Science.gov

Sample records for actinohivin blocks hiv

  1. Structural insights into the specific anti-HIV property of actinohivin: structure of its complex with the α(1–2)mannobiose moiety of gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Hoque, M. Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Tsunoda, Masaru; Jiang, Jiandong; Zhang, Fang; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Tanaka, Haruo; Ōmura, Satoshi; Takénaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    X-ray analysis of anti-HIV actinohivin in complex with the target α(1-2)mannobiose moiety of high-mannose type glycans attached to HIV-1 gp120 reveals that the three rotamers generated with 120 rotations around the molecular pseudo-rotation axis are packed randomly in the unit cell according to the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} symmetry to exhibit an apparent space group P2{sub 1}3 as the statistical structure. However, the high-resolution X-ray structure shows the detailed interaction geometry for specific binding. Actinohivin (AH) is an actinomycete lectin with a potent specific anti-HIV activity. In order to clarify the structural evidence for its specific binding to the α(1–2)mannobiose (MB) moiety of the D1 chains of high-mannose-type glycans (HMTGs) attached to HIV-1 gp120, the crystal structure of AH in complex with MB has been determined. The AH molecule is composed of three identical structural modules, each of which has a pocket in which an MB molecule is bound adopting a bracket-shaped conformation. This conformation is stabilized through two weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds facilitated by the α(1–2) linkage. The binding features in the three pockets are quite similar to each other, in accordance with the molecular pseudo-threefold symmetry generated from the three tandem repeats in the amino-acid sequence. The shape of the pocket can accept two neighbouring hydroxyl groups of the O{sup 3} and O{sup 4} atoms of the equatorial configuration of the second mannose residue. To recognize these atoms through hydrogen bonds, an Asp residue is located at the bottom of each pocket. Tyr and Leu residues seem to block the movement of the MB molecules. Furthermore, the O{sup 1} atom of the axial configuration of the second mannose residue protrudes from each pocket into an open space surrounded by the conserved hydrophobic residues, suggesting an additional binding site for the third mannose residue of the branched D1 chain of HMTGs. These structural features

  2. Microfluidic assay without blocking for rapid HIV screening and confirmation.

    PubMed

    Song, Lusheng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wenjun; Ma, Liying; Liu, Yong; Hao, Yanlin; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2012-08-01

    The essential step for HIV spreading limitation is the screening tests. However, there are multiple disadvantages in current screening assays which need further confirmation test. Herein we developed a rapid HIV assay combining screening and confirmation test by using the microfluidic network assay. Meanwhile, the assay is accelerated by bypassing the step of blocking. We call this method as microfluidic assay without blocking (MAWB). Both the limit of detection and reagent incubation time of MAWB are determined by screening of one model protein pair: ovalbumin and its antibody. The assay time is accelerated about 25% while the limit of detection (LOD) is well kept. Formatting the method in for both HIV screening (testing 8 HIV-related samples) and confirmation (assaying 6 kinds of HIV antibodies of each sample) within 30 min was successful. Fast HIV screening and confirmation of 20 plasma samples were also demonstrated by this method. MAWB improved the assay speed while keeping the LOD of conventional ELISA. Meanwhile, both the accuracy and throughput of MAWB were well improved, which made it an excellent candidate for a quick HIV test for both screening and confirmation. Methods like this one will find wide applications in clinical diagnosis and biochemical analysis based on the interactions between pairs of molecules.

  3. Characterization of two distinct early post-entry blocks to HIV-1 in common marmoset lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Beatriz; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Sodroski, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In nature, primate lentiviruses infect humans and several Old World monkeys and apes. However, to date, lentiviruses infecting New World monkeys have not been described. We studied the susceptibility of common marmoset cells to HIV-1 infection and observed the presence of post-entry blocks to the early phase of HIV-1 infection in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and a B lymphocytic cell line (B-LCL). The blocks present in these cells are dominant and phenotypically different from each other. In PBLs, the block occurs at the level of reverse transcription, reducing the accumulation of early and late transcripts, similar to the block imposed by TRIM5α. However, we have found that marmoset TRIM5α does not block HIV-1. In contrast, the restriction factor present in B-LCLs blocks HIV-1 replication at a later step, after nuclear entry, and inhibits integration. Additionally, we have identified an HIV-1 capsid mutant, N74D, that is able to escape the restriction in the marmoset B-LCLs. Our results suggest that the factors responsible for the blocks present in marmoset PBLs and B-LCLs are different. We propose the existence of at least two new restriction factors able to block HIV-1 infection in marmoset lymphocytes. PMID:27876849

  4. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Anticipating and blocking HIV-1 escape by second generation antiviral shRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of target mRNAs. RNAi can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. However, the error-prone replication machinery of HIV-1 can generate RNAi-resistant variants with specific mutations in the target sequence. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. Here we present a strategy that anticipates HIV-1 escape by designing 2nd generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that form a complete match with the viral escape sequences. Results To block the two favorite viral escape routes observed when the HIV-1 integrase gene sequence is targeted, the original shRNA inhibitor was combined with two 2nd generation shRNAs in a single lentiviral expression vector. We demonstrate in long-term viral challenge experiments that the two dominant viral escape routes were effectively blocked. Eventually, virus breakthrough did however occur, but HIV-1 evolution was skewed and forced to use new escape routes. Conclusion These results demonstrate the power of the 2nd generation RNAi concept. Popular viral escape routes are blocked by the 2nd generation RNAi strategy. As a consequence viral evolution was skewed leading to new escape routes. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under RNAi pressure. PMID:20529316

  6. Blocking HIV-1 entry by a gp120 surface binding inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Lun K.; Chen, Chin-Ho; Dutschman, Ginger E.

    2012-01-01

    We report the mode of action of a proteomimetic compound that binds to the exterior surface of gp120 and blocks HIV-1 entry into cells. Using a one cycle time-of-addition study and antibody competition binding studies, we have determined that the compound blocks HIV-1 entry through modulation of key protein-protein interactions mediated by gp120. The compound exhibits anti-HIV-1 replication activities against several pseudotype viruses derived from primary isolates and the resistant strains isolated from existing drug candidates with equal potency. Together, these data provide evidence that the proteomimetic compound represents a novel class of HIV-1 viral entry inhibitor that functions through protein surface recognition in analogy to an antibody. PMID:22487177

  7. HIV Blocks Interferon Induction in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages by Dysregulation of TBK1

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Andrew N.; Nasr, Najla; Feetham, Alexandra; Galoyan, Ani; Alshehri, Abdullateef A.; Rambukwelle, Dharshini; Botting, Rachel A.; Hiener, Bonnie M.; Diefenbach, Eve; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Kim, Min; Mansell, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are present in the tissues of the anogenital tract, where HIV-1 transmission occurs in almost all cases. These cells are both target cells for HIV-1 and represent the first opportunity for the virus to interfere with innate recognition. Previously we have shown that both cell types fail to produce type I interferons (IFNs) in response to HIV-1 but that, unlike T cells, the virus does not block IFN induction by targeting IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) for cellular degradation. Thus, either HIV-1 inhibits IFN induction by an alternate mechanism or, less likely, these cells fail to sense HIV-1. Here we show that HIV-1 (but not herpes simplex virus 2 [HSV-2] or Sendai virus)-exposed DCs and macrophages fail to induce the expression of all known type I and III IFN genes. These cells do sense the virus, and pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-induced signaling pathways are triggered. The precise stage in the IFN-inducing signaling pathway that HIV-1 targets to block IFN induction was identified; phosphorylation but not K63 polyubiquitination of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) was completely inhibited. Two HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vpr and Vif, were shown to bind to TBK1, and their individual deletion partly restored IFN-β expression. Thus, the inhibition of TBK1 autophosphorylation by binding of these proteins appears to be the principal mechanism by which HIV-1 blocks type I and III IFN induction in myeloid cells. IMPORTANCE Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are key HIV target cells. Therefore, definition of how HIV impairs innate immune responses to initially establish infection is essential to design preventative interventions, especially by restoring initial interferon production. Here we demonstrate how HIV-1 blocks interferon induction by inhibiting the function of a key kinase in the interferon signaling pathway, TBK1, via two different viral accessory proteins. Other viral proteins have been shown to target the

  8. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  9. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  10. A novel approach to block HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 in non-toxic manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhou, Jieqiong; Pan, Ji-An; Mabiala, Prudence; Guo, Deyin

    2014-10-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is one of the major coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and considered as an important therapeutic target. Knockdown of CXCR4 by RNA interference has emerged as a promising strategy for combating HIV-1 infection. However, there is a potential drawback to this strategy as undesired side effects may occur due to the loss of natural function of CXCR4. In this study, we developed a novel approach using a single lentiviral vector to express simultaneously CXCR4 dual-shRNAs and an shRNA-resistant CXCR4 mutant possessing the most possible natural functions of CXCR4 and reduced HIV-1 coreceptor activity. Via this approach we achieved the replacement of endogenous CXCR4 by CXCR4 mutant P191A that could compensate the functional loss of endogenous CXCR4 and significant reduction of HIV-1 replication by 59.2 %. Besides, we demonstrated that construction of recombinant lentiviral vector using 2A peptide-based strategy has significant advantages over using additional promoter-based strategy, including increase of lentivirus titer and avoidance of promoter competition. Therefore, the novel approach to block HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 without impairing its normal function provides a new strategy for CXCR4-targeted therapeutics for HIV-1 infection and potential universal applications to knock down a cellular protein in non-toxic manner.

  11. The HLA-B/-C haplotype block contains major determinants for host control of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, E; Bhattacharya, T; Ladner, M; Phair, J; Erlich, H; Wolinsky, S

    2010-01-01

    A genome-wide association study of people with incident human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection selected from nine different cohorts identified allelic polymorphisms, which associated with either viral set point (HCP5 and 5′ HLA-C) or with HIV disease progression (RNF39 and ZNRD1). To determine the influence of these polymorphisms on host control of HIV, we carried out a population-based association study. The analysis revealed complete linkage disequilibrium between HCP5 and HLA-B*5701/HLA-Cw*06, a modest effect of 5′ HLA-C on viral set point in the absence of HLA-B*5701, and no influence of the RNF39 /ZNRD1 extended haplotype on HIV disease progression. No correlation was found between the infection status and any of these genetic variants (P>0.1, Fisher's exact test). These findings suggest a pattern of strong linkage disequilibrium consistent with an HLA-B/-C haplotype block, making identification of a causal variant difficult, and underscore the importance of validating polymorphisms in putative determinants for host control by association analysis of independent populations. PMID:19693088

  12. Relief of Preintegration Inhibition and Characterization of Additional Blocks for HIV Replication in Primary Mouse T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-xin; Diehl, Gretchen E.; Littman, Dan R.

    2008-01-01

    Development of a small animal model to study HIV replication and pathogenesis has been hampered by the failure of the virus to replicate in non-primate cells. Most studies aimed at achieving replication in murine cells have been limited to fibroblast cell lines, but generating an appropriate model requires overcoming blocks to viral replication in primary T cells. We have studied HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells from human CD4/ CCR5/Cyclin T1 transgenic mice. Expression of hCD4 and hCCR5 in mouse CD4+ T cells enabled efficient entry of R5 strain HIV-1. In mouse T cells, HIV-1 underwent reverse transcription and nuclear import as efficiently as in human T cells. In contrast, chromosomal integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA was inefficient in activated mouse T cells. This process was greatly enhanced by providing a secondary T cell receptor (TCR) signal after HIV-1 infection, especially between 12 to 24 h post infection. This effect was specific for primary mouse T cells. The pathways involved in HIV replication appear to be PKCθ−, CARMA1-, and WASp-independent. Treatment with Cyclosporin A (CsA) further relieved the pre-integration block. However, transcription of HIV-1 RNA was still reduced in mouse CD4+ T cells despite expression of the hCyclin T1 transgene. Additional post-transcriptional defects were observed at the levels of Gag expression, Gag processing, Gag release and virus infectivity. Together, these post-integration defects resulted in a dramatically reduced yield of infectious virus (300–500 fold) after a single cycle of HIV-1 replication. This study implies the existence of host factors, in addition to those already identified, that are critical for HIV-1 replication in mouse cells. This study also highlights the differences between primary T cells and cell lines regarding pre-integration steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:18446227

  13. Soluble CD4 blocks the infectivity of diverse strains of HIV and SIV for T cells and monocytes but not for brain and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Clapham, P R; Weber, J N; Whitby, D; McIntosh, K; Dalgleish, A G; Maddon, P J; Deen, K C; Sweet, R W; Weiss, R A

    1989-01-26

    The CD4 antigen has been subverted as a receptor by the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV). Several groups have reported that recombinant, soluble forms of the CD4 molecule (sCD4) block the infection of T lymphocytes by HIV-1, as CD4 binds the HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, with high affinity. We now report that sCD4 blocks diverse strains of HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV, but is less effective for HIV-2. The blocking effect is apparent even after adsorption of virions to CD4 cells. Soluble CD4 prevents HIV infection of T-lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cell lines, but neither sCD4 nor anti-CD4 antibodies inhibit infection of glioma and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

  14. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  15. Derivatives of mesoxalic acid block translocation of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Bernatchez, Jean A; Paul, Rakesh; Tchesnokov, Egor P; Ngure, Marianne; Beilhartz, Greg L; Berghuis, Albert M; Lavoie, Rico; Li, Lianhai; Auger, Anick; Melnyk, Roman A; Grobler, Jay A; Miller, Michael D; Hazuda, Daria J; Hecht, Sidney M; Götte, Matthias

    2015-01-16

    The pyrophosphate mimic and broad spectrum antiviral phosphonoformic acid (PFA, foscarnet) was shown to freeze the pre-translocational state of the reverse transcriptase (RT) complex of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, PFA lacks a specificity domain, which is seen as a major reason for toxic side effects associated with the clinical use of this drug. Here, we studied the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 RT by the 4-chlorophenylhydrazone of mesoxalic acid (CPHM) and demonstrate that this compound also blocks RT translocation. Hot spots for inhibition with PFA or CPHM occur at template positions with a bias toward pre-translocation. Mutations at active site residue Asp-185 compromise binding of both compounds. Moreover, divalent metal ions are required for the formation of ternary complexes with either of the two compounds. However, CPHM contains both an anchor domain that likely interacts with the catalytic metal ions and a specificity domain. Thus, although the inhibitor binding sites may partly overlap, they are not identical. The K65R mutation in HIV-1 RT, which reduces affinity to PFA, increases affinity to CPHM. Details with respect to the binding sites of the two inhibitors are provided on the basis of mutagenesis studies, structure-activity relationship analyses with newly designed CPHM derivatives, and in silico docking experiments. Together, these findings validate the pre-translocated complex of HIV-1 RT as a specific target for the development of novel classes of RT inhibitors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Blocking HIV-1 transmission in the female reproductive tract: from microbicide development to exploring local antiviral responses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Sahar G; Mangan, Niamh E; Hertzog, Paul J; Mak, Johnson

    2015-01-01

    The majority of new HIV-1 infections are transmitted sexually by penetrating the mucosal barrier to infect target cells. The development of microbicides to restrain heterosexual HIV-1 transmission in the past two decades has proven to be a challenging endeavor. Therefore, better understanding of the tissue environment in the female reproductive tract may assist in the development of the next generation of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. In this review, we highlight the important factors involved in the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, provide an update on microbicides' clinical trials, and discuss how different delivery platforms and local immunity may empower the development of next generation of microbicide to block HIV-1 transmission in the female reproductive tract. PMID:26682051

  17. Gp120/CD4 Blocking Antibodies Are Frequently Elicited in ART-Naïve Chronically HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Jorge; Molinos-Albert, Luis Manuel; de la Concepción, Maria Luisa Rodríguez; Marfil, Silvia; García, Elisabet; Derking, Ronald; Sanders, Rogier W.; Clotet, Bonaventura; Blanco, Julià

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies with the ability to block the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 with CD4, including those overlapping the CD4 binding site (CD4bs antibodies), can protect from infection by HIV-1, and their elicitation may be an interesting goal for any vaccination strategy. To identify gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies in plasma samples from HIV-1 infected individuals we have developed a competitive flow cytometry-based functional assay. In a cohort of treatment-naïve chronically infected patients, we showed that gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies were frequently elicited (detected in 97% plasma samples) and correlated with binding to trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. However, no correlation was observed between functional CD4 binding blockade data and titer of CD4bs antibodies determined by ELISA using resurfaced gp120 proteins. Consistently, plasma samples lacking CD4bs antibodies were able to block the interaction between gp120 and its receptor, indicating that antibodies recognizing other epitopes, such as PGT126 and PG16, can also play the same role. Antibodies blocking CD4 binding increased over time and correlated positively with the capacity of plasma samples to neutralize the laboratory-adapted NL4.3 and BaL virus isolates, suggesting their potential contribution to the neutralizing workforce of plasma in vivo. Determining whether this response can be boosted to achieve broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide valuable information for the design of new strategies aimed to improve the anti-HIV-1 humoral response and to develop a successful HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25803681

  18. Blocking CXCL9 Decreases HIV-1 Replication and Enhances the Activity of Prophylactic Antiretrovirals in Human Cervical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Macura, Sherrill L.; Lathrop, Melissa J.; Gui, Jiang; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Rollenhagen, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The interferon-gamma–induced chemokine CXCL9 is expressed in a wide range of inflammatory conditions including those affecting the female genital tract. CXCL9 promotes immune cell recruitment, activation, and proliferation. The role of CXCL9 in modulating HIV-1 infection of cervicovaginal tissues, a main portal of viral entry, however, has not been established. We report a link between CXCL9 and HIV-1 replication in human cervical tissues and propose CXCL9 as a potential target to enhance the anti–HIV-1 activity of prophylactic antiretrovirals. Design: Using ex vivo infection of human cervical tissues as a model of mucosal HIV-1 acquisition, we described the effect of CXCL9 neutralization on HIV-1 gene expression and mucosal CD4+ T-cell activation. The anti-HIV-1 activity of tenofovir, the leading mucosal pre-exposure prophylactic microbicide, alone or in combination with CXCL9 neutralization was also studied. Methods: HIV-1 replication was evaluated by p24 ELISA. HIV-1 DNA and RNA, and CD4, CCR5, and CD38 transcription were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Frequency of activated cervical CD4+ T cells was quantified using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Results: Antibody blocking of CXCL9 reduced HIV-1 replication by decreasing mucosal CD4+ T-cell activation. CXCL9 neutralization in combination with suboptimal concentrations of tenofovir, possibly present in the cervicovaginal tissues of women using the drug inconsistently, demonstrated an earlier and greater decrease in HIV-1 replication compared with tissues treated with tenofovir alone. Conclusions: CXCL9 neutralization reduces HIV-1 replication and may be an effective target to enhance the efficacy of prophylactic antiretrovirals. PMID:26545124

  19. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  20. Deletions in the fifth alpha helix of HIV-1 matrix block virus release

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, Bridget; Li, Yan; Maly, Connor J.; Madson, Christian J.; Chen, Han; Zhou, You; Belshan, Michael

    2014-11-15

    The matrix (MA) protein of HIV-1 is the N-terminal component of the Gag structural protein and is critical for the early and late stages of viral replication. MA contains five α-helices (α1–α5). Deletions in the N-terminus of α5 as small as three amino acids impaired virus release. Electron microscopy of one deletion mutant (MA∆96-120) showed that its particles were tethered to the surface of cells by membranous stalks. Immunoblots indicated all mutants were processed completely, but mutants with large deletions had alternative processing intermediates. Consistent with the EM data, MA∆96-120 retained membrane association and multimerization capability. Co-expression of this mutant inhibited wild type particle release. Alanine scanning mutation in this region did not affect virus release, although the progeny virions were poorly infectious. Combined, these data demonstrate that structural ablation of the α5 of MA inhibits virus release. - Highlights: • Deletions were identified in the C-terminus of matrix that block virus release. • These deletion mutants still multimerized and associated with membranes. • TEM showed the mutant particles were tethered to the cell surface. • Amino acid mutagenesis of the region did not affect release. • The data suggests that disruption of matrix structure blocks virus release.

  1. HIV blocking antibodies following immunisation with chimaeric peptides coding a short N-terminal sequence of the CCR5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benjamin M.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Gardener, Michelle; Tsang, Jhen; Wright, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is required for cellular entry by many strains of HIV, and provides a potential target for molecules, including antibodies, designed to block HIV transmission. This study investigates a novel approach to stimulate antibodies to CCR5. Rabbits were immunised with chimaeric peptides which encode a short fragment of the N-terminal sequence of CCR5, as well as an unrelated T cell epitope from Tetanus toxoid. Immunisation with these chimaeric peptides generates a strong antibody response which is highly focused on the N-terminal CCR5 sequence. The antibody to the chimaeric peptide containing an N-terminal methionine also recognises the full length CCR5 receptor on the cell surface, albeit at higher concentrations. Further comparison of binding to intact CCR5 with binding to CCR5 peptide suggest that the receptor specific antibody generated represents a very small fragment of the total anti-peptide antibody. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminal peptide in the context of the intact receptor has a different structure to that of the synthetic peptide. Finally, the antibody was able to block HIV infection of macrophages in vitro. Thus results of this study suggest that N-terminal fragments of CCR5 may provide potential immunogens with which to generate blocking antibodies to this receptor, while avoiding the dangers of including T cell auto-epitopes. PMID:18765264

  2. Vaccine-Induced HIV-1 Envelope gp120 Constant Region 1-Specific Antibodies Expose a CD4-Inducible Epitope and Block the Interaction of HIV-1 gp140 with Galactosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S. Moses; Anasti, Kara M.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Stewart, Shelley M.; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Kunz, Erika L.; Zhang, Ruijun; Vandergrift, Nathan; Permar, Sallie; Ferrari, Guido; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucosal epithelial cell surface galactosylceramide (Galcer) has been postulated to be a receptor for HIV-1 envelope (Env) interactions with mucosal epithelial cells. Disruption of the HIV-1 Env interaction with such alternate receptors could be one strategy to prevent HIV-1 entry through the mucosal barrier. To study antibody modulation of HIV-1 Env-Galcer interactions, we used Galcer-containing liposomes to assess whether natural- and vaccine-induced monoclonal antibodies can block HIV-1 Env binding to Galcer. HIV-1 Env gp140 proteins bound to Galcer liposomes with Kds (dissociation constants) in the nanomolar range. Several HIV-1 ALVAC/AIDSVAX vaccinee-derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the gp120 first constant (C1) region blocked Galcer binding of a transmitted/founder HIV-1 Env gp140. Among the C1-specific MAbs that showed Galcer blocking, the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating CH38 IgG and its natural IgA isotype were the most potent blocking antibodies. C1-specific IgG monoclonal antibodies that blocked Env binding to Galcer induced upregulation of the gp120 CD4-inducible (CD4i) epitope bound by MAb 17B, demonstrating that a conformational change in gp120 may be required for Galcer blocking. However, the MAb 17B itself did not block Env-Galcer binding, suggesting that the C1 antibody-induced gp120 conformational changes resulted in alteration in a Galcer binding site distant from the CD4i 17B MAb binding site. IMPORTANCE Galactosyl ceramide, a glycosphingolipid, has been postulated to be a receptor for the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) interaction with mucosal epithelial cells. Here, we have mimicked this interaction by using an artificial membrane containing synthetic Galcer and recombinant HIV-1 Env proteins to identify antibodies that would block the HIV-1 Env-Galcer interaction. Our study revealed that a class of vaccine-induced human antibodies potently blocks HIV-1 Env-Galcer binding by perturbing the HIV-1

  3. Extracurricular interest as a resilience building block for children affected by parental HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfeng; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Tam, Cheuk Chi; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Parental illness and death due to human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) impose challenges to children's psychological adjustment. Positive psychology emphasizes individual's resilience in the face of adversity, trauma, and tragedy. Limited data are available regarding the factors that can cultivate resilience of children affected by HIV/AIDS. This study aims to examine the role of extracurricular interest in strengthening resilience among children affected by HIV/AIDS. Participants included 755 children orphaned by parental HIV/AIDS, 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-positive parent(s), and 404 comparison children from HIV-free families in the same community in rural China. The measures include extracurricular interest (i.e., reading, sports, music, painting, science, and playing chess) and indicators of psychological adjustment (i.e., depression, loneliness, and self-esteem). Having extracurricular interest was positively associated with self-esteem and negatively associated with depression and loneliness. Having extracurricular interest attenuated the negative effect of parental HIV/AIDS on children's self-esteem and loneliness, after controlling for children's age, gender, and family socioeconomic status. The findings underscore the importance of nurturing extracurricular interest and make available of such activities to promote resilience for children affected by HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings.

  4. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Alessandro; Le Sage, Valerie; Ghanem, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se) induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms. PMID:27025252

  5. Induction of HIV-Blocking Anti-CCR5 IgA in Peyers's Patches without Histopathological Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, Claudia; Diomede, Lorenzo; Venuti, Assunta; Fisher, Gregory; Jarvik, Jonathan; Bomsel, Morgane; Sanvito, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chemokine receptor CCR5 is essential for HIV infection and is thus a potential target for vaccine development. However, because CCR5 is a host protein, generation of anti-CCR5 antibodies requires the breaking of immune tolerance and thus carries the risk of autoimmune responses. In this study, performed in mice, we compared 3 different immunogens representing surface domains of murine CCR5, 4 different adjuvants, and 13 different immunization protocols, with the goal of eliciting HIV-blocking activity without inducing autoimmune dysfunction. In all cases the CCR5 sequences were presented as fusions to the Flock House virus (FHV) capsid precursor protein. We found that systemic immunization and mucosal boosting elicited CCR5-specific antibodies and achieved consistent priming in Peyer's patches, where most cells showed a phenotype corresponding to activated B cells and secreted high levels of IgA, representing up to one-third of the total HIV-blocking activity. Histopathological analysis revealed mild to moderate chronic inflammation in some tissues but failed in reporting signs of autoimmune dysfunction associated with immunizations. Antisera against immunogens representing the N terminus and extracellular loops 1 and 2 (Nter1 and ECL1 and ECL2) of CCR5 were generated. All showed specific anti-HIV activity, which was stronger in the anti-ECL1 and -ECL2 sera than in the anti-Nter sera. ECL1 and ECL2 antisera induced nearly complete long-lasting CCR5 downregulation of the receptor, and especially, their IgG-depleted fractions prevented HIV infection in neutralization and transcytosis assays. In conclusion, the ECL1 and ECL2 domains could offer a promising path to achieve significant anti-HIV activity in vivo. IMPORTANCE The study was the first to adopt a systematic strategy to compare the immunogenicities of all extracellular domains of the CCR5 molecule and to set optimal conditions leading to generation of specific antibodies in the mouse model. There

  6. Secretion modification region-derived peptide disrupts HIV-1 Nef's interaction with mortalin and blocks virus and Nef exosome release.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Martin N; Huang, Ming-Bo; Ali, Syed A; Powell, Michael D; Bond, Vincent C

    2012-01-01

    Nef is secreted from infected cells in exosomes and is found in abundance in the sera of HIV-infected individuals. Secreted exosomal Nef (exNef) induces apoptosis in uninfected CD4⁺ T cells and may be a key component of HIV pathogenesis. The exosomal pathway has been implicated in HIV-1 virus release, suggesting a possible link between these two viral processes. However, the underlying mechanisms and cellular components of exNef secretion have not been elucidated. We have previously described a Nef motif, the secretion modification region (SMR; amino acids 66 to 70), that is required for exNef secretion. In silico modeling data suggest that this motif can form a putative binding pocket. We hypothesized that the Nef SMR binds a cellular protein involved in protein trafficking and that inhibition of this interaction would abrogate exNef secretion. By using tandem mass spectrometry and coimmunoprecipitation with a novel SMR-based peptide (SMRwt) that blocks exNef secretion and HIV-1 virus release, we identified mortalin as an SMR-specific cellular protein. A second set of coimmunoprecipitation experiments with full-length Nef confirmed that mortalin interacts with Nef via Nef's SMR motif and that this interaction is disrupted by the SMRwt peptide. Overexpression and microRNA knockdown of mortalin revealed a positive correlation between exNef secretion levels and mortalin protein expression. Using antibody inhibition we demonstrated that the Nef/mortalin interaction is necessary for exNef secretion. Taken together, this work constitutes a significant step in understanding the underlying mechanism of exNef secretion, identifies a novel host-pathogen interaction, and introduces an HIV-derived peptide with antiviral properties.

  7. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar C, Selvaa; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  8. Identification of an inhibitory budding signal that blocks the release of HIV particles and exosome/microvesicle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

     Animal cells bud exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) from endosome and plasma membranes. The combination of higher-order oligomerization and plasma membrane binding is a positive budding signal that targets diverse proteins into EMVs and retrovirus particles. Here we describe an inhibitory budding signal (IBS) from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein. This IBS was identified in the spacer peptide 2 (SP2) domain of Gag, is activated by C-terminal exposure of SP2, and mediates the severe budding defect of p6-deficient and PTAP-deficient strains of HIV. This IBS also impairs the budding of CD63 and several other viral and nonviral EMV proteins. The IBS does not prevent cargo delivery to the plasma membrane, a major site of EMV and virus budding. However, the IBS does inhibit an interaction between EMV cargo proteins and VPS4B, a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Taken together, these results demonstrate that inhibitory signals can block protein and virus budding, raise the possibility that the ESCRT machinery plays a role in EMV biogenesis, and shed new light on the role of the p6 domain and PTAP motif in the biogenesis of HIV particles. PMID:21248205

  9. Identification of an inhibitory budding signal that blocks the release of HIV particles and exosome/microvesicle proteins.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J

    2011-03-15

    Animal cells bud exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) from endosome and plasma membranes. The combination of higher-order oligomerization and plasma membrane binding is a positive budding signal that targets diverse proteins into EMVs and retrovirus particles. Here we describe an inhibitory budding signal (IBS) from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein. This IBS was identified in the spacer peptide 2 (SP2) domain of Gag, is activated by C-terminal exposure of SP2, and mediates the severe budding defect of p6-deficient and PTAP-deficient strains of HIV. This IBS also impairs the budding of CD63 and several other viral and nonviral EMV proteins. The IBS does not prevent cargo delivery to the plasma membrane, a major site of EMV and virus budding. However, the IBS does inhibit an interaction between EMV cargo proteins and VPS4B, a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Taken together, these results demonstrate that inhibitory signals can block protein and virus budding, raise the possibility that the ESCRT machinery plays a role in EMV biogenesis, and shed new light on the role of the p6 domain and PTAP motif in the biogenesis of HIV particles.

  10. Interactions of Pluronic Block Copolymers on P-gp Efflux Activity: Experience With HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    SHAIK, NAVEED; PAN, GUOYU; ELMQUIST, WILLIAM F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to examine the influence of Pluronic block-copolymers on the interaction between the drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein and HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs). The ATPase assay determined the effect of various Pluronics on PI-stimulated P-gp ATPase activity. Cellular accumulation studies were conducted using MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cells transfected with human MDR1 to assess Pluronic modulation of PI efflux. Pluronic P85 inhibited both basal and nelfinavir-stimulated P-gp ATPase activity, while Pluronic F127 had no effect. In cell accumulation studies, Pluronic P85 restored the accumulation of nelfinavir in MDCKII-MDR1 cells while Pluronic F127 and F88 had no effect. Pluronic P85 increased saquinavir accumulation in wild-type and MDR1-transfected cells in both the MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cell models, suggesting inhibition of multiple transporters, including MRPs. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that a block-copolymer, Pluronic P85, effectively inhibits the interaction of P-gp with nelfinavir and saquinavir. These data indicate that effective inhibition of HIV-1 PI efflux by Pluronic P85 may influence the distribution of antiretroviral agents to sites protected by efflux mechanisms, such as the blood–brain barrier, and possibly increase the brain exposure of these drugs resulting in suppression of viral replication and reduction in the incidence of drug resistant mutants. PMID:18393290

  11. A mucosally targeted subunit vaccine candidate eliciting HIV-1 transcytosis-blocking Abs

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Magérus, Aude; Geyer, Brian C.; Zhang, Yunfang; Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Alfsen, Annette; Arntzen, Charles J.; Bomsel, Morgane; Mor, Tsafrir S.

    2004-01-01

    A vaccine that would engage the mucosal immune system against a broad range of HIV-1 subtypes and prevent epithelial transmission is highly desirable. Here we report fusing the mucosal targeting B subunit of cholera toxin to the conserved galactosylceramide-binding domain (including the ELDKWA-neutralizing epitope) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein, which mediates the transcytosis of HIV-1 across the mucosal epithelia. Chimeric protein expressed in bacteria or plants assembled into oligomers that were capable of binding galactosyl-ceramide and GM1 gangliosides. Mucosal (intranasal) administration in mice of the purified chimeric protein followed by an i.p. boost resulted in transcytosis-neutralizing serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses and induced immunological memory. Plant production of mucosally targeted immunogens could be particularly useful for immunization programs in developing countries, where desirable product traits include low cost of manufacture, heat stability, and needle-free delivery. PMID:15347807

  12. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Jones, Philip H.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25880110

  13. Inhibition of CUL4A Neddylation Causes a Reversible Block to SAMHD1-Mediated Restriction of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Henning; Norton, Thomas D.; Schultz, Megan L.; Polsky, Sylvie B.; Sunseri, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The deoxynucleoside triphosphohydrolase SAMHD1 restricts retroviral replication in myeloid cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and a simian immunodeficiency virus from rhesus macaques (SIVmac) encode Vpx, a virion-packaged accessory protein that counteracts SAMHD1 by inducing its degradation. SAMHD1 is thought to work by depleting the pool of intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates but has also been reported to have exonuclease activity that could allow it to degrade the viral genomic RNA or viral reverse-transcribed DNA. To induce the degradation of SAMHD1, Vpx co-opts the cullin4a-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL4. E3 ubiquitin ligases are regulated by the covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to the cullin subunit. Neddylation can be prevented by MLN4924, a drug that inhibits the nedd8-activating enzyme. We report that MLN4924 inhibits the neddylation of CRL4, blocking Vpx-induced degradation of SAMHD1 and maintaining the restriction. Removal of the drug several hours postinfection released the block. Similarly, Vpx-containing virus-like particles and deoxynucleosides added to the cells more than 24 h postinfection released the SAMHD1-mediated block. Taken together, these findings support deoxynucleoside triphosphate pool depletion as the primary mechanism of SAMHD1 restriction and argue against a nucleolytic mechanism, which would not be reversible. PMID:23986575

  14. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry.

    PubMed

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G

    2014-10-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer ((gp120-gp41)3) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an 'opening' of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 co-receptor and formation and/or exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but it inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants with increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A.

  15. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry

    PubMed Central

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer (gp1203/gp413) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an “opening” of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 coreceptor, and formation/exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the formation/exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants exhibiting increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A. PMID:25174000

  16. HIV-protease inhibitors block the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses at an early post-entry replication step

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Maurizio

    2011-08-15

    The inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (PIs) have been designed to block the activity of the viral aspartyl-protease. However, it is now accepted that this family of inhibitors can also affect the activity of cell proteases. Since the replication of many virus species requires the activity of host cell proteases, investigating the effects of PIs on the life cycle of viruses other than HIV would be of interest. Here, the potent inhibition induced by saquinavir and nelfinavir on the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses is described. These are unrelated enveloped RNA viruses infecting target cells upon endocytosis and intracellular fusion. The PI-induced inhibition was apparently a consequence of a block at the level of the fusion between viral envelope and endosomal membranes. These findings would open the way towards the therapeutic use of PIs against enveloped RNA viruses other than HIV.

  17. The Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Protects the Genital Mucosal Epithelial Barrier from Disruption and Blocks Replication of HIV-1 and HSV-2

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Victor H.; Mueller, Kristen; Kaushic, Charu

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a known mechanism that facilitates HIV acquisition and the spread of infection. In this study, we evaluated whether curcumin, a potent and safe anti-inflammatory compound, could be used to abrogate inflammatory processes that facilitate HIV-1 acquisition in the female genital tract (FGT) and contribute to HIV amplification. Primary, human genital epithelial cells (GECs) were pretreated with curcumin and exposed to HIV-1 or HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120), both of which have been shown to disrupt epithelial tight junction proteins, including ZO-1 and occludin. Pre-treatment with curcumin prevented disruption of the mucosal barrier by maintaining ZO-1 and occludin expression and maintained trans-epithelial electric resistance across the genital epithelium. Curcumin pre-treatment also abrogated the gp120-mediated upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6, which mediate barrier disruption, as well as the chemokines IL-8, RANTES and interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10), which are capable of recruiting HIV target cells to the FGT. GECs treated with curcumin and exposed to the sexually transmitted co-infecting microbes HSV-1, HSV-2 and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were unable to elicit innate inflammatory responses that indirectly induced activation of the HIV promoter and curcumin blocked Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated induction of HIV replication in chronically infected T-cells. Finally, curcumin treatment resulted in significantly decreased HIV-1 and HSV-2 replication in chronically infected T-cells and primary GECs, respectively. All together, our results suggest that the use of anti-inflammatory compounds such as curcumin may offer a viable alternative for the prevention and/or control of HIV replication in the FGT. PMID:25856395

  18. X-ray structures of the hexameric building block of the HIV capsid.

    PubMed

    Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Kelly, Brian N; Hua, Yuanzi; Whitby, Frank G; Stout, C David; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hill, Christopher P; Yeager, Mark

    2009-06-26

    The mature capsids of HIV and other retroviruses organize and package the viral genome and its associated enzymes for delivery into host cells. The HIV capsid is a fullerene cone: a variably curved, closed shell composed of approximately 250 hexamers and exactly 12 pentamers of the viral CA protein. We devised methods for isolating soluble, assembly-competent CA hexamers and derived four crystallographically independent models that define the structure of this capsid assembly unit at atomic resolution. A ring of six CA N-terminal domains form an apparently rigid core, surrounded by an outer ring of C-terminal domains. Mobility of the outer ring appears to be an underlying mechanism for generating the variably curved lattice in authentic capsids. Hexamer-stabilizing interfaces are highly hydrated, and this property may be key to the formation of quasi-equivalent interactions within hexamers and pentamers. The structures also clarify the molecular basis for capsid assembly inhibition and should facilitate structure-based drug design strategies.

  19. X-Ray Structures of the Hexameric Building Block of the HIV Capsid

    SciTech Connect

    Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Kelly, Brian N.; Hua, Yuanzi; Whitby, Frank G.; Stout, C. David; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.; Yeager, Mark

    2009-09-11

    The mature capsids of HIV and other retroviruses organize and package the viral genome and its associated enzymes for delivery into host cells. The HIV capsid is a fullerene cone: a variably curved, closed shell composed of approximately 250 hexamers and exactly 12 pentamers of the viral CA protein. We devised methods for isolating soluble, assembly-competent CA hexamers and derived four crystallographically independent models that define the structure of this capsid assembly unit at atomic resolution. A ring of six CA N-terminal domains form an apparently rigid core, surrounded by an outer ring of C-terminal domains. Mobility of the outer ring appears to be an underlying mechanism for generating the variably curved lattice in authentic capsids. Hexamer-stabilizing interfaces are highly hydrated, and this property may be key to the formation of quasi-equivalent interactions within hexamers and pentamers. The structures also clarify the molecular basis for capsid assembly inhibition and should facilitate structure-based drug design strategies.

  20. X-ray Structures of the Hexameric Building Block of the HIV Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Kelly, Brian N.; Hua, Yuanzi; Whitby, Frank G.; Stout, C. David; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.; Yeager, Mark

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The mature capsids of HIV and other retroviruses organize and package the viral genome and its associated enzymes for delivery into host cells. The HIV capsid is a fullerene cone: a variably curved, closed shell composed of approximately 250 hexamers and exactly 12 pentamers of the viral CA protein. We devised methods for isolating soluble, assembly-competent CA hexamers and derived four crystallographically independent models that define the structure of this capsid assembly unit at atomic resolution. A ring of six CA N-terminal domains form an apparently rigid core, surrounded by an outer ring of C-terminal domains. Mobility of the outer ring appears to be an underlying mechanism for generating the variably curved lattice in authentic capsids. Hexamer-stabilizing interfaces are highly hydrated, and this property may be key to forming quasi-equivalent interactions within hexamers and pentamers. The structures also clarify the molecular basis for capsid assembly inhibition, and should facilitate structure-based drug design strategies. PMID:19523676

  1. Amyloid-binding small molecules efficiently block SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of virus infection)- and semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Joanna S; Brown, Caitlin; Capule, Christina C; Rubinshtein, Mark; Doran, Todd M; Srivastava, Rajesh K; Feng, Changyong; Nilsson, Bradley L; Yang, Jerry; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2010-11-12

    Semen was recently shown to contain amyloid fibrils formed from a self-assembling peptide fragment of the protein prostatic acid phosphatase. These amyloid fibrils, termed semen-derived enhancer of virus infection, or SEVI, have been shown to strongly enhance HIV infectivity and may play an important role in sexual transmission of HIV, making them a potential microbicide target. One novel approach to target these fibrils is the use of small molecules known to intercalate into the structure of amyloid fibrils, such as derivatives of thioflavin-T. Here, we show that the amyloid-binding small molecule BTA-EG(6) (the hexa(ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline) is able to bind SEVI fibrils and effectively inhibit both SEVI-mediated and semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection. BTA-EG(6) also blocks the interactions of SEVI with HIV-1 virions and HIV-1 target cells but does not cause any inflammation or toxicity to cervical epithelial cells. These results suggest that an amyloid-binding small molecule may have utility as a microbicide, or microbicidal supplement, for HIV-1.

  2. Amyloid-binding Small Molecules Efficiently Block SEVI (Semen-derived Enhancer of Virus Infection)- and Semen-mediated Enhancement of HIV-1 Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Joanna S.; Brown, Caitlin; Capule, Christina C.; Rubinshtein, Mark; Doran, Todd M.; Srivastava, Rajesh K.; Feng, Changyong; Nilsson, Bradley L.; Yang, Jerry; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Semen was recently shown to contain amyloid fibrils formed from a self-assembling peptide fragment of the protein prostatic acid phosphatase. These amyloid fibrils, termed semen-derived enhancer of virus infection, or SEVI, have been shown to strongly enhance HIV infectivity and may play an important role in sexual transmission of HIV, making them a potential microbicide target. One novel approach to target these fibrils is the use of small molecules known to intercalate into the structure of amyloid fibrils, such as derivatives of thioflavin-T. Here, we show that the amyloid-binding small molecule BTA-EG6 (the hexa(ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline) is able to bind SEVI fibrils and effectively inhibit both SEVI-mediated and semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection. BTA-EG6 also blocks the interactions of SEVI with HIV-1 virions and HIV-1 target cells but does not cause any inflammation or toxicity to cervical epithelial cells. These results suggest that an amyloid-binding small molecule may have utility as a microbicide, or microbicidal supplement, for HIV-1. PMID:20833717

  3. HIV-1 Fusion Is Blocked through Binding of GB Virus C E2D Peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 Disulfide Loop

    PubMed Central

    Eissmann, Kristin; Mueller, Sebastian; Sticht, Heinrich; Jung, Susan; Zou, Peng; Jiang, Shibo; Gross, Andrea; Eichler, Jutta; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Reil, Heide

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C), since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:23349893

  4. HIV-1 fusion is blocked through binding of GB Virus C E2-derived peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop [corrected].

    PubMed

    Eissmann, Kristin; Mueller, Sebastian; Sticht, Heinrich; Jung, Susan; Zou, Peng; Jiang, Shibo; Gross, Andrea; Eichler, Jutta; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Reil, Heide

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C), since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  5. Vaccine-induced plasma IgA specific for the C1 region of the HIV-1 envelope blocks binding and effector function of IgG

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Fong, Youyi; Chen, Xi; Poling, Brigid; Nicholson, Cindo O.; Zhang, Ruijun; Lu, Xiaozhi; Parks, Robert; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Gilbert, Peter B.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of correlates of risk of infection in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial demonstrated that plasma IgG against the HIV-1 envelope (Env) variable region 1 and 2 inversely correlated with risk, whereas HIV-1 Env-specific plasma IgA responses directly correlated with risk. In the secondary analysis, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was another inverse correlate of risk, but only in the presence of low plasma IgA Env-specific antibodies. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that IgA could attenuate the protective effect of IgG responses through competition for the same Env binding sites. We report that Env-specific plasma IgA/IgG ratios are higher in infected than in uninfected vaccine recipients in RV144. Moreover, Env-specific IgA antibodies from RV144 vaccinees blocked the binding of ADCC-mediating mAb to HIV-1 Env glycoprotein 120 (gp120). An Env-specific monomeric IgA mAb isolated from an RV144 vaccinee also inhibited the ability of natural killer cells to kill HIV-1–infected CD4+ T cells coated with RV144-induced IgG antibodies. We show that monomeric Env-specific IgA, as part of postvaccination polyclonal antibody response, may modulate vaccine-induced immunity by diminishing ADCC effector function. PMID:23661056

  6. Transcytosis-blocking abs elicited by an oligomeric immunogen based on the membrane proximal region of HIV-1 gp41 target non-neutralizing epitopes.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Griffin, Tagan A; Mittman, Michele; Doran, Jeffrey D; Alfsen, Annette; Montefiori, David C; Hanson, Carl V; Bomsel, Morgane; Mor, Tsafrir S

    2008-05-01

    CTB-MPR(649-684), a translational fusion protein consisting of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and residues 649 684 of gp41 membrane proximal region (MPR), is a candidate vaccine aimed at blocking early steps of HIV-1 mucosal transmission. Bacterially produced CTB MPR(649-684) was purified to homogeneity by two affinity chromatography steps. Similar to gp41 and derivatives thereof, the MPR domain can specifically and reversibly self-associate. The affinities of the broadly-neutralizing monoclonal Abs 4E10 and 2F5 to CTB MPR(649-684) were equivalent to their nanomolar affinities toward an MPR peptide. The fusion protein's affinity to GM1 ganglioside was comparable to that of native CTB. Rabbits immunized with CTB-MPR(649-684) raised only a modest level of anti-MPR(649-684) Abs. However, a prime-boost immunization with CTB-MPR(649-684) and a second MPR(649-684)-based immunogen elicited a more productive anti-MPR(649-684) antibody response. These Abs strongly blocked the epithelial transcytosis of a primary subtype B HIV-1 isolate in a human tight epithelial model, expanding our previously reported results using a clade D virus. The Abs recognized epitopes at the N-terminal portion of the MPR peptide, away from the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes and were not effective in neutralizing infection of CD4+ cells. These results indicate distinct vulnerabilities of two separate interactions of HIV-1 with human cells - Abs against the C-terminal portion of the MPR can neutralize CD4+-dependent infection, while Abs targeting the MPR's N-terminal portion can effectively block galactosyl ceramide dependent transcytosis. We propose that Abs induced by MPR(649-684)-based immunogens may provide broad protective value independent of infection neutralization.

  7. Monoclonal And Single Domain Antibodies Targeting β-Integrin Subunits Block Sexual Transmission of HIV-1 in in vitro and in vivo Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Guedon, Janet Tai; Luo, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Markham, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to prevention regimens for gel-based anti-HIV-1 microbicides has been a major obstacle to more effective pre-exposure prophylaxis. Concern persists that the antiretroviral drug containing microbicides might promote development of antiretroviral resistance. Methods Using in vitro transwell systems and a humanized mouse model of HIV-1 sexual transmission, we examined, as candidate microbicides, antibodies targeting the heterodimeric leukocyte function associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), a non-virally encoded protein acquired by the virus that also plays a critical role cell movement across endothelial and epithelial barriers. LFA-1 specific single domain variable regions from alpaca heavy-chain only antibodies (VHH) were identified and evaluated for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell system. Results Monoclonal antibodies targeting the CD11a and CD18 components of LFA-1 significantly reduced cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 transmission in the in vitro transwell culture system and prevented virus transmission in the humanized mouse model of vaginal transmission. The broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody b12 was unable to block transmission of cell-free virus. CD11a-specific VHH were isolated and expressed and the purified variable region protein domains reduced in vitro transepithelial transmission with an efficacy comparable to that of the CD11a monoclonal antibody. Conclusions Targeting integrins acquired by HIV-1 during budding and which are critical to interactions between epithelial cells and lymphocytes can reduce viral movement across epithelial barriers and prevent transmission in a humanized mouse model of sexual transmission. VHH capable of being produced by transformed bacteria can significantly reduce transepithelial virus transmission in in vitro model systems. PMID:25828964

  8. Passive transfer of modest titers of potent and broadly neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies block SHIV infection in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Shingai, Masashi; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Nason, Martha C.; Montefiori, David; Moldt, Brian; Poignard, Pascal; Diskin, Ron; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Cetrulo Lorenzi, Julio Cesar; Gazumyan, Anna; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that effective human vaccines directed against viral pathogens elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The passive transfer of anti–HIV-1 NAbs conferring sterilizing immunity to macaques has been used to determine the plasma neutralization titers, which must be present at the time of exposure, to prevent acquisition of SIV/HIV chimeric virus (SHIV) infections. We administered five recently isolated potent and broadly acting anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rhesus macaques and challenged them intrarectally 24 h later with either of two different R5-tropic SHIVs. By combining the results obtained from 60 challenged animals, we determined that the protective neutralization titer in plasma preventing virus infection in 50% of the exposed monkeys was relatively modest (∼1:100) and potentially achievable by vaccination. PMID:25155019

  9. Medicinal chemistry of small molecule CCR5 antagonists for blocking HIV-1 entry: a review of structural evolution.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Dujuan; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a member of G protein-coupled receptors superfamily, plays an important role in the HIV-1 entry process. Antagonism of this receptor finally leads to the inhibition of R5 strains of HIV entry into the human cells. The identification of CCR5 antagonists as antiviral agents will provide more option for HAART. Now, more than a decade after the first small molecule CCR5 inhibitor was discovered, great achievements have been made. In this article, we will give a brief introduction of several series of small molecule CCR5 antagonists, focused on their appealing structure evolution, essential SAR information and thereof the enlightenment of strategies on CCR5 inhibitors design.

  10. Comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA) for virtual combinatorial library screening of styrylquinoline HIV-1 blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, Halina; Polanski, Jaroslaw; Gieleciak, Rafal; Musiol, Robert; Tabak, Dominik; Podeszwa, Barbara; Bak, Andrzej; Palka, Anna; Mouscadet, Jean-Francois; Gasteiger, Johann; Le Bret, Marc

    2006-12-01

    We used comparative molecular surface analysis to design molecules for the synthesis as part of the search for new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. We analyzed the virtual combinatorial library (VCL) constituted from various moieties of styrylquinoline and styrylquinazoline inhibitors. Since imines can be applied in a strategy of dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC), we also tested similar compounds in which the -C=N- or -N=C- linker connected the heteroaromatic and aromatic moieties. We then used principal component analysis (PCA) or self-organizing maps (SOM), namely, the Kohonen neural networks to obtain a clustering plot analyzing the diversity of the VCL formed. Previously synthesized compounds of known activity, used as molecular probes, were projected onto this plot, which provided a set of promising virtual drugs. Moreover, we further modified the above mentioned VCL to include the single bond linker -C-N- or -N-C-. This allowed increasing compound stability but expanded also the diversity between the available molecular probes and virtual targets. The application of the CoMSA with SOM indicated important differences between such compounds and active molecular probes. We synthesized such compounds to verify the computational predictions.

  11. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  12. PVP-coated silver nanoparticles block the transmission of cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 in human cervical culture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that polyvinylpyrrolidone coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-coated AgNPs) have antiviral activity against HIV-1 at non-cytotoxic concentrations. These particles also demonstrate broad spectrum virucidal activity by preventing the interaction of HIV-1 gp120 and cellular CD4, thereby inhibiting fusion or entry of the virus into the host cell. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of PVP-coated AgNPs as a potential topical vaginal microbicide to prevent transmission of HIV-1 infection using human cervical culture, an in vitro model that simulates in vivo conditions. Results When formulated into a non-spermicidal gel (Replens) at a concentration of 0.15 mg/mL, PVP-coated AgNPs prevented the transmission of cell-associated HIV-1 and cell-free HIV-1 isolates. Importantly, PVP-coated AgNPs were not toxic to the explant, even when the cervical tissues were exposed continuously to 0.15 mg/mL of PVP-coated AgNPs for 48 h. Only 1 min of PVP-coated AgNPs pretreatment to the explant was required to prevent transmission of HIV-1. Pre-treatment of the cervical explant with 0.15 mg/mL PVP-coated AgNPs for 20 min followed by extensive washing prevented the transmission of HIV-1 in this model for 48 h. Conclusions A formulation of PVP-coated AgNPs homogenized in Replens gel acts rapidly to inhibit HIV-1 transmission after 1 min and offers long-lasting protection of the cervical tissue from infection for 48 h, with no evidence of cytotoxicity observed in the explants. Based on this data, PVP-coated AgNPs are a promising microbicidal candidate for use in topical vaginal/cervical agents to prevent HIV-1 transmission, and further research is warranted. PMID:20626911

  13. ADS-J1 inhibits semen-derived amyloid fibril formation and blocks fibril-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tianrong; Li, Wenjuan; Chen, Jinquan; Yu, Fei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Qian; Yu, Ruizhe; Li, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Li, Lin; Tan, Suiyi; Liu, Shuwen

    2015-09-01

    Semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is composed of amyloid fibrils that can greatly enhance HIV-1 infectivity. By its cationic property, SEVI promotes viral sexual transmission by facilitating the attachment and internalization of HIV-1 to target cells. Therefore, semen-derived amyloid fibrils are potential targets for microbicide design. ADS-J1 is an anionic HIV-1 entry inhibitor. In this study, we explored an additional function of ADS-J1: inhibition of SEVI fibril formation and blockage of SEVI-mediated enhancement of viral infection. We found that ADS-J1 bound to an amyloidogenic peptide fragment (PAP248-286, comprising amino acids 248 to 286 of the enzyme prostatic acid phosphatase), thereby inhibiting peptide assembly into amyloid fibrils. In addition, ADS-J1 binds to mature amyloid fibrils and antagonizes fibril-mediated enhancement of viral infection. Unlike cellulose sulfate, a polyanion that failed in clinical trial to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission, ADS-J1 shows no ability to facilitate fibril formation. More importantly, the combination of ADS-J1 with several antiretroviral drugs exhibited synergistic effects against HIV-1 infection in semen, with little cytotoxicity to vaginal epithelial cells. Our results suggest that ADS-J1 or a derivative may be incorporated into a combination microbicide for prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV-1. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. ADS-J1 Inhibits Semen-Derived Amyloid Fibril Formation and Blocks Fibril-Mediated Enhancement of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xun, Tianrong; Li, Wenjuan; Chen, Jinquan; Yu, Fei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Qian; Yu, Ruizhe; Li, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is composed of amyloid fibrils that can greatly enhance HIV-1 infectivity. By its cationic property, SEVI promotes viral sexual transmission by facilitating the attachment and internalization of HIV-1 to target cells. Therefore, semen-derived amyloid fibrils are potential targets for microbicide design. ADS-J1 is an anionic HIV-1 entry inhibitor. In this study, we explored an additional function of ADS-J1: inhibition of SEVI fibril formation and blockage of SEVI-mediated enhancement of viral infection. We found that ADS-J1 bound to an amyloidogenic peptide fragment (PAP248–286, comprising amino acids 248 to 286 of the enzyme prostatic acid phosphatase), thereby inhibiting peptide assembly into amyloid fibrils. In addition, ADS-J1 binds to mature amyloid fibrils and antagonizes fibril-mediated enhancement of viral infection. Unlike cellulose sulfate, a polyanion that failed in clinical trial to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission, ADS-J1 shows no ability to facilitate fibril formation. More importantly, the combination of ADS-J1 with several antiretroviral drugs exhibited synergistic effects against HIV-1 infection in semen, with little cytotoxicity to vaginal epithelial cells. Our results suggest that ADS-J1 or a derivative may be incorporated into a combination microbicide for prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:26055369

  15. Phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose oligomers as microbicides that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and block Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9 triggering by HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Fraietta, Joseph A; Mueller, Yvonne M; Do, Duc H; Holmes, Veronica M; Howett, Mary K; Lewis, Mark G; Boesteanu, Alina C; Alkan, Sefik S; Katsikis, Peter D

    2010-10-01

    Topical microbicides may prove to be an important strategy for preventing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. We examined the safety and efficacy of sequence-nonspecific phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose oligomers as potential novel microbicides. A short, 13-mer poly(T) phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (OPB-T) significantly inhibited infection of primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by high-titer HIV-1(Ba-L) and simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIV(mac251)). Continuous exposure of human vaginal and foreskin tissue explants to OPB-T showed no toxicity. An abasic 14-mer phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose backbone (PDB) demonstrated enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity relative to OPB-T and other homo-oligodeoxynucleotide analogs. When PDB was used to pretreat HIV-1, PDB was effective against R5 and X4 isolates at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of <1 μM in both PBMC and P4-R5 MAGI cell infections. PDB also reduced HIV-1 infectivity following the binding of virus to target cells. This novel topical microbicide candidate exhibited an excellent in vitro safety profile in human PBMC and endocervical epithelial cells. PDB also retained activity in hydroxyethylcellulose gel at pH 4.4 and after transition to a neutral pH and was stable in this formulation for 30 days at room temperature. Furthermore, the compound displayed potent antiviral activity following incubation with a Lactobacillus strain derived from normal vaginal flora. Most importantly, PDB can inhibit HIV-1-induced alpha interferon production. Phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose oligomers may therefore be promising microbicide candidates that inhibit HIV-1 infection and also dampen the inflammation which is critical for the initial spread of the virus.

  16. HIV-1 Vpu Blocks Recycling and Biosynthetic Transport of the Intrinsic Immunity Factor CD317/Tetherin To Overcome the Virion Release Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sarah; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Bitzegeio, Julia; Fackler, Oliver T.; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intrinsic immunity factor CD317 (BST-2/HM1.24/tetherin) imposes a barrier to HIV-1 release at the cell surface that can be overcome by the viral protein Vpu. Expression of Vpu results in a reduction of CD317 surface levels; however, the mechanism of this Vpu activity and its contribution to the virological antagonism are incompletely understood. Here, we characterized the influence of Vpu on major CD317 trafficking pathways using quantitative antibody-based endocytosis and recycling assays as well as a microinjection/microscopy-based kinetic de novo expression approach. We report that HIV-1 Vpu inhibited both the anterograde transport of newly synthesized CD317 and the recycling of CD317 to the cell surface, while the kinetics of CD317 endocytosis remained unaffected. Vpu trapped trafficking CD317 molecules at the trans-Golgi network, where the two molecules colocalized. The subversion of both CD317 transport pathways was dependent on the highly conserved diserine S52/S56 motif of Vpu; however, it did not require recruitment of the diserine motif interactor and substrate adaptor of the SCF-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, β-TrCP. Treatment of cells with the malaria drug primaquine resulted in a CD317 trafficking defect that mirrored that induced by Vpu. Importantly, primaquine could functionally replace Vpu as a CD317 antagonist and rescue HIV-1 particle release. PMID:21610122

  17. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  18. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  19. Improving Adaptive and Memory Immune Responses of an HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidate MVA-B by Deletion of Vaccinia Virus Genes (C6L and K7R) Blocking Interferon Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Arnáez, Pilar; Gómez, Carmen E.; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.; Esteban, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Poxvirus vector Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (termed MVA-B) is a promising HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate, as confirmed from results obtained in a prophylactic phase I clinical trial in humans. To improve the immunogenicity elicited by MVA-B, we have generated and characterized the innate immune sensing and the in vivo immunogenicity profile of a vector with a double deletion in two vaccinia virus (VACV) genes (C6L and K7R) coding for inhibitors of interferon (IFN) signaling pathways. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B deletion mutants (MVA-B ΔC6L and MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R) in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) showed an up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β, IFN-α/β-inducible genes, TNF-α, and other cytokines and chemokines. A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice revealed that these MVA-B deletion mutants were able to improve the magnitude and quality of HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell adaptive and memory immune responses, which were mostly mediated by CD8+ T cells of an effector phenotype, with MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R being the most immunogenic virus recombinant. CD4+ T cell responses were mainly directed against Env, while GPN-specific CD8+ T cell responses were induced preferentially by the MVA-B deletion mutants. Furthermore, antibody levels to Env in the memory phase were slightly enhanced by the MVA-B deletion mutants compared to the parental MVA-B. These findings revealed that double deletion of VACV genes that act blocking intracellularly the IFN signaling pathway confers an immunological benefit, inducing innate immune responses and increases in the magnitude, quality and durability of the HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses. Our observations highlighted the immunomodulatory role of the VACV genes C6L and K7R, and that targeting common pathways, like IRF3/IFN-β signaling, could be a general strategy to improve the immunogenicity of poxvirus

  20. Improving Adaptive and Memory Immune Responses of an HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidate MVA-B by Deletion of Vaccinia Virus Genes (C6L and K7R) Blocking Interferon Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Arnáez, Pilar; Gómez, Carmen E; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Poxvirus vector Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (termed MVA-B) is a promising HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate, as confirmed from results obtained in a prophylactic phase I clinical trial in humans. To improve the immunogenicity elicited by MVA-B, we have generated and characterized the innate immune sensing and the in vivo immunogenicity profile of a vector with a double deletion in two vaccinia virus (VACV) genes (C6L and K7R) coding for inhibitors of interferon (IFN) signaling pathways. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B deletion mutants (MVA-B ΔC6L and MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R) in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) showed an up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β, IFN-α/β-inducible genes, TNF-α, and other cytokines and chemokines. A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice revealed that these MVA-B deletion mutants were able to improve the magnitude and quality of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell adaptive and memory immune responses, which were mostly mediated by CD8(+) T cells of an effector phenotype, with MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R being the most immunogenic virus recombinant. CD4(+) T cell responses were mainly directed against Env, while GPN-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were induced preferentially by the MVA-B deletion mutants. Furthermore, antibody levels to Env in the memory phase were slightly enhanced by the MVA-B deletion mutants compared to the parental MVA-B. These findings revealed that double deletion of VACV genes that act blocking intracellularly the IFN signaling pathway confers an immunological benefit, inducing innate immune responses and increases in the magnitude, quality and durability of the HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses. Our observations highlighted the immunomodulatory role of the VACV genes C6L and K7R, and that targeting common pathways, like IRF3/IFN-β signaling, could be a general strategy to improve the immunogenicity

  1. C-terminal HIV-1 transframe p6* tetra-peptide blocks enhanced Gag cleavage incurred by leucine zipper replacement of a deleted p6* domain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Hsien; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) functions as a homodimer mediating virus maturation following virus budding. Gag-Pol dimerization is believed to trigger embedded PR activation by promoting PR dimer formation. Early PR activation can lead to markedly reduced virus yields due to premature Gag cleavage. The p6* peptide, located between Gag and PR, is believed to ensure virus production by preventing early PR maturation. Studies aimed at finding supporting evidence for this proposal are limited due to a reading frame overlap between p6* and the p6gag budding domain. To determine if p6* affects virus production via the modulation of PR activation, we engineered multiple constructs derived from Dp6*PR (an assembly- and processing-competent construct with Pol fused at the inactivated PR C-terminus). The data indicate that a p6* deletion adjacent to active PR significantly impaired virus processing. We also observed that the insertion of a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization motif in the deleted region eliminated virus production in a PR activity-dependent manner, suggesting that the LZ insertion triggered premature PR activation by facilitating PR dimer formation. As few as four C-terminal p6* residues remaining at the p6*/PR junction were sufficient to restore virus yields, with a Gag processing profile similar to that of the wild type. Our study provides supporting evidence in a virus assembly context that the C-terminal p6* tetra-peptide plays a role in preventing premature PR maturation.IMPORTANCE Supporting evidence is lacking for the assumption that p6* retards PR maturation in the context of virus assembly. We found that replacing p6* with a leucine-zipper peptide abolished virus assembly due to the significant enhancement of Gag cleavage. However, as few as four C-terminal p6* residues remaining in the deleted region were sufficient for significant PR release, as well as for counteracting leucine zipper-incurred premature Gag cleavage. Our data provide evidence that (a) p6

  2. Advances in HIV microbicide development.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Joanna S; Easterhoff, David; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-12-01

    There is an urgent need control the spread of the global HIV pandemic. A microbicide, or topical drug applied to the mucosal environment to block transmission, is a promising HIV prevention strategy. The development of a safe and efficacious microbicide requires a thorough understanding of the mucosal environment and its role in HIV transmission. Knowledge of the key events in viral infection identifies points at which the virus might be most effectively targeted by a microbicide. The cervicovaginal and rectal mucosa play an important role in the innate defense against HIV, and microbicides must not interfere with these functions. In this review, we discuss the current research on HIV microbicide development.

  3. Commentary on the role of treatment-related HIV compensatory mutations on increasing virulence: new discoveries twenty years since the clinical testing of protease inhibitors to block HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Arts, Eric J

    2012-10-03

    Approximately 20 years has passed since the first human trial with HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors set the stage for combination therapy in the mid-1990s but are now rarely used in first-line combination therapy and reserved for salvage therapy. Initially, resistance to protease inhibitors was deemed unlikely due to the small enzymatic target with limited genetic diversity, the extended drug binding site in protease, and the need to cleave multiple sites in the HIV-1 precursor proteins. However, a highly protease inhibitor-resistant virus can emerge during treatment and is found to harbor a collection of primary drug-resistant mutations near the drug and/or substrate binding site as well as secondary mutations that compensate for fitness loss. For years, the research field has debated the impact of these secondary mutations on the emergence rates of high-level protease inhibitor resistance. A recent study poses a more pertinent question, related to disease progression in patients newly infected with a virus harboring secondary protease inhibitor-associated polymorphisms. The authors of that study show that increased rates of disease progression, inferred by increased viral loads and decreased CD4 cell counts, correlate with a fitness score of the infecting virus. The modeled fitness scores increased with an accumulation of these secondary protease inhibitors mutations, and not because of any one specific polymorphism.

  4. ADS-J1 Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Interacting with gp120 and Does Not Block Fusion-Active gp41 Core Formation▿

    PubMed Central

    González-Ortega, Emmanuel; Mena, Maria-Pau; Permanyer, Marc; Ballana, Ester; Clotet, Bonaventura; Esté, José A.

    2010-01-01

    We had shown that virus resistance to ADS-J1 was associated with amino acid changes in the envelope glycoprotein, mostly located in the gp120 coding region. Time-of-addition and endocytic virus transfer assays clearly demonstrated that ADS-J1 behaved as a gp120 inhibitor. ADS-J1-resistant virus was cross-resistant to the polyanion dextran sulfate, and recombination of gp120 recovered only the ADS-J1-resistant phenotype. In summary, ADS-J1 blocks an early step of virus entry that appears to be driven by gp120 alone. PMID:20643898

  5. ADS-J1 inhibits HIV-1 entry by interacting with gp120 and does not block fusion-active gp41 core formation.

    PubMed

    González-Ortega, Emmanuel; Mena, Maria-Pau; Permanyer, Marc; Ballana, Ester; Clotet, Bonaventura; Esté, José A

    2010-10-01

    We had shown that virus resistance to ADS-J1 was associated with amino acid changes in the envelope glycoprotein, mostly located in the gp120 coding region. Time-of-addition and endocytic virus transfer assays clearly demonstrated that ADS-J1 behaved as a gp120 inhibitor. ADS-J1-resistant virus was cross-resistant to the polyanion dextran sulfate, and recombination of gp120 recovered only the ADS-J1-resistant phenotype. In summary, ADS-J1 blocks an early step of virus entry that appears to be driven by gp120 alone.

  6. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  7. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  8. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  9. HIV-1 and HIV-2 LTR nucleotide sequences: assessment of the alignment by N-block presentation, "retroviral signatures" of overrepeated oligonucleotides, and a probable important role of scrambled stepwise duplications/deletions in molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Laprevotte, I; Pupin, M; Coward, E; Didier, G; Terzian, C; Devauchelle, C; Hénaut, A

    2001-07-01

    Previous analyses of retroviral nucleotide sequences, suggest a so-called "scrambled duplicative stepwise molecular evolution" (many sectors with successive duplications/deletions of short and longer motifs) that could have stemmed from one or several starter tandemly repeated short sequence(s). In the present report, we tested this hypothesis by focusing on the long terminal repeats (LTRs) (and flanking sequences) of 24 human and 3 simian immunodeficiency viruses. By using a calculation strategy applicable to short sequences, we found consensus overrepresented motifs (often containing CTG or CAG) that were congruent with the previously defined "retroviral signature." We also show many local repetition patterns that are significant when compared with simply shuffled sequences. First- and second-order Markov chain analyses demonstrate that a major portion of the overrepresented oligonucleotides can be predicted from the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences, but by no means can biological mechanisms be deduced from these results: some of the listed local repetitions remain significant against dinucleotide-conserving shuffled sequences; together with previous results, this suggests that interspersed and/or local mononucleotide and oligonucleotide repetitions could have biased the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences. We searched for suggestive evolutionary patterns by scrutinizing a reliable multiple alignment of the 27 sequences. A manually constructed alignment based on homology blocks was in good agreement with the polypeptide alignment in the coding sectors and has been exhaustively assessed by using a multiplied alphabet obtained by the promising mathematical strategy called the N-block presentation (taking into account the environment of each nucleotide in a sequence). Sector by sector, we hypothesize many successive duplication/deletion scenarios that fit our previous evolutionary hypotheses. This suggests an important duplication/deletion role for

  10. Neuromuscular block.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them specially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are specially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of special interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors.

  11. Block People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rayma

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an activity in which students in an after-school art class drew one another on pieces of 2-by-4 scrap lumber in order to create a class portrait in three dimensions. Stresses that the portraits on the wood blocks were done in-the-round, or each side was covered. (CMK)

  12. Block Busters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noblitt, Bill

    1994-01-01

    A number of college publications editors and designers share their secrets for coping with writer's block and other forms of creative anxiety. Suggested techniques include a change of scenery, guarding one's time, sharing ideas with others, thorough research, and organization. (MSE)

  13. HIV Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, ...

  14. F(ab')2 fragment of a gp41 NHR-trimer-induced IgM monoclonal antibody neutralizes HIV-1 infection and blocks viral fusion by targeting the conserved gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Wei, Meili; Chen, Yanxia; Xiong, Weiliang; Yu, Fei; Qi, Zhi; Jiang, Shibo; Pan, Chungen

    2013-11-01

    Using a recombinant protein N46FdFc that mimics the HIV-1 gp41 N-helix trimer to immunize mice, we identified the first IgM monoclonal antibody 18D3 that specifically bound to the conserved gp41 pocket. Its F(ab')2 fragment potently inhibited HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and neutralized infection by laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes and tropism, including the T20-resistant variants. This F(ab')2 fragment can be used to develop a bispecific broad neutralizing monoclonal antibody or HIV-1 inactivator as a novel immunotherapeutic for treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  15. [Human defensins: prophylaxis and therapy against HIV?].

    PubMed

    Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    Human defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides with prophylactic and therapeutic potential against HIV. The ability of defensins to bind the HIV envelope could be exploited to design topic agents that block viral entry into exposed mucosa. Additionally, their capacity to inhibit viral replication, complement system activation, dendritic and memory T cells chemoattraction, together with peptide engineering could bring about new and better antiretroviral drugs. Clinical trials could be demonstrated the efficacy of defensins against HIV in clinical practice.

  16. Advances in HIV Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Joanna S.; Easterhoff, David; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a way to control the spread of the global HIV pandemic. A microbicide, or topical drug applied to the mucosal environment to block transmission, is a promising HIV prevention strategy. The development of a safe and efficacious microbicide requires a thorough understanding of the mucosal environment and it's role in HIV transmission. Knowledge of the key events in viral infection identifies points at which the virus might be most effectively targeted by a microbicide. The cervicovaginal and rectal mucosa play an important role in the innate defense against HIV, and microbicides must not interfere with these functions. In this review we discuss the current research on HIV microbicide development. PMID:22098355

  17. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Stages of HIV Infection How Does HIV Progress in Your Body? Without treatment, HIV advances ... are the three stages of HIV infection: Acute HIV Infection Stage Within 2-4 weeks after HIV ...

  18. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  19. Treatment for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Treatment » Treatment Decisions and HIV HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Home ... here Enter ZIP code here Treatment Decisions and HIV for Veterans and the Public Treatment for HIV: ...

  20. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nalla, Arun K.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV. PMID:28536375

  1. Habitual Prospective Memory in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Katie L.; Weber, Erica; Morgan, Erin E.; Loft, Shayne; Cushman, Clint; Villalobos, Javier; Johnston, Elaine; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are associated with deficits in prospective memory (PM). However, most PM research in HIV has used single-event tasks as opposed to habitual PM paradigms, which may be more relevant to clinical populations for whom many healthcare behaviors must be performed both frequently and routinely. The current study examined habitual PM and its associations with real-world functioning outcomes in 36 HIV+ individuals with HAND (HAND+), 70 HIV+ individuals without HAND (HAND-), and 115 HIV- individuals. The ongoing task consisted of 24 one-minute Stroop trial blocks in which the emotive and cognitive load was manipulated. The habitual PM task required participants to press the spacebar once per block, but only after twenty seconds had elapsed. A series of MANOVAs covarying for relevant clinicodemographic factors revealed a main effect of study group on habitual PM, such that the HAND+ cohort made significantly more repetition errors compared to the HIV- and HAND- groups, particularly during early trial blocks. There was no main effect of ongoing task demands. There was no interaction between HAND group and task demands. Within the entire HIV+ sample, poorer habitual PM was associated with deficits in learning and dysfunction in real-world outcomes, including medication nonadherence and failures on a naturalistic healthcare task. Findings indicate that HAND may be associated with deficient internal source monitoring or temporal discrimination for habitual PM output that may play a critical role in real-world functioning, including HIV disease management. PMID:25730731

  2. HIV Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibody tests, combination or fourth-generation tests, and nucleic acid tests (NAT). HIV tests may be performed on ... retested 3 months after your possible exposure. A nucleic acid test (NAT) looks for HIV in the blood. ...

  3. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  4. Adenovirus Vectors Block Human Immunodeficiency Virus–1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages by Inhibition of the Long Terminal Repeat

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Robert J.; Santiago, Francisco; Rahaghi, Franck; Michaels, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Heterologous viruses may transactivate or suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–1 replication. An adenovirus type 5 gene transfer vector (Ad5) HIV-1 vaccine was recently evaluated in a clinical trial, without efficacy. In this context, it is relevant to ask what effect Ad vectors have on HIV-1 replication, particularly in cells that are part of the innate immune system. Infection of HIV-1–infected human alveolar macrophages (AMs) obtained from HIV-1+ individuals with an Ad vector containing no transgene (AdNull) resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of endogenous HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 replication in normal AMs infected with HIV-1 in vitro was inhibited by AdNull with a similar dose response. Ad reduced AM HIV-1 replication up to 14 days after HIV-1 infection. Fully HIV-1–infected AMs were treated with 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine, after which Ad infection still inhibited HIV-1 replication, suggesting a postentry step was affected. Substantial HIV-1 DNA was still produced after Ad infection, as quantified by TaqMan real-time PCR, suggesting that the replication block occurred after reverse transcription. AdNull blocked HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) transcription, as assessed by an vesicular stomatitis virus G protein pseudotyped HIV-1 LTR luciferase construct. The formation of HIV-1 DNA integrated into the host chromosome was not inhibited by Ad, as quantified by a two-step TaqMan real-time PCR assay, implying a postintegration block to HIV-1 replication. These data indicate that Ad vectors are inhibitory to HIV-1 replication in human AMs based, in part, on their ability to inhibit LTR-driven transcription. PMID:19805482

  5. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  6. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Antiretroviral Drug Regimens.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral drug regimens has transformed HIV infection from a fatal illness into a manageable chronic condition. All patients with HIV infection should be considered for antiretroviral therapy, regardless of CD4 count or HIV viral load, for individual benefit and to prevent HIV transmission. Antiretroviral drugs affect HIV in several ways: entry inhibitors block HIV entry into CD4 T cells; nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription from RNA to DNA via chain-terminating proteins; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription through enzymatic inhibition; integrase strand transfer inhibitors block integration of viral DNA into cellular DNA; protease inhibitors block maturation and production of the virus. Current guidelines recommend six combination regimens for initial therapy. Five are based on tenofovir and emtricitabine; the other uses abacavir and lamivudine. Five include integrase strand transfer inhibitors. HIV specialists should assist with treating patients with complicated HIV infection, including patients with treatment-resistant HIV infection, coinfection with hepatitis B or C virus, pregnancy, childhood infections, severe opportunistic infections, complex drug interactions, significant drug toxicity, or comorbidities. Family physicians can treat most patients with HIV infection effectively by choosing appropriate treatment regimens, monitoring patients closely, and retaining patients in care. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  7. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  8. Developing a Successful HIV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Robert C

    2015-07-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome integration indicates that persistent sterilizing immunity will be needed for a successful vaccine candidate. This suggests a need for broad antibodies targeting the Env protein. Immunogens targeting gp120 have been developed that block infection in monkeys and mimic the modest success of the RV144 clinical trial in that protection is short-lived following a decline in antibody-depending cell-mediated cytotoxicity-like antibodies. Attempts to induce antibody persistence have been complicated by a loss of efficacy, presumably by increasing the number of HIV-target cells. The key seems to be achieving an immune balance.

  9. HIV increases HCV-induced hepatocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae Young; Shao, Run-Xuan; Lin, Wenyu; Weinberg, Ethan; Chung, Woo Jin; Tsai, Wei Lun; Zhao, Hong; Goto, Kaku; Zhang, Leiliang; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Jilg, Nikolaus; Peng, Lee F.; Brockman, Mark A.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims HCV related liver disease is one of the most important complications in persons with HIV, with accelerated fibrosis progression in coinfected persons compared to those with HCV alone. We hypothesized that HIV coinfection increases HCV related hepatocyte apoptosis and that HCV and HIV influence TRAIL signaling in hepatocytes. Methods We analyzed the effect of HIV on JFH1-infected Huh 7.5.1 cells. Apoptosis was measured by Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay and Western blot for cleaved PARP. TRAIL, TRAIL receptor 1 (DR4) and 2 (DR5) mRNA and protein levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We also investigated activation of caspase pathways using caspase inhibitors and assessed expression of Bid and cytochrome C. Results We found increased caspase 3/7 activity and cleaved PARP in JFH1 HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence of heat-inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Both DR4 and DR5 mRNA and protein expression were increased in JFH1-infected cells in the presence of inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Pancaspase, Caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibition blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, inactivated HIV and HCV plus inactivated HIV. A caspase-9 inhibitor blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, HIV and HCV-HIV comparably to pancaspase and caspase-8 inhibitors. HCV induced the activation of Bid cleavage and cytochrome C release. The addition of HIV substantially augmented this induction. Conclusions Our findings indicate that hepatocyte apoptosis is increased in the presence of HCV and HIV compared to HCV or HIV alone, and that this increase is mediated by DR4 and DR5 up-regulation. They provide an additional mechanism for the observed accelerated liver disease progression observed in HCV-HIV coinfection. PMID:21146890

  10. A general approach to chiral building blocks via direct amino acid-catalyzed cascade three-component reductive alkylations: formal total synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors, antibiotic agglomerins, brefeldin A, and (R)-gamma-hexanolide.

    PubMed

    Ramachary, Dhevalapally B; Vijayendar Reddy, Y

    2010-01-01

    Multicatalysis cascade (MCC) process for the synthesis of highly substituted chiral building blocks (2-alkyl-CH-acids, 2-alkylcyclohexane-1,3-diones, 2-alkylcyclopentane-1,3-diones, and H-P ketone analogues) is presented based on the cascade three-component reductive alkylation's (TCRA) platform. Herein, we developed the high-yielding alkylation of a variety of CH-acids with (R)-glyceraldehyde acetonide/(S)-Garner aldehyde and Hantzsch ester through amino acid-catalyzed TCRA reaction without racemization at the alpha-position to carbonyl. Direct sequential combination of the L-proline-catalyzed TCRA reaction with other reactions like cascade alkylation/ketenization/esterification (A/K/E), alkylation/ketenization/esterification/alkylation (A/K/E/A), Brønsted acid-catalyzed cascade hydrolysis/lactonization/esterification (H/L/E), hydrolysis/esterification (H/E), hydrolysis/oxy-Michael/dehydration (H/OM/DH), and Robinson annulation (RA) of CH-acids, chiral aldehydes, Hantzsch ester, diazomethane, methyl vinyl ketone, various active olefins, and acetylenes furnished the highly functionalized chiral building blocks in good to high yields with excellent diastereoselectivities. In this context, many of the pharmaceutically applicable chiral building blocks were prepared via MCC reactions.

  11. 17β-estradiol protects primary macrophages against HIV infection through induction of interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Carley; Ding, Jian; Schmolke, Mirco; Rivera-Medina, Amariliz; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Chang, Theresa L

    2014-05-01

    Estrogen has been shown to increase resistance to HIV/SIV transmission by increasing the thickness of the genital epithelium. The immunological role of estrogen in HIV infection of primary target cells is less well characterized. We have found that primary macrophages are a target for anti-HIV activity of 17β-estradiol (E2). E2 did not affect surface expression of CD4 and HIV co-receptors nor HIV attachment to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). In addition, E2 treatment blocked infection by a co-receptor-independent HIV-1VSV-G pseudotyped virus. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of HIV reverse transcribed DNA products indicated that E2 blocked HIV reverse transcription. E2 upregulated gene expression of interferons (IFNs) in MDMs from multiple donors. However, induction of host restriction factors APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, or SAMHD1 was not consistent, with exception of APOBEC3A. Anti-HIV activity of E2 was abolished in the presence of IFN-α neutralizing antibody, and was absent in bone marrow-derived macrophages from IFN-α receptor deficient mice. Interestingly, HIV overcame E2-mediated HIV inhibition by suppressing induction of IFNs when MDMs were exposed to HIV before E2 treatment. These results offer a new mechanism of E2 on HIV inhibition. Future studies on the interplay between HIV and E2-mediated innate immune responses will likely provide insights relevant for development of effective strategies for HIV prevention.

  12. Advertising HIV.

    PubMed

    Mougenez, Stephane; Chad, N'Djamena; Howe, John

    1995-04-05

    Think of advertising and what comes to mind, soap powders, motor cars, baked beans? All of these, of course, are heavily advertised, but what about HIV? Among the most durable of the government's advertisement campaigns have been the ones concerning HIV. Tens of millions of pounds have been spent telling the public of the presence and dangers of the virus.

  13. Learning with Large Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how large hollow blocks can meet many preschool children's learning needs through creative dramatic play, and also gives some guidelines on how these blocks can be constructed by parents and teachers. (BB)

  14. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  15. Living with Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Block First-degree heart block may ... whether you need ongoing care for your condition. Living With a Pacemaker People who have third-degree ...

  16. Effects of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms on HIV-1 susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommy E.; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Knowlton, Caitlin; Kim, Baek; Sawyer, Sara L.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-07-15

    SAMHD1 is a human restriction factor that prevents efficient infection of macrophages, dendritic cells and resting CD4+ T cells by HIV-1. Here we explored the antiviral activity and biochemical properties of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms. Our studies focused on human SAMHD1 polymorphisms that were previously identified as evolving under positive selection for rapid amino acid replacement during primate speciation. The different human SAMHD1 polymorphisms were tested for their ability to block HIV-1, HIV-2 and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). All studied SAMHD1 variants block HIV-1, HIV-2 and EIAV infection when compared to wild type. We found that these variants did not lose their ability to oligomerize or to bind RNA. Furthermore, all tested variants were susceptible to degradation by Vpx, and localized to the nuclear compartment. We tested the ability of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms to decrease the dNTP cellular levels. In agreement, none of the different SAMHD1 variants lost their ability to reduce cellular levels of dNTPs. Finally, we found that none of the tested human SAMHD1 polymorphisms affected the ability of the protein to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. - Highlights: • Human SAMHD1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms block HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms do not affect its ability to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms decrease the cellular levels of dNTPs.

  17. Arrange Time into Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepeda, Sally J.

    1999-01-01

    Block scheduling can help high school principals become staff-development leaders. It gives teachers more time to help individual students and contributes to improved achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. This paper describes the results of research on block scheduling in urban high schools and concludes that block scheduling can support…

  18. Blocked Tear Duct

    MedlinePlus

    Blocked tear duct Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff When you have a blocked tear duct, your tears can't drain normally, leaving you ... in the tear drainage system. A blocked tear duct is common in newborns. The condition usually gets ...

  19. SUN2 Overexpression Deforms Nuclear Shape and Inhibits HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Sonia; di Nunzio, Francesca; Kieffer, Camille; Porrot, Françoise; Opp, Silvana; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a previous screen of putative interferon-stimulated genes, SUN2 was shown to inhibit HIV-1 infection in an uncharacterized manner. SUN2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein belonging to the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton complex. We have analyzed here the role of SUN2 in HIV infection. We report that in contrast to what was initially thought, SUN2 is not induced by type I interferon, and that SUN2 silencing does not modulate HIV infection. However, SUN2 overexpression in cell lines and in primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells inhibits the replication of HIV but not murine leukemia virus or chikungunya virus. We identified HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains that are unaffected by SUN2, suggesting that the effect is specific to particular viral components or cofactors. Intriguingly, SUN2 overexpression induces a multilobular flower-like nuclear shape that does not impact cell viability and is similar to that of cells isolated from patients with HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia or with progeria. Nuclear shape changes and HIV inhibition both mapped to the nucleoplasmic domain of SUN2 that interacts with the nuclear lamina. This block to HIV replication occurs between reverse transcription and nuclear entry, and passaging experiments selected for a single-amino-acid change in capsid (CA) that leads to resistance to overexpressed SUN2. Furthermore, using chemical inhibition or silencing of cyclophilin A (CypA), as well as CA mutant viruses, we implicated CypA in the SUN2-imposed block to HIV infection. Our results demonstrate that SUN2 overexpression perturbs both nuclear shape and early events of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE Cells encode proteins that interfere with viral replication, a number of which have been identified in overexpression screens. SUN2 is a nuclear membrane protein that was shown to inhibit HIV infection in such a screen, but how it blocked HIV infection was not known. We show that SUN2 overexpression blocks the infection of certain

  20. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S.; Rennert, Paul D.; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C.; Freed, Eric O.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors. PMID:25136083

  1. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB. PMID:27366387

  2. The Space Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ciba-Geigy Corporation's "Space Block," technically known as TDT-177-51 Ren Shape epoxy model block, is a two-foot by two-foot by five- inch plastic block from which master models of the Space Shuttle protective tiles are cut by NC machines. Space Block is made of epoxy resin with low viscosity and slow curing time, enabling the large block to cure uniformly without cracking. Rockwell International uses master models of Shuttle tiles to check accuracy of NC machines accurately by comparing model dimensions with specifications. New epoxy resins are attracting broad interest as a replacement for traditional materials used in modeling auto, aerospace or other parts.

  3. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  4. HIV Viral Load

    MedlinePlus

    ... Count ; HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) ; HIV Drug Resistance ( Genotypic and Phenotypic ) All content on Lab Tests ... have their therapy changed. They should undergo HIV drug resistance testing to help in the selection of an ...

  5. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV and Mental Health HIV and Nutrition and Food Safety Print This ... from the following sources: From the Department of Health and Human Services: ... of Veterans Affairs: Treatment Decisions for HIV From the National ...

  6. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: HIV Screening Tests; AIDS Test; AIDS Screen; HIV Serology; ...

  7. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  8. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  9. HIV and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG HIV and Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs HIV ... HIV and Pregnancy FAQ113, July 2017 PDF Format HIV and Pregnancy Pregnancy What is human immunodeficiency virus ( ...

  10. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: March 2, 2017 Key ...

  11. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  12. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  13. Therapy of HIV Infection: Current Approaches and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Prokofjeva, M. M.; Kochetkov, S. N.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the causative agent of one of the most dangerous human diseases – the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Over the past 30 years since the discovery of HIV-1, a number of antiviral drugs have been developed to suppress various stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. This approach has enables the suppression of virus replication in the body, which significantly prolongs the life of HIV patients. The main downside of the method is the development of viral resistance to many anti-HIV drugs, which requires the creation of new drugs effective against drug-resistant viral forms. Currently, several fundamentally new approaches to HIV-1 treatment are under development, including the use of neutralizing antibodies, genome editing, and blocking an integrated latent provirus. This review describes a traditional approach involving HIV-1 inhibitors as well as the prospects of other treatment options. PMID:28050264

  14. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    PubMed

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  15. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  16. Living with HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  17. HIV among Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Women Format: Select One File [155K] Recommend ...

  18. HIV among Transgender People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Transgender People Format: Select One PDF [227K] ...

  19. Methamphetamine Enhances HIV Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Wang, Xu; Chen, Hui; Song, Li; Ye, Li; Wang, Shi-Hong; Wang, Yan-Jian; Zhou, Lin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the use of methamphetamine (meth), a sympathomimetic stimulant, is particularly common among patients infected with HIV. However, there is a lack of direct evidence that meth promotes HIV infection of target cells. This study examined whether meth is able to enhance HIV infection of macrophages, the primary target site for the virus. Meth treatment resulted in a significant and dose-dependent increase of HIV reverse transcriptase activity in human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Dopamine D1 receptor antagonists (SCH23390 and SKF83566) blocked this meth-mediated increase in the HIV infectivity of macrophages. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of meth action showed that meth up-regulated the expression of the HIV entry co-receptor CCR5 on macrophages. Additionally, meth inhibited the expression of endogenous interferon-α and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 in macrophages. These findings provide direct in vitro evidence to support the possibility that meth may function as a cofactor in the immunopathogenesis of HIV infection and may lead to the future development of innate immunity-based intervention for meth users with HIV infection. PMID:18458095

  20. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Calif. 42 1 •1 90 NEW LEGEND 80 A VIBORG, DENMARK, BLOCKS A VIBORG, DENMARK, ASPHALTIC CONCRETE AFTER 00 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, BLOCKS VIBRATION MEAN ...the load-distributing characteristics of the Mlock pavements. *. 45 -, , - t 171 LEGENDT 0 CONCRETE BASE, MEAN OF 8 TESTS,9 KNAPTON (1978) I RANGE OF...45 to 60 min. 90. Table 11 summarizes the results of these tests. The mean penetration of water through the block pavements with a slope of I per

  1. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  2. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  3. The anti-HIV activity of ADS-J1 targets the HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Tintori, Cristina; Manetti, Fabrizio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Botta, Maurizio; Esté, José A

    2005-12-05

    Recent data suggest that heparin sulfates may bind to a CD4 induced epitope in the HIV-1 gp120 that constitutes the coreceptor binding site. We have studied the mechanism of action of ADS-J1, a non-peptidic compound selected by docking analysis to interact with gp41 and to interfere with the formation of N-36/C-34 complexes in sandwich ELISA experiments. We show that ADS-J1 blocked the binding of wild-type HIV-1 NL4-3 strain to MT-4 cells but not virus-cell binding of a polyanion-resistant virus. However, ADS-J1 blocked the replication of polyanion-resistant, T-20- and C34-resistant HIV-1, suggesting a second mechanism of action. Development of resistance to ADS-J1 on the polyanion-resistant HIV-1 led to mutations in gp120 coreceptor binding site and not in gp41. Time of addition experiments confirmed that ADS-J1, but not polyanions such as dextran sulfate or AR177, worked at a step that mimics the activity of an HIV coreceptor antagonist but prior to gp41-dependent fusion. We conclude that ADS-J1 may bind to the HIV coreceptor binding site as its mechanism of anti-HIV activity.

  4. Bundle Branch Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart to pump blood efficiently through your circulatory system. There's no specific treatment for bundle branch block itself. However, any underlying health condition that caused bundle branch block, such as heart disease, will need to be treated. In most people, ...

  5. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  6. Geography Should Not Be Destiny: Focusing HIV/AIDS Implementation Research and Programs on Microepidemics in US Neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Yolken, Annajane; Cutler, Blayne; Trooskin, Stacey; Wilson, Phill; Little, Susan; Mayer, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    African Americans and Hispanics are disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Within the most heavily affected cities, a few neighborhoods account for a large share of new HIV infections. Addressing racial and economic disparities in HIV infection requires an implementation program and research agenda that assess the impact of HIV prevention interventions focused on increasing HIV testing, treatment, and retention in care in the most heavily affected neighborhoods in urban areas of the United States. Neighborhood-based implementation research should evaluate programs that focus on community mobilization, media campaigns, routine testing, linkage to and retention in care, and block-by-block outreach strategies. PMID:24716570

  7. Beautiful Blocks of Bedrock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-01

    This image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft targets a 3-kilometer diameter crater that occurs within the ejecta blanket of the much older Bakhuysen Crater, a 150-kilometer diameter impact crater in Noachis Terra. Impact craters are interesting because they provide a mechanism to uplift and expose underlying bedrock, allowing for the study of the subsurface and the geologic past. An enhanced color image shows the wall of the crater, which exposes layering as well as blocks of rock. There is a distinctive large block in the upper left of the crater wall, generally referred to as a "mega-block." It is an angular, light-toned, highly fragmented block, about 100 meters across. Several smaller light-toned blocks are also in the crater wall, possibly of the same rock type as the "mega-block." Ejecta blocks are thrown outward during the initial excavation of a crater, or are deposited as part of the ground-hugging flows of which the majority of the ejecta blanket is comprised. Through images like these, we are able to study the deeper subsurface of Mars that is not otherwise exposed. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20728

  8. Neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 induced by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Most neutralizing antibodies act at the earliest steps of viral infection and block interaction of the virus with cellular receptors to prevent entry into host cells. The inability to induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV has been a major obstacle to HIV vaccine research since the early days of the epidemic. However, in the past three years, the definition of a neutralizing antibody against HIV has been revolutionized by the isolation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies from HIV-infected individuals. Considerable hurdles remain for inducing neutralizing antibodies to a protective level after immunization. Meanwhile, novel technologies to bypass the induction of antibodies are being explored to provide prophylactic antibody-based interventions. This review addresses the challenge of inducing HIV neutralizing antibodies upon immunization and considers notable recent advances in the field. A greater understanding of the successes and failures for inducing a neutralizing response upon immunization is required to accelerate the development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:23401570

  9. HIV Life Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/13/2016; last reviewed 9/8/2016) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  10. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  11. What Causes Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... acquired heart block. Coronary heart disease , also called coronary artery disease. Myocarditis (MI-o-kar-DI-tis), or inflammation ...

  12. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  13. Mid-Career Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    Considers typical reactions of midcareer employees to blocked opportunity; reasons for correcting these attitudes; ways of motivating these employees; methods of rekindling midcareer employees' interest in their jobs; encouraging competition; job switching; self-development programs; and supervisory attitudes. (CT)

  14. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... is less serious than Mobitz type II. The animation below shows how your heart's electrical system works. ... block. Click the "start" button to play the animation. Written and spoken explanations are provided with each ...

  15. Using the Stern Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from "Experimenting with Numbers" by Margaret Stern demonstrate the use of Stern Blocks to develop the conceptual base on which learning disabled students can build further mathematical skills. (DB)

  16. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  17. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  18. Mid-Career Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    Considers typical reactions of midcareer employees to blocked opportunity; reasons for correcting these attitudes; ways of motivating these employees; methods of rekindling midcareer employees' interest in their jobs; encouraging competition; job switching; self-development programs; and supervisory attitudes. (CT)

  19. Recipient block TMA technique.

    PubMed

    Mirlacher, Martina; Simon, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    New high-throughput screening technologies have led to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. One way to prioritize the leads obtained in such studies is to analyze a large number of tissues for candidate gene expression. The TMA methodology is now an established and frequently used tool for high-throughput tissue analysis. The recipient block technology is the "classical" method of TMA making. In this method, minute cylindrical tissue punches typically measuring 0.6 mm in diameter are removed from donor tissue blocks and are transferred into empty "recipient" paraffin blocks. Up to 1,000 different tissues can be analyzed in one TMA block. The equipment is affordable and easy to use in places where basic skills in histology are available.

  20. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  3. HIV and Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV and Immunizations (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Vaccines protect people from ... a disease outbreak. Is there a vaccine against HIV? Testing is underway on experimental vaccines to prevent ...

  4. HIV Among Asians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partnerships for Care THRIVE Serostatus Approach Policy and Law Affordable Care Act Expanded Testing Initiative High-Impact ... of High-Impact Prevention Bibliography HIV and the Law State HIV Laws HIV-Specific Criminal Laws Laboratory ...

  5. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laotian Mongolian Spanish Turkish Vietnamese Hindi Subscribe HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  6. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  7. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts HIV/AIDS Fact sheet Updated November 2016 Key facts HIV ... and 2015, new HIV infections fell by 35%, AIDS-related deaths fell by 28% with some 8 ...

  8. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS A A ... serious infection. continue How Many People Have HIV/AIDS? Since the discovery of the virus in 1983, ...

  9. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  10. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGENT HIV, a single-stranded, positive-sense, enveloped RNA virus in the genus Lentivirus. TRANSMISSION HIV can ... be diagnosed is approximately 9 days, when HIV RNA becomes detectable in blood; however, tests needed to ...

  11. Epitope target structures of Fc-mediated effector function during HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Guan, Yongjun; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Sajadi, Mohammad; Pazgier, Marzena; Devico, Anthony L

    2014-05-01

    This review analyzes recent studies suggesting that highly conserved epitopes in the HIV-1 Env trimer are targets of potentially protective nonneutralizing antibodies that mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Recent studies in both non-human primates and humans suggest that nonneutralizing antibodies play a role in blocking infection with hybrid simian HIV (SHIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or HIV-1 by Fc-mediated effector function, in particular antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Further, several studies implicate highly conserved epitopes in the C1 region of gp120 as targets of these antibodies. However, these suggestions are controversial, as passive immunization studies do not indicate that such antibodies can block acquisition in non-human primates. Potential reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in the structural context of potent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity epitopes on target cells during the narrow window of opportunity when antibodies can block HIV-1 acquisition. Cumulative evidence suggests that, in addition to virus neutralization, Fc-mediated effector responses to highly conserved epitopes in the HIV-1 trimer play distinct as well as overlapping roles in blocking HIV-1 acquisition. Evidence will be discussed as to whether nonneutralizing antibodies specific for epitopes on the HIV-1 Env trimer that become exposed during viral entry contribute significantly to blocking HIV-1 acquisition.

  12. Complement-Opsonized HIV-1 Overcomes Restriction in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Wilfried; Steger, Marion; Knackmuss, Ulla; Blatzer, Michael; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Doppler, Wolfgang; White, Tommy E.; Hörtnagl, Paul; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Hackl, Hubert; Moris, Arnaud; Keppler, Oliver T.; Wilflingseder, Doris

    2015-01-01

    DCs express intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms to specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Thus, DCs are productively infected only at very low levels with HIV-1, and this non-permissiveness of DCs is suggested to go along with viral evasion. We now illustrate that complement-opsonized HIV-1 (HIV-C) efficiently bypasses SAMHD1 restriction and productively infects DCs including BDCA-1 DCs. Efficient DC infection by HIV-C was also observed using single-cycle HIV-C, and correlated with a remarkable elevated SAMHD1 T592 phosphorylation but not SAMHD1 degradation. If SAMHD1 phosphorylation was blocked using a CDK2-inhibitor HIV-C-induced DC infection was also significantly abrogated. Additionally, we found a higher maturation and co-stimulatory potential, aberrant type I interferon expression and signaling as well as a stronger induction of cellular immune responses in HIV-C-treated DCs. Collectively, our data highlight a novel protective mechanism mediated by complement opsonization of HIV to effectively promote DC immune functions, which might be in the future exploited to tackle HIV infection. PMID:26121641

  13. IFN-λ Inhibits Drug-Resistant HIV Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, He; Liu, Man-Qing; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Run-Hong; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Zhou, Wang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) have been demonstrated to inhibit a number of viruses, including HIV. Here, we further examined the anti-HIV effect of IFN-λs in macrophages. We found that IFN-λs synergistically enhanced anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals [azidothymidine (AZT), efavirenz, indinavir, and enfuvirtide] in infected macrophages. Importantly, IFN-λs could suppress HIV infection of macrophages with the drug-resistant strains, including AZT-resistant virus (A012) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant virus (TC49). Mechanistically, IFN-λs were able to induce the expression of several important anti-HIV cellular factors, including myxovirus resistance 2 (Mx2), a newly identified HIV post-entry inhibitor and tetherin, a restriction factor that blocks HIV release from infected cells. These observations provide additional evidence to support the potential use of IFN-λs as therapeutics agents for the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:28321215

  14. CCR5 antagonism in HIV infection: current concepts and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Timothy J; Gulick, Roy M

    2012-01-01

    CCR5 antagonists inhibit HIV-1 entry by blocking the interaction of HIV-1 with the CCR5 cellular receptor. In patients with established HIV-1 infection, some viral strains use an alternative coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, CXCR4; CCR5 antagonists are not effective in patients harboring these viral strains. Coreceptor tropism testing of viral strains in an individual patient is necessary prior to treating with a CCR5 antagonist. There is one CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, that is FDA-approved for treatment of HIV-1 infection. This drug is used most commonly for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in patients who have failed other antiretroviral regimens. In addition to virologic effects, CCR5 antagonists are under investigation for immune-modulating effects and for HIV-1 prevention. Ongoing research will further elucidate the role of CCR5 antagonists in combating HIV disease.

  15. Curdlan sulfate and HIV-1. I. In vitro inhibitory effects of curdlan sulfate on HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Kaneko, Y; Stefanski, M S; Nguyen, T; Ting, R C

    1991-04-01

    Action mechanisms of a newly synthesized polysaccharide, curdlan sulfate (CRDS), on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection were investigated in vitro using syncytium formation microassay and p24 antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These assays measured the titer of infectious virions and the amounts of HIV-1 core antigen p24 in soluble, intraviral, and intracellular forms. CRDS treatments were performed for 1 h at 37 degrees C. H9 cells pretreated with 0.1 to 100.0 micrograms/ml of CRDS appreciably inhibited HIV-1 infection. CRDS-treated HIV-1 virions were less able to infect H9 cells than untreated virions. The simultaneous treatment of H9 cells and HIV-1 virions with CRDS induced a significant inhibition of HIV-1 infection, resulting in the temporary disappearance of virions at the highest dose of CRDS. In contrast, CRDS treatment of newly HIV-1-infected H9 cells caused a significant decrease in the titer of infectious HIV-1 and the p24 amounts of all three forms, but no absolute elimination. Taken together, these results indicate that CRDS may block the binding of the HIV-1 envelope to the H9 cell surface, with emphasis on the high affinity of CRDS to the HIV-1 envelope.

  16. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  17. Antiviral lectins as potential HIV microbicides.

    PubMed

    Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2014-08-01

    A growing class of potential antivirals encompasses carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as antibodies and lectins. They block virus entry into host target cells and halt virus transmission from virus-infected cells to non-infected cells, thereby preventing infection. Here, we review the structural basis for the anti-HIV activity of various lectins, describing their structures and determinants of high-affinity oligosaccharide binding. The mechanism of glycan recognition on the gp120 envelope protein by these antiviral lectins may therefore be exploited for developing agents and alternative strategies to prevent HIV transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells.

  19. 31 CFR 547.302 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 547.302 Section 547.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 547.302 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and blocked property shall mean any account or property subject to the prohibitions in § 547.201...

  20. In vitro anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of transition state mimetic HIV protease inhibitors containing allophenylnorstatine.

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, S; Mimoto, T; Murakawa, Y; Nomizu, M; Ford, H; Shirasaka, T; Gulnik, S; Erickson, J; Takada, K; Hayashi, H

    1993-01-01

    Transition state mimetic tripeptide human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors containing allophenylnorstatine [(2S,3S)-3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutyric acid] were synthesized and tested for activity against HIV in vitro. Two compounds, KNI-227 and KNI-272, which were highly potent against HIV protease with little inhibition of other aspartic proteases, showed the most potent activity against the infectivity and cytopathic effect of a wide spectrum of HIV strains. As tested in target CD4+ ATH8 cells, the 50% inhibitory concentrations of KNI-227 against HIV type 1 LAI (HIV-1LAI), HIV-1RF, HIV-1MN, and HIV-2ROD were 0.1, 0.02, 0.03, and 0.1 microM, respectively, while those of KNI-272 were 0.1, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.1 microM, respectively. Both agents completely blocked the replication of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine-sensitive and -insensitive clinical HIV-1 isolates at 0.08 microM as tested in target phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The ratios of 50% cytotoxic concentrations to 50% inhibitory concentrations for KNI-227 and KNI-272 were approximately 2,500 and > 4,000, respectively, as assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Both compounds blocked the posttranslational cleavage of the p55 precursor protein to generate the mature p24 Gag protein in stably HIV-1-infected cells. The n-octanol-water partition coefficients of KNI-227 and KNI-272 were high, with log Po/w values of 3.79 and 3.56, respectively. Degradation of KNI-227 and KNI-272 in the presence of pepsin (1 mg/ml, pH 2.2) at 37 degrees C for 24 h was negligible. Current data warrant further careful investigations toward possible clinical application of these two novel compounds. Images PMID:8494379

  1. HIV infection increases HCV-induced hepatocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Young; Shao, Run-Xuan; Lin, Wenyu; Weinberg, Ethan; Chung, Woo Jin; Tsai, Wei Lun; Zhao, Hong; Goto, Kaku; Zhang, Leiliang; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Jilg, Nikolaus; Peng, Lee F; Brockman, Mark A; Chung, Raymond T

    2011-04-01

    HCV related liver disease is one of the most important complications in persons with HIV, with accelerated fibrosis progression in coinfected persons compared to those with HCV alone. We hypothesized that HCV-HIV coinfection increases HCV related hepatocyte apoptosis and that HCV and HIV influence TRAIL signaling in hepatocytes. We analyzed the effect of HIV in JFH1-infected Huh7.5.1 cells. Apoptosis was measured by Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay and Western blotting for cleaved PARP. TRAIL, TRAIL receptor 1 (DR4), and 2 (DR5) mRNA and protein levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. We also investigated activation of caspase pathways using caspase inhibitors and assessed expression of Bid and cytochrome C. We found increased caspase 3/7 activity and cleaved PARP in JFH1 HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence of heat-inactivated HIV, compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Both DR4 and DR5 mRNA and protein expression were increased in JFH1-infected cells in the presence of inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Pancaspase, caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibition blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, inactivated HIV, and HCV plus inactivated HIV. A caspase-9 inhibitor blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, HIV, and HCV-HIV comparably to pancaspase and caspase-8 inhibitors. HCV induced the activation of Bid cleavage and cytochrome C release. The addition of HIV substantially augmented this induction. Our findings indicate that hepatocyte apoptosis is increased in the presence of HCV and HIV compared to HCV or HIV alone, and that this increase is mediated by DR4 and DR5 up-regulation. These results provide an additional mechanism for the accelerated liver disease progression observed in HCV-HIV co-infection. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-15

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 mug/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 mug. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 mug/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development.

  3. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development. PMID:18197976

  4. Sustained attention deficits among HIV-positive individuals with comorbid bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Posada, Carolina; Moore, David J; Deutsch, Reena; Rooney, Alexandra; Gouaux, Ben; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton

    2012-01-01

    Difficulties with sustained attention have been found among both persons with HIV infection (HIV+) and bipolar disorder (BD). The authors examined sustained attention among 39 HIV+ individuals with BD (HIV+/BD+) and 33 HIV-infected individuals without BD (HIV+/BD-), using the Conners' Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II). A Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score was also assigned to each participant as an overall indicator of daily functioning abilities. HIV+/BD+ participants had significantly worse performance on CPT-II omission errors, hit reaction time SE (Hit RT SE), variability of SE, and perseverations than HIV+/BD- participants. When examining CPT-II performance over the six study blocks, both HIV+/BD+ and HIV+/BD- participants evidenced worse performance on scores of commission errors and reaction times as the test progressed. The authors also examined the effect of current mood state (i.e., manic, depressive, euthymic) on CPT-II performance, but no significant differences were observed across the various mood states. HIV+/BD+ participants had significantly worse GAF scores than HIV+/BD- participants, which indicates poorer overall functioning in the dually-affected group; among HIV+/BD+ persons, significant negative correlations were found between GAF scores and CPT-II omission and commission errors, detectability, and perseverations, indicating a possible relationship between decrements in sustained attention and worse daily-functioning outcomes.

  5. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  6. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  7. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  8. Hawaii Census 2000 Blocks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Tiger line files are the source of the geometry representing the Census blocks. Attributes include total population counts, racial/ethnic, and poverty/income information. Racial/ethnic classifications are represented in units of blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Poverty and income data are represented in units of blockgroups and tracts. Percentages of each racial/ethnic group have been calculated from the population counts. Total Minority counts and percentages were compiled from each racial/ethnic non-white category. Categories compiled to create the Total Minority count includes the following: African American, Asian, American Indian, Pacific Islander, White Hispanic, Other and all mixed race categories. The percentage poverty attribute represents the percent of the population living at or below poverty level. The per capita income attribute represents the sum of all income within the geographic entity, divided by the total population of that entity. Special fields designed to be used for EJ analysis have been derived from the PL data and include the following: Percentage difference of block, blockgroup and total minority from the state and county averages, percentile rank for each percent total minority within state and county entitie

  9. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  10. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  11. Flattening basic blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2006-01-01

    The application of cross country elimination strategies requires access to the computational graph or at least subgraphs for certain scopes, e.g. a basic block. Under the presence of aliased variables the construction of these (sub)graphs encounters ambiguities. We propose an algorithm to construct ambiguity free subgraphs.

  12. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A What's in this article? ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  13. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  14. Sulfated polysaccharides (chondroitin sulfate and carrageenan) plus glucosamine sulfate are potent inhibitors of HIV.

    PubMed

    Konlee, M

    1998-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate, a fusion inhibitor found in human milk, appears to work by blocking the ability of a virus, such as HIV, to infect a cell. There are questions about whether cow or goat milk can offer the same fusion-inhibiting benefits. One sulfated monosaccharide, glucosamine 6-sulfate, appears to have significant anti-HIV activity. Carrageenan, a seaweed derivative, shows promise as a vaginal microbicide, and should be tested further to determine its effectiveness against HIV transmission.

  15. Prospective Double-Blind Study of Zidovudine (AZT) in Early Stage HIV infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    FRONT COVER FUNDING NO. 87PP7875 S L. TITLE: Prospective Double-Blind Study of Zidovudine (AZT) in Early Stage HIV Infection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Prospective Double-Blind Study of Zidovudine (AZT) in Early State HIV Infection 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Shannon M. Harrison 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 113b...COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUBGROUP HIV , Zidovudine, Early, Infection 06

  16. The mTOR Complex Controls HIV Latency.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Emilie; Hakre, Shweta; Kampmann, Martin; Lim, Hyung W; Hosmane, Nina N; Martin, Alyssa; Bassik, Michael C; Verschueren, Erik; Battivelli, Emilie; Chan, Jonathan; Svensson, J Peter; Gramatica, Andrea; Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie; Greene, Warner C; Krogan, Nevan J; Siliciano, Robert F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Verdin, Eric

    2016-12-14

    A population of CD4 T lymphocytes harboring latent HIV genomes can persist in patients on antiretroviral therapy, posing a barrier to HIV eradication. To examine cellular complexes controlling HIV latency, we conducted a genome-wide screen with a pooled ultracomplex shRNA library and in vitro system modeling HIV latency and identified the mTOR complex as a modulator of HIV latency. Knockdown of mTOR complex subunits or pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity suppresses reversal of latency in various HIV-1 latency models and HIV-infected patient cells. mTOR inhibitors suppress HIV transcription both through the viral transactivator Tat and via Tat-independent mechanisms. This inhibition occurs at least in part via blocking the phosphorylation of CDK9, a p-TEFb complex member that serves as a cofactor for Tat-mediated transcription. The control of HIV latency by mTOR signaling identifies a pathway that may have significant therapeutic opportunities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mathematical modeling of HIV-like particle assembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuewu; Zou, Xiufen

    2017-02-22

    In vitro, the recombinant HIV-1 Gag protein can generate spherical particles with a diameter of 25-30 nm in a fully defined system. It has approximately 80 building blocks, and its intermediates for assembly are abundant in geometry. Accordingly, there are a large number of nonlinear equations in the classical model. Therefore, it is difficult to compute values of geometry parameters for intermediates and make the mathematical analysis using the model. In this work, we develop a new model of HIV-like particle assembly in vitro by using six-fold symmetry of HIV-like particle assembly to decrease the number of geometry parameters. This method will greatly reduce computational costs and facilitate the application of the model. Then, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the positive equilibrium solution for this model with 79 nonlinear equations. Based on this model, we derive the interesting result that concentrations of all intermediates at equilibrium are independent of three important parameters, including two microscopic on-rate constants and the size of nucleating structure. Before equilibrium, these three parameters influence the concentration variation rates of all intermediates. We also analyze the relationship between the initial concentration of building blocks and concentrations of all intermediates. Furthermore, the bounds of concentrations of free building blocks and HIV-like particles are estimated. These results will be helpful to guide HIV-like particle assembly experiments and improve our understanding of the assembly dynamics of HIV-like particles in vitro.

  18. gag, vif, and nef Genes Contribute to the Homologous Viral Interference Induced by a Nonproducer Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Variant: Identification of Novel HIV-1-Inhibiting Viral Protein Mutants

    PubMed Central

    D’Aloja, Paola; Olivetta, Eleonora; Bona, Roberta; Nappi, Filomena; Pedacchia, Daniela; Pugliese, Katherina; Ferrari, Giuliana; Verani, Paola; Federico, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that expression of the nonproducer F12-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variant induces a block in the replication of superinfecting HIV that does not depend on the down-regulation of CD4 HIV receptors. In order to individuate the gene(s) involved in F12-HIV-induced interference, vectors expressing each of the nine F12-HIV proteins were transfected in HIV-susceptible HeLa CD4 cells. Pools of cell clones stably producing each viral protein were infected with HIV-1, and virus release was measured in terms of reverse transcriptase activity in supernatants. We hereby demonstrate that HeLa CD4 cells expressing the F12-HIV gag, vif, or nef gene were resistant, to different degrees, to infection with T-cell-line-adapted HIV-1 strains. Conversely, expression of either the tat, rev, or vpu F12-HIV gene increased the rate of HIV release, and no apparent effects on HIV replication were observed in cells expressing either the F12-HIV vpr, pol, or env gene. No variation of CD4 exposure was detected in any of the uninfected HeLa CD4 pools. These data indicate that F12-HIV homologous viral interference is the consequence of the synergistic anti-HIV effects of Gag, Vif, and Nef proteins. Retrovirus vectors expressing F12-HIV vif or nef allowed us to further establish that the expression of each mutated protein (i) inhibits the replication of clinical HIV-1 isolates as well, (ii) impairs the infectivity of the virus released by cells chronically infected with HIV-1, and (iii) limitedly to F12-HIV Vif protein, induces HIV resistance in both vif-permissive and vif-nonpermissive cells. The levels of action of F12-HIV vif and nef anti-HIV effects were also determined. We observed that HIV virions emerging from the first viral cycle on F12-HIV vif-expressing cells, although released in unaltered amounts, had a strongly reduced ability to initiate the retrotranscription process when they reinfected parental HeLa CD4 cells. Differently, we observed

  19. Why AIDS? The Mystery of How HIV Attacks the Immune System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Damaris

    1999-01-01

    Reviews differing theories surrounding the mystery of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) attacks the immune system. Claims that understanding how HIV triggers immune-cell depletion may enable researchers to block its effects. New knowledge could reveal strategies for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapies that go beyond the drugs…

  20. Risky decision-making in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND).

    PubMed

    Iudicello, Jennifer E; Woods, Steven Paul; Cattie, Jordan E; Doyle, Katie; Grant, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Individuals infected with HIV show moderate deficits in decision-making, but the ecological relevance of such deficits on everyday functioning has not previously been described. This study sought to examine the magnitude, cognitive correlates, and everyday functioning impact of risky decision-making impairment in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Participants included 68 HIV+ individuals with HAND, 78 HIV+ individuals without HAND, and 51 HIV- comparison participants, who were administered the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) alongside a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and self-report measures assessing aspects of everyday functioning. HIV+ individuals with HAND performed more poorly on the IGT relative to the other two groups, most notably during the last three trial blocks. Within the HIV+ group, IGT performance during the last three trial blocks was most strongly associated with cognitive flexibility, but was not significantly related to declines in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), unemployment, or medication non-adherence. While overall IGT performance across the last three trial blocks may be helpful diagnostically in identifying decision-making impairment in HAND, examination of alternate, more specific metrics (e.g., individual deck selections across trial blocks) may be more useful in delineating the role of poor decision-making in HIV-related disability, and should be examined in future research.

  1. Risky decision-making in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Woods, Steven Paul; Cattie, Jordan E.; Doyle, Katie; Grant, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Individuals infected with HIV show moderate deficits in decision-making, but the ecological relevance of such deficits on everyday functioning has not previously been described. This study sought to examine the magnitude, cognitive correlates, and everyday functioning impact of risky decision-making impairment in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Participants included 68 HIV+ individuals with HAND, 78 HIV+ individuals without HAND, and 51 HIV- comparison participants, who were administered the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) alongside a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and self-report measures assessing aspects of everyday functioning. HIV+ individuals with HAND performed more poorly on the IGT relative to the other two groups, most notably during the last three trial blocks. Within the HIV+ group, IGT performance during the last three trial blocks was most strongly associated with cognitive flexibility, but was not significantly related to declines in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), unemployment, or medication non-adherence. While overall IGT performance across the last three trial blocks may be helpful diagnostically in identifying decision-making impairment in HAND, examination of alternate, more specific metrics (e.g., individual deck selections across trial blocks) may be more useful in delineating the role of poor decision-making in HIV-related disability, and should be examined in future research. PMID:23181946

  2. Why AIDS? The Mystery of How HIV Attacks the Immune System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Damaris

    1999-01-01

    Reviews differing theories surrounding the mystery of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) attacks the immune system. Claims that understanding how HIV triggers immune-cell depletion may enable researchers to block its effects. New knowledge could reveal strategies for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapies that go beyond the drugs…

  3. Current developments in anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, Alexander Y

    2009-02-01

    Since the introduction of highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, dramatic improvements in therapeutic treatment modalities for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection have occurred. Potent drug combinations in HAART regimens efficiently block HIV-1 replication in most patients; however, multiple shortcomings of HAART are apparent and require novel treatments that can be utilized in combination with HAART or as stand-alone therapies. Gene therapy of HIV-1 represents one such treatment and several strategies are currently under development. This review focuses on advancements in the gene therapy of HIV/AIDS by highlighting the progress made in selecting new therapeutic targets and developing novel tools to exert an effect on these targets. In addition, new trends emerging from this progress are summarized. This review is based primarily on literature published between 2006 and 2008.

  4. NCCN Evidence Blocks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-05-01

    NCCN has developed a series of Evidence Blocks: graphics that provide ratings for each recommended treatment regimen in terms of efficacy, toxicity, quality and consistency of the supporting data, and affordability. The NCCN Evidence Blocks are currently available in 10 tumor types within the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). At a glance, patients and providers can understand how a given treatment was assessed by the NCCN Guidelines Panel and get a sense of how a given treatment may match individual needs and preferences. Robert W. Carlson, MD, CEO of NCCN, described the reasoning behind this new feature and how the tool is used, and Eric Jonasch, MD, Professor of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Vice Chair of the NCCN Kidney Cancer Panel, described its applicability in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  5. Thermal blocking of preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Rose; Tranberg, Anders E-mail: anders.tranberg@uis.no

    2015-04-01

    The parametric resonance responsible for preheating after inflation will end when self-interactions of the resonating field and interactions of this field with secondary degrees of freedom become important. In many cases, the effect may be quantified in terms of an effective mass and the resulting shifting out of the spectrum of the strongest resonance band. In certain curvaton models, such thermal blocking can even occur before preheating has begun, delaying or even preventing the decay of the curvaton. We investigate numerically to what extent this thermal blocking is realised in a specific scenario, and whether the effective mass is well approximated by the perturbative leading order thermal mass. We find that the qualitative behaviour is well reproduced in this approximation, and that the end of preheating can be confidently estimated.

  6. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment FDA-Approved HIV Medicines (Last updated 2/27/2017; last reviewed 2/27/2017) Treatment with ... 2007 Pharmacokinetic Enhancers Pharmacokinetic enhancers are used in HIV treatment to increase the effectiveness of an HIV medicine ...

  7. Feature-accelerated block matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Bo; Orchard, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    We study the relationship between local features and block matching in this paper. We show that the use of many features can greatly improve the block matching results by introducing several fast block matching algorithms. The first algorithm is pixel decimation-based. We show that pixels with larger gradient magnitude have larger motion compensation error. Therefore for pixel decimation-based fast block matching, it benefits to subsample the block by selecting pixels with the largest gradient magnitude. Such a gradient-assisted adaptive pixel selection strategy greatly outperforms two other subsampling procedures proposed in previous literature. Fast block matching can achieve the optimal performance obtained using full search. We present a family of such fast block matching algorithm using various local features, such as block mean and variance. Our algorithm reduces more than 80 percent computation, while achieving the same performance as the full search. This present a brand new approach toward fast block matching algorithm design.

  8. Recovery from blocking between outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2005-10-01

    Contemporary associative learning research largely focuses on cue competition phenomena that occur when 2 cues are paired with a common outcome. Little research has been conducted to investigate similar phenomena occurring when a single cue is trained with 2 outcomes. Three conditioned lick suppression experiments with rats assessed whether treatments known to alleviate blocking between cues would also attenuate blocking between outcomes. In Experiment 1, conditioned responding recovered from blocking between outcomes when a long retention interval was interposed between training and testing. Experiment 2 obtained recovery from blocking between outcomes when the blocking outcome was extinguished after the blocking treatment. In Experiment 3, a recovery from blocking between outcomes occurred when a reminder stimulus was presented in a novel context prior to testing. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that blocking of outcomes, like blocking of cues, appears to be caused by a deficit in the expression of an acquired association.

  9. Liquid blocking check valve

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, John T.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid blocking check valve useful particularly in a pneumatic system utilizing a pressurized liquid fill chamber. The valve includes a floatable ball disposed within a housing defining a chamber. The housing is provided with an inlet aperture disposed in the top of said chamber, and an outlet aperture disposed in the bottom of said chamber in an offset relation to said inlet aperture and in communication with a cutaway side wall section of said housing.

  10. Intraocular radiation blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, P.T.; Ho, T.K.; Fastenberg, D.M.; Hyman, R.A.; Stroh, E.M.; Packer, S.; Perry, H.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Iodine-based liquid radiographic contrast agents were placed in normal and tumor-bearing (Greene strain) rabbit eyes to evaluate their ability to block iodine-125 radiation. This experiment required the procedures of tumor implantation, vitrectomy, air-fluid exchange, and 125I plaque and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chip implantation. The authors quantified the amount of radiation attenuation provided by intraocularly placed contrast agents with in vivo dosimetry. After intraocular insertion of a blocking agent or sham blocker (saline) insertion, episcleral 125I plaques were placed across the eye from episcleral TLD dosimeters. This showed that radiation attenuation occurred after blocker insertion compared with the saline controls. Then computed tomographic imaging techniques were used to describe the relatively rapid transit time of the aqueous-based iohexol compared with the slow transit time of the oil-like iophendylate. Lastly, seven nontumor-bearing eyes were primarily examined for blocking agent-related ocular toxicity. Although it was noted that iophendylate induced intraocular inflammation and retinal degeneration, all iohexol-treated eyes were similar to the control eyes at 7 and 31 days of follow-up. Although our study suggests that intraocular radiopaque materials can be used to shield normal ocular structures during 125I plaque irradiation, a mechanism to keep these materials from exiting the eye must be devised before clinical application.

  11. Targeting type I interferon–mediated activation restores immune function in chronic HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Rezek, Valerie; Youn, Cindy; Lam, Brianna; Chang, Nelson; Rick, Jonathan; Carrillo, Mayra; Martin, Heather; Kasparian, Saro; Syed, Philip; Brooks, David G.; Kitchen, Scott G.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic immune activation, immunosuppression, and T cell exhaustion are hallmarks of HIV infection, yet the mechanisms driving these processes are unclear. Chronic activation can be a driving force in immune exhaustion, and type I interferons (IFN-I) are emerging as critical components underlying ongoing activation in HIV infection. Here, we have tested the effect of blocking IFN-I signaling on T cell responses and virus replication in a murine model of chronic HIV infection. Using HIV-infected humanized mice, we demonstrated that in vivo blockade of IFN-I signaling during chronic HIV infection diminished HIV-driven immune activation, decreased T cell exhaustion marker expression, restored HIV-specific CD8 T cell function, and led to decreased viral replication. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) in combination with IFN-I blockade accelerated viral suppression, further decreased viral loads, and reduced the persistently infected HIV reservoir compared with ART treatment alone. Our data suggest that blocking IFN-I signaling in conjunction with ART treatment can restore immune function and may reduce viral reservoirs during chronic HIV infection, providing validation for IFN-I blockade as a potential therapy for HIV infection. PMID:27941243

  12. Targeting type I interferon-mediated activation restores immune function in chronic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Rezek, Valerie; Youn, Cindy; Lam, Brianna; Chang, Nelson; Rick, Jonathan; Carrillo, Mayra; Martin, Heather; Kasparian, Saro; Syed, Philip; Rice, Nicholas; Brooks, David G; Kitchen, Scott G

    2017-01-03

    Chronic immune activation, immunosuppression, and T cell exhaustion are hallmarks of HIV infection, yet the mechanisms driving these processes are unclear. Chronic activation can be a driving force in immune exhaustion, and type I interferons (IFN-I) are emerging as critical components underlying ongoing activation in HIV infection. Here, we have tested the effect of blocking IFN-I signaling on T cell responses and virus replication in a murine model of chronic HIV infection. Using HIV-infected humanized mice, we demonstrated that in vivo blockade of IFN-I signaling during chronic HIV infection diminished HIV-driven immune activation, decreased T cell exhaustion marker expression, restored HIV-specific CD8 T cell function, and led to decreased viral replication. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) in combination with IFN-I blockade accelerated viral suppression, further decreased viral loads, and reduced the persistently infected HIV reservoir compared with ART treatment alone. Our data suggest that blocking IFN-I signaling in conjunction with ART treatment can restore immune function and may reduce viral reservoirs during chronic HIV infection, providing validation for IFN-I blockade as a potential therapy for HIV infection.

  13. Creatine protects against mitochondrial dysfunction associated with HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal injury

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Patrick R.; Gawryluk, Jeremy W.; Hui, Liang; Chen, Xuesong; Geiger, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infected individuals are living longer but experiencing a prevalence rate of over 50% for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) for which no effective treatment is available. Viral and cellular factors secreted by HIV-1 infected cells leads to neuronal injury and HIV-1 Tat continues to be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND. Here we tested the hypothesis that creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal injury by preventing mitochondrial bioenergetic crisis and/or redox catastrophe. Creatine blocked HIV-1 Tat1-72-induced increases in neuron cell death and synaptic area loss. Creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced decreases in ATP. Creatine and creatine plus HIV-1 Tat increased cellular levels of creatine, and creatine plus HIV-1 Tat further decreased ratios of phosphocreatine to creatine observed with creatine or HIV-1 Tat treatments alone. Additionally, creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced mitochondrial hypopolarization and HIV-1 Tat-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Thus, creatine may be a useful adjunctive therapy against HAND. PMID:25613139

  14. View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are used to support ship when it is repositioned to paint inaccessible areas masked by original support blocks. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Carpentry Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. MISR Center Block Time Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

      MISR Center Block Time Tool The misr_time tool calculates the block center times for ... in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. It can be run either with a licensed version of the IDL package or by ...

  16. How Is Heart Block Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... second-degree heart block, you may need a pacemaker . A pacemaker is a small device that's placed under the ... third-degree heart block, you will need a pacemaker. In an emergency, a temporary pacemaker might be ...

  17. Differential antiviral effect of PEG-interferon-alpha-2b on HIV and HCV in the treatment of HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Au; Polis, Ma; Rozenberg, L; Jackson, Jo; Reitano, Kn; McLaughlin, M; Koratich, C; Dewar, Rl; Masur, H; Haagmans, Bl; Kottilil, Shyam

    2007-09-12

    The major antiviral effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha on hepatitis C virus (HCV) is blocking of virion production from infected cells. We now investigate the previously unknown mechanism of action of IFN-alpha against HIV. HIV kinetics in parallel to HCV kinetics and IFN pharmacokinetics during pegylated-IFN-alpha-2b (1.5 microg/Kg q.w., PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (1-1.2 g daily) treatment in nine HIV patients co-infected with HCV genotype 1 were analyzed. In vivo modeling predictions of suppression of HIV replication by PEG-IFN in CD8-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells were verified by in vitro experiments. HCV and HIV show different viral decline patterns after administration of PEG-IFN. Unlike the bi-phasic decline shown by HCV, HIV shows a slow continuous decline during the first week, with no rebound when PEG-IFN levels decline. Fitting of HIV kinetics with known half-lives of free virus and infected cells indicates that the major effect of IFN on HIV is to block de novo infection rather than to block virion production. The magnitude of the antiviral effect is similar (mean 1.1 log10 decline at 7 days) to those of direct anti-HIV drugs, but shows an inverse correlation with baseline viremia. In vitro studies show that preincubation with IFN renders a suppression of HIV replication superior to that of treatment postinfection, thus corroborating the mathematical analysis in vivo. The complimentary antiviral properties of IFN-alpha and antiretroviral therapy suggest a role for pharmacokinetically improved formulations of IFN as part of salvage therapy for HIV-infected individuals.

  18. Deficits in complex motor functions, despite no evidence of procedural learning deficits, among HIV+ individuals with history of substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Raul; Jacobus, Joanna; Amatya, Anup K; Quartana, Phillip J; Vassileva, Jasmin; Martin, Eileen M

    2008-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drugs of abuse affect common neural systems underlying procedural memory, including the striatum. The authors compared performance of 48 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 48 HIV seronegative (HIV-) participants with history of cocaine and/or heroin dependence across multiple Trial Blocks of three procedural learning (PL) tasks: Rotary Pursuit (RP), Mirror Star Tracing (MST), and Weather Prediction (WP). Groups were well matched on demographic, psychiatric, and substance use parameters, and all participants were verified abstinent from drugs. Mixed model analyses of variance revealed that the individuals in the HIV+ group performed more poorly across all tasks, with a significant main effect of HIV serostatus observed on the Mirror Star Tracing and a trend toward significance obtained for the Rotary Pursuit task. No significant differences were observed on the Weather Prediction task. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in performance across all three procedural learning tasks. It is important to note that no significant Serostatus x Trial Block interactions were observed on any task. Thus, the individuals in the HIV+ group tended to perform worse than those in the HIV- group across all trial blocks of procedural learning tasks with motor demands, but showed no differences in their rate of improvement across all tasks. These findings are consistent with HIV--associated deficits in complex motor skills, but not in procedural learning.

  19. A lectin isolated from bananas is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Michael D; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Markovitz, David M

    2010-03-19

    BanLec is a jacalin-related lectin isolated from the fruit of bananas, Musa acuminata. This lectin binds to high mannose carbohydrate structures, including those found on viruses containing glycosylated envelope proteins such as human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that BanLec might inhibit HIV-1 through binding of the glycosylated HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. We determined that BanLec inhibits primary and laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates of different tropisms and subtypes. BanLec possesses potent anti-HIV activity, with IC(50) values in the low nanomolar to picomolar range. The mechanism for BanLec-mediated antiviral activity was investigated by determining if this lectin can directly bind the HIV-1 envelope protein and block entry of the virus into the cell. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed direct binding of BanLec to gp120 and indicated that BanLec can recognize the high mannose structures that are recognized by the monoclonal antibody 2G12. Furthermore, BanLec is able to block HIV-1 cellular entry as indicated by temperature-sensitive viral entry studies and by the decreased levels of the strong-stop product of early reverse transcription seen in the presence of BanLec. Thus, our data indicate that BanLec inhibits HIV-1 infection by binding to the glycosylated viral envelope and blocking cellular entry. The relative anti-HIV activity of BanLec compared favorably to other anti-HIV lectins, such as snowdrop lectin and Griffithsin, and to T-20 and maraviroc, two anti-HIV drugs currently in clinical use. Based on these results, BanLec is a potential component for an anti-viral microbicide that could be used to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  20. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  1. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  2. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  3. Strategies for Preventing Mucosal Cell-Associated HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Kevin J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be transmitted through either cell-free virions or leukocytes harboring intracellular HIV in bodily fluids. In recent years, the early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy leading to virological suppression has resulted in decreased HIV transmission to uninfected partners. Additionally, the efficacy of primary chemoprophylaxis with oral or topical antiretroviral regimens containing tenofovir (with or without emtricitabine) has been demonstrated. However, the efficacy of these approaches may be compromised by suboptimal adherence, decreased drug concentrations in mucosal compartments in women, and genital inflammation. Furthermore, in vitro studies on the effects of tenofovir on cell-associated HIV transmission have produced conflicting results. Preclinical studies suggest that combination preventive approaches may be most effective in stopping the transmission of HIV after mucosal exposure. Since the development of antibodies were found to correlate with protection in the only effective HIV vaccine trial, the administration of preformed mucosal and systemic antibodies may inform the development of safe and effective antibody-based oral, topical, and/or systemic preexposure prophylaxis agents and provide guidance in the development of HIV vaccines that effectively block cell-associated HIV transmission. PMID:25414423

  4. The enduring tale of T cells in HIV immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vajpayee, Madhu; Negi, Neema; Kurapati, Sravya

    2013-01-01

    HIV continues to be a major health problem worldwide even today. Owing to the intricate nature of its interactions with the immune system, HIV has remained an enigma that cleverly utilizes the host machinery to survive. Its ability to evade the host immune system, at both levels, innate and adaptive, allows the pathogen to replicate and transmit from one host to another. It has been shown that HIV has multipronged effects especially on the adaptive immunity, with CD4+ T cells being the worst affected T cell populations. Various analyses have revealed that the exposure to HIV results in clonal expansion and excessive activation of the immune system. Also, an abnormal process of differentiation has been observed suggestive of an alteration and blocks in the maturation of various T cell subsets. Additionally, HIV has shown to accelerate immunosenescence and exhaustion of the overtly activated T cells. Apart from causing phenotypic changes, HIV has adverse effects on the functional aspect of the immune system, with evidences implicating it in the loss of the capacity of T cells to secrete various antiviral cytokines and chemokines. However, there continues to be many aspects of the immunopathogenesis of HIV that are still unknown and thus require further research to convert the malaise of HIV into a manageable epidemic. PMID:24434321

  5. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed.

  6. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  7. Modulation of HIV-1 immunity by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Moody, M. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the role of adjuvants in eliciting desirable antibody responses against HIV-1 with particular emphasis on both historical context and recent developments. Recent findings Increased understanding of the role of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors in recruiting and directing the immune system has increased the variety of adjuvant formulations being tested in animal models and humans. Across all vaccine platforms, adjuvant formulations have been shown to enhance desirable immune responses such as higher antibody titers and increased functional activity. Although no vaccine formulation has yet succeeded in eliciting broad neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, the ability of adjuvants to direct the immune response to immunogens suggests they will be critically important in any successful HIV-1 vaccine. Summary The parallel development of adjuvants along with better HIV-1 immunogens will be needed for a successful AIDS vaccine. Additional comparative testing will be required to determine the optimal adjuvant and immunogen regimen that can elicit antibody responses capable of blocking HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24670321

  8. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  9. How Artists Overcome Creative Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Six practicing artists were interviewed about how they overcome creative blocks. Their responses indicated that feelings of self-doubt, fear, and depression accompany blocks but that relaxing and working on new directions and playing ideas off a supportive person helped to overcome such blocks. (DB)

  10. Solving DAEs using block method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abasi, Naghmeh; Suleiman, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Zarina Bibi

    2013-04-01

    This paper is on solving semi-explicit index-one Differential Algebraic Equations (DAEs). The block method suggested computes the solutions of the DAE at 2-point simultaneously. The numerical results obtained are compared with non-block backward differentiation method (BDF). The comparison of the numerical results confirms that the block method developed is more efficient and accurate.

  11. On Post-Hoc Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonett, Douglas G.

    1982-01-01

    Post-hoc blocking and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) both employ a concomitant variable to increase statistical power relative to the completely randomized design. It is argued that the advantages attributed to the block design are not always valid and that there are circumstances when the ANCOVA would be preferred to post-hoc blocking.…

  12. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  13. HIV-1 Prevention for HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.; Coates, Thomas J.; Kurth, Ann; Mugo, Nelly R.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are in stable relationships with HIV-1-uninfected partners, and HIV-1 serodiscordant couples thus represent an important target population for HIV-1 prevention. Couple-based HIV-1 testing and counseling facilitates identification of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, counseling about risk reduction, and referrals to HIV-1 treatment, reproductive health services, and support services. Maximizing HIV-1 prevention for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples requires a combination of strategies, including counseling about condoms, sexual risk, fertility, contraception, and the clinical and prevention benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the HIV-1-infected partner; provision of clinical care and ART for the HIV-1-infected partner; antenatal care and services to prevent mother to child transmission for HIV-1- infected pregnant women; male circumcision for HIV-1-uninfected men; and, pending guidelines and demonstration projects, oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1-uninfected partners. PMID:22415473

  14. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; ...

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  15. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  16. Solar power building block

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.T.

    1982-04-20

    A building unit for exterior walls and the like comprising a molded block of glass having a recess in the side face which is to face the exterior, the recess having a side wall and an open outer end on which a fresnel lens is disposed, the inner end of the recess having a solar cell disposed therein so that sunlight passing through the fresnel lens impinges on the solar cell for the generation of electric power together with a battery disposed within a cavity molded in the block connected by a circuit to the solar cell for storing the generated electric power for subsequent use as needed in a residence or the like. A further embodiment has attached to the interior wall a black painted duct containing vertical radiant fins. This unit contains a ''window'' through which the concentrated radiation is directed by the lens arrangement of the side walls and front lens to create a highly energetic radiant impingement upon the black duct heating it. Air flowing vertically in the duct is used for heating of interior air or removal of superheated interior air by using the force of the rising air for an '' air cooling'' effect.

  17. Mechanisms of HIV persistence in HIV reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Mzingwane, Mayibongwe L; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2017-03-01

    The establishment and maintenance of HIV reservoirs that lead to persistent viremia in patients on antiretroviral drugs remains the greatest challenge of the highly active antiretroviral therapy era. Cellular reservoirs include resting memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, implicated as the major HIV reservoir, having a half-life of approximately 44 months while this is less than 6 hours for HIV in plasma. In some individuals, persistent viremia consists of invariant HIV clones not detected in circulating resting CD4+ T lymphocytes suggesting other possible sources of residual viremia. Some anatomical reservoirs that may harbor such cells include the brain and the central nervous system, the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and other lymphoid organs, and the genital tract. The presence of immune cells and other HIV susceptible cells, occurring in differing compositions in anatomical reservoirs, coupled with variable and poor drug penetration that results in suboptimal drug concentrations in some sites, are all likely factors that fuel the continued low-level replication and persistent viremia during treatment. Latently, HIV-infected CD4+ T cells harboring replication-competent virus, HIV cell-to-cell spread, and HIV-infected T cell homeostatic proliferation due to chronic immune activation represent further drivers of this persistent HIV viremia during highly active antiretroviral therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effects of human SAMHD1 Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    White, Tommy E.; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Knowlton, Caitlin; Kim, Baek; Sawyer, Sara L.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a human restriction factor that prevents efficient infection of macrophages, dendritic cells and resting CD4+ T cells by HIV-1. Here we explored the antiviral activity and biochemical properties of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms. Our studies focused on human SAMHD1 polymorphisms that were previously identified as evolving under positive selection for rapid amino acid replacement during primate speciation. The different human SAMHD1 polymorphisms were tested for their ability to block HIV-1, HIV-2 and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). All studied SAMHD1 variants block HIV-1, HIV-2 and EIAV infection when compared to wild type. We found that these variants did not lose their ability to oligomerize or to bind RNA. Furthermore, all tested variants were susceptible to degradation by Vpx, and localized to the nuclear compartment. We tested the ability of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms to decrease the dNTP cellular levels. In agreement, none of the different SAMHD1 variants lost their ability to reduce cellular levels of dNTPs. Finally, we found that none of the tested human SAMHD1 polymorphisms affected the ability of the protein to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. PMID:25010268

  19. HIV-1 Continues To Replicate and Evolve in Patients with Natural Control of HIV Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mens, Helene; Kearney, Mary; Wiegand, Ann; Shao, Wei; Schønning, Kristian; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W.; Benfield, Thomas; Coffin, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms leading to the natural control of HIV-1 infection is of great importance for vaccine design and for understanding viral pathogenesis. Rare HIV-1-infected individuals, termed HIV-1 controllers, have plasma HIV-1 RNA levels below the limit of detection by standard clinical assays (<50 to 75 copies/ml) without antiretroviral therapy. Although several recent studies have documented persistent low-grade viremia in HIV-1 controllers at a level not significantly different from that in HIV-1-infected individuals undergoing treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), it is unclear if plasma viruses are undergoing full cycles of replication in vivo or if the infection of new cells is completely blocked by host immune mechanisms. We studied a cohort of 21 HIV-1 controllers with a median level of viremia below 1 copy/ml, followed for a median of 11 years. Less than half of the cohort carried known protective HLA types (B*57/27). By isolating HIV-1 RNA from large volumes of plasma, we amplified single genome sequences of both pro-rt and env longitudinally. This study is the first to document that HIV-1 pro-rt and env evolve in this patient group, albeit at rates somewhat lower than in HIV-1 noncontrollers, in HLA B*57/27-positive, as well as HLA B*57/27-negative, individuals. Viral diversity and adaptive events associated with immune escape were found to be restricted in HIV-1 controllers, suggesting that replication occurs in the face of less overall immune selection. PMID:20926564

  20. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  1. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    HIV infection; Infection - HIV; Human immunodeficiency virus; Acquired immune deficiency syndrome ... The virus is spread (transmitted) person-to-person in any of the following ways: Through sexual contact Through blood -- ...

  2. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type of defense cell in the body called a CD4 helper ... are part of the body's immune system , the defense system that fights infections. When HIV destroys these ...

  3. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  4. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partner Spotlight Awareness Days Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or ... AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets ...

  5. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Histoplasmosis Chapter 3 - Influenza HIV Infection Philip J. Peters, John T. Brooks INFECTIOUS ... at 888-448-4911 ( www.nccc.ucsf.edu ). HIV TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR US TRAVELERS ENTERING FOREIGN COUNTRIES ...

  6. Children and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... to living with HIV disease, including, family issues, bullying and medication adherence. As children age into adolescence ... 60 years) infection. But many young adults and adolescents who have lived with HIV since they were ...

  7. HIV and employment.

    PubMed

    McGoldrick, C

    2012-06-01

    According to 2009 statistics, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected an estimated 86,500 individuals within the UK, although around one-quarter were unaware of their infection. In the majority of cases, it is now considered a long-term controllable but incurable infection. Indeed, most HIV-positive individuals are able to work. Employment is across most, if not all, workforce sectors and protection against workplace discrimination is provided by the Equality Act 2010. Issues including confidentiality, workplace adjustments, vaccinations and travel restrictions may be relevant to the occupational health of HIV-positive workers. There are special considerations concerning HIV-infected health care workers, including avoidance of performing exposure-prone procedures. Prevention of HIV acquisition in the workplace is relevant to a diverse range of occupational environments, and HIV post-exposure prophylaxis should be considered after potential HIV exposure incidents. If a worker contracts HIV by occupational means, financial help may be available.

  8. Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Hirofumi; Koike, Minoru; Takeuchi, Seiichi; Douhara, Noriyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK (robot block system) and the rational formula of robots were proposed. ROBO-BLOCK is composed of servo motors, the parts for servomotor rotor, the brackets for servomotor fixation, the board parts and the controllers. A robot can be assembled easily by ROBO-BLOCK. Meanwhile, it is convenient when the structure of the robot can be described easily as a character. The whole structure of the robot is expressed as rational formula of the robot to show molecule structure in chemistry. ROBO-BLOCK can be useful for not only the research but also the education. Creative student experiment was done in the college of industrial technology.

  9. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient.

  10. Block loss for ATM video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Sze K.; Leon-Garcia, Alberto

    1993-10-01

    In BISDN, the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) requires all information to be represented as a sequence of standard data units called cells. Cell los is inherent in ATM networks due to the cell header corruption and buffer overflow in the network. Several studies have shown that cell losses are bursty for an ATM network. In this work, we encoded real video sequences with a variable bit-rate (VBR) version of the H.261 video encoder in order for us to determine the relationship between blocks in a video frame and the number of ATM cells generated. We then considered the impact of bursty cell losses on image block loss probability. Block loss distributions are given at different codec and channel parameters. We also obtained block loss results using a cell loss correction scheme. Three sequences were analyzed to obtain the cumulative block loss probability distribution. Similar maximum and minimum block loss probability values were obtained for each sequence. The block loss probability distribution varies according to the amount and type of motion present in each sequence. We show that the block loss is confined to one group of blocks (GOB). The maximum block loss probability can be two orders of magnitude larger than the channel cell loss probability. By using the cell loss correction scheme, block loss was reduced to a level equivalent to reducing cell loss probability by five orders of magnitude.

  11. Block copolymer investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  12. NK cells are primed by ANRS MVA(HIV)-infected DCs, via a mechanism involving NKG2D and membrane-bound IL-15, to control HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Nieves, Uriel Y; Didier, Céline; Lévy, Yves; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Scott-Algara, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the major antiviral effector cell population of the innate immune system. It has been demonstrated that NK-cell activity can be modulated by the interaction with dendritic cells (DCs). The HIV-1 vaccine candidate Modified Vaccinia Ankara encoding an HIV polypeptide (MVA(HIV)), developed by the French National Agency for Research on AIDS (ANRS), has the ability to prime NK cells to control HIV-1 infection in DCs. However, whether or not MVA(HIV)-primed NK cells are able to better control HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, and the mechanism underlying the specific priming, remain undetermined. In this study, we show that MVA(HIV)-primed NK cells display a greater capacity to control HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4(+) T cells. We also highlight the importance of NKG2D engagement on NK cells and DC-produced IL-15 to achieve the anti-HIV-1 specific priming, as blockade of either NKG2D or IL-15 during MVA(HIV)-priming lead to a subsequent decreased control of HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we show that the decreased control of HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells might be due, at least in part, to the decreased expression of membrane-bound IL-15 (mbIL-15) on DCs when NKG2D is blocked during MVA(HIV)-priming of NK cells.

  13. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J.; Jellinger, Robert M.; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition. PMID:27093399

  14. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J; Jellinger, Robert M; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M C

    2016-04-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition.

  15. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  16. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  17. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  18. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Optical Company of America's Eagle 475 lens absorbs 100 percent of all photowavelengths considered hazardous to eye tissue, including ultraviolet and blue light, which are considered contributors to cataract and age-related macular degeneration. The lens absorbs hazardous wavelengths, but allows a higher percentage of visually useful areas of the spectrum to pass through. Polarization blocks out irritating glint and glare and heightens visual acuity. The Eagle 475 sunglasses are the latest in a series of spinoffs that originated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where two scientists developed a protective, welding curtain that filtered out harmful irradiance. The result was a commercial curtain that absorbs filters and scatters light, providing protection for personnel in welding areas. Further research focused on protective industrial glasses and later on consumer products.

  19. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  20. Baroplastic Block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewlett, Sheldon A.

    2005-03-01

    Block copolymers with rubbery and glassy components have been observed to have pressure induced miscibility. These microphase-separated materials, termed baroplastics, were able to flow and be processed at temperatures below the Tg of the glassy component by simple compression molding and extrusion. Diblock and triblock copolymers of polystyrene and poly(butyl acrylate) or poly(2-ethyl hexyl acrylate) were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and processed at room temperature into well defined transparent objects. SAXS and SANS measurements demonstrated partial mixing between components as a result of pressure during processing. DSC results also show the presence of distinct domains even after several processing cycles. Their mechanical properties after processing were tested and compared with commercial thermoplastic elastomers.

  1. Blocking the Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autzen, Martin; Kouvaris, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Some severe constraints on asymmetric dark matter are based on the scenario that certain types of weakly interacting massive particles can form mini-black holes inside neutron stars that can lead to their destruction. A crucial element for the realization of this scenario is that the black hole grows after its formation (and eventually destroys the star) instead of evaporating. The fate of the black hole is dictated by the two opposite mechanics, i.e., accretion of nuclear matter from the center of the star and Hawking radiation that tends to decrease the mass of the black hole. We study how the assumptions for the accretion rate can in fact affect the critical mass beyond which a black hole always grows. We also study to what extent degenerate nuclear matter can impede Hawking radiation due to the fact that emitted particles can be Pauli blocked at the core of the star.

  2. Some findings of FADD knockdown in inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells and PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Zhao, Jiangqin; Ragupathy, Viswannath; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Hewlett, Indira

    2014-08-01

    Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) is a key adaptor molecule transmitting the death signal mediated by death receptors, and it is also required for T cell proliferation. A recent study indicated that FADD is able to affect HIV-1 production, but the mechanism is not known. Using the susceptible Jurkat cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we studied the effects of FADD on HIV-1 production. TaqMan RT-PCR was used to quantify HIV-1 viral RNA copies, and Western blot analysis was used to detect protein expression. FADD knockdown decreased HIV-1 replication and inactivated caspase-3 activity in the cells and blocked CD4 translocation to the lipid rafts of the plasma membrane. Reduced expression of FADD suppressed TCR signaling through downregulation of TCR, CD3, and Zap-70 in response to HIV-1 infection and blocked the trafficking of TCR, CD3, CD28, and Zap-70 to lipid rafts, leading to reduced activation of NF-κB and NFAT, which are required for HIV-1 replication. FADD knockdown diminished caspase-8 migration to lipid rafts and its expression in response to HIV-1 infection. These results indicate that FADD, as a host pro-apoptotic protein, plays important roles in regulating HIV-1 replication and production in several ways, and apoptotic pathway inhibition is able to decrease HIV-1 replication and production.

  3. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Koup, Richard A; Ferrari, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However, antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Furthermore, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small-molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. IFN-ε protects primary macrophages against HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Carley; Subbian, Selvakumar; Gao, Pan; Couret, Jennifer; Levine, Carly; Ghanny, Saleena; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Zhao, Xilin; Landau, Nathaniel; Lu, Wuyuan

    2016-01-01

    IFN-ε is a unique type I IFN that is not induced by pattern recognition response elements. IFN-ε is constitutively expressed in mucosal tissues, including the female genital mucosa. Although the direct antiviral activity of IFN-ε was thought to be weak compared with IFN-α, IFN-ε controls Chlamydia muridarum and herpes simplex virus 2 in mice, possibly through modulation of immune response. We show here that IFN-ε induces an antiviral state in human macrophages that blocks HIV-1 replication. IFN-ε had little or no protective effect in activated CD4+ T cells or transformed cell lines unless activated CD4+ T cells were infected with replication-competent HIV-1 at a low MOI. The block to HIV infection of macrophages was maximal after 24 hours of treatment and was reversible. IFN-ε acted on early stages of the HIV life cycle, including viral entry, reverse transcription, and nuclear import. The protection did not appear to operate through known type I IFN-induced HIV host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3A and SAMHD1. IFN-ε–stimulated immune mediators and pathways had the signature of type I IFNs but were distinct from IFN-α in macrophages. IFN-ε induced significant phagocytosis and ROS, which contributed to the block to HIV replication. These findings indicate that IFN-ε induces an antiviral state in macrophages that is mediated by different factors than those induced by IFN-α. Understanding the mechanism of IFN-ε–mediated HIV inhibition through immune modulation has implications for prevention. PMID:27942584

  5. Inhibition of HIV infection of H9 cells by chlorpromazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, I; Lee, S; Molnar, J; Foldeak, S; Pine, P S; Weaver, J L; Aszalos, A

    1997-05-01

    The binding between the HIV surface protein, gp120, and the CD4 coreceptor is known to be initiated by electrostatic interactions. Because of the ability of chlorpromazine to interact with proteins by charge transfer, we tested several derivatives for their ability to block binding of HIV to CD4+ cells. We have shown that 7,8-dioxo-chlorpromazine blocks binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled anti-Leu3a and rgp120 to peripheral human blood T4 cells and blocks syncytia formation between gp120- and CD4-expressing cells. We also found that 7,8-dioxo-chlorpromazine blocks HIV infectivity of H9 cells and acts synergistically with zidovudine.

  6. Inhibition of Acute-, Latent-, and Chronic-Phase Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Replication by a Bistriazoloacridone Analog That Selectively Inhibits HIV-1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Jim A.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Derse, David; Hollingshead, Melinda; Williamson, Karen; Palamone, Carla; Osterling, M. Clayton; Hill, Shawn A.; Graham, Lisa; Schaeffer, Catherine A.; Bu, Ming; Huang, Mingjun; Cholody, Wieslaw M.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Rice, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Nanomolar concentrations of temacrazine (1,4-bis[3-(6-oxo-6H-v-triazolo[4,5,1-de]acridin-5-yl)amino-propyl]piperazine) were discovered to inhibit acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections and suppress the production of virus from chronically and latently infected cells containing integrated proviral DNA. This bistriazoloacridone derivative exerted its mechanism of antiviral action through selective inhibition of HIV-1 transcription during the postintegrative phase of virus replication. Mechanistic studies revealed that temacrazine blocked HIV-1 RNA formation without interference with the transcription of cellular genes or with events associated with the HIV-1 Tat and Rev regulatory proteins. Although temacrazine inhibited the in vitro 3′ processing and strand transfer activities of HIV-1 integrase, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of approximately 50 nM, no evidence of an inhibitory effect on the intracellular integration of proviral DNA into the cellular genome during the early phase of infection could be detected. Furthermore, temacrazine did not interfere with virus attachment or fusion to host cells or the enzymatic activities of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or protease, and the compound was not directly virucidal. Demonstration of in vivo anti-HIV-1 activity by temacrazine identifies bistriazoloacridones as a new class of pharmaceuticals that selectively blocks HIV-1 transcription. PMID:9517921

  7. [Virtual screening of small molecular HIV-1 entry inhibitor NC-2 targeting gp120 and its action mechanism].

    PubMed

    Duan, Heng; Wang, Yuqin; Song, Deshou; Chen, Zhipeng; Qiu, Jiayin; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Tan, Suiyi

    2013-06-01

    To screen the HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp120 from the IBS natural product database by virtual screening based on the binding mode of the neutralizing antibody VRC01 with HIV-1 gp120 and investigate the anti-viral activities of the inhibitors and their action mechanisms. The binding interaction of the candidate molecules binding gp120 and changes of the binding free energy were analyzed by MM-PBSA calculation. The anti-HIV-1 activities of the tested compounds were detected by HIV-1 pseudotyped virus, laboratory-adapted HIV-1 and a cell-cell fusion assay. The cytotoxicity of the studied molecules was examined by XTT colorimetric assay. The mechanisms of the anti-viral activities of the candidate molecules were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total of 19 molecules with distinct reduction of the binding free energy after binding with gp120 were screened from 40000 molecules. Among them, NC-2 showed anti-HIV-1 activities against HIV-1 pseudotyped virus and laboratory-adapted HIV-1, and was capable of blocking HIV-1 envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion. The IC50 of NC-2 for inhibiting HIV-1IIIB and pseudotyped HIV-1JRFL infection were 1.95∓0.44 µmol/L and 10.58∓0.13 µmol/L, respectively. The results of ELISA suggested that NC-2 could inhibit the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to CD4 without blocking the formation of gp41 six-helix bundle in vitro. This computer-based virtual screening method can be used to screen HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp120. Using this virtual screening approach combined with anti-viral activity screening, we obtained a potent HIV-1 entry inhibitor NC-2 with novel structure.

  8. Large Block Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  9. Interaction between HIV-1 Nef and calnexin: from modeling to small molecule inhibitors reversing HIV-induced lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Hunegnaw, Ruth; Vassylyeva, Marina; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Üren, Aykut; Brichacek, Beda; Vassylyev, Dmitry; Adzhubei, Alexei A.; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected patients are at an increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to downmodulation and functional impairment of ATP-Binding Cassette A1 (ABCA1) cholesterol transporter by the HIV-1 protein Nef. The mechanism of this effect involves Nef interacting with an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone calnexin and disrupting calnexin binding to ABCA1, leading to ABCA1 retention in ER, its degradation and resulting suppression of cholesterol efflux. However, molecular details of Nef-calnexin interaction remained unknown, limiting translational impact of this finding. Approach and results Here, we used molecular modeling and mutagenesis to characterize Nef-calnexin interaction and to identify small molecule compounds that could block it. We demonstrated that interaction between Nef and calnexin is direct and can be reconstituted using recombinant proteins in vitro with a binding affinity of 89.1 nM measured by surface plasmon resonance. The cytoplasmic tail of calnexin is essential and sufficient for interaction with Nef, and binds Nef with affinity of 9.4 nM. Replacing lysine residues in positions 4 and 7 of Nef with alanines abrogates Nef-calnexin interaction, prevents ABCA1 downregulation by Nef, and preserves cholesterol efflux from HIV-infected cells. Through virtual screening of the NCI library of compounds, we identified a compound, 1[(7-Oxo-7H-benz[de]anthracene-3-yl)amino]anthraquinone, which blocked Nef-calnexin interaction, partially restored ABCA1 activity in HIV-infected cells, and reduced foam cell formation in a culture of HIV-infected macrophages. Conclusion This study identifies potential targets that can be exploited to block the pathogenic effect of HIV infection on cholesterol metabolism and prevent atherosclerosis in HIV-infected subjects. PMID:27470515

  10. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  11. Paracervical Block Anesthesia in Labour

    PubMed Central

    Van Praagh, Ian G. L.; Povey, W. G.

    1966-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of paracervical block anesthesia were studied in 153 patients in the first stage of labour. Transient decrease in uterine activity was noted in 77 patients. There was no acceleration in cervical dilatation following the block. The duration of action of the block in 80 primiparas was 31 to 120 minutes in 69, and over 120 minutes in five. In the 73 multiparas, 53 of the blocks lasted 31 to 90 minutes, eight from 90 to 120 minutes, and two over 120 minutes. The results were good in 66 primiparas and 54 multiparas. The blocks failed in four primiparas and six multiparas. Twenty-six infants had low Apgar scores, but in none could this be related to the paracervical block. There were no significant fetal or maternal complications. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5903165

  12. Topical application of entry inhibitors as "virustats" to prevent sexual transmission of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Michael M; Jump, Robin; Pilch-Cooper, Heather A; Root, Michael; Sieg, Scott F

    2008-01-01

    With the continuing march of the AIDS epidemic and little hope for an effective vaccine in the near future, work to develop a topical strategy to prevent HIV infection is increasingly important. This stated, the track record of large scale "microbicide" trials has been disappointing with nonspecific inhibitors either failing to protect women from infection or even increasing HIV acquisition. Newer strategies that target directly the elements needed for viral entry into cells have shown promise in non-human primate models of HIV transmission and as these agents have not yet been broadly introduced in regions of highest HIV prevalence, they are particularly attractive for prophylaxis. We review here the agents that can block HIV cellular entry and that show promise as topical strategies or "virustats" to prevent mucosal transmission of HIV infection PMID:19094217

  13. Bystander CD4+ T lymphocytes survive in HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angelique; Ito, Yoshinori; Lima, Rosangela G.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with depletion of CD4(+) T cells. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether and to what extent uninfected ("bystander") CD4(+) T cells die in HIV-infected individuals. We address this question using a system of human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Tissue blocks were inoculated with HIV-1. After productive infection was established, they were treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine to protect from infection those CD4(+) T cells that had not yet been infected. These CD4(+) T cells residing in HIV-infected tissue are by definition bystanders. Our results demonstrate that after nevirapine application the number of bystander CD4(+) T cells is conserved. Thus, in the context of HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue, productive HIV infection kills infected cells but is not sufficient to cause the death of a significant number of uninfected CD4(+) T cells.

  14. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is an Innate Immune Sensor of HIV and Other Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Daxing; Wu, Jiaxi; Wu, You-Tong; Du, Fenghe; Aroh, Chukwuemika; Yan, Nan; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses, including HIV, can activate innate immune responses, but the host sensors for retroviruses are largely unknown. Here we show that HIV infection activates cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) to produce cGAMP, which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce type-I interferons and other cytokines. Inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase, but not integrase, abrogated interferon-β induction by the virus, suggesting that the reverse transcribed HIV DNA triggers the innate immune response. Knockout or knockdown of cGAS in mouse or human cell lines blocked cytokine induction by HIV, murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). These results indicate that cGAS is an innate immune sensor of HIV and other retroviruses. PMID:23929945

  15. Bystander CD4+ T lymphocytes survive in HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angelique; Ito, Yoshinori; Lima, Rosangela G.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with depletion of CD4(+) T cells. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether and to what extent uninfected ("bystander") CD4(+) T cells die in HIV-infected individuals. We address this question using a system of human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Tissue blocks were inoculated with HIV-1. After productive infection was established, they were treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine to protect from infection those CD4(+) T cells that had not yet been infected. These CD4(+) T cells residing in HIV-infected tissue are by definition bystanders. Our results demonstrate that after nevirapine application the number of bystander CD4(+) T cells is conserved. Thus, in the context of HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue, productive HIV infection kills infected cells but is not sufficient to cause the death of a significant number of uninfected CD4(+) T cells.

  16. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Statistics Center . How many people are diagnosed with HIV each year in the United States? In 2015, ...

  17. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/17/2017; last reviewed 1/17/2017) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  18. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K.; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life-cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1 infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb), suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection, but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that bNAbs can target CD4+ T cells infected with patient viruses and decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires FcγR engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:27199430

  19. Reliability computation from reliability block diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelson, P. O.; Eckstein, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Computer program computes system reliability for very general class of reliability block diagrams. Four factors are considered in calculating probability of system success: active block redundancy, standby block redundancy, partial redundancy, and presence of equivalent blocks in the diagram.

  20. Vaginal microbicides and the prevention of HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Blayne; Justman, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, nearly half of all individuals living with HIV are now women, who acquire the virus largely by heterosexual exposure. With an HIV vaccine likely to be years away, topical microbicide formulations applied vaginally or rectally are being investigated as another strategy for HIV prevention. A review of preclinical and clinical research on the development of microbicides formulated to prevent vaginal HIV transmission yielded 118 studies: 73 preclinical and 45 clinical. Preclinical research included in-vitro assays and cervical explant models, as well as animal models. Clinical research included phase I and II/IIb safety studies, and phase III efficacy studies. Whereas most phase I and phase II clinical trials have found microbicide compounds to be safe and well tolerated, phase III trials completed to date have not demonstrated efficacy in preventing HIV transmission. Topical microbicides are grouped into five classes of agents, based on where they disrupt the pathway of sexual transmission of HIV. These classes include surfactants/membrane disruptors, vaginal milieu protectors, viral entry inhibitors, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and a fifth group whose mechanism is unknown. The trajectory of microbicide development has been toward agents that block more specific virus—host cell interactions. Microbicide clinical trials face scientifically and ethically complex issues, such as the choice of placebo gel, the potential for viral resistance, and the inclusion of HIV-infected participants. Assessment of combination agents will most likely advance this field of research. PMID:18992405

  1. Interactive effects of cocaine on HIV infection: implication in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder and neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Santosh; Chitti, Sai V. P.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.; Saxena, Shailendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial epidemiological studies suggest that not only, being one of the reasons for the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but drug abuse also serves its role in determining the disease progression and severity among the HIV infected population. This article focuses on the drug cocaine, and its role in facilitating entry of HIV into the CNS and mechanisms of development of neurologic complications in infected individuals. Cocaine is a powerfully addictive central nervous system stimulating drug, which increases the level of neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) in the brain, by blocking the dopamine transporters (DAT) which is critical for DA homeostasis and neurocognitive function. Tat protein of HIV acts as an allosteric modulator of DAT, where as cocaine acts as reuptake inhibitor. When macrophages in the CNS are exposed to DA, their number increases. These macrophages release inflammatory mediators and neurotoxins, causing chronic neuroinflammation. Cocaine abuse during HIV infection enhances the production of platelet monocyte complexes (PMCs), which may cross transendothelial barrier, and result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). HAND is characterized by neuroinflammation, including astrogliosis, multinucleated giant cells, and neuronal apoptosis that is linked to progressive virus infection and immune deterioration. Cocaine and viral proteins are capable of eliciting signaling transduction pathways in neurons, involving in mitochondrial membrane potential loss, oxidative stress, activation of JNK, p38, and ERK/MAPK pathways, and results in downstream activation of NF-κB that leads to HAND. Tat-induced inflammation provokes permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in the platelet dependent manner, which can potentially be the reason for progression to HAND during HIV infection. A better understanding on the role of cocaine in HIV infection can give a clue in developing novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection

  2. Endometrial epithelial cell response to semen from HIV-infected men during different stages of infection is distinct and can drive HIV-1-long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Jessica K; Sheth, Prameet M; Nazli, Aisha; Osborne, Brendan J; Kovacs, Colin; Kaul, Rupert; Kaushic, Charu

    2012-01-02

    Although more than 60% of HIV transmission occurs via semen, little is known about the immune impact of seminal plasma on HIV susceptibility. Here, we examined the level of selected immunomodulatory factors in seminal plasma from HIV-uninfected and therapy-naive, HIV-infected men in acute and chronic stages; the cytokine response elicited by seminal plasma in genital epithelial cells (GECs); and whether any GEC response to seminal plasma could drive HIV replication in infected T cells. A panel of nine cytokines and chemokines was measured in seminal plasma from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected men and in primary GEC cultures following seminal plasma exposure. HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) activation was measured in 1G5 T cells exposed to supernatants from seminal plasma-treated GECs. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were present at significantly higher levels in seminal plasma from acute men, whereas transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was significantly higher in seminal plasma from chronic men. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production by GECs was significantly decreased following incubation with seminal plasma from chronic men. Blocking the TGF-β1 receptor in GECs prior to seminal plasma exposure enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Exposure to seminal plasma activated nuclear factor (NF)-κB in GECs and blocking it significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. GEC responses to seminal plasma, especially from acute men, significantly activated HIV-LTR activation in 1G5 T cells. Immunomodulatory factors in seminal plasma vary, depending on presence and stage of HIV infection. Exposure to seminal plasma leads to NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, whereas TGF-β in seminal plasma may suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine production by GECs. GEC responses to seminal plasma can activate HIV-LTR in infected CD4(+) T cells.

  3. HIV Testing in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV/AIDS HIV Testing in the United States HIV Testing in the United States Jun 23, 2017 ... States or for refugees. 27 Insurance Coverage of HIV Testing HIV testing that is “medically necessary” – recommended ...

  4. 31 CFR 593.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 593.301 Section 593.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR...

  5. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  10. Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the west to the east. This photograph reveals the alignment of trees within the central path of the park. In addition, this photograph exposes broken bricks aligning tree beds - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  11. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 586.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 586.301 Section 586.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF...

  17. 31 CFR 587.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 587.301 Section 587.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF...

  18. 31 CFR 549.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 549.301 Section 549.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  19. 31 CFR 543.302 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 543.302 Section 543.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CôTE D'IVOIRE SANCTIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 558.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 558.301 Section 558.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOUTH SUDAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  4. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  5. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 545.301 Section 545.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  6. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  7. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  8. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  9. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  10. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  11. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  12. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  13. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  14. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  17. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  19. HIV-1 Adapts To Replicate in Cells Expressing Common Marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Oliva, Alberto; Finzi, Andrés; Haim, Hillel; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that a major block to HIV-1 replication in common marmosets operates at the level of viral entry and that this block can be overcome by adaptation of the virus in tissue-cultured cells. However, our current studies indicate that HIV-1 encounters additional postentry blocks in common marmoset peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we show that the common marmoset APOBEC3G (A3G) and BST2 proteins block HIV-1 in cell cultures. Using a directed-evolution method that takes advantage of the natural ability of HIV-1 to mutate during replication, we have been able to overcome these blocks in tissue-cultured cells. In the adapted viruses, specific changes were observed in gag, vif, env, and nef. The contribution of these changes to virus replication in the presence of the A3G and BST2 restriction factors was studied. We found that certain amino acid changes in Vif and Env that arise during adaptation to marmoset A3G and BST2 allow the virus to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors. The changes in Vif reduce expression levels and encapsidation of marmoset APOBEC3G, while the changes in Env increase viral fitness and discretely favor cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, allowing viral escape from these restriction factors. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 can infect only humans and chimpanzees. The main reason for this narrow tropism is the presence in many species of dominant-acting factors, known as restriction factors, that block viral replication in a species-specific way. We have been exploring the blocks to HIV-1 in common marmosets, with the ultimate goal of developing a new animal model of HIV-1 infection in these monkeys. In this study, we observed that common marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2, two known restriction factors, are able to block HIV-1 in cell cultures. We have adapted HIV-1 to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors and have characterized the mechanisms of escape. These studies can help in the

  20. The HIV-1 viral synapse signals human foreskin keratinocytes to secrete thymic stromal lymphopoietin facilitating HIV-1 foreskin entry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Xu, L; Sennepin, A; Federici, C; Ganor, Y; Tudor, D; Damotte, D; Barry Delongchamps, N; Zerbib, M; Bomsel, M

    2017-04-26

    The complexity of signal transduction resulting from the contact of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells and mucosal cells has hampered our comprehension of HIV-1 mucosal entry. Such process is driven efficiently only by viral synapse contacts, whereas cell-free HIV-1 remains poorly infectious. Using CD4(+) T-cells expressing only HIV-1 envelope inoculated on human adult foreskin tissues, we designed methodologies to identify the signals transduced in foreskin keratinocytes following HIV-1-envelope-dependent viral synapse formation. We find that the viral synapse activates the MyD88-independent TLR-4-nuclear factor (NfκB) signaling pathway in keratinocytes and the subsequent secretion of cytokines including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a cytokine linking innate and T-helper type 2-adaptive immune responses. Moreover, the viral synapse upregulates the non-coding microRNA miR-375, known to control TSLP, and transfection of keratinocytes with anti-miR-375 blocks significantly TSLP secretion. Thus, the secretion of TSLP by keratinocytes is induced by the viral synapse in a miR-375 controlled manner. At the tissue level, these signals translate into the epidermal redistribution of Langerhans cells and formation of conjugates with T-cells, recapitulating the initial events observed in human foreskin infection by HIV-1. These results open new possibilities for designing strategies to block mucosal HIV-1 transmission, the major pathway by which HIV-1 spreads worldwide.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 26 April 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.23.

  1. A Shifted Block Lanczos Algorithm 1: The Block Recurrence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Roger G.; Lewis, John G.; Simon, Horst D.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we describe a block Lanczos algorithm that is used as the key building block of a software package for the extraction of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large sparse symmetric generalized eigenproblems. The software package comprises: a version of the block Lanczos algorithm specialized for spectrally transformed eigenproblems; an adaptive strategy for choosing shifts, and efficient codes for factoring large sparse symmetric indefinite matrices. This paper describes the algorithmic details of our block Lanczos recurrence. This uses a novel combination of block generalizations of several features that have only been investigated independently in the past. In particular new forms of partial reorthogonalization, selective reorthogonalization and local reorthogonalization are used, as is a new algorithm for obtaining the M-orthogonal factorization of a matrix. The heuristic shifting strategy, the integration with sparse linear equation solvers and numerical experience with the code are described in a companion paper.

  2. A Shifted Block Lanczos Algorithm 1: The Block Recurrence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Roger G.; Lewis, John G.; Simon, Horst D.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we describe a block Lanczos algorithm that is used as the key building block of a software package for the extraction of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large sparse symmetric generalized eigenproblems. The software package comprises: a version of the block Lanczos algorithm specialized for spectrally transformed eigenproblems; an adaptive strategy for choosing shifts, and efficient codes for factoring large sparse symmetric indefinite matrices. This paper describes the algorithmic details of our block Lanczos recurrence. This uses a novel combination of block generalizations of several features that have only been investigated independently in the past. In particular new forms of partial reorthogonalization, selective reorthogonalization and local reorthogonalization are used, as is a new algorithm for obtaining the M-orthogonal factorization of a matrix. The heuristic shifting strategy, the integration with sparse linear equation solvers and numerical experience with the code are described in a companion paper.

  3. Characterizing the inverses of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Nicholas M.; Hill, Judith C.; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the inversion of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices and comment on the behaviour of these inverses as one moves away from the diagonal. Using matrix Möbius transformations, we first present an O(1) representation (with respect to the number of block rows and block columns) for the inverse matrix and subsequently use this representation to characterize the inverse matrix. There are four symmetry-distinct cases where the blocks of the inverse matrix (i) decay to zero on both sides of the diagonal, (ii) oscillate on both sides, (iii) decay on one side and oscillate on the other and (iv) decay on one side and grow on the other. This characterization exposes the necessary conditions for the inverse matrix to be numerically banded and may also aid in the design of preconditioners and fast algorithms. Finally, we present numerical examples of these matrix types.

  4. Integrin α4β7 expression increases HIV susceptibility in activated cervical CD4+ T cells via an HIV attachment-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Tasker, Carley; Lespinasse, Pierre; Dai, Jihong; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Patricia; Lu, Wuyuan; Heller, Debra; Chang, Theresa L.

    2015-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cells, the principal target in acute SIV and HIV infection, are crucial for the establishment and dissemination of HIV infection in mucosal tissues. Studies indicate that α4β7 CD4+ T cells are preferentially infected by HIV in vitro and during acute SIV infection. The integrin α4β7 is thought to promote HIV capture by target cells; however, the role of integrin α4β7 in HIV transmission remains controversial. In this study, we characterized immune phenotypes of human cervical T cells and examined HIV preference in integrin α4β7+ CD4+ T cells. In vitro all-trans retinoic acid differentiated peripheral CD4+ T cells (at-RA differentiated cells) were included as a comparison. Results In both peripheral and cervical cells, the majority of HIV p24+ cells were activated CD4+ T cells expressing integrin α4β7. Among infected at-RA differentiated cells, the frequency of CCR5 expression was higher in HIV p24+ cells than in HIV p24- cells; no such difference was observed in cervical cells. Neither the cyclic hexapeptide CWLDVC nor a monoclonal antibody against integrin α4β7 blocked HIV attachment or gp120 binding to target cells regardless of the presence of CD4, indicating that integrin α4β7 did not facilitate HIV capture by target cells. Conclusion Integrin α4β7 expression increases HIV susceptibility, but the mechanism is not through promoting HIV binding to target cells. PMID:26167616

  5. Hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 elements used to detect inhibitors and monitor the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Nissley, Dwight V.; Boyer, Paul L.; Garfinkel, David J.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Strathern, Jeffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that hybrid retrotransposons composed of the yeast Ty1 element and the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 are active in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The RT activity of these hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 (his3AI/AIDS RT; HART) elements can be monitored by using a simple genetic assay. HART element reverse transcription depends on both the polymerase and RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. Here we demonstrate that the HART assay is sensitive to inhibitors of HIV-1 RT. (−)-(S)-8-Chloro-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione monohydrochloride (8 Cl-TIBO), a well characterized non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) of HIV-1 RT, blocks propagation of HART elements. HART elements that express NNRTI-resistant RT variants of HIV-1 are insensitive to 8 Cl-TIBO, demonstrating the specificity of inhibition in this assay. HART elements carrying NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1 RT can be used to identify compounds that are active against drug-resistant viruses. PMID:9811899

  6. HIV-1 infection induces strong production of IP-10 through TLR7/9-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    SIMMONS, Rachel P.; SCULLY, Eileen P.; GRODEN, Erin E.; BENEDICT, Kelly F.; CHANG, J. Judy; LANE, Kim; LIFSON, Jeff; ROSENBERG, Eric; LAUFFENBURGER, Douglas A.; ALTFELD, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the cytokine/chemokine profiles in response to HIV-1 viremia, and elucidate the pathways leading to HIV-1-induced inflammation. Design/Methods Plasma levels of 19 cytokines in individuals with early HIV-1 infection and individuals undergoing treatment interruptions were evaluated via multiplex assay. To investigate the cellular sources of relevant cytokines, sorted cells from HIV-1 infected individuals were assessed for mRNA expression. Relevant signaling pathways were assessed by comparing cytokine production patterns of PBMCs stimulated with intact HIV-1 or specific TLR stimulants with and without a TLR7/9 antagonist. Results IP-10 plasma concentration was most significantly associated with HIV-1 viral load and was the most significant contributor in a multivariate model. IP-10 mRNA was highly expressed in monocytes and mDCs and these cells were the dominant producers after in vitro stimulation with TLR7/8 ligands (CL097 and ssRNAGag1166), AT-2 HIV-1, and HIV-1NL43 virus. Partial least square discriminant analysis of culture supernatants revealed distinct cytokine/chemokine secretion profiles associated with intact viruses compared to TLR7/8 ligands alone, with IP-10 production linked to the former. A TLR7/9 antagonist blocked IP-10 production following whole virus stimulation, suggesting the involvement of TLR7/9 in the recognition of HIV-1 by these cells. Conclusions Monocytes and mDCs produce significant amounts of IP-10 in response to HIV-1 viremia and after in vitro stimulation with HIV-1. Stimulation with HIV-1-derived TLR7/8-ligands versus HIV-1 resulted in distinct cytokine/chemokine profiles, indicating additional pathways other than TLR7/8 that lead to the activation of innate immune cells by HIV-1. PMID:24096630

  7. Masquerading bundle branch block: a variety of right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Elizari, Marcelo V; Baranchuk, Adrian; Chiale, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    The so-called 'masquerading' type of right bundle branch block is caused by the simultaneous presence of a high-degree left anterior fascicular block often accompanied with severe left ventricular enlargement and/or fibrotic block in the anterolateral wall of the left ventricle. These conditions tend to reorient the terminal electrical forces of the QRS complex towards the left and upwards, in such a way that the characteristic slurred S wave in lead I becomes smaller or even disappears. In many cases of standard masquerading right bundle branch block, a small Q wave in lead I is present due to the initial forces of the left anterior fascicular block, which are oriented rightwards and inferiorly. However, in some cases, the Q wave in lead I also vanishes, and the mimicking of a left bundle branch block becomes perfect in standard leads. This is commonly associated with an inferior myocardial infarction or severe inferior fibrosis in cardiomyopathies. The typical QRS changes of right bundle branch block may eventually be concealed even in the right precordial leads; under such circumstances, the ECG diagnosis may be mistaken and the right bundle branch block totally missed. The masquerading right bundle branch block carries a poor prognosis, since it always implies the presence of a severe underlying heart disease.

  8. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... and your loved ones from HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Memorial Quilt In 1987, a total of 1, ...

  9. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  10. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us | En Español OFFERING INFORMATION ON HIV/AIDS TREATMENT, PREVENTION, AND RESEARCH Search Search Search Search Search Menu Home Guidelines Understanding HIV/AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps Home Guidelines Understanding HIV/ ...

  11. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... Victoria Cargill talks to students about HIV and AIDS at the opening of a National Library of ...

  12. Sex and Sexuality and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... level of risk you are willing to take. Birth control and HIV The only forms of birth control ... protect against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. Birth control options that DO protect against HIV: abstinence (not ...

  13. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS email updates Enter email Submit HIV and AIDS The human immunodeficiency (IH-myoo-noh-di-FISH- ... health Pregnancy and HIV View more HIV and AIDS resources Related information Birth control methods Sexually transmitted ...

  14. HIV/AIDS in Women

    MedlinePlus

    HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, kills or damages cells of the body's immune system. The most advanced stage of infection with HIV is AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV often ...

  15. FAITH - Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV.

    PubMed

    Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    Due to the high number of drug-resistant HIV-1 mutants generated by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there is continuing demand for new types of inhibitors. Both the assembly of the Gag polyprotein into immature and mature HIV-1 particles are attractive candidates for the blocking of the retroviral life cycle. Currently, no therapeutically-used assembly inhibitor is available. One possible explanation is the lack of a reliable and simple assembly inhibitor screening method. To identify compounds potentially inhibiting the formation of both types of HIV-1 particles, we developed a new fluorescent high-throughput screening assay. This assay is based on the quantification of the assembly efficiency in vitro in a 96-well plate format. The key components of the assay are HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins and a dual-labelled oligonucleotide, which emits fluorescence only when the assembly of retroviral particles is inhibited. The method was validated using three (CAI, BM2, PF74) reported assembly inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Region 9 Census Block 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Geography:The TIGER Line Files are feature classes and related database files (.) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. Census Blocks are statistical areas bounded on all sides by visible features, such as streets, roads, streams, and railroad tracks, and/or by non visible boundaries such as city, town, township, and county limits, and short line-of-sight extensions of streets and roads. Census blocks are relatively small in area; for example, a block in a city bounded by streets. However, census blocks in remote areas are often large and irregular and may even be many square miles in area. A common misunderstanding is that data users think census blocks are used geographically to build all other census geographic areas, rather all other census geographic areas are updated and then used as the primary constraints, along with roads and water features, to delineate the tabulation blocks. As a result, all 2010 Census blocks nest within every other 2010 Census geographic area, so that Census Bureau statistical data can be tabulated at the block level and aggregated up t

  17. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  18. Writing Blocks and Tacit Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A review of the literature on writing block looks at two kinds: inability to write in a timely, fluent fashion, and reluctance by academicians to assist others in writing. Obstacles to fluent writing are outlined, four historical trends in treating blocks are discussed, and implications are examined. (MSE)

  19. The Effectiveness of Block Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamean, Sharon Lightle; Horvath, Robert Jeffery

    This report describes a program for the exploration of block scheduling. The targeted population consists of high school students in a growing, middle-class community, located in a suburban setting of a large mid-western city. The historical background of block scheduling is documented through data gathered using attendance reports, student…

  20. Foreign Language on the Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    The guide is designed to address concerns of North Carolina second/foreign language teachers and school administrators as they plan and implement block class scheduling. The first section outlines the rationale and special considerations for block scheduling, and offers some typical schedule options. North Carolina's instructional time…

  1. Building Minds by Block Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montopoli, Linda

    Noting that the process of playing with blocks supports the groundwork for learning in every area of a child's growth, this paper discusses specific uses of building blocks in the early childhood curriculum to develop a child's physical, social, emotional, artistic, language, scientific and mathematics growth. The paper outlines the contributions…

  2. Stimulation of HIV-1 Replication in Immature Dendritic Cells in Contact with Primary CD4 T or B Lymphocytes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Vincent; Xu, Ke; Peressin, Maryse; Lederle, Alexandre; Biedma, Marina Elizabeth; Delaporte, Maryse; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Moog, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Sexual transmission is the major route of HIV-1 infection worldwide. Dendritic cells (DCs) from the mucosal layers are considered to be the initial targets of HIV-1 and probably play a crucial role in HIV-1 transmission. We investigated the role of cell-to-cell contact between HIV-1-exposed immature DCs and various lymphocyte subsets in the stimulation of HIV-1 replication. We found that HIV-1 replication and production in DCs were substantially enhanced by the coculture of DCs with primary CD4 T or nonpermissive B lymphocytes but not with primary activated CD8 T lymphocytes or human transformed CD4 T lymphocytes. Most of the new virions released by cocultures of HIV-1-exposed immature DCs and primary B lymphocytes expressed the DC-specific marker CD1a and were infectious for both immature DCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Cocultured DCs thus produced large numbers of infectious viral particles under these experimental conditions. The soluble factors present in the supernatants of the cocultures were not sufficient to enhance HIV-1 replication in DCs, for which cell-to-cell contact was required. The neutralizing monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 and polyclonal anti-HIV-1 sera efficiently blocked HIV-1 transfer to CD4 T lymphocytes but did not prevent the increase in viral replication in DCs. Neutralizing antibodies thus proved to be more efficient at blocking HIV-1 transfer than previously thought. Our findings show that HIV-1 exploits DC-lymphocyte cross talk to upregulate replication within the DC reservoir. We provide evidence for a novel mechanism that may facilitate HIV-1 replication and transmission. This mechanism may favor HIV-1 pathogenesis, immune evasion, and persistence. PMID:20147388

  3. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  4. Parenting and HIV.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Tamsen; Netsi, Elena; Redinger, Stephanie; Stein, Alan

    2017-06-01

    With the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy and successful prevention of mother-to-child transmission the development of HIV-negative children with HIV-positive parents has become an important focus. There is considerable evidence that children's developmental risk is heightened because a parental HIV-diagnosis is associated with a range of potential problems such as depression, stigma and financial difficulties. Up to a third of children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are cared for by an HIV-positive parent or caregiver. We review the mechanisms by which HIV affects parenting including its negative effects on parental responsiveness in the early years of parenting and parental avoidant coping styles and parenting deficits in the later years. We describe low-cost parenting interventions suited for low resourced HIV endemic settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. HIV testing in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Jeannin, A; Dubois-Arber, F; Paccaud, F

    1994-11-01

    To obtain information about the prevalence of, reasons for, and adequacy of HIV testing in the general population in Switzerland in 1992. Telephone survey (n = 2800). Some 47% of the sample underwent one HIV test performed through blood donation (24%), voluntary testing (17%) or both (6%). Of the sample, 46% considered themselves well or very well informed about the HIV test. Patients reported unsystematic pre-test screening by doctors for the main HIV risks. People having been in situations of potential exposure to risk were more likely to have had the test than others. Overall, 85% of those HIV-tested had a relevant, generally risk-related reason for having it performed. HIV testing is widespread in Switzerland. Testing is mostly performed for relevant reasons. Pre-test counselling is poor and an opportunity for prevention is thus lost.

  6. Drug-Induced Reactivation of Apoptosis Abrogates HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Saxena, Deepti; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; Luchessi, Augusto D.; Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Hoque, Mainul; Spino, Michael; Gandolfi, Darlene D'Alliessi; Heller, Debra S.; Singh, Sukhwinder; Park, Myung Hee; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Cone, Richard A.; Holland, Bart; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 blocks apoptosis, programmed cell death, an innate defense of cells against viral invasion. However, apoptosis can be selectively reactivated in HIV-infected cells by chemical agents that interfere with HIV-1 gene expression. We studied two globally used medicines, the topical antifungal ciclopirox and the iron chelator deferiprone, for their effect on apoptosis in HIV-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates. Both medicines activated apoptosis preferentially in HIV-infected cells, suggesting that the drugs mediate escape from the viral suppression of defensive apoptosis. In infected H9 cells, ciclopirox and deferiprone enhanced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, initiating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis to execution, as evidenced by caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase proteolysis, DNA degradation, and apoptotic cell morphology. In isolate-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ciclopirox collapsed HIV-1 production to the limit of viral protein and RNA detection. Despite prolonged monotherapy, ciclopirox did not elicit breakthrough. No viral re-emergence was observed even 12 weeks after drug cessation, suggesting elimination of the proviral reservoir. Tests in mice predictive for cytotoxicity to human epithelia did not detect tissue damage or activation of apoptosis at a ciclopirox concentration that exceeded by orders of magnitude the concentration causing death of infected cells. We infer that ciclopirox and deferiprone act via therapeutic reclamation of apoptotic proficiency (TRAP) in HIV-infected cells and trigger their preferential elimination. Perturbations in viral protein expression suggest that the antiretroviral activity of both drugs stems from their ability to inhibit hydroxylation of cellular proteins essential for apoptosis and for viral infection, exemplified by eIF5A. Our findings identify ciclopirox and deferiprone as prototypes of selectively cytocidal

  7. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This instructor guide together with a student guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The instructor guide is a resource for planning and managing individualized, competency-based instruction in six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units with some units having several…

  8. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This student guide together with an instructor guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The student guide contains self-contained instructional material that students can study at their own pace most of the time. Six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units, with some units…

  9. Block Curricula: A Guide to Teaching with Unit Blocks and Hollow Blocks in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Phyllis; Tiedemann, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for preschool teachers was designed for use with wooden unit and hollow blocks to foster a variety of math, science, language, and social skills. Following an introduction to the curriculum and a discussion of cooperative learning and stages of block building, the guide is divided into three parts. Part 1 of the guide,…

  10. HIV Evolution and Escape.

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Smith, Davey M.; Wrin, Terri; Petropoulos, Christos; Wong, Joseph K.

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exemplifies the principles of Darwinian evolution with a telescoped chronology. Because of its high mutation rate and remarkably high rates of replication, evolution can be appreciated over periods of days in contrast to the durations conceived of by Darwin. Certain selective pressures that drive the evolution of HIV include chemotherapy, anatomic compartmentalization and the immune response. Examples of these selective forces on HIV evolution are described. Images Fig. 5 PMID:17060974

  11. Science challenging HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Lakshi, V

    1993-04-01

    The first accepted report of a novel human, slow virus disease belonging to "lentivirus" known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be traced to reports of June 1981. HIV-1 and HIV-2 were later found over the period 1984-86 to be unequivocally associated with AIDS. They are two serologically distinct viruses belonging to the same family with the unique properties of integration and latency in the host cell genome and the presence of reverse transcriptase. Typical of all retroviruses, the HIV genome comprises three genes governing the synthesis of all core proteins, replication protein encoding, and envelope proteins. HIV uses the CD4 antigen on T-helper cells, and about 40% of blood monocytes and tissue macrophages as a cell surface receptor. HIV may, however, also infect cells which contain no CD4. Macrophages serve as the main reservoir of HIV and may carry the virus to different organs. Very recently a rare type of white blood cell called the dendritic cell has been found to allow for direct infection by HIV during sexual intercourse. These cells are prominently present in the anal and vaginal mucosa. The authors discuss facts and figures on the HIV epidemic, the Indian scenario, classification of the clinical spectrum, the enzyme immunoassay HIV testing format, Western blot, immunofluorescence antibody, HIV culture, flow cytometry, radio immuno precipitation assay, and the detection of HIV DNA. Significant advances have been made over the last ten years in understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection and accurately diagnosing infected individuals, with recombinant technology, polymerase chain reaction, and the construction of synthetic hybrid virus rapidly becoming part of routine diagnostics. More sensitive, specific, and rapid techniques are, however, needed for the early diagnosis and management of AIDS cases. The need for more ideal antibody incorporating both regulatory and structural proteins of the virion, preferably manufactured using

  12. CCR5 inhibitors: Emerging promising HIV therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Padmasri Kutikuppala Surya

    2009-01-01

    Though potent anti-HIV therapy has spectacularly reduced the morbidity and mortality of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection in the advanced countries, it continues to be associated with substantial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, difficulties in adherence, and abnormal cost. As a result, better effective, safe antiretroviral drugs and treatment strategies keep on to be pursued. In this process, CCR5 (chemokine receptor 5) inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral drug used in the treatment of HIV. They are designed to prevent HIV infection of CD4 T-cells by blocking the CCR5. When the CCR5 receptor is unavailable, 'R5-tropic' HIV (the variant of the virus that is common in earlier HIV infection) cannot engage with a CD4 T-cell to infect the cell. In August 2007, the FDA approved the first chemokine (C-C motif) CCR5 inhibitor, maraviroc, for treatment-experienced patients infected with R5-using virus. Studies from different cohort in regions, affected by clad B HIV-1, demonstrate that 81-88% of HIV-1 variants in treatment naïve patients are CCR5 tropic and that virtually all the remaining variants are dual/mixed tropic i.e., are able to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 coreceptors. In treatment experienced patients, 49-78% of the variants are purely CCR5 tropic, 22-48% are dual/mixed tropic, and 2-5% exclusively utilize CXCR4. A 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene, which results in a frame shift and truncation of the normal CCR5 protein, was identified in a few persons who had remained uninfected after exposure to CCR5 tropic HIV-1 virus. This allele is common in white of European origin, with prevalence near to 10%, but is absent among East Asian, American Indian, Tamil Indian, and African ethnic groups. HIV-infected individuals, who are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32, have slower rates of disease progression. The currently available data supports the continuation of the development of CCR5 antagonists in different settings related to HIV-1 infection. If

  13. Snell's Law with Large Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, John J.

    2007-03-01

    The introductory physics lab curriculum usually has one experiment devoted to the study of the refraction of light. The most obvious way to study the refraction of light is to lay a transparent block down on the lab bench and aim a laser beam horizontally at the block so that it refracts twice—inward upon entering the block and outward upon exiting. The vendors that provide us with lab equipment (Sargent-Welch, PASCO, Fisher Scientific, and Frey Scientific to name a few) sell acrylic blocks for this very purpose, but these are either too small or they are too expensive. If students are going to measure angles of incidence and refraction, the blocks should be larger than the typical student protractor, which has a radius of 3 in (≈ 7½ cm). These blocks are just not large enough. They are generally not thick enough either so that the beam from a typical laser passes over them and not through them. The vendors mentioned above do sell blackboard optics kits that contain, among other parts, three blocks that are large enough—on the order of 10 to 20 cm. Unfortunately, these kits cost more than 1000.

  14. 31 CFR 560.322 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... name of the Government of Iran, any Iranian financial institution, or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 560.211, or in which the Government of Iran, an...

  15. 31 CFR 560.322 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... name of the Government of Iran, any Iranian financial institution, or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 560.211, or in which the Government of Iran, an...

  16. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  17. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  18. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  19. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  20. Psychogenic "HIV infection".

    PubMed

    Sno, H N; Storosum, J G; Wortel, C H

    1991-01-01

    The case of a man who falsely represented himself as being HIV positive is reported. In less than one year he was admitted twice with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. The diagnoses malingering and factitious disorder were consecutively made. Early recognition of Factitious Disorder is essential to prevent patients from harmful diagnostic procedures or surgical treatments. Psychiatric treatment is best focused on management and care rather than cure. Psychogenic "HIV infection" might become more common than acknowledged up to now. Physicians should consider the occurrence of psychogenic "HIV infection," part of the symptomatology may be psychogenically determined, or indeed frankly simulated.

  1. Gynecologic conditions and HIV.

    PubMed

    1997-07-01

    Studies are reinforcing the need for HIV-infected women to continue getting regular gynecologic examinations so that gynecologic complications can be detected early and monitored regularly. HIV-infected women who also have the human papillomavirus are more likely to progress to cervical cancer than their HIV-negative counterparts. Also, HIV-infected women are more likely to have abnormal pap smears and the presence of squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) compared to women who are HIV-negative. Because pap smears are not always accurate, women who have a history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or SIL should probably include a colposcopy with their pap smear. Studies are showing a positive effect of anti-HIV therapy in lowering viral levels in vaginal secretions and in blood and semen in men. HIV RNA levels, however, have increased in vaginal secretions in response to standard treatment for CIN. HIV levels have also been shown to increase in the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, but when HIV viral levels are suppressed, there appears to be a lower susceptibility to gynecologic infections. Since research shows the benefits of early detection and treatment of gynecologic infections or conditions, all women should be aggressive and proactive in maintaining their health through regular gynecologic care.

  2. Mental Health and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policies and Reports Provider Education Provider Education Home HIV Meds Updates Online Courses (CME) Case Studies Journal Articles Glossary Quick References Quick References Home Guidelines Integrated ...

  3. 1-2-3 Blocks: Beginning Block Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Evelyn

    This book discusses ways that blocks can be used with young children to help them develop different intellectual, motor, and social skills. The book is divided into four sections organized by block type: (1) unit blocks; (2) hollow blocks; (3) table blocks; and (4) homemade blocks. Each section describes the block type, gives reasons for using the…

  4. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruizhong; Achenbach, Jenna; Shen, Yue; Palaia, Jana; Rahkola, Jeremy T; Nick, Heidi J; Smythies, Lesley E; McConnell, Michelle; Fowler, Mary G; Smith, Phillip D; Janoff, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT). Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs) and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  5. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  6. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-03-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  7. Optimizing management of treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV+ patients: the role of maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Poveda, Eva; Soriano, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Maraviroc is the first CCR5 antagonist approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. It specifically inhibits the replication of R5 viruses by blocking viral entry. HIV-1 tropism can be estimated accurately and predict viral response to maraviroc. Genotypic tools are increasingly replacing phenotypic assays in most places. The favorable pharmacokinetic properties and the good safety profile of maraviroc may support an earlier use of the drug in HIV-1 infection, as well as favor its consideration as part of switch strategies in patients under suppressive antiret-roviral regimens containing less-well-tolerated drugs. Moreover, a particular immune benefit of maraviroc might encourage its use as part of intensification strategies in HIV-infected patients with impaired CD4 gains despite prolonged suppression of HIV replication with antiretroviral therapy. However, the long-term consequences of using maraviroc must be carefully checked, given its particular mechanism of action, blocking a physiologic cell receptor. PMID:22096384

  8. Cell activation and HIV-1 replication in unstimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes ingesting exosomes from cells expressing defective HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Arenaccio, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Columba-Cabezas, Sandra; Manfredi, Francesco; Federico, Maurizio

    2014-06-12

    A relevant burden of defective HIV-1 genomes populates PBMCs from HIV-1 infected patients, especially during HAART treatment. These viral genomes, although unable to codify for infectious viral particles, can express viral proteins which may affect functions of host cells as well as bystander ones. Cells expressing defective HIV-1 have a lifespan longer than that of cells producing infectious particles. Hence, their interaction with other cell types, including resting lymphocytes, is expected to occur frequently in tissues where HIV actively replicates. We investigated the effects of the expression of a prototype of functionally defective HIV-1 on bystander, unstimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. We observed that unstimulated human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes were activated and became permissive for HIV-1 replication when co-cultivated with cells expressing a functionally defective HIV-1 (F12/Hut-78 cells). This effect depended on the presence in F12/Hut-78 supernatants of nanovesicles we identified as exosomes. By inspecting the underlying mechanism, we found that ADAM17, i.e., a disintegrin and metalloprotease converting pro-TNF-α in its mature form, associated with exosomes from F12/Hut-78 cells, and played a key role in the HIV-1 replication in unstimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. In fact, the treatment with an inhibitor of ADAM17 abolished both activation and HIV-1 replication in unstimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. TNF-α appeared to be the downstream effector of ADAM17 since the treatment of unstimulated lymphocytes with antibodies against TNF-α or its receptors blocked the HIV-1 replication. Finally, we found that the expression of NefF12 in exosome-producing cells was sufficient to induce the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in unstimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. Exosomes from cells expressing a functionally defective mutant can induce cell activation and HIV-1 susceptibility in unstimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. This evidence highlights the relevance for AIDS pathogenesis

  9. Escape from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, Christopher J.; Weiss, Carol D.

    2012-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enters cells through a series of molecular interactions between the HIV envelope protein and cellular receptors, thus providing many opportunities to block infection. Entry inhibitors are currently being used in the clinic, and many more are under development. Unfortunately, as is the case for other classes of antiretroviral drugs that target later steps in the viral life cycle, HIV can become resistant to entry inhibitors. In contrast to inhibitors that block viral enzymes in intracellular compartments, entry inhibitors interfere with the function of the highly variable envelope glycoprotein as it continuously adapts to changing immune pressure and available target cells in the extracellular environment. Consequently, pathways and mechanisms of resistance for entry inhibitors are varied and often involve mutations across the envelope gene. This review provides a broad overview of entry inhibitor resistance mechanisms that inform our understanding of HIV entry and the design of new inhibitors and vaccines. PMID:23342377

  10. Productive replication of Vif-chimeric HIV-1 in feline cells.

    PubMed

    Stern, Melissa A; Hu, Chunling; Saenz, Dyana T; Fadel, Hind J; Sims, Olivia; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M

    2010-07-01

    Nonprimate animal models of HIV-1 infection are prevented by missing cellular cofactors and by antiviral actions of species-specific host defense factors. These blocks are profound in rodents but may be less abundant in certain Carnivora. Here, we enabled productive, spreading replication and passage of HIV-1 in feline cells. Feline fibroblasts, T-cell lines, and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells supported early and late HIV-1 life cycle phases in a manner equivalent to that of human cells, except that produced virions had low infectivity. Stable expression of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in HIV-1 entry receptor-complemented feline (CrFK) cells enabled robust spreading HIV-1 replication. FIV Vif colocalized with feline APOBEC3 (fA3) proteins, targeted them for degradation, and prevented G-->A hypermutation of the HIV-1 cDNA by fA3CH and fA3H. HIV-1 Vif was inactive against fA3s as expected and even paradoxically augmented restriction in some assays. In an interesting contrast, simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac Vif had substantial anti-fA3 activities, which were complete against fA3CH and partial against fA3H. Moreover, both primate lentiviral Vifs colocalized with fA3s and could be pulled down from cell lysates by fA3CH. HIV-1 molecular clones that encode FIV Vif or SIVmac Vif (HIV-1(VF) and HIV-1(VS)) were then constructed. These viruses replicated productively in HIV-1 receptor-expressing CrFK cells and could be passaged serially to uninfected cells. Thus, with the exception of entry receptors, the cat genome can supply the dependency factors needed by HIV-1, and a main restriction can be countered by vif chimerism. The results raise the possibility that the domestic cat could yield an animal model of HIV-1 infection.

  11. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hyperlipidemia

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Hyperlipidemia (Last updated 11/22/2016; last reviewed 11/22/2016) Key Points Hyperlipidemia refers to high levels ... pancreas). HIV infection and treatment with some HIV medicines can increase the risk of hyperlipidemia. Other risk ...

  12. Slow progress against HIV.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, K

    1995-01-01

    Treatment for people with HIV attempts to prevent HIV from reproducing, boost the immune system, or cure opportunistic infections. The chemical structure of anti-viral drugs is similar to that of DNA. Since HIV bonds with the drugs rather than DNA, it cannot replicate itself. The most widely used anti-viral drug is zidovudine or AZT (brand name, Retrovir), but it does not help HIV infected persons who are still healthy. A recent trial shows that a combination of anti-viral drugs is more likely to delay opportunistic infections and death than AZT alone. When pregnant women use AZT before and during delivery and when their newborns receive AZT therapy, the likelihood of HIV transmission to the newborn is reduced by about 66%. Follow-up studies are needed, however, since AZT is toxic. Disadvantages of anti-viral drugs include resistance, toxicity, side effects (e.g., nausea and anemia), which are particularly severe at high doses, and accessibility of regular and expensive monitoring tests. Protease inhibitors are in the early stages of development. They deactivate the HIV enzyme which allows HIV to attach to white blood cells. Imuthiol (DTC) aims to increase the number of white blood cells so the body can fight HIV longer, but it appears that it has no benefit and may even facilitate development of opportunistic infections. Interleuken 2 may increase the number of CD4 cells. Alternative approaches to strengthening the immune system are lifestyle changes, improved diet, reduced stress, Chinese medicine and acupuncture, herbal medicines, and relaxation exercises. HIV/AIDS therapies are very expensive and often induce side effects. Many HIV positive people in developed countries are opting out of these treatments, even though they have access to them. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infection remain the best strategies for most HIV-infected persons.

  13. Atrioventricular block during fetal life

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lindsey E.; Simpson, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular (AV) block occurs in approximately 1 in 20,000 live births and is known to result in significant mortality and morbidity both during fetal life and postnatally. Complete AV block can occur as a result of an immune or a non-immune mediated process. Immune mediated AV block is a multifactorial disease, but is associated with the trans-placental passage of maternal autoantibodies (anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB). These autoantibodies attach to and subsequently damage the cardiomyocytes and conduction tissue in susceptible fetuses. In this report, we examine the evidence in reference to means of assessment, pathophysiology, and potential prenatal therapy of atrioventricular block. PMID:26136631

  14. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  15. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... to the eardrum) and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  16. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  17. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  18. The Presence and Anti-HIV-1 Function of Tenascin C in Breast Milk and Genital Fluids.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Robin G; Stamper, Lisa; Jaeger, Frederick; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve; Amos, Joshua; Barbas, Kimberly; Ohashi, Tomoo; Alam, S Munir; Erickson, Harold; Permar, Sallie R

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is a newly identified innate HIV-1-neutralizing protein present in breast milk, yet its presence and potential HIV-inhibitory function in other mucosal fluids is unknown. In this study, we identified TNC as a component of semen and cervical fluid of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, although it is present at a significantly lower concentration and frequency compared to that of colostrum and mature breast milk, potentially due to genital fluid protease degradation. However, TNC was able to neutralize HIV-1 after exposure to low pH, suggesting that TNC could be active at low pH in the vaginal compartment. As mucosal fluids are complex and contain a number of proteins known to interact with the HIV-1 envelope, we further studied the relationship between the concentration of TNC and neutralizing activity in breast milk. The amount of TNC correlated only weakly with the overall innate HIV-1-neutralizing activity of breast milk of uninfected women and negatively correlated with neutralizing activity in milk of HIV-1 infected women, indicating that the amount of TNC in mucosal fluids is not adequate to impede HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, the presence of polyclonal IgG from milk of HIV-1 infected women, but not other HIV-1 envelope-binding milk proteins or monoclonal antibodies, blocked the neutralizing activity of TNC. Finally, as exogenous administration of TNC would be necessary for it to mediate measurable HIV-1 neutralizing activity in mucosal compartments, we established that recombinantly produced TNC has neutralizing activity against transmitted/founder HIV-1 strains that mimic that of purified TNC. Thus, we conclude that endogenous TNC concentration in mucosal fluids is likely inadequate to block HIV-1 transmission to uninfected individuals.

  19. FAITH – Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    SciTech Connect

    Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš

    2015-12-15

    Due to the high number of drug-resistant HIV-1 mutants generated by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there is continuing demand for new types of inhibitors. Both the assembly of the Gag polyprotein into immature and mature HIV-1 particles are attractive candidates for the blocking of the retroviral life cycle. Currently, no therapeutically-used assembly inhibitor is available. One possible explanation is the lack of a reliable and simple assembly inhibitor screening method. To identify compounds potentially inhibiting the formation of both types of HIV-1 particles, we developed a new fluorescent high-throughput screening assay. This assay is based on the quantification of the assembly efficiency in vitro in a 96-well plate format. The key components of the assay are HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins and a dual-labelled oligonucleotide, which emits fluorescence only when the assembly of retroviral particles is inhibited. The method was validated using three (CAI, BM2, PF74) reported assembly inhibitors. - Highlights: • Allows screening of assembly inhibitors of both mature and immature HIV-1 particles. • Based on Gag-derived proteins with CA in mature or immature conformation. • Simple and sensitive method suitable for high-throughput screening of inhibitors. • Unlike in other HIV assembly methods, works under physiological conditions. • No washing steps are necessary.

  20. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part II: HIV.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Anna; Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

    This is a second part of a review under a main title Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. In the part we published in Mini Rev Med Chem. 2013,13(13):1837-45, we have described mechanisms of action and mechanism of resistance to antiviral agents used in genital herpes and genital HPV infection. The Part II review focuses on therapeutic options in HIV infection. In 1987, 6 years after the recognition of AIDS, the FDA approved the first drug against HIV--zidovudine. Since then a lot of antiretroviral drugs are available. The most effective treatment for HIV is highly active antiretroviral therapy--a combination of several antiretroviral medicines that cause a reduction of HIV blood concentration and often results in substantial recovery of impaired immunologic function. At present, there are over 20 drugs licensed and used for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, and these drugs are divided into one of six classes. Investigational agents include GS-7340, the prodrug of tenofovir and BMS-663068--the first in a novel class of drugs that blocks the binding of the HIV gp120 to the CD4 receptor.

  1. Vaginal microbiota and its role in HIV transmission and infection.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; van den Broek, Marianne; Balzarini, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    The urogenital tract appears to be the only niche of the human body that shows clear differences in microbiota between men and women. The female reproductive tract has special features in terms of immunological organization, an epithelial barrier, microbiota, and influence by sex hormones such as estrogen. While the upper genital tract is regarded as free of microorganisms, the vagina is colonized by bacteria dominated by Lactobacillus species, although their numbers vary considerably during life. Bacterial vaginosis is a common pathology characterized by dysbiosis, which increases the susceptibility for HIV infection and transmission. On the other hand, HIV infections are often characterized by a disturbed vaginal microbiota. The endogenous vaginal microbiota may protect against HIV by direct production of antiviral compounds, through blocking of adhesion and transmission by ligands such as lectins, and/or by stimulation of immune responses. The potential role of probiotics in the prevention of HIV infections and associated symptoms, by introducing them to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is also discussed. Of note, the GIT is a site of considerable HIV replication and CD4(+) T-cell destruction, resulting in both local and systemic inflammation. Finally, genetically engineered lactobacilli show promise as new microbicidal agents against HIV. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of autophagy in HIV infection and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nardacci, R; Ciccosanti, F; Marsella, C; Ippolito, G; Piacentini, M; Fimia, G M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of autophagy is to re-establish homeostasis in response to a variety of stress conditions. By forming double-membrane vesicles, autophagy engulfs damaged or superfluous cytoplasmic material and recycles degradation products for new synthesis or energy production. Of note, the same mechanism is used to capture pathogens and has important implications in both innate and adaptive immunity. To establish a chronic infection, pathogens have therefore evolved multiple mechanisms to evade autophagy-mediated degradation. HIV infection represents one of the best characterized systems in which autophagy is disarmed by a virus using multiple strategies to prevent the sequestration and degradation of its proteins and to establish a chronic infection. HIV alters autophagy at various stages of the process in both infected and bystander cells. In particular, the HIV proteins TAT, NEF and ENV are involved in this regulation by either blocking or stimulating autophagy through direct interaction with autophagy proteins and/or modulation of the mTOR pathway. Although the roles of autophagy during HIV infection are multiple and vary amongst the different cell types, several lines of evidence point to a potential beneficial effect of stimulating autophagy-mediated lysosomal degradation to potentiate the immune response to HIV. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms regulating selective autophagy is expected to be valuable for developing new drugs able to specifically enhance the anti-HIV response. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  3. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  4. HIV-1, human interaction database: current status and new features.

    PubMed

    Ako-Adjei, Danso; Fu, William; Wallin, Craig; Katz, Kenneth S; Song, Guangfeng; Darji, Dakshesh; Brister, J Rodney; Ptak, Roger G; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/retroviruses/hiv-1/interactions, serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. Each HIV-1 human protein interaction can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols and includes: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. In addition to specific HIV-1 protein-human protein interactions, included are interaction effects upon HIV-1 replication resulting when individual human gene expression is blocked using siRNA. A total of 3142 human genes are described participating in 12,786 protein-protein interactions, along with 1316 replication interactions described for each of 1250 human genes identified using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Together the data identifies 4006 human genes involved in 14,102 interactions. With the inclusion of siRNA interactions we introduce a redesigned web interface to enhance viewing, filtering and downloading of the combined data set.

  5. [Superior gluteal nerve: a new block on the block?

    PubMed

    Sá, Miguel; Graça, Rita; Reis, Hugo; Cardoso, José Miguel; Sampaio, José; Pinheiro, Célia; Machado, Duarte

    2017-05-24

    The superior gluteal nerve is responsible for innervating the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and tensor fascia latae muscles, all of which can be injured during surgical procedures. We describe an ultrasound-guided approach to block the superior gluteal nerve which allowed us to provide efficient analgesia and anesthesia for two orthopedic procedures, in a patient who had significant risk factors for neuraxial techniques and deep peripheral nerve blocks. An 84-year-old female whose regular use of clopidogrel contraindicated neuraxial techniques or deep peripheral nerve blocks presented for urgent bipolar hemiarthroplasty in our hospital. Taking into consideration the surgical approach chosen by the orthopedic team, we set to use a combination of general anesthesia and superficial peripheral nerve blocks (femoral, lateral cutaneous of thigh and superior gluteal nerve) for the procedure. A month and a half post-discharge the patient was re-admitted for debriding and correction of suture dehiscence; we performed the same blocks and light sedation. She remained comfortable in both cases, and reported no pain in the post-operative period. Deep understanding of anatomy and innervation empowers anesthesiologists to solve potentially complex cases with safer, albeit creative, approaches. The relevance of this block in this case arises from its innervation of the gluteus medius muscle and posterolateral portion of the hip joint. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an ultrasound-guided superior gluteal nerve block with an analgesic and anesthetic goal, which was successfully achieved. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Humoral Antibody Responses to HIV Viral Proteins and to CD4 Among HIV Controllers, Rapid and Typical Progressors in an HIV-Positive Patient Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Elizabeth; Fuller, Katherine; Agan, Brian; Berger, Edward A.; Saphire, Andrew; Quinnan, Gerald V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess humoral antibody responses as a function of disease progression (DP) in a well-defined HIV+ cohort. We quantified antibodies to HIV-1 gp120, Gag, and CD4 receptor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from a cohort of 97 HIV+ subjects at defined stages of DP. We also measured antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) as a function of the clinical status of the patients. We purified antibodies to CD4 and gp120 and assessed them for specificity, ability to block gp120 binding to target cells, ability to block virus infection, and ability to facilitate ADCC. All of the HIV+ patient samples were positive for antibodies to HIV gp120 and p24 and 80% showed evidence of hypergammaglobulinemia. Approximately 10% of cohort members were positive for antibodies to CD4, but we noted no significant correlation relevant to DP. There were statistically significant differences between the groups concerning the level of humoral response to gp120 and Gag. However, we observed no distinction in ability of anti-gp120 antibodies purified from each group to neutralize infection. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in ADCC, with elite controllers exhibiting significantly lower levels of ADCC than the other five groups. We detected IgA anti-gp120 antibodies, but did not correlate their presence with either DP or ADCC levels. The results are consistent with the interpretation that the humoral antibody response to the antigens assessed here represents a signature of the level of viremia but does not correlate with clinical status of HIV infection. PMID:27771962

  7. HIV-1 transcriptional regulation in the central nervous system and implications for HIV cure research

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Melissa J.; Cowley, Daniel J.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Gray, Lachlan R.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) during acute infection which can result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in up to 50% of patients, even in the presence of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Within the CNS, productive HIV-1 infection occurs in the perivascular macrophages and microglia. Astrocytes also become infected, although their infection is restricted and does not give rise to new viral particles. The major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 is the establishment of viral reservoirs in different anatomical sites throughout the body and viral persistence during long-term treatment with cART. While the predominant viral reservoir is believed to be resting CD4+ T-cells in the blood, other anatomical compartments including the CNS, gut-associated lymphoid tissue, bone marrow, and genital tract can also harbor persistently infected cellular reservoirs of HIV-1. Viral latency is predominantly responsible for HIV-1 persistence, and is most likely governed at the transcriptional level. Current clinical trials are testing transcriptional activators, in the background of cART, in an attempt to purge these viral reservoirs and reverse viral latency. These strategies aim to activate viral transcription in cells constituting the viral reservoir, so they can be recognized and cleared by the immune system, while new rounds of infection are blocked by co-administration of cART. The CNS has several unique characteristics that may result in differences in viral transcription and in the way latency is established. These include CNS-specific cell types, different transcription factors, altered immune surveillance, and reduced antiretroviral drug bioavailability. A comprehensive understanding of viral transcription and latency in the CNS is required in order to determine treatment outcomes when using transcriptional activators within the CNS. PMID:25060300

  8. HIV-1 transcriptional regulation in the central nervous system and implications for HIV cure research.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Melissa J; Cowley, Daniel J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Gray, Lachlan R

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) during acute infection which can result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in up to 50% of patients, even in the presence of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Within the CNS, productive HIV-1 infection occurs in the perivascular macrophages and microglia. Astrocytes also become infected, although their infection is restricted and does not give rise to new viral particles. The major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 is the establishment of viral reservoirs in different anatomical sites throughout the body and viral persistence during long-term treatment with cART. While the predominant viral reservoir is believed to be resting CD4(+) T cells in the blood, other anatomical compartments including the CNS, gut-associated lymphoid tissue, bone marrow, and genital tract can also harbour persistently infected cellular reservoirs of HIV-1. Viral latency is predominantly responsible for HIV-1 persistence and is most likely governed at the transcriptional level. Current clinical trials are testing transcriptional activators, in the background of cART, in an attempt to purge these viral reservoirs and reverse viral latency. These strategies aim to activate viral transcription in cells constituting the viral reservoir, so they can be recognised and cleared by the immune system, while new rounds of infection are blocked by co-administration of cART. The CNS has several unique characteristics that may result in differences in viral transcription and in the way latency is established. These include CNS-specific cell types, different transcription factors, altered immune surveillance, and reduced antiretroviral drug bioavailability. A comprehensive understanding of viral transcription and latency in the CNS is required in order to determine treatment outcomes when using transcriptional activators within the CNS.

  9. APOBEC3G-Augmented Stem Cell Therapy to Modulate HIV Replication: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Iraj; Mac Gabhann, Feilim

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between the innate immune system restriction factor APOBEC3G and the HIV protein Vif is a key host-retrovirus interaction. APOBEC3G can counteract HIV infection in at least two ways: by inducing lethal mutations on the viral cDNA; and by blocking steps in reverse transcription and viral integration into the host genome. HIV-Vif blocks these antiviral functions of APOBEC3G by impeding its encapsulation. Nonetheless, it has been shown that overexpression of APOBEC3G, or interfering with APOBEC3G-Vif binding, can efficiently block in vitro HIV replication. Some clinical studies have also suggested that high levels of APOBEC3G expression in HIV patients are correlated with increased CD4+ T cell count and low levels of viral load; however, other studies have reported contradictory results and challenged this observation. Stem cell therapy to replace a patient’s immune cells with cells that are more HIV-resistant is a promising approach. Pre-implantation gene transfection of these stem cells can augment the HIV-resistance of progeny CD4+ T cells. As a protein, APOBEC3G has the advantage that it can be genetically encoded, while small molecules cannot. We have developed a mathematical model to quantitatively study the effects on in vivo HIV replication of therapeutic delivery of CD34+ stem cells transfected to overexpress APOBEC3G. Our model suggests that stem cell therapy resulting in a high fraction of APOBEC3G-overexpressing CD4+ T cells can effectively inhibit in vivo HIV replication. We extended our model to simulate the combination of APOBEC3G therapy with other biological activities, to estimate the likelihood of improved outcomes. PMID:23724012

  10. APOBEC3G-Augmented Stem Cell Therapy to Modulate HIV Replication: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Iraj; Mac Gabhann, Feilim

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between the innate immune system restriction factor APOBEC3G and the HIV protein Vif is a key host-retrovirus interaction. APOBEC3G can counteract HIV infection in at least two ways: by inducing lethal mutations on the viral cDNA; and by blocking steps in reverse transcription and viral integration into the host genome. HIV-Vif blocks these antiviral functions of APOBEC3G by impeding its encapsulation. Nonetheless, it has been shown that overexpression of APOBEC3G, or interfering with APOBEC3G-Vif binding, can efficiently block in vitro HIV replication. Some clinical studies have also suggested that high levels of APOBEC3G expression in HIV patients are correlated with increased CD4+ T cell count and low levels of viral load; however, other studies have reported contradictory results and challenged this observation. Stem cell therapy to replace a patient's immune cells with cells that are more HIV-resistant is a promising approach. Pre-implantation gene transfection of these stem cells can augment the HIV-resistance of progeny CD4+ T cells. As a protein, APOBEC3G has the advantage that it can be genetically encoded, while small molecules cannot. We have developed a mathematical model to quantitatively study the effects on in vivo HIV replication of therapeutic delivery of CD34+ stem cells transfected to overexpress APOBEC3G. Our model suggests that stem cell therapy resulting in a high fraction of APOBEC3G-overexpressing CD4+ T cells can effectively inhibit in vivo HIV replication. We extended our model to simulate the combination of APOBEC3G therapy with other biological activities, to estimate the likelihood of improved outcomes.

  11. Living with HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Infection with HIV is serious. But the outlook for people with HIV/AIDS is improving. If you are infected with HIV, there are many things you can do to ... health care provider who knows how to treat HIV. You may want to join a support group. ...

  12. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    DOEpatents

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  13. Positive: HIV Affirmative Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Craig D.

    At the end of the 1980s, counselors largely lacked an integrated approach to counseling people living with HIV disease. This book describes the experience of counseling this group of persons. The major premise here is that counselors who counsel HIV-positive clients must come to understand and affirm their clients' experiences. The text defines a…

  14. HIV and Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to plague many countries across the globe, including the United States, Africa, China and India. Children and adults have been infected with HIV, and both populations can present with communication disorders that coexist with the presence of the virus. The purpose of this paper is to present an…

  15. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  16. Avascular necrosis in HIV.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja; Nelson, Mark; Brand, Alexander; Boag, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is an emerging complication of HIV infection. The incidence of AVN in HIV patients is greater than the general population. Although the incidence has increased in the HAART era, the aetiology remains unclear. We report our experience of AVN from our tertiary referral HIV centre and evaluate risk factors for its development. Review of MRI reports of HIV-positive patients between 2007 and 2010 identified 22 patients with AVN (19 men, 3 women). Case notes and electronic records were reviewed. Twenty-two patients developed AVN, among 6,487 HIV patients attending our centre (0.34% incidence; 95% CI, 0.2-0.48%). 68% of patients had multi-joint involvement. The median nadir CD4 count was 52 cells/μL. 73% of patients had more than two risk factors including HAART (91%), protease inhibitors (68%), hypercholesterolaemia (59%), corticosteroids (55%), hypertriglyceridaemia (45%), smoking (45%), alcohol (27%) and CD4 <200 cells/μL (23%). 9% were idiopathic. AVN is an important musculoskeletal manifestation of HIV and may be multi-focal with multi-factorial aetiology. Preventative strategies should focus on risk factor modification. When investigating joint pain in HIV-infected patients, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for AVN. Unexplained AVN, particularly if multi-focal, should prompt consideration of HIV testing.

  17. Smart HIV testing system.

    PubMed

    El Kateeb, Ali; Law, Peter; Chan, King

    2005-06-01

    The quick HIV testing method called "MiraWell Rapid HIV Test" uses a specialized testing kit to determine whether an individual's blood is contaminated with the HIV virus or not. When a drop of blood is placed on the center of the testing kit, a simple pattern will appear in the middle of the kit to indicate the test status, i.e., positive or negative. This HIV test should be done in a small clinic or in a lab and the test must be conducted by a trained technician. A smart HIV testing system was developed through this research to eliminate the human error that is associated with the use of the quick HIV testing kits. Also, the smart HIV system will improve the testing productivity in comparison to those achieved by the trained technicians. In this research, we have developed a cost-effective system that analyzes the image produced by the HIV kits. We have used a System-On-Chip (SOC) design approach based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology and the Xilinx Virtex SOC chip in building the system's prototype. The system used a CMOS digital camera to capture the image and an FPGA chip to process the captured image and send the testing results to the display unit. The system can be used in small clinics and pharmacies and eliminates the need for trained technicians. The system has been tested successfully and 98% of the tests were correct.

  18. HIV and Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to plague many countries across the globe, including the United States, Africa, China and India. Children and adults have been infected with HIV, and both populations can present with communication disorders that coexist with the presence of the virus. The purpose of this paper is to present an…

  19. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... together, then? This is another question that medical science is searching to answer. We do know that many HIV-infected individu- als have other problems and other risk factors that can lead to PH. A direct cause-and-effect relationship between HIV infection and ...

  20. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Affordable Care Act , the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover HIV testing. HIV counseling is covered for women who are sexually active. Talk to your insurance company to find out more. To learn about other ...

  1. HIV-1 Transmission during Early Antiretroviral Therapy: Evaluation of Two HIV-1 Transmission Events in the HPTN 052 Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Allen G.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Wang, Lei; Eshleman, Susan H.; Cohen, Myron S.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    In the HPTN 052 study, transmission between HIV-discordant couples was reduced by 96% when the HIV-infected partner received suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined two transmission events where the newly infected partner was diagnosed after the HIV-infected partner (index) initiated therapy. We evaluated the sequence complexity of the viral populations and antibody reactivity in the newly infected partner to estimate the dates of transmission to the newly infected partners. In both cases, transmission most likely occurred significantly before HIV-1 diagnosis of the newly infected partner, and either just before the initiation of therapy or before viral replication was adequately suppressed by therapy of the index. This study further strengthens the conclusion about the efficacy of blocking transmission by treating the infected partner of discordant couples. However, this study does not rule out the potential for HIV-1 transmission to occur shortly after initiation of ART, and this should be recognized when antiretroviral therapy is used for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:24086252

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis induces CCR5-dependent transfer of infectious HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells

    PubMed Central

    Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Asrani, Anil C; Gebhard, Kristin H; Dietrich, Elizabeth A; Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic infection with HIV occurs infrequently through the oral route. The frequency of occurrence may be increased by concomitant bacterial infection of the oral tissues, since co-infection and inflammation of some cell types increases HIV-1 replication. A putative periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis selectively up-regulates expression of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 on oral keratinocytes. We, therefore, hypothesized that P. gingivalis modulates the outcome of HIV infection in oral epithelial cells. Results Oral and tonsil epithelial cells were pre-incubated with P. gingivalis, and inoculated with either an X4- or R5-type HIV-1. Between 6 and 48 hours post-inoculation, P. gingivalis selectively increased the infectivity of R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral and tonsil keratinocytes; infectivity of X4-tropic HIV-1 remained unchanged. Oral keratinocytes appeared to harbor infectious HIV-1, with no evidence of productive infection. HIV-1 was harbored at highest levels during the first 6 hours after HIV exposure and decreased to barely detectable levels at 48 hours. HIV did not appear to co-localize with P. gingivalis, which increased selective R5-tropic HIV-1 trans infection from keratinocytes to permissive cells. When CCR5 was selectively blocked, HIV-1 trans infection was reduced. Conclusion P. gingivalis up-regulation of CCR5 increases trans infection of harbored R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells. Oral infections such as periodontitis may, therefore, increase risk for oral infection and dissemination of R5-tropic HIV-1. PMID:18371227

  3. Inhibition of HIV by Legalon-SIL is independent of its effect on cellular metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, Janela; Margineantu, Daciana H.; Sweet, Ian R.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-20

    In this report, we further characterized the effects of silibinin (SbN), derived from milk thistle extract, and Legalon-SIL (SIL), a water-soluble derivative of SbN, on T cell metabolism and HIV infection. We assessed the effects of SbN and SIL on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CEM-T4 cells in terms of cellular growth, ATP content, metabolism, and HIV infection. SIL and SbN caused a rapid and reversible (upon removal) decrease in cellular ATP levels, which was associated with suppression of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis. SbN, but not SIL inhibited glucose uptake. Exposure of T cells to SIL (but not SbN or metabolic inhibitors) during virus adsorption blocked HIV infection. Thus, both SbN and SIL rapidly perturb T cell metabolism in vitro, which may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects that arise with prolonged exposure of cells. However, the metabolic effects are not involved in SIL's unique ability to block HIV entry. - Highlights: • Silibinin (SbN) and Legalon-SIL (SIL) are cytoprotective mixtures of natural products. • SbN and SIL reduce T cell oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in vitro. • SIL but not SbN blocks entry of multiple HIV isolates into T cells in vitro. • SIL's suppression of HIV appears independent of its effects on T cell metabolism. • Metabolic effects of SIL and SbN may be relevant in inflammatory diseases.

  4. Programmatic Cost Evaluation of Nontargeted Opt-Out Rapid HIV Screening in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Haukoos, Jason S.; Campbell, Jonathan D.; Conroy, Amy A.; Hopkins, Emily; Bucossi, Meggan M.; Sasson, Comilla; Al-Tayyib, Alia A.; Thrun, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends nontargeted opt-out HIV screening in healthcare settings. Cost effectiveness is critical when considering potential screening methods. Our goal was to compare programmatic costs of nontargeted opt-out rapid HIV screening with physician-directed diagnostic rapid HIV testing in an urban emergency department (ED) as part of the Denver ED HIV Opt-Out Trial. Methods This was a prospective cohort study nested in a larger quasi-experiment. Over 16 months, nontargeted rapid HIV screening (intervention) and diagnostic rapid HIV testing (control) were alternated in 4-month time blocks. During the intervention phase, patients were offered HIV testing using an opt-out approach during registration; during the control phase, physicians used a diagnostic approach to offer HIV testing to patients. Each method was fully integrated into ED operations. Direct program costs were determined using the perspective of the ED. Time-motion methodology was used to estimate personnel activity costs. Costs per patient newly-diagnosed with HIV infection by intervention phase, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios were calculated. Results During the intervention phase, 28,043 eligible patients were included, 6,933 (25%) completed testing, and 15 (0.2%, 95% CI: 0.1%–0.4%) were newly-diagnosed with HIV infection. During the control phase, 29,925 eligible patients were included, 243 (0.8%) completed testing, and 4 (1.7%, 95% CI: 0.4%–4.2%) were newly-diagnosed with HIV infection. Total annualized costs for nontargeted screening were $148,997, whereas total annualized costs for diagnostic HIV testing were $31,355. The average costs per HIV diagnosis were $9,932 and $7,839, respectively. Nontargeted HIV screening identified 11 more HIV infections at an incremental cost of $10,693 per additional infection. Conclusions Compared to diagnostic testing, nontargeted HIV screening was more costly but identified more HIV infections

  5. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis with HIV.

    PubMed

    Talat, Humaira; Attarwala, Sharmeen; Saleem, Mubasshir

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector borne disease caused by various species of the Leishmania parasite. CL is endemic in the province of Balochistan in Pakistan. In certain instances a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-related immunocompromised is associated with atypical clinical presentation and occurrence of reactivated lesions of CL. Such presentations respond poorly to the standard treatment and frequent relapses are noted. We are reporting three cases of localized and disseminated CL due to Leishmania tropica which responded to meglumine antimoniate. Due to the fact that CL is endemic in Balochistan, we did not consider HIV infection as a causative organism. It was their presentation with history of weight loss and fever that prompted Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) tests for HIV, which turned out to be positive. CL is becoming visible as an opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS and may even be the first symptom in HIV positive patients in an endemic area.

  6. Thinking about HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Evelyn P; Siberry, George K; Hutton, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can occur during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. Evidence-based interventions (routine screening of pregnant women, initiation of antiretroviral drugs for mother's treatment or prevention of MTCT, and avoiding breastfeeding) have reduced transmission rates in the United States from 25% to 30% to less than 2%. Triple-drug combination antiretroviral therapy effectively controls HIV infection and improves survival and quality of life for HIV-infected children and adolescents. Initial regimens use combinations of two NRTIs together with an NNRTI or a ritonavir-boosted PI. These regimens have been shown to increase CD4 counts and achieve virologic suppression. Prevention of serious and opportunistic infections reduces morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents who have HIV infection. Recommendations for immunizations and chemoprophylaxis vary with the patient's CD4 count. Condoms made from latex, polyurethane, or other synthetic materials have been shown to decrease the transmission of STIs, including HIV infection.

  7. Depression and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D

    2008-06-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a significant public health problem. Millions of people worldwide are infected with this virus daily, and thousands die yearly of AIDS-related illnesses. Despite rapid advances in our knowledge about HIV and its mode of transmission, we have been unable to find a cure or prevent new infections. Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with HIV/AIDS: as a risk factor for HIV infection, a comorbidity of HIV infection, sequelae of HIV/AIDS, and a potential mediator for progression to AIDS. In this article, we focus on depression, which is prevalent in HIV/AIDS. We review the evidence associating depression with HIV, the challenges in recognizing depression in HIV-positive individuals, and the psychopharmacologic strategies known to be effective in the treatment of HIV-positive individuals with depression.

  8. Pannexin1 hemichannels are critical for HIV infection of human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Orellana, J A; Velasquez, S; Williams, D W; Sáez, J C; Berman, J W; Eugenin, E A

    2013-09-01

    HIV is a major public health issue, and infection of CD4(+) T lymphocytes is one of its key features. Whereas several cellular proteins have been identified that facilitate viral infection and replication, the role of hemichannels in these processes has not been fully characterized. We now show that the HIV isolates, R5 and X4, induced a transient-early (5-30 min) and a later, persistent (48-120 h) opening of Panx1 hemichannels, which was dependent on the binding of HIV to CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4 receptors. Blocking Panx1 hemichannels by reducing their opening or protein expression inhibited HIV replication in CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that Panx1 hemichannels play an essential role in HIV infection.

  9. [Epidemiology of HIV].

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Bruno; Battegay, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Globally, an estimated 35 million people were living with HIV in 2012; of these, 69 % in sub-Saharan Africa. There were 2.3 million new HIV infections globally and 1.6 million AIDS deaths in 2012. As a result of large roll-out programs with integrated voluntary counselling and testing and prevention programs in resource limited settings, sexual transmission of HIV decreased substantially over the last years. However, the world is not on track to reduced HIV transmission among people who inject drugs. Especially in Eastern Europe and Asia prevention coverage for people who inject drugs remains low. In addition, effective prevention among these people is undermined by stigmatisation, discrimination, punitive policy frameworks and law enforcement practices, which discourage people from seeking the health and social services they need. Antiretroviral coverage among pregnant women living with HIV reached 62 % in 2012 resulting in a reduction of newly infected children by 35 % from 2009. In 2012, 9.7 million people in low and middle-income countries received antiretroviral therapy, representing 61 % of all who were eligible under the 2010 WHO HIV treatment guidelines. Under the 2013 guidelines, this represents only 34 % of the 28.3 million people eligible in 2013. A new concept to curb the HIV epidemic is "Test and Treat" which involves population-wide HIV tests with immediate initiation of antiretroviral therapy among all HIV infected individuals. However, there are concerns regarding the sustainability of such treatment programs for decades due to lost to follow up and insufficient adherence and the danger of a large increase of resistant HIV which jeopardize the effectiveness of affordable treatments.

  10. Virological features associated with the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Moore, Penny L; Williamson, Carolyn; Morris, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    The development of a preventative HIV-1 vaccine remains a global public health priority. This will likely require the elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) able to block infection by diverse viral strains from across the world. Understanding the pathway to neutralization breadth in HIV-1 infected humans will provide insights into how bNAb lineages arise, a process that probably involves a combination of host and viral factors. Here, we focus on the role of viral characteristics and evolution in shaping bNAbs during HIV-1 infection, and describe how these findings may be translated into novel vaccine strategies.

  11. The pathogenesis of HIV infection: stupid may not be so dumb after all.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen M

    2006-09-08

    In the mid-1990's, researchers hypothesized, based on new viral load data, that HIV-1 causes CD4+ T-cell depletion by direct cytopathic effect. New data from non-human primate studies has raised doubts about this model of HIV-1 pathogenesis. Despite having high levels of viremia, most SIV infections are well tolerated by their natural hosts. Two recent studies of these models provide information, which may be useful in determining how HIV-1 causes CD4+ T-cell loss. A full understanding of pathogenesis may lead to novel therapies, which preserve the immune system without blocking virus replication.

  12. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  13. Morphologies of block copolymers composed of charged and neutral blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Mays, Jimmy; Sumpter, Bobby G; Wang, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews current experimental observations and theoretical calculations devoted towards understanding micro-phase separation in charged block copolymer systems. We discuss bulk morphologies in melt and in solution, as well as some of the new emerging research directions. Overall, a comprehensive picture is beginning to emerge on the fundamental role of electrostatics in the microphase separation of charged block copolymers. This understanding provides exciting new insight that may be used to direct targeted structures that endow the materials with desired properties that can have tremendous potential in technological applications.

  14. Associations between HIV-related stigma, racial discrimination, gender discrimination, and depression among HIV-positive African, Caribbean, and Black women in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Logie, Carmen; James, Llana; Tharao, Wangari; Loutfy, Mona

    2013-02-01

    Abstract African, Caribbean, and Black (ACB) women are greatly overrepresented in new HIV infections in comparison with Canada's general population. Social and structural factors such as HIV-related stigma, gender discrimination, and racial discrimination converge to increase vulnerability to HIV infection among ACB women by reducing access to HIV prevention services. Stigma and discrimination also present barriers to treatment, care, and support and may contribute to mental health problems. We administered a cross-sectional survey to HIV-positive ACB women (n=173) across Ontario in order to examine the relationships between HIV-related stigma, gender discrimination, racial discrimination, and depression. One-third of participants reported moderate/severe depression scores using the Beck Depression Inventory Fast-Screen guidelines. Hierarchical block regression, moderation, and mediation analyses were conducted to measure associations between independent (HIV-related stigma, gender discrimination, racial discrimination), moderator/mediator (social support, resilient coping), and dependent (depression) variables. Findings included: (1) HIV-related stigma was associated with increased depression; (2) resilient coping was associated with reduced depression but did not moderate the influence of HIV-related stigma on depression; and (3) the effects of HIV-related stigma on depression were partially mediated through resilient coping. HIV-related stigma, gender discrimination, and racial discrimination were significantly correlated with one another and with depression, highlighting the salience of examining multiple intersecting forms of stigma. Generalizability of findings may be limited due to nonrandom sampling. Findings emphasize the importance of multi-component interventions, including building resilient coping skills, mental health promotion and assessment, and stigma reduction programs.

  15. Various semiclassical limits of torus conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalaev, Konstantin; Geiko, Roman; Rappoport, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    We study four types of one-point torus blocks arising in the large central charge regime. There are the global block, the light block, the heavy-light block, and the linearized classical block, according to different regimes of conformal dimensions. It is shown that the blocks are not independent being connected to each other by various links. We find that the global, light, and heavy-light blocks correspond to three different contractions of the Virasoro algebra. Also, we formulate the c-recursive representation of the one-point torus blocks which is relevant in the semiclassical approximation.

  16. Block Matching for Object Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gyaourova, A; Kamath, C; Cheung, S

    2003-10-13

    Models which describe road traffic patterns can be helpful in detection and/or prevention of uncommon and dangerous situations. Such models can be built by the use of motion detection algorithms applied to video data. Block matching is a standard technique for encoding motion in video compression algorithms. We explored the capabilities of the block matching algorithm when applied for object tracking. The goal of our experiments is two-fold: (1) to explore the abilities of the block matching algorithm on low resolution and low frame rate video and (2) to improve the motion detection performance by the use of different search techniques during the process of block matching. Our experiments showed that the block matching algorithm yields good object tracking results and can be used with high success on low resolution and low frame rate video data. We observed that different searching methods have small effect on the final results. In addition, we proposed a technique based on frame history, which successfully overcame false motion caused by small camera movements.

  17. Flazinamide, a novel {beta}-carboline compound with anti-HIV actions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunhua; Tang Jianguo; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Dong Zejun; Du Li; Shen Xu; Liu Jikai; Zheng Yongtang . E-mail: zhengyt@mail.kiz.ac.cn

    2007-04-20

    A {beta}-carboline compound, flazin isolated from Suillus granulatus has been shown weak anti-HIV-1 activity. Based on the structure of flazin, flazinamide [1-(5'- hydromethyl-2'-furyl)-{beta}-carboline-3-carboxamide] was synthesized and its anti-HIV activities were evaluated in the present study. The cytotoxicity of flazinamide was about 4.1-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide potently reduced syncytium formation induced by HIV-1IIIB with EC50 value of 0.38 {mu}M, the EC50 of flazinamide was about 6.2-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide also inhibited HIV-2ROD and HIV-2CBL-20 infection with EC50 values of 0.57 and 0.89 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide reduced p24 antigen expression in HIV-1IIIB acute infected C8166 and in clinical isolated strain HIV-1KM018 infected PBMC, with EC50 values of 1.45 and 0.77 {mu}M, respectively. Flazinamide did not suppress HIV-1 replication in chronically infected H9 cells. Flazinamide blocked the fusion between normal cells and HIV-1 or HIV-2 chronically infected cells. It weakly inhibited activities of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease or integrase at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the conversion of the carboxyl group in 3 position of flazin markedly enhanced the anti-viral activity (TI value increased from 12.1 to 312.2) and flazinamide might interfere in the early stage of HIV life cycle.

  18. Disulfiram reactivates latent HIV-1 expression through depletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Zerbato, Jennifer; Mellors, John W; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2013-01-14

    Disulfiram (DSF), an inhibitor of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase that is used for the treatment of alcoholism, was shown to reactivate latent HIV-1 expression in a primary cell model of virus latency and is currently being assessed in a clinical trial for its potential to deplete the latent HIV-1 reservoir in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy. The mechanism by which DSF reactivates latent HIV-1 expression, however, is not known and was the focus of this study. The impact of DSF treatment on HIV-1 latency was assessed in the ACH2, J89GFP and U1 cell line models of HIV-1 latency and in resting CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-negative donors. DSF reactivated latent HIV-1 expression in the U1 cell line, but not in the J89GFP or ACH2 cell lines. Interestingly, we found that DSF significantly reduced phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein levels in U1 cells and in resting CD4 T cells from HIV-negative donors. Decreased PTEN resulted in increased phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and activation of the Akt signaling pathway. Consistent with these finding, pharmacological inhibitors of Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) block the latent HIV-1-reactivating activity of DSF. Furthermore, we show that HIV-1 expression in the U1 cell line could be activated by a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or by siRNA knockdown of PTEN expression. Neither the J89GFP nor ACH2 cells express PTEN, explaining the lack of DSF effect on HIV-1 expression in both these cell lines. DSF reactivates latent HIV-1 expression via the Akt signaling pathway through depletion of PTEN.

  19. Transmembrane TNF-α Facilitates HIV-1 Infection of Podocytes Cultured from Children with HIV-Associated Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinliang; Das, Jharna R; Tang, Pingtao; Han, Zhe; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Ray, Patricio E

    2017-03-01

    Studies have shown that podocytes and renal tubular epithelial cells from patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) express HIV-1 transcripts, suggesting that productive infection of renal epithelial cells precipitates development of HIVAN. However, podocytes and renal tubular epithelial cells do not express CD4 receptors, and it is unclear how these cells become productively infected in vivo We investigated the mechanisms underlying the infection by HIV-1 of podocytes cultured from the urine of children with HIVAN. We observed low-level productive infection on exposure of these cells to primary cell-free HIV-1 supernatants. However, envelope-defective recombinant HIV-1 did not infect the renal epithelial cell lines. Moreover, treatment of podocytes to inhibit endocytic transport or dynamin activity or remove cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans reduced infection efficiency. Transfection of CD4- 293T cells with a cDNA expression library developed from a podocyte cell line derived from a child with HIVAN led to the identification of TNF-α as a possible mediator of HIV-1 infection. Overexpression of transmembrane TNF-α in cultured CD4- renal tubular epithelial cells, 293T cells, and HeLa cells enabled the infection of these cells; exposure to soluble TNF-α did not. Immunohistochemistry showed TNF-α expression in podocytes of renal sections from children with HIVAN. Furthermore, we found that TNF-α enhanced NF-κB activation and integration of HIV-1 into the podocyte DNA. Finally, inhibition of dynamin activity blocked TNF-α-mediated infection. These data establish a role for transmembrane TNF-α in facilitating the viral entry and integration of HIV-1 into the DNA of renal epithelial cells.

  20. HIV/AIDS and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters HIV/AIDS and the Flu Questions & Answers Language: English Españ ... with HIV and AIDS. Should people with HIV/AIDS receive the inactivated influenza vaccine? People with HIV ...

  1. HIV and AIDS: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Audience For Women Free Publications HIV and AIDS--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... HIV treatment. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. HIV stands for H uman I mmunodeficiency V ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Care Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file Error processing SSI file HIV Care Saves Lives Viral Suppression is Key Language: ... high risk of getting HIV. People living with HIV can Get into HIV medical care as soon ...

  3. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  4. The INSTI HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ameeta E; Lee, Bonita; Fenton, Jayne; Preiksaitis, Jutta

    2013-05-01

    Rapid HIV tests have been widely adopted globally as an important component of HIV prevention and control programs. The INSTI™ HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test is a second-generation HIV antibody test, available in most countries for use from whole blood, serum, and plasma. Available data on kit characteristics and current performance data on the INSTI™ HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test are presented together with six other rapid point-of-care tests (RPOCTs) for HIV antibody. Few published data are available providing direct comparisons of INSTI™ with other RPOCTs for HIV antibody and standard laboratory-based HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody assays. Existing data showed that INSTI™ has comparable performance to other RPOCTs but detected seroconversion later than standard laboratory-based assays. The good performance of INSTI HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test, its ease of use, the rapid availability of results (< 5 min), and the lack of specialized equipment required to use the kit make this kit a useful addition to the global market. The unique antigen and flow through technology contained in the kit make it a strong addition to HIV RPOCTs and to rapid/rapid algorithms used in many resource-limited settings.

  5. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficult to study the interaction between HIV and substance abuse in human populations. Several rodent models have been developed in an attempt to study the transmission and pathogenesis of the HIV-1 virus. The HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat is a reliable model of neuroHIV because it mimics the condition of HIV-infected patients on cART. Research using this model supports the hypothesis that the presence of HIV-1 viral proteins in the central nervous system increases the sensitivity and susceptibility of HIV-positive individuals to substance abuse. PMID:25733103

  6. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  7. Toy Blocks and Rotational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.; Jully, Isabel R.

    2005-09-01

    Have you ever observed a child playing with toy blocks? A favorite game is to build towers and then make them topple like falling trees. To the eye of a trained physicist this should immediately look like an example of the physics of "falling chimneys," when tall structures bend and break in mid-air while falling to the ground. The game played with toy blocks can actually reproduce well what is usually seen in photographs of falling towers, such as the one that appeared on the cover of the September 1976 issue of The Physics Teacher. In this paper we describe how we performed and analyzed these simple but interesting experiments with toy blocks.

  8. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  9. Contrasting reduced overshadowing and blocking.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2007-07-01

    Preexposure of a cue without an outcome (X-) prior to compound pairings with the outcome (XZ-->O) can reduce overshadowing of a target cue (Z). Moreover, pairing a cue with an outcome (X-->O) before compound training can enhance its ability to compete with another cue (i.e., blocking). Four experiments were conducted in a conditioned bar-press suppression preparation with rats to determine whether spacing of the X- or X-->O trials would differentially affect reduced overshadowing and blocking. Experiment 1a showed that reduced overshadowing was larger with massed trials than with spaced trials. Experiment 1b found that blocking was larger with spaced trials than with massed trials. Experiments 2a and 2b indicated that these effects of trial spacing were both mediated by the associative status of the context at test. The results are interpreted in the framework of contemporary learning theories.

  10. To block or not to block - what is the impact?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proper design of biological experiments involves significant advance thought, attention, and planning of the following items: • A block design should be employed in any circumstance in which the researcher expects some level of spatial or temporal variation among observations. • The most informed ch...

  11. Block by Block: The Challenges of Urban Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    guns led to the obsolescence of the protective city wall and to the capa - bility to defend within individual city buildings and blocks of buildings. The...Chubut 23. Santa Cruz TERRITORIO NACIONAL 24. Tierra del Fuego CAPITAL FEDERAL 15. Buenos Aires (city) lagoa dosPatos Antofagasta SANTIAGO Puerto Montt

  12. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  13. Block LancZos PACKage

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Osni

    2005-05-01

    BLZPACK (for Block LancZos PACKage) is a standard Fortran 77 implementation of the block Lanczos algorithm intended for the solution of the standard eigenvalue problem Ax=ux or the generalized eigenvalue problem Ax=uBx, where A and B are real, sparse symmetric matrices, u and eigenvalue and x and eigenvector. The development of this eigensolver was motivated by the need to solve large, sparse, generalized problems from free vibration analyses in structural engineering. Several upgrades were performed afterwards aiming at the solution of eigenvalues problems from a wider range of applications.

  14. HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Saksena, Nitin K.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is associated with the development of neurocognitive disorders in many infected individuals, including a broad spectrum of motor impairments and cognitive deficits. Despite extensive research, the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is still not clear. This review provides a comprehensive view of HAND, including HIV neuroinvasion, HAND diagnosis and different level of disturbances, influence of highly-active antiretroviral therapy to HIV-associated dementia (HAD), possible pathogenesis of HAD, etc. Together, this review will give a thorough and clear understanding of HAND, especially HAD, which will be vital for future research, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24470972

  15. Mobility and HIV.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people are vulnerable to HIV because they live in poor areas with little privacy, have different sexual relationships, and lack information about sexual health and services. In response to these problems, HIV prevention and care programs were initiated. The programs include: 1) involving migrant workers as both interviewers and outreach workers to better understand the idea of the migrants per Coordination of Action Research on Mobility and AIDS; 2) improving living conditions; 3) access of migrants to information and services; 4) improving the rights of the people; 5) increasing income; and 6) access to sexual health information that concerns exposure of HIV through different sexual partners.

  16. HIV and gynaecological infections.

    PubMed

    Sebitloane, Mothshedisi H

    2005-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection primarily affects women during their reproductive years, and the co-existence of gynaecological infections is not surprising, given the fact that HIV is mainly acquired via heterosexual contact. Most gynaecological infections are themselves sexually acquired, and have the potential to increase the risk both of acquiring and transmitting the HI virus. As most sexually transmitted infections are asymptomatic, there is a need to improve methods of diagnosis and algorithms for early detection of sexually transmitted infections. HIV infection, however, particularly advanced disease, may alter the clinical presentation, course and response to conservative treatment for some of the sexually transmitted infections.

  17. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  18. HIV/AIDS eradication.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-07-15

    Antiretroviral therapy can inhibit HIV replication in patients and prevent progression to AIDS. However, it is not curative. Here we provide an overview of what antiretroviral drugs do and how the virus persists during therapy in rare reservoirs, such as latently infected CD4+ T cells. We also outline several innovative methods that are currently under development to eradicate HIV from infected individuals. These strategies include gene therapy approaches intended to create an HIV-resistant immune system, and activation/elimination approaches directed towards flushing out latent virus. This latter approach could involve the use of novel chemically synthesized analogs of natural activating agents.

  19. HIV Sequence Databases

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette; Shafer, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Two important databases are often used in HIV genetic research, the HIV Sequence Database in Los Alamos, which collects all sequences and focuses on annotation and data analysis, and the HIV RT/Protease Sequence Database in Stanford, which collects sequences associated with the development of viral resistance against anti-retroviral drugs and focuses on analysis of those sequences. The types of data and services these two databases offer, the tools they provide, and the way they are set up and operated are described in detail. PMID:12875108

  20. What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV Overview What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine? (Last updated 2/20/2017; last reviewed ... a preventive HIV vaccine. What is a preventive HIV vaccine? A preventive HIV vaccine is given to ...

  1. What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV Overview What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine? (Last updated 10/17/2016; last reviewed ... HIV from the body. What is a therapeutic HIV vaccine? A therapeutic HIV vaccine is a vaccine ...

  2. HIV among Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Gay and Bisexual Men Language: English Spanish ...

  3. HIV/AIDS among African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among African Americans Format: Select One File [163K] ...

  4. Blocks and Bridges: Learning Artistic Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Explores research about creative thinking and outlines various processes that students go through when they attempt an art assignment. Describes the blocks to creative thinking that non-art majors have experienced, such as cultural blocks, conceptual and perceptual blocks, and social blocks. Discusses the instructional conditions important for…

  5. Planning Block Play Experiences for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Playing with blocks can facilitate the creative, social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development of young children. This article presents information and activities concerning block play and its role in young children's experience. Topics covered include: (1) types of blocks; (2) selection of blocks and accessories; (3) planning of the…

  6. Teaching Numeracy, Language, and Literacy with Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Abigail; Vaughan, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    By enhancing the block play in classrooms, teachers can help children acquire the emerging skills they need--with numbers, vocabulary, and reading--for kindergarten readiness. Newburger and Vaughan provide a theoretical foundation describing why and how to use blocks, and give guidance on selecting blocks and block safety. With chapters on the…

  7. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  8. Chloroquine modulates HIV-1-induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell alpha interferon: implication for T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Jeffrey A; Montoya, Carlos J; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L; Desai, Seema N

    2010-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-alpha levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-alpha could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-alpha production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-alpha production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-alpha synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-alpha by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection.

  9. Chloroquine Modulates HIV-1-Induced Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Alpha Interferon: Implication for T-Cell Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Montoya, Carlos J.; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L.; Desai, Seema N.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-α levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-α could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-α production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-α production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-α synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-α by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection. PMID:19949061

  10. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  11. Hawaii Census 2000 Block Groups

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Tiger line files are the source of the geometry representing the Census blocks. Attributes include total population counts, racial/ethnic, and poverty/income information. Racial/ethnic classifications are represented in units of blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Poverty and income data are represented in units of blockgroups and tracts. Percentages of each racial/ethnic group have been calculated from the population counts. Total Minority counts and percentages were compiled from each racial/ethnic non-white category. Categories compiled to create the Total Minority count includes the following: African American, Asian, American Indian, Pacific Islander, White Hispanic, Other and all mixed race categories. The percentage poverty attribute represents the percent of the population living at or below poverty level. The per capita income attribute represents the sum of all income within the geographic entity, divided by the total population of that entity. Special fields designed to be used for EJ analysis have been derived from the PL data and include the following: Percentage difference of block, blockgroup and total minority from the state and county averages, percentile rank for each percent total minority within state and county entitie

  12. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  13. Preschoolers' Thinking during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolo, Diana L.; Test, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Children build foundations for mathematical thinking in early play and exploration. During the preschool years, children enjoy exploring mathematical concepts--such as patterns, shape, spatial relationships, and measurement--leading them to spontaneously engage in mathematical thinking during play. Block play is one common example that engages…

  14. A conformal block Farey tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Alexander; Maxfield, Henry; Ng, Gim Seng

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the constraints of crossing symmetry on CFT correlation functions. Four point conformal blocks are naturally viewed as functions on the upper-half plane, on which crossing symmetry acts by PSL(2, Z ) modular transformations. This allows us to construct a unique, crossing symmetric function out of a given conformal block by averaging over PSL(2, Z ). In some two dimensional CFTs the correlation functions are precisely equal to the modular average of the contributions of a finite number of light states. For example, in the two dimensional Ising and tri-critical Ising model CFTs, the correlation functions of identical operators are equal to the PSL(2, Z ) average of the Virasoro vacuum block; this determines the 3 point function coefficients uniquely in terms of the central charge. The sum over PSL(2, Z ) in CFT2 has a natural AdS3 interpretation as a sum over semi-classical saddle points, which describe particles propagating along rational tangles in the bulk. We demonstrate this explicitly for the correlation function of certain heavy operators, where we compute holographically the semi-classical conformal block with a heavy internal operator.

  15. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Blocks Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Nayyer; Fahlgren, Anna; Fällman, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Neutrophils are essential components of immunity and are rapidly recruited to infected or injured tissue. Upon their activation, neutrophils release granules to the cell's exterior, through a process called degranulation. These granules contain proteins with antimicrobial properties that help combat infection. The enteropathogenic bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis successfully persists as an extracellular bacterium during infection by virtue of its translocation of virulence effectors (Yersinia outer proteins [Yops]) that act in the cytosol of host immune cells to subvert phagocytosis and proinflammatory responses. Here, we investigated the effect of Y. pseudotuberculosis on neutrophil degranulation upon cell contact. We found that virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis was able to prevent secondary granule release. The blocking effect was general, as the release of primary and tertiary granules was also reduced. Degranulation of secondary granules was also blocked in primed neutrophils, suggesting that this mechanism could be an important element of immune evasion. Further, wild-type bacteria conferred a transient block on neutrophils that prevented their degranulation upon contact with plasmid-cured, avirulent Y. pseudotuberculosis and Escherichia coli Detailed analyses showed that the block was strictly dependent on the cooperative actions of the two antiphagocytic effectors, YopE and YopH, suggesting that the neutrophil target structures constituting signaling molecules needed to initiate both phagocytosis and general degranulation. Thus, via these virulence effectors, Yersinia can impair several mechanisms of the neutrophil's antimicrobial arsenal, which underscores the power of its virulence effector machinery. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Enduring and Diagnosing Reader's Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Lisa Stapleton

    1990-01-01

    Describes a condition called "reader's block" whereby the mind fails to comprehend the meaning of the text because of digressing thoughts. Suggests that "freereading," like freewriting, can help to clarify thoughts. Argues that it is not necessary to read things correctly the first time through. (PRA)

  17. Restoring HIV-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1999-02-12

    When HIV is controlled with antiretrovirals, immunity to other infections often returns. Sometimes patients can stop prophylactic treatment, and sometimes opportunistic infections can clear up without treatment. However, immunity to HIV itself does not return, or returns very slowly, even when HIV has been suppressed for years with drug therapy. Researchers do not know why HIV immunity reacts differently, but several possible approaches to restoring HIV-specific immunity are being researched. One approach involves a therapeutic vaccination while the virus is well suppressed with antiretrovirals. The other approach is beginning HIV treatment very early, before the virus begins destroying the cells that recognize it. Several studies are discussed.

  18. HIV counseling for behavior change.

    PubMed

    Grinstead, O A

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide a framework for discussion in the working group on HIV Counseling for Behavior Change at the Third USAID HIV/AIDS Prevention Conference. The paper begins with a section defining HIV counseling and describing different types of HIV counseling. Next, points of consensus and controversy regarding the conduct and evaluation of HIV counseling are discussed. This is followed by a section outlining findings to date on the effectiveness of HIV counseling, and a discussion of methodological issues in evaluating counseling outcomes. Finally, the paper includes a list of key issues for further research.

  19. HIV Treatment Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Risk Activities When One Partner Is HIV+ Substance Abuse/Use Pregnancy & Childbirth Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Post-Exposure ... Doctor, Clinical & Dental Visits Treatment Adherence Mental Health Substance Abuse Issues Sexual Health Nutrition & Food Safety Exercise Immunizations ...

  20. Mental Health and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... a headache or other physical problem. Taking some deep breaths also releases tension. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders ( ... rested. Learn relaxation methods like meditation, yoga, or deep breathing. Limit the amount of caffeine and nicotine ...

  1. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Changes Find Care & Treatment You and Your Provider Discrimination from Providers Locating HIV/AIDS Services Addressing the ... Dating and Marriage Family Planning Mixed-Status Couples Discrimination Legal Issues Workplace Issues Federal Resources Federal Programs ...

  2. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Changes Find Care & Treatment You and Your Provider Discrimination from Providers Locating HIV/AIDS Services Addressing the ... Dating and Marriage Family Planning Mixed-Status Couples Discrimination Legal Issues Workplace Issues Federal Resources Federal Programs ...

  3. [HIV infection and immigration].

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care.

  4. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence could be reduced if people changed their sexual behaviors. Our research has demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American adolescents and adults." Spring 2008 ...

  5. HIV/AIDS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - HIV/AIDS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on AIDS : AIDS.gov -- www.aids.gov AIDS Info -- aidsinfo.nih.gov The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation -- www. ...

  6. HIV and Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis C (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... the medicines for any side effects. What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused ...

  7. HIV and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... should be treated for both diseases. What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused ...

  8. Depression and HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sharon M

    2003-01-01

    Depressive disorders are common among 20% to 32% of people with HIV disease but are frequently unrecognized. Major depression is a recurring and disabling illness that typically responds to medications, cognitive psychotherapy, education, and social support. A large percentage of the emotional distress and major depression associated with HIV disease results from immunosuppression, treatment, and neuropsychiatric aspects of the disease. People with a history of intravenous drug use also have increased rates of depressive disorders. Untreated depression along with other comorbid conditions may increase costly clinic visits, hospitalizations, substance abuse, and risky behaviors and may reduce adherence to treatment and quality of life. HIV clinicians need not have psychiatric expertise to play a major role in depression. Screening tools improve case finding and encourage early treatment. Effective treatments can reduce major depression in 80% to 90% of patients. Clinicians who mistake depressive signs and symptoms for those of HIV disease make a common error that increases morbidity and mortality.

  9. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) (Last updated 9/1/2016; last reviewed ... depends on a person’s individual circumstances. What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease that can ...

  10. Mouth Problems and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... orientation. This information is for people who have mouth (oral) problems related to HIV infection. It explains ... look like. It also describes where in the mouth they occur and how they are treated. They ...

  11. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina; Brander, Christian; Barouch, Dan; de Boer, Rob; Haynes, Barton F.; Koup, Richard; Moore, John P.; Walker, Bruce D.; Watkins, David

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  12. Pediatric HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Espanol, Teresa; Caragol, Isabel; Soler, Pere; Hernandez, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    HIV infection by maternal transmission is increasing in the world due to the increase in infected women who are not receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. Prognosis of HIV infection in children is poor because the newborn has an immature immune system. Early diagnosis and therapy are needed to avoid the development of AIDS. New therapies are becoming available but prevention of infection, through maternal therapy during pregnancy, is the most effective measure in avoiding this infection through this transmission route.

  13. Unconventional conceptions and HIV.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, L; Kitzinger, J; Green, G; Wight, D

    1995-01-01

    The condom is widely recommended as the principal method for preventing HIV transmission, but such advice obviously does not apply to women who are seeking to become pregnant. In this sense, 'safer sex' is incompatible with reproduction. Existing research into HIV transmission has examined the choices made by those wishing to conceive within a sexual relationship; such research shows that HIV is not a highly significant factor in their decision-making processes. This study aims to extend the debate by exploring the decision-making processes of women seeking to become pregnant with donated sperm. In particular, we focus on women outside the fertility clinic system who do not have access to sperm screened for HIV to see whether HIV is a significant factor in these women's decisions. The study involved in-depth interviews with 20 women (14 lesbians, one bisexual and five heterosexuals) recruited through informal networking and snowball sampling. HIV was a salient concern for our sample, largely because of their contacts with gay men, but nonetheless most of these women took some risks. On the one hand, the conscious deliberations necessary to conceive through self-insemination facilitated risk reduction, as did factors such as 'stranger-danger'. On the other hand, factors such as the scarcity of suitable sperm donors and the women's own feelings of gratitude and loyalty to their donors mitigated against their requesting that their donor take an HIV test. This study highlights the need to provide information for women seeking self-insemination, and to remove restrictions on access to fertility clinics, in order to reduce their risk of HIV infection and subsequent vertical transmission.

  14. HIV resistance to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Francois

    2009-11-24

    Similar to all antiretroviral drugs, failure of raltegravir-based treatment regimens to fully supress HIV replication almost invariably results in emergence of HIV resistance to this new drug. HIV resistance to raltegravir is the consequence of mutations located close to the integrase active site, which can be divided into three main evolutionary pathways: the N155H, the Q148R/H/K and the Y143R/C pathways. Each of these primary mutations can be accompanied by a variety of secondary mutations that both increase resistance and compensate for the variable loss of viral replicative capacity that is often associated with primary resistance mutations. One unique property of HIV resistance to raltegravir is that each of these different resistance pathways are mutually exclusive and appear to evolve separately on distinct viral genomes. Resistance is frequently initiated by viruses carrying mutations of the N155H pathway, followed by emergence and further dominance of viral genomes carrying mutations of the Q148R/H/K or of the Y143R/C pathways, which express higher levels of resistance. Even if some natural integrase polymorphisms can be part of this evolution process, these polymorphisms do not affect HIV susceptibility in the absence of primary mutations. Therefore, all HIV-1 subtypes and groups, together with HIV-2, are naturally susceptible to raltegravir. Finally, because interaction of integrase strand transfer inhibitors with the HIV integrase active site is comparable from one compound to another, raltegravir-resistant viruses express significant cross resistance to most other compounds of this new class of antiretroviral drugs.

  15. HIV in the military.

    PubMed

    1996-04-05

    A stopgap spending bill that would repeal a recently enacted provision discharging members of the armed services who test positive for HIV was approved in the Senate. The provision, inserted into the bill by Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-CA), was part of a $256 defense authorization bill that forces the Pentagon to discharge all HIV-positive service members within 6 months of diagnosis. Dornan promises to insert the same language into next year's defense bill if the repeal stands.

  16. Perceived everyday racism, residential segregation, and HIV testing among patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic.

    PubMed

    Ford, Chandra L; Daniel, Mark; Earp, Jo Anne L; Kaufman, Jay S; Golin, Carol E; Miller, William C

    2009-04-01

    More than one quarter of HIV-infected people are undiagnosed and therefore unaware of their HIV-positive status. Blacks are disproportionately infected. Although perceived racism influences their attitudes toward HIV prevention, how racism influences their behaviors is unknown. We sought to determine whether perceiving everyday racism and racial segregation influence Black HIV testing behavior. This was a clinic-based, multilevel study in a North Carolina city. Eligibility was limited to Blacks (N = 373) seeking sexually transmitted disease diagnosis or screening. We collected survey data, block group characteristics, and lab-confirmed HIV testing behavior. We estimated associations using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. More than 90% of the sample perceived racism, which was associated with higher odds of HIV testing (odds ratio = 1.64; 95% confidence interval = 1.07, 2.52), after control for residential segregation, and other covariates. Neither patient satisfaction nor mechanisms for coping with stress explained the association. Perceiving everyday racism is not inherently detrimental. Perceived racism may improve odds of early detection of HIV infection in this high-risk population. How segregation influences HIV testing behavior warrants further research.

  17. Antiviral Breadth and Combination Potential of Peptide Triazole HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Karyn; Fletcher, Patricia; Rossi, Fiorella; Kantharaju; Umashankara, Muddagowda; Pirrone, Vanessa; Rajagopal, Srivats; Gopi, Hosahudya; Krebs, Fred C.; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Shattock, Robin J.

    2012-01-01

    The first stage of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection involves the fusion of viral and host cellular membranes mediated by viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Inhibitors that specifically target gp120 are gaining increased attention as therapeutics or preventatives to prevent the spread of HIV-1. One promising new group of inhibitors is the peptide triazoles, which bind to gp120 and simultaneously block its interaction with both CD4 and the coreceptor. In this study, we assessed the most potent peptide triazole, HNG-156, for inhibitory breadth, cytotoxicity, and efficacy, both alone and in combination with other antiviral compounds, against HIV-1. HNG-156 inhibited a panel of 16 subtype B and C isolates of HIV-1 in a single-round infection assay. Inhibition of cell infection by replication-competent clinical isolates of HIV-1 was also observed with HNG-156. We found that HNG-156 had a greater than predicted effect when combined with several other entry inhibitors or the reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. Overall, we find that HNG-156 is noncytotoxic, has a broad inhibition profile, and provides a positive combination with several inhibitors of the HIV-1 life cycle. These results support the pursuit of efficacy and toxicity analyses in more advanced cell and animal models to develop peptide triazole family inhibitors of HIV-1 into antagonists of HIV-1 infection. PMID:22083481

  18. Cellular and viral mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission mediated by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Christopher M; Gelais, Corine St; Wu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initial infection and cell-to-cell transmission events that occur upon HIV-1 infection. DCs interact closely with CD4(+) T cells, the main target of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 challenged DCs and target CD4(+) T cells form a virological synapse that allows highly efficient transmission of HIV-1 to the target CD4(+) T cells, in the absence of productive HIV-1 replication in the DCs. Immature and subsets of mature DCs show distinct patterns of HIV-1 replication and cell-to-cell transmission, depending upon the maturation stimulus that is used. The cellular and viral mechanisms that promote formation of the virological synapse have been the subject of intense study and the most recent progress is discussed here. Characterizing the cellular and viral factors that affect DC-mediated cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 to CD4(+) T cells is vitally important to understanding, and potentially blocking, the initial dissemination of HIV-1 in vivo.

  19. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2013-01-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus. PMID:23956726

  20. Reversible atrioventricular blocks in thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Atri, Sudhir Kumar; Chugh, S N; Goya, Sandeep; Chugh, Kiran

    2011-03-01

    Atrioventricular blocks or sinoatrial blocks are rarely described in patients with thyrotoxicosis or thyroid storm. The mechanism of these blocks remains obscure. Thyroid storm, being an emergency situation requires early diagnosis and management because if left untreated, it may prove fatal. Usually patients with AV blocks require pacing (temporary or permanent). Here we describe a case who developed AV blocks, did not undergo pacing, but recovered only on antithyroid treatment.

  1. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2013-04-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus.

  2. Vectored immunoprophylaxis protects humanized mice from mucosal HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Balazs, Alejandro B; Ouyang, Yong; Hong, Christin M; Chen, Joyce; Nguyen, Steven M; Rao, Dinesh S; An, Dong Sung; Baltimore, David

    2014-03-01

    The vast majority of new HIV infections result from relatively inefficient transmission of the virus across mucosal surfaces during sexual intercourse. A consequence of this inefficiency is that small numbers of transmitted founder viruses initiate most heterosexual infections. This natural bottleneck to transmission has stimulated efforts to develop interventions that are aimed at blocking this step of the infection process. Despite the promise of this strategy, clinical trials of preexposure prophylaxis have had limited degrees of success in humans, in part because of lack of adherence to the recommended preexposure treatment regimens. In contrast, a number of existing vaccines elicit systemic immunity that protects against mucosal infections, such as the vaccines for influenza and human papilloma virus. We recently demonstrated the ability of vectored immunoprophylaxis (VIP) to prevent intravenous transmission of HIV in humanized mice using broadly neutralizing antibodies. Here we demonstrate that VIP is capable of protecting humanized mice from intravenous as well as vaginal challenge with diverse HIV strains despite repeated exposures. Moreover, animals receiving VIP that expresses a modified VRC07 antibody were completely resistant to repetitive intravaginal challenge by a heterosexually transmitted founder HIV strain, suggesting that VIP may be effective in preventing vaginal transmission of HIV between humans.

  3. Natural antimicrobial peptides as promising anti-HIV candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains to be one of the major global health problems. It is thus necessary to identify novel therapeutic molecules to combat HIV-1. Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been recognized as promising templates for developing topical microbicides. This review systematically discusses over 80 anti-HIV peptides annotated in the antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP). Such peptides have been discovered from bacteria, plants, and animals. Examples include gramicidin and bacteriocins from bacteria, cyclotides from plants, melittins and cecropins from insects, piscidins from fish, ascaphins, caerins, dermaseptins, esculentins, and maximins from amphibians, and cathelicidins and defensins from vertebrates. These peptides appear to work by different mechanisms and could block viral entry in multiple ways. As additional advantages, such anti-HIV peptides may possess other desired features such as antibacterial, antiparasital, spermicidal, and anticancer activity. With continued optimization of peptide stability, production, formulation and delivery methods, it is anticipated that some of these compounds may eventually become new anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26834391

  4. HIV in Europe.

    PubMed

    Põder, Airi; Haldre, Madli

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the estimated number of people living with HIV in Europe and Central Asia was 2.3 million. This is more than twice the 2001 figure. At the same time, approximately 50% of the infected people may not know their HIV status. The Europe/Central Asia region is one of only two regions in which HIV infections continue to increase. The estimated prevalence rate in the west and center of the region, however, has remained stable at 0.2%. The HIV epidemics in Eastern Europe and Central Asia are typically driven by unsafe drug injection and by onward transmission to the sexual partners of people who inject drugs. In the western part of the region, the epidemic remains concentrated among men who have sex with men and migrants from countries with generalized epidemics. Means of preventing and fighting HIV should, first and foremost, be directed to those parts of the population that are most exposed to the risk of the infection. Proceeding from the data presented, recommendations are given for ways of decreasing HIV prevalence in the region, such as promoting dialogue and awareness among multistakeholders, including policy makers, donors, and population groups most exposed to the infection. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. HIV infection in children.

    PubMed

    Canosa, C A

    1991-01-01

    Various studies have reported rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from mother to child of 13-40%. Vertical transmission occurs in utero, during delivery, or, in a small number of cases, through breast milk. Whether mothers at various stages of HIV infection experience different rates of transmission remains unknown. Maternal antibodies cross the placenta and are present from birth up to 18 months of age. The offspring of HIV-positive mothers tend to be low birthweight, under 37 weeks' gestation, and at high risk of perinatal mortality. It is likely, however, that this profile is indicative of the low socioeconomic status of most women with HIV rather than a result of infection. Also emerging is a psychosocial profile of the HIV child. These children are isolated, neglected, battered, frequently abandoned, and exhibit various degrees of mental retardation. Also common are delayed psychomotor development, loss of developmental milestones, limited attention span, poor language development, and abnormal reflexes. These features result from the interaction of low socioeconomic status, a lack of psychosocial stimulation, nutritional deficiencies, and central nervous system infections. Since HIV-infected children tend to be the offspring of drug addicts, bisexuals, and prostitutes, they are not awarded the same compassion as children afflicted with other terminal illnesses. Moreover, these children are generally neglected by groups formed to provide support to AIDS patients. Thus, it is up to the general public, the mass media, and the health care system to advocate for the needs of these neglected children.

  6. HIV among transgendered people.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, G P

    2002-02-01

    This study explores HIV status and HIV-related risk factors among transgendered people. A needs assessment survey developed with the help of transgendered people was used to conduct face-to-face interviews with 81 transgendered persons, 49 male-to-females (MTFs) and 32 female-to-males (FTMs). The findings indicate that HIV/AIDS is a serious health concern facing the transgender community. The majority of respondents engaged in at least one high risk sexual activity during the past three months, were willing to have high risk sex in the future and did not believe they were susceptible to infection. FTMs have a significantly lower level of AIDS knowledge than MTFs (p < 0.01). Over half (56.7%) of FTMs have not been tested for HIV/AIDS. Efforts to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among the transgender community are urgently needed. HIV/AIDS prevention must specifically target transgendered people, including FTMs who, despite being at risk, have been largely ignored.

  7. HIV / AIDS and tourism.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, S

    1999-01-01

    Since it tends to be significantly affected by HIV/AIDS, the tourism sector is a likely target for HIV/AIDS interventions in many countries. The tourist industry is at particular risk from the pandemic because of the mobility of the work force, the presence of sex tourists, and the heavy reliance of many countries upon tourism revenues. Indeed, tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in many countries. Some people have speculated that potential tourists' fear of AIDS could discourage them from visiting certain countries, while others have even suggested that tourism should be discouraged because the industry contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. When traveling, tourists often take risks that they would not take at home. They tend to drink more, use drugs more, and be generally more adventurous while on holiday. Such adventures often include taking sexual risks. When tourists have sex with prostitutes, hotel staff, and others in the local population, a bridge can be created for HIV to cross back and forth between the tourist's home country and the tourist destination. The author reviews selected studies on the relationship between HIV/AIDS and tourism. Overall, the existing literature offers no definitive evidence that AIDS has had any lasting impact upon the tourism industry anywhere in the world. Rather, promoting a healthy tourism industry and HIV/AIDS prevention are likely complementary in many ways.

  8. Genetic therapies against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, John J; June, Carl H; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy prolongs the life of HIV-infected individuals, but it requires lifelong treatment and results in cumulative toxicities and viral-escape mutants. Gene therapy offers the promise of preventing progressive HIV infection by sustained interference with viral replication in the absence of chronic chemotherapy. Gene-targeting strategies are being developed with RNA-based agents, such as ribozymes, antisense, RNA aptamers and small interfering RNA, and protein-based agents, such as the mutant HIV Rev protein M10, fusion inhibitors and zinc-finger nucleases. Recent advances in T-cell–based strategies include gene-modified HIV-resistant T cells, lentiviral gene delivery, CD8+ T cells, T bodies and engineered T-cell receptors. HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells have the potential to protect all cell types susceptible to HIV infection. The emergence of viral resistance can be addressed by therapies that use combinations of genetic agents and that inhibit both viral and host targets. Many of these strategies are being tested in ongoing and planned clinical trials. PMID:18066041

  9. Women, drugs and HIV.

    PubMed

    Azim, Tasnim; Bontell, Irene; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-02-01

    Women who use drugs, irrespective of whether these are injected or not, are faced with multiple issues which enhance their vulnerability to HIV. In this commentary, we explore the HIV risks and vulnerabilities of women who use drugs as well as the interventions that have been shown to reduce their susceptibility to HIV infection. Women who inject drugs are among the most vulnerable to HIV through both unsafe injections and unprotected sex. They are also among the most hidden affected populations, as they are more stigmatized than their male counterparts. Many sell sex to finance their own and their partner's drug habit and often their partner exerts a significant amount of control over their sex work, condom use and injection practices. Women who use drugs all over the world face many different barriers to HIV service access including police harassment, judgmental health personnel and a fear of losing their children. In order to enable these women to access life-saving services including needle-syringe and condom programs, opioid substitution therapy and HIV testing and treatment, it is essential to create a conducive environment and provide tailor-made services that are adapted to their specific needs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. HIV, poverty and women.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2010-03-01

    This review examines the interactions of financial status and HIV and its implications for women. MEDLINE and Google scholar were searched using the keywords 'women', 'poverty' and 'HIV' in any field of the article. The search was limited to articles published in English over the last 10 years. The first section of the article tries to establish whether poverty or wealth is a risk factor for HIV. There is credible evidence for both arguments. While wealth shows an increased risk for both sexes, poverty places women at a special disadvantage. The second section explains how the financial status interacts with other 'non biological' factors to put women at increased risk. While discrimination based on these factors disadvantage women, there are some paradoxical observations that do not fit with the traditional line of explanation (e.g. paradoxical impact of wealth and education on HIV). The final section assesses the impact of HIV in driving poverty and the role of women in interventional programmes. The specific impact of poverty on females in families living with HIV is less explored. Though microfinance initiatives to empower women are a good idea in theory, the actual outcome of such a programme is less convincing.

  11. Maternal HIV Infection Influences the Microbiome of HIV Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Jeffrey M.; Li, Fan; Martelly, Shoria; Byrt, Erin; Rouzier, Vanessa; Leo, Marguerithe; Tobin, Nicole; Pannaraj, Pia S.; Adisetiyo, Helty; Rollie, Adrienne; Santiskulvong, Chintda; Wang, Shuang; Autran, Chloe; Bode, Lars; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Kuhn, Louise; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2017-01-01

    More than one million HIV-exposed, uninfected infants are born annually to HIV-positive mothers worldwide. This growing population of infants experiences twice the mortality of HIV-unexposed infants. We found that although there were very few differences seen in the microbiomes of mothers with and without HIV infection, maternal HIV infection was associated with changes in the microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Furthermore, we observed that human breast milk oligosaccharides were associated with the bacterial species in the infant microbiome. The disruption of the infant’s microbiome associated with maternal HIV infection may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. PMID:27464748

  12. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hepatotoxicity

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Hepatotoxicity (Last updated 11/15/2016; last reviewed 11/15/2016) Key Points Hepatotoxicity means damage to the liver caused by a medicine, chemical, or herbal or dietary supplement. Hepatotoxicity can ...

  13. Induction of HIV neutralizing antibodies against the MPER of the HIV envelope protein by HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based DNA and VLP vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ling; Wen, Zhiyuan; Dong, Ke; Wang, Xi; Bu, Zhigao; Zhang, Huizhong; Compans, Richard W; Yang, Chinglai

    2011-01-01

    Several conserved neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the HIV Env protein and among these, the MPER of gp41 has received great attention and is widely recognized as a promising target. However, little success has been achieved in eliciting MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by a number of different vaccine strategies. We investigated the ability of HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based vaccines, which were designed to enhance the exposure of the MPER in its native conformation, to induce MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies. In characterization of the HA/gp41 chimeric protein, we found that by mutating an unpaired Cys residue (Cys-14) in its HA1 subunit to a Ser residue, the modified chimeric protein HA-C14S/gp41 showed increased reactivity to a conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibody against HA and formed more stable trimers in VLPs. On the other hand, HA-C14S/gp41 and HA/gp41 chimeric proteins expressed on the cell surfaces exhibited similar reactivity to monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of guinea pigs using the HA-C14S/gp41 DNA or VLP vaccines induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 as well as to a peptide corresponding to a segment of MPER at higher levels than immunization by standard HIV VLPs. Further, sera from vaccinated guinea pigs were found to exhibit HIV neutralizing activities. Moreover, sera from guinea pigs vaccinated by HA-C14S/gp41 DNA and VLP vaccines but not the standard HIV VLPs, were found to neutralize HIV pseudovirions containing a SIV-4E10 chimeric Env protein. The virus neutralization could be blocked by a MPER-specific peptide, thus demonstrating induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by this novel vaccine strategy. These results show that induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies can be achieved through a rationally designed vaccine strategy.

  14. Identification of dual-tropic HIV-1 using evolved neural networks.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Gary B; Lamers, Susanna L; Liu, Enoch S; Salemi, Marco; McGrath, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Blocking the binding of the envelope HIV-1 protein to immune cells is a popular concept for development of anti-HIV therapeutics. R5 HIV-1 binds CCR5, X4 HIV-1 binds CXCR4, and dual-tropic HIV-1 can bind either coreceptor for cellular entry. R5 viruses are associated with early infection and over time can evolve to X4 viruses that are associated with immune failure. Dual-tropic HIV-1 is less studied; however, it represents functional antigenic intermediates during the transition of R5 to X4 viruses. Viral tropism is linked partly to the HIV-1 envelope V3 domain, where the amino acid sequence helps dictate the receptor a particular virus will target; however, using V3 sequence information to identify dual-tropic HIV-1 isolates has remained difficult. Our goal in this study was to elucidate features of dual-tropic HIV-1 isolates that assist in the biological understanding of dual-tropism and develop an approach for their detection. Over 1559 HIV-1 subtype B sequences with known tropisms were analyzed. Each sequence was represented by 73 structural, biochemical and regional features. These features were provided to an evolved neural network classifier and evaluated using balanced and unbalanced data sets. The study resolved R5X4 viruses from R5 with an accuracy of 81.8% and from X4 with an accuracy of 78.8%. The approach also identified a set of V3 features (hydrophobicity, structural and polarity) that are associated with tropism transitions. The ability to distinguish R5X4 isolates will improve computational tropism decisions for R5 vs. X4 and assist in HIV-1 research and drug development efforts.

  15. Nuclear import of the pre-integration complex (PIC): the Achilles heel of HIV?

    PubMed

    Piller, S C; Caly, L; Jans, D A

    2003-07-01

    Current treatments against the Aquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are reasonably effective in reducing the amount of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) present in infected patients, but their side-effects, and the emergence of drug-resistant HIV strains have intensified the renewed search for novel anti-HIV therapies. An essential step in HIV infection is the integration of the viral genome into the host cell chromosomes within the nucleus. Unlike other retroviruses, HIV can transport its genetic material, in the form of the large nucleoprotein pre-integration complex (PIC), into the nucleus through the intact nuclear envelope (NE). This enables HIV to infect non-dividing cells such as macrophages and microglial cells. Detailed knowledge of the signal-dependent pathways by which cellular proteins and RNAs cross the NE has accumulated in the past decade, but although several different components of the PIC have been implicated in its nuclear import, the mechanism of nuclear entry remains unclear. Since specifically inhibiting PIC nuclear import would undoubtedly block HIV infection in non-dividing cells, this critical step of HIV replication is of great interest as a drug target. This review examines the complex and controversial literature regarding three PIC components--the HIV proteins matrix, integrase and Vpr--proposed to facilitate PIC nuclear import, and existing models of HIV PIC nuclear import. It also suggests approaches to move towards a better understanding of PIC nuclear import, through examining the role of individual PIC components in the context of the intact PIC by direct visualisation, in order to develop new anti-HIV therapeutics.

  16. Knowledge about HIV in a Community Sample of Urban African Americans in the South

    PubMed Central

    Klein, H; Sterk, CE; Elifson, KW

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Race and HIV are intertwined in complex ways. African Americans, particularly those residing in the southern United States, are at great risk for contracting and subsequently transmitting HIV. Research on the extent to which members of this population understand the risks associated with engaging in specific behaviors is limited. This paper examines HIV knowledge among at-risk adult African American men and women and the factors associated with levels of HIV knowledge. Methods Based on a conceptual model derived from Social Disorganization Theory and Syndemics Theory, interviews were conducted between 2009 and 2011. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted with 1,864 respondents from 80 strategically-chosen census block groups in Atlanta, Georgia. An innovative approach to assessing amount of HIV knowledge was implemented, to derive better estimates of the extent of knowledge. Results Overall, HIV knowledge was low (average=43.5% correct answers). Seven factors were identified as contributing uniquely to having higher levels of knowledge about HIV transmission: (1) younger age, (2) being educated beyond the high school level, (3) being gay, lesbian or bisexual, (4) experiencing sexual abuse during childhood and/or adolescence, (5) drinking alcohol less frequently, (6) knowing a larger number of HIV-infected persons and (7) knowing anyone currently living with “full blown” AIDS. Conclusion HIV educational and intervention programs targeting at-risk African American adults need to develop effective ways of bolstering a solid understanding of how HIV is/not transmitted. In particular, efforts need to be targeted toward older adults, those with lower levels of educational attainment and persons who are not acquainted with anyone who is HIV-infected. PMID:27891291

  17. Bioinformatic Analysis of HIV-1 Entry and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Dampier, Will; Antell, Gregory; Rivera, Nina; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Pirrone, Vanessa; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with respect to co-receptor utilization has been shown to be relevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease. The CCR5-utilizing (R5) virus has been shown to be important in the very early stages of transmission and highly prevalent during asymptomatic infection and chronic disease. In addition, the R5 virus has been proposed to be involved in neuroinvasion and central nervous system (CNS) disease. In contrast, the CXCR4-utilizing (X4) virus is more prevalent during the course of disease progression and concurrent with the loss of CD4+ T cells. The dual-tropic virus is able to utilize both co-receptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) and has been thought to represent an intermediate transitional virus that possesses properties of both X4 and R5 viruses that can be encountered at many stages of disease. The use of computational tools and bioinformatic approaches in the prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor usage has been growing in importance with respect to understanding HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease, developing diagnostic tools, and improving the efficacy of therapeutic strategies focused on blocking viral entry. Current strategies have enhanced the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility relative to the prediction of co-receptor use; however, these technologies need to be improved with respect to their efficient and accurate use across the HIV-1 subtypes. The most effective approach may center on the combined use of different algorithms involving sequences within and outside of the env-V3 loop. This review focuses on the HIV-1 entry process and on co-receptor utilization, including bioinformatic tools utilized in the prediction of co-receptor usage. It also provides novel preliminary analyses for enabling identification of linkages between amino acids in V3 with other components of the HIV-1 genome and demonstrates that these linkages are different between X4 and R5 viruses. PMID:24862329

  18. Neuroelectric assessment of HIV: EEG, ERP, and viral load.

    PubMed

    Polich, J; Ilan, A; Poceta, J S; Mitler, M M; Darko, D F

    2000-10-01

    The effects of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on the central nervous system function were studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) and auditory event-related brain potentials (EPRs) in patients infected with HIV and unaffected young adult control subjects (n=10/group). All subjects were assessed once every 15 min for four trial blocks at the same time of day to assess EEG/ERP changes with time on task-induced fatigue. Spectral analysis was applied to the pre- and post-stimulus EEG segments. ERP values were evaluated with respect to group differences for component amplitude and latency measures. Spectral analysis demonstrated that HIV patients evinced greater pre-stimulus delta power over frontal areas compared to control subjects, and less post-stimulus spectral power for the delta, theta, and alpha bands over the central/parietal areas. P300 amplitude was smaller, and latency was marginally longer for the HIV patients compared to control subjects. P300 latency correlated positively with increases in the patient HIV viral load. Time-on-task generally did not affect EEG or ERP measures for either group other than contributing to an overall decrease in neuroelectric responsivity. Group spectral power effects were consistent with differences in arousal/fatigue level. P300 group differences were consistent with declines in cognitive capability, and P300 latency increased with increased viral load. HIV infection negatively affected central nervous system function as measured by EEG and cognitive ERPs in a manner that suggests decreased arousal and increased fatigue in HIV patients.

  19. HIV-1 Epitope Variability Is Associated with T Cell Receptor Repertoire Instability and Breadth.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Arumugam; Claiborne, Deon; Ng, Hwee L; Yang, Otto O

    2017-08-15

    Mutational escape of HIV-1 from HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a major barrier for effective immune control. Each epitope typically is targeted by multiple clones with distinct T cell receptors (TCRs). While the clonal repertoire may be important for containing epitope variation, determinants of its composition are poorly understood. We investigate the clonal repertoire of 29 CTL responses against 23 HIV-1 epitopes longitudinally in nine chronically infected untreated subjects with plasma viremia of <3,000 RNA copies/ml over 17 to 179 weeks. The composition of TCRs targeting each epitope varied considerably in stability over time, although clonal stability (Sorensen index) was not significantly time dependent within this interval. However, TCR stability inversely correlated with epitope variability in the Los Alamos HIV-1 Sequence Database, consistent with TCR evolution being driven by epitope variation. Finally, a robust inverse correlation of TCR breadth against each epitope versus epitope variability further suggested that this variability drives TCR repertoire diversification. In the context of studies demonstrating rapidly shifting HIV-1 sequences in vivo, our findings support a variably dynamic process of shifting CTL clonality lagging in tandem with viral evolution and suggest that preventing escape of HIV-1 may require coordinated direction of the CTL clonal repertoire to simultaneously block escape pathways.IMPORTANCE Mutational escape of HIV-1 from HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a major barrier to effective immune control. The number of distinct CTL clones targeting each epitope is proposed to be an important factor, but the determinants are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the clonal stability and number of clones for the CTL response against an epitope are inversely associated with the general variability of the epitope. These results show that CTLs constantly lag epitope mutation, suggesting that preventing HIV

  20. 2´,3´-Dialdehyde of ATP, ADP, and adenosine inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Julieta; Valadao, Ana Luiza Chaves; Aguiar, Renato Santana; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Rossi, Atila Duque; Arantes, Pablo Ricardo; Verli, Hugo; Quintana, Paula Gabriela; Heise, Norton; Tanuri, Amilcar; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis

    2014-01-01

    The 2´3´-dialdehyde of ATP or oxidized ATP (oATP) is a compound known for specifically making covalent bonds with the nucleotide-binding site of several ATP-binding enzymes and receptors. We investigated the effects of oATP and other oxidized purines on HIV-1 infection and we found that this compound inhibits HIV-1 and SIV infection by blocking early steps of virus replication. oATP, oxidized ADP (oADP), and oxidized Adenosine (oADO) impact the natural activity of endogenous reverse transcriptase enzyme (RT) in cell free virus particles and are able to inhibit viral replication in different cell types when added to the cell cultures either before or after infection. We used UFLC-UV to show that both oADO and oATP can be detected in the cell after being added in the extracellular medium. oATP also suppresses RT activity and replication of the HIV-1 resistant variants M184V and T215Y. We conclude that oATP, oADP and oADO display anti HIV-1 activity that is at in least in part due to inhibitory activity on HIV-1 RT.

  1. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Diabetes (Last updated 11/17/2016; last reviewed 11/17/2016) Key Points Diabetes is a disease in which levels ... diabetes and type 2 diabetes . Use of some HIV medicines may increase blood glucose levels and lead ...

  2. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Rash

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Rash (Last updated 11/23/2016; last reviewed 11/23/2016) Key Points A rash is an irritated area of ... requires immediate medical attention. Why do people with HIV develop rash? A rash is an irritated area ...

  3. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Lipodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection or medicines used to treat HIV. Other risk factors for lipodystrophy include: Age : Older people are at ... Effects of Antiretroviral Agents From the Department of Veterans Affairs: Body Shape Changes with HIV From the Health Resources and Services Administration: Guide for HIV/AIDS ...

  4. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID). /* // ** // */ Prevention Research Vaccines Microbicides Related Topics on AIDS.gov Clinical Trials Immune System 101 HIV Vaccine ... Be the Generation Last revised: 12/09/2016 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  5. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports » HIV/AIDS » Letter from the Director HIV/AIDS Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director Human ... the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. ...

  6. HIV/AIDS and Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Having HIV/AIDS weakens your body's immune system. It destroys the white blood cells that fight infection. This puts ... such as crypto (cryptosporidiosis) and toxo (toxoplasmosis) Having HIV/AIDS can make infections harder to treat. People ...

  7. What Is HIV/AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours ... HIV currently exists, but with proper treatment and medical care, HIV can be controlled. The medicine used ...

  8. Gauge Blocks - A Zombie Technology.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Gauge blocks have been the primary method for disseminating length traceability for over 100 years. Their longevity was based on two things: the relatively low cost of delivering very high accuracy to users, and the technical limitation that the range of high precision gauging systems was very small. While the first reason is still true, the second factor is being displaced by changes in measurement technology since the 1980s. New long range sensors do not require master gauges that are nearly the same length as the part being inspected, and thus one of the primary attributes of gauge blocks, wringing stacks to match the part, is no longer needed. Relaxing the requirement that gauges wring presents an opportunity to develop new types of end standards that would increase the accuracy and usefulness of gauging systems.

  9. On multilevel block modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, Tadao; Takata, Toyoo; Fujiwara, Toru; Lin, Shu

    1991-01-01

    The multilevel (ML) technique for combining block coding and modulation is investigated. A general formulation is presented for ML modulation codes in terms of component codes with appropriate distance measures. A specific method for constructing ML block modulation codes (MLBMCs) with interdependency among component codes is proposed. Given an MLBMC C with no interdependency among the binary component codes, the proposed method gives an MLBC C-prime that has the same rate as C, a minimum squared Euclidean distance not less than that of C, a trellis diagram with the same number of states as that of C, and a smaller number of nearest-neighbor codewords than that of C. Finally, a technique is presented for analyzing the error performance of MLBMCs for an additive white Gaussian noise channel based on soft-decision maximum-likelihood decoding.

  10. On multilevel block modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, Tadao; Takata, Toyoo; Fujiwara, Toru; Lin, Shu

    1991-01-01

    The multilevel (ML) technique for combining block coding and modulation is investigated. A general formulation is presented for ML modulation codes in terms of component codes with appropriate distance measures. A specific method for constructing ML block modulation codes (MLBMCs) with interdependency among component codes is proposed. Given an MLBMC C with no interdependency among the binary component codes, the proposed method gives an MLBC C-prime that has the same rate as C, a minimum squared Euclidean distance not less than that of C, a trellis diagram with the same number of states as that of C, and a smaller number of nearest-neighbor codewords than that of C. Finally, a technique is presented for analyzing the error performance of MLBMCs for an additive white Gaussian noise channel based on soft-decision maximum-likelihood decoding.

  11. Human Mucosal Mast Cells Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Wei, Ji-Fu; Guo, Ming-Gao; Qin, Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Ma, Li; Liu, Bao-Chi; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary site where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades, amplifies, and becomes persistently established, and cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 plays a pivotal role in mucosal viral dissemination. Mast cells are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract and are early targets for invasive pathogens, and they have been shown to have increased density in the genital mucosa in HIV-infected women. Intestinal mast cells express numerous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and have been shown to combat various viral, parasitic, and bacterial infections. However, the role of mast cells in HIV-1 infection is poorly defined. In this study, we investigated their potential contributions to HIV-1 transmission. Mast cells isolated from gut mucosal tissues were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs), such as DC-SIGN, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin, which mediate capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Intriguingly, following coculture with CD4+ T cells, mast cell surface-bound viruses were efficiently transferred to target T cells. Prior blocking with anti-HAF antibody or mannan before coculture impaired viral trans-infection. Cell-cell conjunctions formed between mast cells and T cells, to which viral particles were recruited, and these were required for efficient cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission. Our results reveal a potential function of gut mucosal mast cells in HIV-1 dissemination in tissues. Strategies aimed at preventing viral capture and transfer mediated by mast cells could be beneficial in combating primary HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate the role of human mast cells isolated from mucosal tissues in mediating HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. This finding facilitates our understanding of HIV-1 mucosal infection and will benefit the development of strategies to combat primary HIV-1 dissemination. PMID:26719250

  12. A Block to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Assembly in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Roberto; Rutter, Gabriel; Harris, Matthew E.; Hope, Thomas J.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) does not replicate in murine cells. We investigated the basis of this block by infecting a murine NIH 3T3 reporter cell line that stably expressed human CD4, CCR5, and cyclin T1 and contained a transactivatable HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) cassette. Although the virus entered efficiently, formed provirus, and was expressed at a level close to that in a highly permissive human cell line, the murine cells did not support M-tropic HIV-1 replication. To determine why the virus failed to replicate, the efficiency of each postentry step in the virus replication cycle was analyzed using vesicular stomatitis virus G pseudotypes. The murine cells supported reverse transcription and integration at levels comparable to those in the human osteosarcoma-derived cell line GHOST.R5, and human cyclin T1 restored provirus expression, consistent with earlier findings of others. The infected murine cells contained nearly as much virion protein as did the human cells but released less than 1/500 the amount of p24gag into the culture medium. A small amount of p24gag was released and was in the form of fully infectious virus. Electron microscopy suggested that aberrantly assembled virion protein had accumulated in cytoplasmic vesicular structures. Virions assembling at the cell membrane were observed but were rare. The entry of M-tropic JR.FL-pseudotyped reporter virus was moderately reduced in the murine cells, suggesting a minor reduction in coreceptor function. A small reduction in the abundance of full-length viral mRNA transcripts was also noted; however, the major block was at virion assembly. This could have been due to a failure of Gag to target to the cell membrane. This block must be overcome before a murine model for HIV-1 replication can be developed. PMID:10729160

  13. Uav Photogrammetry: Block Triangulation Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Pagliari, D.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.; Dosso, P.

    2013-08-01

    UAVs systems represent a flexible technology able to collect a big amount of high resolution information, both for metric and interpretation uses. In the frame of experimental tests carried out at Dept. ICA of Politecnico di Milano to validate vector-sensor systems and to assess metric accuracies of images acquired by UAVs, a block of photos taken by a fixed wing system is triangulated with several software. The test field is a rural area included in an Italian Park ("Parco Adda Nord"), useful to study flight and imagery performances on buildings, roads, cultivated and uncultivated vegetation. The UAV SenseFly, equipped with a camera Canon Ixus 220HS, flew autonomously over the area at a height of 130 m yielding a block of 49 images divided in 5 strips. Sixteen pre-signalized Ground Control Points, surveyed in the area through GPS (NRTK survey), allowed the referencing of the block and accuracy analyses. Approximate values for exterior orientation parameters (positions and attitudes) were recorded by the flight control system. The block was processed with several software: Erdas-LPS, EyeDEA (Univ. of Parma), Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4UAV, in assisted or automatic way. Results comparisons are given in terms of differences among digital surface models, differences in orientation parameters and accuracies, when available. Moreover, image and ground point coordinates obtained by the various software were independently used as initial values in a comparative adjustment made by scientific in-house software, which can apply constraints to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods of point extraction and accuracies on ground check points.

  14. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  15. Liquid-blocking check valve

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, J.T.

    1982-09-27

    A liquid blocking check valve useful particularly in a pneumatic system utilizing a pressurized liquid fill chamber. The valve includes a floatable ball disposed within a housing defining a chamber. The housing is provided with an inlet aperture disposed in the top of said chamber, and an outlet aperture disposed in the bottom of said chamber in an offset relation to said inlet aperture and in communication with a cutaway side wall section of said housing.

  16. Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C; Coombs, Robert W; Polyak, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 Viral Infection by an Engineered CRISPR Csy4 RNA Endoribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Li, Wei; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial defense system CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has been explored as a powerful tool to edit genomic elements. In this study, we test the potential of CRISPR Csy4 RNA endoribonuclease for targeting HIV-1. We fused human codon-optimized Csy4 endoribonuclease with VPR, a HIV-1 viral preintegration complex protein. An HIV-1 cell model was modified to allow quantitative detection of active virus production. We found that the trans-expressing VPR-Csy4 almost completely blocked viral infection in two target cell lines (SupT1, Ghost). In the MAGI cell assay, where the HIV-1 LTR β-galactosidase is expressed under the control of the tat gene from an integrated provirus, VPR-Csy4 significantly blocked the activity of the provirus-activated HIV-1 reporter. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that Csy4 endoribonuclease is a promising tool that could be tailored further to target HIV-1. PMID:26495836

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 Viral Infection by an Engineered CRISPR Csy4 RNA Endoribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Li, Wei; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial defense system CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has been explored as a powerful tool to edit genomic elements. In this study, we test the potential of CRISPR Csy4 RNA endoribonuclease for targeting HIV-1. We fused human codon-optimized Csy4 endoribonuclease with VPR, a HIV-1 viral preintegration complex protein. An HIV-1 cell model was modified to allow quantitative detection of active virus production. We found that the trans-expressing VPR-Csy4 almost completely blocked viral infection in two target cell lines (SupT1, Ghost). In the MAGI cell assay, where the HIV-1 LTR β-galactosidase is expressed under the control of the tat gene from an integrated provirus, VPR-Csy4 significantly blocked the activity of the provirus-activated HIV-1 reporter. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that Csy4 endoribonuclease is a promising tool that could be tailored further to target HIV-1.

  19. Relieving pain with nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Carron, H

    1978-04-01

    Pain syndromes in elderly patients are seldom psychogenic or due merely to "old age." Careful differential diagnosis is important, as judicious use of nerve blocks as adjunctive therapy often can relieve pain and restore activity. In the acute phase of shoulder pain, intrabursal injection of local anesthetic and steroid inhibits the inflammatory process. In the later stages, suprascapular nerve block relieves pain and interrupts afferent pain pathways. The occipital pain and headache of cervical arthritis also often respond to injection of 2 to 3 ml of long-acting anesthetic into the greater and lesser occipital nerves at the sites where they pierce the trapezius. Minor causalgia, shoulder-arm syndrome, or chronic traumatic edema may follow either forearm fracture or inflammation around the shoulder joint. Five stellate ganglion blocks with 1% lidocaine on alternate days, followed by 3 to 4 months of active and passive exercise, is the most effective treatment. This regimen usually produces a fully functional extremity. In degenerative disk disease, osteoarthritis, and metastatic disease, the cause of back pain is essentially the same--edema and inflammation of nerve roots at the intervertebral foramina. Injection of local anesthetic and steroid into the epidural space usually reduces swelling and inflammation. Patients are evaluated in 2 weeks and reblocked if improvement has plateaued. Pain relief most often is prompt and persists for an indefinite period.

  20. Scanning probe block copolymer lithography

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jinan; Huo, Fengwei; Zheng, Zijian; Giam, Louise R.; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2010-01-01

    Integration of individual nanoparticles into desired spatial arrangements over large areas is a prerequisite for exploiting their unique electrical, optical, and chemical properties. However, positioning single sub-10-nm nanoparticles in a specific location individually on a substrate remains challenging. Herein we have developed a unique approach, termed scanning probe block copolymer lithography, which enables one to control the growth and position of individual nanoparticles in situ. This technique relies on either dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) or polymer pen lithography (PPL) to transfer phase-separating block copolymer inks in the form of 100 or more nanometer features on an underlying substrate. Reduction of the metal ions via plasma results in the high-yield formation of single crystal nanoparticles per block copolymer feature. Because the size of each feature controls the number of metal atoms within it, the DPN or PPL step can be used to control precisely the size of each nanocrystal down to 4.8 ± 0.2 nm. PMID:21059942