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Sample records for actinobacterial strain designated

  1. Rhodococcus baikonurensis BTM4c, a boron-tolerant actinobacterial strain isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Miwa, Hiroki; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Yokota, Akira; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    By screening a bacterial population from the soil in Tokyo, Japan, we isolated a boron-tolerant bacterium, strain BTM4c. Strain BTM4c grew under the boron excess conditions with 100 mM boric acid, which is generally toxic to bacteria. Molecular phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic, and physiological data showed that the strain belongs to the genus Rhodococcus, and is to be identified as Rhodococcus baikonurensis. PMID:20057133

  2. Cultural, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Analyses of Water-Stressed Cells of Actinobacterial Strains Isolated from Compost: Ecological Implications in the Fed-Batch Composting Process.

    PubMed

    Narihiro, Takashi; Kanosue, Yuji; Hiraishi, Akira

    2016-06-25

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of water activity (aw) on the viability of actinobacterial isolates from a fed-batch composting (FBC) process by comparing culturability and stainability with 5-cyano-2,3-ditoryl tetrazolium chloride (CTC). The FBC reactor as the source of these bacteria was operated with the daily loading of household biowaste for 70 d. During this period of composting, aw in the reactor decreased linearly with time and reached approximately 0.95 at the end of operation. The plate counts of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria were 3.2-fold higher than CTC-positive (CTC+) counts on average at the fully acclimated stage (after 7 weeks of operation), in which Actinobacteria predominated, as shown by lipoquinone profiling and cultivation methods. When the actinobacterial isolates from the FBC process were grown under aw stress, no significant differences were observed in culturability among the cultures, whereas CTC stainability decreased with reductions in aw levels. A cDNA microarray-based transcriptomic analysis of a representative isolate showed that many of the genes involved in cellular metabolism and genetic information processing were down-regulated by aw stress. This result was fully supported by a proteomic analysis. The results of the present study suggest that, in low aw mature compost, the metabolic activity of the community with Actinobacteria predominating is temporarily reduced to a level that hardly reacts with CTC; however, these bacteria are easily recoverable by exposure to a high aw culture medium. This may be a plausible reason why acclimated FBC reactors in which Actinobacteria predominate yields higher plate counts than CTC+ counts. PMID:27246805

  3. Cultural, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Analyses of Water-Stressed Cells of Actinobacterial Strains Isolated from Compost: Ecological Implications in the Fed-Batch Composting Process

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Kanosue, Yuji; Hiraishi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of water activity (aw) on the viability of actinobacterial isolates from a fed-batch composting (FBC) process by comparing culturability and stainability with 5-cyano-2,3-ditoryl tetrazolium chloride (CTC). The FBC reactor as the source of these bacteria was operated with the daily loading of household biowaste for 70 d. During this period of composting, aw in the reactor decreased linearly with time and reached approximately 0.95 at the end of operation. The plate counts of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria were 3.2-fold higher than CTC-positive (CTC+) counts on average at the fully acclimated stage (after 7 weeks of operation), in which Actinobacteria predominated, as shown by lipoquinone profiling and cultivation methods. When the actinobacterial isolates from the FBC process were grown under aw stress, no significant differences were observed in culturability among the cultures, whereas CTC stainability decreased with reductions in aw levels. A cDNA microarray-based transcriptomic analysis of a representative isolate showed that many of the genes involved in cellular metabolism and genetic information processing were down-regulated by aw stress. This result was fully supported by a proteomic analysis. The results of the present study suggest that, in low aw mature compost, the metabolic activity of the community with Actinobacteria predominating is temporarily reduced to a level that hardly reacts with CTC; however, these bacteria are easily recoverable by exposure to a high aw culture medium. This may be a plausible reason why acclimated FBC reactors in which Actinobacteria predominate yields higher plate counts than CTC+ counts. PMID:27246805

  4. Effect of Microbial Inoculants on the Indigenous Actinobacterial Endophyte Population in the Roots of Wheat as Determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vanessa M.; Franco, Christopher M. M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of single actinobacterial endophyte seed inoculants and a mixed microbial soil inoculant on the indigenous endophytic actinobacterial population in wheat roots was investigated by using the molecular technique terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Wheat was cultivated either from seeds coated with the spores of single pure actinobacterial endophytes of Microbispora sp. strain EN2, Streptomyces sp. strain EN27, and Nocardioides albus EN46 or from untreated seeds sown in soil with and without a commercial mixed microbial soil inoculant. The endophytic actinobacterial population within the roots of 6-week-old wheat plants was assessed by T-RFLP. Colonization of the wheat roots by the inoculated actinobacterial endophytes was detected by T-RFLP, as were 28 to 42 indigenous actinobacterial genera present in the inoculated and uninoculated plants. The presence of the commercial mixed inoculant in the soil reduced the endophytic actinobacterial diversity from 40 genera to 21 genera and reduced the detectable root colonization by approximately half. The results indicate that the addition of a nonadapted microbial inoculum to the soil disrupted the natural actinobacterial endophyte population, reducing diversity and colonization levels. This was in contrast to the addition of a single actinobacterial endophyte to the wheat plant, where the increase in colonization level could be confirmed even though the indigenous endophyte population was not adversely affected. PMID:15528499

  5. Actinobacterial Flora in Feces of Healthy Cottontail Rabbits (Sylvilagus auduboni).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Tan, Hongming; Deng, Qingli; Cao, Lixiang

    2015-03-01

    Most known antibiotics from bacteria are produced by Actinobacteria. However, little is known about the community structure and diversity of fecal actinobacteria from rabbit feces. To investigate the actinobacterial community structure in rabbit feces, different actinobacterial-specific primer sets were used to amplify the overlap regions of 16S rRNA genes from the same DNA. At the genus level, 12 actinobacterial genera were detected by the L and S libraries. Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Dietzia, Leucobacter, Microbacterium, Promicromonospora and Rhodococcus were detected by L and S libraries. The Nocardioides, Streptomyces and Williamsia were only detected by L library; the Oerskovia and Brevibacterium were only detected by S library. The results indicated that rabbit feces contain diverse nonpathogenic actinobacterial taxa and PCR primer sets could underestimate the actinobacterial diversity besides the DNA extract efficiency.

  6. Sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity: validation of the methods of actinobacterial DNA extraction and optimization of 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M M; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Experiments were designed to validate the two common DNA extraction protocols (CTAB-based method and DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit) used to effectively recover actinobacterial DNA from sponge samples in order to study the sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. This was done by artificially spiking sponge samples with actinobacteria (spores, mycelia and a combination of the two). Our results demonstrated that both DNA extraction methods were effective in obtaining DNA from the sponge samples as well as the sponge samples spiked with different amounts of actinobacteria. However, it was noted that in the presence of the sponge, the bacterial 16S rRNA gene could not be amplified unless the combined DNA template was diluted. To test the hypothesis that the extracted sponge DNA contained inhibitors, dilutions of the DNA extracts were tested for six sponge species representing five orders. The results suggested that the inhibitors were co-extracted with the sponge DNA, and a high dilution of this DNA was required for the successful PCR amplification for most of the samples. The optimized PCR conditions, including primer selection, PCR reaction system and program optimization, further improved the PCR performance. However, no single PCR condition was found to be suitable for the diverse sponge samples using various primer sets. These results highlight for the first time that the DNA extraction methods used are effective in obtaining actinobacterial DNA and that the presence of inhibitors in the sponge DNA requires high dilution coupled with fine tuning of the PCR conditions to achieve success in the study of sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity.

  7. [Advance in marine actinobacterial research--a review].

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Si; Li, Wenjun

    2011-02-01

    The research on marine actinobacteria has worldwide interest because of their potential to produce special and new metabolites. Based on the research history of marine actinobacteria, we reviewed the research progress, conception, bio-resources and diversity,secondary metabolites, ecological function, genomics of marine actinobacteria and finally introduced the status of marine actinobacterial research in China.

  8. Actinobacterial Diversity in the Sediments of Five Cold Springs on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Li, Xiaoyan; Huang, Liuqin; Jiang, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    The actinobacterial diversity was investigated in the sediments of five cold springs in Wuli region on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The actinobacterial communities of the studied cold springs were diverse and the obtained actinobacterial operational taxonomic units were classified into 12 actinobacterial orders (e.g., Acidimicrobiales, Corynebacteriales, Gaiellales, Geodermatophilales, Jiangellales, Kineosporiales, Micromonosporales, Micrococcales, Nakamurellales, Propionibacteriales, Pseudonocardiales, Streptomycetales) and unclassified Actinobacteria. The actinobacterial composition varied among the investigated cold springs and were significantly correlated (r = 0.748, P = 0.021) to environmental variables. The actinobacterial communities in the cold springs were more diverse than other cold habitats on the Tibetan Plateau, and their compositions showed unique geographical distribution characteristics. Statistical analyses showed that biogeographical isolation and unique environmental conditions might be major factors influencing actinobacterial distribution among the investigated cold springs. PMID:26648925

  9. Actinobacterial community dynamics in long term managed grasslands.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sasha N; Waite, Ian S; Blackburn, Adrian; Husband, Rebecca; Rushton, Steven P; Manning, David C; O'Donnell, Anthony G

    2009-05-01

    Palace Leas, a long-term experiment at Cockle Park Farm, Northumberland, UK was established in winter 1896-1897 since when the 13 plots have received regular and virtually unchanged mineral fertiliser and farm yard manure inputs. Fertilisers have had a profound impact on soil pH with the organically fertilised plots showing a significantly higher pH than those receiving mineral fertiliser where ammonium sulphate has led to soil acidification. Here, we investigate the impact of organic and mineral fertilisers on the actinobacterial community structure of these soils using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S rRNA gene analysis. To differentiate fertiliser effects from seasonal variation, soils were sampled three times over one growing season between May and September 2004 and January 2005. Community profiles obtained using T-RFLP were analysed using multivariate statistics to investigate the relationship between community structure, seasonality and fertiliser management. Soil pH was shown to be the most significant edaphic factor influencing actinobacterial communities. Canonical correspondence analysis, used to investigate the relationship between the 16S rRNA gene community profiles and the environmental parameters, showed that actinobacterial communities also responded to soil water content with major changes evident over the summer months between May and September. Quantitative PCR of the actinobacterial and fungal 16S and 18S rRNA genes, respectively suggested that fungal rRNA gene copy numbers were negatively correlated (P = 0.0131) with increasing actinobacterial signals. A similar relationship (P = 0.000365) was also evident when fatty acid methyl esters indicative of actinobacterial biomass (10-methyloctadecanoic acid) were compared with the amounts of fungal octadecadienoic acid (18:2omega9,12). These results show clearly that soil pH is a major driver of change in actinobacterial communities and that genera such as

  10. Actinobacterial community dynamics in long term managed grasslands.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sasha N; Waite, Ian S; Blackburn, Adrian; Husband, Rebecca; Rushton, Steven P; Manning, David C; O'Donnell, Anthony G

    2009-05-01

    Palace Leas, a long-term experiment at Cockle Park Farm, Northumberland, UK was established in winter 1896-1897 since when the 13 plots have received regular and virtually unchanged mineral fertiliser and farm yard manure inputs. Fertilisers have had a profound impact on soil pH with the organically fertilised plots showing a significantly higher pH than those receiving mineral fertiliser where ammonium sulphate has led to soil acidification. Here, we investigate the impact of organic and mineral fertilisers on the actinobacterial community structure of these soils using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S rRNA gene analysis. To differentiate fertiliser effects from seasonal variation, soils were sampled three times over one growing season between May and September 2004 and January 2005. Community profiles obtained using T-RFLP were analysed using multivariate statistics to investigate the relationship between community structure, seasonality and fertiliser management. Soil pH was shown to be the most significant edaphic factor influencing actinobacterial communities. Canonical correspondence analysis, used to investigate the relationship between the 16S rRNA gene community profiles and the environmental parameters, showed that actinobacterial communities also responded to soil water content with major changes evident over the summer months between May and September. Quantitative PCR of the actinobacterial and fungal 16S and 18S rRNA genes, respectively suggested that fungal rRNA gene copy numbers were negatively correlated (P = 0.0131) with increasing actinobacterial signals. A similar relationship (P = 0.000365) was also evident when fatty acid methyl esters indicative of actinobacterial biomass (10-methyloctadecanoic acid) were compared with the amounts of fungal octadecadienoic acid (18:2omega9,12). These results show clearly that soil pH is a major driver of change in actinobacterial communities and that genera such as

  11. Actinobacterial diversity in limestone deposit sites in Hundung, Manipur (India) and their antimicrobial activities

    PubMed Central

    Nimaichand, Salam; Devi, Asem Mipeshwaree; Tamreihao, K.; Ningthoujam, Debananda S.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Studies on actinobacterial diversity in limestone habitats are scarce. This paper reports profiling of actinobacteria isolated from Hundung limestone samples in Manipur, India using ARDRA as the molecular tool for preliminary classification. A total of 137 actinobacteria were clustered into 31 phylotypic groups based on the ARDRA pattern generated and representative of each group was subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Generic diversity of the limestone isolates consisted of Streptomyces (15 phylotypic groups), Micromonospora (4), Amycolatopsis (3), Arthrobacter (3), Kitasatospora (2), Janibacter (1), Nocardia (1), Pseudonocardia (1) and Rhodococcus (1). Considering the antimicrobial potential of these actinobacteria, 19 showed antimicrobial activities against at least one of the bacterial and candidal test pathogens, while 45 exhibit biocontrol activities against at least one of the rice fungal pathogens. Out of the 137 actinobacterial isolates, 118 were found to have at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, NRPS). The results indicate that 86% of the strains isolated from Hundung limestone deposit sites possessed biosynthetic gene clusters of which 40% exhibited antimicrobial activities. It can, therefore, be concluded that limestone habitat is a promising source for search of novel secondary metabolites. PMID:25999937

  12. C/N Ratio Drives Soil Actinobacterial Cellobiohydrolase Gene Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T.; Poonpatana, Pabhon; Farrell, Mark; Bissett, Andrew; Macdonald, Lynne M.; Toscas, Peter; Richardson, Alan E.; Thrall, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose accounts for approximately half of photosynthesis-fixed carbon; however, the ecology of its degradation in soil is still relatively poorly understood. The role of actinobacteria in cellulose degradation has not been extensively investigated despite their abundance in soil and known cellulose degradation capability. Here, the diversity and abundance of the actinobacterial glycoside hydrolase family 48 (cellobiohydrolase) gene in soils from three paired pasture-woodland sites were determined by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and clone libraries with gene-specific primers. For comparison, the diversity and abundance of general bacteria and fungi were also assessed. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of 80 clones revealed significant new diversity of actinobacterial GH48 genes, and analysis of translated protein sequences showed that these enzymes are likely to represent functional cellobiohydrolases. The soil C/N ratio was the primary environmental driver of GH48 community compositions across sites and land uses, demonstrating the importance of substrate quality in their ecology. Furthermore, mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry-predicted humic organic carbon was distinctly more important to GH48 diversity than to total bacterial and fungal diversity. This suggests a link between the actinobacterial GH48 community and soil organic carbon dynamics and highlights the potential importance of actinobacteria in the terrestrial carbon cycle. PMID:25710367

  13. C/N ratio drives soil actinobacterial cellobiohydrolase gene diversity.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Poonpatana, Pabhon; Farrell, Mark; Bissett, Andrew; Macdonald, Lynne M; Toscas, Peter; Richardson, Alan E; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose accounts for approximately half of photosynthesis-fixed carbon; however, the ecology of its degradation in soil is still relatively poorly understood. The role of actinobacteria in cellulose degradation has not been extensively investigated despite their abundance in soil and known cellulose degradation capability. Here, the diversity and abundance of the actinobacterial glycoside hydrolase family 48 (cellobiohydrolase) gene in soils from three paired pasture-woodland sites were determined by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and clone libraries with gene-specific primers. For comparison, the diversity and abundance of general bacteria and fungi were also assessed. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of 80 clones revealed significant new diversity of actinobacterial GH48 genes, and analysis of translated protein sequences showed that these enzymes are likely to represent functional cellobiohydrolases. The soil C/N ratio was the primary environmental driver of GH48 community compositions across sites and land uses, demonstrating the importance of substrate quality in their ecology. Furthermore, mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry-predicted humic organic carbon was distinctly more important to GH48 diversity than to total bacterial and fungal diversity. This suggests a link between the actinobacterial GH48 community and soil organic carbon dynamics and highlights the potential importance of actinobacteria in the terrestrial carbon cycle. PMID:25710367

  14. Actinobacterial melanins: current status and perspective for the future.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    Melanins are enigmatic pigments that are produced by a wide variety of microorganisms including several species of bacteria and fungi. Melanins are biological macromolecules with multiple important functions, yet their structures are not well understood. Melanins are frequently used in medicine, pharmacology, and cosmetics preparations. Melanins also have great application potential in agriculture industry. They have several biological functions including photoprotection, thermoregulation, action as free radical sinks, cation chelators, and antibiotics. Plants and insects incorporate melanins as cell wall and cuticle strengtheners, respectively. Actinobacteria are the most economically as well as biotechnologically valuable prokaryotes. However, the melanin properties are, in general, poorly understood. In this review an evaluation is made on the present state of research on actinobacterial melanins and its perspectives. The highlights include the production and biotechnological applications of melanins in agriculture, food, cosmetic and medicinal fields. With increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be greater demands in the future for melanins produced by actinobacteria from various sources.

  15. Actinobacterial Diversity in Volcanic Caves and Associated Geomicrobiological Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Cristina; Marshall Hathaway, Jennifer J.; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de L. N.; Miller, Ana Z.; Kooser, Ara; Northup, Diana E.; Jurado, Valme; Fernandez, Octavio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2015-01-01

    volcanic caves are still very limited. To rectify this deficiency, the results from our study help fill in the gaps in our knowledge of actinobacterial diversity and their potential roles in the volcanic cave ecosystems. PMID:26696966

  16. Actinobacterial Diversity in Volcanic Caves and Associated Geomicrobiological Interactions.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cristina; Marshall Hathaway, Jennifer J; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de L N; Miller, Ana Z; Kooser, Ara; Northup, Diana E; Jurado, Valme; Fernandez, Octavio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2015-01-01

    volcanic caves are still very limited. To rectify this deficiency, the results from our study help fill in the gaps in our knowledge of actinobacterial diversity and their potential roles in the volcanic cave ecosystems.

  17. Actinobacterial community dominated by a distinct clade in acidic soil of a waterlogged deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, Jan; Kyselkova, Martina; Omelka, Marek; Cermak, Ladislav; Novotna, Jitka; Grundmann, Genevieve L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Sagova-Mareckova, Marketa

    2011-11-01

    Members of the Actinobacteria are among the most important litter decomposers in soil. The site of a waterlogged deciduous forest with acidic soil was explored for actinobacteria because seasonality of litter inputs, temperature, and precipitation provided contrasting environmental conditions, particularly variation of organic matter quantity and quality. We hypothesized that these factors, which are known to influence decomposition, were also likely to affect actinobacterial community composition. The relationship between the actinobacterial community, soil moisture and organic matter content was assessed in two soil horizons in the summer and winter seasons using a 16S rRNA taxonomic microarray and cloning-sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Both approaches showed that the community differed significantly between horizons and seasons, paralleling the changes in soil moisture and organic matter content. The microarray analysis further indicated that the actinobacterial community of the upper horizon was characterized by high incidence of the genus Mycobacterium. In both horizons and seasons, the actinobacterial clone libraries were dominated (by 80%) by sequences of a separate clade sharing an ancestral node with Streptosporangineae. This relatedness is supported also by some common adaptations, for example, to soil acidity and periodic oxygen deprivation or dryness.

  18. Developmental biology of Streptomyces from the perspective of 100 actinobacterial genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Govind; Chater, Keith F

    2014-01-01

    To illuminate the evolution and mechanisms of actinobacterial complexity, we evaluate the distribution and origins of known Streptomyces developmental genes and the developmental significance of actinobacteria-specific genes. As an aid, we developed the Actinoblast database of reciprocal blastp best hits between the Streptomyces coelicolor genome and more than 100 other actinobacterial genomes (http://streptomyces.org.uk/actinoblast/). We suggest that the emergence of morphological complexity was underpinned by special features of early actinobacteria, such as polar growth and the coupled participation of regulatory Wbl proteins and the redox-protecting thiol mycothiol in transducing a transient nitric oxide signal generated during physiologically stressful growth transitions. It seems that some cell growth and division proteins of early actinobacteria have acquired greater importance for sporulation of complex actinobacteria than for mycelial growth, in which septa are infrequent and not associated with complete cell separation. The acquisition of extracellular proteins with structural roles, a highly regulated extracellular protease cascade, and additional regulatory genes allowed early actinobacterial stationary phase processes to be redeployed in the emergence of aerial hyphae from mycelial mats and in the formation of spore chains. These extracellular proteins may have contributed to speciation. Simpler members of morphologically diverse clades have lost some developmental genes. PMID:24164321

  19. Diversity and chemical defense role of culturable non-actinobacterial bacteria isolated from the South China Sea gorgonians.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiang; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Xu, Xinya; He, Fei; Qi, Shuhua

    2013-04-01

    The diversity of culturable non-actinobacterial (NA) bacteria associated with four species of South China Sea gorgonians was investigated using culture-dependent methods followed by analysis of the bacterial 16S rDNA sequence. A total of 76 bacterial isolates were recovered and identified, which belonged to 21 species of 7 genera, and Bacillus was the most diverse genus. Fifty-one percent of the 76 isolates displayed antibacterial activities, and most of them belonged to the Bacillus genus. From the culture broth of gorgonian-associated Bacillus methylotrophicus SCSGAB0092 isolated from gorgonian Melitodes squamata, 11 antimicrobial lipopeptides including seven surfactins and four iturins were obtained. These results imply that Bacillus strains associated with gorgonians play roles in coral defense mechanisms through producing antimicrobial substances. This study, for the first time, compares the diversity of culturable NA bacterial communities among four species of South China Sea gorgonians and investigates the secondary metabolites of gorgonian-associated B. methylotrophicus SCSGAB0092.

  20. Designing recombinant Pseudomonas strains to enhance biodesulfurization.

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, M E; Ferrández, A; De Lorenzo, V; García, J L; Díaz, E

    1997-01-01

    The dsz biodesulfurization cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 has been engineered under the control of heterologous broad-host-range regulatory signals to alleviate the mechanism of sulfur repression, and it was stably inserted into the chromosomes of different Pseudomonas strains. The recombinant bacteria were able to desulfurize dibenzothiophene more efficiently than the native host. Furthermore, these new biocatalysts combine relevant industrial and environmental traits, such as production of biosurfactants, with the enhanced biodesulfurization phenotype. PMID:9371464

  1. NASA LaRC Strain Gage Balance Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been designing strain-gage balances for more than fifty years. These balances have been utilized in Langley's wind tunnels, which span over a wide variety of aerodynamic test regimes, as well as other ground based test facilities and in space flight applications. As a result, the designs encompass a large array of sizes, loads, and environmental effects. Currently Langley has more than 300 balances available for its researchers. This paper will focus on the design concepts for internal sting mounted strain-gage balances. However, these techniques can be applied to all force measurement design applications. Strain-gage balance concepts that have been developed over the years including material selection, sting, model interfaces, measuring, sections, fabrication, strain-gaging and calibration will be discussed.

  2. Rat Strain Ontology: structured controlled vocabulary designed to facilitate access to strain data at RGD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Rat Genome Database (RGD) ( http://rgd.mcw.edu/) is the premier site for comprehensive data on the different strains of the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus). The strain data are collected from various publications, direct submissions from individual researchers, and rat providers worldwide. Rat strain, substrain designation and nomenclature follow the Guidelines for Nomenclature of Mouse and Rat Strains, instituted by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. While symbols and names aid in identifying strains correctly, the flat nature of this information prohibits easy search and retrieval, as well as other data mining functions. In order to improve these functionalities, particularly in ontology-based tools, the Rat Strain Ontology (RS) was developed. Results The Rat Strain Ontology (RS) reflects the breeding history, parental background, and genetic manipulation of rat strains. This controlled vocabulary organizes strains by type: inbred, outbred, chromosome altered, congenic, mutant and so on. In addition, under the chromosome altered category, strains are organized by chromosome, and further by type of manipulations, such as mutant or congenic. This allows users to easily retrieve strains of interest with modifications in specific genomic regions. The ontology was developed using the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontology (OBO) file format, and is organized on the Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) structure. Rat Strain Ontology IDs are included as part of the strain report (RS: ######). Conclusions As rat researchers are often unaware of the number of substrains or altered strains within a breeding line, this vocabulary now provides an easy way to retrieve all substrains and accompanying information. Its usefulness is particularly evident in tools such as the PhenoMiner at RGD, where users can now easily retrieve phenotype measurement data for related strains, strains with similar backgrounds or those with similar

  3. High Sensitivity MEMS Strain Sensor: Design and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ahmed A. S.; Moussa, Walied A.; Lou, Edmond

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we report on the new design of a miniaturized strain microsensor. The proposed sensor utilizes the piezoresistive properties of doped single crystal silicon. Employing the Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology, high sensor sensitivities and resolutions have been achieved. The current sensor design employs different levels of signal amplifications. These amplifications include geometric, material and electronic levels. The sensor and the electronic circuits can be integrated on a single chip, and packaged as a small functional unit. The sensor converts input strain to resistance change, which can be transformed to bridge imbalance voltage. An analog output that demonstrates high sensitivity (0.03mV/με), high absolute resolution (1με) and low power consumption (100μA) with a maximum range of ±4000με has been reported. These performance characteristics have been achieved with high signal stability over a wide temperature range (±50°C), which introduces the proposed MEMS strain sensor as a strong candidate for wireless strain sensing applications under harsh environmental conditions. Moreover, this sensor has been designed, verified and can be easily modified to measure other values such as force, torque…etc. In this work, the sensor design is achieved using Finite Element Method (FEM) with the application of the piezoresistivity theory. This design process and the microfabrication process flow to prototype the design have been presented.

  4. Stress-strain analysis and optimal design of aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakhovenko, I. A.

    The papers contained in this volume present results of theoretical and experimental research related to the stress-strain analysis and optimal design of aircraft structures. Topics discussed include a study of the origin of residual stresses and strains in the transparencies of supersonic aircraft, methodology for studying the fracture of aircraft structures in static tests, and the stability of a multispan panel under combined loading. The discussion also covers optimization of the stiffness and mass characteristics of lifting surface structures modeled by an elastic beam, a study of the strength of a closed system of wings, and a method for the optimal design of a large-aspect-ratio wing.

  5. Transcriptomics-based strain optimization tool for designing secondary metabolite overproducing strains of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsuk; Yi, Jeong Sang; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Lee, Dong-Yup; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-03-01

    In silico model-driven analysis using genome-scale model of metabolism (GEM) has been recognized as a promising method for microbial strain improvement. However, most of the current GEM-based strain design algorithms based on flux balance analysis (FBA) heavily rely on the steady-state and optimality assumptions without considering any regulatory information. Thus, their practical usage is quite limited, especially in its application to secondary metabolites overproduction. In this study, we developed a transcriptomics-based strain optimization tool (tSOT) in order to overcome such limitations by integrating transcriptomic data into GEM. Initially, we evaluated existing algorithms for integrating transcriptomic data into GEM using Streptomyces coelicolor dataset, and identified iMAT algorithm as the only and the best algorithm for characterizing the secondary metabolism of S. coelicolor. Subsequently, we developed tSOT platform where iMAT is adopted to predict the reaction states, and successfully demonstrated its applicability to secondary metabolites overproduction by designing actinorhodin (ACT), a polyketide antibiotic, overproducing strain of S. coelicolor. Mutants overexpressing tSOT targets such as ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase and NADP-dependent malic enzyme showed 2 and 1.8-fold increase in ACT production, thereby validating the tSOT prediction. It is expected that tSOT can be used for solving other metabolic engineering problems which could not be addressed by current strain design algorithms, especially for the secondary metabolite overproductions.

  6. Modeling and observer design for recombinant Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Nadri, M; Trezzani, I; Hammouri, H; Dhurjati, P; Longin, R; Lieto, J

    2006-03-01

    A mathematical model for recombinant bacteria which includes foreign protein production is developed. The experimental system consists of an Escherichia Coli strain and plasmid pIT34 containing genes for bioluminescence and production of a protein, beta-galactosidase. This recombinant strain is constructed to facilitate on-line estimation and control in a complex bioprocess. Several batch experiments are designed and performed to validate the developed model. The design of a model structure, the identification of the model parameters and the estimation problem are three parts of a joint design problem. A nonlinear observer is designed and an experimental evaluation is performed on a batch fermentation process to estimate the substrate consumption. PMID:16411071

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of marine actinobacterial extract and its mediated titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the degradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Priyaragini, S; Veena, S; Swetha, D; Karthik, L; Kumar, G; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the present study was to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from marine actinobacteria and to develop an eco-friendly azo-dye degradation method. A total of five actinobacterial isolates were isolated from Chennai marine sediments, Tamilnadu, India and analyzed for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs using titanium hydroxide. Among these, the isolate PSV 3 showed positive results for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs, which was confirmed by UV analysis. Further characterization of the synthesized TiO2 NPs was done using XRD, AFM and FT-IR analysis. Actinobacterial crude extract and synthesized TiO2 NPs was found efficient in degrading azo dye such as Acid Red 79 (AR-79) and Acid Red 80 (AR-80). Degradation percentage was found to be 81% for AR-79, 83% for AR-80 using actinobacterial crude extract and 84% for AR-79, 85% for AR-80 using TiO2 NPs. Immobilized actinobacterial cells showed 88% for AR-79 and 81% for AR-80, dye degrading capacity. Degraded components were characterized by FT-IR and GC-MS analysis. The phytotoxicity test with 500 μg/mL of untreated dye showed remarkable phenotypic as well as cellular damage to Tagetes erecta plant. Comparatively no such damage was observed on plants by degraded dye components. In biotoxicity assay, treated dyes showed less toxic effect as compared to the untreated dyes.

  8. Design and development of a MEMS capacitive bending strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aebersold, J.; Walsh, K.; Crain, M.; Martin, M.; Voor, M.; Lin, J.-T.; Jackson, D.; Hnat, W.; Naber, J.

    2006-05-01

    The design, modeling, fabrication and testing of a MEMS-based capacitive bending strain sensor utilizing a comb drive is presented. This sensor is designed to be integrated with a telemetry system that will monitor changes in bending strain to assist with the diagnosis of spinal fusion. ABAQUS/CAE finite-element analysis (FEA) software was used to predict sensor actuation, capacitance output and avoid material failure. Highly doped boron silicon wafers with a low resistivity were fabricated into an interdigitated finger array employing deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to create 150 µm sidewalls with 25 µm spacing between the adjacent fingers. The sensor was adhered to a steel beam and subjected to four-point bending to mechanically change the spacing between the interdigitated fingers as a function of strain. As expected, the capacitance output increased as an inverse function of the spacing between the interdigitated fingers. At the unstrained state, the capacitive output was 7.56 pF and increased inversely to 17.04 pF at 1571 µɛ of bending strain. The FEA and analytical models were comparable with the largest differential of 0.65 pF or 6.33% occurring at 1000 µɛ. Advantages of this design are a dice-free process without the use of expensive silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers.

  9. Protein design in systems metabolic engineering for industrial strain development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-05-01

    Accelerating the process of industrial bacterial host strain development, aimed at increasing productivity, generating new bio-products or utilizing alternative feedstocks, requires the integration of complementary approaches to manipulate cellular metabolism and regulatory networks. Systems metabolic engineering extends the concept of classical metabolic engineering to the systems level by incorporating the techniques used in systems biology and synthetic biology, and offers a framework for the development of the next generation of industrial strains. As one of the most useful tools of systems metabolic engineering, protein design allows us to design and optimize cellular metabolism at a molecular level. Here, we review the current strategies of protein design for engineering cellular synthetic pathways, metabolic control systems and signaling pathways, and highlight the challenges of this subfield within the context of systems metabolic engineering.

  10. Dynamic strain scanning optimization: an efficient strain design strategy for balanced yield, titer, and productivity. DySScO strategy for strain design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, constraint-based metabolic models have emerged as an important tool for metabolic engineering; a number of computational algorithms have been developed for identifying metabolic engineering strategies where the production of the desired chemical is coupled with the growth of the organism. A caveat of the existing algorithms is that they do not take the bioprocess into consideration; as a result, while the product yield can be optimized using these algorithms, the product titer and productivity cannot be optimized. In order to address this issue, we developed the Dynamic Strain Scanning Optimization (DySScO) strategy, which integrates the Dynamic Flux Balance Analysis (dFBA) method with existing strain algorithms. Results In order to demonstrate the effective of the DySScO strategy, we applied this strategy to the design of Escherichia coli strains targeted for succinate and 1,4-butanediol production respectively. We evaluated consequences of the tradeoff between growth yield and product yield with respect to titer and productivity, and showed that the DySScO strategy is capable of producing strains that balance the product yield, titer, and productivity. In addition, we evaluated the economic viability of the designed strain, and showed that the economic performance of a strain can be strongly affected by the price difference between the product and the feedstock. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the DySScO strategy is a useful computational tool for designing microbial strains with balanced yield, titer, and productivity, and has potential applications in evaluating the economic performance of the design strains. PMID:23388063

  11. Genome sequence of "Candidatus Aquiluna" sp. strain IMCC13023, a marine member of the Actinobacteria isolated from an arctic fjord.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ilnam; Lee, Kiyoung; Yang, Seung-Jo; Choi, Ahyoung; Kang, Dongmin; Lee, Yoo Kyoung; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2012-07-01

    We report the genome sequence of actinobacterial strain IMCC13023, isolated from arctic fjord seawater. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the strain is related to "Candidatus Aquiluna rubra." The genome information suggests that strain IMCC13023 is a photoheterotroph carrying actinorhodopsin, with the smallest genome ever reported for a free-living member of the Actinobacteria. PMID:22689238

  12. Design-oriented aeroservoelastic optimization of strain-actuated aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Timothy W.

    An integrated design-oriented aeroservoelastic optimization capability for strain-actuated aircraft is presented. This capability is called SMART and it encompasses a suite of computer applications created for conceptual and preliminary design of aircraft augmented with "smart" actuation technologies. The SMART suite of applications includes: (1) a dedicated pre-processor for vehicle geometry, material, actuator, mechanism, and sensor layout; (2) a dedicated finite element automesher for conventional and strain-actuated flight vehicles; (3) integration of structural dynamics with a state of the art commercial unsteady aerodynamics code (ZAERO) via automated pre- and post-processors; (4) a database architecture for analyzing multiple designs and flight conditions; and (5) automated open- and closed-loop aeroservoelastic (ASE) model preparation. The analysis techniques used as the basis for SMART are suitable (within the range of application of linear theory) for modeling real flight vehicles with real large-scale structural, aerodynamic, and control systems. These techniques include: (6) dedicated linear finite element infrastructure for modeling conventional and strain-actuated (temperature and voltage induced) flight structures; (7) dedicated static and dynamic finite element solvers; (8) state space stability analysis for coupled aeroservoelastic systems; (9) computational tools for LQR controller design; and (10) analysis tools for the calculation of random response of linear systems to random inputs. SMART can compute: (11) static aeroelastic deformations and stresses in trimmed maneuvering elastic airplanes; (12) open-loop aeroelastic poles; (13) closed-loop (control by LQR) aeroservoelastic poles; (14) gust response (random gusts) of the open-loop and closed-loop aeroservoelastic system, and, also, when aerodynamic loads are not present; and (15) deformation and stresses of passive or actively-controlled structures subject to dynamic and static loads. To

  13. Structural, functional, and genetic analyses of the actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA.

    PubMed

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Humphrey, Laurence J; Flack, Joshua E; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Gene expression is highly regulated at the step of transcription initiation, and transcription activators play a critical role in this process. RbpA, an actinobacterial transcription activator that is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), binds selectively to group 1 and certain group 2 σ-factors. To delineate the molecular mechanism of RbpA, we show that the Mtb RbpA σ-interacting domain (SID) and basic linker are sufficient for transcription activation. We also present the crystal structure of the Mtb RbpA-SID in complex with domain 2 of the housekeeping σ-factor, σ(A). The structure explains the basis of σ-selectivity by RbpA, showing that RbpA interacts with conserved regions of σ(A) as well as the nonconserved region (NCR), which is present only in housekeeping σ-factors. Thus, the structure is the first, to our knowledge, to show a protein interacting with the NCR of a σ-factor. We confirm the basis of selectivity and the observed interactions using mutagenesis and functional studies. In addition, the structure allows for a model of the RbpA-SID in the context of a transcription initiation complex. Unexpectedly, the structural modeling suggests that RbpA contacts the promoter DNA, and we present in vivo and in vitro studies supporting this finding. Our combined data lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of RbpA function as a transcription activator.

  14. Actinobacterial diversity across a marine transgression in the deep subsurface off Shimokita Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, B. K.; Bailey, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment horizons represent a significant - but not permanent - barrier to microbial transport. Cells commonly attach to mineral surfaces in unconsolidated sediments. However, by taxis, growth, or passive migration under advecting fluids, some portion of the microbial community may transgress sedimentary boundaries. Few studies have attempted to constrain such transport of community signatures in the marine subsurface and its potential impact on biogeography. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 off the Shimokita Peninsula recovered sediments over a greater than 1km interval representing a gradual decrease of terrestrial influence, from tidal to continental shelf depositional settings. This sequence represents a key opportunity to link subsurface microbial communities to lithological variability and investigate the permanence of community signatures characteristic of distinct depositional regimes. The phylogenetic connectivity between marine and terrestrially-influenced deposits may demonstrate to what degree sediments offer a substantial barrier to cell transport in the subsurface. Previous work has demonstrated that the Actinobacterial phylum is broadly distributed in marine sediments (Maldonado et al., 2005), present and active in the deep subsurface (Orsi et al., 2013), and that marine and terrestrial lineages may potentially be distinguished by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (e.g. Prieto-Davó et al., 2013). We report on Actinobacteria-specific 16S rRNA gene diversity recovered between 1370 and 2642 mbsf with high-throughput sequencing using the Illumina MiSeq platform, as well as selective assembly and analysis of environmental clone libraries.

  15. Structural, functional, and genetic analyses of the actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Elizabeth A.; Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Humphrey, Laurence J.; Flack, Joshua E.; Olinares, Paul Dominic B.; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Paget, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is highly regulated at the step of transcription initiation, and transcription activators play a critical role in this process. RbpA, an actinobacterial transcription activator that is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), binds selectively to group 1 and certain group 2 σ-factors. To delineate the molecular mechanism of RbpA, we show that the Mtb RbpA σ-interacting domain (SID) and basic linker are sufficient for transcription activation. We also present the crystal structure of the Mtb RbpA-SID in complex with domain 2 of the housekeeping σ-factor, σA. The structure explains the basis of σ-selectivity by RbpA, showing that RbpA interacts with conserved regions of σA as well as the nonconserved region (NCR), which is present only in housekeeping σ-factors. Thus, the structure is the first, to our knowledge, to show a protein interacting with the NCR of a σ-factor. We confirm the basis of selectivity and the observed interactions using mutagenesis and functional studies. In addition, the structure allows for a model of the RbpA-SID in the context of a transcription initiation complex. Unexpectedly, the structural modeling suggests that RbpA contacts the promoter DNA, and we present in vivo and in vitro studies supporting this finding. Our combined data lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of RbpA function as a transcription activator. PMID:26040003

  16. (Actino)Bacterial "intelligence": using comparative genomics to unravel the information processing capacities of microbes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Daniela; Mascher, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial genomes encode numerous and often sophisticated signaling devices to perceive changes in their environment and mount appropriate adaptive responses. With their help, microbes are able to orchestrate specific decision-making processes that alter the cellular behavior, but also integrate and communicate information. Moreover and beyond, some signal transducing systems also enable bacteria to remember and learn from previous stimuli to anticipate environmental changes. As recently suggested, all of these aspects indicate that bacteria do, in fact, exhibit cognition remarkably reminiscent of what we refer to as intelligent behavior, at least when referred to higher eukaryotes. In this essay, comprehensive data derived from comparative genomics analyses of microbial signal transduction systems are used to probe the concept of cognition in bacterial cells. Using a recent comprehensive analysis of over 100 actinobacterial genomes as a test case, we illustrate the different layers of the capacities of bacteria that result in cognitive and behavioral complexity as well as some form of 'bacterial intelligence'. We try to raise awareness to approach bacteria as cognitive organisms and believe that this view would enrich and open a new path in the experimental studies of bacterial signal transducing systems.

  17. Characterisation of the first actinobacterial group isolated from a Mexican extremophile environment.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Erika T; Badillo, Ricardo Flores; Maldonado, Luis A

    2013-07-01

    The "Cave of Crystals" (aka 'Naica') in Chihuahua Mexico is a natural unique subterranean ecosystem which mainly consists of crystals made of calcium sulfate. The main system of caves are found at a depth of 300 meters (m) below sea level with crystals that range in size from a few centimeters to 15 m. The crystals date from nearly 400,000 years old and are thought to be formed when the cave was fully covered by water. At present time, this place shows a nearly constant temperature of 55 °C over the year and a humidity of 100 % which makes this place incomparable and unbearable to animal and/or human life. In the present study, two actinobacterial groups were isolated from within this system of caves and subjected to a systematic study to establish their phylogenetic relationship to microorganisms belonging to this vast group of Gram positive bacteria. Phenotypic properties, chemotaxonomic and 16S rRNA gene sequencing show that the microorganisms are members of the family Pseudonocardiaceae and are most closely related to the genus Prauserella. The present study is the first to report the isolation and presence of Actinobacteria or any other microbial form of life in this exceptional place. Moreover, this unexpected biodiversity can also provide an insight of the antibiotic resistome present in the isolates reported in this study.

  18. Strain concentration factor as a function of strain in a design application

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents results for a detailed inelastic finite element analysis for a part of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Control Rod Drive Mechanism. The analysis results indicate that plastic strain concentration factors may in fact be less than corresponding elastic strain concentration factors for nominal strains as low as .2%. This is particularly insightful in that it is presently common practice to approximate inelastic strain concentration factors as the square of the elastic concentration factors. The paper also examines Neuber's relation for predicting strain concentration factors and looks at the variation in the strain concentration factor through the cross-section of the component analyzed.

  19. Computational methods in metabolic engineering for strain design.

    PubMed

    Long, Matthew R; Ong, Wai Kit; Reed, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic engineering uses genetic approaches to control microbial metabolism to produce desired compounds. Computational tools can identify new biological routes to chemicals and the changes needed in host metabolism to improve chemical production. Recent computational efforts have focused on exploring what compounds can be made biologically using native, heterologous, and/or enzymes with broad specificity. Additionally, computational methods have been developed to suggest different types of genetic modifications (e.g. gene deletion/addition or up/down regulation), as well as suggest strategies meeting different criteria (e.g. high yield, high productivity, or substrate co-utilization). Strategies to improve the runtime performances have also been developed, which allow for more complex metabolic engineering strategies to be identified. Future incorporation of kinetic considerations will further improve strain design algorithms.

  20. Computational methods in metabolic engineering for strain design.

    PubMed

    Long, Matthew R; Ong, Wai Kit; Reed, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic engineering uses genetic approaches to control microbial metabolism to produce desired compounds. Computational tools can identify new biological routes to chemicals and the changes needed in host metabolism to improve chemical production. Recent computational efforts have focused on exploring what compounds can be made biologically using native, heterologous, and/or enzymes with broad specificity. Additionally, computational methods have been developed to suggest different types of genetic modifications (e.g. gene deletion/addition or up/down regulation), as well as suggest strategies meeting different criteria (e.g. high yield, high productivity, or substrate co-utilization). Strategies to improve the runtime performances have also been developed, which allow for more complex metabolic engineering strategies to be identified. Future incorporation of kinetic considerations will further improve strain design algorithms. PMID:25576846

  1. Candidatus Frankia Datiscae Dg1, the Actinobacterial Microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, Expresses the Canonical nod Genes nodABC in Symbiosis with Its Host Plant.

    PubMed

    Persson, Tomas; Battenberg, Kai; Demina, Irina V; Vigil-Stenman, Theoden; Vanden Heuvel, Brian; Pujic, Petar; Facciotti, Marc T; Wilbanks, Elizabeth G; O'Brien, Anna; Fournier, Pascale; Cruz Hernandez, Maria Antonia; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; Médigue, Claudine; Normand, Philippe; Pawlowski, Katharina; Berry, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Frankia strains are nitrogen-fixing soil actinobacteria that can form root symbioses with actinorhizal plants. Phylogenetically, symbiotic frankiae can be divided into three clusters, and this division also corresponds to host specificity groups. The strains of cluster II which form symbioses with actinorhizal Rosales and Cucurbitales, thus displaying a broad host range, show suprisingly low genetic diversity and to date can not be cultured. The genome of the first representative of this cluster, Candidatus Frankia datiscae Dg1 (Dg1), a microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, was recently sequenced. A phylogenetic analysis of 50 different housekeeping genes of Dg1 and three published Frankia genomes showed that cluster II is basal among the symbiotic Frankia clusters. Detailed analysis showed that nodules of D. glomerata, independent of the origin of the inoculum, contain several closely related cluster II Frankia operational taxonomic units. Actinorhizal plants and legumes both belong to the nitrogen-fixing plant clade, and bacterial signaling in both groups involves the common symbiotic pathway also used by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. However, so far, no molecules resembling rhizobial Nod factors could be isolated from Frankia cultures. Alone among Frankia genomes available to date, the genome of Dg1 contains the canonical nod genes nodA, nodB and nodC known from rhizobia, and these genes are arranged in two operons which are expressed in D. glomerata nodules. Furthermore, Frankia Dg1 nodC was able to partially complement a Rhizobium leguminosarum A34 nodC::Tn5 mutant. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Dg1 Nod proteins are positioned at the root of both α- and β-rhizobial NodABC proteins. NodA-like acyl transferases were found across the phylum Actinobacteria, but among Proteobacteria only in nodulators. Taken together, our evidence indicates an Actinobacterial origin of rhizobial Nod factors. PMID:26020781

  2. Candidatus Frankia Datiscae Dg1, the Actinobacterial Microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, Expresses the Canonical nod Genes nodABC in Symbiosis with Its Host Plant

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Tomas; Battenberg, Kai; Demina, Irina V.; Vigil-Stenman, Theoden; Vanden Heuvel, Brian; Pujic, Petar; Facciotti, Marc T.; Wilbanks, Elizabeth G.; O'Brien, Anna; Fournier, Pascale; Cruz Hernandez, Maria Antonia; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; Médigue, Claudine; Normand, Philippe; Pawlowski, Katharina; Berry, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Frankia strains are nitrogen-fixing soil actinobacteria that can form root symbioses with actinorhizal plants. Phylogenetically, symbiotic frankiae can be divided into three clusters, and this division also corresponds to host specificity groups. The strains of cluster II which form symbioses with actinorhizal Rosales and Cucurbitales, thus displaying a broad host range, show suprisingly low genetic diversity and to date can not be cultured. The genome of the first representative of this cluster, Candidatus Frankia datiscae Dg1 (Dg1), a microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, was recently sequenced. A phylogenetic analysis of 50 different housekeeping genes of Dg1 and three published Frankia genomes showed that cluster II is basal among the symbiotic Frankia clusters. Detailed analysis showed that nodules of D. glomerata, independent of the origin of the inoculum, contain several closely related cluster II Frankia operational taxonomic units. Actinorhizal plants and legumes both belong to the nitrogen-fixing plant clade, and bacterial signaling in both groups involves the common symbiotic pathway also used by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. However, so far, no molecules resembling rhizobial Nod factors could be isolated from Frankia cultures. Alone among Frankia genomes available to date, the genome of Dg1 contains the canonical nod genes nodA, nodB and nodC known from rhizobia, and these genes are arranged in two operons which are expressed in D. glomerata nodules. Furthermore, Frankia Dg1 nodC was able to partially complement a Rhizobium leguminosarum A34 nodC::Tn5 mutant. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Dg1 Nod proteins are positioned at the root of both α- and β-rhizobial NodABC proteins. NodA-like acyl transferases were found across the phylum Actinobacteria, but among Proteobacteria only in nodulators. Taken together, our evidence indicates an Actinobacterial origin of rhizobial Nod factors. PMID:26020781

  3. Biomedical potential of actinobacterially synthesized selenium nanoparticles with special reference to anti-biofilm, anti-oxidant, wound healing, cytotoxic and anti-viral activities.

    PubMed

    Ramya, Suseenthar; Shanmugasundaram, Thangavel; Balagurunathan, Ramasamy

    2015-10-01

    Currently, there is an ever-increasing need to develop environmentally benign processes in place of synthetic protocols. As a result, researchers in the field of nanoparticle synthesis are focusing their attention on microbes from rare biological ecosystems. One potential actinobacterium, Streptomyces minutiscleroticus M10A62 isolated from a magnesite mine had the ability to synthesize selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs), extracellularly. Actinobacteria mediated SeNP synthesis were characterized by UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis. The UV-spectral analysis of SeNPs indicated the maximum absorption at 510nm, FT-IR spectral analysis confirms the presence of capping protein, peptide, amine and amide groups. The selenium signals confirm the presence of SeNPs. All the diffraction peaks in the XRD pattern and HR-TEM confirm the size of SeNPs in the range of 10-250nm. Further, the anti-biofilm and antioxidant activity of the SeNPs increased proportionally with rise in concentration, and the test strains reduced to 75% at concentration of 3.2μg. Selenium showed significant anti-proliferative activity against HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. The wound healing activity of SeNPs reveals that 5% selenium oinment heals the excision wound of Wistar rats up to 85% within 18 days compared to the standard ointment. The biosynthesized SeNPs exhibited good antiviral activity against Dengue virus. The present study concludes that extremophilic actinobacterial strain was a novel source for SeNPs with versatile biomedical applications and larger studies are needed to quantify these observed effects of SeNPs.

  4. Candidatus Frankia Datiscae Dg1, the Actinobacterial Microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, Expresses the Canonical nod Genes nodABC in Symbiosis with Its Host Plant.

    PubMed

    Persson, Tomas; Battenberg, Kai; Demina, Irina V; Vigil-Stenman, Theoden; Vanden Heuvel, Brian; Pujic, Petar; Facciotti, Marc T; Wilbanks, Elizabeth G; O'Brien, Anna; Fournier, Pascale; Cruz Hernandez, Maria Antonia; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; Médigue, Claudine; Normand, Philippe; Pawlowski, Katharina; Berry, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Frankia strains are nitrogen-fixing soil actinobacteria that can form root symbioses with actinorhizal plants. Phylogenetically, symbiotic frankiae can be divided into three clusters, and this division also corresponds to host specificity groups. The strains of cluster II which form symbioses with actinorhizal Rosales and Cucurbitales, thus displaying a broad host range, show suprisingly low genetic diversity and to date can not be cultured. The genome of the first representative of this cluster, Candidatus Frankia datiscae Dg1 (Dg1), a microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, was recently sequenced. A phylogenetic analysis of 50 different housekeeping genes of Dg1 and three published Frankia genomes showed that cluster II is basal among the symbiotic Frankia clusters. Detailed analysis showed that nodules of D. glomerata, independent of the origin of the inoculum, contain several closely related cluster II Frankia operational taxonomic units. Actinorhizal plants and legumes both belong to the nitrogen-fixing plant clade, and bacterial signaling in both groups involves the common symbiotic pathway also used by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. However, so far, no molecules resembling rhizobial Nod factors could be isolated from Frankia cultures. Alone among Frankia genomes available to date, the genome of Dg1 contains the canonical nod genes nodA, nodB and nodC known from rhizobia, and these genes are arranged in two operons which are expressed in D. glomerata nodules. Furthermore, Frankia Dg1 nodC was able to partially complement a Rhizobium leguminosarum A34 nodC::Tn5 mutant. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Dg1 Nod proteins are positioned at the root of both α- and β-rhizobial NodABC proteins. NodA-like acyl transferases were found across the phylum Actinobacteria, but among Proteobacteria only in nodulators. Taken together, our evidence indicates an Actinobacterial origin of rhizobial Nod factors.

  5. Actinobacterial Nitrate Reducers and Proteobacterial Denitrifiers Are Abundant in N2O-Metabolizing Palsa Peat

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Palsa peats are characterized by elevated, circular frost heaves (peat soil on top of a permanently frozen ice lens) and are strong to moderate sources or even temporary sinks for the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Palsa peats are predicted to react sensitively to global warming. The acidic palsa peat Skalluvaara (approximate pH 4.4) is located in the discontinuous permafrost zone in northwestern Finnish Lapland. In situ N2O fluxes were spatially variable, ranging from 0.01 to −0.02 μmol of N2O m−2 h−1. Fertilization with nitrate stimulated in situ N2O emissions and N2O production in anoxic microcosms without apparent delay. N2O was subsequently consumed in microcosms. Maximal reaction velocities (vmax) of nitrate-dependent denitrification approximated 3 and 1 nmol of N2O per h per gram (dry weight [gDW]) in soil from 0 to 20 cm and below 20 cm of depth, respectively. vmax values of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 2- to 5-fold higher than the vmax nitrate-dependent denitrification, and vmax of N2O consumption was 1- to 6-fold higher than that of nitrite-dependent denitrification, highlighting a high N2O consumption potential. Up to 12 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of narG, nirK and nirS, and nosZ were retrieved. Detected OTUs suggested the presence of diverse uncultured soil denitrifiers and dissimilatory nitrate reducers, hitherto undetected species, as well as Actino-, Alpha-, and Betaproteobacteria. Copy numbers of nirS always outnumbered those of nirK by 2 orders of magnitude. Copy numbers of nirS tended to be higher, while copy numbers of narG and nosZ tended to be lower in 0- to 20-cm soil than in soil below 20 cm. The collective data suggest that (i) the source and sink functions of palsa peat soils for N2O are associated with denitrification, (ii) actinobacterial nitrate reducers and nirS-type and nosZ-harboring proteobacterial denitrifiers are important players, and (iii) acidic soils like palsa peats represent

  6. Actinobacterial nitrate reducers and proteobacterial denitrifiers are abundant in N2O-metabolizing palsa peat.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A

    2012-08-01

    Palsa peats are characterized by elevated, circular frost heaves (peat soil on top of a permanently frozen ice lens) and are strong to moderate sources or even temporary sinks for the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O). Palsa peats are predicted to react sensitively to global warming. The acidic palsa peat Skalluvaara (approximate pH 4.4) is located in the discontinuous permafrost zone in northwestern Finnish Lapland. In situ N(2)O fluxes were spatially variable, ranging from 0.01 to -0.02 μmol of N(2)O m(-2) h(-1). Fertilization with nitrate stimulated in situ N(2)O emissions and N(2)O production in anoxic microcosms without apparent delay. N(2)O was subsequently consumed in microcosms. Maximal reaction velocities (v(max)) of nitrate-dependent denitrification approximated 3 and 1 nmol of N(2)O per h per gram (dry weight [g(DW)]) in soil from 0 to 20 cm and below 20 cm of depth, respectively. v(max) values of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 2- to 5-fold higher than the v(max) nitrate-dependent denitrification, and v(max) of N(2)O consumption was 1- to 6-fold higher than that of nitrite-dependent denitrification, highlighting a high N(2)O consumption potential. Up to 12 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of narG, nirK and nirS, and nosZ were retrieved. Detected OTUs suggested the presence of diverse uncultured soil denitrifiers and dissimilatory nitrate reducers, hitherto undetected species, as well as Actino-, Alpha-, and Betaproteobacteria. Copy numbers of nirS always outnumbered those of nirK by 2 orders of magnitude. Copy numbers of nirS tended to be higher, while copy numbers of narG and nosZ tended to be lower in 0- to 20-cm soil than in soil below 20 cm. The collective data suggest that (i) the source and sink functions of palsa peat soils for N(2)O are associated with denitrification, (ii) actinobacterial nitrate reducers and nirS-type and nosZ-harboring proteobacterial denitrifiers are important players, and (iii) acidic soils like

  7. Actinobacterial nitrate reducers and proteobacterial denitrifiers are abundant in N2O-metabolizing palsa peat.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A

    2012-08-01

    Palsa peats are characterized by elevated, circular frost heaves (peat soil on top of a permanently frozen ice lens) and are strong to moderate sources or even temporary sinks for the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O). Palsa peats are predicted to react sensitively to global warming. The acidic palsa peat Skalluvaara (approximate pH 4.4) is located in the discontinuous permafrost zone in northwestern Finnish Lapland. In situ N(2)O fluxes were spatially variable, ranging from 0.01 to -0.02 μmol of N(2)O m(-2) h(-1). Fertilization with nitrate stimulated in situ N(2)O emissions and N(2)O production in anoxic microcosms without apparent delay. N(2)O was subsequently consumed in microcosms. Maximal reaction velocities (v(max)) of nitrate-dependent denitrification approximated 3 and 1 nmol of N(2)O per h per gram (dry weight [g(DW)]) in soil from 0 to 20 cm and below 20 cm of depth, respectively. v(max) values of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 2- to 5-fold higher than the v(max) nitrate-dependent denitrification, and v(max) of N(2)O consumption was 1- to 6-fold higher than that of nitrite-dependent denitrification, highlighting a high N(2)O consumption potential. Up to 12 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of narG, nirK and nirS, and nosZ were retrieved. Detected OTUs suggested the presence of diverse uncultured soil denitrifiers and dissimilatory nitrate reducers, hitherto undetected species, as well as Actino-, Alpha-, and Betaproteobacteria. Copy numbers of nirS always outnumbered those of nirK by 2 orders of magnitude. Copy numbers of nirS tended to be higher, while copy numbers of narG and nosZ tended to be lower in 0- to 20-cm soil than in soil below 20 cm. The collective data suggest that (i) the source and sink functions of palsa peat soils for N(2)O are associated with denitrification, (ii) actinobacterial nitrate reducers and nirS-type and nosZ-harboring proteobacterial denitrifiers are important players, and (iii) acidic soils like

  8. RobOKoD: microbial strain design for (over)production of target compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Natalie J.; Millard, Pierre; Swainston, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable production of target compounds such as biofuels and high-value chemicals for pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and chemical industries is becoming an increasing priority given their current dependency upon diminishing petrochemical resources. Designing these strains is difficult, with current methods focusing primarily on knocking-out genes, dismissing other vital steps of strain design including the overexpression and dampening of genes. The design predictions from current methods also do not translate well-into successful strains in the laboratory. Here, we introduce RobOKoD (Robust, Overexpression, Knockout and Dampening), a method for predicting strain designs for overproduction of targets. The method uses flux variability analysis to profile each reaction within the system under differing production percentages of target-compound and biomass. Using these profiles, reactions are identified as potential knockout, overexpression, or dampening targets. The identified reactions are ranked according to their suitability, providing flexibility in strain design for users. The software was tested by designing a butanol-producing Escherichia coli strain, and was compared against the popular OptKnock and RobustKnock methods. RobOKoD shows favorable design predictions, when predictions from these methods are compared to a successful butanol-producing experimentally-validated strain. Overall RobOKoD provides users with rankings of predicted beneficial genetic interventions with which to support optimized strain design. PMID:25853130

  9. Design and application of FBG strain experimental apparatus in high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhongcheng; Liu, Yueming; Gao, Xiaoliang

    2014-09-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology has many applications, and it's widely used in detection of temperature, strain and etc. Now the application of FBG sensor is limited to the temperature below 200°C owing to the so called High Temperature Erasing Phenomenon. Strain detection over 200°C is still an engineering challenge since high temperature has a bad influence on the sensor, testing equipment and test data, etc, thus effective measurement apparatus are needed to ensure the accuracy of the measurement over 200°C, but there are no suitable FBG strain experimental apparatus in high temperature to date. In this paper a high temperature FBG strain experimental apparatus has been designed to detect the strain in high temperature. In order to verify working condition of the high temperature FBG strain, an application of FBG strain sensing experiment was given in this paper. The high temperature FBG strain sensor was installed in the apparatus, the internal temperature of experimental apparatus was controlled from -20 to 300°C accurately, and strain loading was given by the counterweight, then the data was recorded through electrical resistance strain measurement and optical sensing interrogator. Experimental data result shows that the high temperature FBG strain experimental apparatus can work properly over 200°C. The design of the high temperature FBG strain experimental apparatus are demonstrated suitable for high temperature strain gauges and FBG strain sensors , etc, which can work under the temperature of -20 ~ 300°C, the strain of -1500 ~ +1500μepsilon and the wavelength resolution of 1pm.

  10. Phase-Change Memory Materials by Design: A Strain Engineering Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xilin; Kalikka, Janne; Ji, Xinglong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Simpson, Robert E

    2016-04-20

    Van der Waals heterostructure superlattices of Sb2 Te1 and GeTe are strain-engineered to promote switchable atomic disordering, which is confined to the GeTe layer. Careful control of the strain in the structures presents a new degree of freedom to design the properties of functional superlattice structures for data storage and photonics applications.

  11. Materials design and processings for industrial high-strain-rate superplastic forming

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, H.; Higashi, K.

    2000-07-01

    The optimum materials design in microstructural control could be developed for the high-strain-rate superplastic materials in the industrial scale. In the present work, it is reported that the high-performance-engine pistons with near-net-shape can be fabricated by the superplastic forging technology in the high-strain-rate superplastic PM Al-Si based alloy, which is produced by using this optimum materials design.

  12. Impact of elevated atmospheric O3 on the actinobacterial community structure and function in the rhizosphere of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Haesler, Felix; Hagn, Alexandra; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria belonging to the phylum of Actinobacteria are known as antagonists against phytpathogenic microbes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of ozone on the actinobacterial community of the rhizosphere of four years old European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) trees during different time points of the vegetation period. Effects of ozone on the total community structure of Actinobacteria were studied based on the analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. In addition effects of the ozone treatment on the diversity of potential biocontrol active Actionobacteria being able to produce antibiotics were characterized by using the type II polyketide synthases (PKS) genes as marker. Season as well as ozone treatments had a significant effect on parts of the actinobacterial rhizosphere community of European beech. However on the basis of the performed analysis, the diversity of Actinobacteria possessing type II PKS genes is neither affected by seasonal changes nor by the ozone treatments, indicating no influence of the investigated treatments on the biocontrol active part of the actinobacterial community. PMID:24575080

  13. Strain response of stretchable micro-electrodes: Controlling sensitivity with serpentine designs and encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gutruf, Philipp; Walia, Sumeet; Nur Ali, Md; Sriram, Sharath E-mail: madhu.bhaskaran@gmail.com; Bhaskaran, Madhu E-mail: madhu.bhaskaran@gmail.com

    2014-01-13

    The functionality of flexible electronics relies on stable performance of thin film micro-electrodes. This letter investigates the behavior of gold thin films on polyimide, a prevalent combination in flexible devices. The dynamic behavior of gold micro-electrodes has been studied by subjecting them to stress while monitoring their resistance in situ. The shape of the electrodes was systematically varied to examine resistive strain sensitivity, while an additional encapsulation was applied to characterize multilayer behavior. The realized designs show remarkable tolerance to repetitive strain, demonstrating that curvature and encapsulation are excellent approaches for minimizing resistive strain sensitivity to enable durable flexible electronics.

  14. Design and Testing of the Strain Transducer for Measuring Deformations of Pipelines Operating in the Mining-deformable Ground Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawedzki, Waclaw; Tarnowski, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    Design and laboratory test results of the strain transducer intended for monitoring and assessing stress states of pipelines sited in mining areas are presented in this paper. This transducer allows measuring strains of pipelines subjected to external forces - being the mining operations effect. Pipeline strains can have a direct influence on a tightness loss and penetration of the transported fluid into the environment. The original strain gauge transducer was proposed for performing measurements of strains. It allows measuring circumferential strains and determining the value and direction of the main longitudinal strain. This strain is determined on the basis of measuring component longitudinal strains originating from axial forces and the resultant bending moment. The main purpose of investigations was the experimental verification of the possibility of applying the strain transducer for measuring strains of polyethylene pipelines. The obtained results of the transducer subjected to influences of tensile and compression forces are presented and tests of relaxation properties of polyethylene are performed.

  15. Morphological, Physiological, and Taxonomic Characterization of Actinobacterial Isolates Living as Endophytes of Cacao Pods and Cacao Seeds.

    PubMed

    Tchinda, Romaric Armel Mouafo; Boudjeko, Thaddée; Simao-Beaunoir, Anne-Marie; Lerat, Sylvain; Tsala, Éric; Monga, Ernest; Beaulieu, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Vascular plants are commonly colonized by endophytic actinobacteria. However, very little is known about the relationship between these microorganisms and cacao fruits. In order to determine the physiological and taxonomic relationships between the members of this community, actinobacteria were isolated from cacao fruits and seeds. Among the 49 isolates recovered, 11 morphologically distinct isolates were selected for further characterization. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed the partition of the selected isolates into three phylogenetic clades. Most of the selected endophytic isolates belonged to the Streptomyces violaceusniger clade. Physiological characterization was carried out and a similarity index was used to cluster the isolates. However, clustering based on physiological properties did not match phylogenetic lineages. Isolates were also characterized for traits commonly associated with plant growth-promoting bacteria, including antibiosis and auxin biosynthesis. All isolates exhibited resistance to geldanamycin, whereas only two isolates were shown to produce this antibiotic. Endophytes were inoculated on radish seedlings and most isolates were found to possess plant growth-promoting abilities. These endophytic actinobacteria inhibited the growth of various plant pathogenic fungi and/or bacteria. The present study showed that S. violaceusniger clade members represent a significant part of the actinobacterial community living as endophytes in cacao fruits and seeds. While several members of this clade are known to be geldanamycin producers and efficient biocontrol agents of plant diseases, we herein established the endophytic lifestyle of some of these microorganisms, demonstrating their potential as plant health agents. PMID:26947442

  16. Structure of an Actinobacterial-Type [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Reveals Insight into O2-Tolerant H2 Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Caspar; Bommer, Martin; Hennig, Sandra E; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger; Lenz, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    A novel group of bacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenases is responsible for high-affinity H2 uptake from the troposphere, and is therefore thought to play an important role in the global H2 cycle. Here we present the first crystal structure at 2.85-Å resolution of such an actinobacterial-type hydrogenase (AH), which was isolated from the dihydrogen oxidizing bacterium, Ralstonia eutropha. The enzyme has a dimeric structure carrying two active [NiFe] sites that are interconnected by six [4Fe4S] clusters over a range of approximately 90 Å. Unlike most other [NiFe]-hydrogenases, the [4Fe4S] cluster proximal to the [NiFe] site is coordinated by three cysteines and one aspartate. Mutagenesis experiments revealed that this aspartate residue is related to the apparent O2 insensitivity of the AH. Our data provide first structural insight into specialized hydrogenases that are supposed to consume atmospheric H2 under challenging conditions, i.e. at high O2 concentration and wide temperature and pH ranges.

  17. Morphological, Physiological, and Taxonomic Characterization of Actinobacterial Isolates Living as Endophytes of Cacao Pods and Cacao Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Tchinda, Romaric Armel Mouafo; Boudjeko, Thaddée; Simao-Beaunoir, Anne-Marie; Lerat, Sylvain; Tsala, Éric; Monga, Ernest; Beaulieu, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Vascular plants are commonly colonized by endophytic actinobacteria. However, very little is known about the relationship between these microorganisms and cacao fruits. In order to determine the physiological and taxonomic relationships between the members of this community, actinobacteria were isolated from cacao fruits and seeds. Among the 49 isolates recovered, 11 morphologically distinct isolates were selected for further characterization. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed the partition of the selected isolates into three phylogenetic clades. Most of the selected endophytic isolates belonged to the Streptomyces violaceusniger clade. Physiological characterization was carried out and a similarity index was used to cluster the isolates. However, clustering based on physiological properties did not match phylogenetic lineages. Isolates were also characterized for traits commonly associated with plant growth-promoting bacteria, including antibiosis and auxin biosynthesis. All isolates exhibited resistance to geldanamycin, whereas only two isolates were shown to produce this antibiotic. Endophytes were inoculated on radish seedlings and most isolates were found to possess plant growth-promoting abilities. These endophytic actinobacteria inhibited the growth of various plant pathogenic fungi and/or bacteria. The present study showed that S. violaceusniger clade members represent a significant part of the actinobacterial community living as endophytes in cacao fruits and seeds. While several members of this clade are known to be geldanamycin producers and efficient biocontrol agents of plant diseases, we herein established the endophytic lifestyle of some of these microorganisms, demonstrating their potential as plant health agents. PMID:26947442

  18. Effect of nickel titanium file design on the root surface strain and apical microcracks.

    PubMed

    Jamleh, Ahmed; Adorno, Carlos G; Ebihara, Arata; Suda, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of nickel titanium file design on the root surface strain generated and apical microcracks caused during canal shaping. Thirty-three mandibular incisors were distributed into LightSpeed X, FlexMaster and a control group. A strain gauge was fixed apically on the proximal root surface to determine the maximum strain during canal shaping. Except for the control group, all root canals were enlarged to size 50. Images were taken after removing the apical 1 and 2 mm of the root end. Mean maximum strain values and presence of microcracks were statistically compared using the t-test and chi-square test, respectively. During canal shaping, the strain increased cumulatively with mean maximum strains of 808.2 ± 228.8 and 525.1 ± 168.9 microstrain in LightSpeed X and FlexMaster, respectively (P = 0.004). Both systems caused comparable microcracks. Although LightSpeed X produced higher maximum strain, no difference in microcrack development was found between both systems.

  19. Design, Evaluation and Experimental Effort Toward Development of a High Strain Composite Wing for Navy Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Joseph; Libeskind, Mark

    1990-01-01

    This design development effort addressed significant technical issues concerning the use and benefits of high strain composite wing structures (Epsilon(sub ult) = 6000 micro-in/in) for future Navy aircraft. These issues were concerned primarily with the structural integrity and durability of the innovative design concepts and manufacturing techniques which permitted a 50 percent increase in design ultimate strain level (while maintaining the same fiber/resin system) as well as damage tolerance and survivability requirements. An extensive test effort consisting of a progressive series of coupon and major element tests was an integral part of this development effort, and culminated in the design, fabrication and test of a major full-scale wing box component. The successful completion of the tests demonstrated the structural integrity, durability and benefits of the design. Low energy impact testing followed by fatigue cycling verified the damage tolerance concepts incorporated within the structure. Finally, live fire ballistic testing confirmed the survivability of the design. The potential benefits of combining newer/emerging composite materials and new or previously developed high strain wing design to maximize structural efficiency and reduce fabrication costs was the subject of subsequent preliminary design and experimental evaluation effort.

  20. Human papilloma virus strain detection utilising custom-designed oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Duncan; Platt, Mark; Javad, Farzad; Day, Philip J R

    2011-01-01

    Within the past 15 years, the utilisation of microarray technology for the detection of specific pathogen strains has increased rapidly. Presently, it is possible to simply purchase a pre-manufactured "off the shelf " oligonucleotide microarray bearing a wide variety of known signature DNA sequences previously identified in the organism being studied. Consequently, a hybridisation analysis may be used to pinpoint which strain/s is present in any given clinical sample. However, there exists a problem if the study necessitates the identification of novel sequences which are not represented in commercially available microarray chips. Ideally, such investigations require an in situ oligonucleotide microarray platform with the capacity to synthesise microarrays bearing probe sequences designed solely by the researcher. This chapter will focus on the employment of the Combimatrix® B3 CustomArray™ for the synthesis of reusable, bespoke microarrays for the purpose of discerning multiple Human Papilloma Virus strains. PMID:20938834

  1. Complete genome sequence of Stackebrandtia nassauensis type strain (LLR-40K-21T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Chris; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Jando, Marlen; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Pitluck, Sam; Göker, Markus; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-12-30

    Stackebrandtia nassauensis Labeda and Kroppenstedt (2005) is the type species of the genus Stackebrandtia, and a member of the actinobacterial family Glycomycetaceae. Stackebrandtia currently contains two species, which are differentiated from Glycomyces spp. by cellular fatty acid and menaquinone composition. Strain LLR-40K-21T is Gram-positive, aerobic, and nonmotile, with a branched substrate mycelium and on some media an aerial mycelium. The strain was originally isolated from a soil sample collected from a road side in Nassau, Bahamas. We describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. Lastly, this is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial suborder Glycomycineae. The 6,841,557 bp long single replicon genome with its 6487 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Novel design of dual-core microstructured fiber with enhanced longitudinal strain sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Tenderenda, T.; Napierala, M.; Szymański, M.; Murawski, M.; Mergo, P.; Lesiak, P.; Marc, P.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Nasilowski, T.

    2014-05-01

    Constantly refined technology of manufacturing increasingly complex photonic crystal fibers (PCF) leads to new optical fiber sensor concepts. The ways of enhancing the influence of external factors (such as hydrostatic pressure, temperature, acceleration) on the fiber propagating conditions are commonly investigated in literature. On the other hand longitudinal strain analysis, due to the calculation difficulties caused by the three dimensional computation, are somehow neglected. In this paper we show results of such a 3D numerical simulation and report methods of tuning the fiber strain sensitivity by changing the fiber microstructure and core doping level. Furthermore our approach allows to control whether the modes' effective refractive index is increasing or decreasing with strain, with the possibility of achieving zero strain sensitivity with specific fiber geometries. The presented numerical analysis is compared with experimental results of the fabricated fibers characterization. Basing on the aforementioned methodology we propose a novel dual-core fiber design with significantly increased sensitivity to longitudinal strain for optical fiber sensor applications. Furthermore the reported fiber satisfies all conditions necessary for commercial applications like good mode matching with standard single-mode fiber, low confinement loss and ease of manufacturing with the stack-and-draw technique. Such fiber may serve as an integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer when highly coherent source is used. With the optimization of single mode transmission to 850 nm, we propose a VCSEL source to be used in order to achieve a low-cost, reliable and compact strain sensing transducer.

  3. Strain-Based Design Methodology of Large Diameter Grade X80 Linepipe

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Mark D.

    2014-04-01

    Continuous growth in energy demand is driving oil and natural gas production to areas that are often located far from major markets where the terrain is prone to earthquakes, landslides, and other types of ground motion. Transmission pipelines that cross this type of terrain can experience large longitudinal strains and plastic circumferential elongation as the pipeline experiences alignment changes resulting from differential ground movement. Such displacements can potentially impact pipeline safety by adversely affecting structural capacity and leak tight integrity of the linepipe steel. Planning for new long-distance transmission pipelines usually involves consideration of higher strength linepipe steels because their use allows pipeline operators to reduce the overall cost of pipeline construction and increase pipeline throughput by increasing the operating pressure. The design trend for new pipelines in areas prone to ground movement has evolved over the last 10 years from a stress-based design approach to a strain-based design (SBD) approach to further realize the cost benefits from using higher strength linepipe steels. This report presents an overview of SBD for pipelines subjected to large longitudinal strain and high internal pressure with emphasis on the tensile strain capacity of high-strength microalloyed linepipe steel. The technical basis for this report involved engineering analysis and examination of the mechanical behavior of Grade X80 linepipe steel in both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Testing was conducted to assess effects on material processing including as-rolled, expanded, and heat treatment processing intended to simulate coating application. Elastic-plastic and low-cycle fatigue analyses were also performed with varying internal pressures. Proposed SBD models discussed in this report are based on classical plasticity theory and account for material anisotropy, triaxial strain, and microstructural damage effects

  4. Testing the association between psychosocial job strain and adverse birth outcomes - design and methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of studies have examined the effects of prenatal exposure to stress on birth outcomes but few have specifically focused on psychosocial job strain. In the present protocol, we aim to examine if work characterised by high demands and low control, during pregnancy, is associated with the risk of giving birth to a child born preterm or small for gestational age. Methods and design We will use the Danish National Birth Cohort where 100.000 children are included at baseline. In the present study 49,340 pregnancies will be included. Multinomial logistic regression will be applied to estimate odds ratios for the outcomes: preterm; full term but small for gestational age; full term but large for gestational age, as a function of job-strain (high strain, active and passive versus low strain). In the analysis we control for maternal age, Body Mass Index, parity, exercise, smoking, alcohol use, coffee consumption, type of work (manual versus non-manual), maternal serious disease and parents' heights as well as gestational age at interview. Discussion The prospective nature of the design and the high number of participants strengthen the study. The large statistical power allows for interpretable results regardless of whether or not the hypotheses are confirmed. This is, however, not a controlled study since all kinds of 'natural' interventions takes place throughout pregnancy (e.g. work absence, medical treatment and job-redesign). The analysis will be performed from a public health perspective. From this perspective, we are not primarily interested in the effect of job strain per se but if there is residual effect of job strain after naturally occurring preventive measures have been taken. PMID:21510894

  5. Migration and strains induced by different designs of force-closed stems for THA☆

    PubMed Central

    Griza, Sandro; Gomes, Luiz Sérgio Marcelino; Cervieri, André; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Subtle differences in stem design can result in different mechanical responses of the total hip arthroplasty. Tests measuring migration of the stem relative to the femur, as well as the strains in the cement mantle and on the femur can detect different mechanical behavior between stems. Methods In this article, conical, double and triple tapered stems were implanted in composite femurs and subjected to static and cyclic loads. Stems differed mainly on taper angle, calcar radius and proximal stiffness. Stem migration and strains on the femur and in the cement mantle were achieved. Results Significant differences (p < 0.05) were noted in the permanent rotation between double and triple tapers, in the strains on the proximal medial femur between triple and both conical and double tapers, and in the strains on the lateral proximal femur between double tapers and both conical and triple tapers. Conclusion The proposed mechanical tests were able to detect significant differences in the behavior of these resembling stems. Stem proximal stiffness and the calcar radius of the stem influence its rotational stability and the strain transmission to the femur. PMID:27218081

  6. Design, modeling, fabrication and testing of a MEMS capacitive bending strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aebersold, J.; Walsh, K.; Crain, M.; Voor, M.; Martin, M.; Hnat, W.; Lin, J.; Jackson, D.; Naber, J.

    2006-04-01

    Presented herein are the design, modelling, fabrication and testing of a MEMSbased capacitive bending strain sensor utilizing a comb drive. This sensor is designed to be integrated with a telemetry system that will monitor changes in bending strain to assist orthopaedic surgeons with the diagnosis of spinal fusion. ABAQUS/CAE version 6.5 finite element analysis (FEA) modelling software was used to predict sensor actuation, capacitance output and the avoidance of material failure. Highly doped boron silicon wafers with a low resistivity were fabricated into an interdigitated finger array employing deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to create 150 µm sidewalls with 25 µm spacing between the adjacent fingers. For testing, the sensor was adhered to a steel beam, which was subjected to four-point bending. This mechanically changed the spacing between the interdigitated fingers as a function of strain. As expected, the capacitance output increased as an inverse function of the spacing between the interdigitated fingers, beginning with an initial capacitance of 7.56 pF at the unstrained state and increasing inversely to 17.04 pF at 1571 µɛ of bending strain. The FEA and analytical models were comparable with experimental data. The largest differential of 0.65 pF or 6.33% occurred at 1000 µɛ.

  7. Simplified sensor design for temperature-strain discrimination using fiber Bragg gratings embedded in laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Marques, A. T.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.; Santos, J. L.; Frazão, O.

    2013-05-01

    Several easy-to-manufacture designs based on a pair of Fiber Bragg Gratings structure embedded in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) have been explored. These smart composites can be used for strain and temperature discrimination. A Finite Elements Analysis and Matlab software were used to study the mechanical responses and its optical behaviors. The results exhibited different sensitivity and using a matrix method it is possible to compensate the thermal drift in a real application keeping a simple manufacture process.

  8. Genome Sequence of the Acidophilic Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing Isolate Acidithrix ferrooxidans Strain Py-F3, the Proposed Type Strain of the Novel Actinobacterial Genus Acidithrix.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Sebastian; Poehlein, Anja; Johnson, D Barrie; Daniel, Rolf; Schlömann, Michael; Mühling, Martin

    2015-04-30

    Extremely acidophilic iron-oxidizing Gram-positive bacteria comprise species within the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Here, we report the 4.02-Mb draft genome of Acidithrix ferrooxidans Py-F3, which was isolated from a stream draining an abandoned copper mine and proposed as the type species of a new genus of Actinobacteria.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Acidophilic Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing Isolate Acidithrix ferrooxidans Strain Py-F3, the Proposed Type Strain of the Novel Actinobacterial Genus Acidithrix

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Sebastian; Poehlein, Anja; Johnson, D. Barrie; Daniel, Rolf; Schlömann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Extremely acidophilic iron-oxidizing Gram-positive bacteria comprise species within the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Here, we report the 4.02-Mb draft genome of Acidithrix ferrooxidans Py-F3, which was isolated from a stream draining an abandoned copper mine and proposed as the type species of a new genus of Actinobacteria. PMID:25931603

  10. Complete genome sequence of Brachybacterium faecium type strain (Schefferle 6-10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla; Pukall, Rudiger; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Johnathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Brachybacterium faecium Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermabacteraceae, a rather isolated family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. B. faecium is known for its rod-coccus growth cycle and the ability to degrade uric acid. It grows aerobically or weakly anaerobically. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from poultry deep litter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the actinobacterial family Dermabacteraceae, and the 3,614,992 bp long single replicon genome with its 3129 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Metabolic design of a platform Escherichia coli strain producing various chorismate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Noda, Shuhei; Shirai, Tomokazu; Oyama, Sachiko; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic metabolic pathway suitable for the production of chorismate derivatives was designed in Escherichia coli. An L-phenylalanine-overproducing E. coli strain was engineered to enhance the availability of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), which is a key precursor in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds in microbes. Two major reactions converting PEP to pyruvate were inactivated. Using this modified E.coli as a base strain, we tested our system by carrying out the production of salicylate, a high-demand aromatic chemical. The titer of salicylate reached 11.5 g/L in batch culture after 48 h cultivation in a 2-liter jar fermentor, and the yield from glucose as the sole carbon source exceeded 40% (mol/mol). In this test case, we found that pyruvate was synthesized primarily via salicylate formation and the reaction converting oxaloacetate to pyruvate. In order to demonstrate the generality of our designed strain, we employed this platform for the production of each of 7 different chorismate derivatives. Each of these industrially important chemicals was successfully produced to levels of 1-3g/L in test tube-scale culture.

  12. Design and test of a MEMS strain-sensing device for monitoring artificial knee implants.

    PubMed

    Hasenkamp, W; Thevenaz, N; Villard, J; Bertsch, A; Arami, A; Aminian, K; Terrier, A; Renaud, P

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a polyimide-based MEMS strain-sensing device. Finite element analysis was used to investigate an artificial knee implant and assist on device design and to optimize sensing characteristics. The sensing element of the device was fabricated using polyimide micromachining with embedded thin-metallic wires and placed into a knee prosthesis. The device was evaluated experimentally in a mechanical knee simulator using static and dynamic axial load conditions similar to those encountered in vivo. Results indicates the sensor is capable of measuring the strain associated to the total axial forces in the range of approximately 4 times body weight with a good sensitivity and accuracy for events happening within 1 s time window.

  13. Improved Kolsky-bar design for mechanical characterization of materials at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Connelly, Kevin; Korellis, John; Lu, Wei-Yang; Antoun, Bonnie R.

    2009-11-01

    A Kolsky apparatus with numerous modifications has been designed for mechanical characterization of materials at high strain rates. These modifications include employing a highly precise optical table, pillow blocks with Frelon®-coated linear bearings as bar supports and a laser system for better precision bar alignment, etc. In addition, the striker bars were coated with Teflon® to minimize the friction with the gun barrel after removal of the conventional plastic sabots. This new design significantly simplifies the alignment process, improving the final alignment and calibration in the bar system; both are critical for validity and accuracy of the resulting data. An example of a dynamic experiment on a 6061 aluminum specimen by using this newly designed Kolsky bar is also presented.

  14. Design of strain tension sensor of steel wire rope used in the coal mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Jin, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    According to the dynamic tension testing requirements of the multi-rope winder rope, this paper designs the sensor used to measure the tension of steel wire rope directly. The sensor uses the strain shear measuring principle, and has many features with small size, big measuring range, easy to install, don't change the structure of connected devices and so on. Application of the finite element analysis software makes the structure of the sensor optimized, and then enhance the static and dynamic performance of the sensor.

  15. Design and characterization of LC strain sensors with novel inductor for sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sung-Yueh; Hsu, Wensyang

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a LC strain sensor with a novel encapsulated serpentine helical inductor. The helical coil of the inductor is formed by serpentine wire to reduce the radial rigidity. Also the inductor is encapsulated by material with high Poisson’s ratio. When an axial deformation is applied to this encapsulated inductor, the cross-sectional area of the helical coil will have more evident change due to lower radial rigidity and encapsulation. Therefore, the variation of inductance or LC resonant frequency can be enhanced to provide better sensitivity of the LC strain sensor. By using PDMS as encapsulated material, it is shown that the sensitivity of the conventional helical inductor with or without encapsulation are both about 73.0 kHz/0.01ε, which means that encapsulation on the conventional helical inductor does not help to improve the sensitivity due to high radial rigidity of the conventional helical coil. It is also found that the encapsulated serpentine helical inductor has better sensitivity (121.9 kHz/0.01ε) than the serpentine helical inductor without encapsulation (62.7 kHz/0.01ε), which verifies the sensitivity enhancing capability of the proposed encapsulated serpentine helical inductor design. The error between simulation and measurement results on sensitivity of LC strain sensor with the encapsulated serpentine inductor is about 5.57%, which verifies the accuracy of the simulation model. The wireless sensing capability is also successfully demonstrated.

  16. A strain-absorbing design for tissue-machine interfaces using a tunable adhesive gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungwon; Inoue, Yusuke; Kim, Dongmin; Reuveny, Amir; Kuribara, Kazunori; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Reeder, Jonathan; Sekino, Masaki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Someya, Takao

    2014-12-01

    To measure electrophysiological signals from the human body, it is essential to establish stable, gentle and nonallergic contacts between the targeted biological tissue and the electrical probes. However, it is difficult to form a stable interface between the two for long periods, especially when the surface of the biological tissue is wet and/or the tissue exhibits motion. Here we resolve this difficulty by designing and fabricating smart, stress-absorbing electronic devices that can adhere to wet and complex tissue surfaces and allow for reliable, long-term measurements of vital signals. We demonstrate a multielectrode array, which can be attached to the surface of a rat heart, resulting in good conformal contact for more than 3 h. Furthermore, we demonstrate arrays of highly sensitive, stretchable strain sensors using a similar design. Ultra-flexible electronics with enhanced adhesion to tissue could enable future applications in chronic in vivo monitoring of biological signals.

  17. The impact of zinc and lead concentrations and seasonal variation on bacterial and actinobacterial community structure in a metallophytic grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Bamborough, L; Cummings, S P

    2009-01-01

    The diversity and structure of bacterial and actinobacteral diversity and communities were determined in a metallophytic grassland soil from an upland site in northern England. The community profiles were subjected to multivariate analyses using correspondence and cluster analyses. The total bacterial community diversities and structures were not significantly affected by Pb and Zn concentration in the soil. However, the community structure did show changes between winter and summer samples. Raup and Crick analysis indicated that deterministic selection lead to winter profiles exhibiting significant similarity. The actinobacterial community was also unaffected by Pb and Zn concentration. However, seasonal changes were apparent as diversity were significantly lower in winter compared to summer profiles. Moreover, the community structure showed evidence of changes of structure based on the seasonal samples with winter samples showing significant similarity to each other.

  18. Design of a Probe for Strain Sensitivity Studies of Critical Current Densities in SC Wires and Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Rusy, A.; Lombardo, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    The design of a variable-temperature probe used to perform strain sensitivity measurements on LTS wires and HTS wires and tapes is described. The measurements are intended to be performed at liquid helium temperatures (4.2 K). The wire or tape to be measured is wound and soldered on to a helical spring device, which is fixed at one end and subjected to a torque at the free end. The design goal is to be able to achieve {+-} 0.8 % strain in the wire and tape. The probe is designed to carry a current of 2000A.

  19. The activation strain model and molecular orbital theory: understanding and designing chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2014-07-21

    In this Tutorial Review, we make the point that a true understanding of trends in reactivity (as opposed to measuring or simply computing them) requires a causal reactivity model. To this end, we present and discuss the Activation Strain Model (ASM). The ASM establishes the desired causal relationship between reaction barriers, on one hand, and the properties of reactants and characteristics of reaction mechanisms, on the other hand. In the ASM, the potential energy surface ΔE(ζ) along the reaction coordinate ζ is decomposed into the strain ΔEstrain(ζ) of the reactants that become increasingly deformed as the reaction proceeds, plus the interaction ΔEint(ζ) between these deformed reactants, i.e., ΔE(ζ) = ΔEstrain(ζ) + ΔEint(ζ). The ASM can be used in conjunction with any quantum chemical program. An analysis of the method and its application to problems in organic and organometallic chemistry illustrate the power of the ASM as a unifying concept and a tool for rational design of reactants and catalysts.

  20. Enhanced production of thermostable laccases from a native strain of Pycnoporus sanguineus using central composite design*

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Cavazos, Leticia I.; Junghanns, Charles; Nair, Rakesh; Cárdenas-Chávez, Diana L.; Hernández-Luna, Carlos; Agathos, Spiros N.; Parra, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The production of thermostable laccases from a native strain of the white-rot fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus isolated in Mexico was enhanced by testing different media and a combination of inducers including copper sulfate (CuSO4). The best conditions obtained from screening experiments in shaken flasks using tomato juice, CuSO4, and soybean oil were integrated in an experimental design. Enhanced levels of tomato juice as the medium, CuSO4 and soybean oil as inducers (36.8% (v/v), 3 mmol/L, and 1% (v/v), respectively) were determined for 10 L stirred tank bioreactor runs. This combination resulted in laccase titer of 143 000 IU/L (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), pH 3.0), which represents the highest activity so far reported for P. sanguineus in a 10-L fermentor. Other interesting media resulting from the screening included glucose-bactopeptone which increased laccase activity up to 20 000 IU/L, whereas the inducers Acid Blue 62 and Reactive Blue 19 enhanced enzyme production in this medium 10 times. Based on a partial characterization, the laccases of this strain are especially promising in terms of thermostability (half-life of 6.1 h at 60 °C) and activity titers. PMID:24711355

  1. Improved vertical optical fiber borehole strainmeter design for measuring Earth strain.

    PubMed

    DeWolf, Scott; Wyatt, Frank K; Zumberge, Mark A; Hatfield, William

    2015-11-01

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. A new 250 m, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the design and deployment at the Piñon Flat Observatory are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 ϵ(2)/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio for local near surface material of 0.25 that is consistent with previous results.

  2. Improved vertical optical fiber borehole strainmeter design for measuring Earth strain.

    PubMed

    DeWolf, Scott; Wyatt, Frank K; Zumberge, Mark A; Hatfield, William

    2015-11-01

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. A new 250 m, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the design and deployment at the Piñon Flat Observatory are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 ϵ(2)/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio for local near surface material of 0.25 that is consistent with previous results. PMID:26628152

  3. Succinate Overproduction: A Case Study of Computational Strain Design Using a Comprehensive Escherichia coli Kinetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Khodayari, Ali; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational strain-design prediction accuracy has been the focus for many recent efforts through the selective integration of kinetic information into metabolic models. In general, kinetic model prediction quality is determined by the range and scope of genetic and/or environmental perturbations used during parameterization. In this effort, we apply the k-OptForce procedure on a kinetic model of E. coli core metabolism constructed using the Ensemble Modeling (EM) method and parameterized using multiple mutant strains data under aerobic respiration with glucose as the carbon source. Minimal interventions are identified that improve succinate yield under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to test the fidelity of model predictions under both genetic and environmental perturbations. Under aerobic condition, k-OptForce identifies interventions that match existing experimental strategies while pointing at a number of unexplored flux re-directions such as routing glyoxylate flux through the glycerate metabolism to improve succinate yield. Many of the identified interventions rely on the kinetic descriptions that would not be discoverable by a purely stoichiometric description. In contrast, under fermentative (anaerobic) condition, k-OptForce fails to identify key interventions including up-regulation of anaplerotic reactions and elimination of competitive fermentative products. This is due to the fact that the pathways activated under anaerobic condition were not properly parameterized as only aerobic flux data were used in the model construction. This study shed light on the importance of condition-specific model parameterization and provides insight on how to augment kinetic models so as to correctly respond to multiple environmental perturbations. PMID:25601910

  4. Succinate Overproduction: A Case Study of Computational Strain Design Using a Comprehensive Escherichia coli Kinetic Model.

    PubMed

    Khodayari, Ali; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D

    2014-01-01

    Computational strain-design prediction accuracy has been the focus for many recent efforts through the selective integration of kinetic information into metabolic models. In general, kinetic model prediction quality is determined by the range and scope of genetic and/or environmental perturbations used during parameterization. In this effort, we apply the k-OptForce procedure on a kinetic model of E. coli core metabolism constructed using the Ensemble Modeling (EM) method and parameterized using multiple mutant strains data under aerobic respiration with glucose as the carbon source. Minimal interventions are identified that improve succinate yield under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to test the fidelity of model predictions under both genetic and environmental perturbations. Under aerobic condition, k-OptForce identifies interventions that match existing experimental strategies while pointing at a number of unexplored flux re-directions such as routing glyoxylate flux through the glycerate metabolism to improve succinate yield. Many of the identified interventions rely on the kinetic descriptions that would not be discoverable by a purely stoichiometric description. In contrast, under fermentative (anaerobic) condition, k-OptForce fails to identify key interventions including up-regulation of anaplerotic reactions and elimination of competitive fermentative products. This is due to the fact that the pathways activated under anaerobic condition were not properly parameterized as only aerobic flux data were used in the model construction. This study shed light on the importance of condition-specific model parameterization and provides insight on how to augment kinetic models so as to correctly respond to multiple environmental perturbations. PMID:25601910

  5. Geomechanical Modeling to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, S. P.; Sobolik, S. R.; Matteo, E. N.; Dewers, T. A.; Taha, M. R.; Stormont, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. For the DOE-NETL project 'Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials,' we are especially interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Building on existing thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) finite element modeling of wellbore casings subject to significant tensile and shear loads, we advance a conceptual and numerical methodology to assess responses of annulus cement and casing. Bench-scale models complement bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. Field scale models use the stratigraphy from a pilot CO2 injection operation to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. We report on approaches used for adapting existing wellbore models and share preliminary results of field scale models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: 2013-6241A.

  6. Constraint-based strain design using continuous modifications (CosMos) of flux bounds finds new strategies for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Cameron; Reed, Jennifer L

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, a growing number of metabolic engineering strain design techniques have employed constraint-based modeling to determine metabolic and regulatory network changes which are needed to improve chemical production. These methods use systems-level analysis of metabolism to help guide experimental efforts by identifying deletions, additions, downregulations, and upregulations of metabolic genes that will increase biological production of a desired metabolic product. In this work, we propose a new strain design method with continuous modifications (CosMos) that provides strategies for deletions, downregulations, and upregulations of fluxes that will lead to the production of the desired products. The method is conceptually simple and easy to implement, and can provide additional strategies over current approaches. We found that the method was able to find strain design strategies that required fewer modifications and had larger predicted yields than strategies from previous methods in example and genome-scale networks. Using CosMos, we identified modification strategies for producing a variety of metabolic products, compared strategies derived from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic models, and examined how imperfect implementation may affect experimental outcomes. This study gives a powerful and flexible technique for strain engineering and examines some of the unexpected outcomes that may arise when strategies are implemented experimentally.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Sanguibacter keddieii type strain (ST-74T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-20

    Sanguibacter keddieii is the type species of the genus Sanguibacter, the only described genus within the family of Sanguibacteraceae. Phylogenetically, this family is located in the neighbourhood of the genus Oerskovia and the family Cellulomonadaceae within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. The strain described in this report was isolated from blood of apparently healthy cows. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Sanguibacteraceae, and the 4,253,413 bp long single replicon genome with its 3735 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. k-OptForce: Integrating Kinetics with Flux Balance Analysis for Strain Design

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Anupam; Zomorrodi, Ali R.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-01-01

    Computational strain design protocols aim at the system-wide identification of intervention strategies for the enhanced production of biochemicals in microorganisms. Existing approaches relying solely on stoichiometry and rudimentary constraint-based regulation overlook the effects of metabolite concentrations and substrate-level enzyme regulation while identifying metabolic interventions. In this paper, we introduce k-OptForce, which integrates the available kinetic descriptions of metabolic steps with stoichiometric models to sharpen the prediction of intervention strategies for improving the bio-production of a chemical of interest. It enables identification of a minimal set of interventions comprised of both enzymatic parameter changes (for reactions with available kinetics) and reaction flux changes (for reactions with only stoichiometric information). Application of k-OptForce to the overproduction of L-serine in E. coli and triacetic acid lactone (TAL) in S. cerevisiae revealed that the identified interventions tend to cause less dramatic rearrangements of the flux distribution so as not to violate concentration bounds. In some cases the incorporation of kinetic information leads to the need for additional interventions as kinetic expressions render stoichiometry-only derived interventions infeasible by violating concentration bounds, whereas in other cases the kinetic expressions impart flux changes that favor the overproduction of the target product thereby requiring fewer direct interventions. A sensitivity analysis on metabolite concentrations shows that the required number of interventions can be significantly affected by changing the imposed bounds on metabolite concentrations. Furthermore, k-OptForce was capable of finding non-intuitive interventions aiming at alleviating the substrate-level inhibition of key enzymes in order to enhance the flux towards the product of interest, which cannot be captured by stoichiometry-alone analysis. This study paves

  9. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    PubMed Central

    Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian J.; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304636

  12. Design and Fabrication of Single-Walled Carbon Nanonet Flexible Strain Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Huang, Shyh-Chour; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chao, Ru-Min; Vu, Trung Kien

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a novel flexible strain sensor for real-time strain sensing. The material for strain sensing is single-walled carbon nanonets, grown using the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method, that were encapsulated between two layers of Parylene-C, with a polyimide layer as the sensing surface. All of the micro-fabrication was compatible with the standard IC process. Experimental results indicated that the gauge factor of the proposed strain sensor was larger than 4.5, approximately 2.0 times greater than those of commercial gauges. The results also demonstrated that the gauge factor is small when the growth time of SWCNNs is lengthier, and the gauge factor is large when the line width of the serpentine pattern of SWCNNs is small. PMID:22737007

  13. Design and validation of high-precision wireless strain sensors for structural health monitoring of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hongki; Park, JongWoong; Spencer, B. F., Jr.; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2012-04-01

    Due to their cost-effectiveness and ease of installation, smart wireless sensors have received considerable recent attention for structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure. Though various wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN) have been successfully implemented for full-scale structural health monitoring (SHM) applications, monitoring of low-level ambient strain still remains a challenging problem for wireless smart sensors (WSS) due to A/D converter resolution, inherent circuit noise, and the need for automatic operation. In this paper, the design and validation of high-precision strain sensor board for Imote2 WSS platform and its application to SHM of a cable-stayed bridge are presented. By accurate and automated balancing the Wheatstone bridge, signal amplification of up to 2507-times can be obtained. Temperature compensation and shunt calibration are implemented. In addition to traditional foil-type strain gages, the sensor board has been designed to accommodate a friction-type magnet strain sensor, facilitating fast and easy deployment. The sensor board has been calibrated using lab-scale tests, and then deployed on a full-scale cable-stayed bridge to verify its performance.

  14. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: experimental design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed.

  15. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: experimental design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed. PMID:25430144

  16. A Higher Bandwidth Servo Design for Magnetic Disk Drives: A Head-positioning Control System with Strain Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    In magnetic disk drives, mechanical resonance modes prevent a higher bandwidth servo being used for head positioning control. To overcome this limitation and realize more precise head positioning, a strain feedback controller which is added to a conventional head-position feedback loop was developed. The controller of a strain-feedback control system was designed so that the gain and the phase delay of the sensitivity function of the strain-feedback control system were both reduced below the frequency of a primary mechanical resonance. The controller achieves gain suppression by about 10dB at a primary mechanical resonance and phase delay of about zero degrees. It was found that the head-position control system (i.e., the strain feedback plus the conventional head-position feedback loop) increases the servo bandwidth by 17% and improves the positioning accuracy by 18%. It was also confirmed that unlike conventional servo system, the new servo design does not suffer degradation of servo characteristics at high temperature.

  17. Design and optimisation of suspended strained germanium membranes for near-infrared lasing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Daniel; Aldeek, Waseem; Aldaghri, Osamah A.; Ikonic, Zoran; Querin, Oswaldo M.; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2016-05-01

    The development of a semiconductor laser compatible with silicon substrates and high-volume silicon integrated circuit manufacturing is a key requirement for monolithic silicon photonic transceivers. Tensile strained germanium is a promising material system which meets these criteria, and both optically pumped and electrically injected lasing have been reported[1,2]. It is well established that growth of thick (~1 micron) layers of germanium on silicon substrates by two-stage chemical vapour deposition followed by thermal annealing results in nearly-relaxed germanium with a residual biaxial tensile strain of typically 0.15-0.25% [3]. Several researchers have investigated methods of amplifying this built-in strain in order to increase the attainable optical gain. Increased uniaxial strain levels have been demonstrated in suspended linear bridge structures created by wet chemical underetching. However, uniaxial strain is less effective than biaxial strain in converting germanium from an indirect to a direct gap semiconductor and hence generating substantial optical gain. In this work, we have computationally investigated and optimised two-dimensional patterning and under-etching of germanium membranes in order to achieve biaxial strain amplification. Strain simulations were carried out using finite element methods and the shape of the suspended germanium structures was optimised to achieve the highest tensile strain whilst remaining below the empirically determined yield strength of the thin membranes. The net optical gain distribution across the membrane was calculated using 8 band k.p bandstructure to determine the full interband gain, the inter-valence-band absorption and the intervalley and intravalley phonon- and impurity-assisted free carrier absorption. Band-gap narrowing effects were included using empirical data. Biaxial strain values of ~1% can be achieved in the lasing region of the structure, which, although below the level required to convert germanium

  18. Complete genome sequence of Intrasporangium calvumtype strain (7 KIPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chertkov, Olga; Yasawong, Montri; Lucas, Susan; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Intrasporangium calvum Kalakoutskii et al. 1967 is the type species of the genus Intrasporangium, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Intrasporangiaceae. The species is a Gram-positive bacterium that forms a branching mycelium, which tends to break into irregular fragments. The mycelium of this strain may bear intercalary vesicles but does not contain spores. The strain described in this study is an airborne organism that was isolated from a school dining room in 1967. One particularly interesting feature of I. calvum is that the type of its menaquinone is different from all other representatives of the family Intrasporangiaceae. This is the first completed genome sequence from a member of the genus Intrasporangium and also the first sequence from the family Intrasporangiaceae. The 4,024,382 bp long genome with its 3,653 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Intrasporangium calvum type strain (7 KIPT)

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Chertkov, Olga; Yasawong, Montri; Lucas, Susan; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rüdiger; Sikorski, Johannes; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2010-01-01

    Intrasporangium calvum Kalakoutskii et al. 1967 is the type species of the genus Intrasporangium, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Intrasporangiaceae. The species is a Gram-positive bacterium that forms a branching mycelium, which tends to break into irregular fragments. The mycelium of this strain may bear intercalary vesicles but does not contain spores. The strain described in this study is an airborne organism that was isolated from a school dining room in 1967. One particularly interesting feature of I. calvum is that the type of its menaquinone is different from all other representatives of the family Intrasporangiaceae. This is the first completed genome sequence from a member of the genus Intrasporangium and also the first sequence from the family Intrasporangiaceae. The 4,024,382 bp long genome with its 3,653 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304734

  20. High-temperature materials testing with full-field strain measurement: experimental design and practice.

    PubMed

    Novak, Mark D; Zok, Frank W

    2011-11-01

    Experimental characterization of the thermomechanical response of ceramic composites at very high temperatures is plagued by challenges associated with imaging and strain measurement. The problems involve illumination, heat haze, and surface contrast. Techniques that address these challenges have been developed and implemented in a laser heating facility, enabling non-contact strain measurement via digital image correlation. The thermomechanical characterization of both a Ni-based superalloy and a C/SiC composite are used to demonstrate the efficacy of experimental practices in realizing such measurements at temperatures up to 1500 °C. PMID:22129007

  1. Computer Simulation of Stress-Strain State of Oil Gathering Pipeline Designed for Ugut Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, P. V.; Burkova, S. P.; Samigullin, V. D.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the stress and strain state modeling of infield pipeline in Ugut oil field. The finite element models of the stress field distribution in the pipeline wall are presented in this paper. The attention is paid to the pipeline reliability under stress conditions induced by the internal pressure and external compressive or tensile loads.

  2. General Strain Theory as a Basis for the Design of School Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this article applies general strain theory to identify possible points of intervention for reducing delinquency of students in two middle schools. Data were collected from 296 youths, and separate negative binomial regression analyses were used to identify predictors of violent, property, and status delinquency. Emotional…

  3. Design and Analysis of a Compact Precision Positioning Platform Integrating Strain Gauges and the Piezoactuator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei; Yang, Zhaojun; Fan, Zunqiang; Wan, Shunguang; Shi, Chengli; Ma, Zhichao

    2012-01-01

    Miniaturization precision positioning platforms are needed for in situ nanomechanical test applications. This paper proposes a compact precision positioning platform integrating strain gauges and the piezoactuator. Effects of geometric parameters of two parallel plates on Von Mises stress distribution as well as static and dynamic characteristics of the platform were studied by the finite element method. Results of the calibration experiment indicate that the strain gauge sensor has good linearity and its sensitivity is about 0.0468 mV/μm. A closed-loop control system was established to solve the problem of nonlinearity of the platform. Experimental results demonstrate that for the displacement control process, both the displacement increasing portion and the decreasing portion have good linearity, verifying that the control system is available. The developed platform has a compact structure but can realize displacement measurement with the embedded strain gauges, which is useful for the closed-loop control and structure miniaturization of piezo devices. It has potential applications in nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests, especially in the field of in situ nanomechanical testing which requires compact structures. PMID:23012566

  4. Design and implementation of an x-ray strain measurement capability using a rotating anode machine

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.A.; Rangaswamy, P.; Lujan, M. Jr.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Residual stresses close to the surface can improve the reliability and lifetime of parts for technological applications. X-ray diffraction plays a significant role in gaining an exact knowledge of the stresses at the surface and their depth distribution. An x-ray capability at Los Alamos is key to developing and maintaining industrial collaborations in strain effects. To achieve this goal, the authors implemented a residual strain measuring station on the rotating anode x-ray instrument at the Lujan Center. This capability has been used to investigate residual strains in heat treated automotive components, machining effects on titanium alloys, resistance welded steel joints, titanium matrix fiber reinforced composites, ceramic matrix composites, thin films, and ceramic coatings. The overall objective is to combine both x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements with numerical models (e.g., finite element calculations).

  5. Design and characterization of a single channel two-liquid capacitor and its application to hyperelastic strain sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanliangzi; Sun, Xiaoda; Hildreth, Owen J; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    Room temperature liquid-metal microfluidic devices are attractive systems for hyperelastic strain sensing. These liquid-phase electronics are intrinsically soft and retain their functionality even when stretched to several times their original length. Currently two types of liquid metal-based strain sensors exist for in-plane measurements: single-microchannel resistive and two-microchannel capacitive devices. With a winding serpentine channel geometry, these sensors typically have a footprint of about a square centimeter. This large footprint of an individual device limits the number of sensors that can be embedded into, for example, electronic fabric or skin. In this work we introduce an alternative capacitor design consisting of two liquid metal electrodes separated by a liquid dielectric material within a single straight channel. Using a liquid insulator instead of a solid elastomer enables us to tailor the system's capacitance by selecting high or low dielectric constant liquids. We quantify the effects of the electrode geometry including the diameter, spacing, and meniscus shape as well as the dielectric constant of the insulating liquid on the overall system's capacitance. We also develop a procedure for fabricating the two-liquid capacitor within a single straight polydiemethylsiloxane channel and demonstrate that this device can have about 25 times higher capacitance per sensor's base area when compared to two-channel liquid metal capacitors. Lastly, we characterize the response of this compact device to strain and identify operational issues arising from complex hydrodynamics near liquid-liquid and liquid-elastomer interfaces.

  6. Evaluating a prototype device designed to alleviate night vision goggle induced neck strain among military personnel.

    PubMed

    Dibblee, Jenna; Worthy, Portia; Farrell, Philip; Hetzler, Markus; Reid, Susan; Stevenson, Joan; Fischer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was verify the design of a novel Helmet System Support Device (HSSD) that can be used by military aircrew to help intervene on and reduce the high prevalence of neck trouble. Twelve healthy participants repeated simulated helicopter aircrew tasks on 3 separate days. On each day they wore a different helmet configuration, where measures of performance, perceived demand/preference and muscular demand were recorded. The results showed that vigilance tasks were performed over 10% faster with the HSSD configuration compared to wearing the normal helmet configuration. Participants were able to maintain static (endurance) postures for 28% longer, and use of the HSSD helped to prevent neck muscle fatigue in the most demanding task. The results of this design verification study indicate that the HSSD may be a realistic, feasible near-term solution to intervene on the high prevalence of neck trouble among rotary-wing aircrew. Practitioner Summary: This paper verifies the effectiveness of the Helmet System Support Device (HSSD) as an on-body personal protective device to help control exposures associated with aircrew neck trouble. The HSSD reduced perceived demand, reduced cumulative muscle activity in select muscles and provided improved fatigue resistance, meeting its desired design objectives. PMID:25932658

  7. Detection of multiple strains of rabies virus RNA using primers designed to target Mexican vampire bat variants.

    PubMed Central

    Loza-Rubio, E.; Rojas-Anaya, E.; Banda-Ruíz, V. M.; Nadin-Davis, S. A.; Cortez-García, B.

    2005-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), that uses primers specifically designed to amplify a portion of the N gene of vampire bat strains of rabies that circulate in Mexico, but also recognizing most of the rabies variants circulating in endemic areas, was established. This standardized PCR assay was able to detect viral RNA in tenfold serial dilutions up to a 10(7) dilution using stock virus at an original titre of 10(7.5) LD50. The assay was highly specific for rabies virus. Forty different rabies isolates recovered from different species and geographical regions in the country were diagnosed as positive and negative by the fluorescent antibody test (FAT). These same samples were re-examined by both PCR and the mouse inoculation test (MIT). Compared with MIT the PCR exhibited an epidemiological sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 91% while its positive predictive value was 96%. PMID:16181515

  8. Detection of multiple strains of rabies virus RNA using primers designed to target Mexican vampire bat variants.

    PubMed

    Loza-Rubio, E; Rojas-Anaya, E; Banda-Ruíz, V M; Nadin-Davis, S A; Cortez-García, B

    2005-10-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), that uses primers specifically designed to amplify a portion of the N gene of vampire bat strains of rabies that circulate in Mexico, but also recognizing most of the rabies variants circulating in endemic areas, was established. This standardized PCR assay was able to detect viral RNA in tenfold serial dilutions up to a 10(7) dilution using stock virus at an original titre of 10(7.5) LD50. The assay was highly specific for rabies virus. Forty different rabies isolates recovered from different species and geographical regions in the country were diagnosed as positive and negative by the fluorescent antibody test (FAT). These same samples were re-examined by both PCR and the mouse inoculation test (MIT). Compared with MIT the PCR exhibited an epidemiological sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 91% while its positive predictive value was 96%. PMID:16181515

  9. Novel benzofuroxan derivatives against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains: design using Topliss' decision tree, synthesis and biological assay.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Salomão Dória; Palace-Berl, Fanny; Masunari, Andrea; Cechinel, Cléber André; Ishii, Marina; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Tavares, Leoberto Costa

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was the design of a set of benzofuroxan derivatives as antimicrobial agents exploring the physicochemical properties of the related substituents. Topliss' decision tree approach was applied to select the substituent groups. Hierarchical cluster analysis was also performed to emphasize natural clusters and patterns. The compounds were obtained using two synthetic approaches for reducing the synthetic steps as well as improving the yield. The minimal inhibitory concentration method was employed to evaluate the activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. The most active compound was 4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)[N'-(benzofuroxan-5-yl)methylene]benzhydrazide (MIC range 12.7-11.4 μg/mL), pointing out that the antimicrobial activity was indeed influenced by the hydrophobic and electron-withdrawing property of the substituent groups 3-CF(3) and 4-NO(2), respectively. PMID:21757359

  10. Application of statistical experimental design for optimisation of bioinsecticides production by sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis strain on cheap medium.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Jaoua, Samir; Zouari, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    In order to overproduce bioinsecticides production by a sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis strain, an optimal composition of a cheap medium was defined using a response surface methodology. In a first step, a Plackett-Burman design used to evaluate the effects of eight medium components on delta-endotoxin production showed that starch, soya bean and sodium chloride exhibited significant effects on bioinsecticides production. In a second step, these parameters were selected for further optimisation by central composite design. The obtained results revealed that the optimum culture medium for delta-endotoxin production consists of 30 g L(-1) starch, 30 g L(-1) soya bean and 9 g L(-1) sodium chloride. When compared to the basal production medium, an improvement in delta-endotoxin production up to 50% was noted. Moreover, relative toxin yield of sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis S22 was improved markedly by using optimised cheap medium (148.5 mg delta-endotoxins per g starch) when compared to the yield obtained in the basal medium (94.46 mg delta-endotoxins per g starch). Therefore, the use of optimised culture cheap medium appeared to be a good alternative for a low cost production of sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis bioinsecticides at industrial scale which is of great importance in practical point of view.

  11. A systematic optimization of design parameters in strained silicon waveguides to further enhance the linear electro-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Irene; Angelova, Todora I.; Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Sanchis, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    The electro-optic Pockels effect may be generated in silicon photonics structures by breaking the crystal symmetry by means of a highly stressing cladding layer (typically silicon nitride, SiN) deposited on top of the silicon waveguide. In this work, the influence of the waveguide parameters on the strain distribution and its overlap with the optical mode to enhance the Pockels effect has been analyzed. The optimum waveguide structure have been designed based on the definition and quantification of a figure of merit. The fabrication of highly stressing SiN layers by PECVD has also been optimized to characterize the designed structures. The residual stress has been controlled during the growth process by analyzing the influence of the main deposition parameters. Therefore, two identical samples with low and high stress conditions were fabricated and electro-optically characterized to test the induced Pockels effect and the influence of carrier effects. Electro-optical modulation was only measured in the sample with the high stressing SiN layer that could be attributed to the Pockels effect. Nevertheless, the influence of carriers were also observed thus making necessary additional experiments to decouple both effects.

  12. Design stress evaluation based on strain-rate sensitivity analysis for nickel alloys used in the very-high temperature nuclear system

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, K.; Tung, H. M.; Chen, X.; Zhao, Y.; Stubbins, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    Both Alloy 617 and Alloy 230 have been considered the most promising structural materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). In this study, mechanical properties of both alloys were examined by performing tensile tests at three different strain rates and at temperatures up to 1000 deg.C. This range covers time-dependent (plasticity) to time-independent (creep) deformations. Strain-rate sensitivity analysis for each alloy was conducted in order to approximate the long-term flow stresses. The strain-rate sensitivities for the 0.2% flow stress were found to be temperature independent (m {approx_equal} 0) at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 700 deg.C due to dynamic strain aging. At elevated temperatures (800-1000 deg.C), the strain-rate sensitivity significantly increased (m > 0.1). Compared to Alloy 617, Alloy 230 displayed higher strain-rate sensitivities at high temperatures. This leads to a lower estimated long-term flow stresses. Results of this analysis were used to evaluate current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) allowable design limits. According to the comparison with the estimated flow stresses, the allowable design stresses in ASME B and PV Code for either alloy did not provide adequate degradation estimation for the possible long-term service life in VHTR. However, rupture stresses for Alloy 617, developed in ASME code case N-47-28, can generally satisfy the safety margin estimated in the study following the strain-rate sensitivity analysis. Nevertheless, additional material development studies might be required, since the design parameters for rupture stresses are constrained such that current VHTR conceptual designs cannot satisfy the limits. (authors)

  13. Complete genome sequence of Kytococcus sedentarius type strain (strain 541T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrick; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Schneider, Susanne; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Kytococcus sedentarius (ZoBell and Upham 1944) Stackebrandt et al. 1995 is the type strain of the species, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermacoccaceae, a poorly studied family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. K. sedentarius is known for the production of oligoketide antibiotics as well as for its role as an opportunistic pathogen causing valve endocarditis, hemorrhagic pneumonia, and pitted keratolysis. It is strictly aerobic and can only grow when several amino acids are provided in the medium. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from a marine environment. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Dermacoccaceae and the 2,785,024 bp long single replicon genome with its 2639 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Optimization of Magnetosome Production and Growth by the Magnetotactic Vibrio Magnetovibrio blakemorei Strain MV-1 through a Statistics-Based Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Karen T.; Leão, Pedro E.; Abreu, Fernanda; López, Jimmy A.; Gutarra, Melissa L.; Farina, Marcos; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Freire, Denise M. G.

    2013-01-01

    The growth and magnetosome production of the marine magnetotactic vibrio Magnetovibrio blakemorei strain MV-1 were optimized through a statistics-based experimental factorial design. In the optimized growth medium, maximum magnetite yields of 64.3 mg/liter in batch cultures and 26 mg/liter in a bioreactor were obtained. PMID:23396329

  15. Alignment-Free Design of Highly Discriminatory Diagnostic Primer Sets for Escherichia coli O104:H4 Outbreak Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Karch, Helge; Toth, Ian K.

    2012-01-01

    Background An Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak in Germany in summer 2011 caused 53 deaths, over 4000 individual infections across Europe, and considerable economic, social and political impact. This outbreak was the first in a position to exploit rapid, benchtop high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and crowdsourced data analysis early in its investigation, establishing a new paradigm for rapid response to disease threats. We describe a novel strategy for design of diagnostic PCR primers that exploited this rapid draft bacterial genome sequencing to distinguish between E. coli O104:H4 outbreak isolates and other pathogenic E. coli isolates, including the historical hæmolytic uræmic syndrome (HUSEC) E. coli HUSEC041 O104:H4 strain, which possesses the same serotype as the outbreak isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Primers were designed using a novel alignment-free strategy against eleven draft whole genome assemblies of E. coli O104:H4 German outbreak isolates from the E. coli O104:H4 Genome Analysis Crowd-Sourcing Consortium website, and a negative sequence set containing 69 E. coli chromosome and plasmid sequences from public databases. Validation in vitro against 21 ‘positive’ E. coli O104:H4 outbreak and 32 ‘negative’ non-outbreak EHEC isolates indicated that individual primer sets exhibited 100% sensitivity for outbreak isolates, with false positive rates of between 9% and 22%. A minimal combination of two primers discriminated between outbreak and non-outbreak E. coli isolates with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusions/Significance Draft genomes of isolates of disease outbreak bacteria enable high throughput primer design and enhanced diagnostic performance in comparison to traditional molecular assays. Future outbreak investigations will be able to harness HTS rapidly to generate draft genome sequences and diagnostic primer sets, greatly facilitating epidemiology and clinical diagnostics. We expect that high throughput

  16. Strain-driven and ultrasensitive resistive sensor/switch based on conductive alginate/nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag hybrid aerogels with pyramid design.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Songfang; Zhang, Guoping; Gao, Yongju; Deng, Libo; Li, Jinhui; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-12-24

    Flexible strain-driven sensor is an essential component in the flexible electronics. Especially, high durability and sensitivity to strain are required. Here, we present an efficient and low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor based on a conductive, elastic aerogel with pyramid design. When pressure is loaded, the contact area between the interfaces of the conductive aerogel and the copper electrode as well as among the building blocks of the nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag (N-CNTs/Ag) aerogel monoliths, changes in reversible and directional manners. This contact resistance mechanism enables the hybrid aerogels to act as strain-driven sensors with high sensitivity and excellent on/off swithching behavior, and the gauge factor (GF) is ∼15 under strain of 3%, which is superior to those reported for other aerogels. In addition, robust, elastomeric and conductive nanocomposites can be fabricated by injecting polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into alginate/N-CNTs/Ag aerogels. Importantly, the building blocks forming the aerogels retain their initial contact and percolation after undergoing large-strain deformation, PDMS infiltration, and cross-linking of PDMS, suggesting their potential applications as strain sensors.

  17. Strain-driven and ultrasensitive resistive sensor/switch based on conductive alginate/nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag hybrid aerogels with pyramid design.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Songfang; Zhang, Guoping; Gao, Yongju; Deng, Libo; Li, Jinhui; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-12-24

    Flexible strain-driven sensor is an essential component in the flexible electronics. Especially, high durability and sensitivity to strain are required. Here, we present an efficient and low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor based on a conductive, elastic aerogel with pyramid design. When pressure is loaded, the contact area between the interfaces of the conductive aerogel and the copper electrode as well as among the building blocks of the nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag (N-CNTs/Ag) aerogel monoliths, changes in reversible and directional manners. This contact resistance mechanism enables the hybrid aerogels to act as strain-driven sensors with high sensitivity and excellent on/off swithching behavior, and the gauge factor (GF) is ∼15 under strain of 3%, which is superior to those reported for other aerogels. In addition, robust, elastomeric and conductive nanocomposites can be fabricated by injecting polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into alginate/N-CNTs/Ag aerogels. Importantly, the building blocks forming the aerogels retain their initial contact and percolation after undergoing large-strain deformation, PDMS infiltration, and cross-linking of PDMS, suggesting their potential applications as strain sensors. PMID:25423613

  18. Design and application of a fiber Bragg grating strain sensor with enhanced sensitivity in the small-scale dam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liang; Chen, Jianyun; Li, Hong-Nan; Song, Gangbing; Ji, Xueheng

    2009-03-01

    Accurate measurement of strain variation and effective prediction of failure within models have been major objectives for strain sensors in dam model tests. In this paper, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensor with enhanced strain sensitivity that is packaged by two gripper tubes is presented and applied in the seismic tests of a small-scale dam model. This paper discusses the principle of enhanced sensitivity of the FBG strain sensor. Calibration experiments and reliability tests were conducted to evaluate the sensor's strain transferring characteristics on plates of different material. This paper also investigates the applicability of the FBG strain sensors in seismic tests of a dam model by conducting a comparison between the test measurements of FBG sensors and analytical predictions, monitoring the failure progress and predicting the cracking inside the dam model. Results of the dam model tests prove that the FBG strain sensor has the advantages of small size, high precision, and embeddability. It has a promising potential in the cracking and failure monitoring and identification of the dam model.

  19. Design of a pulse-type strain gauge balance for a long-test-duration hypersonic shock tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Jiang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    When the measurement of aerodynamic forces is conducted in a hypersonic shock tunnel, the inertial forces lead to low-frequency vibrations of the model, and its motion cannot be addressed through digital filtering because a sufficient number of cycles cannot be obtained during a tunnel run. This finding implies restrictions on the model size and mass as the natural frequencies are inversely proportional to the length scale of the model. Therefore, the force measurement still has many problems, particularly for large and heavy models. Different structures of a strain gauge balance (SGB) are proposed and designed, and the measurement element is further optimized to overcome the difficulties encountered during the measurement of aerodynamic forces in a shock tunnel. The motivation for this study is to assess the structural performance of the SGB used in a long-test-duration JF12 hypersonic shock tunnel, which has more than 100 ms of test time. Force tests were conducted for a large-scale cone with a 10° semivertex angle and a length of 0.75 m in the JF12 long-test-duration shock tunnel. The finite element method was used for the analysis of the vibrational characteristics of the Model-Balance-Sting System (MBSS) to ensure a sufficient number of cycles, particularly for the axial force signal during a shock tunnel run. The higher-stiffness SGB used in the test shows good performance, wherein the frequency of the MBSS increases because of the stiff construction of the balance. The experimental results are compared with the data obtained in another wind tunnel and exhibit good agreement at M = 7 and α =5°.

  20. In vivo strains in the femur of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) during terrestrial locomotion: testing hypotheses of evolutionary shifts in mammalian bone loading and design.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Michael T; White, Bartholomew J; Hudzik, Nathan B; Gosnell, W Casey; Parrish, John H A; Blob, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    Terrestrial locomotion can impose substantial loads on vertebrate limbs. Previous studies have shown that limb bones from cursorial species of eutherian mammals experience high bending loads with minimal torsion, whereas the limb bones of non-avian reptiles (and amphibians) exhibit considerable torsion in addition to bending. It has been hypothesized that these differences in loading regime are related to the difference in limb posture between upright mammals and sprawling reptiles, and that the loading patterns observed in non-avian reptiles may be ancestral for tetrapod vertebrates. To evaluate whether non-cursorial mammals show loading patterns more similar to those of sprawling lineages, we measured in vivo strains in the femur during terrestrial locomotion of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), a marsupial that uses more crouched limb posture than most mammals from which bone strains have been recorded, and which belongs to a clade phylogenetically between reptiles and the eutherian mammals studied previously. The presence of substantial torsion in the femur of opossums, similar to non-avian reptiles, would suggest that this loading regime likely reflects an ancestral condition for tetrapod limb bone design. Strain recordings indicate the presence of both bending and appreciable torsion (shear strain: 419.1 ± 212.8 με) in the opossum femur, with planar strain analyses showing neutral axis orientations that placed the lateral aspect of the femur in tension at the time of peak strains. Such mediolateral bending was unexpected for a mammal running with near-parasagittal limb kinematics. Shear strains were similar in magnitude to peak compressive axial strains, with opossum femora experiencing similar bending loads but higher levels of torsion compared with most previously studied mammals. Analyses of peak femoral strains led to estimated safety factor ranges of 5.1-7.2 in bending and 5.5-7.3 in torsion, somewhat higher than typical mammalian values

  1. Streptomyces chitinivorans sp. nov., a chitinolytic strain isolated from estuarine lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lopamudra; Mishra, Samir Ranjan; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Das, Surajit; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattanaik, Ajit Kumar; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-09-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain RC1832T was isolated from the sediment of a fish dumping yard at Balugaon near Chilika Lake. The strain is halotolerant (15 % NaCl, w/v), alkali-tolerant (pH 7-10) and hydrolyzes chitin, starch, gelatin, cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, Tween 80, tributyrin, lecithin and casein. Apart from showing typical genus-specific morphological and chemotaxonomic features, the comparision and analysis of the near complete 16S rRNA gene sequence clearly revealed that the strain RC1832T represented a member of the genus Streptomyces. It exhibited the highest sequence similarities with the strains Streptomyces fenghuangensis GIMN4.003T (99.78 %), Streptomyces nanhaiensis DSM 41926T (99.07 %), Streptomyces radiopugnans R97T(98.71 %), Streptomyces atacamensis DSM 42065T (98.65 %) and Streptomyces barkulensis DSM 42082T (98.25 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain RC 1832T with the closest phylogenetic neighbours S. fenghuangensis GIMN4.003T and S. nanhaiensis DSM 41926T were 20±2 % and 21±2 %, respectively. Thus, based on a range of phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain RC1832T was suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Streptomyces for which the name Streptomyces chitinivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RC1832T (=JCM 30611=KCTC 29696). PMID:27220564

  2. A multiscale and multiphysics model of strain development in a 1.5 T MRI magnet designed with 36 filament composite MgB2 superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Abdullah Al; Baig, Tanvir; Deissler, Robert J.; Yao, Zhen; Tomsic, Michael; Doll, David; Akkus, Ozan; Martens, Michael

    2016-05-01

    High temperature superconductors such as MgB2 focus on conduction cooling of electromagnets that eliminates the use of liquid helium. With the recent advances in the strain sustainability of MgB2, a full body 1.5 T conduction cooled magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet shows promise. In this article, a 36 filament MgB2 superconducting wire is considered for a 1.5 T full-body MRI system and is analyzed in terms of strain development. In order to facilitate analysis, this composite wire is homogenized and the orthotropic wire material properties are employed to solve for strain development using a 2D-axisymmetric finite element analysis (FEA) model of the entire set of MRI magnet. The entire multiscale multiphysics analysis is considered from the wire to the magnet bundles addressing winding, cooling and electromagnetic excitation. The FEA solution is verified with proven analytical equations and acceptable agreement is reported. The results show a maximum mechanical strain development of 0.06% that is within the failure criteria of -0.6% to 0.4% (-0.3% to 0.2% for design) for the 36 filament MgB2 wire. Therefore, the study indicates the safe operation of the conduction cooled MgB2 based MRI magnet as far as strain development is concerned.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus S99: Designated Antigenic Smooth Reference Strain Used in Diagnostic Tests in India

    PubMed Central

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Padmashree, B. S.; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S.; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rahman, Habibur

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus strain S99 is widely used for the preparation of colored, plain, recombinant and smooth lipopolysaccharide antigens for the preparation of Brucella diagnostic kits. The genome of this strain was sequenced and the length of the genome was 3,253,175 bp, with 57.2% G+C content. A total of 3,365 protein coding genes and 53 RNA genes were predicted. PMID:25146137

  4. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104T)

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Detter, John C.; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the monospecific genus Nakamurella in the actinobacterial suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is capable of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304699

  5. Complete genome sequence of Eggerthella lenta type strain (IPP VPI 0255T)

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Elizabeth H; Pukall, Rudiger; Birte, Abt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Han, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta (Eggerth 1935) Wade et al. 1999, emended W rdemann et al. 2009 is the type species of the genus Eggerthella, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae. E. lenta is a Gram-positive, non-motile, non-sporulating pathogenic bacterium that can cause severe bacteremia. The strain described in this study has been isolated from a rectal tumor in 1935. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the genus Eggerthella, and the 3,632,260 bp long single replicon genome with its 3123 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Olsenella uli type strain (VPI D76D-27CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Yasawong, Montri; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Olsenella uli (Olsen et al. 1991) Dewhirst et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Olsenella, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae. The species is of interest because it is frequently isolated from dental plaque in periodontitis patients and can cause primary endodontic infection. The species is a Gram-positive, non-motile and non-sporulating bacterium. The strain described in this study has been isolated from human gingival crevices in 1982. This is the first completed sequence of the genus Olsenella and the fifth sequence from the family Coriobacteriaceae. The 2,051,896 bp long genome with its 1,795 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Design procedures for Strain Hardening Cement Composites (SHCC) and measurement of their shear properties by mechanical and 2-D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswani, Karan

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the behaviour and applications of strain hardening cement composites (SHCC). Application of SHCC for use in slabs of common configurations was studied and design procedures are prepared by employing yield line theory and integrating it with simplified tri-linear model developed in Arizona State University by Dr. Barzin Mobasher and Dr. Chote Soranakom. Intrinsic material property of moment-curvature response for SHCC was used to derive the relationship between applied load and deflection in a two-step process involving the limit state analysis and kinematically admissible displacements. For application of SHCC in structures such as shear walls, tensile and shear properties are necessary for design. Lot of research has already been done to study the tensile properties and therefore shear property study was undertaken to prepare a design guide. Shear response of textile reinforced concrete was investigated based on picture frame shear test method. The effects of orientation, volume of cement paste per layer, planar cross-section and volume fraction of textiles were investigated. Pultrusion was used for the production of textile reinforced concrete. It is an automated set-up with low equipment cost which provides uniform production and smooth final surface of the TRC. A 3-D optical non-contacting deformation measurement technique of digital image correlation (DIC) was used to conduct the image analysis on the shear samples by means of tracking the displacement field through comparison between the reference image and deformed images. DIC successfully obtained full-field strain distribution, displacement and strain versus time responses, demonstrated the bonding mechanism from perspective of strain field, and gave a relation between shear angle and shear strain.

  8. Design and proposal of dual line-of-defense perimeter watchdog incorporating optimally designed FBG based accelerometers and strain sensors using single optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohd. Mansoor; Sonkar, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents Opto-Mechanical intrusion sensor fence with FBGs attached to mechanical accelerometers and strain sensors, optimized on SolidWorks 2013 for desired frequency to 35 Hz, picking up accelerations/ strains and its deployment for perimeter security. The accelerometer structure consists of inertial mass supported by an L-shaped modified cantilever beam having non-uniform cross section area connected to base by a thin neck element which acts as strain concentrated centre hence an optimum zone for FBG sensors placement. Bragg wavelength shifts were obtained on Optigrating software for the obtained strain values on mechanical assembly of fence. CFD wind analysis is performed on the assembly to obtain the spot for accelerometer's placement to avoid false alarms up to wind velocities of 20 m/s.

  9. Effectiveness of a newly designed construction uniform for heat strain attenuation in a hot and humid environment.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wen; Chan, Albert P C; Wong, Francis K W; Wong, Del P

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly designed construction uniform in combating heat stress. Ten male volunteers performed treadmill running in a climatic chamber maintained at 34.5 °C temperature, 75% relative humidity, 0.3 m/s air velocity, and solar radiation of 450 W/m(2) that simulates typical summer working environment of construction sites in Hong Kong. The participants were tested while wearing two kinds of construction uniforms: a commonly worn uniform A, or a newly designed uniform B. It was found during exercise that Tc (38.34 ± 0.14 vs 38.45 ± 0.11 °C, p = 0.03), Tsk (36.01 ± 0.36 vs 36.27 ± 0.34 °C, p = 0.03), HR (162.7 ± 10.1 vs 172.5 ± 9.2 bpm, p < 0.01), PSI (7.0 ± 0.4 vs 7.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.04), thermal sensation (1.7 ± 0.9 vs 2.6 ± 0.7, p = 0.02), and wetness sensation (1.9 ± 0.9 vs 2.6 ± 0.8, p < 0.01) was lower when wearing uniform B than that of uniform A. It was found during recovery that Tc (37.89 ± 0.13 vs 38.06 ± 0.13 °C, p < 0.01), Tsk (35.68 ± 0.37 vs 36.02 ± 0.41 °C, p < 0.01), HR (104.2 ± 10.1 vs 112.6 ± 10.7 bpm, p < 0.01), PSI (3.3 ± 0.7 vs 4.1 ± 1.0, p < 0.01), thermal sensation (0.1 ± 0.9 vs 1.0 ± 0.8, p = 0.02), and wetness sensation (1.1 ± 1.0 vs 2.3 ± 0.8, p = 0.02) was lower when wearing uniform B than that of uniform A. The findings of this study suggested the newly designed construction uniform could reduce thermoregulatory and cardiovascular strain, and improve thermal comfort while exercising in a hot and humid environment.

  10. Effectiveness of a newly designed construction uniform for heat strain attenuation in a hot and humid environment.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wen; Chan, Albert P C; Wong, Francis K W; Wong, Del P

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly designed construction uniform in combating heat stress. Ten male volunteers performed treadmill running in a climatic chamber maintained at 34.5 °C temperature, 75% relative humidity, 0.3 m/s air velocity, and solar radiation of 450 W/m(2) that simulates typical summer working environment of construction sites in Hong Kong. The participants were tested while wearing two kinds of construction uniforms: a commonly worn uniform A, or a newly designed uniform B. It was found during exercise that Tc (38.34 ± 0.14 vs 38.45 ± 0.11 °C, p = 0.03), Tsk (36.01 ± 0.36 vs 36.27 ± 0.34 °C, p = 0.03), HR (162.7 ± 10.1 vs 172.5 ± 9.2 bpm, p < 0.01), PSI (7.0 ± 0.4 vs 7.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.04), thermal sensation (1.7 ± 0.9 vs 2.6 ± 0.7, p = 0.02), and wetness sensation (1.9 ± 0.9 vs 2.6 ± 0.8, p < 0.01) was lower when wearing uniform B than that of uniform A. It was found during recovery that Tc (37.89 ± 0.13 vs 38.06 ± 0.13 °C, p < 0.01), Tsk (35.68 ± 0.37 vs 36.02 ± 0.41 °C, p < 0.01), HR (104.2 ± 10.1 vs 112.6 ± 10.7 bpm, p < 0.01), PSI (3.3 ± 0.7 vs 4.1 ± 1.0, p < 0.01), thermal sensation (0.1 ± 0.9 vs 1.0 ± 0.8, p = 0.02), and wetness sensation (1.1 ± 1.0 vs 2.3 ± 0.8, p = 0.02) was lower when wearing uniform B than that of uniform A. The findings of this study suggested the newly designed construction uniform could reduce thermoregulatory and cardiovascular strain, and improve thermal comfort while exercising in a hot and humid environment. PMID:27154277

  11. Designing and exploring active N'-[(5-nitrofuran-2-yl) methylene] substituted hydrazides against three Trypanosoma cruzi strains more prevalent in Chagas disease patients.

    PubMed

    Palace-Berl, Fanny; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Jorge, Salomão Dória; Zingales, Bianca; Zorzi, Rodrigo Rocha; Silva, Marcelo Nunes; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; de Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Tavares, Leoberto Costa

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease affects around 8 million people worldwide and its treatment depends on only two nitroheterocyclic drugs, benznidazole (BZD) and nifurtimox (NFX). Both drugs have limited curative power in chronic phase of disease. Nifuroxazide (NF), a nitroheterocyclic drug, was used as lead to design a set of twenty one compounds in order to improve the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity. Lipinski's rules were considered in order to support drug-likeness designing. The set of N'-[(5-nitrofuran-2-yl) methylene] substituted hydrazides was assayed against three T. cruzi strains, which represent the discrete typing units more prevalent in human patients: Y (TcII), Silvio X10 cl1 (TcI), and Bug 2149 cl10 (TcV). All the derivatives, except one, showed enhanced trypanocidal activity against the three strains as compared to BZD. In the Y strain 62% of the compounds were more active than NFX. The most active compound was N'-((5-nitrofuran-2-yl) methylene)biphenyl-4-carbohydrazide (C20), which showed IC50 values of 1.17 ± 0.12 μM; 3.17 ± 0.32 μM; and 1.81 ± 0.18 μM for Y, Silvio X10 cl1, and Bug 2149 cl10 strains, respectively. Cytotoxicity assays with human fibroblast cells have demonstrated high selectivity indices for several compounds. Exploratory data analysis indicated that primarily topological, steric/geometric, and electronic properties have contributed to the discrimination of the set of investigated compounds. The findings can be helpful to drive the designing, and subsequently, the synthesis of additional promising drugs against Chagas disease. PMID:25899337

  12. Simulation-based design of a strained graphene field effect transistor incorporating the pseudo magnetic field effect

    SciTech Connect

    Souma, Satofumi Ueyama, Masayuki; Ogawa, Matsuto

    2014-05-26

    We present a numerical study on the performance of strained graphene-based field-effect transistors. A local strain less than 10% is applied over a central channel region of the graphene to induce the shift of the Dirac point in the channel region along the transverse momentum direction. The left and the right unstrained graphene regions are doped to be either n-type or p-type. By using the atomistic tight-binding model and a Green's function method, we predict that the gate voltage applied to the central strained graphene region can switch the drain current on and off with an on/off ratio of more than six orders of magnitude at room temperature. This is in spite of the absence of a bandgap in the strained channel region. Steeper subthreshold slopes below 60 mV/decade are also predicted at room temperature because of a mechanism similar to the band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors.

  13. Conformational locking by design: relating strain energy with luminescence and stability in rigid metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Shustova, Natalia B; Cozzolino, Anthony F; Dincă, Mircea

    2012-12-01

    Minimization of the torsional barrier for phenyl ring flipping in a metal-organic framework (MOF) based on the new ethynyl-extended octacarboxylate ligand H(8)TDPEPE leads to a fluorescent material with a near-dark state. Immobilization of the ligand in the rigid structure also unexpectedly causes significant strain. We used DFT calculations to estimate the ligand strain energies in our and all other topologically related materials and correlated these with empirical structural descriptors to derive general rules for trapping molecules in high-energy conformations within MOFs. These studies portend possible applications of MOFs for studying fundamental concepts related to conformational locking and its effects on molecular reactivity and chromophore photophysics.

  14. The properties given at the time of publication for the designated type strain of Leifsonia rubra Reddy et al. 2003, CMS 76r, do not correspond with those of MTCC 4210, DSM 15304, CIP 107783 and JCM 12471 that are deposited as representing the type strain: Opinion 96. Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tindall, B J

    2014-10-01

    The Judicial Commission affirms that, according to information presented to it, the type strain of Leifsonia rubra Reddy et al. 2003 designated in the original publication as strain CMS 76r and deposited as MTCC 4210, DSM 15304, CIP 107783 and JCM 12471 does not have properties corresponding with those of the strains held in those collections under those accession numbers. The species Leifsonia rubra Reddy et al. 2003 was not represented by an authentic deposit of a type strain at the time of effective publication in the pages of the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology.

  15. Experimental mixture design as a tool to enhance glycosyl hydrolases production by a new Trichoderma harzianum P49P11 strain cultivated under controlled bioreactor submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Delabona, Priscila da Silva; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez; Lima, Deise Juliana da Silva; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz

    2013-03-01

    This work investigates the glycosyl hydrolase (GH) profile of a new Trichoderma harzianum strain cultivated under controlled bioreactor submerged fermentation. The influence of different medium components (delignified steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse, sucrose, and soybean flour) on GH biosynthesis was assessed using experimental mixture design (EMD). Additionally, the effect of increased component concentrations in culture media selected from the EMD was studied. It was found that that a mixed culture medium could significantly maximize GH biosynthesis rate, especially for xylanase enzymes which achieved a 2-fold increment. Overall, it was demonstrated that T. harzianumP49P11 enzymes have a great potential to be used in the deconstruction of biomass.

  16. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  17. Non-radiative recombination in Ge{sub 1−y}Sn{sub y} light emitting diodes: The role of strain relaxation in tuned heterostructure designs

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, J. D.; Xu, C.; Smith, D. J.; Menéndez, J.; Senaratne, C. L.; Sims, P.; Kouvetakis, J.; Aoki, T.

    2015-06-28

    This paper describes the properties of Ge{sub 1−y}Sn{sub y} light emitting diodes with a broad range of Sn concentrations (y = 0.0–0.11). The devices are grown upon Si(100) platforms using ultra-low temperature deposition of highly reactive Ge and Sn hydrides. The device fabrication adopts two new photodiode designs which lead to optimized performance and enables a systematic study of the effects of strain relaxation on emission efficiency. In contrast with n-Ge/i-Ge{sub 1−y}Sn{sub y}/p-Ge analogs, which in most cases contain two defected interfaces, our designs include a p-layer with composition Ge{sub 1−z}Sn{sub z} chosen to be z < y to facilitate light extraction, but with z close enough to y to guarantee no strain relaxation at the i/p interface. In addition, a Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloy is also used for the n layer, with compositions in the 0 ≤ x ≤ y range, so that defected and non-defected n/i interfaces can be studied. The electroluminescence spectra vs the Sn content y in the intrinsic layer of the diodes exhibit a monotonic shift in the emission wavelength from 1550 nm to 2500 nm. On the other hand, the emission intensities show a complex dependence that cannot be explained solely on the basis of Sn concentrations. Detailed theoretical modeling of these intensities makes it possible to extract recombination lifetimes that are found to be more than three times longer in samples in which strain relaxation has not occurred at the n-i interface, demonstrating the existence of a large non-radiative contribution from the relaxation defects. This finding is particularly significant for direct gap diodes with y > 0.09, for which it is practically impossible to avoid strain relaxation in n-Ge/i-Ge{sub 1−y}Sn{sub y}/p-Ge analogs. The new designs introduced here open the door to the fabrication of highly efficient electrically pumped systems for applications in future generations of integrated photonics.

  18. Non-radiative recombination in Ge1-ySny light emitting diodes: The role of strain relaxation in tuned heterostructure designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. D.; Senaratne, C. L.; Xu, C.; Sims, P.; Aoki, T.; Smith, D. J.; Menéndez, J.; Kouvetakis, J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the properties of Ge1-ySny light emitting diodes with a broad range of Sn concentrations (y = 0.0-0.11). The devices are grown upon Si(100) platforms using ultra-low temperature deposition of highly reactive Ge and Sn hydrides. The device fabrication adopts two new photodiode designs which lead to optimized performance and enables a systematic study of the effects of strain relaxation on emission efficiency. In contrast with n-Ge/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge analogs, which in most cases contain two defected interfaces, our designs include a p-layer with composition Ge1-zSnz chosen to be z < y to facilitate light extraction, but with z close enough to y to guarantee no strain relaxation at the i/p interface. In addition, a Ge1-xSnx alloy is also used for the n layer, with compositions in the 0 ≤ x ≤ y range, so that defected and non-defected n/i interfaces can be studied. The electroluminescence spectra vs the Sn content y in the intrinsic layer of the diodes exhibit a monotonic shift in the emission wavelength from 1550 nm to 2500 nm. On the other hand, the emission intensities show a complex dependence that cannot be explained solely on the basis of Sn concentrations. Detailed theoretical modeling of these intensities makes it possible to extract recombination lifetimes that are found to be more than three times longer in samples in which strain relaxation has not occurred at the n-i interface, demonstrating the existence of a large non-radiative contribution from the relaxation defects. This finding is particularly significant for direct gap diodes with y > 0.09, for which it is practically impossible to avoid strain relaxation in n-Ge/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge analogs. The new designs introduced here open the door to the fabrication of highly efficient electrically pumped systems for applications in future generations of integrated photonics.

  19. Evaluation of nitrogenous media components by Plackett-Burman statistical design for beta-d-fructofuranosidase production by Saccharomyces sp. strain GVT263.

    PubMed

    Venkateshwar, M; Chaitanya, K; Altaf, M D; Hameeda, B; Ghopal Reddy, M

    2009-04-01

    beta-d-Fructofuranosidase (FFase), an important enzyme of the confectionery and fructose syrup industry, is produced by several microorganisms. However, yeasts are the most used source because of their high sucrose fermentation capacity. In this work, production of FFase was carried out in submerged fermentation using a high enzyme-producing yeast strain. Plackett-Burman statistical experimental design was applied to evaluate the fermentation medium components. The effects of 10 nitrogen sources were studied in a 16-run experimental design. Beef extract, yeast extract, N-Z-amine, tryptone, meat extract, and ammonium acetate were found to have significant effects on enzyme production. Among these, yeast extract, N-Z-amine, and ammonium acetate were the most significant. A maximum FFase activity of 299.4 U/mL was obtained after a 24 h fermentation period.

  20. Design and Development of a Flexible Strain Sensor for Textile Structures Based on a Conductive Polymer Composite

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Cédric; Koncar, Vladan; Lewandowski, Maryline; Dufour, Claude

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a smart flexible sensor adapted to textile structures, able to measure their strain deformations. The sensors are “smart” because of their capacity to adapt to the specific mechanical properties of textile structures that are lightweight, highly flexible, stretchable, elastic, etc. Because of these properties, textile structures are continuously in movement and easily deformed, even under very low stresses. It is therefore important that the integration of a sensor does not modify their general behavior. The material used for the sensor is based on a thermoplastic elastomer (Evoprene)/carbon black nanoparticle composite, and presents general mechanical properties strongly compatible with the textile substrate. Two preparation techniques are investigated: the conventional melt-mixing process, and the solvent process which is found to be more adapted for this particular application. The preparation procedure is fully described, namely the optimization of the process in terms of filler concentration in which the percolation theory aspects have to be considered. The sensor is then integrated on a thin, lightweight Nylon fabric, and the electromechanical characterization is performed to demonstrate the adaptability and the correct functioning of the sensor as a strain gauge on the fabric. A normalized relative resistance is defined in order to characterize the electrical response of the sensor. Finally, the influence of environmental factors, such as temperature and atmospheric humidity, on the sensor performance is investigated. The results show that the sensor's electrical resistance is particularly affected by humidity. This behavior is discussed in terms of the sensitivity of the carbon black filler particles to the presence of water.

  1. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for strains. Gymnastics, tennis, rowing, golf, and other sports that require extensive gripping can ... Trials and You was designed to help people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and ...

  2. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  3. Development of a Custom-Designed, Pan Genomic DNA Microarray to Characterize Strain-Level Diversity among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Ben Davies; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Yan, Qiongqiong; Chase, Hannah R.; Lee, Boram; Hwang, Seongeun; Trach, Larisa; Park, Eunbi; Yoo, YeonJoo; Chung, TaeJung; Jackson, Scott A.; Patel, Isha R.; Sathyamoorthy, Venugopal; Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Kotewicz, Michael L.; Carter, Laurenda; Iversen, Carol; Pagotto, Franco; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika; Fanning, Séamus; Grim, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter species cause infections in all age groups; however neonates are at highest risk and remain the most susceptible age group for life-threatening invasive disease. The genus contains seven species:Cronobacter sakazakii, Cronobacter malonaticus, Cronobacter turicensis, Cronobacter muytjensii, Cronobacter dublinensis, Cronobacter universalis, and Cronobacter condimenti. Despite an abundance of published genomes of these species, genomics-based epidemiology of the genus is not well established. The gene content of a diverse group of 126 unique Cronobacter and taxonomically related isolates was determined using a pan genomic-based DNA microarray as a genotyping tool and as a means to identify outbreak isolates for food safety, environmental, and clinical surveillance purposes. The microarray constitutes 19,287 independent genes representing 15 Cronobacter genomes and 18 plasmids and 2,371 virulence factor genes of phylogenetically related Gram-negative bacteria. The Cronobacter microarray was able to distinguish the seven Cronobacter species from one another and from non-Cronobacter species; and within each species, strains grouped into distinct clusters based on their genomic diversity. These results also support the phylogenic divergence of the genus and clearly highlight the genomic diversity among each member of the genus. The current study establishes a powerful platform for further genomics research of this diverse genus, an important prerequisite toward the development of future countermeasures against this foodborne pathogen in the food safety and clinical arenas. PMID:25984509

  4. A Method for Calculating Strain Energy Release Rates in Preliminary Design of Composite Skin/Stringer Debonding Under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Three simple procedures were developed to determine strain energy release rates, G, in composite skin/stringer specimens for various combinations of unaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out-of-plane) loading conditions. These procedures may be used for parametric design studies in such a way that only a few finite element computations will be necessary for a study of many load combinations. The results were compared with mixed mode strain energy release rates calculated directly from nonlinear two-dimensional plane-strain finite element analyses using the virtual crack closure technique. The first procedure involved solving three unknown parameters needed to determine the energy release rates. Good agreement was obtained when the external loads were used in the expression derived. This superposition technique was only applicable if the structure exhibits a linear load/deflection behavior. Consequently, a second technique was derived which was applicable in the case of nonlinear load/deformation behavior. The technique involved calculating six unknown parameters from a set of six simultaneous linear equations with data from six nonlinear analyses to determine the energy release rates. This procedure was not time efficient, and hence, less appealing. A third procedure was developed to calculate mixed mode energy release rates as a function of delamination lengths. This procedure required only one nonlinear finite element analysis of the specimen with a single delamination length to obtain a reference solution for the energy release rates and the scale factors. The delamination was extended in three separate linear models of the local area in the vicinity of the delamination subjected to unit loads to obtain the distribution of G with delamination lengths. This set of sub-problems was Although additional modeling effort is required to create the sub- models, this local technique is efficient for parametric studies.

  5. Large-strain, multiform movements from designable electrothermal actuators based on large highly anisotropic carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingwei; Liu, Changhong; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-01-27

    Many electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators use diverse configurations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as pliable electrodes to realize discontinuous, agile movements, for CNTs are conductive and flexible. However, the reported CNT-based EAP actuators could only accomplish simple, monotonous actions. Few actuators were extended to complex devices because efficiently preparing a large-area CNT electrode was difficult, and complex electrode design has not been carried out. In this work, we successfully prepared large-area CNT paper (buckypaper, BP) through an efficient approach. The BP is highly anisotropic, strong, and suitable as flexible electrodes. By means of artful graphic design and processing on BP, we fabricated various functional BP electrodes and developed a series of BP-polymer electrothermal actuators (ETAs). The prepared ETAs can realize various controllable movements, such as large-stain bending (>180°), helical curling (∼ 630°), or even bionic actuations (imitating human-hand actions). These functional and interesting movements benefit from flexible electrode design and the anisotropy of BP material. Owing to the advantages of low driving voltage (20-200 V), electrolyte-free and long service life (over 10000 times), we think the ETAs will have great potential applications in the actuator field. PMID:25559661

  6. Optical properties of InAsBi and optimal designs of lattice-matched and strain-balanced III-V semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Shalindar, A. J.; Riordan, N. A.; Gogineni, C.; Liang, H.; Sharma, A. R.; Johnson, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    The optical properties of bulk InAs0.936Bi0.064 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (100)-oriented GaSb substrate are measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The index of refraction and absorption coefficient are measured over photon energies ranging from 44 meV to 4.4 eV and are used to identify the room temperature bandgap energy of bulk InAs0.936Bi0.064 as 60.6 meV. The bandgap of InAsBi is expressed as a function of Bi mole fraction using the band anticrossing model and a characteristic coupling strength of 1.529 eV between the Bi impurity state and the InAs valence band. These results are programmed into a software tool that calculates the miniband structure of semiconductor superlattices and identifies optimal designs in terms of maximizing the electron-hole wavefunction overlap as a function of transition energy. These functionalities are demonstrated by mapping the design spaces of lattice-matched GaSb/InAs0.911Sb0.089 and GaSb/InAs0.932Bi0.068 and strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb, InAs/GaInSb, and InAs/InAsBi superlattices on GaSb. The absorption properties of each of these material systems are directly compared by relating the wavefunction overlap square to the absorption coefficient of each optimized design. Optimal design criteria are provided for key detector wavelengths for each superlattice system. The optimal design mid-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattice is grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and its optical properties are evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  7. Modelling, Design, Growth and Characterization of Strain Balanced Quantum Cascade Lasers (3-11mum), grown by Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Neelanjan

    Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) is a compact room temperature (RT) source of mid-infrared radiation, which can be used for spectroscopic detection of trace amount of chemicals. The mid-infrared spectral range between (3-11 microm), has a dense array of absorption lines of numerous molecules, due to the presence of fundamental vibrational modes. The goal of this thesis can be subdivided into two parts. Firstly, short wavelength QCLs, emitting below 4microm, perform poorly at RT, due to inter-valley Gamma --- L carrier scattering, carrier escape to the continuum, heat removal from the core region at high power density corresponding to short wavelength operation, and large interface scattering due to highly strained materials. Secondly, it is desirable to have a single QCL based source emitting between 6-10microm, which be used to detect multiple molecules having their peak absorptions far apart, inside this spectral range. However, gain bandwidth of a single core QCL is relatively small, so laser emission cannot be tuned over a wide spectral range. This thesis describes the working principle of a QCL based on superlattice transport, rate equations, scattering mechanism, and waveguide design. The choice of the material system for this work and the fundamentals of band structure engineering has been derived. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy - growth optimization and characterization is one of the most important features of this work, especially for short wavelength QCLs, and has been explained in depth. Different strategies for design of active region design of short wavelength QCL and heterogeneous broadband QCL has been explored. The major milestones, of this research was the world's first watt level continuous wave (CW), RT demonstration at 3.76 microm, which was followed by another milestone of the first CW, RT demonstration at 3.39microm and 3.55microm, and finally the elusive result of QCL emitting at CW, RT at a wavelength as short as lambda ~3microm, a record. In

  8. Design and characteristics of strained InAs/InAlAs composite-channel heterostructure field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.-K.; Kadow, C.; Bae, J.-U.; Rodwell, M. J. W.; Gossard, A. C.; Brar, B.; Sullivan, G.; Nagy, G.; Bergman, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report composite-channel heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) with an InAs channel and an In0.9Al0.1As subchannel. The HFETs are grown on antimonide buffer layers. Two composite-channel structures with different planar Te doping schemes are designed, fabricated, and characterized. High radio-frequency transconductances of above 0.9 S/mm and ˜55GHz current gain cutoff frequencies are achieved in devices with 500 nm gates. Planar Te doping in the buffer layers reduces the high kink-effect currents otherwise found in InAs/AlSb HFETs, an effect which can be attributed to either increased breakdown field in the In0.9Al0.1As subchannel or to suppression of hole blocking in the buffer. The present limitations to device performance and suggested approaches for their elimination are discussed.

  9. Vehicular Causation Factors and Conceptual Design Modifications to Reduce Aortic Strain in Numerically Reconstructed Real World Nearside Lateral Automotive Crashes.

    PubMed

    Belwadi, Aditya; Yang, King H

    2015-01-01

    Aortic injury (AI) leading to disruption of the aorta is an uncommon but highly lethal consequence of trauma in modern society. Most recent estimates range from 7,500 to 8,000 cases per year from a variety of causes. It is observed that more than 80% of occupants who suffer an aortic injury die at the scene due to exsanguination into the chest cavity. It is evident that effective means of substantially improving the outcome of motor vehicle crash-induced AIs is by preventing the injury in the first place. In the current study, 16 design of computer experiments (DOCE) were carried out with varying levels of principal direction of force (PDOF), impact velocity, impact height, and impact position of the bullet vehicle combined with occupant seating positions in the case vehicle to determine the effects of these factors on aortic injury. Further, a combination of real world crash data reported in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database, Finite Element (FE) vehicle models, and the Wayne State Human Body Model-II (WSHBM-II) indicates that occupant seating position, impact height, and PDOF, in that order play, a primary role in aortic injury. PMID:26448781

  10. Vehicular Causation Factors and Conceptual Design Modifications to Reduce Aortic Strain in Numerically Reconstructed Real World Nearside Lateral Automotive Crashes.

    PubMed

    Belwadi, Aditya; Yang, King H

    2015-01-01

    Aortic injury (AI) leading to disruption of the aorta is an uncommon but highly lethal consequence of trauma in modern society. Most recent estimates range from 7,500 to 8,000 cases per year from a variety of causes. It is observed that more than 80% of occupants who suffer an aortic injury die at the scene due to exsanguination into the chest cavity. It is evident that effective means of substantially improving the outcome of motor vehicle crash-induced AIs is by preventing the injury in the first place. In the current study, 16 design of computer experiments (DOCE) were carried out with varying levels of principal direction of force (PDOF), impact velocity, impact height, and impact position of the bullet vehicle combined with occupant seating positions in the case vehicle to determine the effects of these factors on aortic injury. Further, a combination of real world crash data reported in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database, Finite Element (FE) vehicle models, and the Wayne State Human Body Model-II (WSHBM-II) indicates that occupant seating position, impact height, and PDOF, in that order play, a primary role in aortic injury.

  11. Non-linear visco-elastic analysis and the design of super-pressure balloons : stress, strain and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, David

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures. Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite, these activities have broadened to encompass ‘lighter than air' structures such as aerostats, hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons. Since 2004 Tensys have acted as consultants to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Program. Early implementations of the super-pressure balloon design chosen for ULDB have shown problems of geometric instability, characterised by improper deployment and the potential for overall geometric instability once deployed. The latter has been reproduced numerically using inTENS, and the former are better understood following a series of large-scale hangar tests simulating launch and ascent. In both cases the solution lies in minimising the film lobing between the tendons. These tendons, which span between base and apex end fittings, cause the characteristic pumpkin shape of the balloons and also provide valuable constraint against excessive film deformation. There is also the requirement to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness. A consequence of reduced lobing between tendons is the development of higher stresses in the balloon film under pressure. The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film lead to further significant meridional stress under low temperature flight conditions. The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate excessive stress and local concentrations. However, creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations sufficient to compromise the geometric stability of the balloon. The design of a balloon requires an analysis approach that addresses the questions of stress and stability over the duration of a flight by time stepping analyses using an appropriate material model. This paper summarises the Dynamic Relaxation

  12. The Actinobacterial Colonization of Etruscan Paintings

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Herraiz, Marta; Jurado, Valme; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Pallecchi, Pasquino; Tiano, Piero; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2013-01-01

    The paintings from Tomba della Scimmia, in Tuscany, are representative of the heavy bacterial colonization experienced in most Etruscan necropolises. The tomb remained open until the late 70′s when it was closed because of severe deterioration of the walls, ceiling and paintings after decades of visits. The deterioration is the result of environmental changes and impacts suffered since its discovery in 1846. We show scanning electron microscopy and molecular studies that reveal the extent and nature of the biodeterioration. Actinobacteria, mainly Nocardia and Pseudonocardia colonize and grow on the tomb walls and this process is linked to the availability of organic matter, phyllosilicates (e.g. clay minerals) and iron oxides. Nocardia is found metabolically active in the paintings. The data confirm the specialization of the genera Nocardia and Pseudonocardia in the colonization of subterranean niches. PMID:23486535

  13. The actinobacterial colonization of Etruscan paintings.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Herraiz, Marta; Jurado, Valme; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Pallecchi, Pasquino; Tiano, Piero; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2013-01-01

    The paintings from Tomba della Scimmia, in Tuscany, are representative of the heavy bacterial colonization experienced in most Etruscan necropolises. The tomb remained open until the late 70's when it was closed because of severe deterioration of the walls, ceiling and paintings after decades of visits. The deterioration is the result of environmental changes and impacts suffered since its discovery in 1846. We show scanning electron microscopy and molecular studies that reveal the extent and nature of the biodeterioration. Actinobacteria, mainly Nocardia and Pseudonocardia colonize and grow on the tomb walls and this process is linked to the availability of organic matter, phyllosilicates (e.g. clay minerals) and iron oxides. Nocardia is found metabolically active in the paintings. The data confirm the specialization of the genera Nocardia and Pseudonocardia in the colonization of subterranean niches.

  14. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  15. Achieving high performance electric field induced strain: a rational design of hyperbranched aromatic polyamide functionalized graphene-polyurethane dielectric elastomer composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian; Qiu, Jinhao; Zhu, Kongjun; Li, Jinhuan; Wang, Jingwen; Li, Shuqin; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2015-03-26

    Dielectric elastomers have great potentials as flexible actuators in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) due to their large deformation, light weight, mechanical compliancy, and low cost. The low dielectric constant of these elastomers requires a rather high voltage electric field, which has greatly limited their applications. In this work, a diaphragm-type flexible microactuator comprising a hyperbranched aromatic polyamide functionalized graphene (HAPFG) filler embedded into the polyurethane (PU) dielectric elastomer matrix is described. The rational designed HAPFG sheets exhibits uniform dispersion in PU matrix and strong adhesion with the matrix by hydrogen-bond coupling. Consequently, the HAPFG-PU composites possess high dielectric performance and low loss modulus. The effect of hyperbranched aromatic polyamide functionalized graphene on high voltage electric field induced strain was experimentally investigated using the Fotonic sensor. The high electric field response of the composite was discussed by applying different kinds of alternating-current field. In addition, a comparison of the breakdown strength between the HAPFG-PU composite and the pure PU was carried out. PMID:25741878

  16. Geomechanical Modeling of CO2 Injection Site to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolik, S. R.; Matteo, E. N.; Dewers, T. A.; Newell, P.; Gomez, S. P.; Stormont, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper will present the results of large-scale three-dimensional calculations simulating the hydrological-mechanical behavior of a CO2 injection reservoir and the resulting effects on wellbore casings and sealant repair materials. A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. The DOE-NETL project "Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials," is interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Two distinct computational models comprise the current modeling effort. The first is a field scale model that uses the stratigraphy, material properties, and injection history from a pilot CO2 injection operation in Cranfield, MS to develop a stress-strain history for wellbore locations from 100 to 400 meters from an injection well. The results from the field scale model are used as input to a more detailed model of a wellbore casing. The 3D wellbore model examines the impacts of various loading scenarios on a casing structure. This model has been developed in conjunction with bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. The results from these models will be used to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant Number DE-FE0009562. This project is managed and administered by the University of New Mexico and funded by DOE/NETL and cost-sharing partners. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of

  17. Geomechanical Modeling of CO2 Injection Site to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolik, S. R.; Gomez, S. P.; Matteo, E. N.; Stormont, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper will present the results of large-scale three-dimensional calculations simulating the hydrological-mechanical behavior of a CO2injection reservoir and the resulting effects on wellbore casings and sealant repair materials. A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. The DOE-NETL project "Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials," is interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Two distinct computational models comprise the current modeling effort. The first is a field scale model that uses the stratigraphy, material properties, and injection history from a pilot CO2injection operation in Cranfield, MS to develop a stress-strain history for wellbore locations from 100 to 400 meters from an injection well. The results from the field scale model are used as input to a more detailed model of a wellbore casing. The 3D wellbore model examines the impacts of various loading scenarios on a casing structure. This model has been developed in conjunction with bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. The results from these models will be used to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. This material is based upon work supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant Number DE-FE0009562. This project is managed and administered by the Storage Division of the NETL and funded by DOE/NETL and cost-sharing partners. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science

  18. Geomechanical Modeling of CO2 Injection Site to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolik, S. R.; Gomez, S. P.; Matteo, E. N.; Stormont, J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper will present the results of large-scale three-dimensional calculations simulating the hydrological-mechanical behavior of a CO2injection reservoir and the resulting effects on wellbore casings and sealant repair materials. A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. The DOE-NETL project "Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials," is interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Two distinct computational models comprise the current modeling effort. The first is a field scale model that uses the stratigraphy, material properties, and injection history from a pilot CO2injection operation in Cranfield, MS to develop a stress-strain history for wellbore locations from 100 to 400 meters from an injection well. The results from the field scale model are used as input to a more detailed model of a wellbore casing. The 3D wellbore model examines the impacts of various loading scenarios on a casing structure. This model has been developed in conjunction with bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. The results from these models will be used to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. This material is based upon work supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant Number DE-FE0009562. This project is managed and administered by the Storage Division of the NETL and funded by DOE/NETL and cost-sharing partners. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science

  19. Dissecting the Functional Role of Key Residues in Triheme Cytochrome PpcA: A Path to Rational Design of G. sulfurreducens Strains with Enhanced Electron Transfer Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Leonor; Lourenço, Sílvia; Londer, Yuri Y.; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    PpcA is the most abundant member of a family of five triheme cytochromes c7 in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs) and is the most likely carrier of electrons destined for outer surface during respiration on solid metal oxides, a process that requires extracellular electron transfer. This cytochrome has the highest content of lysine residues (24%) among the family, and it was suggested to be involved in e−/H+ energy transduction processes. In the present work, we investigated the functional role of lysine residues strategically located in the vicinity of each heme group. Each lysine was replaced by glutamine or glutamic acid to evaluate the effects of a neutral or negatively charged residue in each position. The results showed that replacing Lys9 (located near heme IV), Lys18 (near heme I) or Lys22 (between hemes I and III) has essentially no effect on the redox properties of the heme groups and are probably involved in redox partner recognition. On the other hand, Lys43 (near heme IV), Lys52 (between hemes III and IV) and Lys60 (near heme III) are crucial in the regulation of the functional mechanism of PpcA, namely in the selection of microstates that allow the protein to establish preferential e−/H+ transfer pathways. The results showed that the preferred e−/H+ transfer pathways are only established when heme III is the last heme to oxidize, a feature reinforced by a higher difference between its reduction potential and that of its predecessor in the order of oxidation. We also showed that K43 and K52 mutants keep the mechanistic features of PpcA by establishing preferential e−/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values than the wild-type protein, a property that can enable rational design of Gs strains with optimized extracellular electron transfer capabilities. PMID:25153891

  20. Improvement of LysM-Mediated Surface Display of Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) in Recombinant and Nonrecombinant Strains of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut

    2015-01-01

    Safety and probiotic properties make lactic acid bacteria (LAB) attractive hosts for surface display of heterologous proteins. Protein display on nonrecombinant microorganisms is preferred for therapeutic and food applications due to regulatory requirements. We displayed two designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), each possessing affinity for the Fc region of human IgG, on the surface of Lactococcus lactis by fusing them to the Usp45 secretion signal and to the peptidoglycan-binding C terminus of AcmA, containing lysine motif (LysM) repeats. Growth medium containing a secreted fusion protein was used to test its heterologous binding to 10 strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus, using flow cytometry, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fluorescence microscopy. The fusion proteins bound to the surfaces of all lactobacilli; however, binding to the majority of bacteria was only 2- to 5-fold stronger than that of the control. Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 demonstrated exceptionally strong binding (32- to 55-fold higher than that of the control) and may therefore be an attractive host for nonrecombinant surface display. Genomic comparison of the species indicated the exopolysaccharides of Lb. salivarius as a possible reason for the difference. Additionally, a 15-fold concentration-dependent increase in nonrecombinant surface display on L. lactis was demonstrated by growing bacteria with sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics chloramphenicol and erythromycin. Nonrecombinant surface display on LAB, based on LysM repeats, was optimized by selecting Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 as the optimal host and by introducing antibiotics as additives for increasing surface display on L. lactis. Additionally, effective display of DARPins on the surfaces of nonrecombinant LAB has opened up several new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:25576617

  1. A novel plasmid vector designed for chromosomal gene integration and expression: use for developing a genetically stable Escherichia coli melanin production strain.

    PubMed

    Sabido, Andrea; Martínez, Luz María; de Anda, Ramón; Martínez, Alfredo; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of valuable products are usually generated by transformation with plasmid expression vectors. However, in spite of their usefulness, common problems associated with plasmid use include segregrational and structural instability as well as undesired copy-number effects. A viable alternative to plasmid use is chromosomal gene integration. With the purpose of facilitating the process of stable strain generation, a novel chromosomal integration vector was developed and tested. We describe the construction and use of novel expression vector pLoxGentrc that contains the strong trc promoter (P(trc)), a multiple cloning site, the T1 and T2 rrnB terminator sequences, the lacI(q) gene and the aacC1 gene conferring gentamicin resistance flanked by two loxP sites. As a demonstration of utility, melanin-producing strains of E. coli were generated employing this vector. Melanin is a polymer synthesized by the enzyme tyrosinase using l-tyrosine as substrate. The melA gene encoding a tyrosinase from Rhizobium etli was ligated to pLoxGentrc to generate pLoxGentrcmelA. This plasmid was transformed into E. coli W3110 to generate a melanin-producing strain. A region from this plasmid including P(trc)melA, T1 and T2 rrnB and the aacC1 gene was amplified by PCR employing primers with 45 b regions of homology to the lacZ gene. The PCR product was electroporated into strain W3110 that expressed the λ-Red enzymes. From this experiment, strain W3110P(tr)(c)melA, was obtained having the melA gene inserted in the lacZ locus. Fermentor cultures with strain W3110/pLoxGentrcmelA grown in the presence and absence of gentamicin as well as W3110P(tr)(c)melA without antibiotic revealed that the latter displays high genetic stability as well as the highest melanin titer. Vector pLoxGentrc should be useful during strain generation processes, enabling direct comparison of plasmid and chromosome-based production systems. PMID:22884755

  2. A novel plasmid vector designed for chromosomal gene integration and expression: use for developing a genetically stable Escherichia coli melanin production strain.

    PubMed

    Sabido, Andrea; Martínez, Luz María; de Anda, Ramón; Martínez, Alfredo; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of valuable products are usually generated by transformation with plasmid expression vectors. However, in spite of their usefulness, common problems associated with plasmid use include segregrational and structural instability as well as undesired copy-number effects. A viable alternative to plasmid use is chromosomal gene integration. With the purpose of facilitating the process of stable strain generation, a novel chromosomal integration vector was developed and tested. We describe the construction and use of novel expression vector pLoxGentrc that contains the strong trc promoter (P(trc)), a multiple cloning site, the T1 and T2 rrnB terminator sequences, the lacI(q) gene and the aacC1 gene conferring gentamicin resistance flanked by two loxP sites. As a demonstration of utility, melanin-producing strains of E. coli were generated employing this vector. Melanin is a polymer synthesized by the enzyme tyrosinase using l-tyrosine as substrate. The melA gene encoding a tyrosinase from Rhizobium etli was ligated to pLoxGentrc to generate pLoxGentrcmelA. This plasmid was transformed into E. coli W3110 to generate a melanin-producing strain. A region from this plasmid including P(trc)melA, T1 and T2 rrnB and the aacC1 gene was amplified by PCR employing primers with 45 b regions of homology to the lacZ gene. The PCR product was electroporated into strain W3110 that expressed the λ-Red enzymes. From this experiment, strain W3110P(tr)(c)melA, was obtained having the melA gene inserted in the lacZ locus. Fermentor cultures with strain W3110/pLoxGentrcmelA grown in the presence and absence of gentamicin as well as W3110P(tr)(c)melA without antibiotic revealed that the latter displays high genetic stability as well as the highest melanin titer. Vector pLoxGentrc should be useful during strain generation processes, enabling direct comparison of plasmid and chromosome-based production systems.

  3. Strain gage system evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolleris, G. W.; Mazur, H. J.; Kokoszka, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine the reliability of various strain gage systems when applied to rotating compressor blades in an aircraft gas turbine engine. A survey of current technology strain gage systems was conducted to provide a basis for selecting candidate systems for evaluation. Testing and evaluation was conducted in an F 100 engine. Sixty strain gage systems of seven different designs were installed on the first and third stages of an F 100 engine fan. Nineteen strain gage failures occurred during 62 hours of engine operation, for a survival rate of 68 percent. Of the failures, 16 occurred at blade-to-disk leadwire jumps (84 percent), two at a leadwire splice (11 percent), and one at a gage splice (5 percent). Effects of erosion, temperature, G-loading, and stress levels are discussed. Results of a post-test analysis of the individual components of each strain gage system are presented.

  4. Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  5. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  6. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  7. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  8. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  9. Genetic analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains from patients in Cyprus: identification of a new subtype designated subtype I.

    PubMed Central

    Kostrikis, L G; Bagdades, E; Cao, Y; Zhang, L; Dimitriou, D; Ho, D D

    1995-01-01

    DNA sequences encoding the C2 to V3 region of envelope glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were amplified by PCR from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from 24 of 25 HIV-1-seropositive patients from Cyprus. By using a heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA), all amplified products were studied genetically and compared with 16 previously characterized HIV-1 strains belonging to subtypes A through F. HMA results revealed that HIV-1 gp120 sequences from 15 of our patients were of subtype B of HIV-1, whereas one isolate was of subtype C. However, gp120 sequences from eight patients had no obvious similarities to the known subtypes as defined by HMA. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of molecular clones confirmed the HMA results and placed the eight undefined HIV-1 isolates into three distinct genetic clusters. On the basis of branch topology and lengths of the phylogenetic tree, we conclude that one group consisting of three clones from two patients represents a new HIV-1 env subtype, which we have termed subtype I. The remaining two sequence clusters, consisting of five sequences from four patients and two sequences from two other patients, are distally related to subtypes A and F. These data demonstrate the extensive heterogeneity of HIV-1 in Cyprus, including the presence of new subtype. PMID:7666516

  10. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla L.; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rudiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304688

  12. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134).

    PubMed

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-07-29

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver Strain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' strain and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in strain among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…

  14. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  15. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  16. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles from two acidophilic strains of Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida and their antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Golińska, Patrycja; Wypij, Magdalena; Rathod, Dnyaneshwar; Tikar, Sagar; Dahm, Hanna; Rai, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is an eco-friendly approach by using different biological sources; for example, plants and microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and actinobacteria. In this report, we present the biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by acidophilic actinomycetes SL19 and SL24 strains isolated from pine forest soil (pH < 4.0). The isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequence were identified as Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by visual observations of colour change from light-yellow to dark-brown. The UV-vis spectra of AgNPs were recorded at 425 and 430 nm. The AgNPs were further characterized by Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), Zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). FTIR analysis revealed the presence of proteins as a capping agent. TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical and polydispersed NPs of 12.7 and 15.9 nm sizes. The in vitro antibacterial activity of AgNPs alone and in combination with antibiotics was evaluated against clinical bacteria viz., Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and uropathogens such as Enterobacter, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and E. coli. The lowest MIC (40 μg ml(-1) ) was demonstrated by AgNPs synthesized from SL24 against E. coli. However, the AgNPs of SL19 showed lowest MIC (70 μg ml(-1) ) against S. aureus. The activity of antibiotic was enhanced, when tested in combination with silver nanoparticles synthesized from both actinobacterial strains.

  17. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles from two acidophilic strains of Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida and their antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Golińska, Patrycja; Wypij, Magdalena; Rathod, Dnyaneshwar; Tikar, Sagar; Dahm, Hanna; Rai, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is an eco-friendly approach by using different biological sources; for example, plants and microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and actinobacteria. In this report, we present the biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by acidophilic actinomycetes SL19 and SL24 strains isolated from pine forest soil (pH < 4.0). The isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequence were identified as Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by visual observations of colour change from light-yellow to dark-brown. The UV-vis spectra of AgNPs were recorded at 425 and 430 nm. The AgNPs were further characterized by Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), Zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). FTIR analysis revealed the presence of proteins as a capping agent. TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical and polydispersed NPs of 12.7 and 15.9 nm sizes. The in vitro antibacterial activity of AgNPs alone and in combination with antibiotics was evaluated against clinical bacteria viz., Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and uropathogens such as Enterobacter, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and E. coli. The lowest MIC (40 μg ml(-1) ) was demonstrated by AgNPs synthesized from SL24 against E. coli. However, the AgNPs of SL19 showed lowest MIC (70 μg ml(-1) ) against S. aureus. The activity of antibiotic was enhanced, when tested in combination with silver nanoparticles synthesized from both actinobacterial strains. PMID:27151174

  18. Effects of systematic clinical supervision on psychiatric nurses' sense of coherence, creativity, work-related strain, job satisfaction and view of the effects from clinical supervision: a pre-post test design.

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Hallberg, I R

    1999-10-01

    There are few investigations of the type and the outcome of interventions aimed at supporting nurses caring for psychiatric patients. Therefore a prepost-test design study was used in which 22 psychiatric nurses, on a general psychiatric ward were examined before, during and after one year of systematic clinical supervision combined with supervised documented, planned, individualized care. The methods used were the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC), the Creative Climate Questionnaire (CCQ), the Work-Related Strain Inventory and 34 statements from the Satisfaction with Nursing Care and Work Questionnaire (SNCW). In addition 14 statements were developed to evaluate the nurses' view of the effects from clinical supervision. The baseline values for the CCQ indicated a stagnant organization and a high score in the conflict dimension indicated personal and emotional tensions within the organization. The intervention led to a significantly increased creative and innovative climate in the dimensions for trust, idea time and reduced conflicts. However, the organizational climate remained stagnant. The nurses' view of the effects from clinical supervision also increased significantly. There were no significant changes in the nurses' SNCW, WRSI or SOC score. The result of the correlation analysis indicated that a strong sense of coherence was related to low work-related strain but not to unsatisfactory working conditions/milieu. The results gave some support to the idea that systematic clinical supervision and supervised nursing care plans constitute one type of support strategy that improves creativity and the organizational climate. It may, not, however, buffer for interpersonal problems. Further research is required to explore the need for effects of various support systems depending on the circumstances in the organization.

  19. Can a strain yield a qubit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A Josepshon qubit is designed via the application of a tensile strain to a topological insulator surface, sandwiched between two s-wave superconductors. The strain applied leads to a shift in Dirac point without changing the conducting states existing on the surface of a topological insulator. This strain applied can be tuned to form a π-junction in such a structure. Combining two such junctions in a ring architecture leads to the ground state of the ring being in a doubly degenerate state- ``0'' and ``1'' states of the qubit. A qubit designed this way is easily controlled via the tunable strain. We report on the conditions necessary to design such a qubit. Finally the operating time of a single qubit phase gate is derived. This work was supported by funds from Dept. of Science and Technology (Nanomission), Govt. of India, Grant No. SR/NM/NS-1101/2011.

  20. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  1. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine.

    PubMed

    Castro, Daniel B A; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M E; Silva, Bárbara P da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R B; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G; Lacerda, Gileno V Jr; Nery, Mariana B P; Gomes, Milene B; Souza, Salatiel S de; Silva, Thiago M da; Rodrigues, Viviane D; Paulino, Luciana C; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F C; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2015-09-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest. PMID:26484219

  2. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniel B.A.; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M. e; Silva, Bárbara P. da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R.B.; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G.; Lacerda, Gileno V. Jr; Nery, Mariana B.P.; Gomes, Milene B.; Souza, Salatiel S. de; Silva, Thiago M. da; Rodrigues, Viviane D.; Paulino, Luciana C.; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F.C.; Ottoboni, Laura M.M.

    2015-01-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest. PMID:26484219

  3. Multiplexed FBG strain measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsztynski, Jerzy; Lewandowski, Lech; Jasiewicz, Wieslaw; Jedrzejewski, Kazimierz P.

    2008-11-01

    The idea and, design and realization of fiber Bragg grating multiplexing system is given. Special Bragg gratings with very long and linear side slopes were practically realized. They were tuned for different wavelengths distanced 9nm in each measurement channel. The system was applied for strain control. Special spectrophotometer with linear photodiode array was made. For flexible distributed multiplexing of many sensor channels fiber-optic switches were used.

  4. AN ORGANOTYPIC UNIAXIAL STRAIN MODEL USING MICROFLUIDICS

    PubMed Central

    Dollé, Jean-Pierre; Morrison, Barclay; Schloss, Rene R.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries are the leading cause of disability each year in the US. The most common and devastating consequence is the stretching of axons caused by shear deformation that occurs during rotational acceleration of the brain during injury. The injury effects on axonal molecular and functional events are not fully characterized. We have developed a strain injury model that maintains the three dimensional cell architecture and neuronal networks found in vivo with the ability to visualize individual axons and their response to a mechanical injury. The advantage of this model is that it can apply uniaxial strains to axons that make functional connections between two organotypic slices and injury responses can be observed in real-time and over long term. This uniaxial strain model was designed to be capable of applying an array of mechanical strains at various rates of strain, thus replicating a range of modes of axonal injury. Long term culture, preservation of slice and cell orientation, and slice-slice connection on the device was demonstrated. The device has the ability to strain either individual axons or bundles of axons through the control of microchannel dimensions. The fidelity of the model was verified by observing characteristic responses to various strain injuries which included axonal beading, delayed elastic effects and breakdown in microtubules. Microtubule breakdown was shown to be dependent on the degree of the applied strain field, where maximal breakdown was observed at peak strain and minimal breakdown is observed at low strain. This strain injury model could be a powerful tool in assessing strain injury effects on functional axonal connections. PMID:23233120

  5. Development of quantitative PCR and metagenomics-based approaches for strain quantification of a defined mixed-strain starter culture.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Pernille; Vindeløv, Jannik; Arneborg, Nils; Brockmann, Elke

    2014-05-01

    Although the strain composition of mixed cultures may hugely affect production of various fermented foods, such as e.g. cheese, tools for investigating it have so far been limited. In this study, two new approaches for quantification of seven Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains (S1-S7) in a defined mixed-strain starter culture were developed and verified. By mapping NGS reads from 47 sequenced L. lactis strains to de novo assembly contigs of the seven strains, two strain-specific sequence regions (SEQ1 and SEQ2) were identified for each strain for qPCR primer design (A1 and A2). The qPCR assays amplified their strain-specific sequence region target efficiently. Additionally, high reproducibility was obtained in a validation sample containing equal amounts of the seven strains, and assay-to-assay coefficients of variance (CVs) for six (i.e. S1, S2, S4-S7) of the seven strains correlated to the inter-plate CVs. Hence, at least for six strains, the qPCR assay design approach was successful. The metagenomics-based approach quantified the seven strains based on average coverage of SEQ1 and SEQ2 by mapping sequencing reads from the validation sample to the strain-specific sequence regions. Average coverages of the SEQ1 and SEQ2 in the metagenomics data showed CVs of ≤17.3% for six strains (i.e. S1-S4, S6, S7). Thus, the metagenomics-based quantification approach was considered successful for six strains, regardless of the strain-specific sequence region used. When comparing qPCR- and metagenomics-based quantifications of the validation sample, the identified strain-specific sequence regions were considered suitable and applicable for quantification at a strain level of defined mixed-strain starter cultures.

  6. Elastocaloric cooling processes: The influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Marvin; Schütze, Andreas; Seelecke, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span of elastocaloric cooling processes. The elastocaloric material, a newly developed quaternary Ni-Ti-Cu-V alloy, is characterized at different maximum strains and strain rates. The experiments are performed with a specially designed test setup, which enables the measurement of mechanical and thermal process parameters. The material efficiency is compared to the efficiency of the Carnot process at equivalent thermal operation conditions. This method allows for a direct comparison of the investigated material with other caloric materials.

  7. Heterogeneity of inelastic strain during creep of Carrara marble: Microscale strain measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Evans, Brian

    2016-08-01

    We combined the split cylinder technique with microfabrication technology to observe strain heterogeneities that were produced during high-pressure transient creep of Carrara marble. Samples were patterned with a custom-designed grid of markers spaced 10 µm apart and containing an embedded coordinate system. The microscale strain measurement (MSSM) technique described here allowed us to analyze the local strain distribution with unprecedented detail over large regions. The description of the strain field is a function of the area over which strain is being computed. The scale at which the strain field can be considered homogeneous can provide insight into the deformation processes taking place. At 400-500°C, when twinning production is prolific, we observe highly strained bands that span several grains. One possible cause for the multigrain bands is the need to relieve strain incompatibilities that result when twins impinge on neighboring grains. At 600-700°C, the strain fields are still quite heterogeneous, and local strain varies substantially within grains and near grain boundaries, but the multigrain slip bands are not present. Deformation is concentrated in much smaller areas within grains and along some grain boundaries. The disappearance of the multigrain slip bands occurs when the deformation conditions allow additional slip systems to be activated. At 600°C, when the total strain is varied from 0.11 to 0.36, the spatial scale of the heterogeneity does not vary, but there are increases in the standard deviation of the distribution of local strains normalized by the total strain; thus, we conclude that the microstructure does not achieve a steady state in this strain interval.

  8. High Temperature Capacitive Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P., Jr.; Wnuk, Stephen P., III; Wnuk, V. P.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitive strain gages designed for measurements in wind tunnels to 2000 F were built and evaluated. Two design approaches were followed. One approach was based on fixed capacitor plates with a movable ground plane inserted between the plates to effect differential capacitive output with strain. The second approach was based on movable capacitor plates suspended between sapphire bearings, housed in a rugged body, and arranged to operate as a differential capacitor. A sapphire bearing gage (1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. in size) was built with a range of 50,000 and a resolution of 200 microstrain. Apparent strain on Rene' 41 was less than + or - 1000 microstrain from room temperature to 2000 F. Three gage models were built from the Ground Plane Differential concept. The first was 1/4 in. square by 1/32 in. high and useable to 700 F. The second was 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high and useable to 1440 F. The third, also 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high was expected to operate in the 1600 to 2000 F range, but was not tested because time and funding ended.

  9. Strain limit criteria to predict failure

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify existing structures for conditions that are beyond the original design basis. Determination of the component failure load is useful for this type of evaluation. This paper presents criteria based upon strain limits to predict the load at failure. The failure modes addressed are excessive plastic deformations, localized plastic strains, and structural instability. The effects of analytical method sophistication, as built configurations, material properties degradation, and stress state are addressed by the criteria.

  10. Strain gage balances and buffet gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    One-piece strain gage force balances were developed for use in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This was accomplished by studying the effects of the cryogenic environment on materials, strain gages, cements, solders, and moisture proofing agents, and selecting those that minimized strain gage output changes due to temperature. In addition, because of the higher loads that may be imposed by the NTF, these balances are designed to carry a larger load for a given diameter than conventional balances. Full cryogenic calibrations were accomplished, and wind tunnel results that were obtained from the Langley 0-3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel were used to verify laboratory test results.

  11. Can strain magnetize light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Strain in photonic structures can induce pseudomagnetic fields and Landau levels. Nature Photonics spoke to Mordechai Segev, Mikael Rechtsman, Alexander Szameit and Julia Zeuner about their unique approach.

  12. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. A Portable Calibrator for Dynamic Strain Gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, Albert E

    1943-01-01

    A portable device for calibrating dynamic strain gages is described. The device contains a motor-driven cam, which applies alternating tensile loads to a metal strip 5/8 inch wide and 6 1/4 inches long. The cam is designed to produce a nearly sinusoidal variation of strain with time. Dynamic strain gages with gage lengths up to 5 inches may be calibrated by mounting them on the strip and by changing the frequency and the amplitude of the tensile load. The frequency may be varied from 15 to 30 cycles per second and the strain amplitude from 0 to 10x10-4 in steps of 2x10-4.

  15. Thin film strain gage development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.; Anderson, W. L.; Claing, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Sputtered thin-film dynamic strain gages of 2 millimeter (0.08 in) gage length and 10 micrometer (0.0004 in) thickness were fabricated on turbojet engine blades and tested in a simulated compressor environment. Four designs were developed, two for service to 600 K (600 F) and two for service to 900 K (1200 F). The program included a detailed study of guidelines for formulating strain-gage alloys to achieve superior dynamic and static gage performance. The tests included gage factor, fatigue, temperature cycling, spin to 100,000 G, and erosion. Since the installations are 30 times thinner than conventional wire strain gage installations, and any alteration of the aerodynamic, thermal, or structural performance of the blade is correspondingly reduced, dynamic strain measurement accuracy higher than that attained with conventional gages is expected. The low profile and good adherence of the thin film elements is expected to result in improved durability over conventional gage elements in engine tests.

  16. Heat strain during explosive ordnance disposal.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian B; Rojek, Amanda M; Hunt, Andrew P

    2011-08-01

    Bomb technicians perform their work while encapsulated in explosive ordnance disposal suits. Designed primarily for safety, these suits have an unintended consequence of impairing the body's natural mechanisms for heat dissipation. Consequently, bomb technicians are known to experience symptoms of heat illness while performing their work. This research provides the first field based analysis of heat strain in bomb technicians. Six participants undertook simulated operational tasks across 2 days of variable climate. All subjects demonstrated high levels of heat strain as evidenced by elevated heart rate, core body temperature, and physiological strain index. Participants also reported signs and symptoms associated with heat illness. These results were exacerbated by more intense physical activity despite being undertaken in a cooler environment. The universal experience of heat strain in this sample has significant implications for the health of bomb technicians and additional research examining methods to improve temperature regulation and performance is warranted. PMID:21882791

  17. Nanowires enabling strained photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, J.; Bertagnolli, E.; Lugstein, A.; Birner, S.

    2014-04-21

    Photovoltaic nano-devices have largely been relying on charge separation in conventional p-n junctions. Junction formation via doping, however, imposes major challenges in process control. Here, we report on a concept for photovoltaic energy conversion at the nano scale without the need for intentional doping. Our approach relies on charge carrier separation in inhomogeneously strained germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). This concept utilizes the strain-induced gradient in bandgap along tapered NWs. Experimental data confirms the feasibility of strain-induced charge separation in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge NW devices with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼5%. The charge separation mechanism, though, is not inherently limited to a distinct material. Our work establishes a class of photovoltaic nano-devices with its opto-electronic properties engineered by size, shape, and applied strain.

  18. Magnetocaloric materials: Strained relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordblad, Per

    2013-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect could form the basis for efficient refrigeration technologies. The finding that large and reversible magnetocaloric effects can be induced through a strain-mediated feedback mechanism may expand the range of available magnetocaloric materials.

  19. What Are Sprains and Strains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprain, one or more ligaments is stretched or torn. What Causes a Sprain? Where Do Sprains Usually ... strain, a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn. What Causes Strains? A strain is caused by ...

  20. Flexible Bond Wire Capacitive Strain Sensor for Vehicle Tyres.

    PubMed

    Cao, Siyang; Pyatt, Simon; Anthony, Carl J; Kubba, Ammar I; Kubba, Ali E; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2016-01-01

    The safety of the driving experience and manoeuvrability of a vehicle can be improved by detecting the strain in tyres. To measure strain accurately in rubber, the strain sensor needs to be flexible so that it does not deform the medium that it is measuring. In this work, a novel flexible bond wire capacitive strain sensor for measuring the strain in tyres is developed, fabricated and calibrated. An array of 25 micron diameter wire bonds in an approximately 8 mm × 8 mm area is built to create an interdigitated structure, which consists of 50 wire loops resulting in 49 capacitor pairs in parallel. Laser machining was used to pattern copper on a flexible printed circuit board PCB to make the bond pads for the wire attachment. The wire array was finally packaged and embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which acts as the structural material that is strained. The capacitance of the device is in a linear like relationship with respect to the strain, which can measure the strain up to at least ±60,000 micro-strain (±6%) with a resolution of ~132 micro-strain (0.013%). In-tyre testing under static loading has shown the ability of the sensor to measure large tyre strains. The technology used for sensor fabrication lends itself to mass production and so the design is considered to be consistent with low cost commercialisable strain sensing technology. PMID:27338402

  1. Flexible Bond Wire Capacitive Strain Sensor for Vehicle Tyres.

    PubMed

    Cao, Siyang; Pyatt, Simon; Anthony, Carl J; Kubba, Ammar I; Kubba, Ali E; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2016-06-21

    The safety of the driving experience and manoeuvrability of a vehicle can be improved by detecting the strain in tyres. To measure strain accurately in rubber, the strain sensor needs to be flexible so that it does not deform the medium that it is measuring. In this work, a novel flexible bond wire capacitive strain sensor for measuring the strain in tyres is developed, fabricated and calibrated. An array of 25 micron diameter wire bonds in an approximately 8 mm × 8 mm area is built to create an interdigitated structure, which consists of 50 wire loops resulting in 49 capacitor pairs in parallel. Laser machining was used to pattern copper on a flexible printed circuit board PCB to make the bond pads for the wire attachment. The wire array was finally packaged and embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which acts as the structural material that is strained. The capacitance of the device is in a linear like relationship with respect to the strain, which can measure the strain up to at least ±60,000 micro-strain (±6%) with a resolution of ~132 micro-strain (0.013%). In-tyre testing under static loading has shown the ability of the sensor to measure large tyre strains. The technology used for sensor fabrication lends itself to mass production and so the design is considered to be consistent with low cost commercialisable strain sensing technology.

  2. Flexible Bond Wire Capacitive Strain Sensor for Vehicle Tyres

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Siyang; Pyatt, Simon; Anthony, Carl J.; Kubba, Ammar I.; Kubba, Ali E.; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2016-01-01

    The safety of the driving experience and manoeuvrability of a vehicle can be improved by detecting the strain in tyres. To measure strain accurately in rubber, the strain sensor needs to be flexible so that it does not deform the medium that it is measuring. In this work, a novel flexible bond wire capacitive strain sensor for measuring the strain in tyres is developed, fabricated and calibrated. An array of 25 micron diameter wire bonds in an approximately 8 mm × 8 mm area is built to create an interdigitated structure, which consists of 50 wire loops resulting in 49 capacitor pairs in parallel. Laser machining was used to pattern copper on a flexible printed circuit board PCB to make the bond pads for the wire attachment. The wire array was finally packaged and embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which acts as the structural material that is strained. The capacitance of the device is in a linear like relationship with respect to the strain, which can measure the strain up to at least ±60,000 micro-strain (±6%) with a resolution of ~132 micro-strain (0.013%). In-tyre testing under static loading has shown the ability of the sensor to measure large tyre strains. The technology used for sensor fabrication lends itself to mass production and so the design is considered to be consistent with low cost commercialisable strain sensing technology. PMID:27338402

  3. Test load verification through strain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Harrington, F.

    1995-01-01

    A traditional binding acceptance criterion on polycrystalline structures is the experimental verification of the ultimate factor of safety. At fracture, the induced strain is inelastic and about an order-of-magnitude greater than designed for maximum expected operational limit. At this extreme strained condition, the structure may rotate and displace at the applied verification load such as to unknowingly distort the load transfer into the static test article. Test may result in erroneously accepting a submarginal design or rejecting a reliable one. A technique was developed to identify, monitor, and assess the load transmission error through two back-to-back surface-measured strain data. The technique is programmed for expediency and convenience. Though the method was developed to support affordable aerostructures, the method is also applicable for most high-performance air and surface transportation structural systems.

  4. The genome of Shigella dysenteriae strain Sd1617 comparison to representative strains in evaluating pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vongsawan, Ajchara A.; Kapatral, Vinayak; Vaisvil, Benjamin; Burd, Henry; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Venkatesan, Malabi M.; Mason, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed Shigella dysenteriae strain Sd1617 serotype 1 that is widely used as model strain for vaccine design, trials and research. A combination of next-generation sequencing platforms and assembly yielded two contigs representing a chromosome size of 4.34 Mb and the large virulence plasmid of 177 kb. This genome sequence is compared with other Shigella genomes in order to understand gene complexity and pathogenic factors. PMID:25743074

  5. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials. PMID:27283872

  6. Ultra-responsive soft matter from strain-stiffening hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Maarten; Dennison, Matthew; Mabesoone, Mathijs F J; MacKintosh, Frederick C; Rowan, Alan E; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2014-01-01

    The stiffness of hydrogels is crucial for their application. Nature's hydrogels become stiffer as they are strained. This stiffness is not constant but increases when the gel is strained. This stiffening is used, for instance, by cells that actively strain their environment to modulate their function. When optimized, such strain-stiffening materials become extremely sensitive and very responsive to stress. Strain stiffening, however, is unexplored in synthetic gels since the structural design parameters are unknown. Here we uncover how readily tuneable parameters such as concentration, temperature and polymer length impact the stiffening behaviour. Our work also reveals the marginal point, a well-described but never observed, critical point in the gelation process. Around this point, we observe a transition from a low-viscous liquid to an elastic gel upon applying minute stresses. Our experimental work in combination with network theory yields universal design principles for future strain-stiffening materials. PMID:25510333

  7. Ultra-responsive soft matter from strain-stiffening hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaspers, Maarten; Dennison, Matthew; Mabesoone, Mathijs F. J.; Mackintosh, Frederick C.; Rowan, Alan E.; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2014-12-01

    The stiffness of hydrogels is crucial for their application. Nature’s hydrogels become stiffer as they are strained. This stiffness is not constant but increases when the gel is strained. This stiffening is used, for instance, by cells that actively strain their environment to modulate their function. When optimized, such strain-stiffening materials become extremely sensitive and very responsive to stress. Strain stiffening, however, is unexplored in synthetic gels since the structural design parameters are unknown. Here we uncover how readily tuneable parameters such as concentration, temperature and polymer length impact the stiffening behaviour. Our work also reveals the marginal point, a well-described but never observed, critical point in the gelation process. Around this point, we observe a transition from a low-viscous liquid to an elastic gel upon applying minute stresses. Our experimental work in combination with network theory yields universal design principles for future strain-stiffening materials.

  8. Ultra-responsive soft matter from strain-stiffening hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Maarten; Dennison, Matthew; Mabesoone, Mathijs F. J.; MacKintosh, Frederick C.; Rowan, Alan E.; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2014-01-01

    The stiffness of hydrogels is crucial for their application. Nature’s hydrogels become stiffer as they are strained. This stiffness is not constant but increases when the gel is strained. This stiffening is used, for instance, by cells that actively strain their environment to modulate their function. When optimized, such strain-stiffening materials become extremely sensitive and very responsive to stress. Strain stiffening, however, is unexplored in synthetic gels since the structural design parameters are unknown. Here we uncover how readily tuneable parameters such as concentration, temperature and polymer length impact the stiffening behaviour. Our work also reveals the marginal point, a well-described but never observed, critical point in the gelation process. Around this point, we observe a transition from a low-viscous liquid to an elastic gel upon applying minute stresses. Our experimental work in combination with network theory yields universal design principles for future strain-stiffening materials. PMID:25510333

  9. Ultra-responsive soft matter from strain-stiffening hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Maarten; Dennison, Matthew; Mabesoone, Mathijs F J; MacKintosh, Frederick C; Rowan, Alan E; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2014-12-16

    The stiffness of hydrogels is crucial for their application. Nature's hydrogels become stiffer as they are strained. This stiffness is not constant but increases when the gel is strained. This stiffening is used, for instance, by cells that actively strain their environment to modulate their function. When optimized, such strain-stiffening materials become extremely sensitive and very responsive to stress. Strain stiffening, however, is unexplored in synthetic gels since the structural design parameters are unknown. Here we uncover how readily tuneable parameters such as concentration, temperature and polymer length impact the stiffening behaviour. Our work also reveals the marginal point, a well-described but never observed, critical point in the gelation process. Around this point, we observe a transition from a low-viscous liquid to an elastic gel upon applying minute stresses. Our experimental work in combination with network theory yields universal design principles for future strain-stiffening materials.

  10. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-06-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials.

  11. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P; Pint, Cary L

    2016-06-10

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials.

  12. MEMS Graphene Strain Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Clinton Wen-Chieh

    Graphene is a two dimensional honeycomb structure of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms that has possibilities in many applications due to its excellent mechanical and electrical properties. One application for Graphene is in the field of sensors. Graphene's electronic properties do not degrade when it undergoes mechanical strain which is advantageous for strain sensors. In this thesis, certain properties, such as the piezo-resistivity and flexibility, of graphene will be explored to show how they can be utilized to make a strain sensing device. Our original fabrication process of patterning graphene and the transfer process of graphene onto a flexible substrate will be discussed. The development of a stretchable and flexible graphene based rosette strain sensor will also be detailed. Developing a novel, reliable patterning process for the graphene is the first step to manufacture a stretchable graphene based sensor. The graphene was patterned using a photolithography and etching process that was developed by our research team, then it was transferred to a flexible polymer substrate with the use of a combination of soft lithography and wet etching of the Ni foil with ferric chloride solution. Graphene patterning is an essential step in fabricating reliable and sensitive sensors. With this process, graphene can be consistently patterned into different shapes and sizes. To utilize the graphene as the sensing material it also needs to be transferred onto a flexible substrate. The innovative transfer process developed by our research team consistently adheres graphene to a flexible PDMS substrate while removing the original nickel substrate. In the end, the graphene was transferred from the metal substrate to the desired flexible substrate. This process was repeated multiple times to create a stack and multilayer device. While many graphene-based strain sensors have been developed, they are uni-directional and can only measure the strain applied on the sensor in a principle

  13. Design and evaluation of two-stage multiplex real-time PCR method for detecting O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC strains from beef samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: E. coli O157:H7 was first recognized as a human pathogen in 1982 and until recently was the only E. coli strain mandated for testing by the USDA. In June 2012, the USDA declared six additional Shiga-toxin producing E. coli serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as adulterant...

  14. The designated type strain of Pseudomonas halophila Fendrich 1989 is DSM 3051, the designated type strain of Halovibrio variabilis Fendrich 1989 is DSM 3050, the new name Halomonas utahensis (Fendrich 1989) Sorokin and Tindall 2006 is created for the species represented by DSM 3051 when treated as a member of the genus Halomonas, the combination Halomonas variabilis (Fendrich 1989) Dobson and Franzmann 1996 is rejected, and the combination Halovibrio denitrificans Sorokin et al. 2006 is validly published with an emendation of the description of the genus Halovibrio Fendrich 1989 emend. Sorokin et al. 2006. Opinion 93. Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tindall, B J

    2014-10-01

    The Judicial Commission affirms that, according to information presented to it, the designated type strain of Pseudomonas halophila Fendrich 1989 is DSM 3051 (replacing DSM 3050) and the designated type strain of Halovibrio variabilis Fendrich 1989 is DSM 3050 (replacing DSM 3051). A new name, Halomonas utahensis (Fendrich 1989) Sorokin and Tindall 2006 nom. nov., is created for the species represented by DSM 3051 when treated as a member of the genus Halomonas, because the combination Halomonas halophila (Quesada et al. 1984) Dobson and Franzmann 1996 has priority based on the fact that the epithet halophila in the combination Halomonas halophila (Quesada et al. 1984) Dobson and Franzmann 1996 ( BASOYNM: Deleya halophila Quesada et al. 1984) has priority over the epithet halophila should the taxon Pseudomonas halophila Fendrich 1989 be treated as a member of the genus Halomonas. The combination Halomonas variabilis (Fendrich 1989) Dobson and Franzmann 1996 is rejected. The combination Halovibrio denitrificans Sorokin et al. 2006 is validly published with an emendation of the description of the genus Halovibrio Fendrich 1989 emend. Sorokin et al. 2006.

  15. Fiber optic strain monitoring for pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, J.W.

    1998-04-08

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of using fiber optic Bragg grating sensors (BGS) to measure axial and bending strain in pipes. Work was performed by McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) and included BGS design and procurement. In addition to the pipe strain testing, a number of BGS evaluations were performed. Several methods were evaluated to protect and encapsulate the BGS, which are embedded inside an optical fiber, and strain transfer tests were performed on two of the encapsulation approaches. A high strain bending test to failure was performed on one BGS. A special test section was used to characterize the performance of the BGS and compare to standard electrical resistance foil strain gages. Two sets of pipe strain tests were performed. In the first test series, optical fiber was positioned along the pipe test section and embedded BGS were attached directly to the outside of the pipe wall. In the second tests series, the BGS were encapsulated inside a stainless steel tube which was attached to the outside of the pipe wall. All the tests were successfully completed, the data analyzed, and the results summarized in this report.

  16. High-Temperature Adhesive Strain Gage Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique strain gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial strain gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial strain gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial strain gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' strain gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each strain gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal strain gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the strain gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.

  17. Genetic transformation assays for identification of strains of Moraxella urethralis.

    PubMed Central

    Juni, E

    1977-01-01

    Studies of 31 strains of Moraxella urethralis have shown that 20 of them are competent for genetic transformation. This finding has led to the development of transformation assays for identification of newly isolated strains of this organism. Crude deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples from all strains of M. urethralis readily transform auxotrophic mutants of competent strains to prototrophy, whereas DNA samples from unrelated bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Moraxella, and Neisseria species uniformly fail to elicit positive transformation of mutant tester strains. One of the competent strains of M. urethralis investigated is a naturally occurring mutant defective in its ability to utilize citrate as a carbon and energy source. DNA samples from 29 of the 30 remaining strains of utilization; the one nonreacting strain is citrate negative and probably possesses the same genetic lesion as the citrate-negative mutant. Three organisms originally identified as strains of M. urethralis, because of their phenotypic properties, are probably incorrectly designated, since DNA samples from these strains failed to transform any of the tester mutant strains used in the present study. The transformation assay for M. urethralis is very simple and can be performed readily in a clinical laboratory. The entire procedure can be carried out in less than 24 h. Images PMID:845247

  18. Genomic fingerprinting of bacteriocin-producer strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Janaína dos S; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; de Oliveira, Selma S; Ceotto, Hilana; dos Santos, Kátia Regina N; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de F

    2005-09-01

    Among 363 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, 21 were shown to produce bacteriocins (Bac), antimicrobial peptides with potential biotechnological applications. This collection includes strains which are either isolated from food, patients and healthy cattle, or are involved in subclinical bovine mastitis. From these 21 strains, 17 were shown to carry closely-related 8.0-kb Bac plasmids encoding bacteriocins either identical to or similar to aureocin A70, a bacteriocin able to inhibit strains of Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne pathogen. Such findings prompted us to investigate the genetic relationships among these Bac+ strains. To obtain more discriminatory results, a combined analysis of AP-PCR, rep-PCR, and a modified PCR technique that we designated SD-PCR was employed. The 17 Bac+ strains harboring 8.0-kb Bac plasmids exhibited seven fingerprint patterns. One such genotype was composed of 8 out of the 11 strains associated with bovine mastitis, which suggests the prevalence of a clone of Bac+ strains involved in this animal infection carrying 8.0-kb Bac plasmids. Our data support the assumption that Bac+ strains of S. aureus carrying genetically related 8.0-kb Bac plasmids do not belong to a single clone. It seems, therefore, that 8.0-kb Bac plasmids have spread horizontally among different S. aureus strains. There also seems to be genetic diversity among the remaining Bac+ strains analyzed. PMID:16171981

  19. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  20. Comparative studies of strains Ictero No. I and RGA as the type strain of Leptospira interrogans: agglutinin absorption test, protein and antigen profiles, and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hata, K; Ono, E; Yanagawa, R

    1988-01-01

    Strain Ictero No. I, the first isolate of Leptospira, isolated by Inada and Ido in 1914, was found to be sufficiently qualified to be the type strain of Leptospira interrogans rather than strain RGA. In an agglutinin absorption test, anti-Ictero No. I serum was not absorbed completely with strain RGA, and 25% of the homologous titer remained unabsorbed, while anti-RGA serum was completely absorbed with strain Ictero No. I. Thus, strain Ictero No. I was not serologically identical with strain RGA, and the two strains were considered to be different serovars. A protein band with a molecular weight of approximately 33,000 daltons was detected in strain Ictero No. I but not in strain RGA by SDS-PAGE. By Western blotting, this protein band was detectable with anti-Ictero No. I serum but not with anti-RGA serum. The presence of the 33K protein in strain Ictero No. I, but not in strain RGA, was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation using [125I]-labeled antigens, indicating that the protein antigen was surface-exposed. Only 8 of the 89 enzymes activities were different between strains Ictero No. I and RGA (line Sapporo). From the above results, we propose that strain Ictero No. I should be designated as the type strain of L. interrogans instead of strain RGA.

  1. Development of high temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    High temperature electric resistance wire strain gages were developed and evaluated for use at temperatures exceeding 922 K (1200 F). A special high temperature strain gage alloy (Fe-25Cr-7.5A1), designated BCL-3, was used to fabricate the gages. Pertinent gage characteristics were determined at temperatures up to 1255 K (1800 F). The results of the evaluation were reported in graphical and tabular form. It was concluded that the gages will perform satisfactorily at temperatures to at least 1089 K (1500 F) for at least one hour.

  2. ConStrains identifies microbial strains in metagenomic datasets

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengwei; Knight, Rob; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gevers, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    An important fraction of microbial diversity is harbored in strain individuality, so identification of conspecific bacterial strains is imperative for improved understanding of microbial community functions. Limitations in bioinformatics and sequencing technologies have to date precluded strain identification owing to difficulties in phasing short reads to faithfully recover the original strain-level genotypes, which have highly similar sequences. We present ConStrains, an open-source algorithm that identifies conspecific strains from metagenomic sequence data and reconstructs the phylogeny of these strains in microbial communities. The algorithm uses single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns in a set of universal genes to infer within-species structures that represent strains. Applying ConStrains to simulated and host-derived data sets provides insights into microbial community dynamics. PMID:26344404

  3. ConStrains identifies microbial strains in metagenomic datasets.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengwei; Knight, Rob; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gevers, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    An important fraction of microbial diversity is harbored in strain individuality, so identification of conspecific bacterial strains is imperative for improved understanding of microbial community functions. Limitations in bioinformatics and sequencing technologies have to date precluded strain identification owing to difficulties in phasing short reads to faithfully recover the original strain-level genotypes, which have highly similar sequences. We present ConStrains, an open-source algorithm that identifies conspecific strains from metagenomic sequence data and reconstructs the phylogeny of these strains in microbial communities. The algorithm uses single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns in a set of universal genes to infer within-species structures that represent strains. Applying ConStrains to simulated and host-derived datasets provides insights into microbial community dynamics.

  4. Strain gage barometric transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viton, P.

    1977-01-01

    A strain gage barometric transmitter for measuring the atmospheric pressure in severe environmental conditions is described. This equipment specifications are presented and its performance assessed. It is shown that this barometric sensor can measure the atmospheric pressure with a precision of 0.5 mb during a 6 month period.

  5. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  6. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Sadovskii vortices are patches of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. They were first constructed as models for wakes behind bluff objects. We investigate the Sadovskii vortex in a straining field and examine limiting cases to validate our computational method. One limit is the patch vortex in strain (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971), where there is no vortex sheet. We solve this as a free-boundary problem, and show that a simple method using the Biot-Savart law quickly gives solutions for stable shapes. When used for the more elongated (stronger straining field) situations, the method also leads to new vortex shapes. In the hollow vortex case, where there is no vortex patch and the circulation is entirely due to the vortex sheet (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691 2012), we use the Birkhoff-Rott equation to calculate the velocity of the fluid on the vortex boundary. The combination of these two methods can then be used to calculate the shape and velocity field of the Sadovksii vortex in strain.

  7. Development of a fiber optic high temperature strain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, E. O.; Murphy, K. E.; Brookshire, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    From 1 Apr. 1991 to 31 Aug. 1992, the Georgia Tech Research Institute conducted a research program to develop a high temperature fiber optic strain sensor as part of a measurement program for the space shuttle booster rocket motor. The major objectives of this program were divided into four tasks. Under Task 1, the literature on high-temperature fiber optic strain sensors was reviewed. Task 2 addressed the design and fabrication of the strain sensor. Tests and calibration were conducted under Task 3, and Task 4 was to generate recommendations for a follow-on study of a distributed strain sensor. Task 4 was submitted to NASA as a separate proposal.

  8. A Comparison of Ellipse-Fitting Techniques for Two and Three-Dimensional Strain Analysis, and Their Implementation in an Integrated Computer Program Designed for Field-Based Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, F. W.

    2010-12-01

    A new computer program, EllipseFit 2, was developed to implement computational and graphical techniques for two and three-dimensional geological finite strain analysis. The program includes an integrated set of routines to derive three-dimensional strain from oriented digital photographs, with a graphical interface suitable for field-based structural studies. The intuitive interface and multi-platform deployment make it useful for structural geology teaching laboratories as well (the program is free). Images of oriented sections are digitized using center-point, five-point ellipse, or n-point polygon moment-equivalent ellipse fitting. The latter allows strain calculation from irregular polygons with sub-pixel accuracy (Steger, 1996; Mulchrone and Choudhury, 2004). Graphical strain ellipse techniques include center-to-center methods (Fry, 1979; Erslev, 1988; Erslev and Ge, 1990), with manual and automatic n-point ellipse-fitting. Graphical displays include axial length graphs, Rf/Φ graphs (Dunnet, 1969), logarithmic and hyperbolic polar graphs (Elliott, 1970; Wheeler, 1984) with automatic contouring, and strain maps. Best-fit ellipse calculations include harmonic and circular means, and eigenvalue (Shimamoto and Ikeda, 1976) and mean radial length (Mulchrone et al., 2003) shape-matrix calculations. Shape-matrix error analysis is done analytically (Mulchrone, 2005) and using bootstrap techniques (Efron, 1979). The initial data set can be unstrained to check variation in the calculated pre-strain fabric. Fitting of ellipse-section data to a best-fit ellipsoid (b*) is done using the shape-matrix technique of Shan (2008). Error analysis is done by calculating the section ellipses of b*, and comparing the misfits between calculated and observed section ellipses. Graphical displays of ellipsoid data include axial-ratio (Flinn, 1962) and octahedral strain magnitude (Hossack, 1968) graphs. Calculations were done to test and compare computational techniques. For two

  9. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; Yu, Xun; Blecke, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages,more » as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.« less

  10. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; Yu, Xun; Blecke, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages, as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.

  11. Inexpensive Implementation of Many Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed to develop arrays of strain gauges as arrays of ordinary metal film resistors and associated electronic readout circuitry on printed circuit boards or other suitable substrates. This proposal is a by-product of a development of instrumentation utilizing metal film resistors on printed-circuit boards to measure temperatures at multiple locations. In the course of that development, it was observed that in addition to being sensitive to temperature, the metal film resistors were also sensitive to strains in the printed-circuit boards to which they were attached. Because of the low cost of ordinary metal film resistors (typically <$0.01 apiece at 2007 prices), the proposal could enable inexpensive implementation of arrays of many (e.g., 100 or more) strain gauges, possibly concentrated in small areas. For example, such an array could be designed for use as a computer keyboard with no moving parts, as a device for sensing the shape of an object resting on a surface, or as a device for measuring strains at many points on a mirror, a fuel tank, an airplane wing, or other large object. Ordinarily, the effect of strain on resistance would be regarded as a nuisance in a temperature-measuring application, and the effect of temperature on resistance would be regarded as a nuisance in a strain-measuring application. The strain-induced changes in resistance of the metal film resistors in question are less than those of films in traditional strain gauges. The main novel aspect of present proposal lies in the use of circuitry affording sufficient sensitivity to measure strain plus means for compensating for the effect of temperature. For an array of metal film resistors used as proposed, the readout circuits would include a high-accuracy analog-to-digital converter fed by a low noise current source, amplifier chain, and an analog multiplexer chain. Corrections would be provided by use of high-accuracy calibration resistors and a temperature sensor. By use of

  12. Strain patterns and strain accumulation along plate margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of strain accumulation along plate margins in Japan, New Zealand, and the United States indicate that: (1) a typical maximum rate of secular strain accumulation is on the order of 0.3 ppm/a, (2) a substantial part of the strain accumulation process can be attributed to slip at depth on the major plate boundary faults, and (3) some plastic deformation in a zone 100 km or more in width is apparently involved in the strain accumulation process.

  13. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  14. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain Can Be A Pain Page Content If ... speeds, sports hernias are frequently confused with common muscle strain ,” says Michael Sampson, DO, who practices in ...

  15. Genealogies of mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Beck, J A; Lloyd, S; Hafezparast, M; Lennon-Pierce, M; Eppig, J T; Festing, M F; Fisher, E M

    2000-01-01

    The mouse is a prime organism of choice for modelling human disease. Over 450 inbred strains of mice have been described, providing a wealth of different genotypes and phenotypes for genetic and other studies. As new strains are generated and others become extinct, it is useful to review periodically what strains are available and how they are related to each other, particularly in the light of available DNA polymorphism data from microsatellite and other markers. We describe the origins and relationships of inbred mouse strains, 90 years after the generation of the first inbred strain. Given the large collection of inbred strains available, and that published information on these strains is incomplete, we propose that all genealogical and genetic data on inbred strains be submitted to a common electronic database to ensure this valuable information resource is preserved and used efficiently.

  16. Construction of the Inbred Strain.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Minori

    2016-01-01

    Genetically homogeneous populations such as inbred strains are valuable experimental tools in various fields of biomedical analyses. In many animals, inbred strains are established by consecutive sib-pair mating for a minimum of 20 generations. As the generation proceeds, fitness of the population reduces usually. Therefore, in order to establish inbred strains, the important point is the selection of pairs in good condition at each generation. Here, I describe the procedure and tips for generating inbred strains in zebrafish. PMID:27464804

  17. Strain incompatibility and residual strains in ferroelectric single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Pramanick, A.; Jones, J. L.; Tutuncu, G.; Ghosh, D.; Stoica, A. D.; An, K.

    2012-01-01

    Residual strains in ferroelectrics are known to adversely affect the material properties by aggravating crack growth and fatigue degradation. The primary cause for residual strains is strain incompatibility between different microstructural entities. For example, it was shown in polycrystalline ferroelectrics that residual strains are caused due to incompatibility between the electric-field-induced strains in grains with different crystallographic orientations. However, similar characterization of cause-effect in multidomain ferroelectric single crystals is lacking. In this article, we report on the development of plastic residual strains in [111]-oriented domain engineered BaTiO3 single crystals. These internal strains are created due to strain incompatibility across 90° domain walls between the differently oriented domains. The average residual strains over a large crystal volume measured by in situ neutron diffraction is comparable to previous X-ray measurements of localized strains near domain boundaries, but are an order of magnitude lower than electric-field-induced residual strains in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. PMID:23226595

  18. Investigation of the interface characteristics of Y2O3/GaAs under biaxial strain, triaxial strain, and non-strain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li-Bin; Liu, Xu-Yang; Dong, Hai-Kuan

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the interface behaviors of Y2O3/GaAs under biaxial strain, triaxial strain, and non-strain conditions. This study is performed by first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). First of all, the biaxial strain is realized by changing the lattice constants in ab plane. Averaged electrostatic potential (AEP) is aligned by establishing Y2O3 and GaAs (110) surfaces. The band offsets of Y2O3/GaAs interface under biaxial strain are investigated by generalized gradient approximation and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) functionals. The interface under biaxial strain is suitable for the design of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices because the valence band offsets (VBO) and conduction band offsets (CBO) are larger than 1 eV. Second, the triaxial strain is applied to Y2O3/GaAs interface by synchronously changing the lattice constants in a, b, and c axis. The band gaps of Y2O3 and GaAs under triaxial strain are investigated by HSE functional. We compare the VBO and CBO under triaxial strain with those under biaxial strain. Third, in the absence of lattice strain, the formation energies, charge state switching levels, and migration barriers of native defects in Y2O3 are assessed. We investigate how they will affect the MOS device performance. It is found that VO+2 and Oi-2 play a very dangerous role in MOS devices. Finally, a direct tunneling leakage current model is established. The model is used to analyze current and voltage characteristics of the metal/Y2O3/GaAs.

  19. Strain balanced quantum posts

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Alvarez, D.; Alen, B.; Ripalda, J. M.; Llorens, J. M.; Taboada, A. G.; Briones, F.; Roldan, M. A.; Hernandez-Saz, J.; Hernandez-Maldonado, D.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2011-04-25

    Quantum posts are assembled by epitaxial growth of closely spaced quantum dot layers, modulating the composition of a semiconductor alloy, typically InGaAs. In contrast with most self-assembled nanostructures, the height of quantum posts can be controlled with nanometer precision, up to a maximum value limited by the accumulated stress due to the lattice mismatch. Here, we present a strain compensation technique based on the controlled incorporation of phosphorous, which substantially increases the maximum attainable quantum post height. The luminescence from the resulting nanostructures presents giant linear polarization anisotropy.

  20. High catalase production by Rhizobium radiobacter strain 2-1.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Mami; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Katayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Yoshio; Fuji, Ryujiro

    2008-12-01

    To promote the application of catalase for treating wastewater containing hydrogen peroxide, bacteria exhibiting high catalase activity were screened. A bacterium, designated strain 2-1, with high catalase activity was isolated from the wastewater of a beverage factory that uses hydrogen peroxide. Strain 2-1 was identified as Rhizobium radiobacter (formerly known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens) on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. Although some strains of R. radiobacter are known plant pathogens, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that strain 2-1 has no phytopathogenic factor. Compared with a type strain of R. radiobacter, the specific catalase activity of strain 2-1 was approximately 1000-fold. Moreover, Strain 2-1 grew faster and exhibited considerably higher catalase activity than other microorganisms that have been used for industrial catalase production. Strain 2-1 is harmless to humans and the environment and produces catalase efficiently, suggesting that strain 2-1 is a good resource for the mass production of catalase for the treatment of hydrogen peroxide-containing wastewater. PMID:19134550

  1. Development of an Integrated Evaluation System for a Stretchable Strain Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungkook; Hong, Seong Kyung; Cho, Seong J.; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much research has been focused on stretchable or flexible electronic sensors for the measurement of strain or deformation on movable and variably shaped objects. In this research, to evaluate the performance of stretchable strain sensors, we have designed an integrated evaluation system capable of simultaneously measuring the change in stress and conductance of a strain sensor. Using the designed system, we have successfully evaluated the deformation characteristics, sensing range and sensing sensitivity of a stretchable strain sensor. We believe that the developed integrated evaluation system could be a useful tool for performance evaluation of stretchable strain sensors. PMID:27447639

  2. Compensated High Temperature Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring strain in substrates at high temperatures in which the thermally induced apparent strain is nulled is described. Two gages are used, one active gage and one compensating gage. Both gages are placed on the substrate to be gaged; the active gage is attached such that it responds to mechanical and thermally induced apparent strain while the compensating gage is attached such that it does not respond to mechanical strain and and measures only thermally induced apparent strain. A thermal blanket is placed over the two gages to maintain the gages at the same temperature. The two gages are wired as adjacent arms of a wheatstone bridge which nulls the thermally induced apparent strain giving a true reading of the mechanical strain in the substrate.

  3. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  4. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    van Tulder, Maurits; Malmivaara, Antti; Koes, Bart

    2007-05-26

    Repetitive strain injury remains a controversial topic. The term repetitive strain injury includes specific disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon canal syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and tendonitis of the wrist or hand. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of history and clinical examination. Large high-quality studies using newer imaging techniques, such as MRI and ultrasonography are few. Consequently, the role of such imaging in diagnosis of upper limb disorders remains unclear. In many cases, no specific diagnosis can be established and complaints are labelled as non-specific. Little is known about the effectiveness of treatment options for upper limb disorders. Strong evidence for any intervention is scarce and the effect, if any, is mainly short-term pain relief. Exercise is beneficial for non-specific upper limb disorders. Immobilising hand braces and open carpal tunnel surgery release are beneficial for carpal tunnel syndrome, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections are helpful for lateral epicondylitis. Exercise is probably beneficial for neck pain, as are corticosteroid injections and exercise for shoulder pain. Although upper limb disorders occur frequently in the working population, most trials have not exclusively included a working population or assessed effects on work-related outcomes. Further high-quality trials should aim to include sufficient sample sizes, working populations, and work-related outcomes.

  5. Strained-bond semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1994-05-01

    Theories of strained-bond semiconductors and superconductors have been developed that promise to have significant impact on future electronic devices of interest to the Air Force. These include: (1) development of a theory of high-temperature superconductivity based on the idea of strained-layer superlattices, (2) elucidation of the physics of doping in Type-2 semiconductor superlattices, which is now central to the development of high-speed field-effect transistors, (3) a theory of dimerization and reconstruction on (001) semiconductor surfaces, (4) theory of Mobius transforms as applied to physics and remote sensing, (5) new understanding of how defects affect the vibrational properties of semiconductors, (6) new methods of efficiently computing the trajectories of atoms in semiconductors by a priori molecular dynamics, (7) elucidation of the criteria affecting quantum-well luminescence from Si, (8) models of the effects of vacancies in large-gap Al(x)Ga(1-x)N alloys, (9) physics of rare-earth-doped silicon, (10) models of Co adsorption to silicon surfaces, (11) theories of how defects affect the properties of large band-gap superlattices, and (12) models of the effects of electronic structure on the properties of semiconductors.

  6. Electronic Raman scattering as an ultra-sensitive probe of strain effects in semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Fluegel., Brian; Mialitsin, Aleksej V.; Beaton, Daniel A.; Reno, John L.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-05-28

    Semiconductor strain engineering has become a critical feature of high-performance electronics because of the significant device performance enhancements that it enables. These improvements, which emerge from strain-induced modifications to the electronic band structure, necessitate new ultra-sensitive tools to probe the strain in semiconductors. Here, we demonstrate that minute amounts of strain in thin semiconductor epilayers can be measured using electronic Raman scattering. We also applied this strain measurement technique to two different semiconductor alloy systems using coherently strained epitaxial thin films specifically designed to produce lattice-mismatch strains as small as 10-4. Thus, comparing our strain sensitivity and signal strength inmore » AlxGa 1-x As with those obtained using the industry-standard technique of phonon Raman scattering, we found that there was a sensitivity improvement of 200-fold and a signal enhancement of 4 × 103, thus obviating key constraints in semiconductor strain metrology.« less

  7. Electronic Raman scattering as an ultra-sensitive probe of strain effects in semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Fluegel, Brian; Mialitsin, Aleksej V.; Beaton, Daniel A.; Reno, John L.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor strain engineering has become a critical feature of high-performance electronics because of the significant device performance enhancements that it enables. These improvements, which emerge from strain-induced modifications to the electronic band structure, necessitate new ultra-sensitive tools to probe the strain in semiconductors. Here, we demonstrate that minute amounts of strain in thin semiconductor epilayers can be measured using electronic Raman scattering. We applied this strain measurement technique to two different semiconductor alloy systems using coherently strained epitaxial thin films specifically designed to produce lattice-mismatch strains as small as 10−4. Comparing our strain sensitivity and signal strength in AlxGa1−xAs with those obtained using the industry-standard technique of phonon Raman scattering, we found that there was a sensitivity improvement of 200-fold and a signal enhancement of 4 × 103, thus obviating key constraints in semiconductor strain metrology. PMID:26017853

  8. Palladium-chromium static strain gage for high temperature propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1991-01-01

    The present electrical strain gage for high temperature static strain measurements is in its fine-wire and thin-film forms designed to be temperature-compensated on any substrate material. The gage element is of Pd-Cr alloy, while the compensator is of Pt. Because the thermally-induced apparent strain of this compensated wire strain gage is sufficiently small, with good reproducibility between thermal cycles to 800 C, output figures can be corrected within a reasonable margin of error.

  9. Effect of anharmonicity of interatomic potential on strain distribution in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarenkova, Olga L.; von Allmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Lee, Seungwoii; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and theory have shown that the energy spectrum of nanostructures is extremely sensitive to the built-in strain. Knowledge of the strain distribution is therefore Experiments and theory have shown that the energy spectrum of nanostructures is extremely sensitive to the built-in strain. Knowledge of the strain distribution is therefore of utmost importance for the design of optical devices with prescribed light emission spectrum.

  10. Buried pipe design

    SciTech Connect

    Mosler, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers basic information on proper, cost-effective design of buried-pipe systems for underground fluid transportation. Examines various pipe products available. Discusses soil engineering and piping mechanics. Specific topics include pipe-wall stresses and strains; design bases; rigid- and flexible-pipe analysis; soil pressure; and longitudinal, wheel, expansive-soil, and frost loading.

  11. Isolation of a Variant Strain of Pleurotus eryngii and the Development of Specific DNA Markers to Identify the Variant Strain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ryu, Jae-San; Lee, Chang-Yun; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2014-03-01

    A degenerated strain of Pleurotus eryngii KNR2312 was isolated from a commercial farm. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis performed on the genomic DNA of the normal and degenerated strains of this species revealed differences in the DNA banding pattern. A unique DNA fragment (1.7 kbp), which appeared only in the degenerated strain, was isolated and sequenced. Comparing this sequence with the KNR2312 genomic sequence showed that the sequence of the degenerated strain comprised three DNA regions that originated from nine distinct scaffolds of the genomic sequence, suggesting that chromosome-level changes had occurred in the degenerated strain. Using the unique sequence, three sets of PCR primers were designed that targeted the full length, the 5' half, and the 3' half of the DNA. The primer sets P2-1 and P2-2 yielded 1.76 and 0.97 kbp PCR products, respectively, only in the case of the degenerated strain, whereas P2-3 generated a 0.8 kbp product in both the normal and the degenerated strains because its target region was intact in the normal strain as well. In the case of the P2-1 and P2-2 sets, the priming regions of the forward and reverse primers were located at distinct genomic scaffolds in the normal strain. These two primer sets specifically detected the degenerate strain of KNR2312 isolated from various mushrooms including 10 different strains of P. eryngii, four strains of P. ostreatus, and 11 other wild mushrooms. PMID:24808734

  12. Geodetic strain measurements in Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two new geodetic measurements of strain accumulation in the state of Washington for the interval 1972-1979 are reported. Near Seattle the average principal strain rates are 0.07 + or - 0.03 mu strain/yr N19oW and -0.13 + or - 0.02 mu strain/yr N71oE, and near Richland (south central Washington) the average principal strain rates are -0.02 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N36oW and -0.04 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N54oE. Extension is taken as positive, and the uncertainties quoted are standard deviations. A measurement of shear strain accumulation (dilation not determined) in the epoch 1914- 1966 along the north coast of Vancouver Island by the Geodetic Survey of Canada indicates a marginally significant accumulation of right-lateral shear (0.06 + or - 0.03 mu rad/yr) across the plate boundary (N40oW strike). Although there are significant differences in detail, these strain measurements are roughly consistent with a crude dislocation model that represents subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate. The observed accumulation of strain implies that large, shallow, thrust earthquakes should be expected off the coast of Washington and British Columbia. However, this conclusion is not easily reconciled with either observations of elevation change along the Washington coast or the focal mechanism solutions for shallow earthquakes in Washington. -Authors

  13. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial strain.

    PubMed

    Gorcsan, John; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2011-09-27

    Echocardiographic strain imaging, also known as deformation imaging, has been developed as a means to objectively quantify regional myocardial function. First introduced as post-processing of tissue Doppler imaging velocity converted to strain and strain rate, strain imaging has more recently also been derived from digital speckle tracking analysis. Strain imaging has been used to gain greater understanding into the pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia and infarction, primary diseases of the myocardium, and the effects of valvular disease on myocardial function, and to advance our understanding of diastolic function. Strain imaging has also been used to quantify abnormalities in the timing of mechanical activation for heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization pacing therapy. Further advances, such as 3-dimensional speckle tracking strain imaging, have emerged to provide even greater insight. Strain imaging has become established as a robust research tool and has great potential to play many roles in routine clinical practice to advance the care of the cardiovascular patient. This perspective reviews the physiology of myocardial strain, the technical features of strain imaging using tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking, their strengths and weaknesses, and the state-of-the-art present and potential future clinical applications.

  14. High-Temperature Strain Sensing for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazza, Anthony; Richards, Lance W.; Hudson, Larry D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are utilizing advanced materials that operate at temperatures that exceed abilities to measure structural performance. Robust strain sensors that operate accurately and reliably beyond 1800 F are needed but do not exist. These shortcomings hinder the ability to validate analysis and modeling techniques and hinders the ability to optimize structural designs. This presentation examines high-temperature strain sensing for aerospace applications and, more specifically, seeks to provide strain data for validating finite element models and thermal-structural analyses. Efforts have been made to develop sensor attachment techniques for relevant structural materials at the small test specimen level and to perform laboratory tests to characterize sensor and generate corrections to apply to indicated strains. Areas highlighted in this presentation include sensors, sensor attachment techniques, laboratory evaluation/characterization of strain measurement, and sensor use in large-scale structures.

  15. Uncovering high-strain rate protection mechanism in nacre.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Haoze; Pan, Zhiliang; Wei, Qiuming; Chao, Yuh J; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    Under high-strain-rate compression (strain rate approximately 10(3) s(-1)), nacre (mother-of-pearl) exhibits surprisingly high fracture strength vis-à-vis under quasi-static loading (strain rate 10(-3) s(-1)). Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism responsible for such sharply different behaviors in these two loading modes remains completely unknown. Here we report a new deformation mechanism, adopted by nacre, the best-ever natural armor material, to protect itself against predatory penetrating impacts. It involves the emission of partial dislocations and the onset of deformation twinning that operate in a well-concerted manner to contribute to the increased high-strain-rate fracture strength of nacre. Our findings unveil that Mother Nature delicately uses an ingenious strain-rate-dependent stiffening mechanism with a purpose to fight against foreign attacks. These findings should serve as critical design guidelines for developing engineered body armor materials. PMID:22355664

  16. Applying strain into graphene by SU-8 resist shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Makoto; Hibino, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the use of the shrinkage of SU-8 resist caused by thermal annealing to apply strain into graphene grown by the chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) method. We demonstrate that the shrinkage of resist deposited on top of graphene on a substrate induces a local tensile strain within a distance of 1–2 μm from the edge of the resist. The thermal shrinkage of SU-8 will allow us to design the local strain in graphene on substrates. We also show that the shrinkage induces a large tensile strain in graphene suspended between two bars of SU-8. We expect that a much larger strain can be induced by suppressing defects in CVD-grown graphene.

  17. Uncovering high-strain rate protection mechanism in nacre

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Haoze; Pan, Zhiliang; Wei, Qiuming; Chao, Yuh J.; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    Under high-strain-rate compression (strain rate ∼103 s−1), nacre (mother-of-pearl) exhibits surprisingly high fracture strength vis-à-vis under quasi-static loading (strain rate 10−3 s−1). Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism responsible for such sharply different behaviors in these two loading modes remains completely unknown. Here we report a new deformation mechanism, adopted by nacre, the best-ever natural armor material, to protect itself against predatory penetrating impacts. It involves the emission of partial dislocations and the onset of deformation twinning that operate in a well-concerted manner to contribute to the increased high-strain-rate fracture strength of nacre. Our findings unveil that Mother Nature delicately uses an ingenious strain-rate-dependent stiffening mechanism with a purpose to fight against foreign attacks. These findings should serve as critical design guidelines for developing engineered body armor materials. PMID:22355664

  18. Proteomic analysis of two Trypanosoma cruzi zymodeme 3 strains.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Simone A; Sodré, Cátia L; Kalume, Dário E; Elias, Camila G R; Santos, André L S; de Nazaré Soeiro, Maria; Meuser, Marcus; Chapeaurouge, Alex; Perales, Jonas; Fernandes, Octavio

    2010-12-01

    Two Trypanosoma cruzi Z3 strains, designated as 3663 and 4167, were previously isolated from insect vectors captured in the Brazilian Amazon region. These strains exhibited different infection patterns in Vero, C6/36, RAW 264.7 and HEp-2 cell lineages, in which 3663 trypomastigote form was much less infective than 4167 ones. A proteomic approach was applied to investigate the differences in the global patterns of protein expression in these two Z3 strains. Two-dimensional (2D) protein maps were generated and certain spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Our analyses revealed a significant difference in the expression profile of different proteins between strains 3663 and 4167. Among them, cruzipain, an important regulator of infectivity. This data was corroborated by flow cytometry analysis using anti-cruzipain antibody. This difference could contribute to the infectivity profiles observed for each strain by in vitro assay using different cell lines.

  19. Applying strain into graphene by SU-8 resist shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Makoto; Hibino, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the use of the shrinkage of SU-8 resist caused by thermal annealing to apply strain into graphene grown by the chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) method. We demonstrate that the shrinkage of resist deposited on top of graphene on a substrate induces a local tensile strain within a distance of 1-2 μm from the edge of the resist. The thermal shrinkage of SU-8 will allow us to design the local strain in graphene on substrates. We also show that the shrinkage induces a large tensile strain in graphene suspended between two bars of SU-8. We expect that a much larger strain can be induced by suppressing defects in CVD-grown graphene.

  20. Optical Fiber Strain Instrumentation for High Temperature Aerospace Structural Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the program is the development and laboratory demonstration of sensors based on silica optical fibers for measurement of high temperature strain for aerospace materials evaluations. A complete fiber strain sensor system based on white-light interferometry was designed and implemented. An experiment set-up was constructed to permit testing of strain measurement up to 850 C. The strain is created by bending an alumina cantilever beam to which is the fiber sensor is attached. The strain calibration is provided by the application of known beam deflections. To ensure the high temperature operation capability of the sensor, gold-coated single-mode fiber is used. Moreover, a new method of sensor surface attachment which permits accurate sensor gage length determination is also developed. Excellent results were obtained at temperatures up to 800-850 C.

  1. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  2. Lysogenic Strains of Group N Lactic Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A temperate bacteriophage, designated r1t, was inducible from the group N lactic streptococcus, Streptococcus cremoris R1, by ultraviolet irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. Induced lysates produced plaques on lawns of three closely related S. cremoris strains, AM1, SK11, and US3. Strain SK11 was readily lysogenized. S. cremoris AM1 was the most reliable indicator strain, although the age of the culture used for seeding plates was critical. Zones of lysis but no plaque formation were observed on lawns of nine additional S. cremoris strains. Phage r1t could not be detected in filtrates of stationary-phase R1 cultures and was near the limits of detection in logarithmically growing cultures. Phage levels were still very low (1 plaque-forming unit on AM1 per 10 induced cells) in induced lysates of R1 cultures. These low levels of detectable phage may be attributable to an inadequate indicator, lysogenization of the indicator, adsorption of induced phage to cellular debris, concurrent induction of other undetectable phages, or the production of high proportions of defective phages. Electron micrographs of induced R1 lysates revealed a high incidence of incomplete phage particles, fragments, and ghosts. Images PMID:4203783

  3. Thermal strain analysis of optic fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Ying

    2013-01-31

    An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the strain in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal stresses can be generated due to a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure. The optical fiber thermal strain induced by the host structure is transferred via the adhesive layer and protective coating. In this investigation, an analytical expression of the thermal strain and stress in the optical fiber is presented. The theoretical predictions are validated using the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thermal strain and stress are linearly dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure and independent of the thermal expansion coefficients of the adhesive and coating.

  4. onHigh-peak-power strain-compensated GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade lasers (λ ˜4.6 μm) based on a slightly diagonal active region design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lösch, R.; Bronner, W.; Hugger, S.; Fuchs, F.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.

    2008-12-01

    Employing a "slightly diagonal" active region design for the quantum cascade lasers compared to a reference sample based on the conventional vertical transition design [R. Köhler et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1092 (2000)], we have improved the maximum operation temperature, room-temperature maximum peak power per facet, and room-temperature slope efficiency from 320 K, 200 mW, and 570 mW/A to higher than 360 K, 3.2 W, and 2200 mW/A, respectively, for the device size of 16 μm×3 mm with as-cleaved facets operated in pulsed mode.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the ge-nus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobia-ceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomi-crobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Scaffold metamaterial and its application as strain sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Ren, Mengxin Pi, Biao; Cai, Wei Xu, Jingjun; Wu, Yang

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, strain sensors based on planar scaffold metamaterial design are demonstrated. The optical properties of such metamaterials are studied, which are proved to be highly dependent on the deformation of the structure. Fabricating such metamaterial on compliant polymeric substrate, the geometric parameters could be tuned with external strain and hence are found to control the reflection resonance condition of the metamaterial. Such mechanical tunability provides the opportunity to realize efficient strain sensors and about 27 nm resonance wavelength shift is observed by applying as much as 37% tensile strain. Furthermore, distinct from most of the previous works, our structures are based on “intaglio” design, which could be manufactured directly by one step fabrication using focused ion beam cutting, hence makes the fabrication process much simpler.

  7. Strain Engineering in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Neto, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Graphene is a unique example of a one atom thick metallic membrane. Hence, graphene brings together properties of soft and hard condensed matter systems. The elementary electronic excitations in graphene, the Dirac quasiparticles, couple in a singular way to structural distortions in the form of scalar and vector potentials. Therefore, graphene has an effective electrodynamics where structural deformations couple to the Dirac particles at equal footing to electric and magnetic fields. This so-called strain engineering of the electronic properties of graphene opens doors for a new paradigm in terms of electronic devices, where electronic properties can be manipulated at will using its membrane-like properties. I thank partial support from from DOE Grant DE-FG02-08ER46512 and ONR Grant MURI N00014-09-1-1063.

  8. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Isochronous Stress-Strain Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Jill K. Wright; Richard N. Wright; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2014-03-01

    Isochronous stress-strain curves for Alloy 617 up to a temperature of 1000°C will be required to qualify the material for elevated temperature design in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Several potential methods for developing these curves are reviewed in this report. It is shown that in general power-law creep is the rate controlling deformation mechanism for a wide range of alloy heats, test temperatures and stresses. Measurement of the strain rate sensitivity of Alloy 617 indicates that the material is highly strain rate sensitive in the tensile deformation range above about 750°C. This suggests that the concept of a hot tensile curve as a bounding case on the isochronous stress-strain diagrams is problematic. The impact of strain rate on the hot tensile curves is examined and it is concluded that incorporating such a curve is only meaningful if a single tensile strain rate (typically the ASTM standard rate of 0.5%/min) is arbitrarily defined. Current experimentally determined creep data are compared to isochronous stress-strain curves proposed previously by the German programs in the 1980s and by the 1990 draft ASME Code Case. Variability in how well the experimental data are represented by the proposed design curves that suggests further analysis is necessary prior to completing a new draft Code Case.

  9. Genetic Analysis of Biodegradation of Tetralin by a Sphingomonas Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, María José; Reineke, Walter; Santero, Eduardo

    1999-01-01

    A strain designated TFA which very efficiently utilizes tetralin has been isolated from the Rhine river. The strain has been identified as Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus, based on 16S rDNA sequence similarity. Genetic analysis of tetralin biodegradation has been performed by insertion mutagenesis and by physical analysis and analysis of complementation between the mutants. The genes involved in tetralin utilization are clustered in a region of 9 kb, comprising at least five genes grouped in two divergently transcribed operons. PMID:10103288

  10. High temperature strain gage evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The structural thermal test of an advanced ramjet missile section required strain measurements as high as 922 K (1200 F). Since there is relatively little experience in the use of strain gages above the 700-755 K (800-900 F) level, a program was initiated to select and evaluate the best available gage. Candidate gages suitable for measurements up to 922 K (1200 F) were selected. This involved the determination of their operating characteristics, availability, cost, installation aspects, etc. The evaluation involved the following tests: strain as a function of load at room temperature and apparent strain as a function of temperature.

  11. Strain variation in corrugated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanye; Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Christopher, Jason; Paiella, Roberto; Swan, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-destructive technique for analyzing strain in graphene. Recently there has been interest in making corrugated graphene devices with varying spatial wavelengths Λ for plasmonic and THz applications. Transferring graphene onto corrugated substrates introduces strain, which if there was perfect clamping (high fraction) would cause a periodic strain variation. However, the strain variation for pattern size smaller than the diffraction limit λ makes it hard to precisely model the strain distribution. Here we present a detailed study on how strain varies in corrugated graphene with sub-diffraction limit periodicity Λ < λ. Mechanically exfoliated graphene was deposited onto sinusoidal shape silicon dioxide gratings with Λ=400 nm period using the pick and place transfer technique. We observed that the graphene is not rigidly clamped, but partially slides to relieve the strain. We model the linewidth variation to extract the local strain variation as well as the sliding in the presence of charge puddling in graphene. The method gives us a better understanding on graphene slippage and strain distribution in graphene on a corrugated substrate with sub-diffraction limit spatial period.

  12. Thermal strain imaging: a review

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Chi Hyung; Shi, Yan; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Kim, Kang; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Thermal strain imaging (TSI) or temporal strain imaging is an ultrasound application that exploits the temperature dependence of sound speed to create thermal (temporal) strain images. This article provides an overview of the field of TSI for biomedical applications that have appeared in the literature over the past several years. Basic theory in thermal strain is introduced. Two major energy sources appropriate for clinical applications are discussed. Promising biomedical applications are presented throughout the paper, including non-invasive thermometry and tissue characterization. We present some of the limitations and complications of the method. The paper concludes with a discussion of competing technologies. PMID:22866235

  13. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    DOEpatents

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  14. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  15. Strain to failure of pressurized thick wall cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, T.G.; Roach, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a highly pressurized vessel is of considerable importance in design. The plastic-strain response during and following autofrettage operations, in comparison with the limiting strain condition, is of special interest. This paper presents the results of an analysis method for thick wall, high pressure, cylinders where the effective plastic strain distribution through the thickness is the material response variable of primary interest. The limiting value of this effective plastic strain depends on the level of tensile-stress triaxiality which also varies through the thickness. This strain-to-failure criterion is used to predict the complete pressure versus strain response and the maximum pressure for test cylinders. A simple model of effective-stress versus effective plastic strain is employed. This model is quantified by data taken from uniaxial, tension, true-stress-strain curves and from the fracture zone of the tensile specimen. A sample calculation is included and, in a companion paper, a series of burst tubes having properties ranging from brittle to ductile are compared with this analytical method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Drug gastrointestinal absorption in rat: Strain and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Oltra-Noguera, Davinia; Mangas-Sanjuan, Victor; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Colon-Useche, Sarin; González-Álvarez, Marta; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-10-12

    Predictive animal models of intestinal drug absorption are essential tools in drug development to identify compounds with promising biopharmaceutical properties. In situ perfusion absorption studies are routinely used in the preclinical setting to screen drug candidates. The objective of this work is to explore the differences in magnitude and variability on intestinal absorption associated with rat strain and gender. Metoprolol and Verapamil absorption rate coefficients were determined using the in situ closed loop perfusion model in four strains of rats and in both genders. Strains used were Sprague-Dawley, Wistar-Han, Wistar-Unilever, Long-Evans and CD∗IGS. In the case of Metoprolol only CD∗IGS and Wistar Unilever showed differences between males and females. For Verapamil, Wistar Han and Sprague-Dawley strains do not show differences between male and female rats. That means that in these strains permeability data from male and female could be combined. In male rats, which are commonly used for permeability estimation, there were differences for Metoprolol permeability between Sprague-Dawley (with lower permeability values) and the other strains, while for Verapamil Sprague-Dawley and Wistar-Han showed the lower permeability values. In conclusion, the selection of rat's strain and gender for intestinal absorption experiments is a relevant element during study design and data from different strains may not be always comparable.

  17. Strain correction in interleaved strain-encoded (SENC) cardiac MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Osman, Nael F.

    2010-03-01

    The strain encoding (SENC) technique directly encodes regional strain of the heart into the acquired MR images and produces two images with two different tunings so that longitudinal strain, on the short-axis view, or circumferential strain on the long-axis view, are measured. Interleaving acquisition is used to shorten the acquisition time of the two tuned images by 50%, but it suffers from errors in the strain calculations due to inter-tunings motion of the heart. In this work, we propose a method to correct for the inter-tunings motion by estimating the motion-induced shift in the spatial frequency of the encoding pattern, which depends on the strain rate. Numerical data was generated to test the proposed method and real images of human subjects were used for validation. The proposed method corrected the measured strain values so they became nearly identical to the original ones. The results show an improvement in strain calculations so as to relax the imaging constraints on spatial and temporal resolutions and improve image quality.

  18. ATCC 43642 replaces ATCC 23581 as the type strain of Leptospira interrogans (Stimson 1907) Wenyon 1926. Opinion 91. Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tindall, B J

    2014-10-01

    The Judicial Commission affirms that, according to information presented to it, the type strain of Leptospira interrogans (Stimson 1907) Wenyon 1926 designated on the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names (ATCC 23581) has been shown not to represent an authentic culture of strain RGA (a member of the serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae) and ATCC 43642, derived from an authentic strain of strain RGA, a member of the serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae, is designated the type strain of Leptospira interrogans (Stimson 1907) Wenyon 1926.

  19. Motion Driven by Strain Gradient Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-09-01

    A new driving mechanism for direction-controlled motion of nano-scale objects is proposed, based on a model of stretching a graphene strip linked to a rigid base with linear springs of identical stiffness. We find that the potential energy difference induced by the strain gradient field in the graphene strip substrate can generate sufficient force to overcome the static and kinetic friction forces between the nano-flake and the strip substrate, resulting in the nanoscale flake motion in the direction of gradient reduction. The dynamics of the nano-flake can be manipulated by tuning the stiffness of linear springs, stretching velocity and the flake size. This fundamental law of directional motion induced by strain gradient could be very useful for promising designs of nanoscale manipulation, transportation and smart surfaces.

  20. Motion Driven by Strain Gradient Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    A new driving mechanism for direction-controlled motion of nano-scale objects is proposed, based on a model of stretching a graphene strip linked to a rigid base with linear springs of identical stiffness. We find that the potential energy difference induced by the strain gradient field in the graphene strip substrate can generate sufficient force to overcome the static and kinetic friction forces between the nano-flake and the strip substrate, resulting in the nanoscale flake motion in the direction of gradient reduction. The dynamics of the nano-flake can be manipulated by tuning the stiffness of linear springs, stretching velocity and the flake size. This fundamental law of directional motion induced by strain gradient could be very useful for promising designs of nanoscale manipulation, transportation and smart surfaces. PMID:26323603

  1. Strain monitoring of a composite wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strathman, Joseph; Watkins, Steve E.; Kaur, Amardeep; Macke, David C.

    2016-04-01

    An instrumented composite wing is described. The wing is designed to meet the load and ruggedness requirements for a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in search-and-rescue applications. The UAV supports educational systems development and has a 2.1-m wingspan. The wing structure consists of a foam core covered by a carbon-fiber, laminate composite shell. To quantify the wing characteristics, a fiber-optic strain sensor was surface mounted to measure distributed strain. This sensor is based on Rayleigh scattering from local index variations and it is capable of high spatial resolution. The use of the Rayleigh-scattering fiber-optic sensors for distributed measurements is discussed.

  2. Thin film strain transducer. [in-flight measurement of stress or strain in walls of high altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop an appropriate sensor for measuring the stress or strain of high altitude balloons during flight are reviewed as well as the various conditions that must be met by such a device. The design, development and calibration of a transducer which promises to satisfy the necessary design constraints are described. The thin film strain transducer has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the strain that would naturally occur in the balloon. In addition, the transducer has a high sensitivity to longitudinal strain (7.216 mV/V/unit strain) which is constant for all temperature from room temperature to -80 C and all strains from 5 percent compression to 10 percent tensile strain. At the same time, the sensor is relatively insensitive (0.27 percent) to transverse forces. The device has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with available bridge balance, amplification and telemetry instrumentation now available for balloon flight. Recommendations are included for improved coatings to provide passive thermal control as well as model, tethered and full scale flight testing.

  3. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    , velocity, and acceleration sensors. This research demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining induced drag and lift forces through the use of distributed sensor technology with measured strain data. An active induced drag control system thus can be designed using the two computed aerodynamic forces, induced drag and lift, to improve the fuel efficiency of an aircraft. Interpolation elements between structural finite element grids and the CFD grids and centroids are successfully incorporated with the unsteady aeroelastic computation scheme. The most critical technology for the success of the proposed approach is the robust on-line parameter estimator, since the least-squares curve fitting method depends heavily on aeroelastic system frequencies and damping factors.

  4. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22317096

  5. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  6. Adductor muscle strains in sport.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Stephen J; Tyler, Timothy F

    2002-01-01

    An in-season adductor muscle strain may be debilitating for the athlete. Furthermore, an adductor strain that is treated improperly could become chronic and career threatening. Any one of the six muscles of the adductor group could be involved. The degree of injury can range from a minor strain (Grade I), where minimal playing time is lost, to a severe strain (Grade III) in which there is complete loss of muscle function. Ice hockey and soccer players seem particularly susceptible to adductor muscle strains. In professional ice hockey players throughout the world, approximately 10% of all injuries are groin strains. These injuries, which have been linked to hip muscle weakness, previous injuries to that area, preseason practice sessions and level of experience, may be preventable if such risk factors can be addressed before each season. Hip-strengthening exercises were shown to be an effective method of reducing the incidence of adductor strains in one closely followed National Hockey League ice hockey team. Despite the identification of risk factors and strengthening intervention for ice hockey players, adductor strains continue to occur throughout sport. Clinicians feel an active training programme, along with completely restoring the strength of the adductor muscle group, is the key to successful rehabilitation. Surgical intervention is available if nonoperative treatment fails for 6 months or longer. Adductor release and tenotomy was reported to have limited success in athletes. PMID:11929360

  7. Hypothetical strain-free oligoradicals

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roald; Eisenstein, Odile; Balaban, Alexandru T.

    1980-01-01

    Several new classes of oligoradicals free of angle strain are suggested and examined by means of molecular orbital calculations. The collapse products of these hypothetical radicals are highly strained molecules. Various electronic strategies for the stabilization of these oligoradicals have been explored. PMID:16592882

  8. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  9. Role of scaffold network in controlling strain and functionalities of nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Hu, Jia-Mian; Lu, Ping; Yang, Tiannan; Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Leigang; Ahmed, Towfiq; Enriquez, Erik; Weigand, Marcus; Su, Qing; Wang, Haiyan; Zhu, Jian-Xin; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Chen, Long-Qing; Yarotski, Dmitry; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-06-01

    Strain is a novel approach to manipulating functionalities in correlated complex oxides. However, significant epitaxial strain can only be achieved in ultrathin layers. We show that, under direct lattice matching framework, large and uniform vertical strain up to 2% can be achieved to significantly modify the magnetic anisotropy, magnetism, and magnetotransport properties in heteroepitaxial nanoscaffold films, over a few hundred nanometers in thickness. Comprehensive designing principles of large vertical strain have been proposed. Phase-field simulations not only reveal the strain distribution but also suggest that the ultimate strain is related to the vertical interfacial area and interfacial dislocation density. By changing the nanoscaffold density and dimension, the strain and the magnetic properties can be tuned. The established correlation among the vertical interface-strain-properties in nanoscaffold films can consequently be used to tune other functionalities in a broad range of complex oxide films far beyond critical thickness. PMID:27386578

  10. High temperature strain measurement with a resistance strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Fichtel, ED; Mcdaniel, Amos

    1993-01-01

    A PdCr based electrical resistance strain gage was demonstrated in the laboratory to be a viable sensor candidate for static strain measurement at high temperatures. However, difficulties were encountered while transferring the sensor to field applications. This paper is therefore prepared for recognition and resolution of the problems likely to be encountered with PdCr strain gages in field applications. Errors caused by the measurement system, installation technique and lead wire attachment are discussed. The limitations and some considerations related to the temperature compensation technique used for this gage are also addressed.

  11. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jurgen; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications. PMID:27158476

  12. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Tayabali, Azam F.; Coleman, Gordon; Nguyen, Kathy C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa), P.fluorescens (Pf), P.putida (Pp), P.stutzeri (Ps)) were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications. PMID:26619347

  13. Genetic diversity of Rhodopirellula strains.

    PubMed

    Frank, Carsten S; Klockow, Christine; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Harder, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica SH1(T) is a marine planctomycete with 7,325 genes in its genome. Ten strains of the genus Rhodopirellula were studied in whole genome microarray experiments to assess the extent of their genetic relatedness to R. baltica SH1(T). DNA of strains which were previously affiliated with the species R. baltica (OTU A) hybridized with 3,645-5,728 genes of the type strain on the microarray. Strains SH398 and 6C (OTU B), representing a closely related species with an average nucleotide identity of 88 %, showed less hybridization signals: 1,816 and 3,302 genes gave a hybridization signal, respectively. Comparative genomics of eight permanent draft genomes revealed the presence of over 4,000 proteins common in R. baltica SH1(T) and strains of OTU A or B. The genus Rhodopirellula is characterized by large genomes, with over 7,000 genes per genome and a core genome of around 3000 genes. Individual Rhodopirellula strains have a large portion of strain-specific genes. PMID:23975513

  14. High-sensitivity strain visualization using electroluminescence technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Jo, Hongki

    2016-04-01

    Visualizing mechanical strain/stress changes is an emerging area in structural health monitoring. Several ways are available for strain change visualization through the color/brightness change of the materials subjected to the mechanical stresses, for example, using mechanoluminescence (ML) materials and mechanoresponsive polymers (MRP). However, these approaches were not effectively applicable for civil engineering system yet, due to insufficient sensitivity to low-level strain of typical civil structures and limitation in measuring both static and dynamic strain. In this study, design and validation for high-sensitivity strain visualization using electroluminescence technologies are presented. A high-sensitivity Wheatstone bridge, of which bridge balance is precisely controllable circuits, is used with a gain-adjustable amplifier. The monochrome electroluminescence (EL) technology is employed to convert both static and dynamic strain change into brightness/color change of the EL materials, through either brightness change mode (BCM) or color alternation mode (CAM). A prototype has been made and calibrated in lab, the linearity between strain and brightness change has been investigated.

  15. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  16. Controlling surface reactions with nanopatterned surface elastic strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhisheng; Potapenko, Denis V; Osgood, Richard M

    2015-01-27

    The application of elastic lattice strain is a promising approach for tuning material properties, but the attainment of a systematic approach for introducing a high level of strain in materials so as to study its effects has been a major challenge. Here we create an array of intense locally varying strain fields on a TiO2 (110) surface by introducing highly pressurized argon nanoclusters at 6-20 monolayers under the surface. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and the continuum mechanics model, we show that strain causes the surface bridge-bonded oxygen vacancies (BBOv), which are typically present on this surface, to be absent from the strained area and generates defect-free regions. In addition, we find that the adsorption energy of hydrogen binding to oxygen (BBO) is significantly altered by local lattice strain. In particular, the adsorption energy of hydrogen on BBO rows is reduced by ∼ 35 meV when the local crystal lattice is compressed by ∼ 1.3%. Our results provide direct evidence of the influence of strain on atomic-scale surface chemical properties, and such effects may help guide future research in catalysis materials design.

  17. Flexible carbon nanotube films for high performance strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Kanoun, Olfa; Müller, Christian; Benchirouf, Abderahmane; Sanli, Abdulkadir; Dinh, Trong Nghia; Al-Hamry, Ammar; Bu, Lei; Gerlach, Carina; Bouhamed, Ayda

    2014-01-01

    Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors. PMID:24915183

  18. Inelastic Strain Analysis of Solder Joint in NASA Fatigue Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Abhijit; Oyan, Chen

    1991-01-01

    The solder fatigue specimen designed by NASA-GSFC/UNISYS is analyzed in order to obtain the inelastic strain history during two different representative temperature cycles specified by UNISYS. In previous reports (dated July 25, 1990, and November 15, 1990), results were presented of the elastic-plastic and creep analysis for delta T = 31 C cycle, respectively. Subsequent results obtained during the current phase, from viscoplastic finite element analysis of the solder fatigue specimen for delta T = 113 C cycle are summarized. Some common information is repeated for self-completeness. Large-deformation continuum formulations in conjunction with a standard linear solid model is utilized for modeling the solder constitutive creep-plasticity behavior. Relevant material properties are obtained from the literature. Strain amplitudes, mean strains, and residual strains (as well as stresses) accumulated due to a representative complete temperature cycle are obtained as a result of this analysis. The partitioning between elastic strains, time-independent inelastic (plastic) strains, and time-dependent inelastic (creep) strains is also explicitly obtained for two representative cycles. Detailed plots are presented for two representative temperature cycles. This information forms an important input for fatigue damage models, when predicting the fatigue life of solder joints under thermal cycling

  19. An experimental/analytical comparison of strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Burchett, S.N.

    1991-11-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study of strains developed in encapsulated assemblies during casting, curing and thermal excursions is described. The experimental setup, designed to measure in situ strains, consisted of thin, closed-end, Kovar tubes that were instrumented with strain gages and thermocouples before being over-cast with a polymeric encapsulant. Four bisphenol A (three diethanolamine cured and one anhydride cured) epoxy-based materials and one urethane elastomeric material were studied. After cure of the encapsulant, tube strains were measured over the temperature range of {minus}55{degrees}C to 90{degrees}C. The thermal excursion experiments were then numerically modeled using finite element analyses and the computed strains were compared to the experimental strains. The predicted strains were over estimated (conservative) when a linear, elastic, temperature-dependent material model was assumed for the encapsulant and the stress free temperature T{sub i} was assumed to correspond to the cure temperature {Tc} of the encapsulant. Very good agreement was obtained with linear elastic calculations provided that the stress free temperature corresponded to the onset of the glassy-to-rubbery transition range of the encapsulant. Finally, excellent agreement was obtained in one of the materials (828/DEA) when a viscoelastic material model was utilized and a stress free temperature corresponding to the cure temperature was assumed. 13 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Suppression and Structure of Low Strain Rate Nonpremixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamins, Anthony; Bundy, Matthew; Park, Woe Chul; Lee, Ki Yong; Logue, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    The agent concentration required to achieve suppression of low strain rate nonpremixed flames is an important fire safety consideration. In a microgravity environment such as a space platform, unwanted fires will likely occur in near quiescent conditions where strain rates are very low. Diffusion flames typically become more robust as the strain rate is decreased. When designing a fire suppression system for worst-case conditions, low strain rates should be considered. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of radiative emission, flame strain, agent addition, and buoyancy on the structure and extinction of low strain rate nonpremixed flames through measurements and comparison with flame simulations. The suppression effectiveness of a suppressant (N2) added to the fuel stream of low strain rate methane-air diffusion flames was measured. Flame temperature measurements were attained in the high temperature region of the flame (T greater than 1200 K) by measurement of thin filament emission intensity. The time varying temperature was measured and simulated as the flame made the transition from normal to microgravity conditions and as the flame extinguished.

  1. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kanoun, Olfa; Müller, Christian; Benchirouf, Abderahmane; Sanli, Abdulkadir; Dinh, Trong Nghia; Al-Hamry, Ammar; Bu, Lei; Gerlach, Carina; Bouhamed, Ayda

    2014-01-01

    Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors. PMID:24915183

  2. Complete genome sequence of Xylanimonas cellulosilytica type strain (XIL07T)

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Brian; Pukall, Rudiger; Abt, Birte; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J C; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Xylanimonas cellulosilytica Rivas et al. 2003 is the type species of the genus Xylanimonas of the actinobacterial family Promicromonosporaceae. The species X. cellulosilytica is of interest because of its ability to hydrolyze cellulose and xylan. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the large family Promicromonosporaceae, and the 3,831,380 bp long genome (one chromosome plus an 88,604 bp long plasmid) with its 3485 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Low TCR nanocomposite strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); Chen, Ximing (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high temperature thin film strain gage sensor capable of functioning at temperatures above 1400.degree. C. The sensor contains a substrate, a nanocomposite film comprised of an indium tin oxide alloy, zinc oxide doped with alumina or other oxide semiconductor and a refractory metal selected from the group consisting of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ni, W, Ir, NiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY deposited onto the substrate to form an active strain element. The strain element being responsive to an applied force.

  4. Study of High Strain Rate Response of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the research was to continue the experimental study of the effect of strain rate on mechanical response (deformation and failure) of epoxy resins and carbon fibers/epoxy matrix composites, and to initiate a study of the effects of temperature by developing an elevated temperature test. The experimental data provide the information needed for NASA scientists for the development of a nonlinear, rate dependent deformation and strength models for composites that can subsequently be used in design. This year effort was directed into testing the epoxy resin. Three types of epoxy resins were tested in tension and shear at various strain rates that ranges from 5 x 10(exp -5), to 1000 per second. Pilot shear experiments were done at high strain rate and an elevated temperature of 80 C. The results show that all, the strain rate, the mode of loading, and temperature significantly affect the response of epoxy.

  5. Magnetic Implosion for Novel Strength Measurements at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Preston, D.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.; Holtkamp, D.; Wright, B.L.

    1998-10-19

    Recently Lee and Preston have proposed to use magnetic implosions as a new method for measuring material strength in a regime of large strains and high strain rates inaccessible to previously established techniques. By its shockless nature, this method avoids the intrinsic difficulties associated with an earlier approach using high explosives. The authors illustrate how the stress-strain relation for an imploding liner can be obtained by measuring the velocity and temperature history of its inner surface. They discuss the physical requirements that lead us to a composite liner design applicable to different test materials, and also compare the code-simulated prediction with the measured data for the high strain-rate experiments conducted recently at LANL. Finally, they present a novel diagnostic scheme that will enable us to remove the background in the pyrometric measurement through data reduction.

  6. Modifying the Optoelectronic Properties of Rubrene by Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    Rubrene crystals are promising organic electronic and optoelectronic materials due to their high charge carrier mobility. Recent studies have shown that the electronic properties of rubrene films can be tuned by substrate-induced strain, suggesting a new route towards the design of more efficient devices. Here, we present a first-principles density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory analysis of strain-induced changes to the mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of rubrene crystals. With an applied strain that is consistent with experiment, we predict changes of hole motilities in excellent agreement with electrical conductivity measurements. Furthermore, we predict that the optical absorption and nature of low-energy excitons within the crystal can be tuned by an applied strain as low as 1%. This work utilized resources at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Electric circuit model for strained-layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, John E.

    2016-11-01

    For the design and analysis of a strained-layer semiconductor device structure, the equilibrium strain profile may be determined numerically by energy minimization but this method is computationally intense and non-intuitive. Here we present an electric circuit model approach for the equilibrium analysis of an epitaxial stack, in which each sublayer may be represented by an analogous configuration involving a current source, a resistor, a voltage source, and an ideal diode. The resulting node voltages in the analogous electric circuit correspond to the equilibrium strains in the original epitaxial structure. This new approach enables analysis using widely accessible circuit simulators, and an intuitive understanding of electric circuits may be translated to the relaxation of strained-layer structures. In this paper, we describe the mathematical foundation of the electrical circuit model and demonstrate its application to epitaxial layers of Si1‑x Ge x grown on a Si (001) substrate.

  8. Carbon nanotube strain sensors for wearable patient monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Aryasomayajula, Lavanya; Whitchurch, Ashwin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2008-03-01

    Wearable health monitoring systems have recently attracted widespread interest for their application in long term patient monitoring. Wireless wearable technology enables continuous observation of patients while they perform their normal everyday activities. This involves the development of flexible and conformable sensors that could be easily integrated to the smart fabrics. Carbon nanotubes are found to be one of the ideal candidate materials for the design of multifunctional e-textiles because of their capability to change conductance based on any mechanical deformation as well as surface functionalization. This paper presents the development and characterization of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer nanocomposite flexible strain sensor for wearable health monitoring applications. These strain sensors can be used to measure the respiration rhythm which is a vital signal required in health monitoring. A number of strain sensor prototypes with different CNT compositions have been fabricated and their characteristics for both static as well as dynamic strain have been measured.

  9. Electronic measurement of strain effects on spin transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Tinkey, Holly; Appelbaum, Ian

    Spin transport in silicon is limited by the Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism, which is driven by scattering between degenerate conduction band valleys. Mechanical strain along a valley axis partially breaks this degeneracy, and will ultimately quench intervalley spin relaxation for transitions between states on orthogonal axes. Using a custom-designed and constructed strain probe, we study the effects of uniaxial compressive strain along the < 100 > direction on ballistic tunnel junction devices used to inject spin-polarized electrons into silicon. The effects of strain-induced valley splitting will be presented and compared to our theoretical model. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract No. N000141410317, the National Science Foundation under Contract No. ECCS-1231855, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-13-1-0013, and the Maryland NanoCenter.

  10. Technical note: development of a quantitative PCR method for monitoring strain dynamics during yogurt manufacture.

    PubMed

    Miller, D M; Dudley, E G; Roberts, R F

    2012-09-01

    Yogurt starter cultures may consist of multiple strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (LB) and Streptococcus thermophilus (ST). Conventional plating methods for monitoring LB and ST levels during yogurt manufacture do not allow for quantification of individual strains. The objective of the present work was to develop a quantitative PCR method for quantification of individual strains in a commercial yogurt starter culture. Strain-specific primers were designed for 2 ST strains (ST DGCC7796 and ST DGCC7710), 1 LB strain (DGCC4078), and 1 Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis strain (LL; DGCC4550). Primers for the individual ST and LB strains were designed to target unique DNA sequences in clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats. Primers for LL were designed to target a putative mannitol-specific IIbC component of the phosphotransferase system. Following evaluation of primer specificity, standard curves relating cell number to cycle threshold were prepared for each strain individually and in combination in yogurt mix, and no significant differences in the slopes were observed. Strain balance data was collected for yogurt prepared at 41 and 43°C to demonstrate the potential application of this method.

  11. Bioprocessing of Stichococcus bacillaris strain siva2011

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, the development of a cost-effective long-term renewable energy infrastructure is one of the most challenging problems faced by society today. Microalgae are rich in potential biofuel substrates such as lipids, including triacylglycerols (TAGs). Some of these algae also biosynthesize small molecule hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons can often be used as liquid fuels, often with more versatility and by a more direct approach than some TAGs. However, the appropriate TAGs, accumulated from microalgae biomass, can be used as substrates for different kinds of renewable liquid fuels such as biodiesel and jet fuel. Results This article describes the isolation and identification of a lipid-rich, hydrocarbon-producing alga, Stichococcus bacillaris strain siva2011, together with its bioprocessing, hydrocarbon and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles. The S. bacillaris strain siva2011 was scaled-up in an 8 L bioreactor with 0.2% CO2. The C16:0, C16:3, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 were 112.2, 9.4, 51.3, 74.1 and 69.2 mg/g dry weight (DW), respectively. This new strain produced a significant amount of biomass of 3.79 g/L DW on day 6 in the 8 L bioreactor and also produced three hydrocarbons. Conclusions A new oil-rich microalga S. bacillaris strain siva2011 was discovered and its biomass has been scaled-up in a newly designed balloon-type bioreactor. The TAGs and hydrocarbons produced by this organism could be used as substrates for jet fuel or biodiesel. PMID:24731690

  12. Nondestructive Strain Measurement System Used to Determine Surface Strain on Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.

    1999-01-01

    Small-diameter structural fibers are being considered as reinforcements for high temperature ceramic matrix composite materials, and thus they require characterization. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a nondestructive optical technique was used to determine surface strain on a structural fiber, in real time, as it was pulled in a tensile test machine. With this technique, interference or speckle patterns from the laser illuminated fiber test specimen are recorded. As the fiber is pulled, its speckle pattern shifts in proportion to the strain, translation, and rotation components of the sample deformation. Shifting speckle patterns are detected in real time by two linear charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera arrays, and the images are processed by a hardware correlator. Surface strain is selectively detected on fibers with diameters on the order of 100 mm and can be resolved to 19 microstrain. This system was designed to be robust and compact and generally does not require surface preparation of the structural fibers. For strain detection, two laser beams are positioned incident on the structural fiber being tested, as shown in the photograph, where the test specimen is mounted in a tensile test machine via two coupons. As the fiber is pulled, the speckle pattern produced from each laser beam is detected by one of two CCD arrays located inside the tube on the right side of the photograph.

  13. SVAS3: Strain Vector Aided Sensorization of Soft Structures

    PubMed Central

    Culha, Utku; Nurzaman, Surya G.; Clemens, Frank; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-01-01

    Soft material structures exhibit high deformability and conformability which can be useful for many engineering applications such as robots adapting to unstructured and dynamic environments. However, the fact that they have almost infinite degrees of freedom challenges conventional sensory systems and sensorization approaches due to the difficulties in adapting to soft structure deformations. In this paper, we address this challenge by proposing a novel method which designs flexible sensor morphologies to sense soft material deformations by using a functional material called conductive thermoplastic elastomer (CTPE). This model-based design method, called Strain Vector Aided Sensorization of Soft Structures (SVAS3), provides a simulation platform which analyzes soft body deformations and automatically finds suitable locations for CTPE-based strain gauge sensors to gather strain information which best characterizes the deformation. Our chosen sensor material CTPE exhibits a set of unique behaviors in terms of strain length electrical conductivity, elasticity, and shape adaptability, allowing us to flexibly design sensor morphology that can best capture strain distributions in a given soft structure. We evaluate the performance of our approach by both simulated and real-world experiments and discuss the potential and limitations. PMID:25036332

  14. High-temperature capacitive strain measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, E. J.; Egger, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Capacitive strain gage and signal conditioning system measures stress-induced strain and cancels thermal expansion strain at temperatures to 1,500 F (815 C). Gage does not significantly restrain or reinforce specimen.

  15. Strain Wave during the Transient Process of Fault Unstable Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Liu, L.

    2011-12-01

    The "stick-slip" model was proposed as an important mechanism for shallow-focus earthquakes. The study on the transient process of fault unstable slip failure is helpful for understanding the earthquake preparatory process, the mechanism of energy released, the precursor and after shake effect. Double shear frictional experiments are conducted for simulating "stick-slip" phenomenon, and a specially designed multi-channel super dynamic strain field observation system is employed to acquire dada continuously with the sample rate of 3,400 samples/second. The rock deformation process can be recorded in detail, especially in the moment of unstable slip (The unstable slip duration is less than two second in experiments). The strain results from super dynamic strain field observation system show that multi-frequency components and tremendous amplitude fluctuation are included in strain signals along the fault. There are three clear phases during the unstable slip progress: pre-slip (phase I), high-frequency strain vibration (phase II) and strain regulating to stop (phase III). Each phase has its own characteristics on duration, strain rate, frequency, amplitude and energy release. There are strong fluctuations in duration of approximately 70ms in phase II. The frequency and maximum amplitude are 300-400Hz and 150~300μɛ respectively. Main strain energy release takes place at phase II, less than one-tenth of the total slip time, so that the whole course of dislocation or stress drop would not be taken as earthquake simply at least in laboratory. The phase characteristic of the strain wave is probably its inherent attribute of unstable slip process and independent of dynamical loading conditions. The elastic rebound phenomena, considered as one classic earthquake generation model, can be observed clearly by analyzing the rotation of the principal strain axis with strain variation. The rotated angle ranges from 5° to 15° typically. The value and location of precursor slip

  16. Evolution of and Evolutionary Relationships between Extant Vaccinia Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Favis, Nicole; Famulski, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although vaccinia virus (VACV) was once used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox on a worldwide scale, the biological origins of VACV are uncertain, as are the historical relationships between the different strains once used as smallpox vaccines. Here, we sequenced additional VACV strains that either represent relatively pristine examples of old vaccines (e.g., Dryvax, Lister, and Tashkent) or have been subjected to additional laboratory passage (e.g., IHD-W and WR). These genome sequences were compared with those previously reported for other VACVs as well as other orthopoxviruses. These extant VACVs do not always cluster in simple phylogenetic trees that are aligned with the known historical relationships between these strains. Rather, the pattern of deletions suggests that all existing strains likely come from a complex stock of viruses that has been passaged, distributed, and randomly sampled over time, thus obscuring simple historical or geographic links. We examined surviving nonclonal vaccine stocks, like Dryvax, which continue to harbor larger and now rare variants, including one that we have designated “clone DPP25.” DPP25 encodes genes not found in most VACV strains, including an ankyrin-F-box protein, a homolog of the variola virus (Bangladesh) B18R gene which we show can be deleted without affecting virulence in mice. We propose a simple common mechanism by which recombination of a larger and hypothetical DPP25-like ancestral strain, combined with selection for retention of critically important genes near the terminal inverted repeat boundaries (vaccinia virus growth factor gene and an interferon alpha/beta receptor homolog), could produce all known VACV variants. IMPORTANCE Smallpox was eradicated by using a combination of intensive disease surveillance and vaccination using vaccinia virus (VACV). Interestingly, little is known about the historical relationships between different strains of VACV and how these viruses may have evolved from a

  17. Anelastic Strain Recovery Analysis Code

    1995-04-05

    ASR4 is a nonlinear least-squares regression of Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) data for the purpose of determining in situ stress orientations and magnitudes. ASR4 fits the viscoelastic model of Warpinski and Teufel to measure ASR data, calculates the stress orientations directly, and stress magnitudes if sufficient input data are available. The code also calculates the stress orientation using strain-rosette equations, and it calculates stress magnitudes using Blanton''s approach, assuming sufficient input data are available.

  18. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  19. Two-Color Laser Speckle Shift Strain Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Greer, Lawrence C., III; Spina, Daniel; Barranger, John

    1996-01-01

    A two color laser speckle shift strain measurement system based on the technique of Yamaguchi was designed. The dual wavelength light output from an Argon Ion laser was coupled into two separate single-mode optical fibers (patchcords). The output of the patchcords is incident on the test specimen (here a structural fiber). Strain on the fiber, in one direction, is produced using an Instron 4502. Shifting interference patterns or speckle patterns will be detected at real-time rates using 2 CCD cameras with image processing performed by a hardware correlator. Strain detected in fibers with diameters from 21 microns to 143 microns is expected to be resolved to 15 mu epsilon. This system was designed to be compact and robust and does not require surface preparation of the structural fibers.

  20. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  1. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  2. The Influence of Elastic Strain on Catalytic Activity in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Khorshidi, Alireza; Sethuraman, Vijay A; Peterson, Andrew A; Guduru, Pradeep R

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the role of elastic strain in modifying catalytic reaction rates is crucial for catalyst design, but experimentally, this effect is often coupled with a ligand effect. To isolate the strain effect, we have investigated the influence of externally applied elastic strain on the catalytic activity of metal films in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We show that elastic strain tunes the catalytic activity in a controlled and predictable way. Both theory and experiment show strain controls reactivity in a controlled manner consistent with the qualitative predictions of the HER volcano plot and the d-band theory: Ni and Pt's activities were accelerated by compression, while Cu's activity was accelerated by tension. By isolating the elastic strain effect from the ligand effect, this study provides a greater insight into the role of elastic strain in controlling electrocatalytic activity. PMID:27079940

  3. Obtaining Formability Characteristics Of Automotive Materials Using On-line Strain Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Situ, Quan; Bruhis, Moisei; Jain, Mukesh

    2005-08-01

    The formability of automobile sheet material AA6111-T4 was investigated in the hemispherical punch test. Specimens with various geometry and lubrication conditions were utilized to obtain a continuous strain map from a biaxial stretching. The data was processed to obtain strain path and limit strain values as measures of formability. The Strain imaging system, ARAMIS, in which a speckle pattern is utilized instead of the conventional grid system, was employed to capture the strains during the forming process. Features of the evolving dome surface, such as development of shear bands and strain localization were accurately captured and studied. Specimen profile with non-symmetric notches for shearing test in biaxial loading was designed and investigated in both the experimental and the FE approach. The on-line strain imaging method offers a useful approach towards developing an understanding of flow localization, formability and fracture under biaxial loading conditions.

  4. Role of scaffold network in controlling strain and functionalities of nanocomposite films

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiping; Hu, Jia-Mian; Lu, Ping; Yang, Tiannan; Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Leigang; Ahmed, Towfiq; Enriquez, Erik; Weigand, Marcus; Su, Qing; Wang, Haiyan; Zhu, Jian-Xin; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Chen, Long-Qing; Yarotski, Dmitry; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-01-01

    Strain is a novel approach to manipulating functionalities in correlated complex oxides. However, significant epitaxial strain can only be achieved in ultrathin layers. We show that, under direct lattice matching framework, large and uniform vertical strain up to 2% can be achieved to significantly modify the magnetic anisotropy, magnetism, and magnetotransport properties in heteroepitaxial nanoscaffold films, over a few hundred nanometers in thickness. Comprehensive designing principles of large vertical strain have been proposed. Phase-field simulations not only reveal the strain distribution but also suggest that the ultimate strain is related to the vertical interfacial area and interfacial dislocation density. By changing the nanoscaffold density and dimension, the strain and the magnetic properties can be tuned. The established correlation among the vertical interface—strain—properties in nanoscaffold films can consequently be used to tune other functionalities in a broad range of complex oxide films far beyond critical thickness. PMID:27386578

  5. Role of scaffold network in controlling strain and functionalities of nanocomposite films

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Aiping; Hu, Jia -Mian; Lu, Ping; Yang, Tiannan; Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Leigang; Ahmed, T.; Enriquez, E.; Weigand, M.; Su, Qing; et al

    2016-06-10

    One novel approach to manipulating functionalities in correlated complex oxides is strain. However, significant epitaxial strain can only be achieved in ultrathin layers. We show that, under direct lattice matching framework, large and uniform vertical strain up to 2% can be achieved to significantly modify the magnetic anisotropy, magnetism, and magnetotransport properties in heteroepitaxial nanoscaffold films, over a few hundred nanometers in thickness. Comprehensive designing principles of large vertical strain have been proposed. Phase-field simulations not only reveal the strain distribution but also suggest that the ultimate strain is related to the vertical interfacial area and interfacial dislocation density. Moreover,more » by changing the nanoscaffold density and dimension, the strain and the magnetic properties can be tuned. The established correlation among the vertical interface—strain—properties in nanoscaffold films can consequently be used to tune other functionalities in a broad range of complex oxide films far beyond critical thickness.« less

  6. Development of a fiber optic pavement subgrade strain measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Craig Emerson

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation describes the development of a fiber optic sensing system to measure strains within the soil subgrade of highway pavements resulting from traffic loads. The motivation to develop such a device include improvements to: (1)all phases of pavement design, (2)theoretical models used to predict pavement performance, and (3)pavement rehabilitation. The design of the sensing system encompasses selecting an appropriate transducer design as well as the development of optimal optical and demodulation systems. The first is spring based, which attempts to match its spring stiffness to that of the soil-data indicate it is not an optimal transducer design. The second transducer implements anchoring plates attached to two telescoping tubes which allows the soil to be compacted to a desired density between the plates to dictate the transducer's behavior. Both transducers include an extrinsic Fabry- Perot cavity to impose the soil strains onto a phase change of the optical signal propagating through the cavity. The optical system includes a low coherence source and allows phase modulation via path length stretching by adding a second interferometer in series with the transducer, resulting in a path matched differential interferometer. A digitally implemented synthetic heterodyne demodulator based on a four step phase stepping algorithm is used to obtain unambiguous soil strain information from the displacement of the Fabry-Perot cavity. The demodulator is calibrated and characterized by illuminating the transducer with a second long coherence source of different wavelength. The transducer using anchoring plates is embedded within cylindrical soil specimens of varying soil types and soil moisture contents. Loads are applied to the specimen and resulting strains are measured using the embedded fiber optic gage and LVDTs attached to the surface of the specimen. This experimental verification is substantiated using a finite element analysis to predict any differences

  7. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, P S; Taylor, W J

    2004-08-01

    Pain in the forearm is relatively common in the community. In the workplace forearm pain is associated with work involving frequent repetition, high forces, and prolonged abnormal postures. Nevertheless, other factors are involved in the presentation and the continuation of the pain. Notable among these factors are psychosocial issues and the workplace environment-the attitude to workers and their welfare, the physical conditions, and design of the job. Primary prevention may be effective but active surveillance is important with early intervention and an active management approach. Physical treatments have not been extensively evaluated. In the established case, management should be multidisciplinary, addressing physical aspects of the job but also addressing the "yellow, blue, and black flags" which should be viewed as obstacles to recovery. For the worker "on sick" a dialogue should be established between the worker, the primary care physician, and the workplace. Return to work should be encouraged and facilitated by medical interventions and light duty options. Rehabilitation programmes may be of use in chronic cases.

  8. Compliant Intracortical Implants Reduce Strains and Strain Rates in Brain Tissue In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n=3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 sec interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p<0.05) compared to non-compliant silicon and PVAc-coated silicon materials. Further, both PVAc-coated non-compliant silicon and compliant nanocomposite shanks showed significantly reduced (by 4–5 fold) stresses due to tissue micromotion at the interface. Significance The results of this study showed that soft, adaptive materials reduce strains and strain rates and micromotion induced stresses in the surrounding brain tissue

  9. Compliant intracortical implants reduce strains and strain rates in brain tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach. Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n = 3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 s interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results. The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p < 0.05) compared to non-compliant silicon and PVAc-coated silicon materials. Furthermore, both PVAc-coated non-compliant silicon and compliant nanocomposite shanks showed significantly reduced (by 4-5 fold) stresses due to tissue micromotion at the interface. Significance. The results of this study showed that soft, adaptive materials reduce strains and strain rates and micromotion induced stresses in the surrounding brain tissue

  10. Bragg grating extensometer rods (BGX) for geotechnical strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia; Borm, Gunter

    1998-06-01

    We report on a new type of optical extensometer for strain measurement in geotechnical and civil engineering applications. The system key elements are fiber Bragg gratings embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rockbolts. In order to monitor rock deformations in tunnels, a prototype sensor rockbolt was designed. First measurements have been made to demonstrate the characteristics of the sensor system.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF A FLAVOBACTERIUM STRAIN VIRULENT AGAINT GIARDIA LAMBLIA CYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have isolated a bacterial strain capable of killing the cyst form of Giardia lamblia, from a Kentucky stream. This bacterium, designated Sun4, is a Gram negative, aerobic rod which produces a yellow pigment, but not of the flexirubin-type. Although true gliding motility has no...

  12. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  13. Cell culture isolation and sequence analysis of genetically diverse US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains including a novel strain with a large deletion in the spike gene.

    PubMed

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Saif, Linda J; Marthaler, Douglas; Esseili, Malak A; Meulia, Tea; Lin, Chun-Ming; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Jung, Kwonil; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qiuhong

    2014-10-10

    The highly contagious and deadly porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) first appeared in the US in April 2013. Since then the virus has spread rapidly nationwide and to Canada and Mexico causing high mortality among nursing piglets and significant economic losses. Currently there are no efficacious preventive measures or therapeutic tools to control PEDV in the US. The isolation of PEDV in cell culture is the first step toward the development of an attenuated vaccine, to study the biology of PEDV and to develop in vitro PEDV immunoassays, inactivation assays and screen for PEDV antivirals. In this study, nine of 88 US PEDV strains were isolated successfully on Vero cells with supplemental trypsin and subjected to genomic sequence analysis. They differed genetically mainly in the N-terminal S protein region as follows: (1) strains (n=7) similar to the highly virulent US PEDV strains; (2) one similar to the reportedly US S INDEL PEDV strain; and (3) one novel strain most closely related to highly virulent US PEDV strains, but with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. Representative strains of these three genetic groups were passaged serially and grew to titers of ∼5-6log10 plaque forming units/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation in cell culture of an S INDEL PEDV strain and a PEDV strain with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. We also designed primer sets to detect these genetically diverse US PEDV strains.

  14. Effects of Applied Strain on Rates of Ageing: Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the stated intents of this project has been to make some assessment of effects of strain on rates of ageing of project thermoplastics exposed to project fluids. To this end, certain straining jigs which apply in various modes - tensile, four-point bending and crack growth using compact tension samples - were designed and made for holding samples during fluid exposures. During testing, features of the thermoplastics have been observed which have tended to confuse apparent strain effects on the polymers' aged performance, but recent assessments of the topic and its data have led to considerable progress being made in identifying test procedures necessary for strain and related effects on chemical deterioration to manifest themselves. It is the intent of this report to provide a summary of what has been determined on strain and related effects thus far, and provide recommendations for clarifying them in Phase 2 by means of further test procedures which will increase and focus the severity of the conditions applying. The choice of flexible pipe rather than umbilicals service for assessing service strain conditions reflects the major interest of project members. However, Tefzel data are still provided.

  15. Surface strain measurements of fingertip skin under shearing.

    PubMed

    Delhaye, Benoit; Barrea, Allan; Edin, Benoni B; Lefèvre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2016-02-01

    The temporal evolution of surface strain, resulting from a combination of normal and tangential loading forces on the fingerpad, was calculated from high-resolution images. A customized robotic device loaded the fingertip with varying normal force, tangential direction and tangential speed. We observed strain waves that propagated from the periphery to the centre of the contact area. Consequently, different regions of the contact area were subject to varying degrees of compression, stretch and shear. The spatial distribution of both the strains and the strain energy densities depended on the stimulus direction. Additionally, the strains varied with the normal force level and were substantial, e.g. peak strains of 50% with a normal force of 5 N, i.e. at force levels well within the range of common dexterous manipulation tasks. While these observations were consistent with some theoretical predictions from contact mechanics, we also observed substantial deviations as expected given the complex geometry and mechanics of fingertips. Specifically, from in-depth analyses, we conclude that some of these deviations depend on local fingerprint patterns. Our data provide useful information for models of tactile afferent responses and background for the design of novel haptic interfaces. PMID:26888949

  16. Systematic screening of behavioral responses in two zebrafish strains.

    PubMed

    Vignet, Caroline; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Péan, Samuel; Lyphout, Laura; Leguay, Didier; Cousin, Xavier

    2013-09-01

    Wild-type (WT) zebrafish are commonly used in behavioral tests, but the term WT is not a precise description, and corresponds to many different strains (e.g., AB, TU, WIK, and others). Previous studies compared the physiological, behavioral, or metabolic characteristics of different zebrafish strains (indigenous WT populations versus laboratory WT strains). AB and TU are widely used, but at least one study has demonstrated behavioral differences between them. To choose the most appropriate strain for our experiments, we systematically screened behavioral responses of AB and TU fish in several assays. We analyzed the locomotion activity and responses to a light/dark challenge in adults and larvae, and exploratory behavior and color conditioning in adults. Differences were observed for all tests, the strains displaying particular behavior depending on the tests. As larvae, TU displayed a wider activity range than AB larvae at the onset of locomotor behavior; as adults, TU were more reactive to sudden light transitions and recovered the swimming activity faster in T-maze or homebase release in novel tank tests, whereas AB fish had more contrasted circadian rhythms and performed better in color learning. Strain-specific behavior should be considered when designing experiments using behavior.

  17. Pipeline blockage location by strain measurement using an ROV

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes an ROV based inspection method for locating a blockage in a marine pipeline. The method measures changes in the hoop strain in the pipe corresponding to changes in the internal fluid pressure. The device (patent applied for), converts radial extension or compression of the pipe into axial compression or tension respectively of a load cell. It allows the use of a high sensitivity axial strain sensing element to measure the hoop strain in the pipe. By pressurizing the pipe at positions upstream and downstream of the blockage and measuring the resulting hoop strain, the boundaries of the blockage can be accurately defined. The device can be installed and recovered by ROV, the signals being relayed to the surface via the ROV`s umbilical. The method has been used successfully to locate and define the extent of a blockage in a deepwater oil flowline running from a satellite well system to a production platform, allowing the planning of effective remedial action. The results of the strain measurements were found to be fully consistent with the contents of the pipe determined by subsequent sectioning. Key features of the hoop strain device include rugged design, high sensitivity, ease of attachment and recovery by ROV with the need for minimal cleaning and for access only to a sector of the pipe, typically {1/4} the circumference.

  18. WIPP Benchmark calculations with the large strain SPECTROM codes

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.; DeVries, K.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides calculational results from the updated Lagrangian structural finite-element programs SPECTROM-32 and SPECTROM-333 for the purpose of qualifying these codes to perform analyses of structural situations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Results are presented for the Second WIPP Benchmark (Benchmark II) Problems and for a simplified heated room problem used in a parallel design calculation study. The Benchmark II problems consist of an isothermal room problem and a heated room problem. The stratigraphy involves 27 distinct geologic layers including ten clay seams of which four are modeled as frictionless sliding interfaces. The analyses of the Benchmark II problems consider a 10-year simulation period. The evaluation of nine structural codes used in the Benchmark II problems shows that inclusion of finite-strain effects is not as significant as observed for the simplified heated room problem, and a variety of finite-strain and small-strain formulations produced similar results. The simplified heated room problem provides stratigraphic complexity equivalent to the Benchmark II problems but neglects sliding along the clay seams. The simplified heated problem does, however, provide a calculational check case where the small strain-formulation produced room closures about 20 percent greater than those obtained using finite-strain formulations. A discussion is given of each of the solved problems, and the computational results are compared with available published results. In general, the results of the two SPECTROM large strain codes compare favorably with results from other codes used to solve the problems.

  19. Surface strain measurements of fingertip skin under shearing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The temporal evolution of surface strain, resulting from a combination of normal and tangential loading forces on the fingerpad, was calculated from high-resolution images. A customized robotic device loaded the fingertip with varying normal force, tangential direction and tangential speed. We observed strain waves that propagated from the periphery to the centre of the contact area. Consequently, different regions of the contact area were subject to varying degrees of compression, stretch and shear. The spatial distribution of both the strains and the strain energy densities depended on the stimulus direction. Additionally, the strains varied with the normal force level and were substantial, e.g. peak strains of 50% with a normal force of 5 N, i.e. at force levels well within the range of common dexterous manipulation tasks. While these observations were consistent with some theoretical predictions from contact mechanics, we also observed substantial deviations as expected given the complex geometry and mechanics of fingertips. Specifically, from in-depth analyses, we conclude that some of these deviations depend on local fingerprint patterns. Our data provide useful information for models of tactile afferent responses and background for the design of novel haptic interfaces. PMID:26888949

  20. Strain-tuned optoelectronic properties of hollow gallium sulphide microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Chen, Chen; Liang, C Y; Liu, Z W; Li, Y S; Che, Renchao

    2015-11-01

    Sulfide semiconductors have attracted considerable attention. The main challenge is to prepare materials with a designable morphology, a controllable band structure and optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report a facile chemical transportation reaction for the synthesis of Ga2S3 microspheres with novel hollow morphologies and partially filled volumes. Even without any extrinsic dopant, photoluminescence (PL) emission wavelength could be facilely tuned from 635 to 665 nm, depending on its intrinsic inhomogeneous strain distribution. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging reveals that the strain distribution and the associated PL properties can be accurately controlled by changing the growth temperature gradient, which depends on the distance between the boats used for raw material evaporation and microsphere deposition. The stacking-fault density, lattice distortion degree and strain distribution at the shell interfacial region of the Ga2S3 microspheres could be readily adjusted. Ab initio first-principles calculations confirm that the lowest conductive band (LCB) is dominated by S-3s and Ga-4p states, which shift to the low-energy band as a result of the introduction of tensile strain, well in accordance with the observed PL evolution. Therefore, based on our strain driving strategy, novel guidelines toward the reasonable design of sulfide semiconductors with tunable photoluminescence properties are proposed.

  1. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 189

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 189 is a potent inhibitor of the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the complete, finished sequence of the 6.8-Mbp genome of this strain, consisting of a single contiguous molecule. Strain 189 is closely related to previously sequenced strains of P. chlororaphis. PMID:27340063

  2. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOEpatents

    Steblay, Bernard J.

    1986-01-01

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  3. Tuning magnetism by biaxial strain in native ZnO.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chengxiao; Wang, Yuanxu; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Chao; Yang, Gui

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic ZnO, one of the most important diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), has attracted great scientific interest because of its possible technological applications in optomagnetic devices. Magnetism in this material is usually delicately tuned by the doping level, dislocations, and local structures. The rational control of magnetism in ZnO is a highly attractive approach for practical applications. Here, the tuning effect of biaxial strain on the d(0) magnetism of native imperfect ZnO is demonstrated through first-principles calculations. Our calculation results show that strain conditions have little effect on the defect formation energy of Zn and O vacancies in ZnO, but they do affect the magnetism significantly. For a cation vacancy, increasing the compressive strain will obviously decrease its magnetic moment, while tensile strain cannot change the moment, which remains constant at 2 μB. For a singly charged anion vacancy, however, the dependence of the magnetic moment on strain is opposite to that of the Zn vacancy. Furthermore, the ferromagnetic state is always present, irrespective of the strain type, for ZnO with two zinc vacancies, 2VZns. A large tensile strain is favorable for improving the Curie temperature and realizing room temperature ferromagnetism for ZnO-based native semiconductors. For ZnO with two singly charged oxygen vacancies, 2Vs, no ferromagnetic ordering can be observed. Our work points the way to the rational design of materials beyond ZnO with novel non-intrinsic functionality by simply tuning the strain in a thin film form.

  4. Suppression of Low Strain Rate Nonpremixed Flames by an Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra L. (Technical Monitor); Hamins, A.; Bundy, M.; Oh, C. B.; Park, J.; Puri, I. K.

    2004-01-01

    The extinction and structure of non-premixed methane/air flames were investigated in normal gravity and microgravity through the comparison of experiments and calculations using a counterflow configuration. From a fire safety perspective, low strain rate conditions are important for several reasons. In normal gravity, many fires start from small ignition sources where the convective flow and strain rates are weak. Fires in microgravity conditions, such as a manned spacecraft, may also occur in near quiescent conditions where strain rates are very low. When designing a fire suppression system, worst-case conditions should be considered. Most diffusion flames become more robust as the strain rate is decreased. The goal of this project is to investigate the extinction limits of non-premixed flames using various agents and to compare reduced gravity and normal gravity conditions. Experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center's 2.2-second drop tower were conducted to attain extinction and temperature measurements in low-strain non-premixed flames. Extinction measurements using nitrogen added to the fuel stream were performed for global strain rates from 7/s to 50/s. The results confirmed the "turning point" behavior observed previously by Maruta et al. in a 10 s drop tower. The maximum nitrogen volume fraction in the fuel stream needed to assure extinction for all strain rates was measured to be 0.855+/-0.016, associated with the turning point determined to occur at a strain rate of 15/s. The critical nitrogen volume fraction in the fuel stream needed for extinction of 0-g flames was measured to be higher than that of 1-g flames.

  5. Psychological Strain and Emotional Labor among Police-Officers: A Diary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gelderen, Benjamin; Heuven, Ellen; van Veldhoven, Marc; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Croon, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between psychological strain, emotional dissonance and emotional job demands during a working day of 65 Dutch (military) police officers, using a 5-day diary design. We hypothesized that emotional dissonance partly mediated the relationship between psychological strain at the start and at the end of a work…

  6. High strain FBG sensors for structural fatigue testing of military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, S.; Kopczyk, J.; Nuyens, T.; Davis, C.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on a series of tests investigating the performance of Draw Tower Gratings (DTGs) combined with custom-designed broad area packaging and bonding techniques for high-strain sensing applications on Defence platforms. The sensors and packaging were subjected to a series of high-strain static and cyclic loading tests and a summary of these results is presented.

  7. Eccentric exercise in vivo: strain-induced muscle damage and adaptation in a stable system.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A

    2010-04-01

    The muscle tendon unit is a stable system, designed to operate eccentrically with efficiency and resiliency. Fiber strains, although minimized by tendon compliance during exercise, are essential components to decoding the mechanical and chemical signals during exercise. Subsequent cellular adaptations minimize the subsequent "dose" of stress and strain and serve to limit the exacerbation of damage into injury.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Biofilm-Forming Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strain 53

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Sirwan; Rout, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    A clinical strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (designated strain 53) was obtained, and a whole-genome sequence was generated. The subsequent draft whole-genome sequence demonstrated the presence of a number of genes encoding for proteins involved in resistance to a number of antimicrobial therapies. PMID:25883296

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Isolated from a Milk Powder Manufacturing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Sara A.; Cox, Murray P.; Flint, Steve H.; Lindsay, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus (designated A1, P3, and D1) were isolated from a New Zealand milk powder manufacturing plant. Here, we describe their draft genome sequences. This information provided the first genomic insights into the nature of G. stearothermophilus strains present in the milk powder manufacturing environment. PMID:26472822

  10. Spin transport in graphene superlattice under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattari, Farhad

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the spin-dependent transport and the spin polarization properties for graphene superlattice with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) in the presence of zigzag and armchair direction strain are studied. It is found that for the zigzag direction strain the angular range of the spin-inversion can be efficiently controlled by the strain strength. In addition, the efficiency of spin-inversion and spin-dependent conductivity decreases by increasing the strain strength. When the armchair direction strain is applied to a monolayer graphene superlattice the spin polarization can be observed and increases by increasing the strain strength, whereas for the zigzag direction strain it is zero.

  11. Micro-electromechanical Systems for Probing Novel Strain Physics and Innovative Strain Devices in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Jason; Vutukuru, Mounika; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna; Goldberg, Bennett

    Straining 2D materials can dramatically change electrical, thermal and optical properties and can even cause unconventional behavior such as generating pseudo-magnetic fields. However attempts at probing these effects have been hindered by the difficulty involved with precisely straining these materials. Here we present micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) as an ideal platform for straining 2D materials because they are readily compatible with existing electronics and their size makes them compatible with 2D materials. Additionally the MEMS platform does more than facilitate experimentation; by freeing us to think of strain as dynamical it makes a whole new class of devices practical for next generation technology. To demonstrate the power of this platform we have for the first time measured the strain response of the Raman and photoluminescence spectra of suspended MoS2, and measured the friction force between MoS2 and the MEMS structure. This talk will touch on the basics of designing MEMS structures for straining 2D materials, how to transfer 2D materials onto MEMS without break either, proof of concept experimental results, and next steps in developing the MEMS platform. This work is supported by NSF DMR Grant 1411008, and author J. Christopher thanks the NDSEG program for its support.

  12. Development of a mutant strain of Escherichia coli for molecular cloning of highly methylated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Bishr, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A mutant strain of Escherichia coli designated as GR219 that allows efficient molecular cloning of highly methylated bean DNA has been developed by UV light mutation of the parent LE392 str[sup r] strain. This mutant strain, like the parent, is streptomycin resistant and is biologically contained, because it requires thymidine for growth. Both the wild type and the mutant strain have lambda phage receptors so both can be utilized for construction of genomic libraries using the phase as a vector. The efficiency of transformation of the parent and the mutant strain with a recombinant plasmid containing bean DNA was compared to the efficiency of transformation of the PLK-F[prime] strain, which has a deletion of mcrA and mcrB genes and, therefore, allows transformation with methylated bean DNA. It has been found that the GR219 strain has the highest efficiency of transformation, while the PLK-F[prime] strain shows less, and the parent LE392 str[sup r] strain the least efficiency of transformation. These results indicate that strains of E. coli with mcrA and mcrB genes can recognize and degrade highly methylated DNA. However, other undefined factors affected by the altered gene(s) in the GR219 strain are also involved in the recognition and degradation of any cloned foreign DNA.

  13. Characterization and probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from cheeses.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Carminati, Domenico; Burns, Patricia; Suàrez, Viviana; Vinderola, Gabriel; Reinheimer, Jorge; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2011-08-01

    Ninety-eight Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Italian and Argentinean cheeses were evaluated for probiotic potential. After a preliminary subtractive screening based on the presence of msa and bsh genes, 27 strains were characterized. In general, the selected strains showed high resistance to lysozyme, good adaptation to simulated gastric juice, and a moderate to low bile tolerance. The capacity to agglutinate yeast cells in a mannose-specific manner, as well as the cell surface hydrophobicity was found to be variable among strains. Very high β-galactosidase activity was shown by a considerable number of the tested strains, whereas variable prebiotic utilization ability was observed. Only tetracycline resistance was observed in two highly resistant strains which harbored the tetM gene, whereas none of the strains showed β-glucuronidase activity or was capable of inhibiting pathogens. Three strains (Lp790, Lp813, and Lp998) were tested by in vivo trials. A considerable heterogeneity was found among a number of L. plantarum strains screened in this study, leading to the design of multiple cultures to cooperatively link strains showing the widest range of useful traits. Among the selected strains, Lp790, Lp813, and Lp998 showed the best probiotic potential and would be promising candidates for inclusion as starter cultures for the manufacture of probiotic fermented foods. PMID:21569949

  14. C55 bacteriocin produced by ETB-plasmid positive Staphylococcus aureus strains is a key factor for competition with S. aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Shammi, Fariha; Oogai, Yuichi; Nakamura, Norifumi; Sugai, Motoyuki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Exfoliative toxin (ET) produced by Staphylococcus aureus is closely associated with the onset of bullous impetigo. To date, three ETs (ETA, ETB and ETD) have been identified. The gene encoding ETB is located in a plasmid designated pETB. Bacteriocin synthesis genes are also located in this plasmid and pETB-positive strains reportedly produce the C55 bacteriocin. In this study, the antibacterial activity against S. aureus strains of the bacteriocin produced by the pETB-positive strain TY4 was investigated. This bacteriocin demonstrated antibacterial activity against all pETB-negative but not pETB-positive strains, including TY4. Additionally, a TY4- strain from which the pETB plasmid had been deleted exhibited susceptibility to the bacteriocin. Further experiments revealed that two immunity factors (orf 46-47 and orf 48) downstream of the bacteriocin synthesis genes in the pETB plasmid are associated with immunity against the bacteriocin produced by TY4. The TY4- with orf46-47 strain exhibited complete resistance to bacteriocin, whereas the TY4- with orf48 strain exhibited partial resistance. Whether bacteriocin affects the proportion of each strain when co-cultured with S. aureus strains was also investigated. When TY4 or TY4- was co-cultured with 209P strain, which is susceptible to the bacteriocin, the proportion of 209P co-cultured with TY4 was significantly less than when 209P was co-cultured with TY4-, whereas the proportion of TY4- with orf46-48 co-cultured with TY4 was greater than with TY4-. These results suggest that the C55 bacteriocin produced by pETB-positive strains affects the proportion of each strain when pETB-positive and -negative strains co-exist. PMID:26801833

  15. Bromoalkane-degrading Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Shochat, E.; Hermoni, I.; Cohen, Z.; Abeliovich, A.; Belkin, S. )

    1993-05-01

    Many of the xenobiotic compounds extensively used in agriculture and industry, particularly the chlorinated halogenated compounds, have been extensively studied. Brominated organics, also used worldwide in, for example, flame retardants, pesticides, industrial biocides, intermediates in the polymer industry, have received far less attention. Investigations into the biodegradative pathways of aliphatic bromides in particular is very limited. This paper reports the isolation and preliminary characterization of two Pseudomonas strains capable of utilizing a broad range of bromoalkanes as single carbon and energy sources, and describes the emulsification and dehalogenation of hydrophobic bromoakanes by these strains. 37 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  17. Genetic analysis of biodegradation of tetralin by a Sphingomonas strain

    SciTech Connect

    Hernaez, M.J.; Santero, E.; Reineke, W.

    1999-04-01

    Tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) is produced for industrial purposes from naphthalene by catalytic hydrogenation or from anthracene by cracking. A strain designated TFA which very efficiently utilizes tetralin has been isolated from the Rhine river. The strain has been identified as Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus, based on 16S rDNA sequence similarity. Genetic analysis of tetralin biodegradation has been performed by insertion mutagenesis and by physical analysis and analysis of complementation between the mutants. The genes involved in tetralin utilization are clustered in a region of 9 kb, comprising at least five genes grouped in two divergently transcribed operons.

  18. Strain-controlled thermal conductivity in ferroic twinned films

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suzhi; Ding, Xiangdong; Ren, Jie; Moya, Xavier; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Large reversible changes of thermal conductivity are induced by mechanical stress, and the corresponding device is a key element for phononics applications. We show that the thermal conductivity κ of ferroic twinned thin films can be reversibly controlled by strain. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations reveal that thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of twin boundaries perpendicular to the direction of heat flow. Our demonstration of large and reversible changes in thermal conductivity driven by strain may inspire the design of controllable thermal switches for thermal logic gates and all-solid-state cooling devices. PMID:25224749

  19. High strain-rate model for fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-07-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamic uniaxial strain loading of fiber-reinforced composites are presented that illustrate the wide range of deformation mechanisms that can be captured using a micromechanics-based homogenization technique as the material model in existing continuum mechanics computer programs. Enhancements to the material model incorporate high strain-rate plastic response, elastic nonlinearity, and rate-dependent strength degradation due to material damage, fiber debonding, and delamination. These make the model relevant to designing composite structural components for crash safety, armor, and munitions applications.

  20. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  1. Bacteriocins and novel bacterial strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry is thought to be a significant source of Campylobacter in human disease. We evaluated anti-Campylobacter activity among 365 Bacillus and Paenibacillus isolates from poultry. One novel antagonistic Bacillus circulans and three Paenibacillus polymyxa strains were identified and further studi...

  2. Physiological strain and countermeasures with firefighting.

    PubMed

    Cheung, S S; Petersen, S R; McLellan, T M

    2010-10-01

    Protective clothing is integral to the task of firefighting, but at the same time can increase physiological strain and impair work capacity. Encapsulation of the head and the high thermal resistance and/or low water vapor permeability of the clothing ensemble impede evaporative heat dissipation, thus elevating the rate of heat storage and creating a state of uncompensable heat stress (UHS). In addition, the additional weight from carrying a supplemental air supply and the greater respiratory work of breathing through a regulator can create a negative spiral of thermal hyperpnea from greater respiratory demands and metabolic heat production. The elevated respiratory demands also increase cardiac strain and potentially the risk for myocardial events. Tolerance time during UHS is determined by three factors: the core temperature at the beginning of the heat stress exposure, the core temperature that can be tolerated before exhaustion or collapse ensues, and the rate of increase in core temperature from the beginning to end of the heat stress exposure. Protective clothing is often employed in highly dynamic environments, making portability, longevity and integration with the task requirements and clothing critical design characteristics for countermeasures. To date, most countermeasures have been relatively indirect in nature, primarily with alterations in work scheduling along with physiological manipulations such as cooling manipulations during recovery periods. Advances are required in materials science to develop lighter and less restrictive protective equipment, concurrent with cooling strategies that target specific regions or which can be effectively implemented during exercise.

  3. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus–like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Results Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non–conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra–specific comparison are sharp markers of inter–specific evolution: indeed, many events of non–conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. Conclusions The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to

  4. BSD: the Biodegradative Strain Database.

    PubMed

    Urbance, John W; Cole, James; Saxman, Paul; Tiedje, James M

    2003-01-01

    The Biodegradative Strain Database (BSD) is a freely-accessible, web-based database providing detailed information on degradative bacteria and the hazardous substances that they degrade, including corresponding literature citations, relevant patents and links to additional web-based biological and chemical data. The BSD (http://bsd.cme.msu.edu) is being developed within the phylogenetic framework of the Ribosomal Database Project II (RDPII: http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/html) to provide a biological complement to the chemical and degradative pathway data of the University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database (UM-BBD: http://umbbd.ahc.umn.edu). Data is accessible through a series of strain, chemical and reference lists or by keyword search. The web site also includes on-line data submission and user survey forms to solicit user contributions and suggestions. The current release contains information on over 250 degradative bacterial strains and 150 hazardous substances. The transformation of xenobiotics and other environmentally toxic compounds by microorganisms is central to strategies for biocatalysis and the bioremediation of contaminated environments. However, practical, comprehensive, strain-level information on biocatalytic/biodegradative microbes is not readily available and is often difficult to compile. Similarly, for any given environmental contaminant, there is no single resource that can provide comparative information on the array of identified microbes capable of degrading the chemical. A web site that consolidates and cross-references strain, chemical and reference data related to biocatalysis, biotransformation, biodegradation and bioremediation would be an invaluable tool for academic and industrial researchers and environmental engineers.

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Nicotine Degradation by a Newly Isolated Strain, Ochrobactrum sp. Strain SJY1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Zhu, Xiongyu; Li, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    A newly isolated strain, SJY1, identified as Ochrobactrum sp., utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Strain SJY1 could efficiently degrade nicotine via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway), which highlights bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation. A 97-kbp DNA fragment containing six nicotine degradation-related genes was obtained by gap closing from the genome sequence of strain SJY1. Three genes, designated vppB, vppD, and vppE, in the VPP pathway were cloned and heterologously expressed, and the related proteins were characterized. The vppB gene encodes a flavin-containing amine oxidase converting 6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine. Although VppB specifically catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 6-hydroxynicotine rather than nicotine, it shares higher amino acid sequence identity with nicotine oxidase (38%) from the pyrrolidine pathway than with its isoenzyme (6-hydroxy-l-nicotine oxidase, 24%) from the pyridine pathway. The vppD gene encodes an NADH-dependent flavin-containing monooxygenase, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine to 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. VppD shows 62% amino acid sequence identity with the hydroxylase (HspB) from Pseudomonas putida strain S16, whereas the specific activity of VppD is ∼10-fold higher than that of HspB. VppE is responsible for the transformation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the VPP pathway, which evolved independently from nicotinic acid degradation, might have a closer relationship with the pyrrolidine pathway. The proteins and functional pathway identified here provide a sound basis for future studies aimed at a better understanding of molecular principles of nicotine degradation. PMID:25344232

  6. Molecular mechanism of nicotine degradation by a newly isolated strain, Ochrobactrum sp. strain SJY1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Tang, Hongzhi; Zhu, Xiongyu; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A newly isolated strain, SJY1, identified as Ochrobactrum sp., utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Strain SJY1 could efficiently degrade nicotine via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway), which highlights bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation. A 97-kbp DNA fragment containing six nicotine degradation-related genes was obtained by gap closing from the genome sequence of strain SJY1. Three genes, designated vppB, vppD, and vppE, in the VPP pathway were cloned and heterologously expressed, and the related proteins were characterized. The vppB gene encodes a flavin-containing amine oxidase converting 6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine. Although VppB specifically catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 6-hydroxynicotine rather than nicotine, it shares higher amino acid sequence identity with nicotine oxidase (38%) from the pyrrolidine pathway than with its isoenzyme (6-hydroxy-l-nicotine oxidase, 24%) from the pyridine pathway. The vppD gene encodes an NADH-dependent flavin-containing monooxygenase, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine to 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. VppD shows 62% amino acid sequence identity with the hydroxylase (HspB) from Pseudomonas putida strain S16, whereas the specific activity of VppD is ∼10-fold higher than that of HspB. VppE is responsible for the transformation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the VPP pathway, which evolved independently from nicotinic acid degradation, might have a closer relationship with the pyrrolidine pathway. The proteins and functional pathway identified here provide a sound basis for future studies aimed at a better understanding of molecular principles of nicotine degradation. PMID:25344232

  7. Molecular mechanism of nicotine degradation by a newly isolated strain, Ochrobactrum sp. strain SJY1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Tang, Hongzhi; Zhu, Xiongyu; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A newly isolated strain, SJY1, identified as Ochrobactrum sp., utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Strain SJY1 could efficiently degrade nicotine via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway), which highlights bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation. A 97-kbp DNA fragment containing six nicotine degradation-related genes was obtained by gap closing from the genome sequence of strain SJY1. Three genes, designated vppB, vppD, and vppE, in the VPP pathway were cloned and heterologously expressed, and the related proteins were characterized. The vppB gene encodes a flavin-containing amine oxidase converting 6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine. Although VppB specifically catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 6-hydroxynicotine rather than nicotine, it shares higher amino acid sequence identity with nicotine oxidase (38%) from the pyrrolidine pathway than with its isoenzyme (6-hydroxy-l-nicotine oxidase, 24%) from the pyridine pathway. The vppD gene encodes an NADH-dependent flavin-containing monooxygenase, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine to 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. VppD shows 62% amino acid sequence identity with the hydroxylase (HspB) from Pseudomonas putida strain S16, whereas the specific activity of VppD is ∼10-fold higher than that of HspB. VppE is responsible for the transformation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the VPP pathway, which evolved independently from nicotinic acid degradation, might have a closer relationship with the pyrrolidine pathway. The proteins and functional pathway identified here provide a sound basis for future studies aimed at a better understanding of molecular principles of nicotine degradation.

  8. Indices of Psychological Strain During Hypoxis Bedrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, Nektarios A.; McDonnell, Adam C.; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B.

    2013-02-01

    Much attention has been devoted to the physiological changes that occur during bed rest. However, there has been a lack of focus on the psychological aspects per se. We investigated indices of psychological strain during three 10-d interventions, designed to assess the combined effects of inactivity/unloading and normobaric hypoxia on several physiological systems. Eleven male participants underwent three 10-d campaigns in a randomized manner: 1) normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB), 2) normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR) and 3) normoxic bed rest (NBR). The most negative psychological profile appeared on BR10 of HBR and HAmb conditions (hypoxic conditions). Concomitantly a decrease in positive emotions was observed from BR-2 to BR10. Bed rest and exposure to hypoxic environments seems to exert a negative effect on person’s psychological mood.

  9. Biotransformation of Tributyltin chloride by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Dnyanada S.; Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial isolate capable of utilizing tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) as sole carbon source was isolated from estuarine sediments of west coast of India and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri based on biochemical tests and Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. This isolate was designated as strain DN2. Although this bacterial isolate could resist up to 3 mM TBTCl level, it showed maximum growth at 2 mM TBTCl in mineral salt medium (MSM). Pseudomonas stutzeri DN2 exposed to 2 mM TBTCl revealed significant alteration in cell morphology as elongation and shrinkage in cell size along with roughness of cell surface. FTIR and NMR analysis of TBTCl degradation product extracted using chloroform and purified using column chromatography clearly revealed biotransformation of TBTCl into Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTCl2) through debutylation process. Therefore, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2 may be used as a potential bacterial strain for bioremediation of TBTCl contaminated aquatic environmental sites. PMID:25763027

  10. Dynamic and static strain gauge using superimposed fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. C.; Yang, Y. H.; Li, J. M.; Yang, M. W.; Tang, J.; Liang, T.

    2012-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a simple and fast interrogation method for the dynamic and/or static strain gauge using a reflection spectrum from two superimposed fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The superimposed FBGs are designed to decrease nonequidistant space of generated a sensing pulse train in a time domain during dynamic strain gauge. By combining centroid finding with smooth filtering methods, both the interrogation speed and accuracy are improved. A four times increase in the interrogation speed of dynamic strain, by generating a 2 kHz optical sensing pulse train from a 500 Hz scanning frequency, is demonstrated experimentally. The interrogation uncertainty and total harmonic distortion characterization of superimposed FBGs are tested and less than 4 pm standard deviation is obtained.

  11. Strain measurement aided assembly for a CFRP hexapod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guorui; Li, Chuang; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xuewu

    2011-12-01

    In order to mount a space optical telescope with long focal length on a spacecraft for an astronomy observation mission, a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) hexapod with titanium alloy brackets was designed and fabricated. Each bracket has a pair of heads and each head has two orthogonal flexures as virtual pivots without clearance to provide flexure mounts. Because of no adjustment parts, slight differences among components and roughly assembly would result in misalignment and asymmetrical stress in the hexapod. The stresses and strains of the CFRP hexapod structure under 1G gravity load were analyzed with finite element method. In order to monitor the assembly stress and provide regulating guidance, strain gauges were stuck centrally on the bottom flexures of each bracket. Comparing the measured strains with the computed values, the low stress assembly of the CFRP hexapod has been accomplished successfully.

  12. Quantum spin hall insulators in strain-modified arsenene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijun; Ma, Yandong; Chen, Zhongfang

    2015-12-01

    By means of density functional theory (DFT) computations, we predict that the suitable strain modulation of honeycomb arsenene results in a unique two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator (TI) with a sizable bulk gap (up to 696 meV), which could be characterized and utilized at room temperature. Without considering any spin-orbit coupling, the band inversion occurs around the Gamma (G) point at tensile strains larger than 11.7%, which indicates the quantum spin Hall effect in arsenene at appropriate strains. The nontrivial topological phase was further confirmed by the topological invariant ν = 1 and edge states with a single Dirac-type crossing at the G point. Our results provide a promising strategy for designing 2D TIs with large bulk gaps from commonly used materials.

  13. FlexPatch: a rugged miniature FBG strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Steve; Snyder, Don; Graver, Tom; Méndez, Alexis

    2007-04-01

    The design and development of a novel opto-mechanical strain sensor-called FlexPatch-based on the use of an optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) mounted into a custom-made miniature metallic flexure is reported. The FBG sensing element is attached to a carrier flexure using proprietary bonding process which ensures a linear, drift-free and repeatable strain response even under severe moisture and temperature conditions. The sensor is uncompensated for temperature effects, but has undergone extensive mechanical and environmental testing and is qualified for use in a strain range of +/- 2,500μɛ with a gage factor of 1.2pm/μɛ over a temperature range from -40° to 120°C, and a fatigue life >100x10 6 cycles. The FlexPatch is intended for use in diverse sensing and monitoring applications and can be installed onto surfaces by epoxy bonding or spot welding.

  14. A NEW STRAIN OF TRANSMISSIBLE LEUCEMIA IN FOWLS (STRAIN H).

    PubMed

    Ellermann, V

    1921-03-31

    1. A new strain of fowl leucosis has been transmitted through twelve generations of fowls. 2. An increase in virulence was observed during its passage. This was shown in a shortening of the interval between inoculation and death. The increase in virulence does not affect the number of successful inoculations, which remains approximately constant in from 20 to 40 per cent of the birds employed. 3. As with former strains, the disease manifests itself in various forms; i.e., myeloid and intravascular lymphoid types. A single lymphatic case was observed. 4. In several intravascular cases a diminution in the hemolytic power of the serum was established. This phenomenon was absent in a number of myeloid cases. 5. Active immunization cannot be produced by means of the subcutaneous injection of virulent material. 6. The finding of previous experiments that the virus is filterable has been confirmed. 7. The inoculation of human leucemic material into fowls gave negative results.

  15. Material mechanical characterization method for multiple strains and strain rates

    DOEpatents

    Erdmand, III, Donald L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Simunovic, Srdjan; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-19

    A specimen for measuring a material under multiple strains and strain rates. The specimen including a body having first and second ends and a gage region disposed between the first and second ends, wherein the body has a central, longitudinal axis passing through the first and second ends. The gage region includes a first gage section and a second gage section, wherein the first gage section defines a first cross-sectional area that is defined by a first plane that extends through the first gage section and is perpendicular to the central, longitudinal axis. The second gage section defines a second cross-sectional area that is defined by a second plane that extends through the second gage section and is perpendicular to the central, longitudinal axis and wherein the first cross-sectional area is different in size than the second cross-sectional area.

  16. Mapping microscale strain heterogeneity during creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla Terminel, A.; Evans, J.

    2013-12-01

    We use a new technique combining microfabrication technology and compression tests to map the strain field at a micrometric scale in polycrystalline materials. This technique allows us to map local strain while measuring macroscopic strain and rheological properties, and provides insight into the relative contribution of various plasticity mechanisms under varying creep conditions. The micro-strain mapping technique was applied to Carrara Marble under different deformation regimes, at 300 MPa and temperatures ranging from 200 to 700 °C. At 600 °C, strain of 10%, and strain rate of 3e-5s-1, the local strain at twin and grain boundaries is up to 5 times greater than the average sample strain. At these conditions, strains averaged across a particular grain may vary by as much as 100%, but the strain field becomes more homogeneous with increasing strain. For example, for the analyzed experiments, the average wavelength of the strain heterogeneity is 70 micrometers at 10% strain, but increases to 110 micrometers at 20%. For a strain of 10%, heterogeneity is increased at slower strain rate (at 1e-5s-1). This increase seems to be associated with a more important role of twin boundary and grain boundary migration. As expected, twin densities are markedly greater at the lower temperature, though it is still unclear whether the relative twin volume is greater. However, twin strains are still important at 600 °C and accommodate an average of 14 % of the total strain at 10% deformation and a strain rate of 3e-5s-1.

  17. Thermoresistive strain sensor and positioning method for roll-to-roll processes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuan-Hsun; Lo, Cheng-Yao

    2014-01-01

    This study uses the Joule heating effect-generated temperature difference to monitor in real-time and localize both compressive and tensile strains for the polymer substrates used in the roll-to-roll process. A serpentine gold (Au) line was patterned on a polyethylenenaphthalate (PEN) substrate to form the strain sensor based on thermoresistive behavior. This strain sensor was then subjected to either current or voltage to induce the Joule heating effect on the Au resistor. An infrared (IR) detector was used to monitor the strain-induced temperature difference on the Au and PEN surfaces and the minimal detectable bending radius was 0.9 mm with a gauge factor (GF) of 1.46. The proposed design eliminates the judgment ambiguity from conventional resistive strain sensors where resistance is the only physical quantity monitored. This study precisely and successfully indicated the local strain quantitatively and qualitatively with complete simulations and measurements. PMID:24803196

  18. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It ismore » found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.« less

  19. Rolling motion of an elastic cylinder induced by elastic strain gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Shaohua

    2014-10-01

    Recent experiment shows that an elastic strain gradient field can be utilized to transport spherical particles on a stretchable substrate by rolling, inspired by which a generalized plane-strain Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model is developed in this paper in order to verify possible rolling of an elastic cylinder adhering on an elastic substrate subject to a strain gradient. With the help of contact mechanics, closed form solutions of interface tractions, stress intensity factors, and corresponding energy release rates in the plane-strain contact model are obtained, based on which a possible rolling motion of an elastic cylinder induced by strain gradients is found and the criterion for the initiation of rolling is established. The theoretical prediction is consistent well with the existing experimental observation. The result should be helpful for understanding biological transport mechanisms through muscle contractions and the design of transport systems with strain gradient.

  20. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It is found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.

  1. FIBER BRAGG GRATING SENSORS FOR LOCALIZED STRAIN MEASUREMENTS AT LOW TEMPERATURE AND IN HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalingam, Rajinikumar

    2010-04-09

    Study of magnetostrictive effects in the bulk superconductors is very essential and can give more knowledge about the effects like namely, flux pinning induced strain, pincushion distortions in the magnets and so on. Currently used electro mechanical sensors are magnetic field dependent and can only give the global stress/strain information but not the local stress/strains. But the information like radius position dependent strain and characterisation of shape distortion in non cylindrical magnets are interesting. Wavelength encoded multiplexed fiber Bragg Grating sensors inscribed in one fiber gives the possibility to measure magentostrictive effects spatially resolved in low temperature and high magnetic field. This paper specifies the design and technology requirements to adapt FBG sensors for such an application. Also reports the experiments demonstrate the properties of glass FBG at low temperature (4.2 K) and the results of strain measurement at 4.2 K/8 T. The sensor exhibits a linear wavelength change for the strain change.

  2. Attenuation of virulence by P and V plasmids in Vibrio cholerae: strains suitable for oral immunization*

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, V. B.; Srivastava, Brahm S.

    1979-01-01

    In a virulent strain of Vibrio cholerae, KB9, P and V plasmids were introduced by bacterial conjugation. Characterization of PV isolates and systematic screening of them in animal models of cholera revealed that a large number of PV isolates were non-pathogenic, owing to the loss of ability to synthesize toxin. Results obtained with two such strains, designated as KB9:PV and CD24, are described. The strains with plasmids were stable during in vitro cultivation or during two successive passages in rabbit intestine. Protection conferred by PV strains was determined in mouse protection tests and in the rabbit ileal loop model. The plasmid strains were immunogenic. In view of the results, it is proposed that PV-bearing attenuated strains should be tried in oral immunization. PMID:316741

  3. Recommended Strain Gage Application Procedures for Various Langley Research Center Balances and Test Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center uses more than 10000 strain gages per year in supporting its various research programs. The character of the testing at LaRC is such that the types of strain gage installations, the materials they are applied to, and the test environments encountered, require many varied approaches for installing strain gages. These installations must be accomplished in the most technically discerning and appropriate manner. This technical memorandum is offered as an assisting guide in helping the strain gage user to determine the appropriate approach for a given strain gage application requirement. Specifically, this document offers detailed recommendations for strain gaging the following: LaRC-Designed balances, LARC custom transducers, certain composite materials and alloys, high-temperature test articles, and selected non-typical or unique materials or test conditions.

  4. Realization of nano static strain sensing with fiber Bragg gratings interrogated by narrow linewidth tunable lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingwen; Tokunaga, Tomochika; He, Zuyuan

    2011-10-10

    Aiming at realizing a static strain sensor of nano-strain resolution, which is required in most geophysical applications, this paper presents a thorough analysis on the strain resolution of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) static strain sensor interrogated with a narrow linewidth tunable laser. The main noise sources of the sensor are discussed, and the strain resolution is deduced with a cross-correlation algorithm. The theoretical prediction agrees well with our experimental result, and the analysis is further validated by numerical simulations. Based on the analysis, the paper provides the guidelines for optimizing this type of sensor to realize ultra-high resolution. It is shown that with properly designed FBGs and interrogation systems, nano static strain resolution can be realized, as we recently demonstrated in experiment.

  5. Nonlinear strain dependences in highly strained germanium micromembranes for on-chip light source applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilloy, Kevin; Gassenq, Alban; Pauc, Nicolas; Escalante Fernandez, Jose Maria; Duchemin, Ivan; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Tardif, Samuel; Rieutord, Francois; Gentile, Pascal; Osvaldo Dias, Guilherme; Rouchon, Denis; Widiez, Julie; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Fowler, Daivid; Chelnokov, Alexei; Geiger, Richard; Zabel, Thomas; Sigg, Hans C.; Faist, Jérôme; Reboud, Vincent; Calvo, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    ]. Finally, we performed electro-absorption measurements on micro-membranes to determine the energy of the direct transitions (conduction band to light and heavy holes) in uniaxially stressed germanium. The relationship between strain and direct bandgap became nonlinear above 2.5 %, in agreement with our theoretical models. In conclusion, we show that under uniaxial strain level above 2 %, germanium exhibits significant nonlinear behaviors which have to be taken into consideration for the design and fabrication of future on-chip germanium laser sources compatible with CMOS technologies. [1] Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. B 39, 1871 (1989) [2] Lim et al., Opt. Express 17, 16358 (2009) [3] Süess et al., Nature Phot. 7, 466 (2013) [4] Widiez et al., ECS Transaction 64, 35-48 (2014) [5] Gassenq et al., submitted [6] Gassenq et al., submitted

  6. Modelling to very high strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, P. D.; Jessell, M. W.; Griera, A.; Evans, L. A.; Wilson, C. J. L.

    2009-04-01

    Ductile strains in shear zones often reach extreme values, resulting in typical structures, such as winged porphyroclasts and several types of shear bands. The numerical simulation of the development of such structures has so far been inhibited by the low maximum strains that numerical models can normally achieve. Typical numerical models collapse at shear strains in the order of one to three. We have implemented a number of new functionalities in the numerical platform "Elle" (Jessell et al. 2001), which significantly increases the amount of strain that can be achieved and simultaneously reduces boundary effects that become increasingly disturbing at higher strain. Constant remeshing, while maintaining the polygonal phase regions, is the first step to avoid collapse of the finite-element grid required by finite-element solvers, such as Basil (Houseman et al. 2008). The second step is to apply a grain-growth routine to the boundaries of polygons that represent phase regions. This way, the development of sharp angles is avoided. A second advantage is that phase regions may merge or become separated (boudinage). Such topological changes are normally not possible in finite element deformation codes. The third step is the use of wrapping vertical model boundaries, with which optimal and unchanging model boundaries are maintained for the application of stress or velocity boundary conditions. The fourth step is to shift the model by a random amount in the vertical direction every time step. This way, the fixed horizontal boundary conditions are applied to different material points within the model every time step. Disturbing boundary effects are thus averaged out over the whole model and not localised to e.g. top and bottom of the model. Reduction of boundary effects has the additional advantage that model can be smaller and, therefore, numerically more efficient. Owing to the combination of these existing and new functionalities it is now possible to simulate the

  7. Strains

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled muscle ... can include: Pain and difficulty moving the injured muscle Discolored and bruised skin Swelling ... if you still have pain. Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep ...

  8. Fabric strain sensor integrated with CNPECs for repeated large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weijing

    Flexible and soft strain sensors that can be used in smart textiles for wearable applications are much desired. They should meet the requirements of low modulus, large working range and good fatigue resistance as well as good sensing performances. However, there were no commercial products available and the objective of the thesis is to investigate fabric strain sensors based on carbon nanoparticle (CNP) filled elastomer composites (CNPECs) for potential wearing applications. Conductive CNPECs were fabricated and investigated. The introduction of silicone oil (SO) significantly decreased modulus of the composites to less than 1 MPa without affecting their deformability and they showed good stability after heat treatment. With increase of CNP concentration, a percolation appeared in electrical resistivity and the composites can be divided into three ranges. I-V curves and impedance spectra together with electro-mechanical studies demonstrated a balance between sensitivity and working range for the composites with CNP concentrations in post percolation range, and were preferred for sensing applications only if the fatigue life was improved. Due to the good elasticity and failure resist property of knitted fabric under repeated extension, it was adopted as substrate to increase the fatigue life of the conductive composites. After optimization of processing parameters, the conductive fabric with CNP concentration of 9.0CNP showed linear I-V curves when voltage is in the range of -1 V/mm and 1 V/mm and negligible capacitive behavior when frequency below 103 Hz even with strain of 60%. It showed higher sensitivity due to the combination of nonlinear resistance-strain behavior of the CNPECs and non-even strain distribution of knitted fabric under extension. The fatigue life of the conductive fabric was greatly improved. Extended on the studies of CNPECs and the coated conductive fabrics, a fabric strain sensor was designed, fabricated and packaged. The Young's modulus of

  9. Biosurfactant-producing strains in enhancing solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Hang; Chen, Xuehua; Liu, Na; Bao, Suriguge

    2014-07-01

    Three biosurfactant-producing strains designated as BS-1, BS-3, and BS-4 were screened out from crude oil-contaminated soil using a combination of surface tension measurement and oil spreading method. Thin layer chromatography and infrared analysis indicated that the biosurfactants produced by the three strains were lipopeptide, glycolipid, and phospholipid. The enhancement of solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater employing biosurfactant-producing strains was investigated. The three strain mixtures led to more solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater, and the solubilization rate was 10.5 mg l−1. The combination of biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains exhibited a higher biodegradation efficiency of 85.4 % than the petroleum-degrading strains (71.2 %). Biodegradation was enhanced the greatest with biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains in a ratio of 1:1. Fluorescence microscopy images illustrate that the oil dispersed into smaller droplets and emulsified in the presence of biosurfactant-producing strains, which attached to the oil. Thus, the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was enhanced.

  10. Strain transfer analysis of optical fiber based sensors embedded in an asphalt pavement structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaping; Xiang, Ping

    2016-07-01

    Asphalt pavement is vulnerable to random damage, such as cracking and rutting, which can be proactively identified by distributed optical fiber sensing technology. However, due to the material nature of optical fibers, a bare fiber is apt to be damaged during the construction process of pavements. Thus, a protective layer is needed for this application. Unfortunately, part of the strain of the host material is absorbed by the protective layer when transferring the strain to the sensing fiber. To account for the strain transfer error, in this paper a theoretical analysis of the strain transfer of a three-layered general model has been carried out by introducing Goodman’s hypothesis to describe the interfacial shear stress relationship. The model considers the viscoelastic behavior of the host material and protective layer. The effects of one crack in the host material and the sensing length on strain transfer relationship are been discussed. To validate the effectiveness of the strain transfer analysis, a flexible asphalt-mastic packaged distributed optical fiber sensor was designed and tested in a laboratory environment to monitor the distributed strain and appearance of cracks in an asphalt concrete beam at two different temperatures. The experimental results indicated that the developed strain transfer formula can significantly reduce the strain transfer error, and that the asphalt-mastic packaged optical fiber sensor can successfully monitor the distributed strain and identify local cracks.

  11. High-strain-rate characterization of TPOs and graphite/epoxy and graphite/peek composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, N. S.; Simha, H.; Pratap, A.

    2001-06-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain response of two types of TPOs and graphite-epoxy composites are investigated at strain rates in the range 0.001/s-1000/s. Specimen strain in the low strain rate regime 0.001-100/s was determined using an optical extensometer in conjunction with standard MTS machine. Tensile test at high strain rate were performed on newly developed tensile version of All- Polymeric Split Hopkinson Bar. Tensile TPO specimens in the dog-bone configuration are placed in specially designed grips fabricated from nylatron. Compression response of TPO specimens at high strain rate is determined using 25.4-mm diameter aluminum bars. Peak compressive stress increases from 10 MPa at a strain rate of 100/s to 35 MPa at a strain rate of 1000/s. Preliminary data on high strain rate tensile response of graphite-epoxy and graphite-peek composites are presented. These data are intended to develop a material model incorporating strain rate sensitivity for TPOs and to be used in car crash simulations.

  12. A mechanistic study for strain rate sensitivity of rabbit patellar tendon

    PubMed Central

    Clemmer, John; Liao, Jun; Davis, Debbie; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Williams, Lakiesha N.

    2014-01-01

    The ultrastructural mechanism for strain rate sensitivity of collagenous tissue has not been well studied at the collagen fibril level. Our objective is to reveal the mechanistic contribution of tendon's key structural component to strain rate sensitivity. We have investigated the structure of the collagen fibril undergoing tension at different strain rates. Tendon fascicles were pulled and fixed within the linear region (12% local tissue strain) at multiple strain rates. Although samples were pulled to the same percent elongation, the fibrils were noticed to elongate differently, increasing with strain rate. For the 0.1, 10, and 70%/s strain rates, there were 1.84±3.6%, 5.5±1.9%, and 7.03±2.2% elongations (mean±S.D.), respectively. We concluded that the collagen fibrils underwent significantly greater recruitment (fibril strain relative to global tissue strain) at higher strain rates. A better understanding of tendon mechanisms at lower hierarchical levels would help establish a basis for future development of constitutive models and assist in tissue replacement design. PMID:20678772

  13. Electronic Raman Scattering as an Ultra-Sensitive Probe of Strain Effects in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenhas, Angelo; Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Dan

    Semiconductor strain engineering has become a critical feature of high-performance electronics due to the significant device performance enhancements it enables. These improvements that emerge from strain induced modifications to the electronic band structure necessitate new ultra-sensitive tools for probing strain in semiconductors. Using electronic Raman scattering, we recently showed that it is possible to measure minute amounts of strain in thin semiconductor epilayers. We applied this strain measurement technique to two different semiconductor alloy systems, using coherently strained epitaxial thin films specifically designed to produce lattice-mismatch strains as small as 10-4. Comparing our strain sensitivity and signal strength in AlxGa1-xAs with those obtained using the industry-standard technique of phonon Raman scattering we found a sensitivity improvement of ×200, and a signal enhancement of 4 ×103 thus obviating key constraints in semiconductor strain metrology. The sensitivity of this approach rivals that of contemporary techniques and opens up a new realm for optically probing strain effects on electronic band structure. We acknowledge the financial support of the DOE Office of Science, BES under DE-AC36-80GO28308.

  14. Identification by PCR of Fusarium culmorum strains producing large and small amounts of deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Bakan, B; Giraud-Delville, C; Pinson, L; Richard-Molard, D; Fournier, E; Brygoo, Y

    2002-11-01

    Thirty deoxynivalenol-producing F. culmorum strains, isolated from wheat grains, were incubated in vitro and analyzed for trichothecene production. Seventeen strains produced more than 1 ppm of deoxynivalenol and acetyldeoxynivalenol and were considered high-deoxynivalenol-producing strains, whereas 13 F. culmorum strains produced less than 0.07 ppm of trichothecenes and were considered low-deoxynivalenol-producing strains. For all strains, a 550-base portion of the trichodiene synthase gene (tri5) was amplified and sequenced. According to the tri5 data, the F. culmorum strains tested clustered into two groups that correlated with in vitro deoxynivalenol production. For three high-producing and three low-producing F. culmorum strains, the tri5-tri6 intergenic region was then sequenced, which confirmed the two separate clusters within the F. culmorum strains. According to the tri5-tri6 sequence data, specific PCR primers were designed to allow differentiation of high-producing from low-producing F. culmorum strains. PMID:12406740

  15. An edited linkage map for the AXB and BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sampson, S B; Higgins, D C; Elliot, R W; Taylor, B A; Lueders, K K; Koza, R A; Paigen, B

    1998-09-01

    We have updated the history of the AXB and BXA recombinant inbred (RI) strains, typed additional loci, and edited the AXB, BXA RI database. Thirteen of the original 51 AXB and BXA RI strains are either extinct or genetically contaminated, leaving 33 living strains available from The Jackson Laboratory. However, we found a high degree of similarity among three sets of strains, indicating that these strains are not independent, which leaves 27 independent RI strains in the set. Accordingly, we modified the database by combining the AXB and BXA RI sets and eliminating strains that were genetically contaminated or extinct with no available DNA. We added 92 newly typed loci, retyped some questionable genotypings, and removed loci with excessive double crossovers or an insufficient number of typed strains. The edited strain distribution pattern (SDP) is available on the World Wide Web (WWW) (http://www. informatics.jax.org/riset.html) and now includes over 700 loci. Each locus is linked to adjacent loci with a LOD score of at least 3.0 with a few described exceptions. We also carried out a second editing designed for the analysis of quantitative trait loci by deleting extinct strains and loci with identical SDPs; this edited database is also available on the WWW.

  16. Biodegradation of phenol by Antarctic strains of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Gerginova, Maria; Manasiev, Jordan; Yemendzhiev, Husein; Terziyska, Anna; Peneva, Nadejda; Alexieva, Zlatka

    2013-01-01

    Taxonomic identification of three newly isolated Antarctic fungal strains by their 18S rDNA sequences revealed their affiliation with Aspergillus fumigatus. Phenol (0.5 g/l) as the sole carbon source was completely degraded by all strains within less than two weeks. Intracellular activities of three key enzymes involved in the phenol catabolism were determined. Activities of phenol hydroxylase (EC 1.14.13.7), hydroquinone hydroxylase (EC 1.14.13.x), and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.1) varied significantly between strains. The rates of phenol degradation in the three strains correlated best with the activity of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. Six pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed on the basis of the Aspergillus fumigatus Af293 genome sequence (NCBI Acc. No. XM_743491.1) and used to amplify phenol hydroxylase-related gene sequences. DNA sequences of about 1200 bp were amplified from all three strains and found to have a high degree of sequence identity with the corresponding gene of Aspergillus fumigatus Af293.

  17. Live-attenuated strains of improved genetic stability.

    PubMed

    Macadam, A J; Ferguson, G; Stone, D M; Meredith, J; Almond, J W; Minor, P D

    2001-01-01

    The current live-attenuated vaccine strains of poliovirus are genetically unstable and capable of rapid evolution in human hosts, resulting in reversion to neurovirulence and, occasionally, disease. They can also be shed by recipients for a considerable time after vaccination. This raises questions about how and when to stop vaccination after wild-type viruses have been eliminated. Persistence of vaccine revertant viruses in the population would present a risk to new cohorts of unvaccinated children and threaten the success of the eradication programme. A number of Sabin vaccine strain derivatives have been described that are, in theory, genetically more stable than the present vaccines and therefore less likely to revert to virulence. The approaches used in their derivation are outlined here and data presented for two strains showing a significant improvement in genetic stability. These strains were designed according to our understanding of the molecular basis of attenuation and incorporate changes in the sequence of an RNA structural domain that plays a key role in attenuation. They may also be less transmissible than the current type 3 vaccine strain and are potentially useful in the strategically difficult final stages of poliomyelitis eradication.

  18. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness meridional tendons This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent Upon inflation and pressurization the instantaneous i e linear-elastic strain and stress distributions in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction However over time and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the gore material the em hoop strains increase and the em meridional stresses decrease whereas the em remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature The results show good correlation with a numerical study using the ABAQUS finite-element package that includes a widely used model of

  19. Susceptibility of Legionella strains to the chlorinated biocide, monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Guillaume, Carole; Binet, Marie; Leblon, Gérard; DuBow, Michael; Le Brun, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Legionella genus find suitable conditions for their growth and survival in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit the proliferation of Legionella pathogenic bacteria in nuclear power plant cooling circuits, and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, monochloramine treatment can be used. Although the treatment is highly effective, i.e. it reduces Legionella numbers by over 99%, Legionella bacteria can still be detected at low concentrations and rapid re-colonisation of circuits can occur after the treatment has ceased. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro methodology for determining the intrinsic susceptibility of L. pneumophila strains, collected from various nuclear power plant cooling circuits subjected to different treatment conditions. The methodology was developed by using an original approach based on response surface methodology (RSM) combined with a multifactorial experimental design. The susceptibility was evaluated by the Ct factor. The susceptibility of environmental strains varies widely and is, for some strains, greater than that of known tolerant species; however, strain susceptibility was not related to treatment conditions. Selection pressure induced by monochloramine use did not result in the selection of more tolerant Legionella strains and did not explain the detection of Legionella during treatment or the rapid re-colonisation of cooling circuits after disinfection has ceased.

  20. TRANSTRAIN: A program to compute strain transformations in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, R.

    1990-07-01

    Over the years, the solid rocket motor community has made increasing use of composite materials for thermal and structural applications. This is particularly true of solid rocket nozzles, which have used carbon phenolic and, increasingly, carbon-carbon materials to provide structural integrity and thermal protection at the high temperatures encountered during motor burn. To evaluate the degree of structural performance of nozzles and their materials and to verify analysis models, many subscale and full-scale tests are run. These provide engineers with valuable data needed to optimize design and to analyze nozzle hardware. Included among these data are strains, pressures, thrust, temperatures, and displacements. Recent nozzle test hardware has made increasing use of strain gauges embedded in the carbon composite material to measure internal strains. In order to evaluate strength, these data must be transformed into strains along the fiber directions. The fiber-direction stresses can then be calculated. A computer program written to help engineers correctly manipulate the strain data into a form that can be used to evaluate structural integrity of the nozzle is examined.

  1. Engineering related neutron diffraction measurements probing strains, texture and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W; Tome, Carlos N; Balogh, Levente; Vogel, Sven C

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used for engineering applications for nearly three decades. The basis of the technique is powder diffraction following Bragg's Law. From the measured diffraction patterns information about internal, or residual, strain can be deduced from the peak positions, texture information can be extracted from the peak intensities, and finally the peak widths can provide information about the microstructure, e.g. dislocation densities and grain sizes. The strains are measured directly from changes in lattice parameters, however, in many cases it is non-trivial to determine macroscopic values of stress or strain from the measured data. The effects of intergranular strains must be considered, and combining the neutron diffraction measurements with polycrystal deformation modeling has proven invaluable in determining the overall stress and strain values of interest in designing and dimensioning engineering components. Furthelmore, the combined use of measurements and modeling has provided a tool for elucidating basic material properties, such as critical resolved shear stresses for the active deformation modes and their evolution as a function of applied deformation.

  2. [Modern Approaches to the Creation of Industrial Microorganism Strains].

    PubMed

    Debabov, V G

    2015-04-01

    Microorganism producer strains are the basis of industrial biotechnology. Their properties determine the economical parameters of the production. Methods of rational design (metabolic engineering) and combinatorial methods of mutagenesis and selection (laboratory evolution, adaptive evolution, protein and genomic shuffling) are used for the construction of microorganism strains. Combination of these methods is frequently used. Modern strains usually do not contain plasmids and markers of drug resistance. All changes are introduced into the chromosome by the methods of homologous and site-specific recombination. The sum of such approaches is called recombineering. Gene expression is carried out at the optimal level under the control of promoters of a certain power (frequently regulated). Knowledge of a complete genomic sequence is almost a mandatory condition for the use of methods of metabolic engineering. Bioinformatics significantly assists in the selection of enzymes and the search for necessary genes and metabolic reactions. Measurement of metabolic fluxes largely assists in the construction of strains. The current level of science makes it possible to construct metabolic pathways de novo in strains for the production of chemicals and biofuel. Carbon dioxide has potential as a raw material for microbiological industry; therefore, the study of CO2 fixation by acetogens and electrogens is a promising direction of studies.

  3. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons, consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness, meridional tendons. This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons. The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation, whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent. Upon inflation and pressurization, the "instantaneous", i.e. linear-elastic strain and stress distribution in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction. However, over time, and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the material, the hoop strains increase and the meridional stresses decrease, whereas the remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged. These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission, both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon. An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter, 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented. The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature. The results show good correlation with a numerical study, using the ABAQUS finite-element package, that includes a widely used model of the visco-elastic response of the gore material:

  4. TRANSTRAIN: A program to compute strain transformations in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    1990-01-01

    Over the years, the solid rocket motor community has made increasing use of composite materials for thermal and structural applications. This is particularly true of solid rocket nozzles, which have used carbon phenolic and, increasingly, carbon-carbon materials to provide structural integrity and thermal protection at the high temperatures encountered during motor burn. To evaluate the degree of structural performance of nozzles and their materials and to verify analysis models, many subscale and full-scale tests are run. These provide engineers with valuable data needed to optimize design and to analyze nozzle hardware. Included among these data are strains, pressures, thrust, temperatures, and displacements. Recent nozzle test hardware has made increasing use of strain gauges embedded in the carbon composite material to measure internal strains. In order to evaluate strength, these data must be transformed into strains along the fiber directions. The fiber-direction stresses can then be calculated. A computer program written to help engineers correctly manipulate the strain data into a form that can be used to evaluate structural integrity of the nozzle is examined.

  5. Construction of a lactose-assimilating strain of baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Adam, A C; Prieto, J A; Rubio-Texeira, M; Polaina, J

    1999-09-30

    A recombinant strain of baker's yeast has been constructed which can assimilate lactose efficiently. This strain has been designed to allow its propagation in whey, the byproduct resulting from cheese-making. The ability to metabolize lactose is conferred by the functional expression of two genes from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC12 and LAC4, which encode a lactose permease and a beta-galactosidase, respectively. To make the recombinant strain more acceptable for its use in bread-making, the genetic transformation of the host baker's yeast was carried out with linear fragments of DNA of defined sequence, carrying as the only heterologous material the coding regions of the two K. lactis genes. Growth of the new strain on cheese whey affected neither the quality of bread nor the yeast gassing power. The significance of the newly developed strain is two-fold: it affords a cheap alternative to the procedure generally used for the propagation of baker's yeast, and it offers a profitable use for cheese whey.

  6. Susceptibility of Legionella Strains to the Chlorinated Biocide, Monochloramine

    PubMed Central

    Jakubek, Delphine; Guillaume, Carole; Binet, Marie; Leblon, Gérard; DuBow, Michael; Le Brun, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Legionella genus find suitable conditions for their growth and survival in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit the proliferation of Legionella pathogenic bacteria in nuclear power plant cooling circuits, and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, monochloramine treatment can be used. Although the treatment is highly effective, i.e. it reduces Legionella numbers by over 99%, Legionella bacteria can still be detected at low concentrations and rapid re-colonisation of circuits can occur after the treatment has ceased. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro methodology for determining the intrinsic susceptibility of L. pneumophila strains, collected from various nuclear power plant cooling circuits subjected to different treatment conditions. The methodology was developed by using an original approach based on response surface methodology (RSM) combined with a multifactorial experimental design. The susceptibility was evaluated by the Ct factor. The susceptibility of environmental strains varies widely and is, for some strains, greater than that of known tolerant species; however, strain susceptibility was not related to treatment conditions. Selection pressure induced by monochloramine use did not result in the selection of more tolerant Legionella strains and did not explain the detection of Legionella during treatment or the rapid re-colonisation of cooling circuits after disinfection has ceased. PMID:24005820

  7. High strain rate mechanical properties of IM7/8551-7 graphite epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, B.M.; Vinson, J.R.; Hall, I.W.

    1995-12-31

    Polymer matrix composites offer excellent mechanical properties such as high specific strength and stiffness which make them attractive for many naval, aerospace and automotive structural components. Although they are candidate materials for many applications where high strain rate loading is probable, little is known of the material responses to shock loading for most composite materials. Because mechanical properties vary significantly with strain rate, the use of static properties in the analysis and design of structures which undergo dynamic loadings can on one hand lead to a very conservative overweight design, or on the other hand can lead to designs which fail prematurely and unexpectedly. The use of dynamic material properties will ensure the design of composite structures which are weight efficient and structurally sound when they are subjected to dynamic loads. In this study, a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar is used to obtain compressive mechanical properties of a unidirectional IM7/8551-7 graphite epoxy composite. For each of the three principal directions, the yield stress, yield strain, ultimate stress, ultimate strain, modulus of elasticity, elastic strain energy function and the total strain energy to failure are presented for strain rates varying from 49 sec{sup {minus}1} to 1430 sec{sup {minus}1}. The data from 72 tests are statistically analyzed, represented by equations, and discussed in some detail.

  8. Computational strain gradient crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niordson, Christian F.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method for viscous strain gradient crystal plasticity theory is presented, which incorporates both energetic and dissipative gradient effects. The underlying minimum principles are discussed as well as convergence properties of the proposed finite element procedure. Three problems of plane crystal plasticity are studied: pure shear of a single crystal between rigid platens as well as plastic deformation around cylindrical voids in hexagonal close packed and face centered cubic crystals. Effective in-plane constitutive slip parameters for plane strain deformation of specifically oriented face centered cubic crystals are developed in terms of the crystallographic slip parameters. The effect on geometrically necessary dislocation structures introduced by plastic deformation is investigated as a function of the ratio of void radius to plasticity length scale.

  9. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Miller, Theodore A.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schwartzkopf, Louis A.; Sanders, Steven C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  10. Retaining large and adjustable elastic strains of kilogram-scale Nb nanowires [Better Superconductor by Elastic Strain Engineering: Kilogram-scale Free-Standing Niobium Metal Composite with Large Retained Elastic Strains

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yan, Jiaqiang; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Brown, Dennis E.; Li, Ju

    2016-02-10

    Crystals held at ultrahigh elastic strains and stresses may exhibit exceptional physical and chemical properties. Individual metallic nanowires can sustain ultra-large elastic strains of 4-7%. However, retaining elastic strains of such magnitude in kilogram-scale nanowires is challenging. Here, we find that under active load, ~5.6% elastic strain can be achieved in Nb nanowires in a composite material. Moreover, large tensile (2.8%) and compressive (-2.4%) elastic strains can be retained in kilogram-scale Nb nanowires when the composite is unloaded to a free-standing condition. It is then demonstrated that the retained tensile elastic strains of Nb nanowires significantly increase their superconducting transitionmore » temperature and critical magnetic fields, corroborating ab initio calculations based on BCS theory. This free-standing nanocomposite design paradigm opens new avenues for retaining ultra-large elastic strains in great quantities of nanowires and elastic-strain-engineering at industrial scale.« less

  11. Gravity- and strain-induced electric fields outside metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, F.; Opat, G. I.

    1992-05-01

    The gravity-induced electric field outside a metal object supported against gravity is predominantly due to its differential compression which arises in supporting its own weight. This Dessler-Michel-Rorschach-Trammell (DMRT) field, as it has come to be known, is expected to be proportional to the strain derivative of the work function of the surface. We report the results of an experiment designed to produce this effect with mechanically applied strain rather than with gravity. In essence, we have measured the strain-induced contact-potential variation between a metal surface of known strain gradient and an unstrained capacitive probe. We describe useful solutions to the problems faced in such an experiment, which were not adequately addressed by earlier workers. A knowledge of the DMRT field is of considerable importance to experiments designed to compare the gravitational acceleration of charged particles and antiparticles inside a metallic shield. Past experiments with electrons yielded results contrary to the then-expected DMRT field. We review and partially extend the theoretical background by drawing on later results based on the jellium model of metal surfaces. Our results for Cu and Au surfaces are consistent with jellium-based calculations which imply a DMRT field that is about an order of magnitude smaller and of opposite sign to the early estimates.

  12. Comparison of different assays for definition of heat-stable enterotoxigenicity of Escherichia coli porcine strains.

    PubMed

    Olsson, E; Söderlind, O

    1980-01-01

    Ninety-one Escherichia coli strains isolated from porcine neonatal diarrhea, representing 28 O-groups and rough and non-O-groupable strains, were examined for enterotoxigenicity (heat stable [ST] or heat labile [LT]) by using bacterial suspensions in intestinal loop tests in 3- to 7-week-old piglets and culture supernatant fluids in the Y1 adrenal cell test, the 18-h rabbit intestinal loop test, and the infant mouse test. Eleven strains in O-groups 101, 138, 147, and 149 were positive in all four assay systems and were designated ST + LT. Fourteen strains within O-groups 8, 9, 20, 64, 141, and 149 and non-O-groupable were positive only in the 3- to 7-week-old piglet loop test and the infant mouse test and were designated ST pig + mouse. Sixteen strains distributed among O-groups 8, 16, 32, 50, 51, 98, 115, 141, 149, and 157 were positive only in the piglet intestinal loop test and were designated ST pig. Three strains of O-groups 8, 9, and 140 were positive only in the infant mouse assay and were designated ST mouse. Two strains of O-group 149 were positive in all tests except the infant mouse test and were designated LT. A total of 42 strains were negative in all four tests (Ent(-)), and 3 strains could not be categorized by the enterotoxigenicity criteria used. All K88-positive isolates, 17 strains of O-groups 8, 32, 147, and 149, were positive in at least one enterotoxigenicity test. ST pig and ST mouse strains gave positive intestinal loop tests as bacterial suspensions in 4- to 10-day-old piglets. A 6-h piglet intestinal loop test performed with heat-inactivated culture supernatants was preferable to an 18- to 20-h test for determination of ST production by strains of diverse O-groups. ST production by the two strains designated LT was detected by the 6-h test. The infant mouse test, although highly reproducible and convenient, appears to possess considerable limitations in routine screening of E. coli of porcine origin for ST production.

  13. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases

  14. Strains around distally inclined implants retaining mandibular overdentures with Locator attachments: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Setta, Fathi Abo; Khirallah, Ahmed Samir

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by means of strain gauge analysis, the effect of different implant angulations on strains around two implants retaining mandibular overdenture with Locator attachments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four duplicate mandibular acrylic models were constructed. Two implants were inserted in the canine regions using the following degrees of distal inclinations: group I (control); 0°, group II; 10°, group III; 20°, and group IV; 30°. Locator pink attachments were used to connect the overdenture to the implants and Locator red (designed for severely angled implants) was used for group IV (group IVred). For each group, two linear strain gauges were attached at the mesial and distal surfaces of the acrylic resin around each implant. Peri-implant strain was measured on loading and non-loading sides during bilateral and unilateral loading. RESULTS For all groups, the mesial surfaces of the implants at loading and non-loading sides experienced compressive (negative) strains, while the distal implant surfaces showed tensile (positive) strains. Group IV showed the highest strain, followed by group III, group II. Both group I and group IVred showed the lowest strain. The strain gauges at the mesial surface of the loading side recorded the highest strain, and the distal surface at non-loading side showed the lowest strain. Unilateral loading recorded significantly higher strain than bilateral loading. CONCLUSION Peri-implant strains around two implants used to retain mandibular overdentures with Locator attachments increase as distal implant inclination increases, except when red nylon inserts were used. PMID:27141255

  15. Phenotypic, antigenic, and molecular characterization of Pasteurella piscicida strains isolated from fish.

    PubMed Central

    Magariños, B; Romalde, J L; Bandín, I; Fouz, B; Toranzo, A E

    1992-01-01

    We compared Pasteurella piscicida strains isolated from different fish species in several European countries with strains isolated in Japan and the United States. The taxonomic analysis revealed that, regardless of the geographic origin and source of isolation, all the strains exhibited the same biochemical and physiological characteristics. Serological assays with different rabbit antisera demonstrated a high level of antigenic similarity among strains, with cross-agglutination titers of 20,480 to 40,960. This serological homogeneity was supported by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and membrane protein profiles. All the P. piscicida strains had the same electrophoretic LPS pattern, showing O side chains with a ladder-like structure, and shared at least four major outer membrane proteins, of 20, 30, 42, and 53 kDa. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with LPS and protein indicated that all the P. piscicida strains are immunologically related. In addition, the chromosomal DNA fingerprint patterns obtained for the European strains with the enzymes EcoRI and BamHI were practically identical to those of the Japanese and U.S. strains. Although some differences were found in the plasmid profiles of P. piscicida, a large number of strains possessed in common plasmid bands of 20 and 7 MDa. In addition, a plasmid of 50 MDa was present in the majority of the European strains. Restriction endonuclease analysis demonstrated the genetic homology of the plasmid bands shared by most of the European strains. All the P. piscicida strains had the same drug resistance patterns, indicating that a correlation between plasmid carriage and resistance to a specific antimicrobial agent cannot be established. The high levels of phenotypic, serological, and genetic homogeneity found among the P. piscicida strains should facilitate the development of DNA probes with diagnostic purposes as well as the design of effective vaccines. Images PMID:1444366

  16. Strain Monitoring of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litteken, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    , such as tensile testing, fatigue testing, and shear testing, but common measurement techniques cannot be used on fabric. Measuring strain in a material and during a test is a critical parameter for an engineer to monitor the structure during the test and correlate to an analytical model. The ability to measure strain in fabric structures is a challenge for NASA. Foil strain gauges, for example, are commonplace on metallic structures testing, but are extremely difficult to interface with a fabric substrate. New strain measuring techniques need to be developed for use with fabric structures. This paper investigates options for measuring strain in fabric structures for both ground testing and in-space structural health monitoring. It evaluates current commercially available options and outlines development work underway to build custom measurement solutions for NASA's fabric structures.

  17. Piezoelectric field in strained GaAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wieczorek, Sebastian Maciej

    2005-11-01

    This report describes an investigation of the piezoelectric field in strained bulk GaAs. The bound charge distribution is calculated and suitable electrode configurations are proposed for (1) uniaxial and (2) biaxial strain. The screening of the piezoelectric field is studied for different impurity concentrations and sample lengths. Electric current due to the piezoelectric field is calculated for the cases of (1) fixed strain and (2) strain varying in time at a constant rate.

  18. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  19. Modal strain energies in COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, B. D.; Venkayya, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    A computer program was developed to take a NASTRAN output file from a normal modes analysis and calculate the modal strain energies of selected elements. The FORTRAN program can determine the modal strain energies for CROD, CBAR, CELAS, CTRMEM, CQDMEM2, and CSHEAR elements. Modal strain energies are useful in estimating damping in structures.

  20. Phenotypic and Genotypic Description of Sedimenticola selenatireducens Strain CUZ, a Marine (Per)Chlorate-Respiring Gammaproteobacterium, and Its Close Relative the Chlorate-Respiring Sedimenticola Strain NSS

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Loutey, Dana E.; Wang, Ouwei; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain; Lucas, Lauren N.; Somasekhar, Pranav Y.

    2015-01-01

    Two (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria, strains CUZ and NSS, were isolated from marine sediments in Berkeley and San Diego, CA, respectively. Strain CUZ respired both perchlorate and chlorate [collectively designated (per)chlorate], while strain NSS respired only chlorate. Phylogenetic analysis classified both strains as close relatives of the gammaproteobacterium Sedimenticola selenatireducens. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations showed the presence of rod-shaped, motile cells containing one polar flagellum. Optimum growth for strain CUZ was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 4% NaCl, while strain NSS grew optimally at 37 to 42°C, pH 7.5 to 8, and 1.5 to 2.5% NaCl. Both strains oxidized hydrogen, sulfide, various organic acids, and aromatics, such as benzoate and phenylacetate, as electron donors coupled to oxygen, nitrate, and (per)chlorate or chlorate as electron acceptors. The draft genome of strain CUZ carried the requisite (per)chlorate reduction island (PRI) for (per)chlorate respiration, while that of strain NSS carried the composite chlorate reduction transposon responsible for chlorate metabolism. The PRI of strain CUZ encoded a perchlorate reductase (Pcr), which reduced both perchlorate and chlorate, while the genome of strain NSS included a gene for a distinct chlorate reductase (Clr) that reduced only chlorate. When both (per)chlorate and nitrate were present, (per)chlorate was preferentially utilized if the inoculum was pregrown on (per)chlorate. Historically, (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) and chlorate-reducing bacteria (CRB) have been isolated primarily from freshwater, mesophilic environments. This study describes the isolation and characterization of two highly related marine halophiles, one a PRB and the other a CRB, and thus broadens the known phylogenetic and physiological diversity of these unusual metabolisms. PMID:25662971

  1. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  2. Rotational acceleration, brain tissue strain, and the relationship to concussion.

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew; Blaine Hoshizaki, T

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms of concussion have been investigated by many researchers using a variety of methods. However, there remains much debate over the relationships between head kinematics from an impact and concussion. This review presents the links between research conducted in different disciplines to better understand the relationship between linear and rotational acceleration and brain strains that have been postulated as the root cause of concussion. These concepts are important when assigning performance variables for helmet development, car design, and protective innovation research.

  3. FEM assessment of large-strain thaw consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Foriero, A.; Ladanyi, B.

    1995-02-01

    Finite-element simulations using a large-strain thaw-consolidation model, formulated by the writers, are presented and compared with the data obtained from a warm-oil test pipeline at Inuvik, Northwest Territory, Canada. Nondimensional design charts generated by the method are used to predict thaw-consolidation settlements. A good agreement is found between observed and predicted settlement values giving encouragement for future thaw-settlement predictions, based on finite-element-generated nondimensional charts.

  4. Design optimization of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, C.-Y.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical optimization procedures were considered for the design of airfoils in transonic flow based on the transonic small disturbance (TSD) and Euler equations. A sequential approximation optimization technique was implemented with an accurate approximation of the wave drag based on the Nixon's coordinate straining approach. A modification of the Euler surface boundary conditions was implemented in order to efficiently compute design sensitivities without remeshing the grid. Two effective design procedures producing converged designs in approximately 10 global iterations were developed: interchanging the role of the objective function and constraint and the direct lift maximization with move limits which were fixed absolute values of the design variables.

  5. BILAM: a composite laminate failure-analysis code using bilinear stress-strain approximations

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, P.V. Jr.; Dasgupta, A.; Chun, Y.W.

    1980-10-01

    The BILAM code which uses constant strain laminate analysis to generate in-plane load/deformation or stress/strain history of composite laminates to the point of laminate failure is described. The program uses bilinear stress-strain curves to model layer stress-strain behavior. Composite laminates are used for flywheels. The use of this computer code will help to develop data on the behavior of fiber composite materials which can be used by flywheel designers. In this program the stress-strain curves are modelled by assuming linear response in axial tension while using bilinear approximations (2 linear segments) for stress-strain response to axial compressive, transverse tensile, transverse compressive and axial shear loadings. It should be noted that the program attempts to empirically simulate the effects of the phenomena which cause nonlinear stress-strain behavior, instead of mathematically modelling the micromechanics involved. This code, therefore, performs a bilinear laminate analysis, and, in conjunction with several user-defined failure interaction criteria, is designed to provide sequential information on all layer failures up to and including the first fiber failure. The modus operandi is described. Code BILAM can be used to: predict the load-deformation/stress-strain behavior of a composite laminate subjected to a given combination of in-plane loads, and make analytical predictions of laminate strength.

  6. Strain-tuned optoelectronic properties of hollow gallium sulphide microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yin; Chen, Chen; Liang, C. Y.; Liu, Z. W.; Li, Y. S.; Che, Renchao

    2015-10-01

    Sulfide semiconductors have attracted considerable attention. The main challenge is to prepare materials with a designable morphology, a controllable band structure and optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report a facile chemical transportation reaction for the synthesis of Ga2S3 microspheres with novel hollow morphologies and partially filled volumes. Even without any extrinsic dopant, photoluminescence (PL) emission wavelength could be facilely tuned from 635 to 665 nm, depending on its intrinsic inhomogeneous strain distribution. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging reveals that the strain distribution and the associated PL properties can be accurately controlled by changing the growth temperature gradient, which depends on the distance between the boats used for raw material evaporation and microsphere deposition. The stacking-fault density, lattice distortion degree and strain distribution at the shell interfacial region of the Ga2S3 microspheres could be readily adjusted. Ab initio first-principles calculations confirm that the lowest conductive band (LCB) is dominated by S-3s and Ga-4p states, which shift to the low-energy band as a result of the introduction of tensile strain, well in accordance with the observed PL evolution. Therefore, based on our strain driving strategy, novel guidelines toward the reasonable design of sulfide semiconductors with tunable photoluminescence properties are proposed.Sulfide semiconductors have attracted considerable attention. The main challenge is to prepare materials with a designable morphology, a controllable band structure and optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report a facile chemical transportation reaction for the synthesis of Ga2S3 microspheres with novel hollow morphologies and partially filled volumes. Even without any extrinsic dopant, photoluminescence (PL) emission wavelength could be facilely tuned from 635 to 665 nm, depending on its

  7. Local strains in waste tank deflagration analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify buried nuclear waste storage tanks under accident conditions. One of these conditions is deflagration of the combustible gases which may build up over time. While much work has been done to calculate the general strain state, less effort has been made to address the local strains at structural discontinuities. An analytical method is presented for calculating these local strains and combining them with the general strain state. A closed form solution of the local strains is compared to a finite element solution.

  8. Siderotyping of Antarctic fluorescent Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, V A; Meyer, J M

    2004-07-01

    Five fluorescent Pseudomonas strains isolated from Antarctica have been previously recognized as producing three structurally different pyoverdines. In the present work, siderotyping procedures have been used to classify these strains, together with 1282 isolates of different origins, into siderovars. The strain biodiversity encountered within each siderovar, as well as the potential taxonomic value of the siderovars, are described and discussed. It is concluded that a majority of antarctic strains are commonly distributed worldwide. One strain, however, presenting a particular pyoverdine structure found in a unique other isolate, was apparently much more specific to cold environment. PMID:15559975

  9. Strain Engineering of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadgar, Ali; Pasupathy, Abhay; Herman, Irving; Wang, Dennis; Kang, Kyungnam; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    The application of strain to materials can cause changes to bandwidth, effective masses, degeneracies and even structural phases. In the case of the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors, small strain (around 1 percent) is expected to change band gaps and mobilities, while larger strains are expected to cause phase changes from the triangular 2H phase to orthorhombic 1T' phases. We will describe experimental techniques to apply small and large (around 10 percent) strains to one or few layer samples of the TMD semiconductors, and describe the effect of the strain using optical (Raman, photoluminescence) and cryogenic transport techniques.

  10. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S. (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  11. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  12. COMPARATIVE TAXONOMY OF CRYSTALLOGENIC STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND PSEUDOMONAS CHLORORAPHIS

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, William C.; Rhodes, Lenora J.

    1962-01-01

    Haynes, William C. (Northern Utilization Research and Development Division, Peoria, Ill.) and Lenora J. Rhodes. Comparative taxonomy of crystallogenic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas chlororaphis. J. Bacteriol. 84:1080–1084. 1962.—Only 11 of 39 strains received in the Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection under the designation Pseudonomas chlororaphis proved to be authentic; 28 were typical, pyocyanogenic strains of P. aeruginosa. The reason for this disproportionately high rate of misidentification apparently arises from an erroneous belief that the ability to produce green and yellow crystals of chlororaphin and oxychlororaphin is confined to P. chlororaphis. The ability of many strains of P. aeruginosa to do likewise is not well known. Inasmuch as the characteristic is not unique to P. chlororaphis, other criteria are required to distinguish crystallogenic strains of these species. After a taxonomic comparison of 18 strains of P. chlororaphis and 47 crystallogenic strains of P. aeruginosa, it was determined that there are three main distinctions: (i) P. aeruginosa grows well at 42 C but fails to grow upon serial transfer at 5 C, whereas P. chlororaphis fails to grow at 42 C, but grows well at 5 C: (ii) most strains of P. aeruginosa produce pyocyanin, whereas P. chlororaphis strains do not; (iii) P. aeruginosa cells possess only one or two polar flagella, whereas P. chlororaphis usually has at least four, sometimes as many as eight, polar flagella. PMID:13963593

  13. Isolation and in vitro selection of actinomycetes strains as potential probiotics for aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Milagro García; Campa-Córdova, Ángel Isidro; Saucedo, Pedro Enrique; González, Marlen Casanova; Marrero, Ricardo Medina; Mazón-Suástegui, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to describe a series of in vitro tests that may aid the discovery of probiotic strains from actinomycetes. Materials and Methods: Actinomycetes were isolated from marine sediments using four different isolation media, followed by antimicrobial activity and toxicity assessment by the agar diffusion method and the hemolysis of human blood cells, respectively. Extracellular enzymatic production was monitored by the hydrolysis of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Tolerance to different pH values and salt concentrations was also determined, followed by hydrophobicity analysis and genetic identification of the most promising strains. Results: Five out of 31 isolated strains showed antimicrobial activity against three Vibrio species. Three non-hemolytic strains (N7, RL8 and V4) among these active isolates yielded positive results in hydrophobicity tests and exhibited good growth at salt concentrations ranging from 0% to 10%, except strain RL8, which required a salt concentration >0.6%. Although these strains did not grow at pH<3, they showed different enzymatic activities. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strains N7 and V4 have more than 99% identity with several Streptomyces species, whereas the closest matches to strain RL8 are Streptomyces panacagri and Streptomyces flocculus, with 98% and 98.2% similarity, respectively. Conclusion: Three actinomycetes strains showing probiotic-like properties were discovered using several in vitro tests that can be easily implemented in different institutions around the world. PMID:27047067

  14. Image-based stress and strain measurement of wood in the split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moilanen, C. S.; Saarenrinne, P.; Engberg, B. A.; Björkqvist, T.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of wood must be considered when designing mechanical pulping machinery. The composition of wood within the annual ring is important. This paper proposes a novel image-based method to measure stress and planar strain distribution in soft, heterogeneous materials. The main advantage of this method in comparison to traditional methods that are based on strain gauges is that it captures local strain gradients and not only average strains. Wood samples were subjected to compression at strain rates of 1000-2500 s-1 in an encapsulated split-Hopkinson device. High-speed photography captured images at 50 000-100 000 Hz and different magnifications to achieve spatial resolutions of 2.9 to 9.7 µm pixels-1. The image-based analysis utilized an image correlation technique with a method that was developed for particle image velocimetry. The image analysis gave local strain distribution and average stress as a function of time. Two stress approximations, using the material properties of the split-Hopkinson bars and the displacement of the transmitter bar/sample interface, are presented. Strain gauges on the bars of the split-Hopkinson device give the reference average stress and strain. The most accurate image-based stress approximation differed from the strain gauge result by 5%.

  15. Comparative full-length sequence analysis of Marek's disease virus vaccine strain 814.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhi-Jie; Liu, Ai-Ling; Yan, Fu-Hai; Cong, Feng; Cheng, Yun

    2012-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotype 1 vaccine strain 814 was determined. It consisted of 172,541 bp, with an overall gene organization identical to that of the MDV-1 type strains. Comparative genomic analysis of vaccine strains (814 and CVI988) and other strains (CU-2, Md5, and Md11) showed that 814 was most similar to CVI988. Several unique insertions, deletions, and substitutions were identified in strain 814. Of note, a 177-bp insertion in the overlapping genes encoding the Meq, RLORF6, and 23-kDa proteins of strain 814 was identified, and a 69-bp deletion was also located in the origin of replication site (Ori) in the gene encoding RLORF12. Compared to the CVI988 vaccine strain, a deletion of 510 bp was identified in the UL36 gene. These analyses identified key mutations in the 814 strain and the vaccine strain that could be exploited for future MDV vaccine design.

  16. Electronic Raman scattering as an ultra-sensitive probe of strain effects in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fluegel., Brian; Mialitsin, Aleksej V.; Beaton, Daniel A.; Reno, John L.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-05-28

    Semiconductor strain engineering has become a critical feature of high-performance electronics because of the significant device performance enhancements that it enables. These improvements, which emerge from strain-induced modifications to the electronic band structure, necessitate new ultra-sensitive tools to probe the strain in semiconductors. Here, we demonstrate that minute amounts of strain in thin semiconductor epilayers can be measured using electronic Raman scattering. We also applied this strain measurement technique to two different semiconductor alloy systems using coherently strained epitaxial thin films specifically designed to produce lattice-mismatch strains as small as 10-4. Thus, comparing our strain sensitivity and signal strength in AlxGa 1-x As with those obtained using the industry-standard technique of phonon Raman scattering, we found that there was a sensitivity improvement of 200-fold and a signal enhancement of 4 × 103, thus obviating key constraints in semiconductor strain metrology.

  17. The complete genome analysis of two enterovirus 96 strains isolated in China in 2005 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aiqiang; Tao, Zexin; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yong; Song, Lizhi; Li, Yan; Liu, Guifang; Liu, Yao; Yang, He; Fan, Qingying; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Jing; Feng, Lei; Xu, Wenbo; Zhao, Zhongtang

    2011-06-01

    Enterovirus 96 (EV96) is a new member of species Human Enterovirus C (HEV-C). In this report, genomic characterization of two EV96 strains isolated from acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in Shandong province of China in 2005 and 2009 is described. The two strains, designated 05517 and 09228C1, had 82.7% genomic similarity with each other and 75.1-84.2% with other three strains available from GenBank in complete genome sequences. In VP1 coding region, they had 77.6-86.6% nucleotide similarity with other EV96 strains. Interestingly, deletions of 3 nucleotides in the VP3 coding region of strain 09228C1, and of 3 nucleotides in the 3A region of both Shandong strains were observed. Simplot and bootscanning analysis on HEV-C genome sequences were performed, and evidence of recombination in P3 region for Shandong EV96 strains was found. In conclusion, these strains had distant genetic relationship with each other and with other EV96 strains.

  18. Strain flexibility identification of bridges from long-gauge strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Xia, Qi; Cheng, YuYao; Wu, ZhiShen

    2015-10-01

    Strain flexibility, defined as the strain response of a structure's element to a unit input force, is import for structural safety evaluation, but its identification is seldom investigated. A novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor has been developed to measure the averaged strain within a long gauge length. Its advantage of measuring both local and global information of the structure offers an excellent opportunity of developing the strain flexibility identification theory. In this article, the method to identify structural strain flexibility from long-gauge dynamic strain measurements is proposed. It includes the following main steps: (a) macro strain frequency response function (FRF) estimation from macro strain measurements and its feature characterization; (b) general strain modal parameter identification; (c) scaling factor calculation, and (d) strain flexibility identification. Numerical and experimental examples successfully verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Anderson, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    A demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages as well as a feasibility test of an optical speckle technique for strain measurement are presented. The strain gage results are reported. Ten Kanthal A-1 wire strain gages were used for low cycle fatigue strain measurements to 950 K and .002 apparent strain on a JT12D burner can in a high pressure (10 atmospheres) burner test. The procedure for use of the strain gages involved extensive precalibration and postcalibration to correct for cooling rate dependence, drift, and temperature effects. Results were repeatable within + or - .0002 to .0006 strain, with best results during fast decels from 950 K. The results agreed with analytical prediction based on an axisymmetric burner model, and results indicated a non-uniform circumferential distribution of axial strain, suggesting temperature streaking.

  20. Biodegradation of Ether Pollutants by Pseudonocardia sp. Strain ENV478

    PubMed Central

    Vainberg, Simon; McClay, Kevin; Masuda, Hisako; Root, Duane; Condee, Charles; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    A bacterium designated Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478 was isolated by enrichment culturing on tetrahydrofuran (THF) and was screened to determine its ability to degrade a range of ether pollutants. After growth on THF, strain ENV478 degraded THF (63 mg/h/g total suspended solids [TSS]), 1,4-dioxane (21 mg/h/g TSS), 1,3-dioxolane (19 mg/h/g TSS), bis-2-chloroethylether (BCEE) (12 mg/h/g TSS), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (9.1 mg/h/g TSS). Although the highest rates of 1,4-dioxane degradation occurred after growth on THF, strain ENV478 also degraded 1,4-dioxane after growth on sucrose, lactate, yeast extract, 2-propanol, and propane, indicating that there was some level of constitutive degradative activity. The BCEE degradation rates were about threefold higher after growth on propane (32 mg/h/g TSS) than after growth on THF, and MTBE degradation resulted in accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol. Degradation of 1,4-dioxane resulted in accumulation of 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2HEAA). Despite its inability to grow on 1,4-dioxane, strain ENV478 degraded this compound for >80 days in aquifer microcosms. Our results suggest that the inability of strain ENV478 and possibly other THF-degrading bacteria to grow on 1,4-dioxane is related to their inability to efficiently metabolize the 1,4-dioxane degradation product 2HEAA but that strain ENV478 may nonetheless be useful as a biocatalyst for remediating 1,4-dioxane-contaminated aquifers. PMID:16885268

  1. Straining Graphene Using Thin Film Shrinkage Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical works suggest the possibility and usefulness of strain engineering of graphene by predicting remarkable properties, such as Dirac cone merging, bandgap opening and pseudo magnetic field generation. However, most of these predictions have not yet been confirmed because it is experimentally difficult to control the magnitude and type (e.g., uniaxial, biaxial, and so forth) of strain in graphene devices. Here we report two novel methods to apply strain without bending the substrate. We employ thin films of evaporated metal and organic insulator deposited on graphene, which shrink after electron beam irradiation or heat application. These methods make it possible to apply both biaxial strain and in-plane isotropic compressive strain in a well-controlled manner. Raman spectroscopy measurements show a clear splitting of the degenerate states of the G-band in the case of biaxial strain, and G-band blue shift without splitting in the case of in-plane isotropic compressive strain. In the case of biaxial strain application, we find out the ratio of the strain component perpendicular to the stretching direction is at least three times larger than what was previously observed, indicating that shrinkage of the metal or organic insulator deposited on graphene induces both tensile and compressive strain in this atomically thin material. Our studies present for the first time a viable way to apply strain to graphene without the need to bend the substrate. PMID:24490629

  2. Strain engineering of graphene: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Chen; Sun, Zhimei; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Graphene has intrigued the science community by many unique properties not found in conventional materials. In particular, it is the strongest two-dimensional material ever measured, being able to sustain reversible tensile elastic strain larger than 20%, which yields an interesting possibility to tune the properties of graphene by strain and thus opens a new field called ``straintronics''. In this article, the current progress in the strain engineering of graphene is reviewed. We first summarize the strain effects on the electronic structure and Raman spectra of graphene. We then highlight the electron-phonon coupling greatly enhanced by the biaxial strain and the strong pseudomagnetic field induced by the non-uniform strain with specific distribution. Finally, the potential application of strain-engineering in the self-assembly of foreign atoms on the graphene surface is also discussed. Given the short history of graphene straintronics research, the current progress has been notable, and many further advances in this field are expected.

  3. Variant colony surface antigenic phenotypes within mycoplasma strain populations: implications for species identification and strain standardization.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, R; Yogev, D

    1996-01-01

    Immunobinding assays with mycoplasma colonies on agar plates (immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques) or with imprints of colonies transferred to solid supports (colony immunoblotting) are widely used as standard diagnostic tests for serological species identification of mycoplasma isolates. However, in light of the high rate of variability of surface antigens in many mycoplasmas, diagnostic data obtained with these techniques require a more critical evaluation. In this report, we demonstrate with some examples that mycoplasma surface variability based on alterations in expression, in size, and in surface presentation of integral and peripheral membrane proteins may lead to misinterpretation of colony immunostaining reactions obtained by using specific monoclonal antibodies as well as conventional diagnostic hyperimmune sera. To more easily identify phenotypically mixed isolates or samples which contain more than one species, we have introduced some minor modifications of the colony immunoblot technique which provide sharp signals of positive as well as negative reactions and enable identification of cryptic epitopes. It is further demonstrated that because of the variability in colony surface antigenic phenotype, mycoplasma strains, including well-established reference and other prototype strains which are used under the same designation in many laboratories, can differ markedly in their antigen profiles and their potentially virulence-related surface properties, since they are usually purified by filter cloning and often propagated by subcultivation of randomly selected agar-grown subpopulations. We conclude from this study that because of this surface variability, the establishment of criteria for standardization of mycoplasma strains and diagnostic antisera is urgently required in order to obtain reproducible results in different laboratories. PMID:8748292

  4. Comparative genomics of two newly isolated Dehalococcoides strains and an enrichment using a genus microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick K H; Cheng, Dan; Hu, Ping; West, Kimberlee A; Dick, Gregory J; Brodie, Eoin L; Andersen, Gary L; Zinder, Stephen H; He, Jianzhong; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomics of Dehalococcoides strains and an enrichment were performed using a microarray targeting genes from all available sequenced genomes of the Dehalococcoides genus. The microarray was designed with 4305 probe sets to target 98.6% of the open-reading frames from strains 195, CBDB1, BAV1 and VS. The microarrays were validated and applied to query the genomes of two recently isolated Dehalococcoides strains, ANAS1 and ANAS2, and their enrichment source (ANAS) to understand the genome–physiology relationships. Strains ANAS1 and ANAS2 can both couple the reduction of trichloroethene, cis-dichloroethene (DCE) and 1,1-DCE, but not tetrachloroethene and trans-DCE with growth, whereas only strain ANAS2 couples vinyl chloride reduction to growth. Comparative genomic analysis showed that the genomes of both strains are similar to each other and to strain 195, except for genes that are within the previously defined integrated elements or high-plasticity regions. Combined results of the two isolates closely matched the results obtained using genomic DNA of the ANAS enrichment. The genome similarities, together with the distinct chlorinated ethene usage of strains ANAS1, ANAS2 and 195 demonstrate that closely phylogenetically related strains can be physiologically different. This incongruence between physiology and core genome phylogeny seems to be related to the presence of distinct reductive dehalogenase-encoding genes with assigned chlorinated ethene functions (pceA, tceA in strain 195; tceA in strain ANAS1; vcrA in strain ANAS2). Overall, the microarrays are a valuable high-throughput tool for comparative genomics of unsequenced Dehalococcoides-containing samples to provide insights into their gene content and dechlorination functions. PMID:21228894

  5. Children with severe early childhood caries: streptococci genetic strains within carious and white spot lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kenneth; Joseph, Raphael; Vo, Alex; Patel, Trusha; Chaudhry, Samiya; Nguyen, Uyen; Trevor, Amy; Robinson, Erica; Campbell, Margaret; McLennan, John; Houran, Farielle; Wong, Tristan; Flann, Kendra; Wages, Melissa; Palmer, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, John; Engle, John; Maier, Tom; Machida, Curtis A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Mutans streptococci (MS) are one of the major microbiological determinants of dental caries. The objectives of this study are to identify distinct MS and non-MS streptococci strains that are located at carious sites and non-carious enamel surfaces in children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), and assess if cariogenic MS and non-cariogenic streptococci might independently exist as primary bacterial strains on distinct sites within the dentition of individual children. Design Dental plaque from children (N=20; aged 3–6) with S-ECC was collected from carious lesions (CLs), white spot lesions (WSLs) and non-carious enamel surfaces. Streptococcal isolates (N=10–20) from each site were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify MS, and arbitrarily primed-PCR for assignment of genetic strains. Primary strains were identified as ≥50% of the total isolates surveyed at any site. In several cases, strains were characterized for acidurity using ATP-driven bioluminescence and subjected to PCR-determination of potential MS virulence products. Identification of non-MS was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results Sixty-four independent MS or non-MS streptococcal strains were identified. All children contained 1–6 strains. In many patients (N=11), single primary MS strains were identified throughout the dentition. In other patients (N=4), primary MS strains were identified within CLs that were distinct from primary strains found on enamel. Streptococcus gordonii strains were identified as primary strains on enamel or WSLs in four children, and in general were less aciduric than MS strains. Conclusions Many children with S-ECC contained only a single primary MS strain that was present in both carious and non-carious sites. In some cases, MS and non-cariogenic S. gordonii strains were found to independently exist as dominant strains at different locations within the dentition of individual children, and the aciduric

  6. Numerical Evaluation of Strain Rate Effect on Mechanical and Electromechanical Coupling Responses in BaTiO3 Single-Crystal Nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiao Bao; Yang, Xin Hua; Cao, Wei Zhong

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical and electromechanical coupling responses of a ferroelectric single-crystal nanofilm under displacement loading at different strain rates have been simulated using the molecular dynamics method based on the shell model. While the linear stress-strain relation is independent of the strain rate, strong strain rate dependence is exhibited in the electromechanical coupling response for strain rates between 0 ns-1 and 0.5 ns-1. There is an approximate semilogarithmic linear relationship between the polarization stability strain and the strain rate. With increasing strain rate, local 180° domain switches take place sequentially from inside to outside in the stable domain structure evolution, and the number of domain walls increases. However, after the strain rate exceeds 0.5 ns-1, it has almost no effect on the␣domain structure. This work is helpful for improving ferroelectric device design and expanding ferroelectric application fields.

  7. Strain Differences in Behavioral Inhibition in a Go/No-go Task Demonstrated Using 15 Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gubner, Noah R.; Wilhelm, Clare J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2012-01-01

    Background High levels of impulsivity have been associated with a number of substance abuse disorders including alcohol abuse. Research has not yet revealed whether these high levels predate the development of alcohol abuse. Methods The current study examined impulsivity in 15 inbred strains of mice (A/HeJ, AKR/J, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, C57L/J, C58/J, CBA/J, DBA/1J, DBA/2J, NZB/B1NJ, PL/J, SJL/J, SWR/J, and 129P3/J) using a Go/No-go task, which was designed to measure a subject’s ability to inhibit a behavior. Numerous aspects of response to ethanol and other drugs of abuse have been examined in these strains. Results There were significant strain differences in the number of responses made during the No-go signal (false alarms) and the extent to which strains responded differentially during the Go and No-go signals (d′). The rate of responding prior to the cue did not differ among strains, although there was a statistically significant correlation between false alarms and precue responding that was not related to basal activity level. Interstrain correlations suggested that false alarms and rate of responding were associated with strain differences in ethanol-related traits from the published literature. Conclusions The results of this study do support a link between innate level of impulsivity and response to ethanol and are consistent with a genetic basis for some measures of behavioral inhibition. PMID:20491731

  8. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and a phylogenetic classification enabling prediction of specific functions of related enzymes. PMID:24244004

  9. Differential receptor usage by measles virus strains.

    PubMed

    Bartz, R; Firsching, R; Rima, B; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that infection of cells with all measles virus (MV) strains tested was inhibited by antibodies against CD46, although not all strains caused downregulation of the MV receptor CD46 from the surface of human cells. We now show that infection of cells with MV strain WTFb, a variant of wild-type isolate WTF which has been isolated and propagated on human BJAB cells, is not inhibited by antibodies against CD46. In contrast, infection of cells with the closely related strain WTFv, a Vero cell-adapted variant of WTF, is inhibited by antibodies against CD46. This observation led us to investigate the interaction of these viruses and the vaccine strain Edmonston (Edm) with CD46 and target cells. Cellular receptors with high affinity binding for WTFb are present on BJAB cells, but not on transfected CD46-expressing CHO cells. In contrast to the Edm strain, virus particles and solubilized envelope glycoproteins of WTFb have a very limited binding capacity to CD46. Furthermore, we show that recombinant soluble CD46 either does not bind, or binds very weakly, to WTFb glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface. Our findings indicate that wild-type MV strain WTFb and vaccine strain Edm use different binding sites on human cells. In addition, the results suggest that MV strains may alternatively use CD46 and an unknown molecule as receptors, and that the degree of usage of both receptors may be MV strain-specific. PMID:9603316

  10. Morphological, physiological and enzymatic characteristics of cephalosporin acylase-producing Arthrobacter strain 45-8A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q J; Xu, W X

    1993-01-01

    A bacterial strain producing cephalosporin acylases was isolated from soil. The morphological and physiological properties of this strain suggest that it belongs to the genus Arthrobacter, and the isolate was therefore designated Arthrobacter strain 45-8A. Substrate specificity of the enzyme was examined. The enzyme can convert both cephalosporin acid to 7-aminocephalosporanic acid. An interesting feature of the acylases is their temperature-dependent regulation. Activity of acylases was detected in strain 45-8A grown at temperature below 30 degrees C, but was not observed at higher temperature. Arthrobacter strain 45-8A did not exhibit beta-lactamase activity, even though its resistance to cephalosporin C was very strong (> 2000 micrograms/ml). This is quite beneficial for its application in the manufacture of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid. PMID:8484708

  11. Strain sensor of carbon nanotubes in microscale: from model to metrology.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei; Li, Shi-Lei; Deng, Wei-Lin; Gao, Di; Kang, Yi-Lan

    2014-01-01

    A strain sensor composed of carbon nanotubes with Raman spectroscopy can achieve measurement of the three in-plane strain components in microscale. Based on previous work on the mathematic model of carbon nanotube strain sensors, this paper presents a detailed study on the optimization, diversification, and standardization of a CNT strain sensor from the viewpoint of metrology. A new miniaccessory for polarization control is designed, and two different preparing methods for CNT films as sensing media are introduced to provide diversified choices for applications. Then, the standard procedure of creating CNT strain sensors is proposed. Application experiments confirmed the effectiveness of the above improvement, which is helpful in developing this method for convenient metrology.

  12. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  13. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate biodegradation and denitrification by a Pseudoxanthomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuezheng; Niu, Guilong; Yang, Weiming; Cao, Xiangsheng

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial strain (designated as N4) of Pseudoxanthomonas was isolated from a denitrification biofilter reactor. This study examined its degradation capability of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and its denitrification ability. All results showed that, strain N4 could use DEHP as a carbon and energy source. Strain N4 demonstrated good DEHP degradation ability over a broad pH and temperature range. The optimal temperature and pH for DEHP degradation were 32°C and 6.0, respectively. The kinetics of DEHP degradation by strain N4 were exponential in nature. Strain N4 showed denitrification ability and could reduce nitrate and nitrite but not with DEHP as its carbon source.

  14. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  15. Axisymmetric analytical stiffness matrices with Green-Lagrange strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, P.

    2005-02-01

    Stiffness matrices based on the non-linear Green-Lagrange definition seem complicated, but for the case of a linear displacement ring-element with triangular cross-section, closed form final results are listed, directly suited for coding in a finite element program. These analytical secant and tangent element stiffness matrices are obtained by separating the dependence on the material constitutive parameters and on the stress/strain state from the dependence on the initial geometry and the displacement assumption. As an example of application, numerical results for a circular plate problem show the indirect severe errors that may result from a linear strain model. It is difficult to predict the indirect errors that follow from the erroneous displacement field, and the explanations behind such predictions are attempted. The nodal positions of an element and the displacement assumption give six basic matrices that do not depend on material and stress strain state, and thus are unchanged during the necessary iterations for obtaining a solution based on Green-Lagrange strain measure. The presented resulting stiffness matrices are especially useful in design optimization, because analytical sensitivity analysis can then be performed.

  16. Oxygen limitation is a pitfall during screening for industrial strains.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Hartmut F; Anderlei, Tibor; Büchs, Jochen; Binder, Michael

    2006-10-01

    Oxygen supply is a key parameter in aerobic fermentation processes like the industrial production of amino acids. Although the oxygen transfer rate (OTR; or the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient k(L)a) is routinely analyzed by engineers during stirred tank fermentations, it is often not taken into account by biologists conducting screening experiments in shake flasks. To show the importance of knowing how to avoid oxygen transfer limitations during primary screenings, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 (wild-type strain) and DSM 12866 (lysine-producing strain) were cultivated in shake flasks with different culture liquid volumes and under different shaking conditions. With the Respiration Activity Monitoring System, the OTR was determined quasi-continuously. Optical density as well as concentrations of lysine and byproducts (lactate, acetate, succinate) were determined off-line and correlated with the OTR signal. From the results, design criteria for improved screening in shaken bioreactors that help to avoid selection of suboptimal strains during early process development steps can be derived. Finally, the suitability of DSM 12866 as a strain for industrial processes with a high space-time yield is discussed.

  17. Inverse Funnel Effect of Excitons in Strained Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San-Jose, Pablo; Parente, Vincenzo; Guinea, Francisco; Roldán, Rafael; Prada, Elsa

    2016-07-01

    We study the effects of strain on the properties and dynamics of Wannier excitons in monolayer (phosphorene) and few-layer black phosphorus (BP), a promising two-dimensional material for optoelectronic applications due to its high mobility, mechanical strength, and strain-tunable direct band gap. We compare the results to the case of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2 ) monolayers. We find that the so-called funnel effect, i.e., the possibility of controlling exciton motion by means of inhomogeneous strains, is much stronger in few-layer BP than in MoS2 monolayers and, crucially, is of opposite sign. Instead of excitons accumulating isotropically around regions of high tensile strain like in MoS2 , excitons in BP are pushed away from said regions. This inverse funnel effect is moreover highly anisotropic, with much larger funnel distances along the armchair crystallographic direction, leading to a directional focusing of exciton flow. A strong inverse funnel effect could enable simpler designs of funnel solar cells and offer new possibilities for the manipulation and harvesting of light.

  18. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  19. Numerical study of strain-rate effect in cold rolls forming of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsafi, J.; Demirci, E.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Cold roll forming (CRF) is a well-known continuous manufacturing process, in which a flat strip is deformed by successive rotating pairs of tools, without changing the material thickness. In the past decades, to lessen the process-development efforts, finite-element simulations have been increasingly employed to improve the process design and predict the manufacturing-induced defects. One of the important aspects in design of the CRF process is consideration of resulting strains in the final product as the material passes through several complex forming stands. Sufficient knowledge of longitudinal strain in the workpiece is required to set various process parameters. Increasing a process speed in a roll forming operation can bring cost advantages, but the influence of the forming speed on the strain distribution should be explored. This study is focussed on a strain-rate effect in the CRF process of steel sheets. The strain-rate dependency of a plastic behaviour observed in most metals can affect the finished product's quality as well as process parameters. This paper investigates the influence of the strain rate on longitudinal strains induced in the roll forming operation by incorporating a phenomenological Johnson-Cook constitutive model, which allows studying the impact of the process speed on the output product. Taking advantage of 3D finite element analysis, a roll forming process was simulated using MCS.Marc, comprising a complete set of forming stations. Through the changing of the process speed, the strain rate impact on longitudinal peak strains and forming length was investigated. The results highlight the effect of the strain rate on edge thinning and subsequent undesirable distortions in the product.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Catenulispora acidiphila type strain (ID 139908T)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Rio, Tijana GlavinaDel; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Ali, Zahid; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Catenulispora acidiphila Busti et al. 2006 is the type species of the genus Catenulispora, and is of interest because of the rather isolated phylogenetic location of the genomically little studied suborder Catenulisporineae within the order Actinomycetales. C. acidiphilia is known for its acidophilic, aerobic lifestyle, but can also grow scantly under anaerobic conditions. Under regular conditions C. acidiphilia grows in long filaments of relatively short aerial hyphae with marked septation. It is a free living, non motile, Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a forest soil sample taken from a wooded area in Gerenzano, Italy. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial family Catenulisporaceae, and the 10,467,782 bp long single replicon genome with its 9056 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Beutenbergia cavernae type strain (HKI 0122T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam; Pukall, Rudiger; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Beutenbergia cavernae (Groth et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. B. cavernae HKI 0122T is a Gram-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from a cave in Guangxi (China). B. cavernae grows best under aerobic conditions and shows a rod-coccus growth cycle. Its cell wall peptidoglycan contains the diagnostic L-lysine - L-glutamate interpeptide bridge. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the poorly populated micrococcineal family Beutenbergiaceae, and this 4,669,183 bp long single replicon genome with its 4225 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Cryptobacterium curtum type strain (12-3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pukall, Rudiger; Rohde, Christine; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Kuske, Cheryl; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rohde, Manfred; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-05-20

    Cryptobacterium curtum Nakazawa et al. 1999 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its very distant and isolated position within the family Coriobacteriaceae. C. curtum is an asaccharolytic, opportunistic pathogen with a typical occurrence in the oral cavity, involved in dental and oral infections like periodontitis, inflammations and abscesses. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae, and this 1,617,804 bp long single replicon genome with its 1364 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Beutenbergia cavernae type strain (HKI 0122T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Pukall, Rudiger; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Beutenbergia cavernae (Groth et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus and is of phyloge-netic interest because of its isolated location in the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. B. cavernae HKI 0122T is a Gram-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from a cave in Guangxi (China). B. cavernae grows best under aerobic conditions and shows a rod-coccus growth cycle. Its cell wall peptidoglycan contains the diagnostic L-lysine L-glutamate interpeptide bridge. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome se-quence from the poorly populated micrococcineal family Beutenbergiaceae, and this 4,669,183 bp long single replicon genome with its 4225 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Modeling competition between yeast strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the strains. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.

  5. Determining Micromechanical Strain in Nitinol

    SciTech Connect

    Strasberg, Matthew; /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    Nitinol is a superelastic alloy made of equal parts nickel and titanium. Due to its unique shape memory properties, nitinol is used to make medical stents, lifesaving devices used to allow blood flow in occluded arteries. Micromechanical models and even nitinol-specific finite element analysis (FEA) software are insufficient for unerringly predicting fatigue and resultant failure. Due to the sensitive nature of its application, a better understanding of nitinol on a granular scale is being pursued through X-ray diffraction techniques at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Through analysis of powder diffraction patterns of nitinol under increasing tensile loads, localized strain can be calculated. We compare these results with micromechanical predictions in order to advance nitinol-relevant FEA tools. From this we hope to gain a greater understanding of how nitinol fatigues under multi-axial loads.

  6. Job Strain in Shift and Daytime Workers.

    PubMed

    Knutsson; Nilsson

    1997-07-01

    Cross-sectional questionnaire data were used to compare the levels of job strain in shift and daytime workers. Job strain was measured according to Karasek's Demands/Discretion model. Four occupational groups were included: drivers, industrial workers, policemen/watchmen, and cooks. The study subjects were a random sample of 508 daytime workers and 418 shift workers. Job demand did not differentiate between shift and daytime workers, comparing groups broken down by gender and by occupation. The daytime workers reported higher levels of job strain than the shift workers, and women experienced a higher level of job strain than did men. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only occupational group and gender predicted job strain level. Shiftwork was not significantly associated with job strain in the regression model.

  7. The many shades of prion strain adaptation.

    PubMed

    Baskakov, Ilia V

    2014-01-01

    In several recent studies transmissible prion disease was induced in animals by inoculation with recombinant prion protein amyloid fibrils produced in vitro. Serial transmission of amyloid fibrils gave rise to a new class of prion strains of synthetic origin. Gradual transformation of disease phenotypes and PrP(Sc) properties was observed during serial transmission of synthetic prions, a process that resembled the phenomenon of prion strain adaptation. The current article discusses the remarkable parallels between phenomena of prion strain adaptation that accompanies cross-species transmission and the evolution of synthetic prions occurring within the same host. Two alternative mechanisms underlying prion strain adaptation and synthetic strain evolution are discussed. The current article highlights the complexity of the prion transmission barrier and strain adaptation and proposes that the phenomenon of prion adaptation is more common than previously thought.

  8. Time-Strain Superposition in Polymer Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Paul A.; McKenna, Gregory B.

    1997-03-01

    Time-strain superposition is often used in constitutive modeling to describe the nonlinear viscoelastic reponse of solid-like polymers. While it is true that time-strain superposition does not always work, a more fundamental question arises when it appears to work. Is the master curve obtained by time-strain superposition the same as that obtained in time-temperature superposition? Here we show work from torsional measurements on polycarbonate in the temperature range from 30 to 130 ^oC. We find that at each temperature time-strain superposition can be performed, but that the strain reductions do not give the same master curves as does the temperature reduction. Such behavior suggests that time-strain superposition cannot be used to represent polymeric material behavior and that its utility for estimating long time performance is very limited.

  9. Enterotoxigenicity of aeromonas strains in suckling mice.

    PubMed

    Jánossy, G; Tarján, V

    1980-01-01

    The enterotoxigenicity of 170 Aeromonas strains isolated from different sources (food poisoning, random food sampling, water, faeces) was examined by the suckling mouse test. The strains were grown on Syncaye culture medium covered with sterilized membrane for Kiil-kidney. The culture supernatants were inoculated orally. Ileal loop dilatation was compared to that produced by the international standard enterotoxic Escherichia coli B7A (O148 : H28) and B2C (O6 : H16) strains. Of the 87 Aeromonas hydrophila strains 69, of the 76 Aeromonas punctate subsp. caviae strains 9, the 6 Aeromonas punctata subsp. punctata strains 5, and 1 Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. achromogenes gave a positive reaction in the test.

  10. Characterization of Microbulbifer strain CMC-5, a new biochemical variant of Microbulbifer elongatus type strain DSM6810T isolated from decomposing seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Jonnadula, RaviChand; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ghadi, Sanjeev C

    2009-12-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore forming, non-motile and moderate halophilic bacteria designated as strain CMC-5 was isolated from decomposing seaweeds by enrichment culture. The growth of strain CMC-5 was assessed in synthetic seawater-based medium containing polysaccharide. The bacterium degraded and utilized agar, alginate, carrageenan, xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose and chitin. The strain was characterized using a polyphasic approach for taxonomic identification. Cellular fatty acid analysis showed the presence of iso-C(15:0) as major fatty acid and significant amounts of iso-C(17:1x9c) and C(18:1x7c). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence indicated that strain CMC-5 is phylogenetically related to Microbulbifer genus and 99% similar to type strain Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T. However in contrast to Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T, strain CMC-5 is non-motile, utilizes glucose, galactose, inositol and xylan, does not utilize fructose and succinate nor does it produce H2S. Further growth of bacterial strain CMC-5 was observed when inoculated in seawater-based medium containing sterile pieces of Gracilaria corticata thalli. The bacterial growth was associated with release of reducing sugar in the broth suggesting its role in carbon recycling of polysaccharides from seaweeds in marine ecosystem.

  11. An ultra-linear piezo-floating-gate strain-gauge for self-powered measurement of quasi-static-strain.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Pikul; Huang, Chenling; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we describe a self-powered sensor that can be used for in-vivo measurement of the quasi-static-strain and also for in-vivo measurement of the L1 norm of the strain signal. At the core of the proposed design is a linear floating-gate injector that can achieve more than 13 bits of precision in sensing, signal integration and non-volatile storage. The injectors are self-powered by the piezoelectric transducers that convert mechanical energy from strain-variations into electrical energy. A differential injector topology is used to measure the quasi-static strain by integrating the difference between the L1 norm of the piezoelectric signal generated during the positive and negative strain-cycles. The linear floating-gate injectors are integrated with charge-pumps, digital calibration circuits and digital programming circuits to form a system-on-chip solution that can interface with a standard bio-telemetry platform. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept self-powered measurement of quasi-static strain and L1 norm of the strain signal using sensor prototypes fabricated in a 0.5- μm standard CMOS process and validated using a bench-top biomechanical test setup.

  12. Occupational Stress and Strain of Support Staff at a Higher Education Institution in the North West Province

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahomed, F. E.; Naude, J. L. P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stressors and strains for support staff at a higher education institution in the North West Province, and to assess the differences between the stressors and strains of different biographical groups. A cross-sectional survey design (N = 315) was used. The ASSET and a biographical…

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Sapelovirus Strain USA/IA33375/2015 Identified in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Ying; Guo, Baoqing; Zhang, Jianqiang; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Harmon, Karen M; Main, Rodger G; Li, Ganwu

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of sapelovirus A, formerly known as porcine sapelovirus (PSV), from a diarrheic pig was sequenced for the first time in the United States (designated PSV USA/IA33375/2015). It shares 87.8% to 83.9% nucleotide identities with other reported PSV strains globally and is most closely related to Asia PSV strains. PMID:27688315

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Sapelovirus Strain USA/IA33375/2015 Identified in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Ying; Guo, Baoqing; Zhang, Jianqiang; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Harmon, Karen M.; Main, Rodger G.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of sapelovirus A, formerly known as porcine sapelovirus (PSV), from a diarrheic pig was sequenced for the first time in the United States (designated PSV USA/IA33375/2015). It shares 87.8% to 83.9% nucleotide identities with other reported PSV strains globally and is most closely related to Asia PSV strains. PMID:27688315

  15. Stress-strain analysis of pipelines laid in permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, P.; Yan‘nan’, Van; Burkova, S.

    2016-09-01

    Increasing reliability of pipelines becomes a real challenge at all stages: design, construction and operation of pipeline systems. It is very important to determine the behaviour of the constructed pipeline under the operational and environmental loads using the design model in accordance with that one adopted in the rules and regulations. This article presents the simulation of pipeline in permafrost. The evaluation of the stress-strain state is given herein and the areas of the stress concentration are detected with the account for different loads occurred during the pipeline operation. Information obtained from the assessment of the stress-strain state of the pipeline allows determining sections in pre-emergency state (even before damages) and take all the necessary measures for eliminating them, thus increasing the pipeline system reliability. It is shown that the most critical pipeline cross-section is observed at the point of transition from one environment to another. The maximum strains decrease the level of the pipeline reliability. The finite element model is presented to determine the pipeline sections in pre-emergency state.

  16. Additive non-uniform random sampling in superimposed fiber Bragg grating strain gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. C.; Liu, H. Y.; Yan, S. B.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, M. W.; Li, J. M.; Tang, J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper demonstrates an additive non-uniform random sampling and interrogation method for dynamic and/or static strain gauge using a reflection spectrum from two superimposed fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The superimposed FBGs are designed to generate non-equidistant space of a sensing pulse train in the time domain during dynamic strain gauge. By combining centroid finding with smooth filtering methods, both the interrogation speed and accuracy are improved. A 1.9 kHz dynamic strain is measured by generating an additive non-uniform randomly distributed 2 kHz optical sensing pulse train from a mean 500 Hz triangular periodically changing scanning frequency.

  17. Optimization of process configuration and strain selection for microalgae-based biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nan; Dieu, Linus Tao Jie; Harvey, Simon; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-10-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the design of microalgae-based biodiesel production system by systematically integrating all the production stages and strain properties. Through the hypothetical case study, the model suggested the most economical system configuration for the selected microalgae strains from the available processes at each stage, thus resulting in the cheapest biodiesel production cost, S$2.66/kg, which is still higher than the current diesel price (S$1.05/kg). Interestingly, the microalgae strain properties, such as lipid content, effective diameter and productivity, were found to be one of the major factors that significantly affect the production cost as well as system configuration.

  18. Strain-induced magnetism in MoS{sub 2} monolayer with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Peng; Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng Zhang, Zhidong

    2014-02-07

    The strain-induced magnetism is observed in single-layer MoS{sub 2} with atomic single vacancies from density functional calculations. Calculated magnetic moment is no less than 2 μ{sub B} per vacancy defect. The strain-induced band gap closure is concurrent with the occurrence of the magnetism. Possible physical mechanism of the emergence of strain-induced magnetism is illustrated. We also demonstrate the possibility to test the predicted magnetism in experiment. Our study may provide an opportunity for the design of new type of memory-switching or logic devices by using earth-rich nonmagnetic materials MoS{sub 2}.

  19. Benchmark 1 - Nonlinear strain path forming limit of a reverse draw: Part A: Benchmark description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchmark-1 Committee

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this benchmark is to demonstrate the predictability of forming limits under nonlinear strain paths for a draw panel with a non-axisymmetric reversed dome-shape at the center. It is important to recognize that treating strain forming limits as though they were static during the deformation process may not lead to successful predictions of this benchmark, due to the nonlinearity of the strain paths involved in this benchmark. The benchmark tool is designed to enable a two-stage draw/reverse draw continuous forming process. Three typical sheet materials, AA5182-O Aluminum, and DP600 and TRIP780 Steels, are selected for this benchmark study.

  20. Strain localisation in mechanically layered rocks beneath detachment zones: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Huet, B.; Labrousse, L.; Yao, K.; Agard, P.; Jolivet, L.

    2013-04-01

    We have designed a series of fully dynamic numerical simulations aimed at assessing how the orientation of mechanical layering in rocks controls the orientation of shear bands and the depth of penetration of strain in the footwall of detachment zones. Two parametric studies are presented. In the first one, the influence of stratification orientation on the occurrence and mode of strain localisation is tested by varying initial dip of inherited layering in the footwall with regard to the orientation of simple shear applied at the rigid boundary simulating a rigid hanging wall, all scaling and rheological parameter kept constant. It appears that when Mohr-Coulomb plasticity is being used, shear bands are found to localise only when the layering is being stretched. This corresponds to early deformational stages for inital layering dipping in the same direction as the shear is applied, and to later stages for intial layering dipping towards the opposite direction of shear. In all the cases, localisation of the strain after only γ=1 requires plastic yielding to be activated in the strong layer. The second parametric study shows that results are length-scale independent and that orientation of shear bands is not sensitive to the viscosity contrast or the strain rate. However, decreasing or increasing strain rate is shown to reduce the capacity of the shear zone to localise strain. In the later case, the strain pattern resembles a mylonitic band but the rheology is shown to be effectively linear. Based on the results, a conceptual model for strain localisation under detachment faults is presented. In the early stages, strain localisation occurs at slow rates by viscous shear instabilities but as the layered media is exhumed, the temperature drops and the strong layers start yielding plastically, forming shear bands and localising strain at the top of the shear zone. Once strain localisation has occured, the deformation in the shear band becomes extremely penetrative but

  1. Lattice Strain Due to an Atomic Vacancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Sellers, Michael S.; Basaran, Cemal; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric strain can be divided into two parts: strain due to bond distance change and strain due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice strain due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The result has been compared with that from a continuum mechanics method. It is shown that using a continuum mechanics approach yields constitutive results similar to the ones obtained based purely on molecular dynamics considerations. PMID:19582230

  2. Material approaches to stretchable strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyoon; You, Insang; Shin, Sangbaie; Jeong, Unyong

    2015-04-27

    With the recent progress made in wearable electronics, devices now require high flexibility and stretchability up to large strain levels (typically larger than 30 % strain). Wearable strain sensors or deformable strain sensors have been gaining increasing research interest because of the rapid development of electronic skins and robotics and because of their biomedical applications. Conventional brittle strain sensors made of metals and piezoresistors are not applicable for such stretchable sensors. This Review summarizes recent advances in stretchable sensors and focuses on material aspects for high stretchability and sensitivity. It begins with a brief introduction to the Wheatstone bridge circuit of conventional resistive strain sensors. Then, studies on the manipulation of materials are reviewed, including waved structural approaches for making metals and semiconductors stretchable, the use of liquid metals, and conductive filler/elastomer composites by using percolation among the fillers. For capacitive strain sensors, the constant conductivity of the electrode is a key factor in obtaining reliable sensors. Possible approaches to developing capacitive strain sensors are presented. This Review concludes with a discussion on the major challenges and perspectives related to stretchable strain sensors.

  3. Diversity among Streptomyces Strains Causing Potato Scab.

    PubMed

    Doering-Saad, C; Kämpfer, P; Manulis, S; Kritzman, G; Schneider, J; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, J; Schrempf, H; Barash, I

    1992-12-01

    Eighty Streptomyces isolates, including 35 potato scab-inducing strains and 12 reference strains of Streptomyces scabies, were physiologically characterized by a total of 329 miniaturized tests. Overall similarities of all strains were determined by numerical taxonomy, with the unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) algorithm and simple matching (S(sm)) and Jaccard (S(j)) coefficients used as measures for similarity. Three cluster groups (A to C) were defined at a similarity level of 80.1% (S(sm)); these groups contained 14 clusters and 24 unclustered strains defined at a similarity level of 86.5% (S(sm)). Cluster group A contained strains phenotypically related to S. griseus or S. exfoliatus, whereas cluster group B contained strains which were phenotypically related to S. violaceus or S. rochei. The majority of the pathogenic isolates and reference strains were assigned to S. violaceus (57%) and S. griseus (22%). A DNA probe derived from the rRNA operon of S. coelicolor IMET 40271 was used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RELPs) among 40 pathogenic and nonpathogenic Streptomyces isolates. Southern blots revealed a high degree of diversity among the pathogenic strains tested. No significant correlation between numerical classification and RFLP grouping of Streptomyces strains could be revealed. The results obtained suggest that RFLP data are of minor importance in classification of Streptomyces species and that genes for pathogenicity determinants are spread among different Streptomyces species by mobilizable elements. PMID:16348823

  4. Diversity among Streptomyces Strains Causing Potato Scab

    PubMed Central

    Doering-Saad, Christiane; Kämpfer, Peter; Manulis, Shulamit; Kritzman, Giora; Schneider, Jörg; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta; Schrempf, Hildgund; Barash, Isaac

    1992-01-01

    Eighty Streptomyces isolates, including 35 potato scab-inducing strains and 12 reference strains of Streptomyces scabies, were physiologically characterized by a total of 329 miniaturized tests. Overall similarities of all strains were determined by numerical taxonomy, with the unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) algorithm and simple matching (Ssm) and Jaccard (Sj) coefficients used as measures for similarity. Three cluster groups (A to C) were defined at a similarity level of 80.1% (Ssm); these groups contained 14 clusters and 24 unclustered strains defined at a similarity level of 86.5% (Ssm). Cluster group A contained strains phenotypically related to S. griseus or S. exfoliatus, whereas cluster group B contained strains which were phenotypically related to S. violaceus or S. rochei. The majority of the pathogenic isolates and reference strains were assigned to S. violaceus (57%) and S. griseus (22%). A DNA probe derived from the rRNA operon of S. coelicolor IMET 40271 was used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RELPs) among 40 pathogenic and nonpathogenic Streptomyces isolates. Southern blots revealed a high degree of diversity among the pathogenic strains tested. No significant correlation between numerical classification and RFLP grouping of Streptomyces strains could be revealed. The results obtained suggest that RFLP data are of minor importance in classification of Streptomyces species and that genes for pathogenicity determinants are spread among different Streptomyces species by mobilizable elements. Images PMID:16348823

  5. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study.

  6. High strain rate damage of Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Mai-Linh; Billi, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Several cases of rock pulverization have been observed along major active faults in granite and other crystalline rocks. They have been interpreted as due to coseismic pervasive microfracturing. In contrast, little is known about pulverization in carbonates. With the aim of understanding carbonate pulverization, we investigate the high strain rate (c. 100 s-1) behavior of unconfined Carrara marble through a set of experiments with a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Three final states were observed: (1) at low strain, the sample is kept intact, without apparent macrofractures; (2) failure is localized along a few fractures once stress is larger than 100 MPa, corresponding to a strain of 0.65%; (3) above 1.3% strain, the sample is pulverized. Contrary to granite, the transition to pulverization is controlled by strain rather than strain rate. Yet, at low strain rate, a sample from the same marble displayed only a few fractures. This suggests that the experiments were done above the strain rate transition to pulverization. Marble seems easier to pulverize than granite. This creates a paradox: finely pulverized rocks should be prevalent along any high strain zone near faults through carbonates, but this is not what is observed. A few alternatives are proposed to solve this paradox.

  7. Compressive strain rate sensitivity of ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jiwoon; Subhash, Ghatu

    2010-02-10

    Gelatin is a popular tissue simulant used in biomedical applications. The uniaxial compressive stress-strain response of gelatin was determined at a range of strain rates. In the quasistatic regime, gelatin strength remained relatively constant. With increase in loading rate, the compressive strength increased from 3kPa at a strain rate of around 0.0013/s to 6MPa at a strain rate of around 3200/s. This dramatic increase in strength of gelatin at high rates is attributed to its shear-thickening behavior and is argued on the basis of hydrocluster formation mechanism and differences in internal energy dissipation mechanism under static and dynamic loading. PMID:19863960

  8. Control of surface wettability via strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Zhen, Quan-Shui

    2013-08-01

    Reversible control of surface wettability has wide applications in lab-on-chip systems, tunable optical lenses, and microfluidic tools. Using a graphene sheet as a sample material and molecular dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that strain engineering can serve as an effective way to control the surface wettability. The contact angles θ of water droplets on a graphene vary from 72.5° to 106° under biaxial strains ranging from -10% to 10% that are applied on the graphene layer. For an intrinsic hydrophilic surface (at zero strain), the variation of θ upon the applied strains is more sensitive, i.e., from 0° to 74.8°. Overall the cosines of the contact angles exhibit a linear relation with respect to the strains. In light of the inherent dependence of the contact angle on liquid-solid interfacial energy, we develop an analytic model to show the cos θ as a linear function of the adsorption energy E ads of a single water molecule over the substrate surface. This model agrees with our molecular dynamic results very well. Together with the linear dependence of E ads on biaxial strains, we can thus understand the effect of strains on the surface wettability. Thanks to the ease of reversibly applying mechanical strains in micro/nano-electromechanical systems, we believe that strain engineering can be a promising means to achieve the reversibly control of surface wettability.

  9. Measurement of Sorption-Induced Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen

    2005-05-01

    Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A. and high-volatile bituminous coal from east-central Utah, U.S.A. using an apparatus developed jointly at the Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, U.S.A.) and Colorado School of Mines (Golden, Colorado, U.S.A.). The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain instead of the more common usage of strain gauges, which require larger samples and longer equilibration times. With this apparatus, we showed that the swelling and shrinkage processes were reversible and that accurate strain data could be obtained in a shortened amount of time. A suite of strain curves was generated for these coals using gases that included carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and various mixtures of these gases. A Langmuir-type equation was applied to satisfactorily model the strain data obtained for pure gases. The sorption-induced strain measured in the subbituminous coal was larger than the high-volatile bituminous coal for all gases tested over the range of pressures used in the experimentation, with the CO2-induced strain for the subbituminous coal over twice as great at the bituminous coal.

  10. Distributed strain monitoring for bridges: temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Ryan; Hoult, Neil A.

    2014-03-01

    To better manage infrastructure assets as they reach the end of their service lives, quantitative data is required to better assess structural behavior and allow for more informed decision making. Distributed fiber optic strain sensors are one sensing technology that could provide comprehensive data for use in structural assessments as these systems potentially allow for strain to be measured with the same accuracy and gage lengths as conventional strain sensors. However, as with many sensor technologies, temperature can play an important role in terms of both the structure's and sensor's performance. To investigate this issue a fiber optic distributed strain sensor system was installed on a section of a two span reinforced concrete bridge on the TransCanada Highway. Strain data was acquired several times a day as well as over the course of several months to explore the effects of changing temperature on the data. The results show that the strain measurements are affected by the bridge behavior as a whole. The strain measurements due to temperature are compared to strain measurements that were taken during a load test on the bridge. The results show that even a small change in temperature can produce crack width and strain changes similar to those due to a fully loaded transport truck. Future directions for research in this area are outlined.

  11. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an Autoregressive Moving Average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. shape sensing, fiber optic strain sensor, system equivalent reduction and expansion process.

  12. Investigation of a noncontact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B.; Talarico, L.J.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new noncontact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components; however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  13. Lesion edge preserved direct average strain estimation for ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohammad Arafat; Alam, Farzana; Rupa, Sharmin Akhtar; Awwal, Rayhana; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2014-01-01

    Elasticity imaging techniques with built-in or regularization-based smoothing feature for ensuring strain continuity are not intelligent enough to prevent distortion or lesion edge blurring while smoothing. This paper proposes a novel approach with built-in lesion edge preservation technique for high quality direct average strain imaging. An edge detection scheme, typically used in diffusion filtering is modified here for lesion edge detection. Based on the extracted edge information, lesion edges are preserved by modifying the strain determining cost function in the direct-average-strain-estimation (DASE) method. The proposed algorithm demonstrates approximately 3.42-4.25 dB improvement in terms of edge-mean-square-error (EMSE) than the other reported regularized or average strain estimation techniques in finite-element-modeling (FEM) simulation with almost no sacrifice in elastographic-signal-to-noise-ratio (SNRe) and elastographic-contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNRe) metrics. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is also tested for the experimental phantom data and in vivo breast data. The results reveal that the proposed method can generate a high quality strain image delineating the lesion edge more clearly than the other reported strain estimation techniques that have been designed to ensure strain continuity. The computational cost, however, is little higher for the proposed method than the simpler DASE and considerably higher than that of the 2D analytic minimization (AM2D) method.

  14. Effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on acetylcholinesterase activity of two strains of Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera).

    PubMed

    Toumi, Hela; Bejaoui, Mustapha; Touaylia, Samir; Burga Perez, Karen F; Ferard, Jean François

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on the acetylcholinesterase activity in two strains (same clone A) of the crustacean cladoceran Daphnia magna. Four carbaryl concentrations (0.4, 0.9, 1.8 and 3.7 µg L(-1)) were compared against control AChE activity. Our results showed that after 48 h of carbaryl exposure, all treatments induced a significant decrease of AChE activities whatever the two considered strains. However, different responses were registered in terms of lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC: 0.4 µg L(-1) for strain 1 and 0.9 µg L(-1) for strains 2) revealing differences in sensitivity among the two tested strains of D. magna. These results suggest that after carbaryl exposure, the AChE activity responses can be also used as a biomarker of susceptibility. Moreover, our results show that strain1 is less sensitive than strain 2 in terms of IC50-48 h of AChE activity. Comparing the EC50-48 h of standard ecotoxicity test and IC50-48 h of AChE inhibition, there is the same order of sensitivity with both strains.

  15. Rapid quantitative detection of Aeromonas hydrophila strains associated with disease outbreaks in catfish aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Matt J; Goodwin, Andrew E; Merry, Gwenn E; Liles, Mark R; Williams, Malachi A; Ware, Cynthia; Waldbieser, Geoffrey C

    2013-07-01

    A new strain of Aeromonas hydrophila has been implicated in significant losses in farm-raised catfish. Outbreaks attributable to this new strain began in Alabama in the summer of 2009 and have spread to Arkansas and Mississippi in subsequent years. These outbreaks mostly afflicted market-sized fish and resulted in considerable losses in short periods of time. The present research was designed to develop an expeditious diagnostic procedure to detect the new strains of A. hydrophila due to the rapid onset and biosecurity concerns associated with this new disease. A discriminatory quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed using gene sequences unique to the virulent strains identified in a related comparative genomic study. Using this assay, suspect colonies on a culture plate can be positively identified as the new strain within 2 hr. The assay is repeatable and reproducible with a linear dynamic range covering 8 orders of magnitude and a sensitivity of approximately 7 copies of target DNA in a 15-µl reaction. In addition, the assay is able to detect and quantify the virulent strain from catfish tissues (0.025 g), pond water (40 ml), and sediments (0.25 g) with a sensitivity limit of approximately 100 bacteria in a sample. This assay provides rapid discrimination between the new virulent strain and more common A. hydrophila and is useful for epidemiological studies involving the detection and quantification of the virulent strain in environmental samples and fish tissues.

  16. Meroparamycin production by newly isolated Streptomyces sp. strain MAR01: taxonomy, fermentation, purification and structural elucidation.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Moustafa Y; El-Assar, Samy A; Abdul-Gawad, Sahar M

    2006-08-01

    Twelve actinomycete strains were isolated from Egyptian soil. The isolated actinomycete strains were then screened with regard to their potential to generate antibiotics. The most potent of the producer strains was selected and identified. The cultural and physiological characteristics of the strain identified the strain as a member of the genus Streptomyces. The nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene (1.5 kb) of the most potent strain evidenced a 99% similarity with Streptomyces spp. and S. aureofaciens 16S rRNA genes, and the isolated strain was ultimately identified as Streptomyces sp. MAR01. The extraction of the fermentation broth of this strain resulted in the isolation of one major compound, which was active in vitro against gram-positive, gram-negative representatives and Candida albicans. The chemical structure of this bioactive compound was elucidated based on the spectroscopic data obtained from the application of MS, IR, UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis techniques. Via comparison to the reference data in the relevant literature and in the database search, this antibiotic, which had a molecular formula of C19H29NO2 and a molecular weight of 303.44, was determined to differ from those produced by this genus as well as the available known antibiotics. Therefore, this antibiotic was designated Meroparamycin. PMID:16953179

  17. Effects of a Static Stretching Program on the Incidence of Lower Extremity Musculotendinous Strains

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Kevin M.; Worrell, Ted W.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Musculotendinous strains are among the most prevalent injuries for which health care professionals provide treatment and rehabilitation interventions. Flexibility has been identified as one of the primary etiologic factors associated with musculotendinous strains, but limited research exists on the effect of a preventive stretching program on musculotendinous strains. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to compare the number of musculotendinous strains for the hamstrings, quadriceps, hip adductors, and gastrocnemius-soleus muscle groups before and after the incorporation of a static stretching program for each muscle group. Design and Setting: We analyzed the incidence of musculotendinous strains among the players of a Division III collegiate football team between 1994 and 1995. All variables were consistent between the 2 seasons except for the incorporation of a lower extremity stretching program in 1995. Subjects: One hundred and ninety-five Division III college football players. Measurements: We calculated the number of musculotendinous strains that required a minimum absence of 1 day from practices or games in 1994 and 1995. Results: A x² analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of lower extremity musculotendinous strains in 1995 as opposed to 1994. Conclusions: Our statistical analysis indicates an association between the incorporation of a static stretching program and a decreased incidence of musculotendinous strains in Division III college football players. PMID:16558540

  18. High Strain Rate Characterization of Plastics and Foams Using Polymeric Split Hopkinson Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawas, Omar; Brar, N. S.

    1997-07-01

    High strain rate and high/low temperature response of engineered plastics and foams is relevant and important for the design and development of fighter aircraft canopies, submarine interiors and automobile exterior and interior systems. The mechanical impedance of conventional split Hopkinson bar materials (aluminum or steel) is extremely large compared to those of plastic or foam specimens. To overcome this difficulty of impedance mismatch we have developed the Polymeric Split Hopkinson Bar (PSHB). A viscoelastic model for cast acrylic bar material, which relates stresses and strains as well as particle velocity and strain, is developed to account for the wave dispersion along the bar. The model is verified by comparing the stress strain data on 1100 aluminum and polycarbonate specimens obtained using PSHB and conventional aluminum SHB. Stress-strain data at a strain rate of 103/s on low strength polyurethane foam (density = 0.57 g/cm3) following this technique show that the foam has a recoverable compressive strain of 0.4 at a stress of 2.9 MPa. High strain rate (2x102-2x103/s) data on polycarbonate, generic elastomer, and styrofoam will also be presented.

  19. Internal strain monitoring in composite materials with embedded photonic crystal fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geernaert, Thomas; Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Chah, Karima; Luyckx, Geert; Lammens, Nicolas; Voet, Eli; Becker, Martin; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2014-09-01

    The possibility of embedding optical fiber sensors inside carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) for structural health monitoring purposes has already been demonstrated previously. So far however, these sensors only allowed axial strain measurements because of their low sensitivity for strain in the direction perpendicular to the optical fiber's axis. The design flexibility provided by novel photonic crystal fiber (PCF) technology now allows developing dedicated fibers with substantially enhanced sensitivity to such transverse loads. We exploited that flexibility and we developed a PCF that, when equipped with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG), leads to a sensor that allows measuring transverse strains in reinforced composite materials, with an order of magnitude increase of the sensitivity over the state-of-the-art. In addition it allows shear strain sensing in adhesive bonds, which are used in composite repair patches. This is confirmed both with experiments and finite element simulations on such fibers embedded in CFRP coupons and adhesive bonds. Our sensor brings the achievable transverse strain measurement resolution close to a target value of 1 μstrain and could therefore play an important role for multi-dimensional strain sensing, not only in the domain of structural health monitoring, but also in the field of composite material production monitoring. Our results thereby illustrate the added value that PCFs have to offer for internal strain measurements inside composite materials and structures.

  20. Strain Manipulated Magnetic Properties in ZnO and GaN Induced by Cation Vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yanqin; Jiang, Jiaping; Wu, Yuxi; Tang, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The effects of isotropic strains on the magnetic properties in ZnO and GaN induced by cation vacancies are comparatively investigated by density functional theory calculations. The magnetic moments and the couplings between vacancies in different charged states are calculated as a function of strains. The modulation of strain on the magnetic properties relies on the materials and the charge states of cation vacancies in them. As the occurrence of charge transfer in ZnO: V Zn under compression, the coupling between V_{{Zn}}0 is antiferromagnetic (AFM) and it could be stabilized by strains. Tensions can strengthen the ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between V_{{Zn}}0 but weaken that of V_{{Ga}}^{ - } . The neutral V Ga are always AFM coupling under strains from -6 to +6% and could be stabilized by compressions. The interactions between V_{{Ga}}^{ - } are always FM with ignorable variations under strains; however, the FM couplings between V_{{Ga}}^{2 - } could be strengthened by compressions. These varying trends of magnetic coupling under strains are interpreted by the band coupling models. Therefore, strain-engineering provides a route to manipulate and design high Curie temperature ferromagnetism derived and mediated by intrinsic defect for spintronic applications.