staining for IL-8 mRNA were detected in tilmicosin- and sham-treated animals. We conclude that tilmicosin does not affect the expression of IL-8 mRNA in tissue showing microscopic signs of inflammation. Together with previous reports, this supports the view that the pro-apoptotic properties of tilmicosin on neutrophils do not compromise the host defense mechanisms required to control the infection.

  16. Immunogenicity and efficacy of three recombinant subunit Pasteurella multocida toxin vaccines against progressive atrophic rhinitis in pigs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, Chih-Ming; Huang, Chienjin; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Liu, Cheng-I; Winton, James R.; Chien, Maw-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Three short fragments of recombinant subunit Pasteurella multocida toxin (rsPMT) were constructed for evaluation as candidate vaccines against progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) of swine. PMT-specific antibody secreting cells and evidence of cellular immunity were detected in rsPMT-immunized pigs following authentic PMT challenge or homologous antigen booster. Piglets immunized with rsPMT fragments containing either the N-terminal or the C-terminal portions of PMT developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Pregnant sows immunized with rsPMT had higher levels of maternal antibodies in their colostrum than did those immunized with a conventional PAR-toxoid vaccine. Offspring from rsPMT vaccinated sows had better survival after challenge with a five-fold lethal dose of authentic PMT and had better growth performance after challenge with a sublethal dose of toxin. Our findings indicate these non-toxic rsPMT proteins are attractive candidates for development of a subunit vaccine against PAR in pigs.

  17. Passive immune cross-protection in mice produced by rabbit antisera against different serotypes of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Rimler, R B

    1996-05-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) and fowl cholera (FC) are specific diseases caused by certain serotypes of Pasteurella multocida. Strains that usually cause HS in cattle and water buffalo do not produce FC in avian species, and strains that cause FC do not produce HS in cattle and water buffalo. A variety of P. multocida serotypes, including unusual strains which can cause HS in wild ruminants, were evaluated in passive immune protection studies to determine the immunological relationship between strains associated with HS and FC. Various degrees of cross-protection were seen among the strains. Antiserum against a serotype B:3,4 strain protected against strains capable of causing HS (serotypes B:1, B:2, B:3,4, B:4 and E:2) and FC (serotypes A:1, A:3 and A:5). Antiserum against an FC strain (serotype A:5) similarly protected against strains capable of causing HS and FC. Antigenic analyses indicated that cross-protection was not necessarily induced by serotype-specific capsular (beta) or somatic (gamma) antigens or major porin protein. SDS-PAGE and immunoblots of whole cell lysates of the different HS and FC strains showed many protein-staining bands with similar mobilities and antigenic activity. These cross-reactive antigenic bands occurred in the 20- to 120-kDa range. Adsorption of antiserum with a heterologous serotype removed its reactivity with most of these bands, as well as its ability to cross-protect.

  18. Diversity of Mannheimia haemolytica and pasteurella trehalosi serotypes from apparently healthy sheep and abattoir specimens in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sisay, T; Zerihun, A

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence and serotypic diversity of Mannheimia [Pasteurella] haemolytica and Pasteurella trehalosi from nasal swabs, sera and abattoir specimens from sheep in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia was investigated. Prevalence rates of 83% and 75% of these microorganisms were found in the serum samples and nasal swabs, respectively, from apparently healthy sheep. In a local abattoir, 205 lungs were investigated, 34% of which showed pneumonia, from which samples were collected from 51 lungs and the same number of corresponding tonsils. Mannheimia and Pasteurella species were isolated from 59% of these pneumonic lungs and 69% of the respective tonsils. M. haemolytica serotypes accounted for 41 (59%) and P. trehalosi for 11 (32%) of the isolates from the abattoir specimens. The majority (67%) of isolates from nasal swabs were P. trehalosi, M. haemolytica being isolated f rom 4 (13%) of the swabs. M. glucosida was isolated only from the tonsils. The predominant serotypes of the isolates from both the nasal swabs and the abattoir specimens were M. haemolytica A1 (17%) and P. trehalosi T4 (16%) and T3 (13%). P. trehalosi T15 was less commonly encountered, while M. haemolytica A9 and A13 were not isolated. Studies on sera from 100 sheep indicated that antibodies against M. haemolytica serotype A1 (14%) were most common, followed by A5 and A8 (each 10%) and A9 and P. trehalosi T3 (each 9%) and T4 (8%). Antibodies against M. glucosida or serotype All occurred in 2% of the sera. Multiple serotypes were common in all types of samples. The importance of including in vaccines the most prevalent serotypes involved in the pneumonia of sheep in the area is discussed. PMID:12625399

  19. An ecologic study comparing distribution of Pasteurella trehalosi and Mannheimia haemolytica between Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep, White Mountain bighorn sheep, and domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Tomassini, Letizia; Gonzales, Ben; Weiser, Glen C; Sischo, William

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence and phenotypic variability of Pasteurella and Mannheimia isolates from Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis sierrae), White Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni), and domestic sheep (Ovis aries) from California, USA, were compared. The White Mountain bighorn sheep population had a recent history of pneumonia-associated mortality, whereas the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep population had no recent history of pneumonia-associated mortality. The domestic sheep flocks were pastured in areas geographically near both populations but were not known to have direct contact with either bighorn sheep population. Oropharyngeal swab samples were collected from healthy domestic and bighorn sheep and cultured to characterize bacterial species, hemolysis, biogroups, and biovariants. Pasteurella trehalosi and Mannheimia haemolytica were detected in all of the study populations, but the relative proportion of each bacterial species differed among sheep populations. Pasteurella trehalosi was more common than M. haemolytica in the bighorn sheep populations, whereas the opposite was true in domestic sheep. Mannheimia haemolytica was separated into 11 biogroups, and P. trehalosi was characterized into two biogroups. Biogroup distributions for M. haemolytica and P. trehalosi differed among the three populations; however, no difference was detected for the distribution of P. trehalosi biogroups between the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep and domestic sheep. The prevalence odds ratios (pOR) for the distribution of M. haemolytica biogroups suggested little difference between White Mountain bighorn sheep and domestic sheep compared with Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep and domestic sheep, although these comparisons had relatively large confidence intervals for the point estimates. Hemolytic activity of the isolates was not different among the sheep populations for M. haemolytica but was different for P. trehalosi. No clear evidence of association was found in the

  20. Capsular polysaccharide vaccine for Group B Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel; Xie, Guilin; Hanson, Lars Å.; Miller, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the literature that is the basis for our proposal that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac conjugates will be safe and effective vaccines for Group B meningococci (GBMs), Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2. Although (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is a virulence factor and a protective antigen of these three pathogens, it is also a component of normal tissues (neural cell adhesion molecule). Natural, anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac present in most adults, vaccine-induced antibodies, and even high levels of spontaneously appearing monoclonal anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac did not cause autoimmunity. Although it is not possible to prove a null hypothesis, there are no epidemiologic, serologic, immunologic, or clinical data to indicate that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac antibodies will induce pathology or an autoimmune disease. No increased pathology caused by these antibodies was found, even in neonates and infants of mothers recovered from GBM meningitis. The lack of pathology mediated by anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac may be explained by different presentations of (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac on bacterial and mammalian cells and by the unusual physicochemical properties of anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac. Based on clinical and experimental data collected over 30 y and because (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is an essential virulence factor and a protective antigen for GBM, E. coli K1, and P. haemolytica A2, protein conjugates of it are easy to prepare using inexpensive and plentiful ingredients, and they would be compatible with routinely administered infant vaccines, clinical studies of these conjugates should proceed. PMID:22025709

  1. Characterization of PaxA and Its Operon: a Cohemolytic RTX Toxin Determinant from Pathogenic Pasteurella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnert, Peter; Heyberger-Meyer, Bénédicte; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella aerogenes is known as a commensal bacterium or as an opportunistic pathogen, as well as a primary pathogen found to be involved in abortion cases of humans, swine, and other mammals. Using broad-range DNA probes for bacterial RTX toxin genes, we cloned and subsequently sequenced a new operon named paxCABD encoding the RTX toxin PaxA in P. aerogenes. The pax operon is organized analogous to the classical RTX operons containing the activator gene paxC upstream of the structural toxin gene paxA, which is followed by the secretion protein genes paxB and paxD. The highest sequence similarity of paxA with known RTX toxin genes is found with apxIIIA (82%). PaxA is structurally similar to ApxIIIA and also shows functional analogy to ApxIIIA, since it shows cohemolytic activity with the sphingomyelinase of Staphylococcus aureus, known as the CAMP effect, but is devoid of direct hemolytic activity. In addition, it shows to some extent immunological cross-reactions with ApxIIIA. P. aerogenes isolated from various specimens showed that the pax operon was present in about one-third of the strains. All of the pax-positive strains were specifically related to swine abortion cases or septicemia of newborn piglets. These strains were also shown to produce the PaxA toxin as determined by the CAMP phenomenon, whereas none of the pax-negative strains did. This indicated that the PaxA toxin is involved in the pathogenic potential of P. aerogenes. The examined P. aerogenes isolates were phylogenetically analyzed by 16S rRNA gene (rrs) sequencing in order to confirm their species. Only a small heterogeneity (<0.5%) was observed between the rrs genes of the strains originating from geographically distant farms and isolated at different times. PMID:10603361

  2. Interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, and fumonisin B1 in the porcine respiratory tract as studied by computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pósa, Roland; Donkó, Tamás; Bogner, Péter; Kovács, Melinda; Repa, Imre; Magyar, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica, toxigenic Pasteurella multocida serotype D, and the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) was studied. On day 0 of the experiment, 28 artificially reared 3-day-old piglets were divided into 4 groups (n = 7 each): a control group (A), a group fed FB1 toxin (B), a group infected with the 2 pathogens (C), and a group infected with the 2 pathogens and fed FB1 toxin (D). The B. bronchiseptica infection [with 106 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL] was performed on day 4 and the P. multocida infection (with 108 CFU/mL) on day 16. From day 16 a Fusarium verticillioides fungal culture (dietary FB1 toxin content 10 mg/kg) was mixed into the feed of groups B and D. In groups C and D, clinical signs including mild serous nasal discharge, sneezing, panting, and hoarseness appeared from day 4, and then from day 16 some piglets had coughing and dyspnea as well. Computed tomography (CT) performed on day 16 demonstrated lung lesions attributable to colonization by B. bronchiseptica in the infected groups. By day 25 the number of piglets exhibiting lesions had increased, and the lesions appeared as well-circumscribed, focal changes characterized by a strong density increase in the affected areas of the lungs. The gross pathological findings confirmed the results obtained by CT. These results indicate that, when combined with dual infection by B. bronchiseptica and P. multocida, dietary exposure of pigs to FB1 toxin raises the risk of pneumonia and increases the extent and severity of the pathological changes. PMID:22210993

  3. Use of DNA analysis of Pasteurella haemolytica biotype T isolates to monitor transmission in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis).

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, M D; Ward, A C; Hunter, D L; Wesley, I V

    1993-01-01

    Pneumonia has been identified as a major cause of poor lamb survival in indigenous herds of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) in central Idaho. Pasteurella haemolytica was isolated from five adult Rocky Mountain bighorn ewes captured from a free-ranging herd in central Idaho. The lambs from two of these ewes delivered by cesarean section were free of P. haemolytica until 40 days of age and after repeated contact with their dams. The lambs subsequently developed signs of pneumonia, and P. haemolytica was isolated from nasal, pharyngeal, and transtracheal wash samples from each lamb. All P. haemolytica biotype T isolates from the ewes and lambs, as well as those from a 9-month-old lamb of the same herd from which samples for culture were obtained 2 years earlier, were subjected to HaeIII restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and ribotyping. Two ribotypes and seven REA patterns were visually distinguishable by these procedures. Similarity coefficients (SAB) of 0.09 to 0.95 were calculated for the seven REA patterns. The REA patterns of the isolates from the lambs were identical (SAB = 1.0). The isolates from the lambs also had SAB values of 1.0, which was indicative of identity with one of the seven isolates cultured from the ewes at the time of capture and with the organism isolated from the 9-month-old lamb. These procedures have the discriminatory capabilities necessary to monitor the transmission of specific strains of bacteria within and between animal populations. Images PMID:8385150

  4. Passage of CD18- and CD18+ bovine neutrophils into pulmonary alveoli during acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A

    1996-11-01

    CD18 is a subunit for three beta 2 integrin molecules (Mac-1, p150, 95, LFA-1), which are expressed on the plasma membrane of neutrophils. These molecules mediate passage of neutrophils into sites of infection. In children and animals that lack CD18 expression, neutrophil infiltration is impaired in most tissues. However, in lung, CD18- neutrophils have been identified in the airway spaces during spontaneous episodes of pneumonia. To determine whether CD18 is vital for passage through the pulmonary alveolar wall, lung lobes of cattle with neutrophils that were deficient in CD18 expression (CD18-) and cattle with normal CD18 expression (CD18+) were inoculated with Pasteurella haemolytica by fiberoptic bronchoscopy; control lobes were inoculated with pyrogen-free saline (PFS). Neutrophil passage into alveolar lumina at 4 and 6 hours postinoculation was measured by computerized image analysis. Blood levels of neutrophils for CD18- cattle ranged from 12- to 26-fold higher than for CD18+ cattle prior to inoculation, and counts in both groups rose slightly postinoculation. In P. haemolytica-inoculated lobes, total numbers of neutrophils in alveolar lumina of the two groups were similar. An increase in the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was fourfold greater in CD18- cattle than in CD18+ cattle. In PFS-inoculated lobes, the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was sixfold higher in CD18 cattle than in CD18+ cattle. This work shows that by 4 and 6 hours, CD18- neutrophils enter the alveolar lumen at a rate similar to that in CD18+ cattle. Higher numbers of CD18- neutrophils are present in the alveolar wall of control (PFS) and bacteria-inoculated lobes. Thus, the CD18- cells are increased in the walls of alveoli and numbers of neutrophils that enter the alveolar lumen are similar in CD18+ and CD18- cattle. PMID:8952022

  5. Arf6-Dependent Intracellular Trafficking of Pasteurella multocida Toxin and pH-Dependent Translocation from Late Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Repella, Tana L.; Ho, Mengfei; Chong, Tracy P. M.; Bannai, Yuka; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2011-01-01

    The potent mitogenic toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT) is the major virulence factor associated with a number of epizootic and zoonotic diseases caused by infection with this respiratory pathogen. PMT is a glutamine-specific protein deamidase that acts on its intracellular G-protein targets to increase intracellular calcium, cytoskeletal, and mitogenic signaling. PMT enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and then translocates into the cytosol through a pH-dependent process that is inhibited by NH4Cl or bafilomycin A1. However, the detailed mechanisms that govern cellular entry, trafficking, and translocation of PMT remain unclear. Co-localization studies described herein revealed that while PMT shares an initial entry pathway with transferrin (Tfn) and cholera toxin (CT), the trafficking pathways of Tfn, CT, and PMT subsequently diverge, as Tfn is trafficked to recycling endosomes, CT is trafficked retrograde to the ER, and PMT is trafficked to late endosomes. Our studies implicate the small regulatory GTPase Arf6 in the endocytic trafficking of PMT. Translocation of PMT from the endocytic vesicle occurs through a pH-dependent process that is also dependent on both microtubule and actin dynamics, as evidenced by inhibition of PMT activity in our SRE-based reporter assay, with nocodazole and cytochalasin D, respectively, suggesting that membrane translocation and cytotoxicity of PMT is dependent on its transfer to late endosomal compartments. In contrast, disruption of Golgi-ER trafficking with brefeldin A increased PMT activity, suggesting that inhibiting PMT trafficking to non-productive compartments that do not lead to translocation, while promoting formation of an acidic tubulovesicle system more conducive to translocation, enhances PMT translocation and activity. PMID:22053287

  6. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, R Y; Shewen, P E; Strathdee, C A; Greer, C N

    1985-01-01

    A clone bank of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was constructed by partial digestion of the genomic DNA with Sau3A and ligation of 5- to 10-kilobase-pair fragments into the BamHI site of the plasmid vector pBR322. After transformation into Escherichia coli K-12, a total of 4 X 10(3) recombinant clones was obtained. These were screened for the production of P. haemolytica soluble antigens by a colony enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay blot method with a rabbit antiserum raised against the soluble antigens. The clones producing P. haemolytica soluble antigens were then analyzed for the production of the leukotoxin by a cytotoxicity assay with cells from a bovine leukemia-derived B-lymphocyte cell line as the target cells. Positive clones were identified, and subsequent restriction analysis of the recombinant plasmids showed that the same 6.3 kilobase pairs of insert DNA was cloned in either of the two orientations into the plasmid vector pBR322. One of the clones was selected for further characterization of the leukotoxin as produced in E. coli. Tests for heat lability and target cell species specificity with canine, porcine, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes indicated that the activity of the cloned leukotoxin was identical to that of the P. haemolytica leukotoxin. Furthermore, the E. coli-produced leukotoxin was also neutralized by bovine or rabbit antiserum known to have antitoxic activity. When cellular proteins from the E. coli clones were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis, a 100,000-dalton protein was identified which corresponded to one of the soluble antigens found in the leukotoxic culture supernatant of P. haemolytica. These results demonstrated that the gene(s) for the P. haemolytica leukotoxin have been cloned and that the leukotoxin was expressed in E. coli. Images PMID:3905610

  7. Involvement of the nervous system following experimental infection with Pasteurella multocida B:2 in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): A clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Marza, Ali Dhiaa; Jesse, Faez Firdaus Abdullah; Ahmed, Ihsan Muneer; Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Ibrahim, Hayder Hamzah; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Saharee, Abdul Aziz; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Alwan, Mohammed Jwaid; Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd

    2016-04-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute, fatal, septicaemic disease of cattle and buffaloes caused by one of two specific serotypes of Pasteurella multocida B:2 and E:2 in Asian and African, respectively. It is well known that HS affect mainly the respiratory and digestive tracts. However, involvement of the nervous system in pathogenesis of HS has been reported in previous studies without details. In this study, nine buffalo calves of 8 months old were distributed into three groups. Animals of Group 1 and 2 were inoculated orally and subcutaneously with 10 ml of 1 × 10(12) cfu/ml of P. multocida B:2, respectively, while animals of Group 3 were inoculated orally with 10 ml of phosphate buffer saline as a control. All calves in Group 1 and Group 3 were euthanised after 504 h (21 day) post-infection, while calves in Group 2 had to euthanise after 12 h post-infection as they develop sever clinical signs of HS. Significant differences were found in Group 2 in the mean scores of clinical signs, gross and histopathological changes which mainly affect different anatomic regions of the nervous system. In addition, successful bacterial isolation of P. multocida B:2 were obtained from different sites of the nervous system. On the other hand, less sever, clinical, gross and histopathological changes were found in Group 1. These results provide for the first time strong evidence of involving of the nervous system in pathogenesis of HS, especially in the peracute stage of the disease. PMID:26850845

  8. Influence of Pasteurella multocida infection on the pharmacokinetic behavior of marbofloxacin after intravenous and intramuscular administrations in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abo-el-Sooud, K; Goudah, A

    2010-02-01

    The pharmacokinetic behavior of marbofloxacin was studied in healthy (n = 12) and Pasteurella multocida infected rabbits (n = 12) after single intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) administrations. Six rabbits in each group (control and diseased) were given a single dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (bw) of marbofloxacin intravenously. The other six rabbits in each group were given the same dose of the drug intramuscularly. The concentration of marbofloxacin in plasma was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. The plasma concentrations were higher in diseased rabbits than in healthy rabbits following both routes of injections. Following i.v. administration, the values of the elimination half-life (t(1/2beta)), and area under the curve were significantly higher, whereas total body clearance was significantly lower in diseased rabbits. After i.m. administration, the elimination half-life (t(1/2el)), mean residence time, and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) were higher in diseased rabbits (5.33 h, 7.35 h and 2.24 microg/mL) than in healthy rabbits (4.33 h, 6.81 h and 1.81 microg/mL, respectively). Marbofloxacin was bound to the extent of 26 +/- 1.3% and 23 +/- 1.6% to plasma protein of healthy and diseased rabbits, respectively. The C(max)/MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) and AUC/MIC ratios were significantly higher in diseased rabbits (28 and 189 h) than in healthy rabbits (23 and 157 h), indicating the favorable pharmacodynamic characteristics of the drug in diseased rabbits.

  9. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida in a tissue-cage model in yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Shan, Q; Wang, J; Yang, F; Ding, H; Liang, C; Lv, Z; Li, Z; Zeng, Z

    2014-06-01

    The fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug marbofloxacin was administered to yellow cattle intravenously and intramuscularly at a dose of 2 mg/kg of body weight in a two-period crossover study. The pharmacokinetic properties of marbofloxacin in serum, inflamed tissue-cage fluid (exudate), and noninflamed tissue-cage fluid (transudate) were studied by using a tissue-cage model. The in vitro and ex vivo activities of marbofloxacin in serum, exudate, and transudate against a pathogenic strain of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) were determined. Integration of in vivo pharmacokinetic data with the in vitro MIC provided mean values for the area under the curve (AUC)/MIC for serum, exudate, and transudate of 155.75, 153.00, and 138.88, respectively, after intravenous dosing and 160.50, 151.00, and 137.63, respectively, after intramuscular dosing. After intramuscular dosing, the maximum concentration/MIC ratios for serum, exudate, and transudate were 21.13, 9.13, and 8.38, respectively. The ex vivo growth inhibition data after intramuscular dosing were fitted to the inhibitory sigmoid Emax equation to provide the values of AUC/MIC required to produce bacteriostasis, bactericidal activity, and elimination of bacteria. The respective values for serum were 17.25, 31.29, and 109.62, and slightly lower values were obtained for transudate and exudate. It is proposed that these findings might be used with MIC50 or MIC90 data to provide a rational approach to the design of dosage schedules which optimize efficacy in respect of bacteriological as well as clinical cures.

  10. Protective efficacy afforded by live Pasteurella multocida vaccines in chickens is independent of lipopolysaccharide outer core structure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Edmunds, Mark; Wright, Amy; Ford, Mark; Turni, Conny; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2016-03-29

    Pasteurella multocida is a major animal pathogen that causes a range of diseases including fowl cholera. P. multocida infections result in considerable losses to layer and breeder flocks in poultry industries worldwide. Both killed whole-cell and live-attenuated vaccines are available; these vaccines vary in their protective efficacy, particularly against heterologous strains. Moreover, until recently there was no knowledge of P. multocida LPS genetics and structure to determine precisely how LPS structure affects the protective capacity of these vaccines. In this study we show that defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants presented as killed whole-cell vaccines elicited solid protective immunity only against P. multocida challenge strains expressing highly similar or identical LPS structures. This finding indicates that vaccination of commercial flocks with P. multocida killed cell formulations will not protect against strains producing an LPS structure different to that produced by strains included in the vaccine formulation. Conversely, protective immunity conferred by vaccination with live P. multocida strains was found to be largely independent of LPS structure. Birds vaccinated with a range of live mutants belonging to the L1 and L3 LPS genotypes, each expressing a specific truncated LPS structure, were protected against challenge with the parent strain. Moreover, birds vaccinated with any of the five LPS mutants belonging to the L1 LPS genotype were also protected against challenge with an unrelated strain and two of the five groups vaccinated with live LPS mutants belonging to the L3 genotype were protected against challenge with an unrelated strain. In summary, vaccination with live P. multocida aroA mutants producing full-length L1 or L3 LPS or vaccination with live strains producing shortened L1 LPS elicited strong protective immunity against both homologous and heterologous challenge.

  11. A Pasteurella multocida sialyltransferase displaying dual trans-sialidase activities for production of 3'-sialyl and 6'-sialyl glycans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yao; Jers, Carsten; Meyer, Anne S; Arnous, Anis; Li, Haiying; Kirpekar, Finn; Mikkelsen, Jørn D

    2014-01-20

    This study examined a recombinant Pasteurella multocida sialyltransferase exhibiting dual trans-sialidase activities. The enzyme catalyzed trans-sialylation using either 2-O-(p-nitrophenyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid or casein glycomacropeptide (whey protein) as the sialyl donor and lactose as the acceptor, resulting in production of both 3'-sialyllactose and 6'-sialyllactose. This is the first study reporting α-2,6-trans-sialidase activity of this sialyltransferase (EC 2.4.99.1 and 2.4.99.4). A response surface design was used to evaluate the effects of three reaction parameters (pH, temperature, and lactose concentration) on enzymatic production of 3'- and 6'-sialyllactoses using 5% (w/v) casein glycomacropeptide (equivalent to 9mM bound sialic acid) as the donor. The maximum yield of 3'-sialyllactose (2.75±0.35mM) was achieved at a reaction condition with pH 6.4, 40°C, 100mM lactose after 6h; and the largest concentration of 6'-sialyllactose (3.33±0.38mM) was achieved under a condition with pH 5.4, 40°C, 100mM lactose after 8h. 6'-sialyllactose was presumably formed from α-2,3 bound sialic acid in the casein glycomacropeptide as well as from 3'-sialyllactose produced in the reaction. The kcat/Km value for the enzyme using 3'-sialyllactose as the donor for 6'-sialyllactose synthesis at pH 5.4 and 40°C was determined to be 23.22±0.7M(-1)s(-1). Moreover, the enzyme was capable of catalyzing the synthesis of both 3'- and 6'-sialylated galactooligosaccharides, when galactooligosaccharides served as acceptors.

  12. Clinico-pathology, hematology, and biochemistry responses toward Pasteurella multocida Type B: 2 via oral and subcutaneous route of infections

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Adamu, Lawan; Marza, Ali Dhiaa; Ibrahim, Hayder Hamzah; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Saharee, Abdul Aziz; Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Bakar, Md Zuki Abu; Norsidin, Mohd Jefri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pasteurella multocida a Gram-negative bacterium has been identified as the causative agent of many economically important diseases in a wide range of hosts. Hemorrhagic septicemia is a disease caused by P. multocida serotype B:2 and E:2. The organism causes acute, a highly fatal septicemic disease with high morbidity and mortality in cattle and more susceptible in buffaloes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs, blood parameters, post mortem and histopathology changes caused by P. multocida Type B:2 infections initiated through the oral and subcutaneous routes. Methods: Nine buffalo heifers were divided equally into 3 treatment groups. Group 1 was inoculated orally with 10 ml of phosphate buffer saline; Groups 2 and 3 were inoculated with 10 ml of 1012 colony forming unit of P. multocida Type B:2 subcutaneously and orally respectively. Results: There was a significant difference (p<0.05) in temperature between the subcutaneous and the control group. The results revealed significant differences (p<0.05) in erythrocytes, hemoglobin, packed cell volume, leukocytes, monocytes, and A: G ratio between the subcutaneous and the control group. Furthermore, there were significant differences (p<0.05) in leukocytes, band neutrophils, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils, basophils, thrombocytes, plasma protein, icterus index, gamma glutamyl tranferase and A: G ratio between the oral and the control group. The post mortem lesions of the subcutaneous group buffaloes showed generalized hyperemia, congestion and hemorrhage of the immune organs, gastro-intestinal tract organs and vital organs. The oral group buffaloes showed mild lesions in the lung and liver. Histologically, there were significant differences (p<0.05) in hemorrhage and congestion; necrosis and degeneration; inflammatory cells infiltration; and edema in between the groups. Conclusion: This study was a proof that oral route infection of P. multocida Type B:2

  13. Interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, and fumonisin B1 in the porcine respiratory tract as studied by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pósa, Roland; Donkó, Tamás; Bogner, Péter; Kovács, Melinda; Repa, Imre; Magyar, Tibor

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica, toxigenic Pasteurella multocida serotype D, and the mycotoxin fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) was studied. On day 0 of the experiment, 28 artificially reared 3-day-old piglets were divided into 4 groups (n = 7 each): a control group (A), a group fed FB(1) toxin (B), a group infected with the 2 pathogens (C), and a group infected with the 2 pathogens and fed FB(1) toxin (D). The B. bronchiseptica infection [with 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL] was performed on day 4 and the P. multocida infection (with 10(8) CFU/mL) on day 16. From day 16 a Fusarium verticillioides fungal culture (dietary FB(1) toxin content 10 mg/kg) was mixed into the feed of groups B and D. In groups C and D, clinical signs including mild serous nasal discharge, sneezing, panting, and hoarseness appeared from day 4, and then from day 16 some piglets had coughing and dyspnea as well. Computed tomography (CT) performed on day 16 demonstrated lung lesions attributable to colonization by B. bronchiseptica in the infected groups. By day 25 the number of piglets exhibiting lesions had increased, and the lesions appeared as well-circumscribed, focal changes characterized by a strong density increase in the affected areas of the lungs. The gross pathological findings confirmed the results obtained by CT. These results indicate that, when combined with dual infection by B. bronchiseptica and P. multocida, dietary exposure of pigs to FB(1) toxin raises the risk of pneumonia and increases the extent and severity of the pathological changes.

  14. Vaccination with Pasteurella multocida recombinant OmpA induces strong but non-protective and deleterious Th2-type immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Dabo, S Mady; Confer, Anthony; Montelongo, Marie; York, Petrina; Wyckoff, John H

    2008-08-12

    Pasteurella multocida OmpA (PmOmpA) belongs to the major and multifunctional Escherichia coli OmpA family of proteins. We have previously reported that the protein is conserved, immunogenic and an adhesin that binds host cells and host cell extracellular matrix molecules [Dabo SM, Confer AW, Quijano-Blas RA. Molecular and immunological characterization of Pasteurella multocida serotype A:3 OmpA: evidence of its role in P. multocida interaction with extracellular matrix molecules. Microb Pathog 2003;35(4):147-157]. In this study, we found that immunization of mice with the recombinant PmOmpA elicited strong Th2-type immune response, characterized by high immunoglobulin G(1) (IgG(1)) antibodies production. Subsequent intraperitoneal homologous challenge of the immunized mice resulted in lack of protection associated with the high IgG(1) titers in anti-rPmOmpA sera. Furthermore, the protection afforded by vaccination with P. multocida OMPs alone was adversely affected by the addition of the rPmOmpA to the vaccine preparations. The results demonstrate that PmOmpA has a detrimental effect on the efficacy of vaccination with OMPs in mice. Targeted inactivation of pmOmpA gene in P. multocida 232 represents a potential mean towards the development of an effective vaccine candidate.

  15. Veterinary use of new quinolones in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S

    1995-01-01

    Five new quinolones are used as veterinary medicines in Japan. Benofloxacin and ofloxacin are orally given in feed or in drinking water for respiratory diseases due to Mycoplasma spp. and Escherichia coli in poultry. Enrofloxacin is subcutaneously, intramuscularly or orally administered to cattle and swine for pneumonia due to Pasteurella spp., Mycoplasma spp. and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and diarrhoea due to E. coli, and is used orally for respiratory diseases in poultry. Danofloxacin is similar to enrofloxacin except that the former is not approved for diarrhoea in cattle and swine. Orbifloxacin is given intramuscularly for pneumonia and diarrhoea in cattle and swine but not for poultry diseases. They are effective and safe in animals, and disappear from edible tissues after appropriate drug withdrawal times. The quinolones are indicated only when first-choice drugs are ineffective, only under the direction of veterinarians and only for periods of less than 5 days. Under these conditions, it appears unlikely that quinolone use in veterinary practice will be detrimental to human chemotherapy.

  16. Occurrence of virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from slaughter cattle in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khamesipour, Faham; Momtaz, Hassan; Azhdary Mamoreh, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    A total of 30 Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from 333 pneumonic and apparently health slaughter cattle were examined for capsule biosynthesis genes and 23 virulence-associated genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The disc diffusion technique was used to determine antimicrobial resistance profiles among the isolates. Of the isolates, 23 belonged to capsular type A, 5 to capsular type D and two isolates were untypeable. The distribution of the capsular types in pneumonic lungs and in apparently health lungs was statistically similar. All virulence genes tested were detected among the isolates derived from pneumonic lungs; whereas isolates derived from apparently health lungs carried 16 of the 23 genes. The frequently detected genes among isolates from pneumonic lungs were exbD, hgbA, hgbB, ompA, ompH, oma87, and sodC; whereas tadD, toxA, and pmHAS genes occurred less frequently. Most of the adhesins and superoxide dismutases; and all of the iron acquisition and protectin proteins occurred at significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher frequencies in isolates from pneumonic lungs. Isolates from apparently healthy lungs didn't carry the following genes; hsf-1, hsf-2, tadD, toxA, nanB, nanH, and pmHAS. One adhesion (hsf-1) and two iron acquisition (exbD and tonB) genes occurred at significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher frequencies among capA isolates. All the P. multocida isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and tetracyclines. Different proportions of the isolates were however resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, erythromycin, lincomycin, penicillin, rifampin, streptomycin, and florfenicol. Our results reveal presence of virulence factors (VFs) in P. multocida strains isolated from symptomatic and asymptomatic bovids. A higher frequency of the factors among isolates from symptomatic study animals may suggest their role in pathogenesis of P. multocida-associated bovine respiratory disease (BRD). The results

  17. Occurrence of virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from slaughter cattle in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khamesipour, Faham; Momtaz, Hassan; Azhdary Mamoreh, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    A total of 30 Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from 333 pneumonic and apparently health slaughter cattle were examined for capsule biosynthesis genes and 23 virulence-associated genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The disc diffusion technique was used to determine antimicrobial resistance profiles among the isolates. Of the isolates, 23 belonged to capsular type A, 5 to capsular type D and two isolates were untypeable. The distribution of the capsular types in pneumonic lungs and in apparently health lungs was statistically similar. All virulence genes tested were detected among the isolates derived from pneumonic lungs; whereas isolates derived from apparently health lungs carried 16 of the 23 genes. The frequently detected genes among isolates from pneumonic lungs were exbD, hgbA, hgbB, ompA, ompH, oma87, and sodC; whereas tadD, toxA, and pmHAS genes occurred less frequently. Most of the adhesins and superoxide dismutases; and all of the iron acquisition and protectin proteins occurred at significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher frequencies in isolates from pneumonic lungs. Isolates from apparently healthy lungs didn't carry the following genes; hsf-1, hsf-2, tadD, toxA, nanB, nanH, and pmHAS. One adhesion (hsf-1) and two iron acquisition (exbD and tonB) genes occurred at significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher frequencies among capA isolates. All the P. multocida isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and tetracyclines. Different proportions of the isolates were however resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, erythromycin, lincomycin, penicillin, rifampin, streptomycin, and florfenicol. Our results reveal presence of virulence factors (VFs) in P. multocida strains isolated from symptomatic and asymptomatic bovids. A higher frequency of the factors among isolates from symptomatic study animals may suggest their role in pathogenesis of P. multocida-associated bovine respiratory disease (BRD). The results

  18. The efficacy of oral vaccination of mice with alginate encapsulated outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella haemolytica and One-Shot.

    PubMed

    Kidane, A; Guimond, P; Ju, T R; Sanchez, M; Gibson, J; Bowersock, T L

    2001-03-21

    The goal of this study was to examine the efficacy of oral delivery of alginate encapsulated outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Pasteurella haemolytica and a commercial One-Shot vaccine in inducing protection in mice against lethal challenge with virulent P. haemolytica. We examined two alginate microsphere formulations and compared them with oral unencapsulated and subcutaneously administered vaccines. Alginate microspheres were made by the emulsion-cross-linking technique. They were examined for size, hydrophobicity, and antigen loading efficiency before they were used in the study. Mice were vaccinated by administering 200 microg of antigens in 200 microl of microspheres suspension orally or subcutaneously. One group of mice received blank microspheres and a second group was given unencapsulated antigen orally. A third and a fourth group received different formulations of alginate encapsulated antigens by oral administration. Three groups received subcutaneous inoculations (alginate encapsulated, non-adjuvanted and unencapsulated antigens, and adjuvanted One-Shot), and one group received water (naïve group). Mice were vaccinated orally for four consecutive days and challenged with P. haemolytica 5 weeks after the first vaccination. Weekly serum and feces samples were assayed for antigen specific antibodies. The number of dead mice in each group 4 days post challenge was used to compare the efficacy of the various vaccination groups. The mean volume sizes of blank alginate microsphere formulations A, and AA were 15.9, 16 and 9.2 microm, respectively. Hydrophobicity of the microspheres was evaluated by measuring contact angle on a glass slide coated with the microspheres. The contact angles on A and AA were 37.8 and 74.3 degrees, respectively. Antigen concentration in a 1:1 w/w suspension of microspheres in water was 0.9 mg/ml. Rate of death for the blank group was 42.8% whereas for groups vaccinated with antigens encapsulated in A and AA the death rates were 40

  19. In situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in calves with acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Radi, Z A; Register, K B; Lee, E K; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    1999-09-01

    The in situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in normal and pneumonic lung tissues of Holstein calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was compared with that of age-matched non-BLAD Holstein calves by in situ hybridization. Twenty-four Holstein calves (both BLAD and non-BLAD) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups and inoculated intrabronchially with Pasteurella haemolytica or pyrogen-free saline. Lung tissues were collected and fixed in 10% neutral formalin at 2 or 4 hours postinoculation (PI). The expression and distribution of ICAM-1 mRNA in the different cell types of the lung tissue was detected by in situ hybridization with a 307-base-pair bovine ICAM-1 riboprobe. In lungs of both non-BLAD and BLAD saline-inoculated calves, ICAM-1 expression was present in epithelial cells but occurred in <30% of cells in bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. ICAM-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells was present in <30% of cells in pulmonary arteries and veins. The expression of ICAM-1 was significantly greater (>60% of cells) in bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells and pulmonary endothelial cells of arteries and veins in both BLAD and non-BLAD calves inoculated with P. haemolytica. Bronchiolar epithelium had the highest intensity of mRNA expression and highest percentage of cells that were stained, whereas bronchial epithelium had the lowest intensity and percentage of cells stained. Most alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in infected lungs also expressed ICAM-1. ICAM-1 expression was generally increased in infected BLAD calves at 2 hours PI as compared with non-BLAD calves but not at 4 hours PI. The increased expression of ICAM-1 during acute P. haemolytica pneumonia in calves suggests that ICAM-1 is upregulated and may play a role in leukocyte infiltration. The extent of ICAM-1 expression in P. haemolytica-inoculated calves with BLAD was initially enhanced but otherwise similar to that in non

  20. Influence of beta(2)-integrin adhesion molecule expression and pulmonary infection with Pasteurella haemolytica on cytokine gene expression in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    2000-07-01

    beta(2)-Integrins are leukocyte adhesion molecules composed of alpha (CD11a, -b, -c, or -d) and beta (CD18) subunit heterodimers. Genetic CD18 deficiency results in impaired neutrophil egress into tissues that varies between conducting airways and alveoli of the lung. In this study, we investigated whether CD18 deficiency in cattle affects proinflammatory cytokine (PIC) expression in pulmonary tissue after respiratory infection with Pasteurella haemolytica. Cattle were infected with P. haemolytica via fiberoptic deposition of organisms into the posterior part of the right cranial lung lobe. Animals were euthanized at 2 or 4 h postinoculation (p.i.), and tissues were collected to assess PIC gene expression using antisense RNA probes specific for bovine interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) along with the beta-actin (beta-Act) housekeeping gene. Expression of PIC was induced at 2 h p.i. in P. haemolytica-infected cattle and continued to 4 h p.i. At 2 h p.i., induction of gene expression and increase of cells that expressed PIC were observed both in CD18(+) and CD18(-) cattle after inoculation of P. haemolytica. The induction of gene expression with P. haemolytica inoculation was more prominent in CD18(-) cattle than in CD18(+) cattle by comparison to pyrogen-free saline (PFS)-inoculated control animals. At 4 h p.i., however, the induction of PIC, especially IL-1alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma, in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle inoculated with P. haemolytica was greater than that in lungs of the CD18(-) cattle. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha genes were not increased in P. haemolytica-inoculated CD18(-) cattle lungs compared to the PFS-inoculated control lungs at 4 h p.i. In PFS-inoculated lungs, we generally observed a higher percentage of cells and higher level of gene expression in the lungs of CD18(-) cattle than in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle, especially at 4 h p.i. The rate of neutrophil

  1. Detection of RTX toxin genes in gram-negative bacteria with a set of specific probes.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnert, P; Heyberger-Meyer, B; Burnens, A P; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1997-01-01

    The family of RTX (RTX representing repeats in the structural toxin) toxins is composed of several protein toxins with a characteristic nonapeptide glycine-rich repeat motif. Most of its members were shown to have cytolytic activity. By comparing the genetic relationships of the RTX toxin genes we established a set of 10 gene probes to be used for screening as-yet-unknown RTX toxin genes in bacterial species. The probes include parts of apxIA, apxIIA, and apxIIIA from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, cyaA from Bordetella pertusis, frpA from Neisseria meningitidis, prtC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, hlyA and elyA from Escherichia coli, aaltA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and lktA from Pasteurella haemolytica. A panel of pathogenic and nonpathogenic gram-negative bacteria were investigated for the presence of RTX toxin genes. The probes detected all known genes for RTX toxins. Moreover, we found potential RTX toxin genes in several pathogenic bacterial species for which no such toxins are known yet. This indicates that RTX or RTX-like toxins are widely distributed among pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. The probes generated by PCR and the hybridization method were optimized to allow broad-range screening for RTX toxin genes in one step. This included the binding of unlabelled probes to a nylon filter and subsequent hybridization of the filter with labelled genomic DNA of the strain to be tested. The method constitutes a powerful tool for the assessment of the potential pathogenicity of poorly characterized strains intended to be used in biotechnological applications. Moreover, it is useful for the detection of already-known or new RTX toxin genes in bacteria of medical importance. PMID:9172345

  2. Development of a Novel Cocktail Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and a Field-Applicable Lateral-Flow Rapid Test for Diagnosis of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Heller, Martin; Gicheru, Nimmo; Tjipura-Zaire, Georgina; Muriuki, Cecilia; Yu, Mingyan; Botelho, Ana; Naessens, Jan; Jores, Joerg; Liljander, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a severe respiratory disease that is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, a bacterium belonging to the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster. In the absence of an efficient CBPP vaccine, improved and easy-to-use diagnostic assays for recurrent testing combined with isolation and treatment of positive animals represent an option for CBPP control in Africa. Here we describe the comprehensive screening of 17 immunogenic Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides proteins using well-characterized bovine sera for the development of a novel cocktail enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for laboratory use. Two recombinant Mycoplasma immunogens, MSC_0136 and MSC_0636, were used to set up a standardized cocktail ELISA protocol. According to the results from more than 100 serum samples tested, the sensitivity and specificity of the novel cocktail ELISA were 85.6% and 96.4%, respectively, with an overall diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of the Office International des Epizooties (OIE)-prescribed serological assays. In addition, we provide a proof of principle for a field-applicable, easy-to-use commercially produced prototype lateral-flow test for rapid (<30-min) diagnosis of CBPP.

  3. Experimental Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia: A Long Term Study on the Course of Infection and Pathology in a Flock of Goats Infected with Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wesonga, HO; Bölske, G; Thiaucourt, F; Wanjohi, C; Lindberg, R

    2004-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a major threat to goat farming in parts of Africa and Asia. It classically causes acute high morbidity and mortality early in infection, but little is known of its long term epizootiology and course. In this study, 10 goats were inoculated with Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (M. capripneumoniae) and then mixed with 15 goats for contact transmission. The disease course was monitored in each goat for 56–105 days, whereafter the goats were killed and necropsied. Varying features signifying infection occurred in altogether 17 goats (7 inoculated, 10 in-contact). Clinical signs were severe in 8 goats but no fatalities occurred. Only 6 goats had serum antibody titres against M. capripneumoniae in ELISA. Fourteen goats (5 inoculated, 9 in-contact) had chronic pleuropulmonary lesions compatible with CCPP at necropsy and 7 of those showed M. capripneumoniae antigen in the lung by immunohistochemistry. Neither cultivation nor PCR tests were positive for the agent in any goat. The results indicate that the clinical course of CCPP in a flock may be comparatively mild, M. capripneumoniae-associated lung lesions may be present at a late stage of infection, and chronic infection may occur without a significant serological response. PMID:15663077

  4. Comparison and analysis of the nucleotide sequences of pilin genes from Haemophilus influenzae type b strains Eagan and M43.

    PubMed Central

    Forney, L J; Marrs, C F; Bektesh, S L; Gilsdorf, J R

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated antigenic differences among the pili expressed by various strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). In order to understand the molecular basis for these differences, the structural gene for pilin was cloned from Hib strain Eagan (p+) and the nucleotide sequence was compared to those of strains M43 (p+) and 770235 b0f+, which had been previously determined. The pilin gene of Hib strain Eagan (p+) had a 648-bp open reading frame that encoded a 20-amino-acid leader sequence followed by the 196 amino acids found in mature pilin. The translated sequence was three amino acids larger than pilins of strains M43 (p+) and 770235 b0f+ and was 78% identical and 95% homologous when conservative amino acid substitutions were considered. Differences between the amino acid sequences were not localized to any one region but rather were distributed throughout the proteins. Comparison of protein hydrophilicity profiles showed several hydrophilic regions with sequences that were conserved between strain Eagan (p+) and pilins of other Hib strains, and these regions represent potentially conserved antigenic domains. Southern blot analyses using an intragenic probe from the pilin gene of strain Eagan (p+) showed that the pilin gene was conserved among all type b and nontypeable strains of H. influenzae examined, and only a single copy was present in these strains. Homologous genes were not present in the phylogenetically related species Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. These data indicate that the pilin gene was highly conserved among different strains of H. influenzae and that small differences in the pilin amino acid sequences account for the observed antigenic differences of assembled pili from these strains. Images PMID:2037360

  5. Application of intact cell-based NFAT-β-lactamase reporter assay for Pasteurella multocida toxin-mediated activation of calcium signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuhong; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2009-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) stimulates and subsequently uncouples phospholipase C β1 (PLCβ1) signal transduction through its selective action on the alpha subunit of the Gq protein. Here, we describe the application of an NFAT-β-lactamase reporter assay as a functional readout for PMT-induced activation of the Gq-protein-coupled PLCβ1-IP3-Ca2+ signaling pathway. Use of the NFAT-β-lactamase reporter assay with a cell-permeable fluorogenic substrate provides high sensitivity due to the absence of endogenous β-lactamase activity in mammalian cells. This assay system was optimized for cell density, dose and time exposure of PMT stimulation. It is suited for quantitative characterization of PMT activity in mammalian cells and for use as a high-throughput screening method for PMT deletion and point mutants suitable for vaccine development. This method has application for diagnostic screening of clinical isolates of toxinogenic P. multocida. PMID:18190943

  6. Pasteurella multocida non-native joint infection after a dog lick: A case report describing a complicated two-stage revision and a comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Philip W, Lam; Page, Andrea V

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are commonly caused by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci; however, other microbial etiologies and specific risk factors are increasingly recognized. Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that is part of the normal oral flora in many animals, and is particularly common in dogs and cats. PJIs caused by P multocida have been reported only rarely in the literature and typically occur in the context of an animal bite or scratch. The present article describes a P multocida joint infection that occurred after a dog lick and complicated a two-stage revision arthroplasty. A comprehensive review of the literature regarding P multocida PJIs follows. PMID:26361490

  7. Analytical performance of an immunologic-based periodontal bacterial test for simultaneous detection and differentiation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Snyder, B; Ryerson, C C; Corona, H; Grogan, E A; Reynolds, H S; Contestable, P B; Boyer, B P; Mayer, J; Mangan, T; Norkus, N; Zambon, J J; Genco, R J

    1996-05-01

    The analytical performance of a membrane-based immunoassay for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia (including Prevotella nigrescens) was investigated. Positive reactions were observed for 71 of 71 reference strains and recent oral isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia. No cross-reactivity was observed with 39 other common oral and environmental species. The specificity of the test was unaffected by the presence of potential oral interferents including whole blood, white blood cells, mucin, saliva, toothpastes, and oral rinses. A proficiency test by dental professionals using a standardized set of unknown simulated samples yielded a sensitivity of 97% (116/120) and a 100% specificity (240/ 240). An additional group including dental professionals and high school students was shown to be 99% proficient (1385/1397) in distinguishing proper from improper test function when processing control samples with normal test devices and devices with simulated error conditions. Comparisons to a culture standard for 104 subgingival plaque samples collected from 26 adult periodontitis patients yielded > 98% specificity for each of the test bacteria. In addition, the detection threshold for the test was determined to be equivalent to 10(4) cultivable test bacteria when compared to the culture standard. The data indicate that this membrane immunoassay is a valid and easy-to-use method for the detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia in subgingival plaque, at levels above the detection threshold of the test.

  8. Risk factors associated with contagious caprine pleuro-pneumonia in goats in pastoral areas in the Rift Valley region of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kipronoh, K A; Ombui, J N; Binepal, Y S; Wesonga, H O; Gitonga, E K; Thuranira, E; Kiara, H K

    2016-09-15

    A cross-sectional study to determine risk factors associated with sero-prevalence of contagious caprine pleuro-pneumonia (CCPP) in goats was carried out between the months of March, 2014 and March, 2015 in Pokot East, Turkana West and Kajiado Central Sub-counties. A semi-structured questionnaire focusing on risk factors for CCPP was completed for each flock whose serum samples were collected. A logistic regression model was developed to assess the association between the risk factors and CCPP sero-positivity. Of the 54 flocks, 49 (90.7%) presented at least one sero-positive animal. Two hundred and four of the 432 goats tested sero-positive at monoclonal antibody based competitive Enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (c-ELISA), hence a sero-prevalence of 47.2% (95% CI=42.5- 51.9). Previous exposure of flocks to CCPP (p<0.001, OR=52.8; CI=6.45, 432), distant sources of veterinary drugs (p<0.001, OR=6.17; CI=3.41, 11.1), movement of goats to dry season feeding areas (p<0.001, OR=4.31; CI=2.39, 7.75) and markets as a source of new introductions to the flock (p=0.033, OR=1.86; CI=1.05, 3.27) were identified as risk factors significantly associated with CCPP sero-prevalence. The findings provide further evidence supporting the high prevalence and endemic state of the disease in pastoral flocks and hence there is need for adequate measures to be put in place to control the disease effectively.

  9. Rapid Detection of Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia Using a Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific Antigen Detection Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    March, J. B.; Gammack, C.; Nicholas, R.

    2000-01-01

    Latex microspheres (diameter, 8 μm) were coated with anti-Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antiserum (anti-F38 biotype). The coated microspheres, when used in a latex agglutination test (LAT), detected M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae antigen in the serum of goats with contagious caprine pleuropneumoniae (CCPP). Beads also agglutinated strongly in the presence of purified M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Preabsorption of CPS-specific antibodies prior to coating of the beads removed agglutinating activity in the presence of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, strongly suggesting that CPS is the likely soluble antigen recognized by the test. In addition, the specificity of the LAT exactly mirrored that of an M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae CPS-specific monoclonal antibody (WM25): of the 8 other mycoplasma species tested, agglutination was observed only with bovine serogroup 7. The LAT detected all 11 strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 1.7 × 104 CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml of serum. With field sera from goats with CCPP, the results of the LAT exhibited a 67% correlation with the results of the currently used complement fixation test (CFT), with the main discrepancy in diagnosis resulting from the increased sensitivity of the LAT compared to that of CFT. This antigen-detection LAT should prove particularly useful in identifying animals in the earliest stages of CCPP and combines sensitivity and low cost with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:11060083

  10. Rapid Detection of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia by a Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific Antigen Detection Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    March, John B.; Kerr, Karen; Lema, Benedict

    2003-01-01

    A latex agglutination test (LAT) has been developed for the diagnosis of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). The latex microspheres were coated with MmmSC polyclonal immunoglobulin G antiserum and detected MmmSC antigen in the serum of cattle infected with CBPP and in growth medium containing MmmSC. The specific antigen recognizsed by this test appeared to be the capsular polysaccharide (CPS). The LAT recognized all 23 strains of MmmSC examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 5 × 103 CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml. Therefore, rapid identification of MmmSC cultures should be possible. Agglutination was also observed with the related goat pathogens and “Mycoplasma mycoides” cluster members Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large colony biotype (four of six strains positive) and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (three of six strains positive), in agreement with the suggestion that these latter two mycoplasmas may in fact represent a single species (although collectively exhibiting two capsular serotypes). Comparisons in diagnosis with the complement fixation test (CFT) were made by using African field sera from CBPP-infected cattle. After 2 (or 3) min of incubation, the test detected 55% (or 61%) of CFT-positive sera and 29% (or 40%) of CFT-negative sera, with an overall correlation in diagnosis of 62% (or 61%). The rates for false-positive diagnoses made by using “known” CBPP-negative sera from the United Kingdom were 3 or 13% after 2 or 3 min of incubation, respectively. The data agree with previous findings that some CBPP CFT-negative misdiagnoses may occur due to “antibody eclipsing” by excess circulating antigen. The LAT combines low cost and high specificity with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:12626448

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to surface-exposes proteins of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (small-colony strain), which causes contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiarie, M N; Rurangirwa, F R; Perryman, L E; Jasmer, D P; McGuire, T C

    1996-01-01

    Outbreaks of bovine pleuropneumonia caused by small-colony strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides occur in Africa, and vaccination is used for control. Since protein subunits are needed to improve multivalent vaccines, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were made to facilitate protein identification and isolation. Eleven immunoglobulin M MAbs derived from mouse spleen donors immunized with disrupted whole organisms bound periodate-sensitive epitopes on externally exposed polysaccharide. Seven of these MAbs caused in vitro growth inhibition of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides; however, reaction with carbohydrate epitopes prevented their use in identifying proteins. Ten additional MAbs from mouse spleen donors immunized with Triton X-114-phase integral membrane proteins reacted with periodate-insensitive, proteinase K-sensitive epitopes. These MAbs were classified into three groups based on immunoblots of Triton X-114-phase proteins. One group reacted with 96-, 16-, and 15-kDa proteins. Another group reacted with 26-, 21-, and 16-kDa proteins, while a third group reacted only with 26- and 21-kDa proteins. One MAb from each group reacted with trypsinsensitive epitopes on live organisms, yet none caused in vitro growth inhibition. Representative MAbs reacted with all small-colony strains in immunoblots and did not react with large colony strains. However, these MAbs were not specific for small-colony strains, as proteins from two other M. mycoides cluster organisms were identified. Nevertheless, MAbs to surface-exposed epitopes on integral membrane proteins will be useful for isolation of these proteins for immunization, since one or more might induce growth-inhibiting antibodies or other protective responses. PMID:8914769

  12. Risk factors associated with contagious caprine pleuro-pneumonia in goats in pastoral areas in the Rift Valley region of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kipronoh, K A; Ombui, J N; Binepal, Y S; Wesonga, H O; Gitonga, E K; Thuranira, E; Kiara, H K

    2016-09-15

    A cross-sectional study to determine risk factors associated with sero-prevalence of contagious caprine pleuro-pneumonia (CCPP) in goats was carried out between the months of March, 2014 and March, 2015 in Pokot East, Turkana West and Kajiado Central Sub-counties. A semi-structured questionnaire focusing on risk factors for CCPP was completed for each flock whose serum samples were collected. A logistic regression model was developed to assess the association between the risk factors and CCPP sero-positivity. Of the 54 flocks, 49 (90.7%) presented at least one sero-positive animal. Two hundred and four of the 432 goats tested sero-positive at monoclonal antibody based competitive Enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (c-ELISA), hence a sero-prevalence of 47.2% (95% CI=42.5- 51.9). Previous exposure of flocks to CCPP (p<0.001, OR=52.8; CI=6.45, 432), distant sources of veterinary drugs (p<0.001, OR=6.17; CI=3.41, 11.1), movement of goats to dry season feeding areas (p<0.001, OR=4.31; CI=2.39, 7.75) and markets as a source of new introductions to the flock (p=0.033, OR=1.86; CI=1.05, 3.27) were identified as risk factors significantly associated with CCPP sero-prevalence. The findings provide further evidence supporting the high prevalence and endemic state of the disease in pastoral flocks and hence there is need for adequate measures to be put in place to control the disease effectively. PMID:27664453

  13. Pets and Pasteurella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  14. Augmentation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Invasion of Human Oral Epithelial Cells and Up-Regulation of Interleukin-8 Production by Saliva CD14

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Atsuko; Satoh, Aya; Ngai, Tomoko; Nishimura, Takashi; Ikawa, Keiji; Matsuyama, Takami; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Takada, Haruhiko; Sugawara, Shunji

    2003-01-01

    It has recently been shown that human salivary glands constitutively express CD14, an important molecule in innate immunity, and that a soluble form of CD14 is secreted in saliva. The concentration of CD14 in parotid (a serous gland) saliva was comparable to that in normal serum and 10-fold the amount in whole saliva, although the physiological function of saliva CD14 remained unclear. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a periodontopathic bacterium and is able to invade oral epithelial cells. The present study showed that upon exposure to live A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 for 2 h, human oral epithelial HSC-2 cells produced interleukin-8 (IL-8) for a further 24 h and whole saliva augmented the production induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4. Parotid saliva showed a more pronounced effect on the production of IL-8 than whole saliva. Neither saliva preparation itself had IL-8-inducing activity. Parotid saliva exhibited antibacterial activity against a low concentration of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4, but recombinant CD14 did not show the activity. The internalization of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 into HSC-2 cells was inhibited by cytochalasin B, indicating that the process was actin dependent, and depletion of CD14 from parotid saliva inhibited the invasion and, as a consequence, inhibited production of IL-8. Furthermore, human recombinant CD14 augmented invasion and IL-8 production. These results suggest that saliva CD14 promoted the invasion of oral epithelial cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans and consequently augmented the production of IL-8, playing an important role in innate immunity in the oral cavity. PMID:14500479

  15. Characterization of an antiproliferative surface-associated protein from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans which can be neutralized by sera from a proportion of patients with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    White, P A; Wilson, M; Nair, S P; Kirby, A C; Reddi, K; Henderson, B

    1995-01-01

    The gentle agitation of suspensions of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype a, b, or c in saline resulted in the release of a proteinaceous surface-associated material (SAM) which produced a dose-dependent inhibition of tritiated thymidine incorporation by the osteoblast-like cell line MG63 in culture. This cell line was sensitive to low concentrations of SAM (50% inhibitory concentration, 200 ng/ml for serotype c). Immunoglobulin G antibodies to constituents of the SAM were found in the blood of patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). Sera from 9 of 16 patients with LJP significantly neutralized the antiproliferative activity of the SAM, while sera from 15 controls, with no evidence of periodontal disease, were unable to neutralize this activity. Neutralization was not directly related to the patient's antibody titer to the whole SAM. Characterization of the antiproliferative activity in the SAM demonstrated that it was not cytotoxic and was heat and trypsin sensitive. The active component separated in a well-defined peak in anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which, when further analyzed by size exclusion HPLC, revealed a single active peak, which had an apparent molecular mass of approximately 8 kDa. The lipopolysaccharide from A. actinomycetemcomitans was only weakly active. SAM from Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 and Eikenella corrodens NCTC 10596 did not exhibit any antiproliferative activity with this cell line, even at concentrations as high as 10 micrograms/ml. This study has shown that SAM from A. actinomycetemcomitans contains a potent antiproliferative protein whose activity can be neutralized by antibodies in the sera from some patients with LJP. PMID:7790076

  16. Comparison of the Effect of Two Purification Methods on the Immunogenicity of Recombinant Outer Membrane Protein H of Pasteurella multocida Serovar A:1

    PubMed Central

    Thanasarasakulpong, Arunee; Poolperm, Pichayanut; Tangjitjaroen, Weerapongse; Varinrak, Thanya; Sawada, Takuo; Pfeiffer, Dirk; Sthitmatee, Nattawooti

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant outer membrane protein H (rOmpH) of Pasteurella multocida strain X-73 can be purified using affinity chromatography but this adversely affects its immunogenicity. The current study presents the results from an intervention study comparing the immunogenicity of rOmpH purified using electroelution with rOmpH purified using affinity chromatography and native OmpH purified using electroelution and a nonimmunized control group. Chickens immunized with rOmpH purified using electroelution produced the highest ELISA antibody levels against P. multocida strains. Chickens in each of the 5 treatment groups were split into two subgroups for challenge with two different P. multocida strains. The average number of adhesions to CEF cells was statistically significantly lower in sera from chickens immunized with rOmpH or native OmpH purified using electroelution than in those of the three other treatment groups. The survival amongst chickens immunized with rOmpH or native OmpH purified using electroelution indicated high levels of protection. In contrast, survival probability was zero or low in the groups immunized with rOmpH purified using affinity chromatography and in the nonimmunized group. These findings show that the rOmpH purified using electroelution retains its immunogenicity and stimulates high levels of protection in chickens against P. multocida infection. PMID:26885439

  17. Structural analysis and cross-protective efficacy of recombinant 87 kDa outer membrane protein (Omp87) of Pasteurella multocida serogroup B:2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinendra; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan A; Viswas, K N; Shivachandra, Sathish B

    2013-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida serogroup B:2, a causative agent of haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) in cattle and buffalo especially in tropical regions of Asian and African countries, is known to possess several outer membrane proteins (OMPs) as immunogenic antigens. In the present study, omp87 gene encoding for 87 kDa OMP (Omp87) protein of P. multocida serogroup B:2 strain P52, has been amplified (∼2304 bp), cloned in to pET32a vector and over-expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli as fusion protein. The recombinant Omp87 protein (∼102 kDa) including N-terminus hexa-histidine tag was purified under denaturing condition. Immunization of mice with rOmp87 resulted in increased antigen specific IgG titres in serum and provided protection of 66.6 and 83.3% following homologous (B:2) and heterologous (A:1) challenge, respectively. A homology model of Omp87 revealed the presence of two distinct domains; N-terminal domain with four POTRA repeats in the periplasmic space and a pore forming C-terminal β-barrel domain (β1- β16) in the outer membrane of P. multocida, which belong to Omp85-TpsB transporter superfamily of OMPs. The study indicated the potential possibilities to use rOmp87 protein along with suitable adjuvant in developing subunit vaccine for haemorrhagic septicaemia and pasteurellosis in livestock.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of Pasteurella multocida subspecies and molecular identification of feline P. multocida subsp. septica by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Boerlin, P; Emler, S; Krawinkler, M; Frey, J

    2000-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida is commonly found in the oral cavity of cats and dogs. In humans it is known as an opportunistic pathogen after bites from these animals. Phenotypic identification of P. multocida based on biochemical reactions is often limited and usually only done on a species level, even though 3 subspecies are described. For molecular taxonomy and diagnostic purposes a phylogenetic analysis of the three subspecies of P. multocida based on their 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequence was therefore carried out. We found P. multocida subsp. septica on a distinguished branch on the phylogenetic tree of Pasteurellaceae, due to a 1.5% divergence of its rrs gene compared to the two other, more closely related subspecies multocida and gallicida. This phylogenetic divergence can be used for the identification of P. multocida subsp. septica by rrs gene determination since they form a phylogenetically well isolated and defined group as shown with a set of feline isolates. Comparison to routine phenotypic identification shows the advantage of the sequence-based identification over conventional methods. It is therefore helpful for future unambiguous identification and molecular taxonomy of P. multocida as well as for epidemiological investigations.

  19. Effects of dietary L-glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Liu, Shuping; Zhang, Fengmei; Ren, Wenkai; Li, Nengzhang; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Peng, Yuanyi; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in a vaccine-immunized animal model. Thus, this study determined roles for dietary glutamine supplementation in specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine. The measured variables included: (1) the production of pathogen-specific antibodies; (2) mRNA levels for pro-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors and anti-oxidative factors; and (3) the distribution of P. multocida in tissues and the expression of its major virulence factors in vivo. Dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had a better protective role than 1 or 2 % glutamine against P. multocida infection in vaccine-immunized mice, at least partly resulting from its effects in modulation of general defense responses. Dietary glutamine supplementation had little effects on the production of P. multocida-specific antibodies. Compared to the non-supplemented group, dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had no effect on bacterial burden in vivo but decreased the expression of major virulence factors in the spleen. Collectively, supplementing 0.5 % glutamine to a conventional diet provides benefits in vaccine-immunized mice by enhancing general defense responses and decreasing expression of specific virulence factors.

  20. Susceptibility of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and domestic sheep to pneumonia induced by bighorn and domestic livestock strains of Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Onderka, D K; Rawluk, S A; Wishart, W D

    1988-01-01

    Bighorn sheep were inoculated intratracheally with suspensions of nonhemolytic Pasteurella haemolytica biotype T (10(12) organisms) unique to wild bighorns, with beta-hemolytic P. haemolytica biotype T (10(12) organisms) isolated from clinically normal domestic sheep or intradermally with half a dose of a cattle vaccine containing P. haemolytica biotype A (10(5) organisms). The bighorn strain caused lobar necrotizing bronchopneumonia whereas both domestic livestock strains precipitated fatal septicemia and fibrinous bronchopneumonia. The serotypes given were T3, T4, T15 and A1 and these were recovered from lung lesions and other organs. In three trials, domestic sheep were inoculated intratracheally with suspensions of bighorn sheep pneumonic lungs, and two concentrations of the P. haemolytica bighorn strain (10(4) and 10(12) organisms). One of these sheep was inoculated intrabronchially. The domestic sheep experienced a transient fever and elevated white blood cell counts. After six days, none of the sheep had lung lesions and inoculated organisms could not be recovered. It is suggested that bighorn sheep are very susceptible to P. haemolytica from domestic livestock and should not be allowed in contact with sheep or cattle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3196974

  1. Time-course investigation of infection with a low virulent Pasteurella multocida strain in normal and immune-suppressed 12-week-old free-range chickens.

    PubMed

    Mbuthia, P G; Njagi, L W; Nyaga, P N; Bebora, L C; Minga, U; Christensen, J P; Olsen, J E

    2011-12-01

    Twelve-week-old indigenous chickens, either immune-suppressed using dexamethasone (IS) or non-immune-suppressed (NIS), were challenged with a low virulent strain, Pasteurella multocida strain NCTC 10322(T), and developed clinical signs and pathological lesions typical of chronic fowl cholera. NIS birds demonstrated much more severe signs of fowl cholera than IS birds. With few exceptions, signs recorded in IS and NIS birds were of the same types, but significantly milder in the IS birds, indicating that immune suppression does not change the course of infection but rather the severity of signs in fowl cholera. P. multocida signals by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were observed between 1 h and 14 days in the lungs, trachea, air sacs, liver, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and caecal tonsils, while signals from other organs mostly were observed after 24 h. More organs had FISH signals in NIS birds than in IS birds and at higher frequency per organ. Many organs were positive by FISH even 14 days post infection, and it is suggested that these organs may be likely places for long-term carriage of P. multocida following infection. The present study has demonstrated the spread of P. multocida in different tissues in chickens and distribution of lesions associated with chronic fowl cholera, and pointed to a decrease of pathology in IS birds. Since dexamethasone mostly affects heterophils, the study suggests that these cells play a role in the development of lesions associated with chronic fowl cholera in chickens.

  2. Differential induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha in ovine pulmonary alveolar macrophages following infection with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Pasteurella haemolytica, or lentiviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; Lairmore, M D; O'Toole, D T; Campos, M

    1991-01-01

    Soluble mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) may be important in the pathogenesis of many chronic pulmonary infections. We examined the ability of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Pasteurella haemolytica, and ovine lentiviruses (OvLV) to induce TNF-alpha secretion by pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). Bronchoalveolar lavage cells, composed of greater than 90% PAM, were obtained from normal sheep. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells were cultured for 2, 24, 48, 72, or 168 h in endotoxin-free RPMI medium (with 10% autologous serum) or in medium containing one of the following additives: lipopolysaccharide, 1-micron polystyrene beads, C. pseudotuberculosis, P. haemolytica, or one of two plaque-cloned OvLV, 85/28 or 85/34. Lipopolysaccharide, C. pseudotuberculosis, and P. haemolytica induced TNF-alpha activity in PAM cultures as early as 2 h after inoculation, as assessed by a colorimetric cytotoxicity assay. This activity could be blocked by rabbit anti-recombinant bovine TNF-alpha serum. In contrast, medium alone, polystyrene beads, and productive infection by OvLV did not induce TNF-alpha activity in PAM cultures. Bacterial pathogens which infect pulmonary macrophages may elicit the secretion of TNF-alpha within the lungs and lead to the cachectic state associated with chronic pneumonia. Images PMID:1652561

  3. A quantitative PCR method for assessing the presence of Pasteurella testudinis DNA in nasal lavage samples from the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii).

    PubMed

    duPre', S A; Tracy, C R; Sandmeier, F C; Hunter, K W

    2012-12-01

    Pasteurella testudinis has been associated with upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in the threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii). Our goal was to develop a sensitive and specific qPCR method for detecting DNA from P. testudinis in nasal lavage fluid collected from desert tortoises in the field. Probes for 16S ribosomal RNA and RNA polymerase β-subunit (rpoB) genes were designed. A standard curve generated with DNA extracted from known numbers of bacterial cells determined by flow cytometry revealed a lower detection limit of 50 fg/ml (10 bacteria/ml). The nasal lavage fluid contained no interfering substances, and the qPCR method did not recognize normal flora DNA. The nasal lavage samples from 20 desert tortoises captured in Clark County, Nevada, USA in 2007 and housed at the Desert Tortoise Conservation Center, were all positive for P. testudinis DNA by qPCR. Another set of 19 lavage samples collected in 2010 from wild desert tortoises in the Mojave Desert were tested and 84% were positive for P. testudinis DNA. Fully validated, this qPCR method will provide a means of determining colonization rate. When used in conjunction with serological methods and clinical evaluations, both infection rate and disease rate can be determined for this potential URTD pathogen. This new assay provides an important tool for managing the threatened populations of the Mojave Desert tortoise.

  4. Serotyping of foot and mouth disease virus and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs (Bos gaurus), concurrently infected with foot and mouth disease and haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Chandranaik, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik; Hegde, Raveendra; Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Giridhar, Papanna; Muniyellappa, Handenahally Kaverappa; Kalge, Rajeshwar; Sumathi, Benamanahalli Raju; Nithinprabhu, Kumble; Chandrashekara, Narasimhaiah; Manjunatha, Venkataramanappa; Jaisingh, Nirupama; Mayanna, Asha; Chandrakala, Gowda Kallenahalli; Kanaka, Sermaraja; Venkatesha, Mudalagiri Dasappagupta

    2015-06-01

    We report the serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs which were concurrently infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and haemorrhagic septicaemia. Bannerghatta biological park (BBP), a national park located in the outskirts of Bengaluru city, Karnataka, India, is bordered by several villages. These villages witnessed massive outbreaks of FMD which spread rapidly to the herbivores at BBP. Post-mortem was conducted on carcasses of two Indian gaurs that died with symptoms of FMD. The salient gross findings included extensive vesicular lesions on the tongue, gums, cheeks, upper palate and hooves. Haemorrhagic tracheitis and ecchymotic haemorrhages on the heart were characteristic. The vesicular lesions of oral cavity were positive for 'O' type of FMD virus by sandwich enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The heart blood and spleen samples yielded growth of pure cultures of P. multocida. The isolates were typed as P. multocida type B using KTSP61 and KTT72 primers yielding specific amplicons of 620 bp. The phylogenetic analysis of the isolates was carried by sequencing of 1.4-Kbp nucleotides on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the isolates. PMID:25894817

  5. Association between Pneumocystis spp. and co-infections with Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida in Austrian pigs with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kureljušić, B; Weissenbacher-Lang, C; Nedorost, N; Stixenberger, D; Weissenböck, H

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective study, 218 pig lung tissue samples were analyzed to examine a possible association between Pneumocystis spp. using in situ hybridization, Bordetella bronchiseptica (B.b.) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M.h.) by quantitative PCR, and Pasteurella multocida (P.m.; IHC). Compared to the bacterial agents (B.b., 5%; M.h., 30%; P.m., 23%), Pneumocystis occurred with a higher prevalence (51%). Co-infections with two or three pathogens were present in 28% of the examined cases. Those of Pneumocystis and M.h. were most commonly seen, followed by Pneumocystis and P.m. and M.h. and P.m. Histologically, interstitial pneumonia was found in both the Pneumocystis positive lungs and lungs with a mild M.h. infection. The B.b. and P.m. positive lungs were mainly associated with suppurative bronchopneumonia and severe M.h. cases with fibrinous or fibrino-haemorrhagic pneumonia. In suckling piglets, the number of samples positive for Pneumocystis predominated, whereas samples from fattening pigs were mainly positive for bacteria or Pneumocystis and bacteria. PMID:26654847

  6. Serotyping of foot and mouth disease virus and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs (Bos gaurus), concurrently infected with foot and mouth disease and haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Chandranaik, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik; Hegde, Raveendra; Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Giridhar, Papanna; Muniyellappa, Handenahally Kaverappa; Kalge, Rajeshwar; Sumathi, Benamanahalli Raju; Nithinprabhu, Kumble; Chandrashekara, Narasimhaiah; Manjunatha, Venkataramanappa; Jaisingh, Nirupama; Mayanna, Asha; Chandrakala, Gowda Kallenahalli; Kanaka, Sermaraja; Venkatesha, Mudalagiri Dasappagupta

    2015-06-01

    We report the serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs which were concurrently infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and haemorrhagic septicaemia. Bannerghatta biological park (BBP), a national park located in the outskirts of Bengaluru city, Karnataka, India, is bordered by several villages. These villages witnessed massive outbreaks of FMD which spread rapidly to the herbivores at BBP. Post-mortem was conducted on carcasses of two Indian gaurs that died with symptoms of FMD. The salient gross findings included extensive vesicular lesions on the tongue, gums, cheeks, upper palate and hooves. Haemorrhagic tracheitis and ecchymotic haemorrhages on the heart were characteristic. The vesicular lesions of oral cavity were positive for 'O' type of FMD virus by sandwich enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The heart blood and spleen samples yielded growth of pure cultures of P. multocida. The isolates were typed as P. multocida type B using KTSP61 and KTT72 primers yielding specific amplicons of 620 bp. The phylogenetic analysis of the isolates was carried by sequencing of 1.4-Kbp nucleotides on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the isolates.

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Asian Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Associated Strains of Pasteurella multocida Identifies More than 90 Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed M.; Seemann, Torsten; Gladman, Simon; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Bennett, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the primary causative agent of a range of economically important diseases in animals, including haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS), a rapidly fatal disease of ungulates. There is limited information available on the diversity of P. multocida strains that cause HS. Therefore, we determined draft genome sequences of ten disease-causing isolates and two vaccine strains and compared these genomes using a range of bioinformatic analyses. The draft genomes of the 12 HS strains were between 2,298,035 and 2,410,300 bp in length. Comparison of these genomes with the North American HS strain, M1404, and other available P. multocida genomes (Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06) identified a core set of 1,824 genes. A set of 96 genes was present in all HS isolates and vaccine strains examined in this study, but absent from Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06. Moreover, 59 genes were shared only by the Asian B:2 strains. In two Pakistani isolates, genes with high similarity to genes in the integrative and conjugative element, ICEPmu1 from strain 36950 were identified along with a range of other antimicrobial resistance genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the HS strains formed clades based on their country of isolation. Future analysis of the 96 genes unique to the HS isolates will aid the identification of HS-specific virulence attributes and facilitate the development of disease-specific diagnostic tests. PMID:26151935

  8. The effects of danofloxacin and tilmicosin on neutrophil function and lung consolidation in beef heifer calves with induced Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fajt, V R; Apley, M D; Roth, J A; Frank, D E; Brogden, K A; Skogerboe, T L; Shostrom, V K; Chin, Y-L

    2003-06-01

    Pneumonia caused by Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica was induced in weaned beef heifer calves, approximately 6 months of age. Calves were treated at 20 h after challenge with therapeutic doses of danofloxacin or tilmicosin. Peripheral blood neutrophils were collected at 3, 24 and 48 h after treatment. The ex vivo effects on neutrophil function, neutrophil apoptosis, and hematological parameters were examined, as was the effect on percentage lung consolidation. Neutrophil function assays included random migration under agarose, cytochrome C reduction, iodination, Staphylococcus aureus ingestion, chemotaxis, and antibody-dependent and antibody-independent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Apoptosis was determined using a cell death detection kit. Killing was performed at 72 h after treatment. Statistical comparisons were made among the three groups of challenged-treated animals: saline, danofloxacin, and tilmicosin. Comparisons were also made between nonchallenged nontreated animals (NCH) and challenged saline-treated animals. There were no significant differences for any of the neutrophil function assays or neutrophil apoptosis among the challenged-treated groups. This suggests that danofloxacin and tilmicosin have no clinically significant effects on neutrophil function or apoptosis. There were also no significant differences in percentage lung consolidation among the challenged-treated groups. Significant differences were found between the NCH calves and the challenged saline-treated calves in several neutrophil assays, which were attributed to effects of P. haemolytica infection.

  9. Evidence of bovine immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) protease activity in partially purified culture supernate of Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Shewen, P E

    1996-01-01

    In the bovine respiratory tract, IgG1 is a major secretory immunoglobulin (Ig), and both IgG1 and IgG2 are believed to be important in defense against pneumonic pasteurellosis (shipping fever) in calves. Here we provide evidence for hydrolysis of IgG1 in the presence of partially purified culture supernate (ppCS) from the respiratory pathogen Pasteurella haemolytica A1. Bovine IgG1 was hydrolysed sequentially into three distinct bands (approximately 39, 12, and 7 kDa respectively). Furthermore, partial hydrolysis of bovine IgG2 was observed, but neither bovine IgA nor IgM were affected by incubation with ppCS. These findings suggest that the production of an IgG1-specific protease by P. haemolytica A1 may be a virulence mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8785718

  10. Surveillance for Pasteurella multocida in Ring-Necked Pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) After an Outbreak of Avian Cholera and Apparently Successful Antibiotic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin D; Dunn, Patricia; Wallner-Pendleton, Eva; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Schriner, Timothy; Hofacre, Charles; Johnson, Joshua; Boyd, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Avian cholera is a significant disease of domestic and wild birds caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida (PM). In poultry, a major source of PM infection is chronic carriers, domestic birds that have become infected and recovered or had subclinical infections. Although outbreaks of avian cholera in ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) have been reported, the potential for chronic carriers is unknown. To address this, we conducted surveillance for PM in a flock of captive ring-necked pheasants after an outbreak of avian cholera that responded positively to antibiotic treatment based on resolution of morbidity and mortality. At approximately 1 mo after antibiotic treatment, oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 300 pheasants (out of a total population of ~2300) in a single winter holding pen. All samples were tested for PM through routine aerobic bacterial culture, but none of the samples were positive. In addition, there were no additional outbreaks within this infected pen over the subsequent months. These data provide preliminary evidence to suggest that pheasants that respond to antibiotic therapy may be less likely to become chronic carriers of PM than other poultry species, such as chickens (Gallus domesticus). However, due to marked phenotypic and biologic differences between PM strains, additional studies are needed to further support or refute these findings and better understand avian cholera in this species. PMID:26953951

  11. MLST typing of Pasteurella multocida associated with haemorrhagic septicaemia and development of a real-time PCR specific for haemorrhagic septicaemia associated isolates.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andreas; Bisgaard, Magne; Townsend, Kirsty; Christensen, Henrik

    2014-06-01

    Two serovars of Pasteurella multocida, B:2 and E:2, have been reportedly associated with haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS), a peracute and devastating disease mainly affecting cattle and water buffaloes. We multilocus sequence typed (MLST) 64 isolates of P. multocida including 55 associated with HS and found that they mainly included sequence type (ST) 122 (n=50) and rarely ST63 (n=1), ST147 (n=2) and ST162 (n=2) compared to other members of the species isolated from other lesion types and hosts. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms suitable for specific detection of STs associated with HS were detected in the est gene. A new HS-est-RT-PCR (est indicating the target gene) specifically detected ST122, ST63, ST147 and ST162 associated with HS. The new HS-est-RT-PCR did not detect strains of ST151 with capsular type D isolated from pigs that were found positive with a previously published HS PCR detection method. The new HS-est-RT-PCR represents a fast and specific detection of the specific types of P. multocida involved in HS. The HS-est-RT-PCR developed in the current study seems to more accurately identify isolates of P. multocida associated with HS compared to PCR detection methods previously published.

  12. Immunolocalization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages, TLR4, TLR9 and IL-8 in normal and Pasteurella multocida-infected lungs of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sethi, R S; Brar, R S; Singh, O; Singh, B

    2011-01-01

    Water buffalo are of considerable economic significance in South East Asia, but these animals suffer from many bacterial respiratory diseases including haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida. Bacterial respiratory diseases of animals cause lung inflammation that is characterized by the activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed on macrophages, expression of chemokines and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes. Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) present in the alveolar septa play a critical role in lung inflammation, but there are no data on the immunolocalization of PIMs or the expression of TLRs and chemokines such as interleukin (IL)-8, in the lungs of water buffalo. The present study compares the occurrence of PIMs, TLR4, TLR9 and IL-8 in the lungs of normal water buffalo and those infected with P. multocida. Labelling of PIMs with the anti-human macrophage antibody (MCA874G) demonstrated an increase in this population in inflamed lungs. TLR4 and IL-8 were detected in the alveolar septa, airway epithelium and endothelium of large blood vessels of normal lungs. TLR9 expression was similar to that of TLR4, but TLR9 was not expressed by the endothelium of arteries and veins. While the expression of TLR9 and IL-8 was increased in the inflamed lungs compared with normal lungs, TLR4 labelling intensity remained unchanged or was reduced. The expression of these molecules potentially plays a role in the regulation of lung inflammation.

  13. Association between Pneumocystis spp. and co-infections with Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida in Austrian pigs with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kureljušić, B; Weissenbacher-Lang, C; Nedorost, N; Stixenberger, D; Weissenböck, H

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective study, 218 pig lung tissue samples were analyzed to examine a possible association between Pneumocystis spp. using in situ hybridization, Bordetella bronchiseptica (B.b.) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M.h.) by quantitative PCR, and Pasteurella multocida (P.m.; IHC). Compared to the bacterial agents (B.b., 5%; M.h., 30%; P.m., 23%), Pneumocystis occurred with a higher prevalence (51%). Co-infections with two or three pathogens were present in 28% of the examined cases. Those of Pneumocystis and M.h. were most commonly seen, followed by Pneumocystis and P.m. and M.h. and P.m. Histologically, interstitial pneumonia was found in both the Pneumocystis positive lungs and lungs with a mild M.h. infection. The B.b. and P.m. positive lungs were mainly associated with suppurative bronchopneumonia and severe M.h. cases with fibrinous or fibrino-haemorrhagic pneumonia. In suckling piglets, the number of samples positive for Pneumocystis predominated, whereas samples from fattening pigs were mainly positive for bacteria or Pneumocystis and bacteria.

  14. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide promotes osteoclast-like cell formation by interleukin-1 alpha production in mouse marrow cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ueda, N; Amano, K; Ishihara, Y; Hayakawa, H; Kuroyanagi, T; Ohsaki, Y; Nagata, K; Noguchi, T

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of osteoclast-like cell formation induced by periodontopathic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide (capsular-like polysaccharide) was examined in a mouse bone marrow culture system. When mouse bone marrow cells were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide for 9 days, many multinucleated cells were formed. The multinucleated cells showed several characteristics of osteoclasts, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) and the ability to resorb the calcified dentine. In this study, we examined the effects of antisera to interleukins on the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. Monospecific anti-mouse recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) serum completely inhibited the formation of osteoclast-like cells in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. However, anti-mouse rIL-1 beta and anti-mouse rIL-6 sera showed no effect on osteoclast-like cell formation. IL-1 receptor antagonist significantly inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation mediated by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide in mouse marrow cultures. The bioactive IL-1 was detected in the culture media of mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. These results indicate that IL-1 alpha is involved in the mechanism of the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. We sought to determine whether osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide could be modulated by the protein kinase inhibitors H8 and HA1004. The formation of osteoclast-like cells was suppressed by H8 and HA1004. These findings suggest that the signals by protein kinases may regulate osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A

  15. Qualitative and quantitative impacts assessment of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia in Fulani pastoral herds of North-central Nigeria: The associated socio-cultural factors.

    PubMed

    Alhaji, N B; Babalobi, O O

    2016-06-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is one of the most important trans-boundary disease affecting Fulani cattle herds of Nigeria and whose control is urgently needed. A Participatory Epidemiology approach and cross-sectional study were concurrently conducted to investigate qualitative and quantitative impacts of CBPP, respectively and associated socio-cultural factors that influenced exposure of Fulani nomadic pastoral communities to its risk in Niger State, North-central Nigeria between January and December 2013. A total of nine pastoral communities were purposively selected for qualitative impact assessment using Participatory Rural Appraisal tools, while 765 cattle randomly sampled from 125 purposively selected nomadic herds were analyzed using c-ELISA. Data on socio-cultural characteristics were collected using structured questionnaires administered on nomadic herd owners of the 125 selected herds. Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance W statistics and OpenEpi 2.3 were used for statistical analyses. Pastoralists' dependent factors associated with their socio-cultural activities were tested using Chisquare tests and likelihood backward logistic regressions. The mean proportional piles (relative qualitative impact) of CBPP was 12.6%, and nomads agreement on this impact was strong (W=0.6855) and statistically significant (P<0.001). This was validated by 16.2% (95% CI: 13.7, 19.0) sero-positive (quantitative impact). Highest sero-prevalence of 25.3% was observed in Northern agro-ecological zone, while lowest of 6.2% was in Eastern zone. Pastoralists in the age groups 51-60 and 61-70 years were more likely (OR 13.07; 95% CI: 3.21, 53.12 and OR 7.10; 95% CI: 1.77, 28.33, respectively) to have satisfactory information/awareness on CBPP and lowland transhumance pastoralists were more likely (OR 5.21; 95% CI: 2.01, 13.54) to have satisfactory information. Socio-cultural activities of extensive husbandry system was six times more likely (OR 5.79; 95% CI: 2.55, 13.13) to be

  16. Qualitative and quantitative impacts assessment of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia in Fulani pastoral herds of North-central Nigeria: The associated socio-cultural factors.

    PubMed

    Alhaji, N B; Babalobi, O O

    2016-06-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is one of the most important trans-boundary disease affecting Fulani cattle herds of Nigeria and whose control is urgently needed. A Participatory Epidemiology approach and cross-sectional study were concurrently conducted to investigate qualitative and quantitative impacts of CBPP, respectively and associated socio-cultural factors that influenced exposure of Fulani nomadic pastoral communities to its risk in Niger State, North-central Nigeria between January and December 2013. A total of nine pastoral communities were purposively selected for qualitative impact assessment using Participatory Rural Appraisal tools, while 765 cattle randomly sampled from 125 purposively selected nomadic herds were analyzed using c-ELISA. Data on socio-cultural characteristics were collected using structured questionnaires administered on nomadic herd owners of the 125 selected herds. Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance W statistics and OpenEpi 2.3 were used for statistical analyses. Pastoralists' dependent factors associated with their socio-cultural activities were tested using Chisquare tests and likelihood backward logistic regressions. The mean proportional piles (relative qualitative impact) of CBPP was 12.6%, and nomads agreement on this impact was strong (W=0.6855) and statistically significant (P<0.001). This was validated by 16.2% (95% CI: 13.7, 19.0) sero-positive (quantitative impact). Highest sero-prevalence of 25.3% was observed in Northern agro-ecological zone, while lowest of 6.2% was in Eastern zone. Pastoralists in the age groups 51-60 and 61-70 years were more likely (OR 13.07; 95% CI: 3.21, 53.12 and OR 7.10; 95% CI: 1.77, 28.33, respectively) to have satisfactory information/awareness on CBPP and lowland transhumance pastoralists were more likely (OR 5.21; 95% CI: 2.01, 13.54) to have satisfactory information. Socio-cultural activities of extensive husbandry system was six times more likely (OR 5.79; 95% CI: 2.55, 13.13) to be

  17. Pasteurella multocida Expresses Two Lipopolysaccharide Glycoforms Simultaneously, but Only a Single Form Is Required for Virulence: Identification of Two Acceptor-Specific Heptosyl I Transferases▿

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Cox, Andrew D.; St. Michael, Frank; Wilkie, Ian W.; Blackall, P. J.; Adler, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a critical virulence determinant in Pasteurella multocida and a major antigen responsible for host protective immunity. In other mucosal pathogens, variation in LPS or lipooligosaccharide structure typically occurs in the outer core oligosaccharide regions due to phase variation. P. multocida elaborates a conserved oligosaccharide extension attached to two different, simultaneously expressed inner core structures, one containing a single phosphorylated 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue and the other containing two Kdo residues. We demonstrate that two heptosyltransferases, HptA and HptB, add the first heptose molecule to the Kdo1 residue and that each exclusively recognizes different acceptor molecules. HptA is specific for the glycoform containing a single, phosphorylated Kdo residue (glycoform A), while HptB is specific for the glycoform containing two Kdo residues (glycoform B). In addition, KdkA was identified as a Kdo kinase, required for phosphorylation of the first Kdo molecule. Importantly, virulence data obtained from infected chickens showed that while wild-type P. multocida expresses both LPS glycoforms in vivo, bacterial mutants that produced only glycoform B were fully virulent, demonstrating for the first time that expression of a single LPS form is sufficient for P. multocida survival in vivo. We conclude that the ability of P. multocida to elaborate alternative inner core LPS structures is due to the simultaneous expression of two different heptosyltransferases that add the first heptose residue to the nascent LPS molecule and to the expression of both a bifunctional Kdo transferase and a Kdo kinase, which results in the initial assembly of two inner core structures. PMID:17517879

  18. Pasteurella multocida isolated from wild birds of North America: a serotype and DNA fingerprint study of isolates from 1978 to 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Duncan, R.M.; Nordholm, G.E.; Berlowski, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Serotype and DNA fingerprint methods were used to study Pasteurella multocida isolated from 320 wild birds of North America. Isolates were collected during 1978-93. The HhaI profiles of 314 isolates matched the HhaI profile of somatic reference type 1, strain X-73; somatic type 1 antigen was expressed by 310 isolates, and the serotype of four isolates was undetected. Differentiation of the 314 isolates was observed by digestion of DNA with HpaII. None of the HpaII profiles matched the HpaII profile of X-73 (designated HhaI 001/HpaII 001). Three HpaII profiles were recognized among the somatic type 1 isolates: HpaII 002 (n = 18), HpaII 003 (n = 122), and HpaII 004 (n = 174). Profile HpaII 002 was found among isolates collected during 1979-83. Profile HpaII 003 was identified from isolates collected during 1979-89, with the exception of two isolates in 1992. The HpaII 004 profile was identified from isolates collected during 1983-93. Of the six remaining isolates, four expressed somatic type 4 and had HhaI profiles identical to the somatic type 4 reference strain P-1662 profile (designated HhaI 004); these isolates were differentiated by digestion of DNA with HpaII. One isolate was identified as serotype F:11, and another was serotype A:3,4. In the present study, 314 of 316 (99.4%) isolates from wild birds in the Central, Mississippi, and Pacific flyways during 1978-93, were P. multocida somatic type 1.

  19. Effects of atrophic rhinitis induced by Pasteurella multocida toxin on heat production and activity of pigs kept under different climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    van Diemen, P M; Henken, A M; Schrama, J W; Brandsma, H A; Verstegen, M W

    1995-06-01

    Effects of moderate, artificially induced atrophic rhinitis symptoms on level and changes in heat production and activity were determined in pigs kept under different climatic conditions. Eight groups of 30 pigs each, housed in one of two climatically controlled respiration chambers, were exposed to a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments: challenged with 0 or 13 micrograms of Pasteurella multocida toxin (Pm-T)/mL, and two climatic environments (good: 25 degrees C, or adverse: 15 degrees C with draught periods). The Pm-T challenge reduced (P < .05) day averages of total (HP) and activity-related heat production (Har). The response to Pm-T treatment was similar in both climatic environments. Differences in the heat production and activity caused by the climatic treatment declined (P < .001) with time and acclimation to the environment. Analyses of HP, Har, and activity-free heat production in 12 2-h periods showed a biphasic activity rhythm. Both treatments affected (P < .05) level of HP and Har in several of the 2-h periods, but the biphasic rhythm was not altered. Day averages of Har showed a disposition to be differently affected (P < .068) by Pm-T challenge in the climatic treatments dependent on duration of exposure. This interaction effect (P < .001) seemed to originate from the periods between 1500 and 2100. Therefore, it might be wise to distinguish between overall effects (day means) on total, activity-related, and activity-free heat production and effects within a day (e.g., 2-h means). Treatment with Pm-T seemed to suppress the general well-being of pigs, reducing pigs' activity and food intake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7673059

  20. Tilmicosin induces apoptosis in bovine peripheral neutrophils in the presence or in the absence of Pasteurella haemolytica and promotes neutrophil phagocytosis by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chin, A C; Lee, W D; Murrin, K A; Morck, D W; Merrill, J K; Dick, P; Buret, A G

    2000-09-01

    Pathogen virulence factors and inflammation are responsible for tissue injury associated with respiratory failure in bacterial pneumonia, as seen in the bovine lung infected with Pasteurella haemolytica. Tilmicosin is a macrolide antibiotic used for the treatment of bovine bacterial pneumonia. Recent evidence suggests that tilmicosin-induced neutrophil apoptosis may have anti-inflammatory effects. Using bovine leukocytes, we sought to define whether live P. haemolytica affected tilmicosin-induced neutrophil apoptosis, assessed the proapoptotic effects of tilmicosin in comparison with other drugs, and characterized its impact on phagocytic uptake of neutrophils by macrophages. Induction of apoptosis in the presence or absence of P. haemolytica was assessed by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for apoptotic nucleosomes. In addition, fluorescent annexin-V staining identified externalized phosphatidylserine in neutrophils treated with tilmicosin, penicillin, ceftiofur, oxytetracycline, or dexamethasone. Neutrophil membrane integrity was assessed by using propidium iodide and trypan blue exclusion. As phagocytic clearance of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages contributes to the resolution of inflammation, phagocytosis of tilmicosin-treated neutrophils by esterase-positive cultured bovine macrophages was assessed with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Unlike bovine neutrophils treated with penicillin, ceftiofur, oxytetracycline, or dexamethasone, neutrophils exposed to tilmicosin became apoptotic, regardless of the presence or absence of P. haemolytica. Tilmicosin-treated apoptotic neutrophils were phagocytosed at a significantly greater rate by bovine macrophages than were control neutrophils. In conclusion, tilmicosin-induced neutrophil apoptosis occurs regardless of the presence or absence of live P. haemolytica, exhibits at least some degree of drug specificity, and promotes phagocytic clearance of the dying inflammatory cells.

  1. Role of outer membrane protein H (OmpH)- and OmpA-specific monoclonal antibodies from hybridoma tumors in protection of mice against Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Vasfi Marandi, M; Mittal, K R

    1997-01-01

    Two major outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella multocida, designated OmpH and OmpA, were characterized and shown to be related to the families of porin and heat-modifiable proteins, respectively. The backpack hybridoma tumor system in BALB/c mice was used to continuously deliver immunoglobulin G2b (IgG2b) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for OmpH (MAb MT1) and OmpA (MAb MT4.1). MAbs were detected in serum and peritoneal lavage samples of mice bearing hybridoma tumors by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an immunoblot assay. Highly significant protection was observed in mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors against both intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge infections with homologous nontoxigenic P. multocida strains possessing MAb MT1-reacting epitopes, whereas the mice bearing MT4.1 hybridoma tumors were not protected. The numbers of P. multocida organisms in the lungs of mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors were significantly less than those in lungs of mice bearing MT4.1 hybridoma tumors at 48 h postchallenge. These results indicate that the OmpH-specific MAb inhibited proliferation of P. multocida in the lungs. MAb MT1 was unable to kill P. multocida in vitro in the presence of complement. However, an enhanced phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) was observed in mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors. P. multocida induced a more extensive and rapid influx of PMNs into the peritoneal cavity of mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors than of mice bearing MT4.1 hybridoma tumors. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time that IgG MAbs against OmpH of P. multocida are involved in the protection of mice against lethal challenge infection by means of opsonization and inhibition of proliferation of P. multocida as a result of increased influx of PMNs into the infection site. PMID:9353026

  2. Evaluation of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant toxin for detection of antibodies against Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    PubMed

    Takada-Iwao, Asuka; Uto, Takehiko; Mukai, Tetsuya; Okada, Munenori; Futo, Satoshi; Shibata, Isao

    2007-06-01

    To facilitate the control of progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) of swine caused by toxigenic Pasteurella multocida, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a serum neutralization test (NT) have recently been developed to detect antibodies against the P. multocida dermonecrotic toxin (PmDNT). However, the NT is a cumbersome and time-consuming technique. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed an indirect ELISA, using recombinant PmDNT expressed in Escherichia coli, for the detection of antibodies to PmDNT in serum samples from pigs. The practical usefulness of this ELISA was compared with the NT using serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and naturally infected pigs. In the pigs experimentally inoculated with vaccine including PmDNT toxoid, the ELISA and neutralization antibodies were detected at almost the same time, and a good correlation was demonstrated between both tests (P<0.01, R(2)=0.807). Therefore, the ELISA can be used to evaluate the immune reaction of pigs after vaccination with P. multocida toxoid. In a survey conducted on a field herd with a history of clinical AR, the seropositivity by ELISA in pigs of age 4.5-6 months was increased even though the NT was negative, and the correlation was low between the results obtained with the two tests (P<0.01, R(2)=0.38). Therefore, the results indicated that this ELISA might be a useful alternative to the NT currently used to detect the antibody to PmDNT after vaccination or infection with P. multocida. PMID:17611352

  3. Clinico-pathology, hematology and biochemistry responses in buffaloes towards Pasteurella multocida type B: 2 immunogen lypopolysaccharide via oral and intravenous routes of infection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Ibrahim, Hayder Hamzah; Marza, Ali Dhiaa; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Norsidin, Mohd Jefri

    2016-02-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia is a disease caused by Pasteurella multocida serotype B: 2 and E: 2. The organism causes acute, highly fatal septicaemic disease with high morbidity and mortality in cattle and more susceptible in buffaloes. Lipopolysaccharide can be found on the outer cell wall of the organism. Lipopolysaccharide is released during multiplication which leads to inflammatory reaction. It represents the endotoxin of P. multocida type B: 2 and responsible for toxicity in haemorrhagic septicaemia which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs, blood parameters, gross post mortem lesions and histopathology changes caused by P. multocida type B:2 immunogen lipopolysaccharide infections initiated through intravenous and oral routes of infection. 9 buffalo heifers were divided equally into 3 treatment groups. Group 1 was inoculated orally with 10 ml of phosphate buffer saline (PBS); Group 2 and 3 were inoculated with 10 ml of lipopolysaccharide broth intravenously and orally respectively. For the clinical signs, there were significant differences (p < 0.05) in temperature between the control, intravenous and oral group. In hematology and biochemistry findings, there were significant differences (p < 0.05) in erythrocytes, haemoglobin, PCV, MCV, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, GGT and albumin between the control, intravenous and oral group. However, there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the MCHC, leukocytes, band neutrophils, basophils, thrombocytes, plasma protein, icterus index, total protein, globulin and A:G ratio between intravenous and oral group. For Group 2 buffaloes, there were gross lesions in the lung, trachea, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney. In contrast, lesions were only observed in the lung, trachea and liver of Group 3 buffaloes. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in hemorrhage and congestion; necrosis and degeneration; and

  4. One-Step Multiplex RT-qPCR Assay for the Detection of Peste des petits ruminants virus, Capripoxvirus, Pasteurella multocida and Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies (ssp.) capripneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lamien, Charles Euloge; Spergser, Joachim; Lelenta, Mamadou; Wade, Abel; Gelaye, Esayas; Loitsch, Angelika; Minoungou, Germaine; Thiaucourt, Francois; Diallo, Adama

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections, although showing common clinical symptoms like pneumonia, are caused by bacterial, viral or parasitic agents. These are often reported in sheep and goats populations and cause huge economic losses to the animal owners in developing countries. Detection of these diseases is routinely done using ELISA or microbiological methods which are being reinforced or replaced by molecular based detection methods including multiplex assays, where detection of different pathogens is carried out in a single reaction. In the present study, a one-step multiplex RT-qPCR assay was developed for simultaneous detection of Capripoxvirus (CaPV), Peste de petits ruminants virus (PPRV), Pasteurella multocida (PM) and Mycoplasma capricolum ssp. capripneumonia (Mccp) in pathological samples collected from small ruminants with respiratory disease symptoms. The test performed efficiently without any cross-amplification. The multiplex PCR efficiency was 98.31%, 95.48%, 102.77% and 91.46% whereas the singleplex efficiency was 93.43%, 98.82%, 102.55% and 92.0% for CaPV, PPRV, PM and Mccp, respectively. The correlation coefficient was greater than 0.99 for all the targets in both multiplex and singleplex. Based on cycle threshold values, intra and inter assay variability, ranged between the limits of 2%–4%, except for lower concentrations of Mccp. The detection limits at 95% confidence interval (CI) were 12, 163, 13 and 23 copies/reaction for CaPV, PPRV, PM and Mccp, respectively. The multiplex assay was able to detect CaPVs from all genotypes, PPRV from the four lineages, PM and Mccp without amplifying the other subspecies of mycoplasmas. The discriminating power of the assay was proven by accurate detection of the targeted pathogen (s) by screening 58 viral and bacterial isolates representing all four targeted pathogens. Furthermore, by screening 81 pathological samples collected from small ruminants showing respiratory disease symptoms, CaPV was detected in 17 samples

  5. Increase of glycocalyx and altered lectin agglutination profiles of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 after incubation in bovine subcutaneous tissue chambers in vivo or in ruminant serum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Brogden, K; Clarke, C

    1997-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 (bovine strain OK) was incubated for 2 and 6 h in bovine subcutaneous tissue chambers in vivo, and ovine strain 82-25 and bovine strain L011 were incubated in vitro for 2 h in heat-inactivated ovine or bovine serum from which gamma globulin had been depleted by protein G affinity chromatography to assess changes in morphology and lectin agglutination profiles (strains 82-25 and L101 only). Cells, removed from chambers after 2 h, were covered with an extensive, dense glycocalyx extending approximately 0.5 microm from the cell surface. In many cells, the glycocalyx was separated from the cell surface by a clear, electron-transparent area. Cells, removed at 6 h, were covered with a sparse glycocalyx of fine fibers 0.2 to 0.3 microm from the cell surface. Strains 82-25 and L101, incubated for 2 h in heat-inactivated ovine or bovine serum or in heat-inactivated ovine or bovine serum depleted of gamma globulin by protein G affinity chromatography, were also covered with a glycocalyx. The glycocalyx did not bind protein A-colloidal gold and therefore did not contain aggregates of accumulated antibody. Strains 82-25 and L101 were incubated individually for 2 h in 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) containing 0.14 M NaCl, 0.5 mM CaCl2, and 0.15 mM MgCl2 or with this buffer and either 25% heat-inactivated, gamma globulin-depleted ovine serum or 25% heat-inactivated, gamma globulin-depleted bovine serum. Agglutination profiles were then determined with 17 lectins in 10 mM HEPES-buffered saline (pH 8.4) with 0.1 mM CaCl2 and 0.08% sodium azide. Profiles did not vary with 10 of 17 lectins. However, profiles did vary with peanut agglutinin, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Sophora japonica agglutinin, Maackia amurensis lectin II, Narcissus pseudonarcissus (daffodil) lectin, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I, and Pisum sativum agglutinin. Altered profiles indicate a change in the bacterial cell surface, possibly by adsorption or

  6. Differences in Virulence Between Bovine-Derived Clinical Isolates of Pasteurella multocida Serotype A from the UK and the USA in a Model of Bovine Pneumonic Pasteurellosis.

    PubMed

    Dagleish, M P; Bayne, C W; Moon, G G; Finlayson, J; Sales, J; Williams, J; Hodgson, J C

    2016-07-01

    The time of onset and subsequent degree and progression of clinical signs, bacterial colonization and tissue pathology during experimental disease induced by intratracheal inoculation of either a UK or USA isolate of Pasteurella multocida serotype A recovered from clinical cases of bovine pneumonia were determined. Calves aged 8 weeks were challenged with 300 ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS) alone (group 1, n = 3, negative control) or containing 7.1 × 10(8) colony forming units (cfu) of UK isolate (group 2, n = 8) or 5.8 × 10(8) cfu of USA isolate (group 3, n = 8). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at 0, 1 and 4 days post challenge (dpc) and at the time of necropsy examination (7-8 dpc) showed no significant differences between groups 2 and 3 in bacterial numbers recovered. No P. multocida were recovered from group 1 animals. No clinical disease was present in group 1 calves and in group 3 was limited to scour in 1 calf at 1 dpc. All calves in group 2 had reduced food intake at 4-5 dpc, five had periods of dullness, three a mild nasal discharge at 1 dpc, four had mild to substantial respiratory stridor and one was killed at 6 dpc for humane reasons. Rectal temperatures remained about 39°C in group 1 calves, but increased in P. multocida-challenged calves to 40-41°C within 8-12 h of challenge. Significantly (P = 0.01) greater percentages of lung surface area were consolidated in group 2 (mean ± SD, 21 ± 10.1) compared with group 3 (7 ± 8.6) calves. Significantly more extensive and severe histological lesions were present in the lung lobes (P = 0.006) and lymph nodes (P = 0.02) of group 2 compared with group 3 calves. Pleurisy was present in group 2 calves only and no pathology was present in group 1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) produced 11 (group 2, UK isolate) or 10 (group 3, USA isolate) bands with differences in banding patterns. Results overall showed that two isolates, distinct geographically and genetically (by PFGE

  7. Analysis of the Polymerization Initiation and Activity of Pasteurella multocida Heparosan Synthase PmHS2, an Enzyme with Glycosyltransferase and UDP-sugar Hydrolase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Chavaroche, Anais A. E.; van den Broek, Lambertus A. M.; Springer, Jan; Boeriu, Carmen; Eggink, Gerrit

    2011-01-01

    Heparosan synthase catalyzes the polymerization of heparosan (-4GlcUAβ1–4GlcNAcα1-)n by transferring alternatively the monosaccharide units from UDP-GlcUA and UDP-GlcNAc to an acceptor molecule. Details on the heparosan chain initiation by Pasteurella multocida heparosan synthase PmHS2 and its influence on the polymerization process have not been reported yet. By site-directed mutagenesis of PmHS2, the single action transferases PmHS2-GlcUA+ and PmHS2-GlcNAc+ were obtained. When incubated together in the standard polymerization conditions, the PmHS2-GlcUA+/PmHS2-GlcNAc+ showed comparable polymerization properties as determined for PmHS2. We investigated the first step occurring in heparosan chain initiation by the use of the single action transferases and by studying the PmHS2 polymerization process in the presence of heparosan templates and various UDP-sugar concentrations. We observed that PmHS2 favored the initiation of the heparosan chains when incubated in the presence of an excess of UDP-GlcNAc. It resulted in a higher number of heparosan chains with a lower average molecular weight or in the synthesis of two distinct groups of heparosan chain length, in the absence or in the presence of heparosan templates, respectively. These data suggest that PmHS2 transfers GlcUA from UDP-GlcUA moiety to a UDP-GlcNAc acceptor molecule to initiate the heparosan polymerization; as a consequence, not only the UDP-sugar concentration but also the amount of each UDP-sugar is influencing the PmHS2 polymerization process. In addition, it was shown that PmHS2 hydrolyzes the UDP-sugars, UDP-GlcUA being more degraded than UDP-GlcNAc. However, PmHS2 incubated in the presence of both UDP-sugars favors the synthesis of heparosan polymers over the hydrolysis of UDP-sugars. PMID:21084307

  8. One-Step Multiplex RT-qPCR Assay for the Detection of Peste des petits ruminants virus, Capripoxvirus, Pasteurella multocida and Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies (ssp.) capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Settypalli, Tirumala Bharani Kumar; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Spergser, Joachim; Lelenta, Mamadou; Wade, Abel; Gelaye, Esayas; Loitsch, Angelika; Minoungou, Germaine; Thiaucourt, Francois; Diallo, Adama

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections, although showing common clinical symptoms like pneumonia, are caused by bacterial, viral or parasitic agents. These are often reported in sheep and goats populations and cause huge economic losses to the animal owners in developing countries. Detection of these diseases is routinely done using ELISA or microbiological methods which are being reinforced or replaced by molecular based detection methods including multiplex assays, where detection of different pathogens is carried out in a single reaction. In the present study, a one-step multiplex RT-qPCR assay was developed for simultaneous detection of Capripoxvirus (CaPV), Peste de petits ruminants virus (PPRV), Pasteurella multocida (PM) and Mycoplasma capricolum ssp. capripneumonia (Mccp) in pathological samples collected from small ruminants with respiratory disease symptoms. The test performed efficiently without any cross-amplification. The multiplex PCR efficiency was 98.31%, 95.48%, 102.77% and 91.46% whereas the singleplex efficiency was 93.43%, 98.82%, 102.55% and 92.0% for CaPV, PPRV, PM and Mccp, respectively. The correlation coefficient was greater than 0.99 for all the targets in both multiplex and singleplex. Based on cycle threshold values, intra and inter assay variability, ranged between the limits of 2%-4%, except for lower concentrations of Mccp. The detection limits at 95% confidence interval (CI) were 12, 163, 13 and 23 copies/reaction for CaPV, PPRV, PM and Mccp, respectively. The multiplex assay was able to detect CaPVs from all genotypes, PPRV from the four lineages, PM and Mccp without amplifying the other subspecies of mycoplasmas. The discriminating power of the assay was proven by accurate detection of the targeted pathogen (s) by screening 58 viral and bacterial isolates representing all four targeted pathogens. Furthermore, by screening 81 pathological samples collected from small ruminants showing respiratory disease symptoms, CaPV was detected in 17 samples

  9. Differences in Virulence Between Bovine-Derived Clinical Isolates of Pasteurella multocida Serotype A from the UK and the USA in a Model of Bovine Pneumonic Pasteurellosis.

    PubMed

    Dagleish, M P; Bayne, C W; Moon, G G; Finlayson, J; Sales, J; Williams, J; Hodgson, J C

    2016-07-01

    The time of onset and subsequent degree and progression of clinical signs, bacterial colonization and tissue pathology during experimental disease induced by intratracheal inoculation of either a UK or USA isolate of Pasteurella multocida serotype A recovered from clinical cases of bovine pneumonia were determined. Calves aged 8 weeks were challenged with 300 ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS) alone (group 1, n = 3, negative control) or containing 7.1 × 10(8) colony forming units (cfu) of UK isolate (group 2, n = 8) or 5.8 × 10(8) cfu of USA isolate (group 3, n = 8). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at 0, 1 and 4 days post challenge (dpc) and at the time of necropsy examination (7-8 dpc) showed no significant differences between groups 2 and 3 in bacterial numbers recovered. No P. multocida were recovered from group 1 animals. No clinical disease was present in group 1 calves and in group 3 was limited to scour in 1 calf at 1 dpc. All calves in group 2 had reduced food intake at 4-5 dpc, five had periods of dullness, three a mild nasal discharge at 1 dpc, four had mild to substantial respiratory stridor and one was killed at 6 dpc for humane reasons. Rectal temperatures remained about 39°C in group 1 calves, but increased in P. multocida-challenged calves to 40-41°C within 8-12 h of challenge. Significantly (P = 0.01) greater percentages of lung surface area were consolidated in group 2 (mean ± SD, 21 ± 10.1) compared with group 3 (7 ± 8.6) calves. Significantly more extensive and severe histological lesions were present in the lung lobes (P = 0.006) and lymph nodes (P = 0.02) of group 2 compared with group 3 calves. Pleurisy was present in group 2 calves only and no pathology was present in group 1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) produced 11 (group 2, UK isolate) or 10 (group 3, USA isolate) bands with differences in banding patterns. Results overall showed that two isolates, distinct geographically and genetically (by PFGE

  10. Plasma concentrations resulting from florfenicol preparations given to pigs in their drinking water.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, L; Vargas, D; Ocampo, L; Sumano, H; Martinez, R; Tapia, G

    2011-09-01

    Florfenicol administered through the drinking water has been recommended as a metaphylactic antibacterial drug to control outbreaks of respiratory diseases in pigs caused by strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida, yet it is difficult to pinpoint in practice when the drug is given metaphylactically or therapeutically. Further, pigs are likely to reject florfenicol-medicated water, and plasma concentrations of the drug are likely to be marginal for diseases caused by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The reported minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for these organisms show a breakpoint of 2 to 3 μg/mL. An experiment was conducted during September and October 2009. One hundred twenty healthy crossbred pigs (Landrace-Yorkshire), weighing 23 ± 6.2 kg, were used in this trial. They were randomly assigned to 5 groups, with 3 replicates of 8 animals/group. Two commercial preparations of florfenicol were administered through the drinking water at 2 concentrations (0.01 and 0.015%). Water intake was measured before and after medication, and plasma concentrations of florfenicol were determined by HPLC. Considerable rejection of florfenicol-medicated water was observed. However, plasma florfenicol concentrations were of a range sufficient for a methaphylaxis approach to preventing disease by bacteria, with MIC breakpoints of ≤ 0.25 μg/mL. Decreased efficacy as a metaphylactic medication should be expected for bacteria with MIC >0.25 μg/mL, considering the reported existence of bacteria resistant to florfenicol and the natural resistance of Streptococcus suis or E. coli to this drug.

  11. Association of swine influenza H1N1 pandemic virus (SIV-H1N1p) with porcine respiratory disease complex in sows from commercial pig farms in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Luisa Fernanda Mancipe; Ramírez Nieto, Gloria; Alfonso, Victor Vera; Correa, Jairo Jaime

    2014-08-01

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is a serious health problem that mainly affects growing and finishing pigs. PRDC is caused by a combination of viral and bacterial agents, such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), swine influenza virus (SIV), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Myh), Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP), Pasteurella multocida and Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2). To characterize the specific role of swine influenza virus in PRDC presentation in Colombia, 11 farms from three major production regions in Colombia were examined in this study. Nasal swabs, bronchial lavage and lung tissue samples were obtained from animals displaying symptoms compatible with SIV. Isolation of SIV was performed in 9-day embryonated chicken eggs or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. Positive isolates, identified via the hemagglutination inhibition test, were further analyzed using PCR. Overall, 7 of the 11 farms were positive for SIV. Notably, sequencing of the gene encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) protein led to grouping of strains into circulating viruses identified during the human outbreak of 2009, classified as pandemic H1N1-2009. Serum samples from 198 gilts and multiparous sows between 2008 and 2009 were obtained to determine antibody presence of APP, Myh, PCV2 and PRRSV in both SIV-H1N1p-negative and -positive farms, but higher levels were recorded for SIV-H1N1p-positive farms. Odds ratio (OR) and P values revealed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) in PRDC presentation in gilts and multiparous sows of farms positive for SIV-H1N1p. Our findings indicate that positive farms have increased risk of PRDC presentation, in particular, PCV2, APP and Myh. PMID:25160760

  12. Multiple-class antimicrobial resistance surveillance in swine Escherichia coli F4, Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus suis isolates from Ontario and the impact of the 2004-2006 Porcine Circovirus type-2 Associated Disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    Glass-Kaastra, Shiona K; Pearl, David L; Reid-Smith, Richard; McEwen, Beverly; Slavic, Durda; Fairles, Jim; McEwen, Scott A

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this work was to describe trends in multiple-class antimicrobial resistance present in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli F4, Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus suis from Ontario swine 1998-2010. Temporal changes in multiple-class resistance varied by the pathogens examined; significant yearly changes were apparent for the E. coli and P. multocida data. Although not present in the E. coli data, significant increases in multiple-class resistance within P. multocida isolates occurred from 2003 to 2005, coinciding with the expected increase in antimicrobials used to treat clinical signs of Porcine Circovirus Associated Disease (PCVAD) before it was confirmed. Prospective temporal scan statistics for multiple-class resistance suggest that significant clusters of increased resistance may have been found in the spring of 2004; months before the identification of the PCVAD outbreak in the fall of 2004.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of the viability, aggregation, and live and dead adherence of Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human saliva in relation to indices of caries, dental plaque and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rudney, J D; Staikov, R K

    2002-05-01

    Salivary proteins have multiple functions and many share similar functions, which may be why it has been difficult to relate variations in their concentrations to oral health and ecology. An alternative is to focus on variations in the major functions of saliva. An hydroxyapatite-coated microplate model has been developed that simultaneously measures saliva-promoted bacterial viability, bacterial aggregation, and live and dead bacterial adherence, while simulating oral temperature and shearing forces from swallowing. That model was applied to resting whole and stimulated parotid saliva from 149 individuals, using representative strains of Streptococcus crista, S. mutans, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Two major factors were defined by multivariate analysis (this was successful only for whole-saliva). One factor was correlated with aggregation, live adherence and dead adherence for all three strains; the other was correlated with total viability of all three strains. Participants were grouped <25th percentile and >75th percentile for each factor. Those groups were compared for clinical indices of oral health. Caries scores were significantly lower in those with high scores for aggregation-adherence, regardless of whether total viability scores were low or high. Live bacteria always predominated on surfaces when live and dead adherence scores were expressed as ratios. However, participants with high scores for aggregation-adherence showed significantly more dead adherent bacteria than those with low scores (these ratios were uncorrelated with total viability). This finding may indicate that extreme differences in the ability to kill bacteria on surfaces can influence caries risk.

  14. OCCURRENCE OF ACTINOBACILLUS ACTINOMYCETEMCOMITANS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS, AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS, HEALTHY SUBJECTS AND CHILDREN WITH GINGIVITIS IN TWO CITIES OF THE STATE OF SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Jardim, Elerson Gaetti; Bosco, Joseane Maria Dias; Lopes, Angélica Marquezim; Landucci, Luís Fernando; Jardim, Ellen Cristina Gaetti; Carneiro, Sílvia Rosana Soares

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in 100 patients with chronic periodontitis, 14 patients with aggressive periodontitis, 142 pre-school children with gingivitis and 134 periodontally healthy subjects. Samples of subgingival plaque were taken using sterilized paper points introduced into periodontal pockets or gingival crevice for 60 seconds and inoculated on TSBV agar, which was incubated under anaerobiosis at 37°C, for 4 days. Microbial identification was performed through biochemical methods and morphocellular and morphocolonial analysis. Aa was detected in 40.3% of healthy subjects, 68% of patients with chronic periodontitis, 92.86% of patients with aggressive periodontitis and 40.14% of children with gingivitis. The rate of recovery of Aa in the tested human groups proved to be higher than previously reported and in agreement with participation of this facultative anaerobe as a member of native microbiota of the periodontium and its relation with aggressive and chronic periodontitis in Brazil. PMID:19089064

  15. Comparisons of Pasteurella multocida lipopolysaccharides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine relationship between group B and E hemorrhagic septicemia strains and serologically related group A strains.

    PubMed Central

    Rimler, R B

    1990-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) purified from 16 reference somatic serotypes of Pasteurella multocida were examined and compared by discontinuous sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Resolution of LPS patterns in a gel was optimum when sample wells were cast separately from the stacking gel and the running gel consisted of 15% T (total monomer) polyacrylamide and 4 M deionized urea. Band patterns of P. multocida LPSs in a gel differed from control Salmonella minnesota wild-type and core mutant LPSs. Although the band patterns and mobilities of LPSs from some P. multocida reference serotypes were similar, none were identical. Evidence for O antigens similar to those produced by enterobacteria was not observed. Proteinase K digestion of whole P. multocida cells resulted in LPS band patterns similar to those of purified LPS. The presence or absence of a capsule on a strain had no major influence on band patterns in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Comparisons of LPS patterns of group B and E hemorrhagic septicemia strains with those of serologically related group A strains of P. multocida indicated that they were similar. Typing antisera made with purified serotype 2 or 5 LPS reacted with electroblots of all these strains. However, the reactions did not distinguish strains as being serotype 2 or 5. Images PMID:2332462

  16. Characterization of a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Willson, P J; Albritton, W L; Slaney, L; Setlow, J K

    1989-01-01

    Plasmid pLS88 from a clinical isolate of Haemophilus ducreyi encoded resistance determinants for sulfonamides and streptomycin related to those of RSF1010 and for kanamycin related to Tn903 but lacked the inverted repeats of the transposon. Its host range included Haemophilus influenzae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and Escherichia coli; and it was compatible with pDM2 and RSF1010. Images PMID:2684012

  17. Induction of protective immunity by aerosol or oral application of candidate vaccines in a dose-controlled pig aerosol infection model.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; van Leengoed, L A; Szostak, M; Windt, H; Weissenböck, H; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Katinger, A; Stadler, M; Ganter, M; Bunka, S; Pabst, R; Lubitz, W

    1996-01-26

    In order to outline basic concepts for the design of a bacterial aerosol infection model, the development of a pig model with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is described. First, reproducibility of aerosol parameters should be maintained by optimizing generating and sampling conditions. Survival rates of the chosen strain must be predictable. Secondly, inhalation conditions for the recipients have to be standardized to enable the determination of deposition sites and the dose administered. Subsequently, dose-response relationship should be evaluated to find a suitable challenge dose. Furthermore, it seems necessary to establish methods to obtain local specimens for determination of the local immune responses. The present study demonstrates that after aerosol challenge pigs were completely protected after inhalation and partially protected after oral application of A. pleuropneumoniae vaccines and describes techniques to administer bacteria in a dose-dependent, viable way. Using the infection model several stages of the disease from acute pleuropneumonia to chronic infection can be induced for research purposes.

  18. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  19. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    PubMed

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  20. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    PubMed

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin.

  1. Sequence analysis of serotype-specific synthesis regions II of Haemophilus influenzae serotypes c and d: evidence for common ancestry of capsule synthesis in Pasteurellaceae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Lâm, Thiên-Trí; Claus, Heike; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    Sequencing of yet unknown Haemophilus influenzae serotype c (Hic) and d (Hid) capsule synthesis regions II revealed four (ccs1-4) and five (dcs1-5) open reading frames, respectively. The inferred gene functions were in line with capsular polysaccharide structures. One or more proteins encoded by the Hic capsule synthesis region II showed similarity to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 and Actinobacillus suis K1 enzymes. Orthologues to the complete operon were observed in Actinobacillus minor strain 202, where even the gene order was conserved. Furthermore, Ccs4 was related to the capsule O-acetyltransferase of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W-135. For the Hid locus, similarities to Hie, Mannheimia haemolytica A1 and N. meningitidis serogroup A were identified and the succession of genes was similar in the different species. The resemblance of genes and gene organization found for Hic and Hid with other species suggested horizontal gene transfer during capsule evolution across the bacterial classes.

  2. An evaluation of the API ZYM system as a means of identifying Haemophilus somnus and related taxa.

    PubMed Central

    Groom, S C; Hazlett, M J; Little, P B

    1986-01-01

    The commercially available API ZYM microbiological identification system was evaluated for the rapid identification of Haemophilus somnus. Eighty-seven isolates of the organism had API ZYM profiles which were characteristic. The API ZYM profiles demonstrate clear differences between H. somnus and other genera but suggest a close association to three related organisms. Enzyme activity of H. somnus isolates were similar to organisms identified as Histophilus ovis, Haemophilus agni and strains UQV of Actinobacillus actinoides and Actinobacillus seminis but was clearly different from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Bordetella bronchiseptica and group EF4. The API ZYM system allowed more rapid identification of H. somnus than conventional biochemical tests and may be a useful adjunct to conventional methods used for identification of H. somnus isolates. The test did not reveal obvious differences between isolates from various anatomic locations. PMID:3530416

  3. [Diagnosis of caprine contagious pleuropneumonia: recent improvements].

    PubMed

    Thiaucourt, F; Guérin, C; Mady, V; Lefèvre, P C

    1992-09-01

    Due to the difficulty in isolating Mycoplasma sp. type F38, two techniques for rapid detection are proposed in order to identify the presence of mycoplasmas of the mycoides group in samples of pleural fluid. A modification in the composition of isolation media promotes the growth of type F38 mycoplasmas and inhibits the growth of M. ovipneumoniae strains.

  4. Genetic diversity among Pasteurella multocida strains of avian, bovine, ovine and porcine origin from England and Wales by comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert L

    2004-12-01

    Genetic diversity among 86 Pasteurella multocida isolates was investigated by comparative sequence analysis of a 1468 bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. The strains included 79 field isolates recovered from birds (poultry) (22), cattle (21), pigs (26) and sheep (10) within England and Wales, four Asian isolates associated with bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia, and the type strains of the three subspecies of P. multocida. Dulcitol and sorbitol fermentation patterns were also determined to establish correlations between subspecies status and phylogenetic relatedness. Nineteen 16S rRNA types were identified, but these were clustered into two distinct phylogenetic lineages, A and B. Sequences within lineages A and B had a mean number of nucleotide differences of 21.12+/-3.90. Isolates within lineage A were associated with birds, cattle, pigs and sheep, whereas those belonging to lineage B were recovered from birds and a cat. Eighty-seven per cent of the isolates were classified as P. multocida subsp. multocida by dulcitol and sorbitol fermentation patterns, but these have diverse 16S rRNA gene sequences that were represented in both lineages A and B. Avian P. multocida subsp. septica isolates were associated exclusively with lineage B, but bovine P. multocida subsp. septica isolates were present in lineage A. P. multocida subsp. gallicida isolates of avian, bovine and porcine origin represent a homogeneous group within lineage A, but they have the same 16S rRNA type as certain P. multocida subsp. multocida isolates. These findings provide strong support for the view that dulcitol and sorbitol fermentation patterns are inaccurate indicators of genetic relatedness among P. multocida strains. Avian capsular type B isolates and capsular type B and E isolates associated with haemorrhagic septicaemia of cattle and water buffaloes are closely related and form a distinct cluster within lineage A. The current subspecies nomenclature of P. multocida neither accurately reflects the

  5. Interleukin-10 Gene Therapy-Mediated Amelioration of Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Daniel F.; Foss, Dennis L.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory infection by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes a highly pathogenic necrotizing pleuropneumonia with severe edema, hemorrhage and fever. Acute infection is characterized by expression of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-8. To determine if high level production of inflammatory cytokines contributed to disease pathogenesis, we investigated if inhibiting macrophage activation with adenovirus type 5-expressed IL-10 (Ad-5/IL-10) reduced the severity of acute disease. Porcine tracheal epithelial cells infected with Ad-5/IL-10 produced bioactive human IL-10. When pigs were intratracheally infected with A. pleuropneumoniae, pigs pretreated with Ad-5/IL-10 showed a significant reduction in the amount of lung damage when compared to adenovirus type 5-expressing β-galactosidase (Ad-5/β-Gal)-treated and untreated pigs. In addition, serum zinc levels were unchanged, the lung weight/body weight ratio (an indicator of vascular leakage) was significantly reduced, and lung pathology scores were reduced. Myeloperoxidase activity in lung lavage fluid samples, an indicator of neutrophil invasion, was decreased to levels similar to that seen in pigs not infected with A. pleuropneumoniae. Reduction in inflammatory cytokine levels in lung lavage fluid samples correlated with the clinical observations in that pigs pretreated with Ad-5/IL-10 showed a corresponding reduction of IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) compared with untreated and Ad-5/β-Gal-treated pigs. IL-6 levels were unaffected by pretreatment with Ad-5/IL-10, consistent with observations that IL-6 was not derived from alveolar macrophages. Since inflammatory cytokines are expressed at high levels in acute bacterial pleuropneumonia, these results indicate that macrophage activation, involving overproduction of IL-1 and TNF, is a prime factor in infection-related cases of massive lung injury. PMID:10899882

  6. [Main infectious agents involved in the etiology of lung diseases of small ruminants in northern Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Martrenchar, A; Zoyem, N; Ngangnou, A; Bouchel, D; Ngo Tama, A C; Njoya, A

    1995-01-01

    Between 1990 and 1992, 91 necropsies of small ruminants affected with pulmonary illness led to the isolation of the following strains of Mycoplasma (M.): M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC, M. ovipneumoniae, M. agalactiae, M. sp. type D2 and M. arginini. Eleven Pasteurella multocida strains (serotypes A1, A3, A5, A7 and D2) and 11 Pasteurella haemolytica strains (serotypes 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9) were isolated. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Actinomyces pyogenes, Staphylococcus sp., Streptococcus sp., Bacillus sp. and Mycobacterium sp. were also isolated. Thirty-two antibiograms were performed on Pasteurella, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and Actinomyces pyogenes strains. Eighty eight p. cent were sensitive to penicillin G and oxytetracycline, and 84% to chloramphenicol; 50% were not sensitive to spiramycin and 47% to streptomycin. One Capripoxvirus strain was isolated on sheep. Pest of small ruminants (PPR) virus was detected by immunocapture ELISA test performed on some lung samples. Two serological surveys, one for contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (898 goats), between 1991 and 1993, and one for PPR (902 sheep and goats) in 1993, were conducted in the North and Far North provinces. No antibody against contagious caprine pleuropneumonia was detected. Among the animals in the sample, PPR prevalence was 64 +/- 7% in the Far North province and 14 +/- 3% in the North province. Concerning control measures, a vaccination campaign against small ruminant pasteurellosis appears to be hardly feasible because of the antigenic diversity of the isolated Pasteurella strains. PPR is endemic especially in the Far North province. The efficiency of a vaccination campaign against PPR must be estimated with a field survey.

  7. The tad locus: postcards from the widespread colonization island.

    PubMed

    Tomich, Mladen; Planet, Paul J; Figurski, David H

    2007-05-01

    The Tad (tight adherence) macromolecular transport system, which is present in many bacterial and archaeal species, represents an ancient and major new subtype of type II secretion. The tad genes are present on a genomic island named the widespread colonization island (WCI), and encode the machinery that is required for the assembly of adhesive Flp (fimbrial low-molecular-weight protein) pili. The tad genes are essential for biofilm formation, colonization and pathogenesis in the genera Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus), Haemophilus, Pasteurella, Pseudomonas, Yersinia, Caulobacter and perhaps others. Here we review the structure, function and evolution of the Tad secretion system.

  8. 9 CFR 113.69 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be... Master Seed used for vaccine production shall be tested for immunogenicity. The immunogenicity of a... Production change must be made before authority for use of a new lot of Master Seed is granted by the...

  9. 9 CFR 113.121 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the mouse test provided in this paragraph. A mouse dose shall be 1/20 of the least dose recommended on the label for other animals which shall not be less than 2 ml. (1) The ability of the bacterin being tested (Unknown) to protect mice shall...

  10. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established by conducting five replicate titrations on a sample of the bacterial vaccine used. Only plates...) of this section. Two replicate titrations shall be conducted on each serial and subserial....

  11. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... titrations on a sample of the bacterial vaccine used. Only plates containing between 30 and 300 colonies... used in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. Two replicate titrations shall be conducted on each...

  12. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... titrations on a sample of the bacterial vaccine used. Only plates containing between 30 and 300 colonies... used in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. Two replicate titrations shall be conducted on each...

  13. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... titrations on a sample of the bacterial vaccine used. Only plates containing between 30 and 300 colonies... used in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. Two replicate titrations shall be conducted on each...

  14. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... established by conducting five replicate titrations on a sample of the bacterial vaccine used. Only plates...) of this section. Two replicate titrations shall be conducted on each serial and subserial....