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Sample records for actinomycetales mce operons

  1. A phylogenomic analysis of the Actinomycetales mce operons

    PubMed Central

    Casali, Nicola; Riley, Lee W

    2007-01-01

    Background The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors four copies of a cluster of genes termed mce operons. Despite extensive research that has demonstrated the importance of these operons on infection outcome, their physiological function remains obscure. Expanding databases of complete microbial genome sequences facilitate a comparative genomic approach that can provide valuable insight into the role of uncharacterized proteins. Results The M. tuberculosis mce loci each include two yrbE and six mce genes, which have homology to ABC transporter permeases and substrate-binding proteins, respectively. Operons with an identical structure were identified in all Mycobacterium species examined, as well as in five other Actinomycetales genera. Some of the Actinomycetales mce operons include an mkl gene, which encodes an ATPase resembling those of ABC uptake transporters. The phylogenetic profile of Mkl orthologs exactly matched that of the Mce and YrbE proteins. Through topology and motif analyses of YrbE homologs, we identified a region within the penultimate cytoplasmic loop that may serve as the site of interaction with the putative cognate Mkl ATPase. Homologs of the exported proteins encoded adjacent to the M. tuberculosis mce operons were detected in a conserved chromosomal location downstream of the majority of Actinomycetales operons. Operons containing linked mkl, yrbE and mce genes, resembling the classic organization of an ABC importer, were found to be common in Gram-negative bacteria and appear to be associated with changes in properties of the cell surface. Conclusion Evidence presented suggests that the mce operons of Actinomycetales species and related operons in Gram-negative bacteria encode a subfamily of ABC uptake transporters with a possible role in remodeling the cell envelope. PMID:17324287

  2. An insight into the regulation of mce4 operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rathor, Nisha; Chandolia, Amita; Saini, Neeraj Kumar; Sinha, Rajesh; Pathak, Rakesh; Garima, Kushal; Singh, Satendra; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Bose, Mridula

    2013-07-01

    The mce4 operon is reported to be involved in cholesterol utilization and intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). The regulatory mechanism of this important operon was unknown so far. Here we report detection of the promoter region and regulatory factors of the mce4 operon. The in silico analyzed putative promoter region was cloned in promoter selection vector and promoter strength was measured by O-Nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranosidase (ONPG) assay. The transcription start site was determined by 5' Rapid amplification of C terminal end (5'RACE). Surface stress, hypoxia and presence of cholesterol, were found to be stimulatory for mce4 operon promoter induction. Pull down assay coupled with 2D gel electrophoresis resolved many proteins; few prominent spots were processed for identification. MALDI TOF-TOF identified proteins of M. tuberculosis which supported the regulatory function of the identified promoter region and cholesterol utilization of mce4 operon. Since mce4 operon is involved in cholesterol utilization and intracellular survival of M. tuberculosis in the later phase of infection, identification of the promoter sequence as reported in the present communication may facilitate development of effective inhibitors to regulate expression of mce4 operon which may prove to be a good drug target to prevent latency in tuberculosis.

  3. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Free mycolic acid accumulation in the cell wall of the mce1 operon mutant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Sally A; Leavell, Michael D; Marjanovic, Olivera; Iavarone, Anthony T; Leary, Julie A; Riley, Lee W

    2013-10-01

    The lipid-rich cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of tuberculosis, serves as an effective barrier against many chemotherapeutic agents and toxic host cell effector molecules, and it may contribute to the mechanism of persistence. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains mutated in a 13-gene operon called mce1, which encodes a putative ABC lipid transporter, induce aberrant granulomatous response in mouse lungs. Because of the postulated role of the mce1 operon in lipid importation, we compared the cell wall lipid composition of wild type and mce1 operon mutant M. tuberculosis H37Rv strains. High resolution mass spectrometric analyses of the mce1 mutant lipid extracts showed unbound mycolic acids to accumulate in the cell wall. Quantitative analysis revealed a 10.7 fold greater amount of free mycolates in the mutant compared to that of the wild type strain. The free mycolates were comprised of alpha, methoxy and keto mycolates in the ratio 1:0.9:0.6, respectively. Since the mce1 operon is regulated in vivo, the free mycolates that accumulate during infection may serve as a barrier for M. tuberculosis against toxic products and contribute to the pathogen's persistence.

  5. Cloning, Expression, Invasion, and Immunological Reactivity of a Mammalian Cell Entry Protein Encoded by the mce1 Operon of Nocardia farcinica

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xingzhao; Tan, Xiaoluo; Hou, Xuexin; Si, Chenchen; Xu, Shuai; Tang, Lu; Yuan, Xiuqin; Li, Zhenjun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial mammalian cell entry (Mce) proteins have been implicated in pathogen invasion of mammalian host cells. The aim of this study was to examine the invasion-conferring ability of mce1E operon-encoded proteins, in vivo expression of Mce1E in cells from infected mice and rabbits, and Mce1E immunogenicity. Nocardia farcinica mce1E was cloned into pet30a(+) vectors, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Invasion assays, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunoblots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detection of cytokines were conducted. TEM confirmed the invasion of HeLa cells by Mce1E-coated beads. The antigenicity of E. coli-expressed recombinant Mce1E was confirmed in immunoblots with sera from N. farcinica-infected mouse and rabbit sera. Co-incubation of Mce1E with splenocytes of N. farcinica-infected mice demonstrated upregulation of interferon (IFN-γ), but not interleukin (IL)-4 or IL-10, in the cultural supernatant. These findings demonstrate that Mce1E may facilitate N. farcinica interactions with and invasion of mammalian cells. Notably, Mce1E are expressed and elicited antibody responses in mice and rabbits during infection. Besides, it may play a role in cell-mediated immune reactions and cause host inflammation responses to N. farcinica infection. PMID:28275374

  6. Actinomycetales from corn.

    PubMed

    Lyons, A J; Pridham, T G; Rogers, R F

    1975-02-01

    Mesophilic Actinomycetales were isolated from whole corn, brewers grits, and break flour received from three different mills. In addition, strains were isolated from high-moisture (27 per cent) field corn; high-moisture, silo-stored corn (untreated); and high-moisture corn treated with ammonia, ammonium isobutyrate, or propionic-acetic acid. According to standard techniques, 139 strains were extensively characterized and 207 additional strains were partially characterized. On the basis of these characterizations, the streptomycete strains were identified by both the systems of Pridham et al. and Hütter because these systems are rapid and accurate. In general, only Streptomyces griseus (Krainsky) Waksman and Henrici was isolated from high-moisture whole corn (treated or untreated) except from grain exposed to ammonium isobutyrate. Strains isolated from high-moisture corn subjected to that treatment represented both S. griseus and S. albus (Rossi Doria) Waksman and Henrici. The strains isolated from corn and corn products from the three mills were identified with a number of streptomycete species. Of all Actinomycetales isolated, only three were not streptomycetes--two from brewer's grits and one from break flour.

  7. Actinomycetales from Corn

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, A. J.; Pridham, T. G.; Rogers, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Mesophilic Actinomycetales were isolated from whole corn, brewer's grits, and break flour received from three different mills. In addition, strains were isolated from high-moisture (27%) field corn; high-moisture, silo-stored corn (untreated); and high-moisture corn treated with ammonia, ammonium isobutyrate, or propionic-acetic acid. According to standard techniques, 139 strains were extensively characterized and 207 additional strains were partially characterized. On the basis of these characterizations, the streptomycete strains were identified by both the systems of Pridham et al. and Hütter because these systems are rapid and accurate. In general, only Streptomyces griseus (Krainsky) Waksman and Henrici was isolated from high-moisture whole corn (treated or untreated) except from grain exposed to ammonium isobutyrate. Strains isolated from high-moisture corn subjected to that treatment represented both S. griseus and S. albus (Rossi Doria) Waksman and Henrici. The strains isolated from corn and corn products from the three mills were identified with a number of streptomycete species. Of all Actinomycetales isolated, only three were not streptomycetes—two from brewer's grits and one from break flour. Images PMID:803819

  8. Bi-Bi to MCE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of American Sign Language (ASL) in educating deaf children, based on the history of using manually coded English (MCE). The paper concludes that use of ASL should not be the ultimate goal of bilingual bicultural programs, and, in some classrooms, the optimal program will be complementary use of ASL and MCE. (JDD)

  9. Cloning of mce1 locus of Mycobacterium leprae in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 SMR5 and evaluation of expression of mce1 genes in M. smegmatis and M. leprae.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Lini, Nirmala; Shabaana, Abdul Khader; Nagavardhini, Avuthu; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu

    2005-08-01

    Plasmid pSET152 is a broad host range mobilizable vector which integrates into streptomyces chromosome utilizing att site and int function of slashed circleC31. Transformation of this plasmid into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 SMR5 gave stable transformants carrying the pSET152 as an integrated copy. Integration occurred at the cross over sequence 5'TTG disrupting the gatA gene (Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase subunitA), which is non-essential under conditions used. Recombinant pSET152 plasmids carrying mce1 locus of Mycobacterium leprae were used to construct M. smegmatis transformants carrying the mce1 locus in their chromosome. RT-PCR analysis revealed specific transcripts of M. leprae mce in M. smegmatis. The transcribed mRNA carried intergenic regions between genes of mce1 locus indicating that mce1 locus is an operon. Examination of M. leprae specific mRNA from lepromatous leprosy patient's biopsy showed that mce locus is transcribed as an operon in the pathogen also.

  10. A Memorandum Report: Physical Constants of MCE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    3.3.1.2 Ramsay-Young Method .........................................................................3 3.3.1.3 Distillation Data... distilled by personnel in the Chemical Division to obtain the pure agent for study. Tests are now in progress on various phases of this study, and in...EXPERIMENTAL 3.1. Materials and Equipment 3.1.1 MCE A number of samples of pure (twice- distilled ) MCE and one sample of the crude material from the bomb

  11. Mce4A protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces pro inflammatory cytokine response leading to macrophage apoptosis in a TNF-α dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Saini, Neeraj Kumar; Sinha, Rajesh; Singh, Pooja; Sharma, Monika; Pathak, Rakesh; Rathor, Nisha; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Bose, Mridula

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis subverts the host immune response through numerous immune-evasion strategies. Apoptosis has been identified as one such mechanism and has been well studied in M. tuberculosis infection. Here, we demonstrate that the Mce4A protein of mce4 operon is involved in the induction of host cell apoptosis. Earlier we have shown that the Mce4A was required for the invasion and survival of M. tuberculosis. In this report we present evidence to establish a role for Mce4A in the modulation of THP-1 cell survival. Recombinant Mce4A was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and then refolded. Viability of THP-1 cells decreased in a dose-dependent manner when treated with Mce4A. The secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) or interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and enhanced nitric oxide release was observed when the THP-1 cells, were treated with Mce4A protein. The Mce4A induced apoptosis of the THP-1 cells was TNF-α dependent since blocking with anti TNF-α antibody abrogated this phenomenon. Collectively, these data suggest that Mce4A can induce the THP-1 cells to undergo apoptosis which primarily follows a TNF- α dependent pathway.

  12. Polyclonal antibody against conserved sequences of mce1A protein blocks MTB infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Sasikala; Namasivayam, Nalini; Chellam, Rajamanickam

    2012-03-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is largely due to its ability to enter and survive within human macrophages. It is suggested that a specific protein namely mammalian cell entry protein is involved in the pathogenesis and the specific gene for this protein mce1A has been identified in several pathogenic organisms such as Rickettsia, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter, Streptomyces, Klebsiella, Vibrio, Neisseria, Rhodococcus, Nocardioides, Saccharopolyspora erthyrae, and Pseudomonas. Analysis of mce1 operons in the above mentioned organisms through bioinformatics tools has revealed the presence of unique sequences (conserved regions) suggesting that these sequences may be involved in the process of infection. Presently, the mce1A full-length (1,365 bp) region from Mycobacterium bovis and its conserved regions (303 bp) were cloned in to an expression vector and the purified expressed proteins of molecular weight ~47 and ~11 kDa, respectively, were injected to rabbits to raise the polyclonal antibodies. The purified polyclonal antibodies were checked for their ability to inhibit the Mycobacterium infection in cultured human macrophages. In macrophage invasion assay, when antibody added at high concentration, decrease in viable counts was observed in all cell cultures within the first 5 days after infection, where the intracellular bacterial CFU obtained from the infected MTB increased by the 3rd day at low concentration of antibody. The macrophage invasion assay has indicated that the purified antibodies of mce1A conserved region can inhibit the infection of Mycobacterium.

  13. Magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in Nickel Ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, J.; Morales, M. B.; Frey, N. A.; Miner, M. J.; Srinath, S.; Srikanth, H.

    2007-03-01

    We report on the magneto caloric effect (MCE) in a Nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticle system. The nanoparticles were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation. Extensive characterization of structural and magnetic properties was done using XRD, TEM, DC and AC magnetization, and transverse susceptibility. The change in entropy was calculated using the thermodynamic Maxwell relation from the family of M-H curves taken at different temperatures. Maximum entropy change in nanoparticle systems is influenced by particle size, anisotropy, and collective dipolar behavior. While the MCE is not as large as that reported in bulk systems, there are advantages as ferrite nanoparticles are easily produced and the operational temperature is tuned by the average particle size. In our studies, we observed a sharp peak in M-T curves at around 60K in addition to the blocking transition which occurs at 120 K. This results in a larger entropy change in comparison with the MCE results on other reported ferrite nanoparticles. The origin of this anomalous MCE is analyzed in the context of surface anisotropy and other possible contributions in the NiFe2O4 system. Work supported by NSF through grant CTS-0408933.

  14. Production of β-Lactamase by Non-Streptomyces Actinomycetales

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Schwartz, Surya P.

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants and whole cells from fermentation broths of Micromonospora, Nocardia, Oerskovia, and other genera of the Actinomycetales were examined for the presence of β-lactamase activity by using the chromogenic cephalosporin 87/312. Nearly 60% of the 250 isolates examined produced detectable levels of β-lactamase. All enzyme preparations were active over a range of pH values from 6.5 to 8.2, with maximum activity occurring between 7.0 and 7.8. The preparations varied in their stability at 60°C. An examination of selected enzyme preparations revealed a similarity between substrate specificities of the non-Streptomyces Actinomycetales and gram-negative-bacterial β-lactamases. PMID:311614

  15. Biosynthesis of Ergothioneine and Hercynine by Fungi and Actinomycetales

    PubMed Central

    Genghof, Dorothy S.

    1970-01-01

    Unlike other bacteria, aerobic members of the order Actinomycetales show a close biochemical relationship to the fungi by their capacity to synthesize hercynine and ergothioneine. The myxomycete Physarum polycephalum, possessing the same synthetic ability, also shows this relationship. Contrariwise, the unusual position of yeasts as fungi is indicated by the inability of all yeastlike Ascomycetes and all except a few false yeasts to synthesize these two betaines. PMID:5432011

  16. Kitasatosporia, a new genus of the order Actinomycetales.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Takahashi, Y; Iwai, Y; Tanaka, H

    1982-08-01

    The morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics of a new actinomycete strain producing a new antibiotic, setamycin are described. The strain forms aerial mycelia. There is no fragmentation of vegetative mycelia. Since the cell wall type is a new one containing both LL- and meso-2,6-diaminopimelic acid, glycine and galactose, strain KM-6054 could not be classified in any previously named genera of the order Actinomycetales. Thus, it is considered to be a member of a new genus, for which the name Kitasatosporia is proposed. The type species (monotype) of this genus is K. setalba. The type strain of K. setalba is strain KM-6054 (ATCC 33774).

  17. Peptidoglycan cross-linking in glycopeptide-resistant Actinomycetales.

    PubMed

    Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Haddache, Nabila; Veckerlé, Carole; Dubost, Lionel; Marie, Arul; Shikura, Noriyasu; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Rice, Louis B; Arthur, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-lactate (D-Lac) is thought to be responsible for glycopeptide resistance in members of the order Actinomycetales that produce these drugs and in related soil bacteria. More recently, the peptidoglycan of several members of the order Actinomycetales was shown to be cross-linked by L,D-transpeptidases that use tetrapeptide acyl donors devoid of the target of glycopeptides. To evaluate the contribution of these resistance mechanisms, we have determined the peptidoglycan structure of Streptomyces coelicolor A(3)2, which harbors a vanHAX gene cluster for the production of precursors ending in D-Lac, and Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727, which is devoid of vanHAX and produces the glycopeptide A40296. Vancomycin retained residual activity against S. coelicolor A(3)2 despite efficient incorporation of D-Lac into cytoplasmic precursors. This was due to a D,D-transpeptidase-catalyzed reaction that generated a stem pentapeptide recognized by glycopeptides by the exchange of D-Lac for D-Ala and Gly. The contribution of L,D-transpeptidases to resistance was limited by the supply of tetrapeptide acyl donors, which are essential for the formation of peptidoglycan cross-links by these enzymes. In the absence of a cytoplasmic metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase, the tetrapeptide substrate was generated by hydrolysis of the C-terminal D-Lac residue of the stem pentadepsipeptide in the periplasm in competition with the exchange reaction catalyzed by D,D-transpeptidases. In Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727, the contribution of L,D-transpeptidases to glycopeptide resistance was limited by the incomplete conversion of pentapeptides into tetrapeptides despite the production of a cytoplasmic metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase. Since the level of drug production exceeds the level of resistance, we propose that L,D-transpeptidases merely act as a tolerance mechanism in this bacterium.

  18. An orphaned Mce-associated membrane protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a virulence factor that stabilizes Mce transporters

    PubMed Central

    Perkowski, Ellen Foot; Miller, Brittany K.; McCann, Jessica R.; Sullivan, Jonathan Tabb; Malik, Seidu; Allen, Irving Coy; Godfrey, Virginia; Hayden, Jennifer D.; Braunstein, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins that are exported out of the bacterial cytoplasm are ideally positioned to be virulence factors; however, the functions of individual exported proteins remain largely unknown. Previous studies identified Rv0199 as an exported membrane protein of unknown function. Here, we characterized the role of Rv0199 in M. tuberculosis virulence using an aerosol model of murine infection. Rv0199 appears to be a member of a Mce-associated membrane (Mam) protein family leading us to rename it OmamA, for orphaned Mce-associated membrane protein A. Consistent with a role in Mce transport, we showed OmamA is required for cholesterol import, which is a Mce4-dependent process. We further demonstrated a function for OmamA in stabilizing protein components of the Mce1 transporter complex. These results indicate a function of OmamA in multiple Mce transporters and one that may be analogous to the role of VirB8 in stabilizing Type IV secretion systems, as structural similarities between Mam proteins and VirB8 proteins are predicted by the Phyre 2 program. In this study, we provide functional information about OmamA and shed light on the function of Mam family proteins in Mce transporters. PMID:26712165

  19. Polysaccharide Degradation Capability of Actinomycetales Soil Isolates from a Semiarid Grassland of the Colorado Plateau.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Chris M; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Dunbar, John; Hesse, Cedar N; Daligault, Hajnalka; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2017-03-15

    Among the bacteria, members of the order Actinomycetales are considered quintessential degraders of complex polysaccharides in soils. However, studies examining complex polysaccharide degradation by Actinomycetales (other than Streptomyces spp.) in soils are limited. Here, we examine the lignocellulolytic and chitinolytic potential of 112 Actinomycetales strains, encompassing 13 families, isolated from a semiarid grassland of the Colorado Plateau in Utah. Members of the Streptomycetaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Micromonosporaceae, and Promicromonosporaceae families exhibited robust activity against carboxymethyl cellulose, xylan, chitin, and pectin substrates (except for low/no pectinase activity by the Micromonosporaceae). When incubated in a hydrated mixture of blended Stipa and Hilaria grass biomass over a 5-week period, Streptomyces and Saccharothrix (a member of the Pseudonocardiaceae) isolates produced high levels of extracellular enzyme activity, such as endo- and exocellulase, glucosidase, endo- and exoxylosidase, and arabinofuranosidase. These characteristics make them well suited to degrade the cellulose and hemicellulose components of grass cell walls. On the basis of the polysaccharide degradation profiles of the isolates, relative abundance of Actinomycetales sequences in 16S rRNA gene surveys of Colorado Plateau soils, and analysis of genes coding for polysaccharide-degrading enzymes among 237 Actinomycetales genomes in the CAZy database and 5 genomes from our isolates, we posit that Streptomyces spp. and select members of the Pseudonocardiaceae and Micromonosporaceae likely play an important role in the degradation of hemicellulose, cellulose, and chitin substances in dryland soils.IMPORTANCE Shifts in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales taxa have been observed in soil microbial community surveys during large, manipulated climate change field studies. However, our limited understanding of the ecophysiology of diverse Actinomycetales taxa in soil

  20. Polysaccharide Degradation Capability of Actinomycetales Soil Isolates from a Semiarid Grassland of the Colorado Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Dunbar, John; Hesse, Cedar N.; Daligault, Hajnalka; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among the bacteria, members of the order Actinomycetales are considered quintessential degraders of complex polysaccharides in soils. However, studies examining complex polysaccharide degradation by Actinomycetales (other than Streptomyces spp.) in soils are limited. Here, we examine the lignocellulolytic and chitinolytic potential of 112 Actinomycetales strains, encompassing 13 families, isolated from a semiarid grassland of the Colorado Plateau in Utah. Members of the Streptomycetaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Micromonosporaceae, and Promicromonosporaceae families exhibited robust activity against carboxymethyl cellulose, xylan, chitin, and pectin substrates (except for low/no pectinase activity by the Micromonosporaceae). When incubated in a hydrated mixture of blended Stipa and Hilaria grass biomass over a 5-week period, Streptomyces and Saccharothrix (a member of the Pseudonocardiaceae) isolates produced high levels of extracellular enzyme activity, such as endo- and exocellulase, glucosidase, endo- and exoxylosidase, and arabinofuranosidase. These characteristics make them well suited to degrade the cellulose and hemicellulose components of grass cell walls. On the basis of the polysaccharide degradation profiles of the isolates, relative abundance of Actinomycetales sequences in 16S rRNA gene surveys of Colorado Plateau soils, and analysis of genes coding for polysaccharide-degrading enzymes among 237 Actinomycetales genomes in the CAZy database and 5 genomes from our isolates, we posit that Streptomyces spp. and select members of the Pseudonocardiaceae and Micromonosporaceae likely play an important role in the degradation of hemicellulose, cellulose, and chitin substances in dryland soils. IMPORTANCE Shifts in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales taxa have been observed in soil microbial community surveys during large, manipulated climate change field studies. However, our limited understanding of the ecophysiology of diverse Actinomycetales taxa

  1. 42 CFR 457.955 - Conditions necessary to contract as a managed care entity (MCE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... entity (MCE). 457.955 Section 457.955 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... care entity (MCE). (a) The State must assure that any entity seeking to contract as an MCE under a... paragraph (a) of this section— (1) Enforce MCE compliance with all applicable Federal and State...

  2. Is the lower atmosphere a readily accessible reservoir of culturable, antimicrobial compound-producing Actinomycetales?

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Carolyn F.; Werth, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies have revealed that microbial diversity in the atmosphere rivals that of surface environments. This indicates that the atmosphere may be worth bioprospecting in for novel microorganisms, especially those selected for by harsh atmospheric conditions. This is interesting in light of the antibiotic resistance crisis and renewed interests in bioprospecting for members of the Actinomycetales, which harbor novel secondary metabolite-producing pathways and produce spores that make them well suited for atmospheric travel. The latter leads to the hypothesis that the atmosphere may be a promising environment in which to search for novel Actinomycetales. Although ubiquitous in soils, where bioprospecting efforts for Actinomycetales have been and are largely still focused, we present novel data indicating that culturable members of this taxonomic order are 3–5.6 times more abundant in air samples collected at 1.5, 4.5, 7.5, and 18 m above the ground, than in the underlying soil. These results support the hypothesis that mining the vast and readily accessible lower atmosphere for novel Actinomycetales in the search for undescribed secondary metabolites could prove fruitful. PMID:26300868

  3. Measuring mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter mass under variable humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T; Brorby, Greg; Berman, D Wayne; Sheehan, Pat; Floyd, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filters, used routinely to collect dust samples from air for fiber analysis, are the only filter type that can be prepared for both phased contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses. However, whenever fiber counts require collecting dust masses <100 μg on a single filter under variable relative humidity (RH) conditions, historically noted effects of humidity on MCE filter mass can hinder accurate estimates of dust mass, measured as loaded minus unloaded filter mass (M). In this study, a baseline set of hundreds of paired measures of change in RH versus M over different time intervals were obtained over a 5-day period for replicate series of 40 unloaded 37-mm MCE filters under varying RH conditions at a nearly constant temperature. Similar baseline data were obtained for 25-mm MCE filters. Linear regressions fit to these data allow improved estimates of dust mass loaded onto MCE filters from measures of M and RH made before and after loading occurs. Using established theory, these relationships were generalized to address temperature variation as well, and examples of numerical applications are provided.

  4. Optimization, purification, and characterization of L-asparaginase from Actinomycetales bacterium BkSoiiA.

    PubMed

    Dash, Chitrangada; Mohapatra, Sukanti Bala; Maiti, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacteria are promising source of a wide range of important enzymes, some of which are produced in industrial scale, with others yet to be harnessed. L-Asparaginase is used as an antineoplastic agent. The present work deals with the production and optimization of L-asparaginase from Actinomycetales bacterium BkSoiiA using submerged fermentation in M9 medium. Production optimization resulted in a modified M9 medium with yeast extract and fructose as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, at pH 8.0, incubated for 120 hr at 30 ± 2 °C. The crude enzyme was purified to near homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation following dialysis, ion-exchange column chromatography, and finally gel filtration. The sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) revealed an apparent molecular weight of 57 kD. The enzyme was purified 95.06-fold and showed a final specific activity of 204.37 U/mg with 3.49% yield. The purified enzyme showed maximum activity at a pH 10.0 and was stable at pH 7.0 to 9.0. The enzyme was activated by Mn(2+) and strongly inhibited by Ba(2+). All these preliminary characterization suggests that the L-asparaginase from the source may be a tool useful to pharmaceutical industries after further research.

  5. Operon prediction in Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thao T.; Dam, Phuongan; Su, Zhengchang; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Zhou, G. Tong; Xu, Ying

    2007-01-01

    Identification of operons in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus represents an important step to understanding the regulatory mechanisms that enable the organism to adapt and thrive in extreme environments. We have predicted operons in P.furiosus by combining the results from three existing algorithms using a neural network (NN). These algorithms use intergenic distances, phylogenetic profiles, functional categories and gene-order conservation in their operon prediction. Our method takes as inputs the confidence scores of the three programs, and outputs a prediction of whether adjacent genes on the same strand belong to the same operon. In addition, we have applied Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway information to improve the accuracy of our algorithm. The parameters of this NN predictor are trained on a subset of all experimentally verified operon gene pairs of Bacillus subtilis. It subsequently achieved 86.5% prediction accuracy when applied to a subset of gene pairs for Escherichia coli, which is substantially better than any of the three prediction programs. Using this new algorithm, we predicted 470 operons in the P.furiosus genome. Of these, 349 were validated using DNA microarray data. PMID:17148478

  6. The Life-cycle of Operons

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2005-11-18

    Operons are a major feature of all prokaryotic genomes, but how and why operon structures vary is not well understood. To elucidate the life-cycle of operons, we compared gene order between Escherichia coli K12 and its relatives and identified the recently formed and destroyed operons in E. coli. This allowed us to determine how operons form, how they become closely spaced, and how they die. Our findings suggest that operon evolution is driven by selection on gene expression patterns. First, both operon creation and operon destruction lead to large changes in gene expression patterns. For example, the removal of lysA and ruvA from ancestral operons that contained essential genes allowed their expression to respond to lysine levels and DNA damage, respectively. Second, some operons have undergone accelerated evolution, with multiple new genes being added during a brief period. Third, although most operons are closely spaced because of a neutral bias towards deletion and because of selection against large overlaps, highly expressed operons tend to be widely spaced because of regulatory fine-tuning by intervening sequences. Although operon evolution seems to be adaptive, it need not be optimal: new operons often comprise functionally unrelated genes that were already in proximity before the operon formed.

  7. Computational analysis of Ciona intestinalis operons.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Robert W

    2010-07-01

    Operons are clusters of genes that are co-regulated from a common promoter. Operons are typically associated with prokaryotes, although a small number of eukaryotes have been shown to possess them. Among metazoans, operons have been extensively characterized in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in which ∼15% of the total genes are organized into operons. The most recent genome assembly for the ascidian Ciona intestinalis placed ∼20% of the genes (2909 total) into 1310 operons. The majority of these operons are composed of two genes, while the largest are composed of six. Here is reported a computational analysis of the genes that comprise the Ciona operons. Gene ontology (GO) terms were identified for about two-thirds of the operon-encoded genes. Using the extensive collection of public EST libraries, estimates of temporal patterns of gene expression were generated for the operon-encoded genes. Lastly, conservation of operons was analyzed by determining how many operon-encoded genes were present in the ascidian Ciona savignyi and whether these genes were organized in orthologous operons. Over 68% of the operon-encoded genes could be assigned one or more GO terms and 697 of the 1310 operons contained genes in which all genes had at least one GO term. Of these 697 operons, GO terms were shared by all of the genes within 146 individual operons, suggesting that most operons encode genes with unrelated functions. An analysis of operon gene expression from nine different EST libraries indicated that for 587 operons, all of the genes that comprise an individual operon were expressed together in at least one EST library, suggesting that these genes may be co-regulated. About 50% (74/146) of the operons with shared GO terms also showed evidence of gene co-regulation. Comparisons with the C. savignyi genome identified orthologs for 1907 of 2909 operon genes. About 38% (504/1310) of the operons are conserved between the two Ciona species. These results suggest that like

  8. Magnetocaloric effect (MCE): Microscopic approach within Tyablikov approximation for anisotropic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikova, O. A.; Prudnikov, V. N.; Rudoy, Yu. G.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the microscopic approach to the description of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) started by Kokorina and Medvedev (E.E. Kokorina, M.V. Medvedev, Physica B 416 (2013) 29.) by applying it to the anisotropic ferromagnet of the "easy axis" type in two settings-with external magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the axis of easy magnetization. In the last case there appears the field induced (or spin-reorientation) phase transition which occurs at the critical value of the external magnetic field. This value is proportional to the exchange anisotropy constant at low temperatures, but with the rise of temperature it may be renormalized (as a rule, proportional to the magnetization). We use the explicit form of the Hamiltonian of the anisotropic ferromagnet and apply widely used random phase approximation (RPA) (known also as Tyablikov approximation in the Green function method) which is more accurate than the well known molecular field approximation (MFA). It is shown that in the first case the magnitude of MCE is raised whereas in the second one the MCE disappears due to compensation of the critical field renormalized with the magnetization.

  9. Allostery and the lac Operon.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2013-07-10

    The ability to regulate gene expression is essential for controlling metabolic events in a cell. Proteins that function like molecular switches respond to fluctuations in the environment to maintain homeostasis. The operon model, proposed by Jacob and Monod, provides a cogent depiction for how gene expression is regulated. A molecular mechanism for the regulation followed shortly with the theory for allosteric transition. Over the past half-century, the details of the lac operon and the allosteric model have been tested using genetic, biochemical, and structural techniques. Remarkably, the principles originally put forward 50 years ago remain essentially unchanged. Models for the operon and the theory of allosteric transitions are two of the most profound discoveries of molecular biology.

  10. Computational identification of operons in microbial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Szustakowski, Joseph D; Fortnow, Lance; Roberts, Richard J; Kasif, Simon

    2002-08-01

    By applying graph representations to biochemical pathways, a new computational pipeline is proposed to find potential operons in microbial genomes. The algorithm relies on the fact that enzyme genes in operons tend to catalyze successive reactions in metabolic pathways. We applied this algorithm to 42 microbial genomes to identify putative operon structures. The predicted operons from Escherichia coli were compared with a selected metabolism-related operon dataset from the RegulonDB database, yielding a prediction sensitivity (89%) and specificity (87%) relative to this dataset. Several examples of detected operons are given and analyzed. Modular gene cluster transfer and operon fusion are observed. A further use of predicted operon data to assign function to putative genes was suggested and, as an example, a previous putative gene (MJ1604) from Methanococcus jannaschii is now annotated as a phosphofructokinase, which was regarded previously as a missing enzyme in this organism. GC content changes in the operon region and nonoperon region were examined. The results reveal a clear GC content transition at the boundaries of putative operons. We looked further into the conservation of operons across genomes. A trp operon alignment is analyzed in depth to show gene loss and rearrangement in different organisms during operon evolution.

  11. The Life-cycle of Operons

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2007-03-15

    Operons are a major feature of all prokaryotic genomes, buthow and why operon structures vary is not well understood. To elucidatethe life-cycle of operons, we compared gene order between Escherichiacoli K12 and its relatives and identified the recently formed anddestroyed operons in E. coli. This allowed us to determine how operonsform, how they become closely spaced, and how they die. Our findingssuggest that operon evolution may be driven by selection on geneexpression patterns. First, both operon creation and operon destructionlead to large changes in gene expression patterns. For example, theremoval of lysA and ruvA from ancestral operons that contained essentialgenes allowed their expression to respond to lysine levels and DNAdamage, respectively. Second, some operons have undergone acceleratedevolution, with multiple new genes being added during a brief period.Third, although genes within operons are usually closely spaced becauseof a neutral bias toward deletion and because of selection against largeoverlaps, genes in highly expressed operons tend to be widely spacedbecause of regulatory fine-tuning by intervening sequences. Althoughoperon evolution may be adaptive, it need not be optimal: new operonsoften comprise functionally unrelated genes that were already inproximity before the operon formed.

  12. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  13. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  14. Detecting uber-operons in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Che, Dongsheng; Li, Guojun; Mao, Fenglou; Wu, Hongwei; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    We present a study on computational identification of uber-operons in a prokaryotic genome, each of which represents a group of operons that are evolutionarily or functionally associated through operons in other (reference) genomes. Uber-operons represent a rich set of footprints of operon evolution, whose full utilization could lead to new and more powerful tools for elucidation of biological pathways and networks than what operons have provided, and a better understanding of prokaryotic genome structures and evolution. Our prediction algorithm predicts uber-operons through identifying groups of functionally or transcriptionally related operons, whose gene sets are conserved across the target and multiple reference genomes. Using this algorithm, we have predicted uber-operons for each of a group of 91 genomes, using the other 90 genomes as references. In particular, we predicted 158 uber-operons in Escherichia coli K12 covering 1830 genes, and found that many of the uber-operons correspond to parts of known regulons or biological pathways or are involved in highly related biological processes based on their Gene Ontology (GO) assignments. For some of the predicted uber-operons that are not parts of known regulons or pathways, our analyses indicate that their genes are highly likely to work together in the same biological processes, suggesting the possibility of new regulons and pathways. We believe that our uber-operon prediction provides a highly useful capability and a rich information source for elucidation of complex biological processes, such as pathways in microbes. All the prediction results are available at our Uber-Operon Database: http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/uber, the first of its kind.

  15. Detecting uber-operons in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Che, Dongsheng; Li, Guojun; Mao, Fenglou; Wu, Hongwei; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    We present a study on computational identification of uber-operons in a prokaryotic genome, each of which represents a group of operons that are evolutionarily or functionally associated through operons in other (reference) genomes. Uber-operons represent a rich set of footprints of operon evolution, whose full utilization could lead to new and more powerful tools for elucidation of biological pathways and networks than what operons have provided, and a better understanding of prokaryotic genome structures and evolution. Our prediction algorithm predicts uber-operons through identifying groups of functionally or transcriptionally related operons, whose gene sets are conserved across the target and multiple reference genomes. Using this algorithm, we have predicted uber-operons for each of a group of 91 genomes, using the other 90 genomes as references. In particular, we predicted 158 uber-operons in Escherichia coli K12 covering 1830 genes, and found that many of the uber-operons correspond to parts of known regulons or biological pathways or are involved in highly related biological processes based on their Gene Ontology (GO) assignments. For some of the predicted uber-operons that are not parts of known regulons or pathways, our analyses indicate that their genes are highly likely to work together in the same biological processes, suggesting the possibility of new regulons and pathways. We believe that our uber-operon prediction provides a highly useful capability and a rich information source for elucidation of complex biological processes, such as pathways in microbes. All the prediction results are available at our Uber-Operon Database: , the first of its kind. PMID:16682449

  16. Medium-Chain Enriched Diacylglycerol (MCE-DAG) Oil Decreases Body Fat Mass in Mice by Increasing Lipolysis and Thermogenesis in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haeun; Choe, Jee-Hwan; Choi, Jong Hun; Kim, Hun Jung; Park, Soo Hyun; Lee, Moon Won; Kim, Wooki; Go, Gwang-Woong

    2017-08-01

    Medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) escapes the formation of chylomicrons in the small intestine, resulting in energy expenditure through beta-oxidation. Diacylglycerol (DAG) is susceptible to oxidation rather than being stored in the adipose tissue. This study was conducted to verify the effect of MCE-DAG oil on body fat mass in vivo. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 12) as follows: (1) normal diet (18% kcal from fat), (2) canola oil as a control (40% kcal from canola oil), (3) MCE-DAG10 (10% kcal from MCE-DAG + 30% kcal from canola oil), and (4) MCE-DAG20 (20% kcal from MCE-DAG + 20% kcal from canola oil). The body weight and fat mass of MCE-DAG20 group mice were decreased relative to those of control mice (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). Serum triacylglycerol (TAG) was decreased in both MCE-DAG10 and MCE-DAG20 groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) were increased in the MCE-DAG20 group relative to the control in white adipose tissue (WAT) (P < 0.05). Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) was also increased in the MCE-DAG20 group relative to the control in brown adipose tissue (BAT) (P < 0.05). In summary, MCE-DAG reduced body fat mass likely by stimulating lipolysis in WAT and thermogenesis in BAT.

  17. The lac operon galactoside acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Steven L

    2005-06-01

    Of the proteins encoded by the three structural genes of the lac operon, the galactoside acetyltransferase (thiogalactoside transacetylase, LacA, GAT) encoded by lacA is the only protein whose biological role remains in doubt. Here, we briefly note the classical literature that led to the identification and initial characterization of GAT, and focus on more recent results which have revealed its chemical mechanism of action and its membership in a large superfamily of structurally similar acyltransferases. The structural and sequence similarities of several members of this superfamily confirm the original claim for GAT as a CoA-dependent acetyltransferase specific for the 6-hydroxyl group of certain pyranosides, but do not yet point to the identity of the natural substrate(s) of the enzyme.

  18. Operon and non-operon gene clusters in the C. elegans genome.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Thomas; Davis, Paul; Garrido-Lecca, Alfonso

    2015-04-28

    Nearly 15% of the ~20,000 C. elegans genes are contained in operons, multigene clusters controlled by a single promoter. The vast majority of these are of a type where the genes in the cluster are ~100 bp apart and the pre-mRNA is processed by 3' end formation accompanied by trans-splicing. A spliced leader, SL2, is specialized for operon processing. Here we summarize current knowledge on several variations on this theme including: (1) hybrid operons, which have additional promoters between genes; (2) operons with exceptionally long (> 1 kb) intercistronic regions; (3) operons with a second 3' end formation site close to the trans-splice site; (4) alternative operons, in which the exons are sometimes spliced as a single gene and sometimes as two genes; (5) SL1-type operons, which use SL1 instead of SL2 to trans-splice and in which there is no intercistronic space; (6) operons that make dicistronic mRNAs; and (7) non-operon gene clusters, in which either two genes use a single exon as the 3' end of one and the 5' end of the next, or the 3' UTR of one gene serves as the outron of the next. Each of these variations is relatively infrequent, but together they show a remarkable variety of tight-linkage gene arrangements in the C. elegans genome.

  19. Siting MSW landfills using MCE methodology in GIS environment (Case study: Birjand plain, Iran).

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Zeynab Karimzadeh; Sayadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-01

    The rapid municipal solid waste growth of Birjand plain causes to find an appropriate site selection for the landfill. In order to reduce the negative impacts of waste, the use of novel tools and technologies to gain a suitable site for landfill seems imperative. The present paper aimed to exhibits the Multi Criteria Evaluation (MCE) for the landfill site selection of the Birjand plain because till date a suitable action has not been implicated. In the present research, the parameters such as environmental and socio-economical factors have been used. The factors like slope, water resources, soil parameters, landuse, fault and protected areas in the model of effective environmental criteria and the factors viz. distance from road, urban areas, village, airport, historical place, and industries in the model of socio-economic criteria were investigated and with the use of Weighted Linear Combination (WLC) and Analytical Network Process (ANP) models were compounded and according to the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA) and Fuzzy Linguistic Quantifier (LQ) were aggregated. The paper focuses on the OWA method as well as an approach for integrating Geographic Information System (GIS) and OWA. OWA has been developed as a generalization of multi-criteria combination. In this study we attained comparable data via the technique of ANP and five scenarios of OWA method were used. The results of field studies, fifth scenario for the study area proposed. Based on the research findings, OWA method had a great potential and flexibility in the modeling of the complex decision-making problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stochastic simulations of the tetracycline operon

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The tetracycline operon is a self-regulated system. It is found naturally in bacteria where it confers resistance to antibiotic tetracycline. Because of the performance of the molecular elements of the tetracycline operon, these elements are widely used as parts of synthetic gene networks where the protein production can be efficiently turned on and off in response to the presence or the absence of tetracycline. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of the tetracycline operon. To this end, we develop a mathematical model guided by experimental findings. Our model consists of biochemical reactions that capture the biomolecular interactions of this intriguing system. Having in mind that small biological systems are subjects to stochasticity, we use a stochastic algorithm to simulate the tetracycline operon behavior. A sensitivity analysis of two critical parameters embodied this system is also performed providing a useful understanding of the function of this system. Results Simulations generate a timeline of biomolecular events that confer resistance to bacteria against tetracycline. We monitor the amounts of intracellular TetR2 and TetA proteins, the two important regulatory and resistance molecules, as a function of intrecellular tetracycline. We find that lack of one of the promoters of the tetracycline operon has no influence on the total behavior of this system inferring that this promoter is not essential for Escherichia coli. Sensitivity analysis with respect to the binding strength of tetracycline to repressor and of repressor to operators suggests that these two parameters play a predominant role in the behavior of the system. The results of the simulations agree well with experimental observations such as tight repression, fast gene expression, induction with tetracycline, and small intracellular TetR2 amounts. Conclusions Computer simulations of the tetracycline operon afford augmented insight into the interplay between its molecular

  1. GIS and Multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) for landform geodiversity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najwer, Alicja; Reynard, Emmanuel; Zwoliński, Zbigniew

    2014-05-01

    In geomorphology, at the contemporary stage of methodology and methodological development, it is very significant to undertake new research problems, from theoretical and application point of view. As an example of applying geoconservation results in landscape studies and environmental conservation one can refer to the problem of the landform geodiversity. The concept of geodiversity was created relatively recently and, therefore, little progress has been made in its objective assessment and mapping. In order to ensure clarity and coherency, it is recommended that the evaluation process to be rigorous. Multi-criteria evaluation meets these criteria well. The main objective of this presentation is to demonstrate a new methodology for the assessment of the selected natural environment components in response to the definition of geodiversity, as well as visualization of the landforms geodiversity, using the opportunities offered by the geoinformation environment. The study area consists of two peculiar alpine valleys: Illgraben and Derborence, located in the Swiss Alps. Apart from glacial and fluvial landforms, the morphology of these two sites is largely due to the extreme phenomena(rockslides, torrential processes). Both valleys are recognized as geosites of national importance. The basis of the assessment is the selection of the geographical environment features. Firstly, six factor maps were prepared for each area: the landform energy, the landform fragmentation, the contemporary landform preservation, geological settings and hydrographic elements (lakes and streams). Input maps were then standardized and resulted from map algebra operations carried out by multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) with GIS-based Weighted Sum technique. Weights for particular classes were calculated using pair-comparison matrixes method. The final stage of deriving landform geodiversity maps was the reclassification procedure with the use of natural breaks method. The final maps of landform

  2. Teaching the Big Ideas of Biology with Operon Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an activity that engages students in model-based reasoning, requiring them to predict the behavior of the trp and lac operons under different environmental conditions. Students are presented six scenarios for the "trp" operon and five for the "lac" operon. In most of the scenarios, specific mutations have…

  3. Teaching the Big Ideas of Biology with Operon Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an activity that engages students in model-based reasoning, requiring them to predict the behavior of the trp and lac operons under different environmental conditions. Students are presented six scenarios for the "trp" operon and five for the "lac" operon. In most of the scenarios, specific mutations have…

  4. Origin of bistability in the lac Operon.

    PubMed

    Santillán, M; Mackey, M C; Zeron, E S

    2007-06-01

    Multistability is an emergent dynamic property that has been invoked to explain multiple coexisting biological states. In this work, we investigate the origin of bistability in the lac operon. To do this, we develop a mathematical model for the regulatory pathway in this system and compare the model predictions with other experimental results in which a nonmetabolizable inducer was employed. We investigate the effect of lactose metabolism using this model, and show that it greatly modifies the bistable region in the external lactose (Le) versus external glucose (Ge) parameter space. The model also predicts that lactose metabolism can cause bistability to disappear for very low Ge. We have also carried out stochastic numerical simulations of the model for several values of Ge and Le. Our results indicate that bistability can help guarantee that Escherichia coli consumes glucose and lactose in the most efficient possible way. Namely, the lac operon is induced only when there is almost no glucose in the growing medium, but if Le is high, the operon induction level increases abruptly when the levels of glucose in the environment decrease to very low values. We demonstrate that this behavior could not be obtained without bistability if the stability of the induced and uninduced states is to be preserved. Finally, we point out that the present methods and results may be useful to study the emergence of multistability in biological systems other than the lac operon.

  5. Origin of Bistability in the lac Operon

    PubMed Central

    Santillán, M.; Mackey, M. C.; Zeron, E. S.

    2007-01-01

    Multistability is an emergent dynamic property that has been invoked to explain multiple coexisting biological states. In this work, we investigate the origin of bistability in the lac operon. To do this, we develop a mathematical model for the regulatory pathway in this system and compare the model predictions with other experimental results in which a nonmetabolizable inducer was employed. We investigate the effect of lactose metabolism using this model, and show that it greatly modifies the bistable region in the external lactose (Le) versus external glucose (Ge) parameter space. The model also predicts that lactose metabolism can cause bistability to disappear for very low Ge. We have also carried out stochastic numerical simulations of the model for several values of Ge and Le. Our results indicate that bistability can help guarantee that Escherichia coli consumes glucose and lactose in the most efficient possible way. Namely, the lac operon is induced only when there is almost no glucose in the growing medium, but if Le is high, the operon induction level increases abruptly when the levels of glucose in the environment decrease to very low values. We demonstrate that this behavior could not be obtained without bistability if the stability of the induced and uninduced states is to be preserved. Finally, we point out that the present methods and results may be useful to study the emergence of multistability in biological systems other than the lac operon. PMID:17351004

  6. Pump-free and low-cost negative pressure sampling device for rapid sample loading in MCE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongmei; Yin, Xuefeng; Qi, Liya; Liu, Jinhua

    2009-12-01

    A pump-free and low-cost negative pressure sampling device for injecting well-defined non-biased sample plugs into the separation channel of MCE was developed. It was composed of a pipet bulb, a 3-way electromagnetic valve and a single voltage supply at constant voltage. A sub-atmospheric pressure was created by hand-pressing air out of the pipet bulb and retained in it by switching the 3-way electromagnetic valve at cutoff position. During the sample loading stage, the sub-atmospheric pressure in the pipet bulb was applied via a 3-way electromagnetic valve to the headspace of the sealed sample waste reservoir (SW). A pinched sample plug was formed at the channel intersection in less than 0.5 s. Once the 3-way electromagnetic valve was switched to connect SW to ambient atmosphere to release the vacuum in SW, electrophoresis separation was consequently activated under the electric potentials applied. Experimental results demonstrated the pump-free negative pressure sampling device worked well in a wide vacuum degree ranged from -250 to -30 mbar with a satisfactory analytical precision. The sample consumption for each cycle was calculated to be 51-12 nL under the sampling pressure. Theoretical deduction indicates that the volume of the pipet bulb can be further reduced to 1 mL, which is critical for minimizing the sampling device for MCE.

  7. Evolutionary conservation of bacterial operons: does transcriptional connectivity matter?

    PubMed

    Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Graur, Dan

    2005-07-01

    In the literature, it has been frequently suggested that the connectivity of a protein, i.e., the number of proteins with which it interacts, is inversely correlated with the rate of evolution. We attempted to extrapolate from proteins to operons by testing the hypothesis that operons with high transcriptional connectivity, i.e., operons that are controlled through interactions with many transcription factors, are evolutionarily more conserved at the structure and sequence levels than low-connectivity operons. With Escherichia coli used as reference, two structural- and two sequence-conservation measures were determined for 82 groups of homologous operons from 30 completely-sequenced bacterial genomes. In E. coli, large operons tend to be regulated by more transcription factors than either smaller operons or single genes. Large E. coli operons that are regulated by single transcription factors were found to be regulated by activators more frequently than by repressors. Levels of sequence conservation and structural conservation of operons were found to be independent of each other, i.e., structurally conserved operons may be divergent in sequence, and vice versa. Transcriptional connectivity was found to influence neither sequence nor structural conservation of operons. Although this finding seems to contradict the situation in genes, a critical review of the literature indicates that although gene connectivity is frequently touted as a factor in determining rates of evolution, only a very small fraction of the variability in degrees of evolutionary conservation is explainable by this factor.

  8. A global analysis of adaptive evolution of operons in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Memon, Danish; Singh, Abhay K; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-02-01

    Operons are an important feature of prokaryotic genomes. Evolution of operons is hypothesized to be adaptive and has contributed significantly towards coordinated optimization of functions. Two conflicting theories, based on (i) in situ formation to achieve co-regulation and (ii) horizontal gene transfer of functionally linked gene clusters, are generally considered to explain why and how operons have evolved. Furthermore, effects of operon evolution on genomic traits such as intergenic spacing, operon size and co-regulation are relatively less explored. Based on the conservation level in a set of diverse prokaryotes, we categorize the operonic gene pair associations and in turn the operons as ancient and recently formed. This allowed us to perform a detailed analysis of operonic structure in cyanobacteria, a morphologically and physiologically diverse group of photoautotrophs. Clustering based on operon conservation showed significant similarity with the 16S rRNA-based phylogeny, which groups the cyanobacterial strains into three clades. Clade C, dominated by strains that are believed to have undergone genome reduction, shows a larger fraction of operonic genes that are tightly packed in larger sized operons. Ancient operons are in general larger, more tightly packed, better optimized for co-regulation and part of key cellular processes. A sub-clade within Clade B, which includes Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, shows a reverse trend in intergenic spacing. Our results suggest that while in situ formation and vertical descent may be a dominant mechanism of operon evolution in cyanobacteria, optimization of intergenic spacing and co-regulation are part of an ongoing process in the life-cycle of operons.

  9. Applicability of a modified MCE filter method with Button Inhalable Sampler for monitoring personal bioaerosol inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Xu, Hong; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a "modified" mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter culturing method (directly placing filter on agar plate for culturing without extraction) was investigated in enumerating airborne culturable bacterial and fungal aerosol concentration and diversity both in different environments. A Button Inhalable Sampler loaded with a MCE filter was operated at a flow rate of 5 L/min to collect indoor and outdoor air samples using different sampling times: 10, 20, and 30 min in three different time periods of the day. As a comparison, a BioStage impactor, regarded as the gold standard, was operated in parallel at a flow rate of 28.3 L/min for all tests. The air samples collected by the Button Inhalable Sampler were directly placed on agar plates for culturing, and those collected by the BioStage impactor were incubated directly at 26 °C. The colony forming units (CFUs) were manually counted and the culturable concentrations were calculated both for bacterial and fungal aerosols. The bacterial CFUs developed were further washed off and subjected to polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for diversity analysis. For fungal CFUs, microscopy method was applied to studying the culturable fungal diversity obtained using different methods. Experimental results showed that the performance of two investigated methods varied with sampling environments and microbial types (culturable bacterial and fungal aerosols). For bacterial aerosol sampling, both methods were shown to perform equally well, and in contrast the "modified" MCE filter method was demonstrated to enumerate more culturable fungal aerosols than the BioStage impactor. In general, the microbial species richness (number of gel bands) was observed to increase with increasing collection time. For both methods, the DGGE gel patterns were observed to vary with sampling time and environment despite of similar number of gel bands. In addition, an increase in sampling time from 20 to 30 min

  10. Escherichia coli fliAZY operon.

    PubMed Central

    Mytelka, D S; Chamberlin, M J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli fliAZY operon, which contains the fliA gene (the alternative sigma factor sigma F) and two novel genes, fliZ and fliY. Transcriptional mapping of this operon shows two start sites, one of which is preceded by a canonical E sigma F-dependent consensus and is dependent on sigma F for expression in vivo and in vitro. We have overexpressed and purified sigma F and demonstrated that it can direct core polymerase to E sigma F-dependent promoters. FliZ and FliY are not required for motility but may regulate sigma F activity, perhaps in response to a putative cell density signal that may be detected by FliY, a member of the bacterial extracellular solute-binding protein family 3. PMID:8550423

  11. gltBDF operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, I; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kilobase DNA fragment carrying antibiotic resistance markers was inserted into the gltB gene of Escherichia coli previously cloned in a multicopy plasmid. Replacement of the chromosomal gltB+ gene by the gltB225::omega mutation led to cells unable to synthesize glutamate synthase, utilize growth rate-limiting nitrogen sources, or derepress their glutamine synthetase. The existence of a gltBDF operon encoding the large (gltB) and small (gltD) subunits of glutamate synthase and a regulatory peptide (gltF) at 69 min of the E. coli linkage map was deduced from complementation analysis. A plasmid carrying the entire gltB+D+F+ operon complemented cells for all three of the mutant phenotypes associated with the polar gltB225::omega mutation in the chromosome. By contrast, plasmids carrying gltB+ only complemented cells for glutamate synthase activity. A major tricistronic mRNA molecule was detected from Northern (RNA blot) DNA-RNA hybridization experiments with DNA probes containing single genes of the operon. A 30,200-dalton polypeptide was identified as the gltF product, the lack of which was responsible for the inability of cells to use nitrogen-limiting sources associated with gltB225::omega. Images PMID:2448295

  12. ProOpDB: Prokaryotic Operon DataBase.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Blanca; Ciria, Ricardo; Martinez-Guerrero, Cristian E; Merino, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The Prokaryotic Operon DataBase (ProOpDB, http://operons.ibt.unam.mx/OperonPredictor) constitutes one of the most precise and complete repositories of operon predictions now available. Using our novel and highly accurate operon identification algorithm, we have predicted the operon structures of more than 1200 prokaryotic genomes. ProOpDB offers diverse alternatives by which a set of operon predictions can be retrieved including: (i) organism name, (ii) metabolic pathways, as defined by the KEGG database, (iii) gene orthology, as defined by the COG database, (iv) conserved protein domains, as defined by the Pfam database, (v) reference gene and (vi) reference operon, among others. In order to limit the operon output to non-redundant organisms, ProOpDB offers an efficient method to select the most representative organisms based on a precompiled phylogenetic distances matrix. In addition, the ProOpDB operon predictions are used directly as the input data of our Gene Context Tool to visualize their genomic context and retrieve the sequence of their corresponding 5' regulatory regions, as well as the nucleotide or amino acid sequences of their genes.

  13. Optimal gene partition into operons correlates with gene functional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslaver, Alon; Mayo, Avi; Ronen, Michal; Alon, Uri

    2006-09-01

    Gene arrangement into operons varies between bacterial species. Genes in a given system can be on one operon in some organisms and on several operons in other organisms. Existing theories explain why genes that work together should be on the same operon, since this allows for advantageous lateral gene transfer and accurate stoichiometry. But what causes the frequent separation into multiple operons of co-regulated genes that act together in a pathway? Here we suggest that separation is due to benefits made possible by differential regulation of each operon. We present a simple mathematical model for the optimal distribution of genes into operons based on a balance of the cost of operons and the benefit of regulation that provides 'just-when-needed' temporal order. The analysis predicts that genes are arranged such that genes on the same operon do not skip functional steps in the pathway. This prediction is supported by genomic data from 137 bacterial genomes. Our work suggests that gene arrangement is not only the result of random historical drift, genome re-arrangement and gene transfer, but has elements that are solutions of an evolutionary optimization problem. Thus gene functional order may be inferred by analyzing the operon structure across different genomes.

  14. Spatial extent of potential habitats of the Mesophotic Coral Ecosystem (MCE, 20-80 m) in the tropical North Atlantic (TNA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, R. N.

    2012-12-01

    The Mesophotic Coral Ecosystem is the deeper-water extension of the much-studied, shallow reef community. It occurs on steep slopes and shelf areas, in the TNA off Belize, the Bahamas, the US Virgin Islands, and the Flower Garden Banks. Framework-building corals at these depths are primarily platy montastraeids and agariciids, with lesser amounts of massive encrusting species. The closely-spaced, platy colonies, expanding up to nearly two meters in diameter have up to 50% live coral cover. The colonies are elevated above the substrate. Their growth creates a thicket-like structure with large, open spaces for mobile species (fish and crustaceans) and extensive habitat for attached and grazing invertebrates. The MCE includes genera or species of zooxanthellate corals, invertebrates and fish, some of which are the same as those in shallow water. Given, the widespread, recent declines of TNA coral communities at depth less than 20 m, it is essential to know the total regional extent of the MCE. To determine the likely depth locations of these deeper coral communities we used methods pioneered by REEFS AT RISK,1998 that incorporates data from the Danish Hydrological Institute (DHI), "MIKE C-MAP" depth points and data on coastline location *NASA, "Sea WiFS" and NIMA, "VMAP," 1997. The results for the larger areas of reef development and for shelf areas are below:Potential MCE shelf habitats.t; Potential MCE platform margin habitats.t;

  15. Metazoan operons accelerate recovery from growth arrested states

    PubMed Central

    Zaslaver, Alon; Baugh, L. Ryan; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Existing theories explain why operons are advantageous in prokaryotes, but their occurrence in metazoans is an enigma. Nematode operon genes, typically consisting of growth genes, are significantly up-regulated during recovery from growth-arrested states. This expression pattern is anti-correlated to non-operon genes consistent with a competition for transcriptional resources. We find that transcriptional resources are initially limiting during recovery, and that recovering animals are highly sensitive to any additional decrease in transcriptional resources. Operons become advantageous because by clustering growth genes into operons, fewer promoters compete for the limited transcriptional machinery, effectively increasing the concentration of transcriptional resources, and accelerating recovery. Mathematical modeling reveals how a moderate increase in transcriptional resources can substantially enhance transcription rate and recovery. This design principle occurs in different nematodes and the chordate C. intestinalis. As transition from arrest to rapid growth is shared by many metazoans, operons could have evolved to facilitate these processes. PMID:21663799

  16. Gene context conservation of a higher order than operons.

    PubMed

    Lathe, W C; Snel, B; Bork, P

    2000-10-01

    Operons, co-transcribed and co-regulated contiguous sets of genes, are poorly conserved over short periods of evolutionary time. The gene order, gene content and regulatory mechanisms of operons can be very different, even in closely related species. Here, we present several lines of evidence which suggest that, although an operon and its individual genes and regulatory structures are rearranged when comparing the genomes of different species, this rearrangement is a conservative process. Genomic rearrangements invariably maintain individual genes in very specific functional and regulatory contexts. We call this conserved context an uber-operon.

  17. Structure of the lac operon galactoside acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Guo; Olsen, Laurence R; Roderick, Steven L

    2002-04-01

    The galactoside acetyltransferase (thiogalactoside transacetylase) of Escherichia coli (GAT, LacA, EC 2.3.1.18) is a gene product of the classical lac operon. GAT may assist cellular detoxification by acetylating nonmetabolizable pyranosides, thereby preventing their reentry into the cell. The structure of GAT has been solved in binary complexes with acetyl-CoA or CoA and in ternary complexes with CoA and the nonphysiological acceptor substrates isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) or p-nitrophenyl beta-D-galactopyranoside (PNPbetaGal). A hydrophobic cleft that binds the thioisopropyl and p-nitrophenyl aglycones of IPTG and PNPbetaGal may discriminate against substrates with hydrophilic substituents at this position, such as lactose, or inducers of the lac operon. An extended loop projecting from the left-handed parallel beta helix domain contributes His115, which is in position to facilitate attack of the C6-hydroxyl group of the substrate on the thioester.

  18. Genomic rearrangements at rrn operons in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Helm, R Allen; Lee, Alison G; Christman, Harry D; Maloy, Stanley

    2003-11-01

    Most Salmonella serovars are general pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. These "generalist" serovars cause disease in many animals from reptiles to mammals. In contrast, a few serovars cause disease only in a specific host. Host-specific serovars can cause a systemic, often fatal disease in one species yet remain avirulent in other species. Host-specific Salmonella frequently have large genomic rearrangements due to recombination at the ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons while the generalists consistently have a conserved chromosomal arrangement. To determine whether this is the result of an intrinsic difference in recombination frequency or a consequence of lifestyle difference between generalist and host-specific Salmonella, we determined the frequency of rearrangements in vitro. Using lacZ genes as portable regions of homology for inversion analysis, we found that both generalist and host-specific serovars of Salmonella have similar tolerances to chromosomal rearrangements in vitro. Using PCR and genetic selection, we found that generalist and host-specific serovars also undergo rearrangements at rrn operons at similar frequencies in vitro. These observations indicate that the observed difference in genomic stability between generalist and host-specific serovars is a consequence of their distinct lifestyles, not intrinsic differences in recombination frequencies.

  19. Operons in Escherichia coli: genomic analyses and predictions.

    PubMed

    Salgado, H; Moreno-Hagelsieb, G; Smith, T F; Collado-Vides, J

    2000-06-06

    The rich knowledge of operon organization in Escherichia coli, together with the completed chromosomal sequence of this bacterium, enabled us to perform an analysis of distances between genes and of functional relationships of adjacent genes in the same operon, as opposed to adjacent genes in different transcription units. We measured and demonstrated the expected tendencies of genes within operons to have much shorter intergenic distances than genes at the borders of transcription units. A clear peak at short distances between genes in the same operon contrasts with a flat frequency distribution of genes at the borders of transcription units. Also, genes in the same operon tend to have the same physiological functional class. The results of these analyses were used to implement a method to predict the genomic organization of genes into transcription units. The method has a maximum accuracy of 88% correct identification of pairs of adjacent genes to be in an operon, or at the borders of transcription units, and correctly identifies around 75% of the known transcription units when used to predict the transcription unit organization of the E. coli genome. Based on the frequency distance distributions, we estimated a total of 630 to 700 operons in E. coli. This step opens the possibility of predicting operon organization in other bacteria whose genome sequences have been finished.

  20. Natural Selection for Operons Depends on Genome Size

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Pablo A.; Romero, Héctor; Farber, Marisa D.; Rocha, Eduardo P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In prokaryotes, genome size is associated with metabolic versatility, regulatory complexity, effective population size, and horizontal transfer rates. We therefore analyzed the covariation of genome size and operon conservation to assess the evolutionary models of operon formation and maintenance. In agreement with previous results, intraoperonic pairs of essential and of highly expressed genes are more conserved. Interestingly, intraoperonic pairs of genes are also more conserved when they encode proteins at similar cell concentrations, suggesting a role of cotranscription in diminishing the cost of waste and shortfall in gene expression. Larger genomes have fewer and smaller operons that are also less conserved. Importantly, lower conservation in larger genomes was observed for all classes of operons in terms of gene expression, essentiality, and balanced protein concentration. We reached very similar conclusions in independent analyses of three major bacterial clades (α- and β-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes). Operon conservation is inversely correlated to the abundance of transcription factors in the genome when controlled for genome size. This suggests a negative association between the complexity of genetic networks and operon conservation. These results show that genome size and/or its proxies are key determinants of the intensity of natural selection for operon organization. Our data fit better the evolutionary models based on the advantage of coregulation than those based on genetic linkage or stochastic gene expression. We suggest that larger genomes with highly complex genetic networks and many transcription factors endure weaker selection for operons than smaller genomes with fewer alternative tools for genetic regulation. PMID:24201372

  1. Electron microscopic visualization of trp operon expression in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    French, S; Martin, K; Patterson, T; Bauerle, R; Miller, O L

    1985-07-01

    Transcriptional activity of plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant trp operons was visualized in cell lysates of Salmonella typhimurium. Plasmid and transcription-unit sizes varied with the size of the cloned operon. Following 3-(3-indolyl)acrylic acid derepression, all operons of a particular type exhibited the same high level of transcriptional activity. An estimated 11-14 transcripts must be initiated each minute to maintain the 190-base-pair spacing of RNA polymerases observed on the promoter-proximal half of the wild-type trp operon. A decline in RNA polymerase density was observed on promoter-distal portions of cloned trp operons, which may be attributable to premature transcription termination accompanying translation inhibition due to indolylacrylic acid's interference with normal tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase activity.

  2. Discovery of gene cluster for mycosporine-like amino acid biosynthesis from Actinomycetales microorganisms and production of a novel mycosporine-like amino acid by heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kiyoko T; Komatsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Haruo

    2014-08-01

    Mycosporines and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), including shinorine (mycosporine-glycine-serine) and porphyra-334 (mycosporine-glycine-threonine), are UV-absorbing compounds produced by cyanobacteria, fungi, and marine micro- and macroalgae. These MAAs have the ability to protect these organisms from damage by environmental UV radiation. Although no reports have described the production of MAAs and the corresponding genes involved in MAA biosynthesis from Gram-positive bacteria to date, genome mining of the Gram-positive bacterial database revealed that two microorganisms belonging to the order Actinomycetales, Actinosynnema mirum DSM 43827 and Pseudonocardia sp. strain P1, possess a gene cluster homologous to the biosynthetic gene clusters identified from cyanobacteria. When the two strains were grown in liquid culture, Pseudonocardia sp. accumulated a very small amount of MAA-like compound in a medium-dependent manner, whereas A. mirum did not produce MAAs under any culture conditions, indicating that the biosynthetic gene cluster of A. mirum was in a cryptic state in this microorganism. In order to characterize these biosynthetic gene clusters, each biosynthetic gene cluster was heterologously expressed in an engineered host, Streptomyces avermitilis SUKA22. Since the resultant transformants carrying the entire biosynthetic gene cluster controlled by an alternative promoter produced mainly shinorine, this is the first confirmation of a biosynthetic gene cluster for MAA from Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, S. avermitilis SUKA22 transformants carrying the biosynthetic gene cluster for MAA of A. mirum accumulated not only shinorine and porphyra-334 but also a novel MAA. Structure elucidation revealed that the novel MAA is mycosporine-glycine-alanine, which substitutes l-alanine for the l-serine of shinorine. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Discovery of Gene Cluster for Mycosporine-Like Amino Acid Biosynthesis from Actinomycetales Microorganisms and Production of a Novel Mycosporine-Like Amino Acid by Heterologous Expression

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kiyoko T.; Komatsu, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Mycosporines and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), including shinorine (mycosporine-glycine-serine) and porphyra-334 (mycosporine-glycine-threonine), are UV-absorbing compounds produced by cyanobacteria, fungi, and marine micro- and macroalgae. These MAAs have the ability to protect these organisms from damage by environmental UV radiation. Although no reports have described the production of MAAs and the corresponding genes involved in MAA biosynthesis from Gram-positive bacteria to date, genome mining of the Gram-positive bacterial database revealed that two microorganisms belonging to the order Actinomycetales, Actinosynnema mirum DSM 43827 and Pseudonocardia sp. strain P1, possess a gene cluster homologous to the biosynthetic gene clusters identified from cyanobacteria. When the two strains were grown in liquid culture, Pseudonocardia sp. accumulated a very small amount of MAA-like compound in a medium-dependent manner, whereas A. mirum did not produce MAAs under any culture conditions, indicating that the biosynthetic gene cluster of A. mirum was in a cryptic state in this microorganism. In order to characterize these biosynthetic gene clusters, each biosynthetic gene cluster was heterologously expressed in an engineered host, Streptomyces avermitilis SUKA22. Since the resultant transformants carrying the entire biosynthetic gene cluster controlled by an alternative promoter produced mainly shinorine, this is the first confirmation of a biosynthetic gene cluster for MAA from Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, S. avermitilis SUKA22 transformants carrying the biosynthetic gene cluster for MAA of A. mirum accumulated not only shinorine and porphyra-334 but also a novel MAA. Structure elucidation revealed that the novel MAA is mycosporine-glycine-alanine, which substitutes l-alanine for the l-serine of shinorine. PMID:24907338

  4. High accuracy operon prediction method based on STRING database scores.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Blanca; Verde, Cristina; Merino, Enrique

    2010-07-01

    We present a simple and highly accurate computational method for operon prediction, based on intergenic distances and functional relationships between the protein products of contiguous genes, as defined by STRING database (Jensen,L.J., Kuhn,M., Stark,M., Chaffron,S., Creevey,C., Muller,J., Doerks,T., Julien,P., Roth,A., Simonovic,M. et al. (2009) STRING 8-a global view on proteins and their functional interactions in 630 organisms. Nucleic Acids Res., 37, D412-D416). These two parameters were used to train a neural network on a subset of experimentally characterized Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis operons. Our predictive model was successfully tested on the set of experimentally defined operons in E. coli and B. subtilis, with accuracies of 94.6 and 93.3%, respectively. As far as we know, these are the highest accuracies ever obtained for predicting bacterial operons. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the predictable accuracy of our model when using an organism's data set for the training procedure, and a different organism's data set for testing, we repeated the E. coli operon prediction analysis using a neural network trained with B. subtilis data, and a B. subtilis analysis using a neural network trained with E. coli data. Even for these cases, the accuracies reached with our method were outstandingly high, 91.5 and 93%, respectively. These results show the potential use of our method for accurately predicting the operons of any other organism. Our operon predictions for fully-sequenced genomes are available at http://operons.ibt.unam.mx/OperonPredictor/.

  5. High accuracy operon prediction method based on STRING database scores

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Blanca; Verde, Cristina; Merino, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple and highly accurate computational method for operon prediction, based on intergenic distances and functional relationships between the protein products of contiguous genes, as defined by STRING database (Jensen,L.J., Kuhn,M., Stark,M., Chaffron,S., Creevey,C., Muller,J., Doerks,T., Julien,P., Roth,A., Simonovic,M. et al. (2009) STRING 8–a global view on proteins and their functional interactions in 630 organisms. Nucleic Acids Res., 37, D412–D416). These two parameters were used to train a neural network on a subset of experimentally characterized Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis operons. Our predictive model was successfully tested on the set of experimentally defined operons in E. coli and B. subtilis, with accuracies of 94.6 and 93.3%, respectively. As far as we know, these are the highest accuracies ever obtained for predicting bacterial operons. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the predictable accuracy of our model when using an organism's data set for the training procedure, and a different organism's data set for testing, we repeated the E. coli operon prediction analysis using a neural network trained with B. subtilis data, and a B. subtilis analysis using a neural network trained with E. coli data. Even for these cases, the accuracies reached with our method were outstandingly high, 91.5 and 93%, respectively. These results show the potential use of our method for accurately predicting the operons of any other organism. Our operon predictions for fully-sequenced genomes are available at http://operons.ibt.unam.mx/OperonPredictor/. PMID:20385580

  6. Evolution and Biophysics of the Escherichia coli lac Operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J. Christian; Igoshin, Oleg; Quan, Selwyn; Monds, Russell; Cooper, Tim; Balázsi, Gábor

    2011-03-01

    To understand, predict, and control the evolution of living organisms, we consider biophysical effects and molecular network architectures. The lactose utilization system of E. coli is among the most well-studied molecular networks in biology, making it an ideal candidate for such studies. Simulations show how the genetic architecture of the wild-type operon attenuates large metabolic intermediate fluctuations that are predicted to occur in an equivalent system with the component genes on separate operons. Quantification of gene expression in the lac operon evolved in growth conditions containing constant lactose, alternating with glucose, or constant glucose, shows characteristic gene expression patterns depending on conditions. We are simulating these conditions to show context-dependent biophysical sources and costs of different lac operon architectures.

  7. Bacterial cells carrying synthetic dual-function operon survived starvation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuki; Ito, Yoichiro; Tsuru, Saburo; Ying, Bei-Wen; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    A synthetic dual-function operon with a bistable structure was designed and successfully integrated into the bacterial genome. Bistability was generated by the mutual inhibitory structure comprised of the promoters P(tet) and P(lac) and the repressors LacI and TetR. Dual function essential for cell growth was introduced by replacing the genes (i.e., hisC and leuB) encoding proteins involved in the biosynthesis of histidine and leucine from their native chromosomal locations to the synthetic operon. Both colony formation and population dynamics of the cells carrying this operon showed that the cells survived starvation and the newly formed population transited between the two stable states, representing the induced hisC and leuB levels, in accordance with the nutritional status. The results strongly suggested that the synthetic design of proto-operons sensitive to external perturbations is practical and functional in native cells.

  8. Boolean models can explain bistability in the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Stigler, Brandilyn

    2011-06-01

    The lac operon in Escherichia coli has been studied extensively and is one of the earliest gene systems found to undergo both positive and negative control. The lac operon is known to exhibit bistability, in the sense that the operon is either induced or uninduced. Many dynamical models have been proposed to capture this phenomenon. While most are based on complex mathematical formulations, it has been suggested that for other gene systems network topology is sufficient to produce the desired dynamical behavior. We present a Boolean network as a discrete model for the lac operon. Our model includes the two main glucose control mechanisms of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. We show that this Boolean model is capable of predicting the ON and OFF steady states and bistability. Further, we present a reduced model which shows that lac mRNA and lactose form the core of the lac operon, and that this reduced model exhibits the same dynamics. This work suggests that the key to model qualitative dynamics of gene systems is the topology of the network and Boolean models are well suited for this purpose.

  9. Assessment of the Immune Responses Induced in Cattle after Inoculation of a Mycobacterium bovis Strain Deleted in Two mce2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Federico Carlos; Soria, Marcelo; Gravisaco, María José; Bianco, María Verónica; Meikle, Virginia; Garbaccio, Sergio; Vagnoni, Lucas; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Bigi, Fabiana

    2012-01-01

    The generation of efficient candidate vaccines against bovine tuberculosis will contribute to the control of this zoonotic disease. Rationally attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strains generated by knockout of virulence genes are promising candidate vaccines. However, to be effective, these candidate vaccines should at least maintain the immunological properties of their virulent parental M. bovis strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to obtain an M. bovis strain deleted in the mce2 genes and evaluate the effect of the mutation on the immunological profile elicited by the bacteria in cattle. We showed that the activation of CD4+ T cells in cattle inoculated with the mutant strain was equivalent to that in animals inoculated with the parental strain. Moreover, after in vitro stimulation, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from animals inoculated with the mutant produced higher levels of mRNA Th-1 cytokines than the parental strain. Therefore, these results indicate that the mce2 mutant is a promising candidate vaccine against bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22719207

  10. A-Site (MCe) Substitution Effects on the Structures and Properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haixue; Li, Chengen; Zhou, Jiaguang; Zhu, Weimin; He, Lianxin; Song, Yuxin

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the effect of A-site compound substitution on the structures and properties of Ca0.8(MCe)0.1Bi4Ti4O15 (M denotes Li, Na and K) ceramics. The samples were prepared by the conventional ceramic technique. Sintering characteristics of Ca0.8(MCe)0.1Bi4Ti4O15 and CaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics were discussed. X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the three modified CBT-based compounds show a single phase of bismuth oxide layer type structure with m=4. The hysteresis loops of polarization versus electric field of the four compounds were also measured. A-site compound substitution improves the piezoelectric properties and the high-temperature resistivity of these materials. A-site (LiCe) and (KCe) substitution not only improves the Curie temperature but also decreases the temperature coefficient of dielectric constant (TK\\varepsilon). Among the three modified ceramics, only the Curie temperature of Ca0.8(NaCe)0.1Bi4Ti4O15 is lower than that of CaBi4Ti4O15; however, its TK\\varepsilon is the lowest. As a result, all the three modified CBT-based ceramics were found to be excellent high-temperature piezoelectric materials.

  11. Operon Gene Order Is Optimized for Ordered Protein Complex Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan N; Bergendahl, L Therese; Marsh, Joseph A

    2016-02-02

    The assembly of heteromeric protein complexes is an inherently stochastic process in which multiple genes are expressed separately into proteins, which must then somehow find each other within the cell. Here, we considered one of the ways by which prokaryotic organisms have attempted to maximize the efficiency of protein complex assembly: the organization of subunit-encoding genes into operons. Using structure-based assembly predictions, we show that operon gene order has been optimized to match the order in which protein subunits assemble. Exceptions to this are almost entirely highly expressed proteins for which assembly is less stochastic and for which precisely ordered translation offers less benefit. Overall, these results show that ordered protein complex assembly pathways are of significant biological importance and represent a major evolutionary constraint on operon gene organization.

  12. Cost-benefit tradeoffs in engineered lac operons.

    PubMed

    Eames, Matt; Kortemme, Tanja

    2012-05-18

    Cells must balance the cost and benefit of protein expression to optimize organismal fitness. The lac operon of the bacterium Escherichia coli has been a model for quantifying the physiological impact of costly protein production and for elucidating the resulting regulatory mechanisms. We report quantitative fitness measurements in 27 redesigned operons that suggested that protein production is not the primary origin of fitness costs. Instead, we discovered that the lac permease activity, which relates linearly to cost, is the major physiological burden to the cell. These findings explain control points in the lac operon that minimize the cost of lac permease activity, not protein expression. Characterizing similar relationships in other systems will be important to map the impact of cost/benefit tradeoffs on cell physiology and regulation.

  13. Genome Data from DOOR: a Database for prOkaryotic OpeRons

    DOE Data Explorer

    DOOR (Database of prOkaryotic OpeRons) is an operon database developed by Computational Systems Biology Lab (CSBL) at University of Georgia. Although the operons in the database are based on prediction, there are some unique features. These are: • A algorithm is consistently best at all aspects including sensitivity and specificity for both true positives and true negatives, and the overall accuracy reaches 90 percent. The prediction algorithm is based on this paper: P. Dam, V. Olman, K. Harris, Z. Su, Y. Xu., Operon prediction using both genome-specific and general genomic information, Nucleic Acids Res., 35(1):288-98, 2007 • DOOR provides one of the largest data sets of operon information available to the public. DOOR provides operons for 675 prokaryotic genomes. Although most of operons in DOOR are not verified by experiments, the creators are also trying to provide some limited literature information, which is extracted from ODB. They emphasize that if the users are looking for strictly experimentally verified operons, they should look into DBTBS and RegulonDB first. • Operons which include RNA genes, which are rarely seen in other operon databases especially for predicted operon databases • Defined the similarity scores between operons, which is based on weighted maximum matching between operons. Similar operon groups can be used to predict accurate orthologous genes,and their upstream regions can be used to find the consensus binding motifs. • Integration of two motif finding programs in the database: MEME and CUBIC. DOOR provides an Organism View for browsing, a gene search tool, an operon search tool, and the operon prediction interface.[Text taken and edited from http://csbl1.bmb.uga.edu/OperonDB/tutorial.php

  14. Genetic organization of the cellulose synthase operon in Acetobacter xylinum.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, H C; Fear, A L; Calhoon, R D; Eichinger, G H; Mayer, R; Amikam, D; Benziman, M; Gelfand, D H; Meade, J H; Emerick, A W

    1990-01-01

    An operon encoding four proteins required for bacterial cellulose biosynthesis (bcs) in Acetobacter xylinum was isolated via genetic complementation with strains lacking cellulose synthase activity. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that the cellulose synthase operon is 9217 base pairs long and consists of four genes. The four genes--bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, and bcsD--appear to be translationally coupled and transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA with an initiation site 97 bases upstream of the coding region of the first gene (bcsA) in the operon. Results from genetic complementation tests and gene disruption analyses demonstrate that all four genes in the operon are required for maximal bacterial cellulose synthesis in A. xylinum. The calculated molecular masses of the proteins encoded by bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, and bcsD are 84.4, 85.3, 141.0, and 17.3 kDa, respectively. The second gene in the operon (bcsB) encodes the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase. The functions of the bcsA, bcsC, and bcsD gene products are unknown. Bacterial strains mutated in the bcsA locus were found to be deficient in cellulose synthesis due to the lack of cellulose synthase and diguanylate cyclase activities. Mutants in the bcsC and bcsD genes were impaired in cellulose production in vivo, even though they had the capacity to make all the necessary metabolic precursors and cyclic diguanylic acid, the activator of cellulose synthase, and exhibit cellulose synthase activity in vitro. When the entire operon was present on a multicopy plasmid in the bacterial cell, both cellulose synthase activity and cellulose biosynthesis increased. When the promoter of the cellulose synthase operon was replaced on the chromosome by E. coli tac or lac promoters, cellulose production was reduced in parallel with decreased cellulose synthase activity. These observations suggest that the expression of the bcs operon is rate-limiting for cellulose synthesis in A. xylinum. Images PMID:2146681

  15. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Ben-Halim, Asma

    2011-03-01

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with delays. We investigate an analytical and numerical solution and analyse the range of values for the parameters corresponding to a stable solution.

  16. Operon Formation is Driven by Co-Regulation and Not by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Katherine H.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2005-04-12

    Although operons are often subject to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), non-HGT genes are particularly likely to be in operons. To resolve this apparent discrepancy and to determine whether HGT is involved in operon formation, we examined the evolutionary history of the genes and operons in Escherichia coli K12. We show that genes that have homologs in distantly related bacteria but not in close relatives of E. coli (indicating HGTi) form new operons at about the same rates as native genes. Furthermore, genes in new operons are no more likely than other genes to have phylogenetic trees that are inconsistent with the species tree. In contrast, essential genes and ubiquitous genes without paralogs (genes believed to undergo HGT rarely) often form new operons. We conclude that HGT is not associated with operon formation, but instead promotes the prevalence of pre-existing operons. To explain operon formation, we propose that new operons reduce the amount of regulatory information required to specify optimal expression patterns. Consistent with this hypothesis, operons have greater amounts of conserved regulatory sequences than do individually transcribed genes.

  17. Characterization of the Cobalamin and Fep Operons in Methylobium petrolphilum PM1

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J

    2005-09-06

    The bacterium Methylobium petroleophilum PM1 is economically important due to its ability to degrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a fuel additive. Because PM1 is a representative of all MTBE degraders, it is important to understand the transport pathways critical for the organism to survive in its particular environment. In this study, the cobalamin pathway and select iron transport genes will be characterized to help further understand all metabolic pathways in PM1. PM1 contains a total of four cobalamin operons. A single operon is located on the chromosome. Located on the megaplasmid are two tandem repeats of cob operons and a very close representative of the cob operon located on the chromosome. The fep operon, an iron transport mechanism, lies within the multiple copies of the cob operon. The cob operon and the fep operon appear to be unrelated except for a shared need for the T-on-B-dependent energy transduction complex to assist the operons in moving large molecules across the outer membrane of the cell. A genomic study of the cob and the fep operons with that of phylogenetically related organisms helped to confirm the identity of the cob and fep operons and to represent the pathways. More study of the pathways should be done to find the relationship that positions the two seemingly unrelated cob and fep genes together in what appears to be one operon.

  18. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI)

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Katherine M.; Gardner, Grant E.; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty. PMID:27252300

  19. Horizontally acquired glycosyltransferase operons drive salmonellae lipopolysaccharide diversity.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark R; Broadbent, Sarah E; Harris, Simon R; Thomson, Nicholas R; van der Woude, Marjan W

    2013-06-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

  20. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI).

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Katherine M; Gardner, Grant E; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty.

  1. Modeling network dynamics: the lac operon, a case study.

    PubMed

    Vilar, José M G; Guet, Călin C; Leibler, Stanislas

    2003-05-12

    We use the lac operon in Escherichia coli as a prototype system to illustrate the current state, applicability, and limitations of modeling the dynamics of cellular networks. We integrate three different levels of description (molecular, cellular, and that of cell population) into a single model, which seems to capture many experimental aspects of the system.

  2. Fucose-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of the fcs Operon by FcsR in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Afzal, Muhammad; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the impact of fucose on the transcriptome of S. pneumoniae D39. The expression of various genes and operons, including the fucose uptake PTS and utilization operon (fcs operon) was altered in the presence of fucose. By means of quantitative RT-PCR and β-galactosidase analysis, we demonstrate the role of the transcriptional regulator FcsR, present upstream of the fcs operon, as a transcriptional activator of the fcs operon. We also predict a 19-bp putative FcsR regulatory site (5'-ATTTGAACATTATTCAAGT-3') in the promoter region of the fcs operon. The functionality of this predicted FcsR regulatory site was further confirmed by promoter-truncation experiments, where deletion of half of the FscR regulatory site or full deletion led to the abolition of expression of the fcs operon.

  3. Design and characterisation of synthetic operons for biohydrogen technology.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Ciaran M; Sargent, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Biohydrogen is produced by a number of microbial systems and the commonly used host bacterium Escherichia coli naturally produces hydrogen under fermentation conditions. One approach to engineering additional hydrogen production pathways is to introduce non-native hydrogenases into E. coli. An attractive candidate is the soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha, which has been shown to link NADH/NAD(+) biochemistry directly to hydrogen metabolism, an activity that E. coli does not perform. In this work, three synthetic operons were designed that code for the soluble hydrogenase and two different enzyme maturase systems. Interestingly, using this system, the recombinant soluble hydrogenase was found to be assembled by the native E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenase assembly machinery, and, vice versa, the synthetic maturase operons were able to complement E. coli mutants defective in hydrogenase biosynthesis. The heterologously expressed soluble hydrogenase was found to be active and was shown to produce biohydrogen in vivo.

  4. [UV-inducibility of the LT-toxin operon].

    PubMed

    Tiganova, I G; Rusina, O Iu; Andreeva, I V; Demkin, V V; Brukhanskiĭ, G V; Aleshkin, G I; Skavronskaia, A G

    1989-07-01

    The plasmid elt-operon pVZ14 was constructed by fusing of the eltoperon of the plasmid pVZ357 with the lac-gene of the bacteriophage Mud1 (Amp, Lac). lacZ gene has been proven to be fused with an elt-promoter by the loss of toxin production coded by pVZ357 and acquiring of Lac+ phenotype by pVZ14 containing cells, as well as by HindIII fragments hybridization of pVZ357 and pVZ14 with the labelled elt-probe. The kinetics of beta-galactosidase synthesis in E. coli cells harboring pVZ14 shows an elt-operon promoter to have expressed constitutive activity and to be activated by a SOS-inducing agent, UV-light.

  5. Positive and Negative Control of the Lac Operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaddour, Jihad S.; Werman, Steven D.; Misra, Prasanta K.

    1997-03-01

    We present a mathematical model for the positive and negative control of lac operon. We investigate a steady state solution for the coupled nonlinear differential equations representing the dynamic behaviors of the repressor-inducer components of negative control as well as the cyclic AMP receptor components of the positive control. A dimensionless derivation of the lac operon system is employed to produce singularly perturbed models. The first model represents the dynamical behavior of the operator while the slow model represents the dynamical behaviors of the inducer and the repressor. We use the singular perturbation theory to show that the behavior of the system can be described as a rapid on-off switch of structural gene transformation.

  6. Structure of the E. coli hisT Operon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO ArintoV 221-50061153N IRRO41-05 ]RR041-O5-Oj NR204-123 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) (U) STRUCTURE OF THE E ... Coli hisT OPERON ritpe C., Arps, Peggy J. and Winkler, Malcolm E. 13 YE OF RAPORT 13b. TIME CO VEE 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year Month. Day) 15. PAGE

  7. Structural characterization of the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 umu operon

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.M.; Crowne, H.M.; Pidsley, S.C.; Sedgwick, S.G. )

    1990-09-01

    The umuDC operon of Escherichia coli encodes functions required for mutagenesis induced by radiation and a wide variety of chemicals. The closely related organism Salmonella typhimurium is markedly less mutable than E. coli, but a umu homolog has recently been identified and cloned from the LT2 subline. In this study the nucleotide sequence and structure of the S. typhimurium LT2 umu operon have been determined and its gene products have been identified so that the molecular basis of umu activity might be understood more fully. S. typhimurium LT2 umu consists of a smaller 417-base-pair (bp) umuD gene ending 2 bp upstream of a larger 1,266-bp umuC gene. The only apparent structural difference between the two operons is the lack of gene overlap. An SOS box identical to that found in E. coli is present in the promoter region upstream of umuD. The calculated molecular masses of the umuD and umuC gene products were 15.3 and 47.8 kilodaltons, respectively, which agree with figures determined by transpositional disruption and maxicell analysis. The S. typhimurium and E. coli umuD sequences were 68% homologous and encoded products with 71% amino acid identity; the umuC sequences were 71% homologous and encoded products with 83% amino acid identity. Furthermore, the potential UmuD cleavage site and associated catalytic sites could be identified. Thus the very different mutagenic responses of S. typhimurium LT2 and E. coli cannot be accounted for by gross differences in operon structure or gene products. Rather, the ability of the cloned S. typhimurium umuD gene to give stronger complementation of E. coli umuD77 mutants in the absence of a functional umuC gene suggests that Salmonella UmuC protein normally constrains UmuD protein activity.

  8. Elucidation of operon structures across closely related bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuan; Ma, Qin; Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components.

  9. Horizontally Acquired Glycosyltransferase Operons Drive Salmonellae Lipopolysaccharide Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Mark R.; Broadbent, Sarah E.; Harris, Simon R.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; van der Woude, Marjan W.

    2013-01-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23818865

  10. Elucidation of Operon Structures across Closely Related Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components. PMID:24959722

  11. The transcription of the cbb operon in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xueming; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Arp, Daniel J

    2004-06-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that participates in the C and N cycles. N. europaea utilizes CO(2) as its predominant carbon source, and is an obligate chemolithotroph, deriving all the reductant required for energy and biosynthesis from the oxidation of ammonia (NH(3)) to nitrite (). This bacterium fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). The RubisCO operon is composed of five genes, cbbLSQON. This gene organization is similar to that of the operon for 'green-like' type I RubisCOs in other organisms. The cbbR gene encoding the putative regulatory protein for RubisCO transcription was identified upstream of cbbL. This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was upregulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy-harvesting-related genes were downregulated. N. europaea responds to carbon limitation by prioritizing resources towards key components for carbon assimilation. Unlike the situation for amo genes, NH(3) was not required for the transcription of the cbb genes. All five cbb genes were only transcribed when an external energy source was provided. In actively growing cells, mRNAs from the five genes in the RubisCO operon were present at different levels, probably due to premature termination of transcription, rapid mRNA processing and mRNA degradation.

  12. Analysis of the gluconate (gnt) operon of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Reizer, A; Deutscher, J; Saier, M H; Reizer, J

    1991-05-01

    The gluconate (gnt) operon of Bacillus subtilis includes the gntR, gntK, gntP, and gntZ genes, respectively encoding the transcriptional repressor of the operon, gluconate kinase, the gluconate permease, and an unidentified open reading frame (Fujita and Fujita, 1987). We have compared the proteins encoded by the gnt operon of B.subtilis with published sequences and showed that (i) the gluconate repressor is homologous to several putative regulatory proteins in Escherichia coli, (ii) the gluconate kinase of B. subtilis is homologous to xylulose kinase, glycerol kinase and fucose kinase in E. coli (20-26% identity; 12-59 S.D.), (iii) the gluconate permease exhibits a C-terminal domain which is homologous to a hydrophobic protein encoded by an unidentified open reading frame (dsdAp) which precedes the dsdA gene of E. coli (39% identity; 19 S.D.), and (iv) the gntZ gene product is homologous to 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases of other bacteria and of animals (48-56%; 82-178 S.D.), thereby suggesting that the B. subtilis gntZ encodes 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Several conserved regions of the sequenced 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases can serve as signature patterns of this protein. Computer analyses have indicated that the previously reported sequences of the porcine and ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases, as well as the hypothetical DsdAp protein, are probably erroneous. The probable reasons for the errors are reported along with the proposed revised sequences.

  13. Expression of an entire bacterial operon in plants.

    PubMed

    Mozes-Koch, Rita; Gover, Ofer; Tanne, Edna; Peretz, Yuval; Maori, Eyal; Chernin, Leonid; Sela, Ilan

    2012-04-01

    Multigene expression is required for metabolic engineering, i.e. coregulated expression of all genes in a metabolic pathway for the production of a desired secondary metabolite. To that end, several transgenic approaches have been attempted with limited success. Better success has been achieved by transforming plastids with operons. IL-60 is a platform of constructs driven from the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl virus. We demonstrate that IL-60 enables nontransgenic expression of an entire bacterial operon in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants without the need for plastid (or any other) transformation. Delivery to the plant is simple, and the rate of expressing plants is close to 100%, eliminating the need for selectable markers. Using this platform, we show the expression of an entire metabolic pathway in plants and delivery of the end product secondary metabolite (pyrrolnitrin). Expression of this unique secondary metabolite resulted in the appearance of a unique plant phenotype disease resistance. Pyrrolnitrin production was already evident 2 d after application of the operon to plants and persisted throughout the plant's life span. Expression of entire metabolic pathways in plants is potentially beneficial for plant improvement, disease resistance, and biotechnological advances, such as commercial production of desired metabolites.

  14. Prevalence of transcription promoters within archaeal operons and coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Tie; Reiss, David J; Bare, J Christopher; Pang, Wyming Lee; Facciotti, Marc T; Schmid, Amy K; Pan, Min; Marzolf, Bruz; Van, Phu T; Lo, Fang-Yin; Pratap, Abhishek; Deutsch, Eric W; Peterson, Amelia; Martin, Dan; Baliga, Nitin S

    2009-01-01

    Despite the knowledge of complex prokaryotic-transcription mechanisms, generalized rules, such as the simplified organization of genes into operons with well-defined promoters and terminators, have had a significant role in systems analysis of regulatory logic in both bacteria and archaea. Here, we have investigated the prevalence of alternate regulatory mechanisms through genome-wide characterization of transcript structures of ∼64% of all genes, including putative non-coding RNAs in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. Our integrative analysis of transcriptome dynamics and protein–DNA interaction data sets showed widespread environment-dependent modulation of operon architectures, transcription initiation and termination inside coding sequences, and extensive overlap in 3′ ends of transcripts for many convergently transcribed genes. A significant fraction of these alternate transcriptional events correlate to binding locations of 11 transcription factors and regulators (TFs) inside operons and annotated genes—events usually considered spurious or non-functional. Using experimental validation, we illustrate the prevalence of overlapping genomic signals in archaeal transcription, casting doubt on the general perception of rigid boundaries between coding sequences and regulatory elements. PMID:19536208

  15. Tryptophan operon regulation in interspecific hybrids of enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Manson, M D; Yanofsky, C

    1976-01-01

    We examined tryptophan regulation in merodiploid hybrids in which a plasmid carrying the trp operon of Escherichia was introduced into Trp mutants of other enteric genera, or in which a plasmid carrying the trpR+ (repressor) gene of E. coli was transfered into fully constitutive trpR mutants of other genera. In these hybrids the trp operon of one species is controlled by the repressor of a different species. Similar investigations were possible in transduction hybrids in which either the trp operon or the trpR+ locus of Shigella dysenteriae was introduced into E. coli. Our measurements of trp enzymes levels in repressed and nonrepressed cells indicate that Trp regulation is normal, with only minor quantitative variations, in hybrids between E coli and Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, and Proteus mirabilis. Our results support the idea that a repressor-operator mechanism for regulating trp messenger ribonucleic acid production evolved in a common ancestor of the enteric bacteria, and that this repressor-operator recognition has been conversed during the evolutionary divergence of the Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:770450

  16. Growth and sporulation defects in Bacillus subtilis mutants with a single rrn operon can be suppressed by amplification of the rrn operon.

    PubMed

    Yano, Koichi; Masuda, Kenta; Akanuma, Genki; Wada, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Shiwa, Yuh; Ishige, Taichiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Niki, Hironori; Inaoka, Takashi; Kawamura, Fujio

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Bacillus subtilis strain 168 encodes ten rRNA (rrn) operons. We previously reported that strains with only a single rrn operon had a decreased growth and sporulation frequency. We report here the isolation and characterization of suppressor mutants from seven strains that each have a single rrn operon (rrnO, A, J, I, E, D or B). The suppressor mutants for strain RIK656 with a single rrnO operon had a higher frequency of larger colonies. These suppressor mutants had not only increased growth rates, but also increased sporulation frequencies and ribosome levels compared to the parental mutant strain RIK656. Quantitative PCR analyses showed that all these suppressor mutants had an increased number of copies of the rrnO operon. Suppressor mutants were also isolated from the six other strains with single rrn operons (rrnA, J, I, E, D or B). Next generation and capillary sequencing showed that all of the suppressor mutants had tandem repeats of the chromosomal locus containing the remaining rrn operon (amplicon). These amplicons varied in size from approximately 9 to 179 kb. The amplifications were likely to be initiated by illegitimate recombination between non- or micro-homologous sequences, followed by unequal crossing-over during DNA replication. These results are consistent with our previous report that rrn operon copy number has a major role in cellular processes such as cell growth and sporulation.

  17. The tryptophan pathway genes of the Sargasso Sea metagenome: new operon structures and the prevalence of non-operon organization

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Juliana; Sharon, Itai; Beja, Oded; Kuhn, Jonathan C

    2008-01-01

    Background The enormous database of microbial DNA generated from the Sargasso Sea metagenome provides a unique opportunity to locate genes participating in different biosynthetic pathways and to attempt to understand the relationship and evolution of those genes. In this article, an analysis of the Sargasso Sea metagenome is made with respect to the seven genes of the tryptophan pathway. Results At least 5% of all the genes that are related to amino acid biosynthesis are tryptophan (trp) genes. Many contigs and scaffolds contain whole or split operons that are similar to previously analyzed trp gene organizations. Only two scaffolds discovered in this analysis possess a different operon organization of tryptophan pathway genes than those previously known. Many marine organisms lack an operon-type organization of these genes or have mini-operons containing only two trp genes. In addition, the trpB genes from this search reveal that the dichotomous division between trpB_1 and trpB_2 also occurs in organisms from the Sargasso Sea. One cluster was found to contain trpB sequences that were closely related to each other but distinct from most known trpB sequences. Conclusion The data show that trp genes are widely dispersed within this metagenome. The novel organization of these genes and an unusual group of trpB_1 sequences that were found among some of these Sargasso Sea bacteria indicate that there is much to be discovered about both the reason for certain gene orders and the regulation of tryptophan biosynthesis in marine bacteria. PMID:18221558

  18. Characterization of genes in the cellulose-synthesizing operon (acs operon) of Acetobacter xylinum: implications for cellulose crystallization.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, I M; Kudlicka, K; Okuda, K; Brown, R M

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of an extracellular ribbon of cellulose in the bacterium Acetobacter xylinum takes place from linearly arranged, membrane-localized, cellulose-synthesizing and extrusion complexes that direct the coupled steps of polymerization and crystallization. To identify the different components involved in this process, we isolated an Acetobacter cellulose-synthesizing (acs) operon from this bacterium. Analysis of DNA sequence shows the presence of three genes in the acs operon, in which the first gene (acsAB) codes for a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 168 kDa, which was identified as the cellulose synthase. A single base change in the previously reported DNA sequence of this gene, resulting in a frameshift and synthesis of a larger protein, is described in the present paper, along with the sequences of the other two genes (acsC and acsD). The requirement of the acs operon genes for cellulose production was determined using site-determined TnphoA/Kanr GenBlock insertion mutants. Mutant analysis showed that while the acsAB and acsC genes were essential for cellulose production in vivo, the acsD mutant produced reduced amounts of two cellulose allomorphs (cellulose I and cellulose II), suggesting that the acsD gene is involved in cellulose crystallization. The role of the acs operon genes in determining the linear array of intramembranous particles, which are believed to be sites of cellulose synthesis, was investigated for the different mutants; however, this arrangement was observed only in cells that actively produced cellulose microfibrils, suggesting that it may be influenced by the crystallization of the nascent glucan chains. Images PMID:8083166

  19. The effector overlap between the lac and mel operons of Escherichia coli: Induction of the mel operon with β-galactosides.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul; Oehler, Stefan

    2017-02-13

    The lac (lactose) operon (processes β-galactosides) and the mel (melibiose) operon (processes α-galactosides) of Escherichia coli have a close historical connection. A number of shared substrates and effectors of the permeases and regulatory proteins has been reported over the years. Up to now, β-thiogalactosides like TMG (methyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside) are generally not considered inducers of the mel operon. The same is true for β-galactosides like lactose (β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1→4)-D-glucose), which is a substrate, but itself not an inducer of the lac operon. This report shows that all three sugars can induce the mel operon significantly, when they are accumulated in the cell by Lac permease. Strong induction by the gratuitous β-thiogalactosides is observed in the presence of Lac permease and strong induction by lactose (more than 200-fold) in the absence of β-galactosidase. This finding calls for re-evaluation of TMG uptake experiments as assays for Lac permease that were performed with mel(+) strains.IMPORTANCE The typical textbook picture of bacterial operons is that of stand-alone units of genetic information that perform, in a regulated manner, well-defined cellular functions. Less attention is given to the extensive interactions that can be found between operons. One well-described example of such interactions are the effector molecules shared by the lac and mel operons. It is here shown that this set has to be extended to include β-galactosides, which have been, until now, considered not to effect expression of the mel operon. That they can be inducers of the mel as well as the lac operon has not been noticed in decades of research, because of the E. coli genetic background used in previous studies.

  20. The use of GIS and multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) to identify agricultural land management practices which cause surface water pollution in drinking water supply catchments.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Richard; Kay, Paul; Foulger, Miles

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse pollution poses a threat to water quality and results in the need for treatment for potable water supplies which can prove costly. Within the Yorkshire region, UK, nitrates, pesticides and water colour present particular treatment problems. Catchment management techniques offer an alternative to 'end of pipe' solutions and allow resources to be targeted to the most polluting areas. This project has attempted to identify such areas using GIS based modelling approaches in catchments where water quality data were available. As no model exists to predict water colour a model was created using an MCE method which is capable of predicting colour concentrations at the catchment scale. CatchIS was used to predict pesticide and nitrate N concentrations and was found to be generally capable of reliably predicting nitrate N loads at the catchment scale. The pesticides results did not match the historic data possibly due to problems with the historic pesticide data and temporal and spatially variability in pesticide usage. The use of these models can be extended to predict water quality problems in catchments where water quality data are unavailable and highlight areas of concern. IWA Publishing 2008.

  1. Interplay of Noisy Gene Expression and Dynamics Explains Patterns of Bacterial Operon Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organized into operons -- sets of genes co-transcribed into polycistronic messenger RNA. Hypotheses explaining the emergence and maintenance of operons include proportional co-regulation, horizontal transfer of intact ``selfish'' operons, emergence via gene duplication, and co-production of physically interacting proteins to speed their association. We hypothesized an alternative: operons can reduce or increase intrinsic gene expression noise in a manner dependent on the post-translational interactions, thereby resulting in selection for or against operons in depending on the network architecture. We devised five classes of two-gene network modules and show that the effects of operons on intrinsic noise depend on class membership. Two classes exhibit decreased noise with co-transcription, two others reveal increased noise, and the remaining one does not show a significant difference. To test our modeling predictions we employed bioinformatic analysis to determine the relationship gene expression noise and operon organization. The results confirm the overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon architectures and provide evidence against other hypotheses. Our results thereby suggest a central role for gene expression noise in selecting for or maintaining operons in bacterial chromosomes. This demonstrates how post-translational network dynamics may provide selective pressure for organizing bacterial chromosomes, and has practical consequences for designing synthetic gene networks. This work is supported by National Institutes of Health grant 1R01GM096189-01.

  2. Operon Conservation and the Evolution of trans-Splicing in the Phylum Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    Guiliano, David B; Blaxter, Mark L

    2006-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five major clades of the phylum Nematoda, for the presence of operons and the use of trans-spliced leaders in resolution of polycistronic pre-mRNAs. Conserved operons were found in Pristionchus pacificus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides ratti, Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum. In nematodes closely related to the rhabditine C. elegans, a related family of SL2-like spliced leaders is used for operonic transcript resolution. However, in the tylenchine S. ratti operonic transcripts are resolved using a family of spliced leaders related to SL1. Non-operonic genes in S. ratti may also receive these SL1 variants. In the spirurine nematodes B. malayi and A. suum operonic transcripts are resolved using SL1. Mapping these phenotypes onto the robust molecular phylogeny for the Nematoda suggests that operons evolved before SL2-like spliced leaders, which are an evolutionary invention of the rhabditine lineage. PMID:17121468

  3. Operon conservation and the evolution of trans-splicing in the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Guiliano, David B; Blaxter, Mark L

    2006-11-24

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five major clades of the phylum Nematoda, for the presence of operons and the use of trans-spliced leaders in resolution of polycistronic pre-mRNAs. Conserved operons were found in Pristionchus pacificus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides ratti, Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum. In nematodes closely related to the rhabditine C. elegans, a related family of SL2-like spliced leaders is used for operonic transcript resolution. However, in the tylenchine S. ratti operonic transcripts are resolved using a family of spliced leaders related to SL1. Non-operonic genes in S. ratti may also receive these SL1 variants. In the spirurine nematodes B. malayi and A. suum operonic transcripts are resolved using SL1. Mapping these phenotypes onto the robust molecular phylogeny for the Nematoda suggests that operons evolved before SL2-like spliced leaders, which are an evolutionary invention of the rhabditine lineage.

  4. Engineered ribosomal RNA operon copy-number variants of E. coli reveal the evolutionary trade-offs shaping rRNA operon number.

    PubMed

    Gyorfy, Zsuzsanna; Draskovits, Gabor; Vernyik, Viktor; Blattner, Frederick F; Gaal, Tamas; Posfai, Gyorgy

    2015-02-18

    Ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons, characteristically present in several copies in bacterial genomes (7 in E. coli), play a central role in cellular physiology. We investigated the factors determining the optimal number of rrn operons in E. coli by constructing isogenic variants with 5-10 operons. We found that the total RNA and protein content, as well as the size of the cells reflected the number of rrn operons. While growth parameters showed only minor differences, competition experiments revealed a clear pattern: 7-8 copies were optimal under conditions of fluctuating, occasionally rich nutrient influx and lower numbers were favored in stable, nutrient-limited environments. We found that the advantages of quick adjustment to nutrient availability, rapid growth and economic regulation of ribosome number all contribute to the selection of the optimal rrn operon number. Our results suggest that the wt rrn operon number of E. coli reflects the natural, 'feast and famine' life-style of the bacterium, however, different copy numbers might be beneficial under different environmental conditions. Understanding the impact of the copy number of rrn operons on the fitness of the cell is an important step towards the creation of functional and robust genomes, the ultimate goal of synthetic biology.

  5. Expression of a synthetic pertussis toxin operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pozza, T D; Yan, H; Walker, M J

    1997-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough, a severe disease of infants characterised by repeated of paroxysmal coughing. Pertussis toxin (PT) is a major virulence factor of B. pertussis and is a typical A/B bacterial toxin consisting of five subunits S1-S5 in a ratio of 1:1:1:2:1. The PT subunit genes are organized into an operon which is not expressed in Escherichia coli, thus hampering the use of this organism for vaccine production. We have expressed the five PT subunits individually in E. coli by replacing the wild-type transcriptional and translational signals, and in the case of the S4 subunit the leader peptide has been exchanged with a modified E. coli beta-lactamase leader sequence. We have developed a stepwise cloning method to construct a synthetic PT operon which simultaneously expresses the five PT subunits in E. coli. Western blot analysis indicated that in E. coli KS476 containing the synthetic PT operon, S4 and S5 were completely processed, S1 was partially processed, whilst the majority of S2 and S3 remained unprocessed. Periplasmic extracts contained soluble S1 and S3; however, the processed form of S2, S4 and S5 were not detected, suggesting that these subunits may be membrane associated or in an insoluble form. This work should allow an investigation of the potential of E. coli to produce detoxified PT in a background free of other pertussis virulence factors that may contribute to the side-effects of some vaccine preparations currently in use.

  6. An inducible tellurite-resistance operon in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Toptchieva, Anna; Sisson, Gary; Bryden, Louis J; Taylor, Diane E; Hoffman, Paul S

    2003-05-01

    Tellurite resistance (Te(r)) is widespread in nature and it is shown here that the natural resistance of Proteus mirabilis to tellurite is due to a chromosomally located orthologue of plasmid-borne ter genes found in enteric bacteria. The P. mirabilis ter locus (terZABCDE) was identified in a screen of Tn5lacZ-generated mutants of which one contained an insertion in terC. The P. mirabilis terC mutant displayed increased susceptibility to tellurite (Te(s)) and complementation with terC carried on a multicopy plasmid restored high-level Te(r). Primer extension analysis revealed a single transcriptional start site upstream of terZ, but only with RNA harvested from bacteria grown in the presence of tellurite. Northern blotting and reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses confirmed that the ter operon was inducible by tellurite and to a lesser extent by oxidative stress inducers such as hydrogen peroxide and methyl viologen (paraquat). Direct and inverted repeat sequences were identified in the ter promoter region as well as motifs upstream of the -35 hexamer that resembled OxyR-binding sequences. Finally, the 390 bp intergenic promoter region located between orf3 and terZ showed no DNA sequence identity with any other published ter sequences, whereas terZABCDE genes exhibited 73-85 % DNA sequence identity. The ter operon was present in all clinical isolates of P. mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris tested and is inferred for Morganella and Providencia spp. based on screening for high level Te(r) and preliminary PCR analysis. Thus, a chromosomally located inducible tellurite resistance operon appears to be a common feature of the genus Proteus.

  7. Transcriptional autoregulation of the Salmonella typhimurium phoPQ operon.

    PubMed

    Soncini, F C; Véscovi, E G; Groisman, E A

    1995-08-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium PhoP-PhoQ two-component regulatory system controls the expression of several genes, some of which are necessary for virulence. During a screening for PhoP-regulated genes, we identified the phoPQ operon as a PhoP-activated locus. beta-Galactosidase activity originating from phoPQ-lac transcriptional fusions required the presence of both the transcriptional regulator PhoP and its cognate sensor-kinase PhoQ. At low concentrations, PhoQ stimulated expression of phoPQ-lac transcriptional fusions. However, larger amounts of PhoQ protein without a concomitant increase in PhoP failed to activate phoPQ-lac fusions. Two different transcripts are produced from the phoPQ operon during exponential growth. These transcripts define two promoters: phoPp1, which requires both PhoP and PhoQ for activity and which is environmentally regulated, and phoPp2, which remains active in the absence of PhoP and PhoQ but which is slightly stimulated by these proteins. The pattern of transcriptional autoregulation was also observed at the protein level with anti-PhoP antibodies. In sum, autoregulation of the phoPQ operon provides several levels of control for the PhoP-PhoQ regulon. First, environmental signals would stimulate PhoQ to phosphorylate the PhoP protein that is produced at basal levels from the PhoP-PhoQ-independent promoter. Then, phospho-PhoP would activate transcription of phoPp1, resulting in larger amounts of PhoP and PhoQ and increased expression of PhoP-activated genes. A return to basal levels could be mediated by a posttranscriptional mechanism by which translation of the mRNA produced from phoPp1 is inhibited.

  8. Nucleotide sequence of the Rhodospirillum rubrum atp operon.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, G; Hampe, A; Walker, J E

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined of a 8775-base-pair region of DNA cloned from the photosynthetic non-sulphur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum. It contains a cluster of five genes encoding F1-ATPase subunits. The genes are arranged in the same order as F1 genes in the Escherichia coli unc operon. However, as in the related organism Rhodopseudomonas blastica, neither genes for components of F0, the membrane sector of ATP synthase, nor a homologue of the E. coli uncI gene are associated with this locus, as they are in E. coli. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2861810

  9. Dynamic behavior in mathematical models of the tryptophan operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    This paper surveys the general theory of operon regulation as first formulated by Goodwin and Griffith, and then goes on to consider in detail models of regulation of tryptophan production by Bliss, Sinha, and Santillán and Mackey, and the interrelationships between them. We further give a linear stability analysis of the Santillán and Mackey model for wild type E. coli as well as three different mutant strains that have been previously studied in the literature. This stability analysis indicates that the tryptophan production systems should be stable, which is in accord with our numerical results.

  10. Operon required for fruiting body development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohee; Chung, Jinwoo; Hyun, Hyesook; Lee, Chayul; Lee, Kyoung; Cho, Kyungyun

    2009-11-01

    We have used mutational analysis to identify four genes, MXAN3553, MXAN3554, MXAN3555, and MXAN3556, constituting an operon that is essential for normal fruiting body development in Myxococcus xanthus. Deletion of MXAN3553, which encoded a hypothetical protein, resulted in delayed fruiting body development. MXAN3554 was predicted to encode a metallopeptidase, and its deletion caused fruiting body formation to fail. Inactivation of MXAN3555, which encoded a putative NtrC-type response regulator, resulted in delayed aggregation and a severe reduction in sporulation. Fruiting bodies also failed to develop with the deletion of MXAN3556, another gene encoding a hypothetical protein.

  11. Unprecedented high-resolution view of bacterial operon architecture revealed by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tyrrell; Creecy, James P; Maddox, Scott M; Grissom, Joe E; Conkle, Trevor L; Shadid, Tyler M; Teramoto, Jun; San Miguel, Phillip; Shimada, Tomohiro; Ishihama, Akira; Mori, Hirotada; Wanner, Barry L

    2014-07-08

    We analyzed the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 by strand-specific RNA sequencing at single-nucleotide resolution during steady-state (logarithmic-phase) growth and upon entry into stationary phase in glucose minimal medium. To generate high-resolution transcriptome maps, we developed an organizational schema which showed that in practice only three features are required to define operon architecture: the promoter, terminator, and deep RNA sequence read coverage. We precisely annotated 2,122 promoters and 1,774 terminators, defining 1,510 operons with an average of 1.98 genes per operon. Our analyses revealed an unprecedented view of E. coli operon architecture. A large proportion (36%) of operons are complex with internal promoters or terminators that generate multiple transcription units. For 43% of operons, we observed differential expression of polycistronic genes, despite being in the same operons, indicating that E. coli operon architecture allows fine-tuning of gene expression. We found that 276 of 370 convergent operons terminate inefficiently, generating complementary 3' transcript ends which overlap on average by 286 nucleotides, and 136 of 388 divergent operons have promoters arranged such that their 5' ends overlap on average by 168 nucleotides. We found 89 antisense transcripts of 397-nucleotide average length, 7 unannotated transcripts within intergenic regions, and 18 sense transcripts that completely overlap operons on the opposite strand. Of 519 overlapping transcripts, 75% correspond to sequences that are highly conserved in E. coli (>50 genomes). Our data extend recent studies showing unexpected transcriptome complexity in several bacteria and suggest that antisense RNA regulation is widespread. Importance: We precisely mapped the 5' and 3' ends of RNA transcripts across the E. coli K-12 genome by using a single-nucleotide analytical approach. Our resulting high-resolution transcriptome maps show that ca. one-third of E. coli operons are

  12. Unprecedented High-Resolution View of Bacterial Operon Architecture Revealed by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Creecy, James P.; Maddox, Scott M.; Grissom, Joe E.; Conkle, Trevor L.; Shadid, Tyler M.; Teramoto, Jun; San Miguel, Phillip; Shimada, Tomohiro; Ishihama, Akira; Mori, Hirotada

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We analyzed the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 by strand-specific RNA sequencing at single-nucleotide resolution during steady-state (logarithmic-phase) growth and upon entry into stationary phase in glucose minimal medium. To generate high-resolution transcriptome maps, we developed an organizational schema which showed that in practice only three features are required to define operon architecture: the promoter, terminator, and deep RNA sequence read coverage. We precisely annotated 2,122 promoters and 1,774 terminators, defining 1,510 operons with an average of 1.98 genes per operon. Our analyses revealed an unprecedented view of E. coli operon architecture. A large proportion (36%) of operons are complex with internal promoters or terminators that generate multiple transcription units. For 43% of operons, we observed differential expression of polycistronic genes, despite being in the same operons, indicating that E. coli operon architecture allows fine-tuning of gene expression. We found that 276 of 370 convergent operons terminate inefficiently, generating complementary 3′ transcript ends which overlap on average by 286 nucleotides, and 136 of 388 divergent operons have promoters arranged such that their 5′ ends overlap on average by 168 nucleotides. We found 89 antisense transcripts of 397-nucleotide average length, 7 unannotated transcripts within intergenic regions, and 18 sense transcripts that completely overlap operons on the opposite strand. Of 519 overlapping transcripts, 75% correspond to sequences that are highly conserved in E. coli (>50 genomes). Our data extend recent studies showing unexpected transcriptome complexity in several bacteria and suggest that antisense RNA regulation is widespread. PMID:25006232

  13. The molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon and the tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Structures and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Linder, D; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1996-11-15

    Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains a tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FwdABCD) and a molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FmdABC). The fwdHFGDACB operon encoding the tungsten enzyme has recently been characterized. We report here on the structure and expression of the gene cluster encoding the molybdenum enzyme. This gene cluster is composed of three open reading frames (fmdECB). The fmdB gene was found to encode the molybdopterin-dinucleotide-binding subunit harboring the enzyme's active site; FmdB is thus functionally equivalent to FwdB. fmdC encodes a protein with sequence similarity to FwdC in its N-terminal part and with sequence similarity to FwdD in its C-terminal part; FmdC is thus functionally equivalent to FwdC and FwdD. Interestingly, the fmd operon lacks a gene fmdA encoding the subunit FmdA of the molybdenum enzyme. FmdA has the same apparent molecular mass and the same N-terminal amino acid sequence as FwdA and only one DNA sequence encoding for this N-terminal amino acid sequence was found in the M. thermoautotrophicum genome. It is therefore proposed that FmdA and FwdA are encoded by the same gene namely fwdA in the fwd operon. In agreement with this proposal is the finding that fwdA is expressed constitutively: northern-blot analysis of RNA from tungstate- and molybdate-grown cells of M. thermo-autotrophicum revealed that the fwdHFGDACB gene cluster is transcribed in the presence of either molybdate or tungstate in the growth medium whereas the fmdECB gene cluster was only transcribed when molybdate was present.

  14. Genetic map of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae RTX-toxin (Apx) operons: characterization of the ApxIII operons.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R; Briaire, J; van Geel, A B; Kamp, E M; Gielkens, A L; Smits, M A

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae RTX-toxin III (ApxIII) is implicated as an important virulence factor of A. pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. Recently, the genes coding for ApxIII (apxIIICA) of serotype 8 were cloned and characterized. The toxin appeared to be a member of the RTX-toxin family, as are the other two secreted toxins of A. pleuropneumoniae, i.e., ApxI and ApxII. In this report, we describe the cloning and sequencing of the remaining part of the ApxIII operon of serotype 8. This sequence coded for the RTX secretion proteins ApxIIIB and ApxIIID, which showed 86 and 63% similarity to ApxIB and ApxID, respectively, and 83 and 63% similarity to HlyB and HlyD of Escherichia coli, respectively. Potential functional domains, such as eight transmembrane regions and an ATP-binding cassette, were present in ApxIIIB. We examined the presence of apxIIICABD sequences in the 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae and found that these sequences were present only in serotypes 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8, the serotypes that secrete ApxIII. Comparison of the apxIIICABD gene sequences of the serotypes revealed very few serotype-specific differences. Only the C terminus of ApxIIIA of serotype 2 differed from ApxIIIA of the other serotypes. The differences were located between the glycine-rich repeats and the secretion signal. The analysis of the apxIIICABD genes completed our efforts to characterize the ApxI, ApxII, and ApxIII operons of the reference strains of the 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. We present a complete map of the ApxI, ApxII, and ApxIII operons and discuss this in terms of gene expression and complementation and the role of the toxins in pathogenesis. Images PMID:7927703

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of the Streptococcus salivarius 57.I Urease Operon

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Weaver, Cheryl A.; Mendelsohn, David R.; Burne, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The Streptococcus salivarius 57.I ure cluster was organized as an operon, beginning with ureI, followed by ureABC (structural genes) and ureEFGD (accessory genes). Northern analyses revealed transcripts encompassing structural genes and transcripts containing the entire operon. A ς70-like promoter could be mapped 5′ to ureI (PureI) by primer extension analysis. The intensity of the signal increased when cells were grown at an acidic pH and was further enhanced by excess carbohydrate. To determine the function(s) of two inverted repeats located 5′ to PureI, transcriptional fusions of the full-length promoter region (PureI), or a deletion derivative (PureIΔ100), and a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were constructed and integrated into the chromosome to generate strains PureICAT and PureIΔ100CAT, respectively. CAT specific activities of PureICAT were repressed at pH 7.0 and induced at pH 5.5 and by excess carbohydrate. In PureIΔ100CAT, CAT activity was 60-fold higher than in PureICAT at pH 7.0 and pH induction was nearly eliminated, indicating that expression was negatively regulated. Thus, it was concluded that PureI was the predominant, regulated promoter and that regulation was governed by a mechanism differing markedly from other known mechanisms for bacterial urease expression. PMID:9791132

  16. The D-allose operon of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C; Song, S; Park, C

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 can utilize D-allose, an all-cis hexose, as a sole carbon source. The operon responsible for D-allose metabolism was localized at 92.8 min of the E. coli linkage map. It consists of six genes, alsRBACEK, which are inducible by D-allose and are under the control of the repressor gene alsR. This operon is also subject to catabolite repression. Three genes, alsB, alsA, and alsC, appear to be necessary for transport of D-allose. D-Allose-binding protein, encoded by alsB, is a periplasmic protein that has an affinity for D-allose, with a Kd of 0.33 microM. As was found for other binding-protein-mediated ABC transporters, the allose transport system includes an ATP-binding component (AlsA) and a transmembrane protein (AlsC). It was found that AlsE (a putative D-allulose-6-phosphate 3-epimerase), but not AlsK (a putative D-allose kinase), is necessary for allose metabolism. During this study, we observed that the D-allose transporter is partially responsible for the low-affinity transport of D-ribose and that strain W3110, an E. coli prototroph, has a defect in the transport of D-allose mediated by the allose permease. PMID:9401019

  17. Wrapped-around models for the lac operon complex.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Perico, Angelo

    2010-06-16

    The protein-DNA complex, involved in the lac operon of enteric bacteria, is paradigmatic in understanding the extent of DNA bending and plasticity due to interactions with protein assemblies acting as DNA regulators. For the lac operon, two classes of structures have been proposed: 1), with the protein tetramer lying away from the DNA loop (wrapped-away model); and 2), with the protein tetramer lying inside the DNA loop (wrapped-around model). A recently developed electrostatic analytical model shows that the size and net charge of the Lac protein tetramer allow the bending of DNA, which is consistent with another wrapped-around model from the literature. Coarse-grained models, designed based on this observation, are extensively investigated and show three kinds of wrapped-around arrangements of DNA and a lower propensity for wrapped-away configurations. Molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atom model, built on the basis of the most tightly collapsed coarse-grained model, show that most of the DNA double-helical architecture is maintained in the region between O3 and O1 DNA operators, that the DNA distortion is concentrated in the chain beyond the O1 operator, and that the protein tetramer can adapt the N-terminal domains to the DNA tension.

  18. The effects of DNA supercoiling on the expression of operons of the ilv regulon of Escherichia coli suggest a physiological rationale for divergently transcribed operons.

    PubMed

    Opel, M L; Arfin, S M; Hatfield, G W

    2001-03-01

    Transcriptional activities of closely spaced divergent promoters are affected by the accumulation of local negative superhelicity in the region between transcribing RNA polymerase molecules (transcriptional coupling). The effect of this transcription-induced DNA supercoiling on these promoters depends on their intrinsic properties. As the global superhelical density of the chromosome is controlled by the energy charge of the cell, which is affected by environmental stresses and transitions from one growth state to another, the transcriptional coupling that occurs between divergently transcribed promoters is likely to serve a physiological purpose. Here, we suggest that transcriptional coupling between the divergent promoters of the ilvYC operon of Escherichia coli serves to co-ordinate the expression of this operon with other operons of the ilv regulon during metabolic adjustments associated with growth state transitions. As DNA supercoiling-dependent transcriptional coupling between the promoters of other divergently transcribed operons is investigated, additional global gene regulatory mechanisms and physiological roles are sure to emerge.

  19. The distinctive signatures of promoter regions and operon junctions across prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Janga, Sarath Chandra; Lamboy, Warren F.; Huerta, Araceli M.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Here we show that regions upstream of first transcribed genes have oligonucleotide signatures that distinguish them from regions upstream of genes in the middle of operons. Databases of experimentally confirmed transcription units do not exist for most genomes. Thus, to expand the analyses into genomes with no experimentally confirmed data, we used genes conserved adjacent in evolutionarily distant genomes as representatives of genes inside operons. Likewise, we used divergently transcribed genes as representative examples of first transcribed genes. In model organisms, the trinucleotide signatures of regions upstream of these representative genes allow for operon predictions with accuracies close to those obtained with known operon data (0.8). Signature-based operon predictions have more similar phylogenetic profiles and higher proportions of genes in the same pathways than predicted transcription unit boundaries (TUBs). These results confirm that we are separating genes with related functions, as expected for operons, from genes not necessarily related, as expected for genes in different transcription units. We also test the quality of the predictions using microarray data in six genomes and show that the signature-predicted operons tend to have high correlations of expression. Oligonucleotide signatures should expand the number of tools available to identify operons even in poorly characterized genomes. PMID:16914446

  20. Functional Operons in Secondary Metabolic Gene Clusters in Glarea lozoyensis (Fungi, Ascomycota, Leotiomycetes)

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Qun; Chen, Li; Li, Yan; Bills, Gerald F.; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiang, Meichun; Li, Shaojie; Che, Yongsheng; Niu, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Operons are multigene transcriptional units which occur mostly in prokaryotes but rarely in eukaryotes. Protein-coding operons have not been reported in the Fungi even though they represent a very diverse kingdom of organisms. Here, we report a functional operon involved in the secondary metabolism of the fungus Glarea lozoyensis belonging to Leotiomycetes (Ascomycota). Two contiguous genes, glpks3 and glnrps7, encoding polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase, respectively, are cotranscribed into one dicistronic mRNA under the control of the same promoter, and the mRNA is then translated into two individual proteins, GLPKS3 and GLNRPS7. Heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans shows that the GLPKS3-GLNRPS7 enzyme complex catalyzes the biosynthesis of a novel pyrrolidinedione-containing compound, xenolozoyenone (compound 1), which indicates the operon is functional. Although it is structurally similar to prokaryotic operons, the glpks3-glnrps7 operon locus has a monophylogenic origin from fungi rather than having been horizontally transferred from prokaryotes. Moreover, two additional operons, glpks28-glnrps8 and glpks29-glnrps9, were verified at the transcriptional level in the same fungus. This is the first report of protein-coding operons in a member of the Fungi. PMID:26081635

  1. Characterization of the RRN Operons in the Channel Catfish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: To advance diagnostics and phylogenetics of Edwardsiella ictaluri by sequencing and characterizing its rrn operons. Methods and Results: The Edw. ictaluri rrn operons were identified from a 5-7 kb insert lambda library and from Edw. ictaluri fosmid clones. We present the complete sequences...

  2. The pseudogenes of Mycobacterium leprae reveal the functional relevance of gene order within operons

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Enrique M.; Mah, Nancy; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Almost 50 years following the discovery of the prokaryotic operon, the functional relevance of gene order within operons remains unclear. In this work, we take advantage of the eroded genome of Mycobacterium leprae to add evidence supporting the notion that functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of its operons. M. leprae’s genome includes 1133 pseudogenes and 1614 protein-coding genes and can be compared with the close genome of M. tuberculosis. Assuming M. leprae’s pseudogenes to represent dispensable genes, we have studied the position of these pseudogenes in the operons of M. leprae and of their orthologs in M. tuberculosis. We observed that both tend to be located in the 3′ (downstream) half of the operon (P-values of 0.03 and 0.18, respectively). Analysis of pseudogenes in all available prokaryotic genomes confirms this trend (P-value of 7.1 × 10−7). In a complementary analysis, we found a significant tendency for essential genes to be located at the 5′ (upstream) half of the operon (P-value of 0.006). Our work provides an indication that, in prokarya, functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of operons, while more relevant genes tend to be located toward operon starts. PMID:21051341

  3. The pseudogenes of Mycobacterium leprae reveal the functional relevance of gene order within operons.

    PubMed

    Muro, Enrique M; Mah, Nancy; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-03-01

    Almost 50 years following the discovery of the prokaryotic operon, the functional relevance of gene order within operons remains unclear. In this work, we take advantage of the eroded genome of Mycobacterium leprae to add evidence supporting the notion that functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of its operons. M. leprae's genome includes 1133 pseudogenes and 1614 protein-coding genes and can be compared with the close genome of M. tuberculosis. Assuming M. leprae's pseudogenes to represent dispensable genes, we have studied the position of these pseudogenes in the operons of M. leprae and of their orthologs in M. tuberculosis. We observed that both tend to be located in the 3' (downstream) half of the operon (P-values of 0.03 and 0.18, respectively). Analysis of pseudogenes in all available prokaryotic genomes confirms this trend (P-value of 7.1 × 10(-7)). In a complementary analysis, we found a significant tendency for essential genes to be located at the 5' (upstream) half of the operon (P-value of 0.006). Our work provides an indication that, in prokarya, functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of operons, while more relevant genes tend to be located toward operon starts.

  4. Vulnerabilities in Yersinia pestis caf operon are unveiled by a Salmonella vector.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Jun, SangMu; Thornburg, Theresa; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-01-01

    During infection, Yersinia pestis uses its F1 capsule to enhance survival and cause virulence to mammalian host. Since F1 is produced in large quantities and secreted into the host tissues, it also serves as a major immune target. To hold this detrimental effect under proper control, Y. pestis expresses the caf operon (encoding the F1 capsule) in a temperature-dependent manner. However, additional properties of the caf operon limit its expression. By overexpressing the caf operon in wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under a potent promoter, virulence of Salmonella was greatly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, expression of the caf operon under the regulation of its native promoter exhibited negligible impairment of Salmonellae virulence. In-depth investigation revealed all individual genes in the caf operon attenuated Salmonella when overexpressed. The deleterious effects of caf operon and the caf individual genes were further confirmed when they were overexpressed in Y. pestis KIM6+. This study suggests that by using a weak inducible promoter, the detrimental effects of the caf operon are minimally manifested in Y. pestis. Thus, through tight regulation of the caf operon, Y. pestis precisely balances its capsular anti-phagocytic properties with the detrimental effects of caf during interaction with mammalian host.

  5. The mbo operon is specific and essential for biosynthesis of mangotoxin in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Víctor J; Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús; de Vicente, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin produced by certain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. This toxin is an oligopeptide that inhibits ornithine N-acetyl transferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ornithine and arginine. Previous studies have reported the involvement of the putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase MgoA in virulence and mangotoxin production. In this study, we analyse a new chromosomal region of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, which contains six coding sequences arranged as an operon (mbo operon). The mbo operon was detected in only mangotoxin-producing strains, and it was shown to be essential for the biosynthesis of this toxin. Mutants in each of the six ORFs of the mbo operon were partially or completely impaired in the production of the toxin. In addition, Pseudomonas spp. mangotoxin non-producer strains transformed with the mbo operon gained the ability to produce mangotoxin, indicating that this operon contains all the genetic information necessary for mangotoxin biosynthesis. The generation of a single transcript for the mbo operon was confirmed and supported by the allocation of a unique promoter and Rho-independent terminator. The phylogenetic analysis of the P. syringae strains harbouring the mbo operon revealed that these strains clustered together.

  6. A predictive biophysical model of translational coupling to coordinate and control protein expression in bacterial operons

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Salis, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural and engineered genetic systems require the coordinated expression of proteins. In bacteria, translational coupling provides a genetically encoded mechanism to control expression level ratios within multi-cistronic operons. We have developed a sequence-to-function biophysical model of translational coupling to predict expression level ratios in natural operons and to design synthetic operons with desired expression level ratios. To quantitatively measure ribosome re-initiation rates, we designed and characterized 22 bi-cistronic operon variants with systematically modified intergenic distances and upstream translation rates. We then derived a thermodynamic free energy model to calculate de novo initiation rates as a result of ribosome-assisted unfolding of intergenic RNA structures. The complete biophysical model has only five free parameters, but was able to accurately predict downstream translation rates for 120 synthetic bi-cistronic and tri-cistronic operons with rationally designed intergenic regions and systematically increased upstream translation rates. The biophysical model also accurately predicted the translation rates of the nine protein atp operon, compared to ribosome profiling measurements. Altogether, the biophysical model quantitatively predicts how translational coupling controls protein expression levels in synthetic and natural bacterial operons, providing a deeper understanding of an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism and offering the ability to rationally engineer operons with desired behaviors. PMID:26117546

  7. In silico evolved lac operons exhibit bistability for artificial inducers, but not for lactose.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, M J A; Hogeweg, P

    2006-10-15

    Bistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli has been widely studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, bistability has been observed when E. coli is induced by an artificial, nonmetabolizable, inducer. However, if the lac operon is induced with lactose, the natural inducer, bistability has not been demonstrated. We derive an analytical expression that can predict the occurrence of bistability both for artificial inducers and lactose. We find very different conditions for bistability in the two cases. Indeed, for artificial inducers bistability is predicted, but for lactose the condition for bistability is much more difficult to satisfy. Moreover, we demonstrate that in silico evolution of the lac operon generates an operon that avoids bistability with respect to lactose, but does exhibit bistability with respect to artificial inducers. The activity of this evolved operon strikingly resembles the experimentally observed activity of the operon. Thus our computational experiments suggest that the wild-type lac operon, which regulates lactose metabolism, is not a bistable switch. Nevertheless, for engineering purposes, this operon can be used as a bistable switch with artificial inducers.

  8. Thermodynamic modeling of variations in the rate of RNA chain elongation of E. coli rrn operons.

    PubMed

    Fange, David; Mellenius, Harriet; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2014-01-07

    Previous electron-microscopic imaging has shown high RNA polymerase occupation densities in the 16S and 23S encoding regions and low occupation densities in the noncoding leader, spacer, and trailer regions of the rRNA (rrn) operons in E. coli. This indicates slower transcript elongation within the coding regions and faster elongation within the noncoding regions of the operon. Inactivation of four of the seven rrn operons increases the transcript initiation frequency at the promoters of the three intact operons and reduces the time for RNA polymerase to traverse the operon. We have used the DNA sequence-dependent standard free energy variation of the transcription complex to model the experimentally observed changes in the elongation rate along the rrnB operon. We also model the stimulation of the average transcription rate over the whole operon by increasing rate of transcript initiation. Monte Carlo simulations, taking into account initiation of transcription, translocation, and backward and forward tracking of RNA polymerase, partially reproduce the observed transcript elongation rate variations along the rrn operon and fully account for the increased average rate in response to increased frequency of transcript initiation.

  9. The htpAB operon of Legionella pneumophila cannot be deleted in the presence of the groE chaperonin operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Gagnon, Elizabeth; Orton, Dennis J; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-11-01

    HtpB, the chaperonin of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila , displays several virulence-related functions in vitro. To confirm HtpB's role in vivo, host infections with an htpB deletion mutant would be required. However, we previously reported that the htpAB operon (encoding co-chaperonin and chaperonin) is essential. We attempted here to delete htpAB in a L. pneumophila strain carrying the groE operon (encoding the Escherichia coli co-chaperonin and chaperonin). The groE operon was inserted into the chromosome of L. pneumophila Lp02, and then allelic replacement of htpAB with a gentamicin resistance cassette was attempted. Although numerous potential postallelic replacement transformants showed a correct selection phenotype, we still detected htpAB by PCR and full-size HtpB by immunoblot. Southern blot and PCR analysis indicated that the gentamicin resistance cassette had apparently integrated in a duplicated htpAB region. However, we showed by Southern blot that strain Lp02, and the Lp02 derivative carrying the groE operon, have only one copy of htpAB. These results confirmed that the htpAB operon cannot be deleted, not even in the presence of the groE operon, and suggested that attempts to delete htpAB under strong phenotypic selection result in aberrant genetic recombinations that could involve duplication of the htpAB locus.

  10. narI region of the Escherichia coli nitrate reductase (nar) operon contains two genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sodergren, E J; DeMoss, J A

    1988-01-01

    In previous studies it has been established that in Escherichia coli the three known subunits of anaerobic nitrate reductase are encoded by the narGHI operon. From the nucleotide sequence of the narI region of the operon we conclude that, in addition to the narG and narH genes, the nar operon contains two other open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2, that encode proteins of 26.5 and 25.5 kilodaltons, respectively. Protein fusions to each of the genes in the operon showed that expression of all four genes was similarly regulated. The reading frames of ORF1 and ORF2 were verified, and the N-terminal sequence for the ORF1 fusion protein was determined. The nar operon therefore contains four genes designated and ordered as narGHJI. Images PMID:2832376

  11. Glycopeptide Resistance vanA Operons in Paenibacillus Strains Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Guardabassi, Luca; Perichon, Bruno; van Heijenoort, Jean; Blanot, Didier; Courvalin, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    The sequence and gene organization of the van operons in vancomycin (MIC of >256 μg/ml)- and teicoplanin (MIC of ≥32 μg/ml)-resistant Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus PT-2B1 and Paenibacillus apiarius PA-B2B isolated from soil were determined. Both operons had regulatory (vanR and vanS), resistance (vanH, vanA, and vanX), and accessory (vanY, vanZ, and vanW) genes homologous to the corresponding genes in enterococcal vanA and vanB operons. The vanAPT operon in P. thiaminolyticus PT-2B1 had the same gene organization as that of vanA operons whereas vanAPA in P. apiarius PA-B2B resembled vanB operons due to the presence of vanW upstream from the vanHAX cluster but was closer to vanA operons in sequence. Reference P. apiarius strains NRRL B-4299 and NRRL B-4188 were found to harbor operons indistinguishable from vanAPA by PCR mapping, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and partial sequencing, suggesting that this operon was species specific. As in enterococci, resistance was inducible by glycopeptides and associated with the synthesis of pentadepsipeptide peptidoglycan precursors ending in d-Ala-d-Lac, as demonstrated by d,d-dipeptidase activities, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. The precursors differed from those in enterococci by the presence of diaminopimelic acid instead of lysine in the peptide chain. Altogether, the results are compatible with the notion that van operons in soil Paenibacillus strains and in enterococci have evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:16189102

  12. Glycopeptide resistance vanA operons in Paenibacillus strains isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Guardabassi, Luca; Perichon, Bruno; van Heijenoort, Jean; Blanot, Didier; Courvalin, Patrice

    2005-10-01

    The sequence and gene organization of the van operons in vancomycin (MIC of >256 microg/ml)- and teicoplanin (MIC of > or =32 microg/ml)-resistant Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus PT-2B1 and Paenibacillus apiarius PA-B2B isolated from soil were determined. Both operons had regulatory (vanR and vanS), resistance (vanH, vanA, and vanX), and accessory (vanY, vanZ, and vanW) genes homologous to the corresponding genes in enterococcal vanA and vanB operons. The vanA(PT) operon in P. thiaminolyticus PT-2B1 had the same gene organization as that of vanA operons whereas vanA(PA) in P. apiarius PA-B2B resembled vanB operons due to the presence of vanW upstream from the vanHAX cluster but was closer to vanA operons in sequence. Reference P. apiarius strains NRRL B-4299 and NRRL B-4188 were found to harbor operons indistinguishable from vanA(PA) by PCR mapping, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and partial sequencing, suggesting that this operon was species specific. As in enterococci, resistance was inducible by glycopeptides and associated with the synthesis of pentadepsipeptide peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-Ala-D-Lac, as demonstrated by D,D-dipeptidase activities, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. The precursors differed from those in enterococci by the presence of diaminopimelic acid instead of lysine in the peptide chain. Altogether, the results are compatible with the notion that van operons in soil Paenibacillus strains and in enterococci have evolved from a common ancestor.

  13. Insights into arsenic multi-operons expression and resistance mechanisms in Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chungui; Zhang, Yi; Chan, Zhuhua; Chen, Shicheng; Yang, Suping

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is widespread in the environment and causes numerous health problems. Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been regarded as a good model organism for studying arsenic detoxification since it was first demonstrated to methylate environmental arsenic by conversion to soluble or gaseous methylated species. However, the detailed arsenic resistance mechanisms remain unknown though there are at least three arsenic-resistance operons (ars1, ars2, and ars3) in R. palustris. In this study, we investigated how arsenic multi-operons contributed to arsenic detoxification in R. palustris. The expression of ars2 or ars3 operons increased with increasing environmental arsenite (As(III)) concentrations (up to 1.0 mM) while transcript of ars1 operon was not detected in the middle log-phase (55 h). ars2 operon was actively expressed even at the low concentration of As(III) (0.01 μM), whereas the ars3 operon was expressed at 1.0 μM of As(III), indicating that there was a differential regulation mechanism for the three arsenic operons. Furthermore, ars2 and ars3 operons were maximally transcribed in the early log-phase where ars2 operon was 5.4-fold higher than that of ars3 operon. A low level of ars1 transcript was only detected at 43 h (early log-phase). Arsenic speciation analysis demonstrated that R. palustris could reduce As(V) to As(III). Collectively, strain CGA009 detoxified arsenic by using arsenic reduction and methylating arsenic mechanism, while the latter might occur with the presence of higher concentrations of arsenic. PMID:26441915

  14. The rise of operon-like gene clusters in plants.

    PubMed

    Boycheva, Svetlana; Daviet, Laurent; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B

    2014-07-01

    Gene clusters are common features of prokaryotic genomes also present in eukaryotes. Most clustered genes known are involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Although horizontal gene transfer is a primary source of prokaryotic gene cluster (operon) formation and has been reported to occur in eukaryotes, the predominant source of cluster formation in eukaryotes appears to arise de novo or through gene duplication followed by neo- and sub-functionalization or translocation. Here we aim to provide an overview of the current knowledge and open questions related to plant gene cluster functioning, assembly, and regulation. We also present potential research approaches and point out the benefits of a better understanding of gene clusters in plants for both fundamental and applied plant science. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. RNA polymerase structure and function at lac operon.

    PubMed

    Borukhov, Sergei; Lee, Jookyung

    2005-06-01

    Transcription of E. coli lac operon by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a classic example of how the basic functions of this enzyme, specifically the ability to recognize/bind promoters, melt the DNA and initiate RNA synthesis, is positively regulated by transcription activators, such as cyclic AMP-receptor protein, CRP, and negatively regulated by lac-repressor, LacI. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in structural and biochemical studies of RNAP and its binary and ternary complexes with CRP and lac promoter. With structural information now available for RNAP and models of binary and ternary elongation complexes, the interaction between these factors and RNAP can be modeled, and possible molecular mechanisms of their action can be inferred.

  16. Evolution of mal ABC transporter operons in the Thermococcales and Thermotogales

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The mal genes that encode maltose transporters have undergone extensive lateral transfer among ancestors of the archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus. Bacterial hyperthermophiles of the order Thermotogales live among these archaea and so may have shared in these transfers. The genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima bears evidence of extensive acquisition of archaeal genes, so its ancestors clearly had the capacity to do so. We examined deep phylogenetic relationships among the mal genes of these hyperthermophiles and their close relatives to look for evidence of shared ancestry. Results We demonstrate that the two maltose ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter operons now found in Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus (termed mal and mdx genes, respectively) are not closely related to one another. The Tc. litoralis and P. furiosus mal genes are most closely related to bacterial mal genes while their respective mdx genes are archaeal. The genes of the two mal operons in Tt. maritima are not related to genes in either of these archaeal operons. They are highly similar to one another and belong to a phylogenetic lineage that includes mal genes from the enteric bacteria. A unique domain of the enteric MalF membrane spanning proteins found also in these Thermotogales MalF homologs supports their relatively close relationship with these enteric proteins. Analyses of genome sequence data from other Thermotogales species, Fervidobacterium nodosum, Thermosipho melanesiensis, Thermotoga petrophila, Thermotoga lettingae, and Thermotoga neapolitana, revealed a third apparent mal operon, absent from the published genome sequence of Tt. maritima strain MSB8. This third operon, mal3, is more closely related to the Thermococcales' bacteria-derived mal genes than are mal1 and mal2. F. nodosum, Ts. melanesiensis, and Tt. lettingae have only one of the mal1-mal2 paralogs. The mal2 operon from an unknown species of Thermotoga appears to have been horizontally

  17. Engineering adherent bacteria by creating a single synthetic curli operon.

    PubMed

    Drogue, Benoît; Thomas, Philippe; Balvay, Laurent; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Dorel, Corinne

    2012-11-16

    The method described here consists in redesigning E. coli adherence properties by assembling the minimum number of curli genes under the control of a strong and metal-overinducible promoter, and in visualizing and quantifying the resulting gain of bacterial adherence. This method applies appropriate engineering principles of abstraction and standardization of synthetic biology, and results in the BBa_K540000 Biobrick (Best new Biobrick device, engineered, iGEM 2011). The first step consists in the design of the synthetic operon devoted to curli overproduction in response to metal, and therefore in increasing the adherence abilities of the wild type strain. The original curli operon was modified in silico in order to optimize transcriptional and translational signals and escape the "natural" regulation of curli. This approach allowed to test with success our current understanding of curli production. Moreover, simplifying the curli regulation by switching the endogenous complex promoter (more than 10 transcriptional regulators identified) to a simple metal-regulated promoter makes adherence much easier to control. The second step includes qualitative and quantitative assessment of adherence abilities by implementation of simple methods. These methods are applicable to a large range of adherent bacteria regardless of biological structures involved in biofilm formation. Adherence test in 24-well polystyrene plates provides a quick preliminary visualization of the bacterial biofilm after crystal violet staining. This qualitative test can be sharpened by the quantification of the percentage of adherence. Such a method is very simple but more accurate than only crystal violet staining as described previously with both a good repeatability and reproducibility. Visualization of GFP-tagged bacteria on glass slides by fluorescence or laser confocal microscopy allows to strengthen the results obtained with the 24-well plate test by direct observation of the phenomenon.

  18. Engineering Adherent Bacteria by Creating a Single Synthetic Curli Operon

    PubMed Central

    Drogue, Benoît; Thomas, Philippe; Balvay, Laurent; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Dorel, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    The method described here consists in redesigning E. coli adherence properties by assembling the minimum number of curli genes under the control of a strong and metal-overinducible promoter, and in visualizing and quantifying the resulting gain of bacterial adherence. This method applies appropriate engineering principles of abstraction and standardization of synthetic biology, and results in the BBa_K540000 Biobrick (Best new Biobrick device, engineered, iGEM 2011). The first step consists in the design of the synthetic operon devoted to curli overproduction in response to metal, and therefore in increasing the adherence abilities of the wild type strain. The original curli operon was modified in silico in order to optimize transcriptional and translational signals and escape the "natural" regulation of curli. This approach allowed to test with success our current understanding of curli production. Moreover, simplifying the curli regulation by switching the endogenous complex promoter (more than 10 transcriptional regulators identified) to a simple metal-regulated promoter makes adherence much easier to control. The second step includes qualitative and quantitative assessment of adherence abilities by implementation of simple methods. These methods are applicable to a large range of adherent bacteria regardless of biological structures involved in biofilm formation. Adherence test in 24-well polystyrene plates provides a quick preliminary visualization of the bacterial biofilm after crystal violet staining. This qualitative test can be sharpened by the quantification of the percentage of adherence. Such a method is very simple but more accurate than only crystal violet staining as described previously 1 with both a good repeatability and reproducibility. Visualization of GFP-tagged bacteria on glass slides by fluorescence or laser confocal microscopy allows to strengthen the results obtained with the 24-well plate test by direct observation of the phenomenon. PMID

  19. Identification and Characterization of the fis Operon in Enteric Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Michael B.; Osuna, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The small DNA binding protein Fis is involved in several different biological processes in Escherichia coli. It has been shown to stimulate DNA inversion reactions mediated by the Hin family of recombinases, stimulate integration and excision of phage λ genome, regulate the transcription of several different genes including those of stable RNA operons, and regulate the initiation of DNA replication at oriC. fis has also been isolated from Salmonella typhimurium, and the genomic sequence of Haemophilus influenzae reveals its presence in this bacteria. This work extends the characterization of fis to other organisms. Very similar fis operon structures were identified in the enteric bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Proteus vulgaris but not in several nonenteric bacteria. We found that the deduced amino acid sequences for Fis are 100% identical in K. pneumoniae, S. marcescens, E. coli, and S. typhimurium and 96 to 98% identical when E. carotovora and P. vulgaris Fis are considered. The deduced amino acid sequence for H. influenzae Fis is about 80% identical and 90% similar to Fis in enteric bacteria. However, in spite of these similarities, the E. carotovora, P. vulgaris, and H. influenzae Fis proteins are not functionally identical. An open reading frame (ORF1) preceding fis in E. coli is also found in all these bacteria, and their deduced amino acid sequences are also very similar. The sequence preceding ORF1 in the enteric bacteria showed a very strong similarity to the E. coli fis P region from −53 to +27 and the region around −116 containing an ihf binding site. Both β-galactosidase assays and primer extension assays showed that these regions function as promoters in vivo and are subject to growth phase-dependent regulation. However, their promoter strengths vary, as do their responses to Fis autoregulation and integration host factor stimulation. PMID:9811652

  20. Identification and characterization of the fis operon in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beach, M B; Osuna, R

    1998-11-01

    The small DNA binding protein Fis is involved in several different biological processes in Escherichia coli. It has been shown to stimulate DNA inversion reactions mediated by the Hin family of recombinases, stimulate integration and excision of phage lambda genome, regulate the transcription of several different genes including those of stable RNA operons, and regulate the initiation of DNA replication at oriC. fis has also been isolated from Salmonella typhimurium, and the genomic sequence of Haemophilus influenzae reveals its presence in this bacteria. This work extends the characterization of fis to other organisms. Very similar fis operon structures were identified in the enteric bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Proteus vulgaris but not in several nonenteric bacteria. We found that the deduced amino acid sequences for Fis are 100% identical in K. pneumoniae, S. marcescens, E. coli, and S. typhimurium and 96 to 98% identical when E. carotovora and P. vulgaris Fis are considered. The deduced amino acid sequence for H. influenzae Fis is about 80% identical and 90% similar to Fis in enteric bacteria. However, in spite of these similarities, the E. carotovora, P. vulgaris, and H. influenzae Fis proteins are not functionally identical. An open reading frame (ORF1) preceding fis in E. coli is also found in all these bacteria, and their deduced amino acid sequences are also very similar. The sequence preceding ORF1 in the enteric bacteria showed a very strong similarity to the E. coli fis P region from -53 to +27 and the region around -116 containing an ihf binding site. Both beta-galactosidase assays and primer extension assays showed that these regions function as promoters in vivo and are subject to growth phase-dependent regulation. However, their promoter strengths vary, as do their responses to Fis autoregulation and integration host factor stimulation.

  1. A portable lab-on-a-chip instrument based on MCE with dual top-bottom capacitive coupled contactless conductivity detector in replaceable cell cartridge.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Kambiz; Ying, Jasmine Yuen Shu; Hauser, Peter C; de Rooij, Nico F; Rodriguez, Isabel

    2013-05-01

    A new design for a compact portable lab-on-a-chip instrument based on MCE and dual capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (dC(4) D) is described. The instrument is battery powered with total dimension of 14 × 25 × 8 cm(3) (w × l × h), and weighs 1.2 kg. The device consists of a front electrophoresis compartment which has the chip holder and the chip, the associated high-voltage electrodes for electrophoresis injection and separation and the detector. The detection cell is integrated into the device housing with an exchangeable plug-and-play cartridge format. The design of the dC(4) D cell has been optimized for maximum performance. The cartridge includes the top-bottom excitation and pick up electrodes incorporated into the cell and connected to push-pull self-latching pins that are insulated with plastic. The metal frame of the cartridge is grounded completely to eliminate electronic interferences. The cartridge is designed to clamp a thin fluidic chip at the detection point. The cartridges are replaceable whereby different cartridges have different detection electrode configurations to employ according to the sensitivity or resolution needed in the specific analytical application. The second compartment consists of all the electronics, data acquisition card, high-voltage modules of up to ±5 kV both polarity, and batteries for 10 h of operation. The improved detector performance is illustrated by the electrophoresis analysis of six cations (NH4 (+) , K(+) , Ca(2+) , Na(+) , Mg(2+) , Li(+) ) with a detection limit of approximately 5 μM and the analysis of the anions (Br(-) , Cl(-) , NO2 (-) , NO3 (-) , SO4 (2-) , F(-) ) with a detection limit of about 3 μM. Analytical capabilities of the instrument for food and medical applications were evaluated by simultaneous detection of organic and inorganic acids in fruit juice and inorganic cations and anions in rabbit blood samples and human urine samples are also demonstrated. © 2013 WILEY

  2. Gene components responsible for discrete substrate specificity in the metabolism of biphenyl (bph operon) and toluene (tod operon).

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, K; Hirose, J; Suyama, A; Zaiki, T; Hayashida, S

    1993-01-01

    bph operons coding for biphenyl-polychlorinated biphenyl degradation in Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and Pseudomonas putida KF715 and tod operons coding for toluene-benzene metabolism in P. putida F1 are very similar in gene organization as well as size and homology of the corresponding enzymes (G. J. Zylstra and D. T. Gibson, J. Biol. Chem. 264:14940-14946, 1989; K. Taira, J. Hirose, S. Hayashida, and K. Furukawa, J. Biol. Chem. 267:4844-4853, 1992), despite their discrete substrate ranges for metabolism. The gene components responsible for substrate specificity between the bph and tod operons were investigated. The large subunit of the terminal dioxygenase (encoded by bphA1 and todC1) and the ring meta-cleavage compound hydrolase (bphD and todF) were critical for their discrete metabolic specificities, as shown by the following results. (i) Introduction of todC1C2 (coding for the large and small subunits of the terminal dioxygenase in toluene metabolism) or even only todC1 into biphenyl-utilizing P. pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and P. putida KF715 allowed them to grow on toluene-benzene by coupling with the lower benzoate meta-cleavage pathway. Introduction of the bphD gene (coding for 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoate hydrolase) into toluene-utilizing P. putida F1 permitted growth on biphenyl. (ii) With various bph and tod mutant strains, it was shown that enzyme components of ferredoxin (encoded by bphA3 and todB), ferredoxin reductase (bphA4 and todA), and dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (bphB and todD) were complementary with one another. (iii) Escherichia coli cells carrying a hybrid gene cluster of todClbphA2A3A4BC (constructed by replacing bphA1 with todC1) converted toluene to a ring meta-cleavage 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-hepta-2,4-dienoic acid, indicating that TodC1 formed a functional multicomponent dioxygenase associated with BphA2 (a small subunit of the terminal dioxygenase in biphenyl metabolism), BphA3, and BphA4. PMID:8349562

  3. Regulation of gene expression: Cryptic β-glucoside (bgl) operon of Escherichia coli as a paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Harwani, Dharmesh

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to extract utilizable substrates from available resources and consequently acquire fitness advantage over competitors. One of the strategies is the exploitation of cryptic cellular functions encoded by genetic systems that are silent under laboratory conditions, such as the bgl (β-glucoside) operon of E. coli. The bgl operon of Escherichia coli, involved in the uptake and utilization of aromatic β-glucosides salicin and arbutin, is maintained in a silent state in the wild type organism by the presence of structural elements in the regulatory region. This operon can be activated by mutations that disrupt these negative elements. The fact that the silent bgl operon is retained without accumulating deleterious mutations seems paradoxical from an evolutionary view point. Although this operon appears to be silent, specific physiological conditions might be able to regulate its expression and/or the operon might be carrying out function(s) apart from the utilization of aromatic β-glucosides. This is consistent with the observations that the activated operon confers a Growth Advantage in Stationary Phase (GASP) phenotype to Bgl+ cells and exerts its regulation on at least twelve downstream target genes. PMID:25763016

  4. The role of FIS in trans activation of stable RNA operons of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L; Vanet, A; Vijgenboom, E; Bosch, L

    1990-03-01

    The thrU(tufB) operon of Escherichia coli is endowed with a cis-acting region upstream of the promoter, designated UAS for Upstream Activator Sequence. A protein fraction has been isolated that binds specifically to DNA fragments of the UAS, thus forming three protein-DNA complexes corresponding to three binding sites on the UAS. It stimulates in vitro transcription of the operon by facilitating the binding of the RNA polymerase to the promoter. All three protein-DNA complexes contain one and the same protein. Dissociation constants for the three complexes have been determined, the lowest being in the sub-nanomolar range. The protein also binds to the UAS of the tyrT operon and to the UAS upstream of the P1 promoter of the rrnB operon, suggesting that transcription of the three operons, if not of more stable RNA operons, is activated by a common trans activator. We demonstrate that the E.coli protein FIS (Factor for Inversion Stimulation) also binds to the UAS of the thrU(tufB) operon forming three protein-DNA complexes. A burst of UAS- and FIS-dependent promoter activity is observed after reinitiation of growth of stationary cultures in fresh medium.

  5. N-acetylgalatosamine-Mediated Regulation of the aga Operon by AgaR in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Ahmed, Hifza; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we analyze the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to N-acetylgalactosamine (NAGa). Transcriptome comparison of S. pneumoniae D39 grown in NAGaM17 (0.5% NAGa + M17) to that grown in GM17 (0.5% Glucose + M17) revealed the elevated expression of various carbon metabolic genes/operons, including a PTS operon (denoted here as the aga operon), which is putatively involved in NAGa transport and utilization, in the presence of NAGa. We further studied the role of a GntR-family transcriptional regulator (denoted here as AgaR) in the regulation of aga operon. Our transcriptome and RT-PCR data suggest the role of AgaR as a transcriptional repressor of the aga operon. We predicted a 20-bp operator site of AagR (5′-ATAATTAATATAACAACAAA-3′) in the promoter region of the aga operon (PbgaC), which was further verified by mutating the AgaR operator site in the respective promoter. The role of CcpA in the additional regulation of the aga operon was elucidated by further transcriptome analyses and confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. PMID:27672623

  6. Regulation of gene expression: cryptic β-glucoside (bgl) operon of Escherichia coli as a paradigm.

    PubMed

    Harwani, Dharmesh

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to extract utilizable substrates from available resources and consequently acquire fitness advantage over competitors. One of the strategies is the exploitation of cryptic cellular functions encoded by genetic systems that are silent under laboratory conditions, such as the bgl (β-glucoside) operon of E. coli. The bgl operon of Escherichia coli, involved in the uptake and utilization of aromatic β-glucosides salicin and arbutin, is maintained in a silent state in the wild type organism by the presence of structural elements in the regulatory region. This operon can be activated by mutations that disrupt these negative elements. The fact that the silent bgl operon is retained without accumulating deleterious mutations seems paradoxical from an evolutionary view point. Although this operon appears to be silent, specific physiological conditions might be able to regulate its expression and/or the operon might be carrying out function(s) apart from the utilization of aromatic β-glucosides. This is consistent with the observations that the activated operon confers a Growth Advantage in Stationary Phase (GASP) phenotype to Bgl(+) cells and exerts its regulation on at least twelve downstream target genes.

  7. Evolution of the capsular operon of Streptococcus iniae in response to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Millard, Candice M; Baiano, Justice C F; Chan, Candy; Yuen, Benedict; Aviles, Fabian; Landos, Matt; Chong, Roger S M; Benedict, Suresh; Barnes, Andrew C

    2012-12-01

    Streptococcus iniae causes severe septicemia and meningitis in farmed fish and is also occasionally zoonotic. Vaccination against S. iniae is problematic, with frequent breakdown of protection in vaccinated fish. The major protective antigens in S. iniae are the polysaccharides of the capsule, which are essential for virulence. Capsular biosynthesis is driven and regulated by a 21-kb operon comprising up to 20 genes. In a long-term study, we have sequenced the capsular operon of strains that have been used in autogenous vaccines across Australia and compared it with the capsular operon sequences of strains subsequently isolated from infected vaccinated fish. Intriguingly, strains isolated from vaccinated fish that subsequently become infected have coding mutations that are confined to a limited number of genes in the cps operon, with the remainder of the genes in the operon remaining stable. Mutations in strains in diseased vaccinated fish occur in key genes in the capsular operon that are associated with polysaccharide configuration (cpsG) and with regulation of biosynthesis (cpsD and cpsE). This, along with high ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations within the cps genes, suggests that immune response directed predominantly against capsular polysaccharide may be driving evolution in a very specific set of genes in the operon. From these data, it may be possible to design a simple polyvalent vaccine with a greater operational life span than the current monovalent killed bacterins.

  8. Evolution of the Capsular Operon of Streptococcus iniae in Response to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Candice M.; Baiano, Justice C. F.; Chan, Candy; Yuen, Benedict; Aviles, Fabian; Landos, Matt; Chong, Roger S. M.; Benedict, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae causes severe septicemia and meningitis in farmed fish and is also occasionally zoonotic. Vaccination against S. iniae is problematic, with frequent breakdown of protection in vaccinated fish. The major protective antigens in S. iniae are the polysaccharides of the capsule, which are essential for virulence. Capsular biosynthesis is driven and regulated by a 21-kb operon comprising up to 20 genes. In a long-term study, we have sequenced the capsular operon of strains that have been used in autogenous vaccines across Australia and compared it with the capsular operon sequences of strains subsequently isolated from infected vaccinated fish. Intriguingly, strains isolated from vaccinated fish that subsequently become infected have coding mutations that are confined to a limited number of genes in the cps operon, with the remainder of the genes in the operon remaining stable. Mutations in strains in diseased vaccinated fish occur in key genes in the capsular operon that are associated with polysaccharide configuration (cpsG) and with regulation of biosynthesis (cpsD and cpsE). This, along with high ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations within the cps genes, suggests that immune response directed predominantly against capsular polysaccharide may be driving evolution in a very specific set of genes in the operon. From these data, it may be possible to design a simple polyvalent vaccine with a greater operational life span than the current monovalent killed bacterins. PMID:23001668

  9. Interplay of gene expression noise and ultrasensitive dynamics affects bacterial operon organization.

    PubMed

    Ray, J Christian J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organized into polycistronic cotranscribed operons, but the evolutionary pressures maintaining them are unclear. We hypothesized that operons alter gene expression noise characteristics, resulting in selection for or against maintaining operons depending on network architecture. Mathematical models for 6 functional classes of network modules showed that three classes exhibited decreased noise and 3 exhibited increased noise with same-operon cotranscription of interacting proteins. Noise reduction was often associated with a decreased chance of reaching an ultrasensitive threshold. Stochastic simulations of the lac operon demonstrated that the predicted effects of transcriptional coupling hold for a complex network module. We employed bioinformatic analysis to find overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon organization compared with randomized controls. Among constitutively expressed physically interacting protein pairs, higher coupling frequencies appeared at lower expression levels, where noise effects are expected to be dominant. Our results thereby suggest an important role for gene expression noise, in many cases interacting with an ultrasensitive switch, in maintaining or selecting for operons in bacterial chromosomes.

  10. Structural analysis of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae-RTX-toxin I (ApxI) operon.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R; Briaire, J; Kamp, E M; Gielkens, A L; Smits, M A

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae-RTX-toxin I (ApxI), an important virulence factor, is secreted by serotypes 1, 5, 9, 10, and 11 of A. pleuropneumoniae. However, sequences homologous to the secretion genes apxIBD of the ApxI operon are present in all 12 serotypes except serotype 3. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the structures of the ApxI operons of the 12 A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes. We focused on the nucleotide sequence comparison of the ApxI-coding genes, the structures of the ApxI operons, and the transcription of the ApxI operons. We determined the nucleotide sequences of the toxin-encoding apxICA genes of serotype 9 and found that the gene for the structural toxin, apxIA, was almost identical to the apxIA gene of serotype 1. The toxin-encoding genes of the other serotypes are also similar for the main part; nevertheless, two variants were identified, one in serotypes 1, 9, and 11 and one in serotypes 5 and 10. The two apxIA variants differ mainly within the distal 110 nucleotides. Structural analysis demonstrated that intact ApxI operons, consisting of the four contiguous genes apxICABD, are present in serotypes 1, 5, 9, 10, and 11. ApxI operons with a major deletion in the apxICA genes are present in serotypes 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 12. Serotype 3 does not contain ApxI operon sequences. We found that all ApxI operons are transcriptionally active despite the partial deletion of the operon in some serotypes. The implications of these data for the expression and secretion of ApxI and the other Apx-toxins, ApxII and ApxIII, as well as for the development of a subunit vaccine against A. pleuropneumoniae will be discussed. Images PMID:8359891

  11. Cloning and sequencing of part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, H; Hotokezaka, H; Ohara, N; Kimura, M; Takagi, O; Yamada, T

    1997-06-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the 5.2 kb EcoRI fragment that contained part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4. The order of the ribosomal protein genes was identical to that of the S10 operon of Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequences of ribosomal proteins in this operon displayed significant homologies (65.3%-100%) to those of H. influenzae, E. coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Phylogenetic trees obtained for these ribosomal proteins were similar to that obtained for 16S rRNA.

  12. Ancient Origin of the Tryptophan Operon and the Dynamics of Evolutionary Change†

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gary; Keyhani, Nemat O.; Bonner; Jensen, Roy A.

    2003-01-01

    The seven conserved enzymatic domains required for tryptophan (Trp) biosynthesis are encoded in seven genetic regions that are organized differently (whole-pathway operons, multiple partial-pathway operons, and dispersed genes) in prokaryotes. A comparative bioinformatics evaluation of the conservation and organization of the genes of Trp biosynthesis in prokaryotic operons should serve as an excellent model for assessing the feasibility of predicting the evolutionary histories of genes and operons associated with other biochemical pathways. These comparisons should provide a better understanding of possible explanations for differences in operon organization in different organisms at a genomics level. These analyses may also permit identification of some of the prevailing forces that dictated specific gene rearrangements during the course of evolution. Operons concerned with Trp biosynthesis in prokaryotes have been in a dynamic state of flux. Analysis of closely related organisms among the Bacteria at various phylogenetic nodes reveals many examples of operon scission, gene dispersal, gene fusion, gene scrambling, and gene loss from which the direction of evolutionary events can be deduced. Two milestone evolutionary events have been mapped to the 16S rRNA tree of Bacteria, one splitting the operon in two, and the other rejoining it by gene fusion. The Archaea, though less resolved due to a lesser genome representation, appear to exhibit more gene scrambling than the Bacteria. The trp operon appears to have been an ancient innovation; it was already present in the common ancestor of Bacteria and Archaea. Although the operon has been subjected, even in recent times, to dynamic changes in gene rearrangement, the ancestral gene order can be deduced with confidence. The evolutionary history of the genes of the pathway is discernible in rough outline as a vertical line of descent, with events of lateral gene transfer or paralogy enriching the analysis as interesting

  13. Physiological control and regulation of the Rhodobacter capsulatus cbb operons.

    PubMed

    Paoli, G C; Vichivanives, P; Tabita, F R

    1998-08-01

    The genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) reductive pentose phosphate pathway in Rhodobacter capsulatus are organized in at least two operons, each preceded by a separate cbbR gene, encoding potential LysR-type transcriptional activators. As a prelude to studies of cbb gene regulation in R. capsulatus, the nucleotide sequence of a 4,537-bp region, which included cbbRII, was determined. This region contained the following open reading frames: a partial pgm gene (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and a complete qor gene (encoding NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase), followed by cbbRII, cbbF (encoding fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase), cbbP (encoding phosphoribulokinase), and part of cbbT (encoding transketolase). Physiological control of the CBB pathway and regulation of the R. capsulatus cbb genes were studied by using a combination of mutant strains and promoter fusion constructs. Characterization of mutant strains revealed that either form I or form II ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), encoded by the cbbLS and cbbM genes, respectively, could support photoheterotrophic and autotrophic growth. A strain with disruptions in both cbbL and cbbM could not grow autotrophically and grew photoheterotrophically only when dimethyl sulfoxide was added to the culture medium. Disruption of cbbP resulted in a strain that did not synthesize form II RubisCO and had a phenotype similar to that observed in the RubisCO-minus strain, suggesting that there is only one cbbP gene in R. capsulatus and that this gene is cotranscribed with cbbM. Analysis of RubisCO activity and synthesis in strains with disruptions in either cbbRI or cbbRII, and beta-galactosidase determinations from wild-type and mutant strains containing cbbIp- and cbbIIp-lacZ fusion constructs, indicated that the cbbI and cbbII operons of R. capsulatus are within separate CbbR regulons.

  14. Quantitative approaches to the study of bistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the history and importance of the lac operon in the development of molecular and systems biology are briefly reviewed. We start by presenting a description of the regulatory mechanisms in this operon, taking into account the most recent discoveries. Then we offer a survey of the history of the lac operon, including the discovery of its main elements and the subsequent influence on the development of molecular and systems biology. Next the bistable behaviour of the operon is discussed, both with respect to its discovery and its molecular origin. A review of the literature in which this bistable phenomenon has been studied from a mathematical modelling viewpoint is then given. We conclude with some brief remarks. PMID:18426771

  15. Incorporation of a horizontally transferred gene into an operon during cnidarian evolution.

    PubMed

    Dana, Catherine E; Glauber, Kristine M; Chan, Titus A; Bridge, Diane M; Steele, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing has revealed examples of horizontally transferred genes, but we still know little about how such genes are incorporated into their host genomes. We have previously reported the identification of a gene (flp) that appears to have entered the Hydra genome through horizontal transfer. Here we provide additional evidence in support of our original hypothesis that the transfer was from a unicellular organism, and we show that the transfer occurred in an ancestor of two medusozoan cnidarian species. In addition we show that the gene is part of a bicistronic operon in the Hydra genome. These findings identify a new animal phylum in which trans-spliced leader addition has led to the formation of operons, and define the requirements for evolution of an operon in Hydra. The identification of operons in Hydra also provides a tool that can be exploited in the construction of transgenic Hydra strains.

  16. Incorporation of a Horizontally Transferred Gene into an Operon during Cnidarian Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Catherine E.; Glauber, Kristine M.; Chan, Titus A.; Bridge, Diane M.; Steele, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing has revealed examples of horizontally transferred genes, but we still know little about how such genes are incorporated into their host genomes. We have previously reported the identification of a gene (flp) that appears to have entered the Hydra genome through horizontal transfer. Here we provide additional evidence in support of our original hypothesis that the transfer was from a unicellular organism, and we show that the transfer occurred in an ancestor of two medusozoan cnidarian species. In addition we show that the gene is part of a bicistronic operon in the Hydra genome. These findings identify a new animal phylum in which trans-spliced leader addition has led to the formation of operons, and define the requirements for evolution of an operon in Hydra. The identification of operons in Hydra also provides a tool that can be exploited in the construction of transgenic Hydra strains. PMID:22328943

  17. Identification and sequence analysis of lpfABCDE, a putative fimbrial operon of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, A J; Heffron, F

    1995-01-01

    A chromosomal region present in Salmonella typhimurium but absent from related species was identified by hybridization. A DNA probe originating from 78 min on the S. typhimurium chromosome hybridized with DNA from Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella heidelberg, and Salmonella dublin but not with DNA from Salmonella typhi, Salmonella arizonae, Escherichia coli, and Shigella serotypes. Cloning and sequence analysis revealed that the corresponding region of the S. typhimurium chromosome encodes a fimbrial operon. Long fimbriae inserted at the poles of the bacterium were observed by electron microscopy when this fimbrial operon was introduced into a nonpiliated E. coli strain. The genes encoding these fimbriae were therefore termed lpfABCDE, for long polar fimbriae. Genetically, the lpf operon was found to be most closely related to the fim operon of S. typhimurium, both in gene order and in conservation of the deduced amino acid sequences. PMID:7721701

  18. An overlap between operons involved in carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Young, D A; Rudzik, M B; Marrs, B L

    1992-08-15

    A new example of superoperonal gene arrangement has been documented in the Rhodobacter capsulatus photosynthetic gene cluster. The promoter for the operon initiated by the bchI gene is embedded within an upstream operon for carotenoid synthesis. The stop codon for the crtA gene, the only gene in the first operon, overlaps the start codon of the downstream bchI gene. As a consequence of this overlap, the promoter(s) for the bch operon must be located within the crtA structural gene. The bchI gene is shown here for the first time to be required for the conversion of protoporphyrin IX to subsequent intermediates in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis.

  19. Parallel Evolution and Horizontal Gene Transfer of the pst Operon in Firmicutes from Oligotrophic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Olmedo, Gabriela; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Martinez-Castilla, Leon; Souza, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The high affinity phosphate transport system (pst) is crucial for phosphate uptake in oligotrophic environments. Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB) has extremely low P levels and its endemic Bacillus are closely related to oligotrophic marine Firmicutes. Thus, we expected the pst operon of CCB to share the same evolutionary history and protein similarity to marine Firmicutes. Orthologs of the pst operon were searched in 55 genomes of Firmicutes and 13 outgroups. Phylogenetic reconstructions were performed for the pst operon and 14 concatenated housekeeping genes using maximum likelihood methods. Conserved domains and 3D structures of the phosphate-binding protein (PstS) were also analyzed. The pst operon of Firmicutes shows two highly divergent clades with no correlation to the type of habitat nor a phylogenetic congruence, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Despite sequence divergence, the PstS protein had a similar 3D structure, which could be due to parallel evolution after horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:21461370

  20. Quantitative approaches to the study of bistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C

    2008-08-06

    In this paper, the history and importance of the lac operon in the development of molecular and systems biology are briefly reviewed. We start by presenting a description of the regulatory mechanisms in this operon, taking into account the most recent discoveries. Then we offer a survey of the history of the lac operon, including the discovery of its main elements and the subsequent influence on the development of molecular and systems biology. Next the bistable behaviour of the operon is discussed, both with respect to its discovery and its molecular origin. A review of the literature in which this bistable phenomenon has been studied from a mathematical modelling viewpoint is then given. We conclude with some brief remarks.

  1. Exploiting Bacterial Operons To Illuminate Human Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Banci, Lucia; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Organisms from all kingdoms of life use iron-sulfur proteins (FeS-Ps) in a multitude of functional processes. We applied a bioinformatics approach to investigate the human portfolio of FeS-Ps. Sixty-one percent of human FeS-Ps bind Fe4S4 clusters, whereas 39% bind Fe2S2 clusters. However, this relative ratio varies significantly depending on the specific cellular compartment. We compared the portfolio of human FeS-Ps to 12 other eukaryotes and to about 700 prokaryotes. The comparative analysis of the organization of the prokaryotic homologues of human FeS-Ps within operons allowed us to reconstruct the human functional networks involving the conserved FeS-Ps common to prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These functional networks have been maintained during evolution and thus presumably represent fundamental cellular processes. The respiratory chain and the ISC machinery for FeS-P biogenesis are the two conserved processes that involve the majority of human FeS-Ps. Purine metabolism is another process including several FeS-Ps, in which BOLA proteins possibly have a regulatory role. The analysis of the co-occurrence of human FeS-Ps with other proteins highlighted numerous links between the iron-sulfur cluster machinery and the response mechanisms to cell damage, from repair to apoptosis. This relationship probably relates to the production of reactive oxygen species within the biogenesis and degradation of FeS-Ps.

  2. Anaerobically expressed Escherichia coli genes identified by operon fusion techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, M; Reznikoff, W S

    1991-01-01

    Genes that are expressed under anaerobic conditions were identified by operon fusion techniques with a hybrid bacteriophage of lambda and Mu, lambda placMu53, which creates transcriptional fusions to lacZY. Cells were screened for anaerobic expression on XG medium. Nine strains were selected, and the insertion point of the hybrid phage in each strain was mapped on the Escherichia coli chromosome linkage map. The anaerobic and aerobic expression levels of these genes were measured by beta-galactosidase assays in different medium conditions and in the presence of three regulatory mutations (fnr, narL, and rpoN). The anaerobically expressed genes (aeg) located at minute 99 (aeg-99) and 75 (aeg-75) appeared to be partially regulated by fnr, and aeg-93 is tightly regulated by fnr. aeg-60 requires a functional rpoN gene for its anaerobic expression. aeg-46.5 is repressed by narL. aeg-65A and aeg-65C are partially controlled by fnr but only in media containing nitrate or fumarate. aeg-47.5 and aeg-48.5 were found to be anaerobically induced only in rich media. The effects of a narL mutation on aeg-46.5 expression were observed in all medium conditions regardless of the presence or absence of nitrate. This suggests that narL has a regulatory function in the absence of exogenously added nitrate. PMID:1917846

  3. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    PubMed Central

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  4. Comparative functional analysis of the lac operons in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Loughman, Jennifer A; Caparon, Michael G

    2007-04-01

    Having no known environmental reservoir, Streptococcus pyogenes, a bacterium responsible for a wider variety of human diseases than any other bacterial species, must rely on its host for metabolic substrates. Although a streptococcal aldolase, LacD.1, has been adapted to virulence gene regulation, both LacD.1 and a paralogous protein, LacD.2, are predicted to function in the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway for lactose and galactose utilization. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of the LacD.1 regulatory pathway and the role of genome context in the emergence of LacD.1's novel regulatory functions, we compared the function and regulation of the Lac.1 and Lac.2 loci. The Lac.1 operon is not inducible, and regulation by LacD.1 is independent of a functional tagatose 6-phosphate pathway and enhanced by the conserved truncation of upstream Lac.1 genes. In contrast, Lac.2 expression is sensitive to environmental carbohydrates, and LacD.2, not LacD.1, contributes to growth on galactose. Thus, we conclude that the Lac.1 locus has been specialized to participate in regulation, leaving efficient utilization of carbohydrate sources to the Lac.2 locus. The adaptation of LacD for transcription regulation may be an underappreciated strategy among prokaryotes, as homologues of this multifaceted enzyme are present in a broad range of species.

  5. Upgrading bioluminescent bacterial bioreporter performance by splitting the lux operon.

    PubMed

    Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon

    2011-05-01

    Bioluminescent bacterial bioreporters harbor a fusion of bacterial bioluminescence genes (luxCDABE), acting as the reporting element, to a stress-response promoter, serving as the sensing element. Upon exposure to conditions that activate the promoter, such as an environmental stress or the presence of an inducing chemical, the promoter::reporter fusion generates a dose-dependent bioluminescent signal. In order to improve bioluminescent bioreporter performance we have split the luxCDABE genes of Photorhabdus luminescens into two smaller functional units: luxAB, that encode for the luciferase enzyme, which catalyzes the luminescence reaction, and luxCDE that encode for the enzymatic complex responsible for synthesis of the reaction's substrate, a long-chain aldehyde. The expression of each subunit was put under the control of either an inducible stress-responsive promoter or a synthetic constitutive promoter, and different combinations of the two units were tested for their response to selected chemicals in Escherichia coli. In all cases tested, the split combinations proved to be superior to the native luxCDABE configuration, suggesting an improved efficiency in the transcription and/or translation of two small gene units instead of a larger one with the same genes. The best combination was that of an inducible luxAB and a constitutive luxCDE, indicating that aldehyde availability is limited when the five genes are expressed together in E. coli, and demonstrating that improved biosensor performance may be achieved by rearrangement of the lux operon genes.

  6. Evolution of a tRNA operon in gamma purple bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, S; Cedergren, R

    1989-01-01

    Genomic DNA from eubacteria belonging to the gamma-3 subdivision of purple bacteria, as classified by Woese (C.R. Woese, Microbiol. Rev. 51:221-271, 1987), were probed with the argT operon of Escherichia coli encoding 5'-tRNA(Arg)-tRNA(His)-tRNA(Leu)-tRNA(Pro)-3'. The homologous operon from Vibrio harveyi was isolated and sequenced. Comparison of the five available sequences of this tRNA cluster from members of the families Enterobacteriaceae, Aeromonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae led to the conclusion that variations in different versions of this operon arose not only by point mutations but also by duplication and addition-deletion of entire tRNA genes. This data base permitted the formulation of a proposal dealing with the evolutionary history of this operon and suggested that DNA regions containing tRNA genes are active centers (hot spots) of recombination. Finally, since the operon from V. harveyi was not highly repetitive and did not contain tRNA pseudogenes, as in the Photobacterium phosphoreum operon, hybridization of genomic DNAs from different photobacterial strains with probes specific for the repeated pseudogene element was performed. We conclude that the phylogenetic distribution of the repetitive DNA is restricted to strains of P. phosphoreum. Images PMID:2687235

  7. Solving a discrete model of the lac operon using Z3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Natalia A.

    2014-05-01

    A discrete model for the Lcac Operon is solved using the SMT-solver Z3. Traditionally the Lac Operon is formulated in a continuous math model. This model is a system of ordinary differential equations. Here, it was considerated as a discrete model, based on a Boolean red. The biological problem of Lac Operon is enunciated as a problem of Boolean satisfiability, and it is solved using an STM-solver named Z3. Z3 is a powerful solver that allows understanding the basic dynamic of the Lac Operon in an easier and more efficient way. The multi-stability of the Lac Operon can be easily computed with Z3. The code that solves the Boolean red can be written in Python language or SMT-Lib language. Both languages were used in local version of the program as online version of Z3. For future investigations it is proposed to solve the Boolean red of Lac Operon using others SMT-solvers as cvc4, alt-ergo, mathsat and yices.

  8. DOOR 2.0: presenting operons and their functions through dynamic and integrated views.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xizeng; Ma, Qin; Zhou, Chuan; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Hanyuan; Yang, Jincai; Mao, Fenglou; Lai, Wei; Xu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We have recently developed a new version of the DOOR operon database, DOOR 2.0, which is available online at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/DOOR/ and will be updated on a regular basis. DOOR 2.0 contains genome-scale operons for 2072 prokaryotes with complete genomes, three times the number of genomes covered in the previous version published in 2009. DOOR 2.0 has a number of new features, compared with its previous version, including (i) more than 250,000 transcription units, experimentally validated or computationally predicted based on RNA-seq data, providing a dynamic functional view of the underlying operons; (ii) an integrated operon-centric data resource that provides not only operons for each covered genome but also their functional and regulatory information such as their cis-regulatory binding sites for transcription initiation and termination, gene expression levels estimated based on RNA-seq data and conservation information across multiple genomes; (iii) a high-performance web service for online operon prediction on user-provided genomic sequences; (iv) an intuitive genome browser to support visualization of user-selected data; and (v) a keyword-based Google-like search engine for finding the needed information intuitively and rapidly in this database.

  9. DOOR 2.0: presenting operons and their functions through dynamic and integrated views

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xizeng; Ma, Qin; Zhou, Chuan; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Hanyuan; Yang, Jincai; Mao, Fenglou; Lai, Wei; Xu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We have recently developed a new version of the DOOR operon database, DOOR 2.0, which is available online at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/DOOR/ and will be updated on a regular basis. DOOR 2.0 contains genome-scale operons for 2072 prokaryotes with complete genomes, three times the number of genomes covered in the previous version published in 2009. DOOR 2.0 has a number of new features, compared with its previous version, including (i) more than 250 000 transcription units, experimentally validated or computationally predicted based on RNA-seq data, providing a dynamic functional view of the underlying operons; (ii) an integrated operon-centric data resource that provides not only operons for each covered genome but also their functional and regulatory information such as their cis-regulatory binding sites for transcription initiation and termination, gene expression levels estimated based on RNA-seq data and conservation information across multiple genomes; (iii) a high-performance web service for online operon prediction on user-provided genomic sequences; (iv) an intuitive genome browser to support visualization of user-selected data; and (v) a keyword-based Google-like search engine for finding the needed information intuitively and rapidly in this database. PMID:24214966

  10. A Novel Method for Accurate Operon Predictions in All SequencedProkaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Katherine H.; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2004-12-01

    We combine comparative genomic measures and the distance separating adjacent genes to predict operons in 124 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Our method automatically tailors itself to each genome using sequence information alone, and thus can be applied to any prokaryote. For Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis, our method is 85 and 83% accurate, respectively, which is similar to the accuracy of methods that use the same features but are trained on experimentally characterized transcripts. In Halobacterium NRC-1 and in Helicobacterpylori, our method correctly infers that genes in operons are separated by shorter distances than they are in E.coli, and its predictions using distance alone are more accurate than distance-only predictions trained on a database of E.coli transcripts. We use microarray data from sixphylogenetically diverse prokaryotes to show that combining intergenic distance with comparative genomic measures further improves accuracy and that our method is broadly effective. Finally, we survey operon structure across 124 genomes, and find several surprises: H.pylori has many operons, contrary to previous reports; Bacillus anthracis has an unusual number of pseudogenes within conserved operons; and Synechocystis PCC6803 has many operons even though it has unusually wide spacings between conserved adjacent genes.

  11. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of regulatory region of the lumP and the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Chao, Y F; Weng, S F

    1995-05-25

    The lumP gene is linked to the lux operon, but runs in the opposite direction in Photobacterium leiognathi PL741. The gene order of the lumP and the lux operon is < -lumP-R & R-luxC-luxD-luxA-luxB-luxN-luxE- > (R & R: regulatory region). The nucleotide sequence of the regulatory region (827-bp) between the lumP and the lux operon was determined. Sequence analysis illustrates that the regulatory region includes two divergent promoter systems, PR-promoter system for the lux operon (R-operon) and PL-promoter system for the lumP or lum operon (L-operon). Functional analysis of the regulatory region shows that the PR- and PL-promoter systems both are able to lead the gene expression. The deletion experiment result elicits that the PR- and PL-promoter are coordinatively and negatively regulated; the PR- and PL-promoter might be competing for recognition by RNA polymerase to initiate transcription. The fact of the LumP responsible for the spectral blue shift in P. leiognathi implied that the lumP gene closedly linked to the lux operon is for coordinative regulation with the lux operon. In addition, the glucose repression on the PR-promoter system shows that the expression of the lux operon is regulated by cAMP-CRP induction in E. coli.

  12. FIS-dependent trans activation of stable RNA operons of Escherichia coli under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L; Verbeek, H; Vijgenboom, E; van Drunen, C; Vanet, A; Bosch, L

    1992-02-01

    In Escherichia coli transcription of the tRNA operon thrU (tufB) and the rRNA operon rrnB is trans-activated by the protein FIS. This protein, which stimulates the inversion of various viral DNA segments, binds specifically to a cis-acting sequence (designated UAS) upstream of the promoter of thrU (tufB) and the P1 promoter of the rrnB operon. There are indications that this type of regulation is representative for the regulation of more stable RNA operons. In the present investigation we have studied UAS-dependent transcription activation of the thrU (tufB) operon in the presence and absence of FIS during a normal bacterial growth cycle and after a nutritional shift-up. In early log phase the expression of the operon rises steeply in wild-type cells, whereafter it declines. Concomitantly, a peak of the cellular FIS concentration is observed. Cells in the stationary phase are depleted of FIS. The rather abrupt increase of transcription activation depends on the nutritional quality of the medium. It is not seen in minimal medium. After a shift from minimal to rich medium, a peak of transcription activation and of FIS concentration is measured. This peak gets higher as the medium gets more strongly enriched. We conclude that a correlation between changes of the UAS-dependent activation of the thrU (tufB) operon and changes of the cellular FIS concentration under a variety of experimental conditions exists. This correlation strongly suggests that the production of FIS responds to environmental signals, thereby trans-activating the operon. Cells unable to produce FIS (fis cells) also show an increase of operon transcription in the early log phase and after a nutritional shift-up, albeit less pronounced than that wild-type cells. Presumably it is controlled by the ribosome feedback regulatory system. cis activation of the operon by the upstream activator sequence is apparent in the absence of FIS. This activation is constant throughout the entire growth cycle and is

  13. Energetic methods to study bifunctional biotin operon repressor.

    PubMed

    Beckett, D

    1998-01-01

    measurements. The results of quantitative studies of the biotin regulatory system can be interpreted in the context of the biological function of the system. The biotin holoenzyme ligases are a class of enzymes found across the evolutionary spectrum. Only a subset of these enzymes, including BirA, also function as transcriptional repressors. The tight binding of the allosteric effector may be understood in light of the bifunctional nature of the BirA-bio-5'-AMP complex. It is possible that the unusually high thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the complex ensures that the most probable state of the protein in vivo is the adenylate-bound form. This complex, not the unliganded protein, is active in both enzymatic transfer of biotin and site-specific DNA binding. This ensures that on depletion of the intracellular pool of apoBCCP, BirA-bio-5'-AMP accumulates and binds to bioO to repress transcription of the biotin biosynthesis operon. The intracellular demand for and synthesis of biotin are, consequently, tightly coupled in the system. The dimerization that accompanies adenylate binding to BirA appears to be significant for site-specific binding of the protein to bioO. Functionally, the simultaneous binding of the two monomers to the two operator half-sites, regardless of the kinetic mechanism by which it occurs, ensures coordinate regulation of transcription initiation from both biotin operon promoters. The multifaceted approach utilized in studies of the biotin regulatory system can serve as a model for studies of any complex transcriptional regulatory system. It is critical in elucidating the functional energetics of any of these systems that the assembly first be dissected into the constituent interactions and that each of these interactions be studied in isolation. This is not only critical for understanding the physicochemical properties of each individual contributing interaction, but is also a necessary precursor to studies of thermodynamic linkage in the system. (AB

  14. The nif Gene Operon of the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Peter S.; Blank, Carrine; Leigh, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation occurs in two domains, Archaea and Bacteria. We have characterized a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Sequence analysis revealed eight genes, six with sequence similarity to known nif genes and two with sequence similarity to glnB. The gene order, nifH, ORF105 (similar to glnB), ORF121 (similar to glnB), nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, and nifX, was the same as that found in part in other diazotrophic methanogens and except for the presence of the glnB-like genes, also resembled the order found in many members of the Bacteria. Using transposon insertion mutagenesis, we determined that an 8-kb region required for nitrogen fixation corresponded to the nif gene cluster. Northern analysis revealed the presence of either a single 7.6-kb nif mRNA transcript or 10 smaller mRNA species containing portions of the large transcript. Polar effects of transposon insertions demonstrated that all of these mRNAs arose from a single promoter region, where transcription initiated 80 bp 5′ to nifH. Distinctive features of the nif gene cluster include the presence of the six primary nif genes in a single operon, the placement of the two glnB-like genes within the cluster, the apparent physical separation of the cluster from any other nif genes that might be in the genome, the fragmentation pattern of the mRNA, and the regulation of expression by a repression mechanism described previously. Our study and others with methanogenic archaea reporting multiple mRNAs arising from gene clusters with only a single putative promoter sequence suggest that mRNA processing following transcription may be a common occurrence in methanogens. PMID:9515920

  15. act Operon Control of Developmental Gene Expression in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Gronewold, Thomas M. A.; Kaiser, Dale

    2002-01-01

    Cell-bound C-signal guides the building of a fruiting body and triggers the differentiation of myxospores. Earlier work has shown that transcription of the csgA gene, which encodes the C-signal, is directed by four genes of the act operon. To see how expression of the genes encoding components of the aggregation and sporulation processes depends on C-signaling, mutants with loss-of-function mutations in each of the act genes were investigated. These mutations were found to have no effect on genes that are normally expressed up to 3 h into development and are C-signal independent. Neither the time of first expression nor the rate of expression increase was changed in actA, actB, actC, or actD mutant strains. Also, there was no effect on A-signal production, which normally starts before 3 h. By contrast, the null act mutants have striking defects in C-signal production. These mutations changed the expression of four gene reporters that are related to aggregation and sporulation and are expressed at 6 h or later in development. The actA and actB null mutations substantially decreased the expression of all these reporters. The other act null mutations caused either premature expression to wild-type levels (actC) or delayed expression (actD), which ultimately rose to wild-type levels. The pattern of effects on these reporters shows how the C-signal differentially regulates the steps that together build a fruiting body and differentiate spores within it. PMID:11807078

  16. The nif gene operon of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, P S; Blank, C; Leigh, J A

    1998-03-01

    Nitrogen fixation occurs in two domains, Archaea and Bacteria. We have characterized a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Sequence analysis revealed eight genes, six with sequence similarity to known nif genes and two with sequence similarity to glnB. The gene order, nifH, ORF105 (similar to glnB), ORF121 (similar to glnB), nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, and nifX, was the same as that found in part in other diazotrophic methanogens and except for the presence of the glnB-like genes, also resembled the order found in many members of the Bacteria. Using transposon insertion mutagenesis, we determined that an 8-kb region required for nitrogen fixation corresponded to the nif gene cluster. Northern analysis revealed the presence of either a single 7.6-kb nif mRNA transcript or 10 smaller mRNA species containing portions of the large transcript. Polar effects of transposon insertions demonstrated that all of these mRNAs arose from a single promoter region, where transcription initiated 80 bp 5' to nifH. Distinctive features of the nif gene cluster include the presence of the six primary nif genes in a single operon, the placement of the two glnB-like genes within the cluster, the apparent physical separation of the cluster from any other nif genes that might be in the genome, the fragmentation pattern of the mRNA, and the regulation of expression by a repression mechanism described previously. Our study and others with methanogenic archaea reporting multiple mRNAs arising from gene clusters with only a single putative promoter sequence suggest that mRNA processing following transcription may be a common occurrence in methanogens.

  17. Kinetic approaches to lactose operon induction and bimodality.

    PubMed

    Michel, Denis

    2013-05-21

    The quasi-equilibrium approximation is acceptable when molecular interactions are fast enough compared to circuit dynamics, but is no longer allowed when cellular activities are governed by rare events. A typical example is the lactose operon (lac), one of the most famous paradigms of transcription regulation, for which several theories still coexist to describe its behaviors. The lac system is generally analyzed by using equilibrium constants, contradicting single-event hypotheses long suggested by Novick and Weiner (1957). Enzyme induction as an all-or-none phenomenon. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 43, 553-566) and recently refined in the study of (Choi et al., 2008. A stochastic single-molecule event triggers phenotype switching of a bacterial cell. Science 322, 442-446). In the present report, a lac repressor (LacI)-mediated DNA immunoprecipitation experiment reveals that the natural LacI-lac DNA complex built in vivo is extremely tight and long-lived compared to the time scale of lac expression dynamics, which could functionally disconnect the abortive expression bursts and forbid using the standard modes of lac bistability. As alternatives, purely kinetic mechanisms are examined for their capacity to restrict induction through: (i) widely scattered derepression related to the arrival time variance of a predominantly backward asymmetric random walk and (ii) an induction threshold arising in a single window of derepression without recourse to nonlinear multimeric binding and Hill functions. Considering the complete disengagement of the lac repressor from the lac promoter as the probabilistic consequence of a transient stepwise mechanism, is sufficient to explain the sigmoidal lac responses as functions of time and of inducer concentration. This sigmoidal shape can be misleadingly interpreted as a phenomenon of equilibrium cooperativity classically used to explain bistability, but which has been reported to be weak in this system.

  18. Diverse pathways for salicin utilization in Shigella sonnei and Escherichia coli carrying an impaired bgl operon.

    PubMed

    Desai, Stuti K; Nandimath, Krithi; Mahadevan, S

    2010-10-01

    Utilization of the aryl-β-glucosides salicin or arbutin in most wild-type strains of E. coli is achieved by a single-step mutational activation of the bgl operon. Shigella sonnei, a branch of the diverse E. coli strain tree, requires two sequential mutational steps for achieving salicin utilization as the bglB gene, encoding the phospho-β-glucosidase B, harbors an inactivating insertion. We show that in a natural isolate of S. sonnei, transcriptional activation of the gene SSO1595, encoding a phospho-β-glucosidase, enables salicin utilization with the permease function being provided by the activated bgl operon. SSO1595 is absent in most commensal strains of E. coli, but is present in extra-intestinal pathogens as bgcA, a component of the bgc operon that enables β-glucoside utilization at low temperature. Salicin utilization in an E. coli bglB laboratory strain also requires a two-step activation process leading to expression of BglF, the PTS-associated permease encoded by the bgl operon and AscB, the phospho-β-glucosidase B encoded by the silent asc operon. BglF function is needed since AscF is unable to transport β-glucosides as it lacks the IIA domain involved in phopho-relay. Activation of the asc operon in the Sal(+) mutant is by a promoter-up mutation and the activated operon is subject to induction. The pathway to achieve salicin utilization is therefore diverse in these two evolutionarily related organisms; however, both show cooperation between two silent genetic systems to achieve a new metabolic capability under selection.

  19. The alr-groEL1 operon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: an interplay of multiple regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Aadil H.; Pathak, Deepika; Rao, Alka

    2017-01-01

    Threonylcarbamoyladenosine is a universally conserved essential modification of tRNA that ensures translational fidelity in cellular milieu. TsaD, TsaB and TsaE are identified as tRNA-A37-threonylcarbamoyl (t6A)-transferase enzymes that have been reconstituted in vitro, in few bacteria recently. However, transcriptional organization and regulation of these genes are not known in any of these organisms. This study describes the intricate architecture of a complex multicistronic alr-groEL1 operon, harboring essential genes, namely tsaD, tsaB, tsaE, groES, groEL1, and alr (required for cell wall synthesis), and rimI encoding an N-α- acetyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using northern blotting, RT-PCR and in vivo fluorescence assays, genes alr to groEL1 were found to constitute an ~6.3 kb heptacistronic operon with multiple internal promoters and an I-shaped intrinsic hairpin-like cis-regulatory element. A strong promoter PtsaD within the coding sequence of rimI gene is identified in M. tuberculosis, in addition. The study further proposes an amendment in the known bicistronic groESL1 operon annotation by providing evidence that groESL1 is co-transcribed as sub-operon of alr-groEL1 operon. The architecture of alr-groEL1 operon, conservation of the genetic context and a mosaic transcriptional profile displayed under various stress conditions convincingly suggest the involvement of this operon in stress adaptation in M. tuberculosis. PMID:28256563

  20. Label-free Quantitative Proteomics Reveals a Role for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis SecA2 Pathway in Exporting Solute Binding Proteins and Mce Transporters to the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Feltcher, Meghan E; Gunawardena, Harsha P; Zulauf, Katelyn E; Malik, Seidu; Griffin, Jennifer E; Sassetti, Christopher M; Chen, Xian; Braunstein, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an example of a bacterial pathogen with a specialized SecA2-dependent protein export system that contributes to its virulence. Our understanding of the mechanistic basis of SecA2-dependent export and the role(s) of the SecA2 pathway in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has been hindered by our limited knowledge of the proteins exported by the pathway. Here, we set out to identify M. tuberculosis proteins that use the SecA2 pathway for their export from the bacterial cytoplasm to the cell wall. Using label-free quantitative proteomics involving spectral counting, we compared the cell wall and cytoplasmic proteomes of wild type M. tuberculosis to that of a ΔsecA2 mutant. This work revealed a role for the M. tuberculosis SecA2 pathway in the cell wall localization of solute binding proteins that work with ABC transporters to import solutes. Another discovery was a profound effect of SecA2 on the cell wall localization of the Mce1 and Mce4 lipid transporters, which contribute to M. tuberculosis virulence. In addition to the effects on solute binding proteins and Mce transporter export, our label-free quantitative analysis revealed an unexpected relationship between SecA2 and the hypoxia-induced DosR regulon, which is associated with M. tuberculosis latency. Nearly half of the transcriptionally controlled DosR regulon of cytoplasmic proteins were detected at higher levels in the ΔsecA2 mutant versus wild type M. tuberculosis. By increasing the list of M. tuberculosis proteins known to be affected by the SecA2 pathway, this study expands our appreciation of the types of proteins exported by this pathway and guides our understanding of the mechanism of SecA2-dependent protein export in mycobacteria. At the same time, the newly identified SecA2-dependent proteins are helpful for understanding the significance of this pathway to M. tuberculosis virulence and physiology.

  1. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Andrey N.; Gintsburg, Alexandr L.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A “lacking biofilm production” (LBP) strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR) gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg) has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene) of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents. PMID:28070515

  2. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Olga L; Kunda, Marina S; Ryzhova, Natalia N; Aksenova, Ekaterina I; Semenov, Andrey N; Romanova, Yulia M; Gintsburg, Alexandr L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A "lacking biofilm production" (LBP) strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR) gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg) has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene) of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents.

  3. Discovery of an operon that participates in agmatine metabolism and regulates biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan J; Du, Rui-Hong; Calcutt, M Wade; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Christman, Brian W; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2010-04-01

    Agmatine is the decarboxylation product of arginine and a number of bacteria have devoted enzymatic pathways for its metabolism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbours the aguBA operon that metabolizes agmatine to putrescine, which can be subsequently converted into other polyamines or shunted into the TCA cycle for energy production. We discovered an alternate agmatine operon in the P. aeruginosa strain PA14 named agu2ABCA' that contains two genes for agmatine deiminases (agu2A and agu2A'). This operon was found to be present in 25% of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates. Agu2A' contains a twin-arginine translocation signal at its N-terminus and site-directed mutagenesis and cell fractionation experiments confirmed this protein is secreted to the periplasm. Analysis of the agu2ABCA' promoter demonstrates that agmatine induces expression of the operon during the stationary phase of growth and during biofilm growth and agu2ABCA' provides only weak complementation of aguBA, which is induced during log phase. Biofilm assays of mutants of all three agmatine deiminase genes in PA14 revealed that deletion of agu2ABCA', specifically its secreted product Agu2A', reduces biofilm production of PA14 following addition of exogenous agmatine. Together, these findings reveal a novel role for the agu2ABCA' operon in the biofilm development of P. aeruginosa.

  4. Artificial citrate operon and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene enhanced mineral phosphate solubilizing ability of Enterobacter hormaechei DHRSS.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kavita; Kumar, Chanchal; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2014-10-01

    Mineral phosphate solubilization by bacteria is mediated through secretion of organic acids, among which citrate is one of the most effective. To overproduce citrate in bacterial systems, an artificial citrate operon comprising of genes encoding NADH-insensitive citrate synthase of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium sodium-dependent citrate transporter was constructed. In order to improve its mineral phosphate solubilizing (MPS) ability, the citrate operon was incorporated into E. hormaechei DHRSS. The artificial citrate operon transformant secreted 7.2 mM citric acid whereas in the native strain, it was undetectable. The transformant released 0.82 mM phosphate in flask studies in buffered medium containing rock phosphate as sole P source. In fermenter studies, similar phenotype was observed under aerobic conditions. However, under microaerobic conditions, no citrate was detected and P release was not observed. Therefore, an artificial citrate gene cluster containing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) gene under its native promoter, along with artificial citrate operon under constitutive tac promoter, was constructed and transformed into E. hormaechei DHRSS. This transformant secreted 9 mM citric acid under microaerobic conditions and released 1.0 mM P. Thus, incorporation of citrate operon along with vgb gene improves MPS ability of E. hormaechei DHRSS under buffered, microaerobic conditions mimicking rhizospheric environment.

  5. A novel marRAB operon contributes to the rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiwei; Gao, Long; Zhang, Jiaoling; Li, Weihui; Yang, Min; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Chunhui; He, Zheng-Guo

    2014-01-01

    The multiple-antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) plays an important role in modulating bacterial antibiotic resistance. However, the regulatory model of the marRAB operon in mycobacteria remains to be characterized. Here we report that a MarR, encoded by Ms6508, and its marRAB operon specifically contribute to rifampicin (RIF) resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We show that the MarR recognizes a conserved 21-bp palindromic motif and negatively regulates the expression of two ABC transporters in the operon, encoded by Ms6509-6510. Unlike other known drug efflux pumps, overexpression of these two ABC transporters unexpectedly increased RIF sensitivity and deletion of these two genes increased mycobacterial resistance to the antibiotic. No change can be detected for the sensitivity of recombinant mycobacterial strains to three other anti-TB drugs. Furthermore, HPLC experiments suggested that Ms6509-Ms6510 could pump RIF into the mycobacterial cells. These findings indicated that the mycobacterial MarR functions as a repressor and constitutively inhibits the expression of the marRAB operon, which specifically contributes to RIF resistance in M. smegmatis. Therefore, our data suggest a new regulatory mechanism of RIF resistance and also provide the new insight into the regulatory model of a marRAB operon in mycobacteria.

  6. Identification of an operon, Pil-Chp, that controls twitching motility and virulence in Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Cursino, Luciana; Galvani, Cheryl D; Athinuwat, Dusit; Zaini, Paulo A; Li, Yaxin; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an important phytopathogenic bacterium that causes many serious plant diseases, including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Disease manifestation by X. fastidiosa is associated with the expression of several factors, including the type IV pili that are required for twitching motility. We provide evidence that an operon, named Pil-Chp, with genes homologous to those found in chemotaxis systems, regulates twitching motility. Transposon insertion into the pilL gene of the operon resulted in loss of twitching motility (pilL is homologous to cheA genes encoding kinases). The X. fastidiosa mutant maintained the type IV pili, indicating that the disrupted pilL or downstream operon genes are involved in pili function, and not biogenesis. The mutated X. fastidiosa produced less biofilm than wild-type cells, indicating that the operon contributes to biofilm formation. Finally, in planta the mutant produced delayed and less severe disease, indicating that the Pil-Chp operon contributes to the virulence of X. fastidiosa, presumably through its role in twitching motility.

  7. Salmonella enteritidis agfBAC operon encoding thin, aggregative fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Collinson, S K; Clouthier, S C; Doran, J L; Banser, P A; Kay, W W

    1996-02-01

    Salmonella enteritidis produces thin, aggregative fimbriae, named SEF17, which are composed of polymerized AgfA fimbrin proteins. DNA sequence analysis of a 2-kb region of S. enteritidis DNA revealed three contiguous genes, agfBAC. The 453-bp agfA gene encodes the AgfA fimbrin, which was predicted to be 74% identical and 86% similar in primary sequence to the Escherichia coli curli structural protein, CsgA. pHAG, a pUC18 derivative containing a 3.0-kb HindIII fragment encoding agfBAC, directed the in vitro expression of the major AgfA fimbrin, with an M(r) of 17,000, and a minor AgfB protein, with an M(r) of 16,000, encoded by the 453-bp agfB gene. AgfA was not expressed from pDAG, a pUC18 derivative containing a 3.1-kb DraI DNA fragment encoding agfA but not agfB. Primer extension analysis identified two adjacent transcription start sites located immediately upstream of agfB in positions analogous to those of the E. coli curlin csgBA operon. No transcription start sites were located immediately upstream of agfA or agfC. Northern (RNA) blot analysis confirmed that transcription of agfA was initiated from the agfB promoter region. Secondary-structure analysis of the putative mRNA transcript for agfBAC predicted the formation of a stem-loop structure (delta Gzero, -22 kcal/mol [-91 kJ/mol]) in the intercistronic region between agfA and agfC, which may be involved in stabilization of the agfBA portion of the agfBAC transcript. agfBAC and flanking regions had a high degree of sequence similarity with those counterparts of the E. coli curlin csgBA region for which sequence data are available. These data are demonstrative of the high degree of similarity between S. enteritidis SEF17 fimbriae and E. coli curli with respect to fimbrin amino acid sequence and genetic organization and, therefore, are indicative of a common and relatively recent ancestry.

  8. An Escherichia coli chromosomal ars operon homolog is functional in arsenic detoxification and is conserved in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Diorio, C; Cai, J; Marmor, J; Shinder, R; DuBow, M S

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic is a known toxic metalloid, whose trivalent and pentavalent ions can inhibit many biochemical processes. Operons which encode arsenic resistance have been found in multicopy plasmids from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The resistance mechanism is encoded from a single operon which typically consists of an arsenite ion-inducible repressor that regulates expression of an arsenate reductase and inner membrane-associated arsenite export system. Using a lacZ transcriptional gene fusion library, we have identified an Escherichia coli operon whose expression is induced by cellular exposure to sodium arsenite at concentrations as low as 5 micrograms/liter. This chromosomal operon was cloned, sequenced, and found to consist of three cistrons which we named arsR, arsB, and arsC because of their strong homology to plasmid-borne ars operons. Mutants in the chromosomal ars operon were found to be approximately 10- to 100-fold more sensitive to sodium arsenate and arsenite exposure than wild-type E. coli, while wild-type E. coli that contained the operon cloned on a ColE1-based plasmid was found to be at least 2- to 10-fold more resistant to sodium arsenate and arsenite. Moreover, Southern blotting and high-stringency hybridization of this operon with chromosomal DNAs from a number of bacterial species showed homologous sequences among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and hybridization was detectable even in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These results suggest that the chromosomal ars operon may be the evolutionary precursor of the plasmid-borne operon, as a multicopy plasmid location would allow the operon to be amplified and its products to confer increased resistance to this toxic metalloid.

  9. Unusual organization, complexity and redundancy at the Escherichia coli hcp-hcr operon promoter.

    PubMed

    Chismon, David L; Browning, Douglas F; Farrant, Gregory K; Busby, Stephen J W

    2010-08-15

    Expression from the Escherichia coli hcp-hcr operon promoter is optimally induced during anaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrite. This expression depends on transcription activation by FNR (fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator), which binds to a target centred at position -72.5 upstream of the transcript start site. Mutational analysis was exploited to identify the corresponding -10 and -35 hexamer elements. A DNA site for NarL and NarP, located at position -104.5, plays only a minor role, whereas NsrR binding to a DNA target centred at position +6 plays a major role in induction of the hcp-hcr operon promoter. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays show that NsrR binds to this target. The consequences of this for the kinetics of induction of the hcp-hcr operon are discussed.

  10. Identification and characterization of an operon in Salmonella typhimurium involved in thiamine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, L A; Downs, D M

    1997-08-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is synthesized de novo in Salmonella typhimurium and is a required cofactor for many enzymes in the cell. Five kinase activities have been implicated in TPP synthesis, which involves joining a 4-methyl-5-(beta-hydroxyethyl)thiazole (THZ) moiety and a 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) moiety. We report here identification of a 2-gene operon involved in thiamine biosynthesis and present evidence that the genes in this operon, thiMD, encode two previously identified kinases, THZ kinase and HMP phosphate (HMP-P) kinase, respectively. We further show that this operon belongs to the growing class of genes involved in TPP synthesis that are transcriptionally regulated by TPP. Our data are consistent with ThiM being a salvage enzyme and ThiD being a biosynthetic enzyme involved in TPP synthesis, as previously suggested.

  11. Two Mutations in the First Gene of the Histidine Operon of Salmonella typhimurium Affecting Control

    PubMed Central

    Rothman-Denes, Lucia; Martin, Robert G.

    1971-01-01

    Two strains with mutations in the first structural gene of the histidine operon of Salmonella typhimurium were characterized. (The first structural gene specifies the first enzyme of histidine biosynthesis, phosphoribosyltransferase, which is sensitive to feedback inhibition by histidine.) One mutation, hisG3934, results in a phosphoribosyltransferase which is no longer sensitive to feedback inhibition by histidine but is instead subject to inhibition by aspartic acid. The other mutation, hisG3935, allows the histidine operon to be partially repressed by several amino acids, including aspartic acid. Analysis of hisG3935 is consistent with the hypothesis that phosphoribosyltransferase is directly involved in the regulation of the histidine operon. PMID:4928009

  12. Molecular analysis of the UV-inducible pili operon from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    van Wolferen, Marleen; Ajon, Małgorzata; Driessen, Arnold J M; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-12-01

    Upon ultraviolet (UV) stress, hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus species show a highly induced transcription of a gene cluster responsible for pili biogenesis: the UV-inducible pili operon (ups operon). This operon is involved in UV-induced pili assembly, cellular aggregation, and subsequent DNA exchange between cells. As the system increases the fitness of Sulfolobus cells after UV light exposure, we assume that transfer of DNA takes place in order to repair UV-induced DNA damages via homologous recombination. Here, we studied all genes present in the ups cluster via gene deletion analysis with a focus on UpsX, a protein that shows no identifiable functional domains. UspX does not seem to be structurally essential for UV-induced pili formation and cellular aggregation, but appears to be important for efficient DNA transfer. In addition, we could show that pilin subunits UpsA and UpsB probably both function as major pilin subunits in the ups pili.

  13. Footprints of Optimal Protein Assembly Strategies in the Operonic Structure of Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Jan; Kötzing, Martin; Bartl, Martin; Kaleta, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate optimality principles behind synthesis strategies for protein complexes using a dynamic optimization approach. We show that the cellular capacity of protein synthesis has a strong influence on optimal synthesis strategies reaching from a simultaneous to a sequential synthesis of the subunits of a protein complex. Sequential synthesis is preferred if protein synthesis is strongly limited, whereas a simultaneous synthesis is optimal in situations with a high protein synthesis capacity. We confirm the predictions of our optimization approach through the analysis of the operonic organization of protein complexes in several hundred prokaryotes. Thereby, we are able to show that cellular protein synthesis capacity is a driving force in the dissolution of operons comprising the subunits of a protein complex. Thus, we also provide a tested hypothesis explaining why the subunits of many prokaryotic protein complexes are distributed across several operons despite the presumably less precise co-regulation. PMID:25927816

  14. Cloning and Analysis of the rnc-era-recO Operon from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Bradford; Peters, Howard K.; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Court, Donald

    1999-01-01

    The rnc operon from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been cloned and characterized. The three genes comprising this operon, rnc, era, and recO, are arranged similarly to those in some other gram-negative bacteria. Multicopy plasmids carrying the rnc operon of P. aeruginosa functionally complement mutations of the rnc, era, and recO genes in Escherichia coli. In particular, the P. aeruginosa era homolog rescues the conditional lethality of era mutants in E. coli, and the presumptive protein has 60% identity with the Era of E. coli. We discuss these data and evidence suggesting that a GTPase previously purified from P. aeruginosa and designated Pra is not an Era homolog. PMID:10438789

  15. Growth rate regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli is cyclic AMP dependent.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Chang, Yu-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2003-10-23

    In contrast to the ribosomal RNA gene expression increasing with growth rate, transcription of the lac operon is downregulated by cell growth rate. In continuous culture, growth rate regulation of lac promoter was independent of carbon substrate used and its location on the chromosome. Since the lac operon is activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which decreases with increasing cell growth rate, expression of plac-lacZ reporter fusion was analyzed in cya mutant under various growth conditions. The results demonstrated that expression of plac-lacZ in cya mutant was both lower and growth rate independent. In addition, ppGpp (guanosine tetraphosphate) was not involved in the mechanism of growth rate regulation of the lac promoter. Thus, the results of this study indicate that cAMP mediates the growth rate-dependent regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli.

  16. Footprints of optimal protein assembly strategies in the operonic structure of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Jan; Kötzing, Martin; Bartl, Martin; Kaleta, Christoph

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we investigate optimality principles behind synthesis strategies for protein complexes using a dynamic optimization approach. We show that the cellular capacity of protein synthesis has a strong influence on optimal synthesis strategies reaching from a simultaneous to a sequential synthesis of the subunits of a protein complex. Sequential synthesis is preferred if protein synthesis is strongly limited, whereas a simultaneous synthesis is optimal in situations with a high protein synthesis capacity. We confirm the predictions of our optimization approach through the analysis of the operonic organization of protein complexes in several hundred prokaryotes. Thereby, we are able to show that cellular protein synthesis capacity is a driving force in the dissolution of operons comprising the subunits of a protein complex. Thus, we also provide a tested hypothesis explaining why the subunits of many prokaryotic protein complexes are distributed across several operons despite the presumably less precise co-regulation.

  17. Characterization of the petI and res Operons of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Levicán, Gloria; Bruscella, Patrice; Guacunano, Maritza; Inostroza, Carolina; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S.; Jedlicki, Eugenia

    2002-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis and bioinformatic interpretations have identified two adjacent clusters of genes potentially involved in the formation of a bc1 complex and in the maturation of a cytochrome c-type protein in two strains (ATCC 19859 and ATCC 33020) of the acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (formerly Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments suggest that the two clusters are organized as operons, and +1 start sites of transcription for the operons have been determined by primer extension experiments. Potential promoters have been identified. The presence of these operons lends support to a recent model of reverse electron flow and is consistent with previous reports of phenotypic switching in this bacterium. PMID:11844787

  18. Positive and negative regulation of the bgl operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, S; Reynolds, A E; Wright, A

    1987-01-01

    We have analyzed the functions encoded by the bgl operon in Escherichia coli K-12. Based on the ability of cloned regions of the operon to complement a series of Bgl- point mutations, we show that the three bgl structural genes, bglC, bglS, and bglB, are located downstream of the regulatory locus bglR in the order indicated. Using a bgl-lacZ transcriptional fusion, we show that bglC and bglS are involved in regulating operon expression. The presence of the bglC gene in trans is absolutely required for the expression of the fusion, which is constitutive when only the bglC gene is present. When the bglC and the bglS genes are both present in the cell, expression of the fusion requires a beta-glucoside inducer. From these observations, we conclude that (i) the bglC gene encodes a positive regulatory of bgl operon expression and (ii) the bglS gene encodes a negative regulator of operon expression, causing the requirement for a beta-glucoside inducer. These conclusions are supported by our observations that (i) a majority of bglC mutants exhibits a Bgl- phenotype, whereas rare trans-dominant mutations in bglC result in constitutive expression of the bgl operon and the fusion, and (ii) mutations in the bglS gene lead to constitutive expression of the fusion. Based on several lines of evidence presented, we propose that the bglS gene product has an additional role as a component of the beta-glucoside transport system. PMID:3294798

  19. Fine-Tuned Transcriptional Regulation of Malate Operons in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Mortera, Pablo; Espariz, Martín; Suárez, Cristian; Repizo, Guillermo; Deutscher, Josef; Alarcón, Sergio; Blancato, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    In Enterococcus faecalis, the mae locus is constituted by two putative divergent operons, maePE and maeKR. The first operon encodes a putative H+/malate symporter (MaeP) and a malic enzyme (MaeE) previously shown to be essential for malate utilization in this bacterium. The maeKR operon encodes two putative proteins with significant similarity to two-component systems involved in sensing malate and activating its assimilation in bacteria. Our transcriptional and genetic assays showed that maePE and maeKR are induced in response to malate by the response regulator MaeR. In addition, we observed that both operons were partially repressed in the presence of glucose. Accordingly, the cometabolism of this sugar and malate was detected. The binding of the complex formed by CcpA and its corepressor P-Ser-HPr to a cre site located in the mae region was demonstrated in vitro and explains the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) observed for the maePE operon. However, our results also provide evidence for a CcpA-independent CCR mechanism regulating the expression of both operons. Finally, a biomass increment of 40 or 75% was observed compared to the biomass of cells grown only on glucose or malate, respectively. Cells cometabolizing both carbon sources exhibit a higher rate of glucose consumption and a lower rate of malate utilization. The growth improvement achieved by E. faecalis during glucose-malate cometabolism might explain why this microorganism employs different regulatory systems to tightly control the assimilation of both carbon sources. PMID:22247139

  20. Expression and regulation of the ery operon of Brucella melitensis in human trophoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Dou, Xiaoxia; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Fei; Wang, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zhen; Li, Tiansen; Gu, Xinli; Chen, Chuangfu

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is primarily a disease of domestic animals in which the bacteria localizes to fetal tissues such as embryonic trophoblast cells and fluids containing erythritol, which stimulates Brucella spp. growth. The utilization of erythritol is a characteristic of the genus Brucella. The ery operon contains four genes (eryA, eryB, eryC and eryD) for the utilization of erythritol, and plays a major role in the survival and multiplication of Brucella spp. The objective of the present study was to conduct a preliminary characterization of differential genes expression of the ery operon at several time points after Brucella infected embryonic trophoblast cells (HPT-8 cells). The result showed that the ery operon expression was higher in HPT-8 cells compared with the medium. The relative expression of eryA, eryB and eryC peaked at 2 h post-infection in HPT-8 cells, and eryD expression peaked at 3 h post-infection. The expression of eryA, eryB and eryC may be inhibited by increased eryD expression. However, the expression of the ery operon was stable in the presence of erythritol in cells. 2308Δery and 027Δery mutants of the ery operon were successfully constructed by homologous recombination, which were attenuated in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. The characterization of the ery operon genes and their expression profiles in response to Brucella infection further contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of infection and the pathogenesis of brucellosis. PMID:27698777

  1. Acquisition of a deliberately introduced phenol degradation operon, pheBA, by different indigenous Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Peters, M; Heinaru, E; Talpsep, E; Wand, H; Stottmeister, U; Heinaru, A; Nurk, A

    1997-12-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes of selective value in an environment 6 years after their introduction into a watershed has been observed. Expression of the gene pheA, which encodes phenol monooxygenase and is linked to the pheBA operon (A. Nurk, L. Kasak, and M. Kivisaar, Gene 102:13-18, 1991), allows pseudomonads to use phenol as a growth substrate. Pseudomonas putida strains carrying this operon on a plasmid were used for bioremediation after an accidental fire in the Estonia oil shale mine in Estonia in 1988. The water samples used for studying the fate of the genes introduced were collected in 1994. The same gene cluster was also detected in Pseudomonas strains isolated from water samples of a nearby watershed which has been continuously polluted with phenols due to oil shale industry leachate. Together with the more frequently existing counterparts of the dmp genes (V. Shingler, J. Powlowski, and U. Marklund, J. Bacteriol. 174:711-724, 1992), the pheA gene was also represented in the phenol-degrading strains. The area where the strains containing the pheA gene were found was restricted to the regular route of phenolic leachate to the Baltic Sea. Nine Pseudomonas strains belonging to four different species (P. corrugata, P. fragi, P. stutzeri, and P. fluorescens biotypes B, C, and F) and harboring horizontally transferred pheBA operons were investigated. The phe genes were clustered in the same manner in these nine phe operons and were connected to the same promoter as in the case of the original pheBA operon. One 10.6-kb plasmid carrying a pheBA gene cluster was sequenced, and the structure of the rearranged pheBA operon was described. This data indicates that introduced genetic material could, if it encodes a beneficial capability, enrich the natural genetic variety for biodegradation.

  2. Acquisition of a deliberately introduced phenol degradation operon, pheBA, by different indigenous Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, M; Heinaru, E; Talpsep, E; Wand, H; Stottmeister, U; Heinaru, A; Nurk, A

    1997-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes of selective value in an environment 6 years after their introduction into a watershed has been observed. Expression of the gene pheA, which encodes phenol monooxygenase and is linked to the pheBA operon (A. Nurk, L. Kasak, and M. Kivisaar, Gene 102:13-18, 1991), allows pseudomonads to use phenol as a growth substrate. Pseudomonas putida strains carrying this operon on a plasmid were used for bioremediation after an accidental fire in the Estonia oil shale mine in Estonia in 1988. The water samples used for studying the fate of the genes introduced were collected in 1994. The same gene cluster was also detected in Pseudomonas strains isolated from water samples of a nearby watershed which has been continuously polluted with phenols due to oil shale industry leachate. Together with the more frequently existing counterparts of the dmp genes (V. Shingler, J. Powlowski, and U. Marklund, J. Bacteriol. 174:711-724, 1992), the pheA gene was also represented in the phenol-degrading strains. The area where the strains containing the pheA gene were found was restricted to the regular route of phenolic leachate to the Baltic Sea. Nine Pseudomonas strains belonging to four different species (P. corrugata, P. fragi, P. stutzeri, and P. fluorescens biotypes B, C, and F) and harboring horizontally transferred pheBA operons were investigated. The phe genes were clustered in the same manner in these nine phe operons and were connected to the same promoter as in the case of the original pheBA operon. One 10.6-kb plasmid carrying a pheBA gene cluster was sequenced, and the structure of the rearranged pheBA operon was described. This data indicates that introduced genetic material could, if it encodes a beneficial capability, enrich the natural genetic variety for biodegradation. PMID:9406411

  3. Regulation of microcin C51 operon expression: the role of global regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Fomenko, D; Veselovskii, A; Khmel, I

    2001-06-01

    Expression of the microcin C51 operon in Escherichia coli cells is regulated as a function of the phase of growth; it is stimulated during the decelerating phase of growth. Using single-copy P(mcc)-lac transcriptional fusion (the promoter region of the microcin C51 operon fused to a promoterless lac operon in lambda phage), we showed that transcription from the microcin operon promoter is dependent on sigma(s) (RpoS) factor. However, some level of P(mcc)-lac expression is possible in rpoS null mutants, indicating that another sigma factor might be involved in transcription of the microcin C51 operon. Overproduction of sigma70 decreased Pmcc-directed transcription, presumably as a result of competition of sigma factors for the limited amount of core RNA polymerase. The cyclic AMP-CRP complex was shown to stimulate transcription from Pmcc: the absence of CRP or cAMP in crp or cya mutant cells strongly decreased the level of P(mcc)-lac expression. The production of C51 microcin decreased or was absent in rpoS, crp and cya mutant cells. Leucine-responsive protein Lrp and histone-like protein H-NS repressed P(mcc)-lac expression in the exponential and decelerating phases of growth. In studies of P(mcc)-lac expression in double mutant cells, we showed that proteins CRP, Lrp and H-NS acted in rpoS-dependent and rpoS-independent ways in transcription of the microcin C51 operon. Mutation hns(-) resulted in an increase in P(mcc)-lac expression in crp, rpoS and lrp mutant cells, as in wild-type cells.

  4. The Mangotoxin Biosynthetic Operon (mbo) Is Specifically Distributed within Pseudomonas syringae Genomospecies 1 and Was Acquired Only Once during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Víctor J.; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A.; Arrebola, Eva; Bardaji, Leire; Codina, Juan C.; de Vicente, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Mangotoxin production was first described in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. A phenotypic characterization of 94 P. syringae strains was carried out to determine the genetic evolution of the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo). We designed a PCR primer pair specific for the mbo operon to examine its distribution within the P. syringae complex. These primers amplified a 692-bp DNA fragment from 52 mangotoxin-producing strains and from 7 non-mangotoxin-producing strains that harbor the mbo operon, whereas 35 non-mangotoxin-producing strains did not yield any amplification. This, together with the analysis of draft genomes, allowed the identification of the mbo operon in five pathovars (pathovars aptata, avellanae, japonica, pisi, and syringae), all of which belong to genomospecies 1, suggesting a limited distribution of the mbo genes in the P. syringae complex. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences from housekeeping genes differentiated three groups within genomospecies 1. All of the strains containing the mbo operon clustered in groups I and II, whereas those lacking the operon clustered in group III; however, the relative branching order of these three groups is dependent on the genes used to construct the phylogeny. The mbo operon maintains synteny and is inserted in the same genomic location, with high sequence conservation around the insertion point, for all the strains in groups I and II. These data support the idea that the mbo operon was acquired horizontally and only once by the ancestor of groups I and II from genomospecies 1 within the P. syringae complex. PMID:23144138

  5. The mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo) is specifically distributed within Pseudomonas syringae genomospecies 1 and was acquired only once during evolution.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Víctor J; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Arrebola, Eva; Bardaji, Leire; Codina, Juan C; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús

    2013-02-01

    Mangotoxin production was first described in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. A phenotypic characterization of 94 P. syringae strains was carried out to determine the genetic evolution of the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo). We designed a PCR primer pair specific for the mbo operon to examine its distribution within the P. syringae complex. These primers amplified a 692-bp DNA fragment from 52 mangotoxin-producing strains and from 7 non-mangotoxin-producing strains that harbor the mbo operon, whereas 35 non-mangotoxin-producing strains did not yield any amplification. This, together with the analysis of draft genomes, allowed the identification of the mbo operon in five pathovars (pathovars aptata, avellanae, japonica, pisi, and syringae), all of which belong to genomospecies 1, suggesting a limited distribution of the mbo genes in the P. syringae complex. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences from housekeeping genes differentiated three groups within genomospecies 1. All of the strains containing the mbo operon clustered in groups I and II, whereas those lacking the operon clustered in group III; however, the relative branching order of these three groups is dependent on the genes used to construct the phylogeny. The mbo operon maintains synteny and is inserted in the same genomic location, with high sequence conservation around the insertion point, for all the strains in groups I and II. These data support the idea that the mbo operon was acquired horizontally and only once by the ancestor of groups I and II from genomospecies 1 within the P. syringae complex.

  6. Thermodynamic Modeling of Variations in the Rate of RNA Chain Elongation of E. coli rrn Operons

    PubMed Central

    Fange, David; Mellenius, Harriet; Dennis, Patrick P.; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2014-01-01

    Previous electron-microscopic imaging has shown high RNA polymerase occupation densities in the 16S and 23S encoding regions and low occupation densities in the noncoding leader, spacer, and trailer regions of the rRNA (rrn) operons in E. coli. This indicates slower transcript elongation within the coding regions and faster elongation within the noncoding regions of the operon. Inactivation of four of the seven rrn operons increases the transcript initiation frequency at the promoters of the three intact operons and reduces the time for RNA polymerase to traverse the operon. We have used the DNA sequence-dependent standard free energy variation of the transcription complex to model the experimentally observed changes in the elongation rate along the rrnB operon. We also model the stimulation of the average transcription rate over the whole operon by increasing rate of transcript initiation. Monte Carlo simulations, taking into account initiation of transcription, translocation, and backward and forward tracking of RNA polymerase, partially reproduce the observed transcript elongation rate variations along the rrn operon and fully account for the increased average rate in response to increased frequency of transcript initiation. PMID:24411237

  7. Lines of evidence for horizontal gene transfer of a phenazine producing operon into multiple bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2009-02-01

    Phenazines are secondary metabolites with broad-spectrum antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and eukaryotes. In pseudomonad species, a conserved seven-gene phenazine operon (phzABCDEFG) is required for the conversion of chorismic acid to the broad-spectrum antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylate. Previous analyses of genes involved in phenazine production from nonpseudomonad species uncovered a high degree of sequence similarity to pseudomonad homologues. The analyses undertaken in this study wished to eluciadate the evolutionary history of genes involved in the production of phenazines. Furthermore, I wanted to determine if the phenazine operon has been transferred through horizontal gene transfer. Analyses of GC content, codon usage patterns, frequency of 3:1 dinucleotides, sequence similarities, and phylogenetic reconstructions were undertaken to map the evolutionary history of phenazine genes from multiple bacterial species. Patchy phyletic distribution, high sequence similarities, and phylogenetic evidence infer that pseudomonad, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Pantoea agglomerans, Burkholderia cepacia, Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Brevibacterium linens, and Mycobacterium abscessus species all contain a phenazine operon which has most likely been transferred among these species through horizontal gene transfer. The acquisition of an antibiotic-associated operon is significant, as it may increase the relative fitness of the recipient species.

  8. clpC operon regulates cell architecture and sporulation in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lalit K; Dhasmana, Neha; Sajid, Andaleeb; Kumar, Prasun; Bhaduri, Asani; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Gandotra, Sheetal; Kalia, Vipin C; Das, Taposh K; Goel, Ajay K; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Misra, Richa; Gerth, Ulf; Leppla, Stephen H; Singh, Yogendra

    2015-03-01

    The clpC operon is known to regulate several processes such as genetic competence, protein degradation and stress survival in bacteria. Here, we describe the role of clpC operon in Bacillus anthracis. We generated knockout strains of the clpC operon genes to investigate the impact of CtsR, McsA, McsB and ClpC deletion on essential processes of B. anthracis. We observed that growth, cell division, sporulation and germination were severely affected in mcsB and clpC deleted strains, while none of deletions affected toxin secretion. Growth defect in these strains was pronounced at elevated temperature. The growth pattern gets restored on complementation of mcsB and clpC in respective mutants. Electron microscopic examination revealed that mcsB and clpC deletion also causes defect in septum formation leading to cell elongation. These vegetative cell deformities were accompanied by inability of mutant strains to generate morphologically intact spores. Higher levels of polyhydroxybutyrate granules accumulation were also observed in these deletion strains, indicating a defect in sporulation process. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the vital role played by McsB and ClpC in physiology of B. anthracis and open up further interest on this operon, which might be of importance to success of B. anthracis as pathogen.

  9. Gene expression of the arsenic resistance operon in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina de; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Peixe Carepo, Marta Sofia; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula

    2008-02-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 presents an arsRCB-type operon, which is involved in arsenic resistance. The regulating protein of this resistance system (ArsR) does not have the small conserved site (ELCVDCL) to link to the metalloid, as observed in Escherichia coli, and is thus considered to be an atypical ArsR protein, like that observed in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. In the present study, the gene expression profile of the ars operon under induction at different concentrations of arsenite - As(III) - was obtained via real-time PCR (TaqMan), by correlating the threshold cycle (Ct) values of induced and uninduced (control) samples. Through linear regression analysis (R2 = 0.9926), the gene expression profile of the ars operon showed clearly that the 0.125 micromol/L concentration of As(III) was sufficient to provoke a 4-fold increase in the resistance system, and a further increase in concentration resulted in an increase of up to 53-fold in transcription rates. The relation between resistance and induction of the ars operon indicates that the increased resistance to As(III) is associated with the increase in the number of transcripts.

  10. Modeling feedback loops in the H-NS-mediated regulation of the Escherichia coli bgl operon.

    PubMed

    Radde, Nicole; Gebert, Jutta; Faigle, Ulrich; Schrader, Rainer; Schnetz, Karin

    2008-01-21

    The histone-like nucleoid-associated protein H-NS is a global transcriptional repressor that controls approximately 5% of all genes in Escherichia coli and other enterobacteria. H-NS binds to DNA with low specificity. Nonetheless, repression of some loci is exceptionally specific. Experimental data for the E. coli bgl operon suggest that highly specific repression is caused by regulatory feedback loops. To analyze whether such feedback loops can account for the observed specificity of repression, here a model was built based on expression data. The model includes several regulatory interactions, which are synergy of repression by binding of H-NS to two regulatory elements, an inverse correlation of the rate of repression by H-NS and transcription, and a threshold for positive regulation by anti-terminator BglG, which is encoded within the operon. The latter two regulatory interactions represent feedback loops in the model. The resulting system of equations was solved for the expression level of the operon and analyzed with respect to different promoter activities. This analysis demonstrates that a small (3-fold) increase of the bgl promoter activity results in a strong (80-fold) enhancement of bgl operon expression. Thus, the parameters included into the model are sufficient to simulate specific repression by H-NS.

  11. msaABCR operon positively regulates biofilm development by repressing proteases and autolysis in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sahukhal, Gyan S; Batte, Justin L; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes nosocomial and community-acquired infections. One of the most important aspects of staphylococcal infections is biofilm development within the host, which renders the bacterium resistant to the host's immune response and antimicrobial agents. Biofilm development is very complex and involves several regulators that ensure cell survival on surfaces within the extracellular polymeric matrix. Previously, we identified the msaABCR operon as an additional positive regulator of biofilm formation. In this study, we define the regulatory pathway by which msaABCR controls biofilm formation. We demonstrate that the msaABCR operon is a negative regulator of proteases. The control of protease production mediates the processing of the major autolysin, Atl, and thus regulates the rate of autolysis. In the absence of the msaABCR operon, Atl is processed by proteases at a high rate, leading to increased cell death and a defect in biofilm maturation. We conclude that the msaABCR operon plays a key role in maintaining the balance between autolysis and growth within the staphylococcal biofilm.

  12. The lumazine protein-encoding gene in Photobacterium leiognathi is linked to the lux operon.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Chao, Y F; Weng, S F

    1993-04-15

    The nucleotide (nt) sequence of the lumP (EMBL accession No. X65612) gene of Photobacterium leiognathi PL741 was determined and the amino acid (aa) sequence deduced. The encoded aa sequence of lumP was identified as that of the lumazine protein (LumP) by homology with that of Photobacterium phosphoreum (56%). This small protein has a calculated M(r) of 19,997 and comprises 186 aa residues. Biochemical studies suggested that LumP is the protein which, when combined with luciferase, is responsible for the bioluminescent spectrum shift from blue-green light (490-505 nm) to blue (470 nm) in P. leiognathi. The nt sequence of the flanking region showed that lumP is linked to the lux operon but runs in the opposite direction. The gene order of the lumP and lux operon is as follows: <--lumP-R&R-luxC-luxD-luxA-luxB-luxN-lu xE-->; the R&R regulatory region sequence included two promoter systems, PR for the lux operon and PL for the lumP or the lum operon.

  13. Nonhemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates That Lack Large Regions of the sag Operon Mediating Streptolysin S Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Miho; Murayama, Somay Y.; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Wajima, Takeaki; Takahashi, Miki; Masaki, Junko; Kurokawa, Iku; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2010-01-01

    Among nonhemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) strains (n = 9) isolated from patients with pharyngitis or acute otitis media, we identified three deletions in the region from the epf gene, encoding the extracellular matrix binding protein, to the sag operon, mediating streptolysin S production. PMID:20018818

  14. DNA supercoiling, a critical signal regulating the basal expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fulcrand, Geraldine; Dages, Samantha; Zhi, Xiaoduo; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard S.; Dunlap, David; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli lac repressor (LacI) is a paradigmatic transcriptional factor that controls the expression of lacZYA in the lac operon. This tetrameric protein specifically binds to the O1, O2 and O3 operators of the lac operon and forms a DNA loop to repress transcription from the adjacent lac promoter. In this article, we demonstrate that upon binding to the O1 and O2 operators at their native positions LacI constrains three (−) supercoils within the 401-bp DNA loop of the lac promoter and forms a topological barrier. The stability of LacI-mediated DNA topological barriers is directly proportional to its DNA binding affinity. However, we find that DNA supercoiling modulates the basal expression from the lac operon in E. coli. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that LacI functions as a topological barrier to constrain free, unconstrained (−) supercoils within the 401-bp DNA loop of the lac promoter. These constrained (−) supercoils enhance LacI’s DNA-binding affinity and thereby the repression of the promoter. Thus, LacI binding is superhelically modulated to control the expression of lacZYA in the lac operon under varying growth conditions. PMID:26763930

  15. Using the TxtAB Operon to Quantify Pathogenic Streptomyces in Potato Tubers and Soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The phytotoxin thaxtomin, produced by plant pathogenic Streptomyces species, is a pathogenicity determinant for common scab. In this study a SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR assay using primers targeted on the txtAB operon of Streptomyces was developed to quantify pathogenic bacterial populati...

  16. Redundant phenazine operons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibit environment-dependent expression and differential roles in pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Recinos, David A.; Sekedat, Matthew D.; Hernandez, Adriana; Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Sakhtah, Hassan; Prince, Alice S.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Dietrich, Lars E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists have postulated that several fitness advantages may be conferred by the maintenance of duplicate genes, including environmental adaptation resulting from differential regulation. We examined the expression and physiological contributions of two redundant operons in the adaptable bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. These operons, phzA1-G1 (phz1) and phzA2-G2 (phz2), encode nearly identical sets of proteins that catalyze the synthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, the precursor for several phenazine derivatives. Phenazines perform diverse roles in P. aeruginosa physiology and act as virulence factors during opportunistic infections of plant and animal hosts. Although reports have indicated that phz1 is regulated by the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, factors controlling phz2 expression have not been identified, and the relative contributions of these redundant operons to phenazine biosynthesis have not been evaluated. We found that in liquid cultures, phz1 was expressed at higher levels than phz2, although phz2 showed a greater contribution to phenazine production. In colony biofilms, phz2 was expressed at high levels, whereas phz1 expression was not detectable, and phz2 was responsible for virtually all phenazine production. Analysis of mutants defective in quinolone signal synthesis revealed a critical role for 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline in phz2 induction. Finally, deletion of phz2, but not of phz1, decreased lung colonization in a murine model of infection. These results suggest that differential regulation of the redundant phz operons allows P. aeruginosa to adapt to diverse environments. PMID:23129634

  17. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession

    PubMed Central

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution. PMID:26565722

  18. Analysis of a ribosomal RNA operon (rrn) from “Candiatus Liberibacter asiaticus”

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 5,005 bp DNA sequence containing a nearly complete rrn operon of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”, a bacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (yellow shoot disease), was obtained by PCR using sequences conserved for Rhizobiaceae in the alpha-proteobacteria as primers. The rrn locus consis...

  19. Interruptions in gene expression drive highly expressed operons to the leading strand of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2005-01-01

    In bacteria, most genes are on the leading strand of replication, a phenomenon attributed to collisions between the DNA and RNA polymerases. In Escherichia coli, these collisions slow the movement of the replication fork through actively transcribed genes only if they are coded on the lagging strand. For genes on both strands, however, these collisions sever nascent transcripts and interrupt gene expression. Based on these observations, we propose a new theory to explain strand bias: genes whose expression is important for fitness are selected to the leading strand because this reduces the duration of these interruptions. Our theory predicts that multi-gene operons, which are subject to longer interruptions, should be more strongly selected to the leading strand than singleton transcripts. We show that this is true even after controlling for the tendency for essential genes, which are strongly biased to the leading strand, to occur in operons. Our theory also predicts that other factors that are associated with strand bias should have stronger effects for genes that are in operons. We find that expression level and phylogenetic ubiquity are correlated with strand bias for both essential and non-essential genes, but only for genes in operons. PMID:15942025

  20. Interruptions in gene expression drive highly expressed operons to the leading strand of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Alm, Eric J; Arkin, Adam P

    2005-01-01

    In bacteria, most genes are on the leading strand of replication, a phenomenon attributed to collisions between the DNA and RNA polymerases. In Escherichia coli, these collisions slow the movement of the replication fork through actively transcribed genes only if they are coded on the lagging strand. For genes on both strands, however, these collisions sever nascent transcripts and interrupt gene expression. Based on these observations, we propose a new theory to explain strand bias: genes whose expression is important for fitness are selected to the leading strand because this reduces the duration of these interruptions. Our theory predicts that multi-gene operons, which are subject to longer interruptions, should be more strongly selected to the leading strand than singleton transcripts. We show that this is true even after controlling for the tendency for essential genes, which are strongly biased to the leading strand, to occur in operons. Our theory also predicts that other factors that are associated with strand bias should have stronger effects for genes that are in operons. We find that expression level and phylogenetic ubiquity are correlated with strand bias for both essential and non-essential genes, but only for genes in operons.

  1. Transcription termination Within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric-siderophore transport, fatD,C,B,A, and two genes for siderophorebiosynthesis, angR and angT and plays an important role in the virulence mechanism of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polyc...

  2. The Pyrimidine Operon pyrRPB-carA from Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Martinussen, Jan; Schallert, Jette; Andersen, Birgit; Hammer, Karin

    2001-01-01

    The four genes pyrR, pyrP, pyrB, and carA were found to constitute an operon in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363. The functions of the different genes were established by mutational analysis. The first gene in the operon is the pyrimidine regulatory gene, pyrR, which is responsible for the regulation of the expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes leading to UMP formation. The second gene encodes a membrane-bound high-affinity uracil permease, required for utilization of exogenous uracil. The last two genes in the operon, pyrB and carA, encode pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes; aspartate transcarbamoylase (pyrB) is the second enzyme in the pathway, whereas carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase subunit A (carA) is the small subunit of a heterodimeric enzyme, catalyzing the formation of carbamoyl phosphate. The carA gene product is shown to be required for both pyrimidine and arginine biosynthesis. The expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes including the pyrRPB-carA operon is subject to control at the transcriptional level, most probably by an attenuator mechanism in which PyrR acts as the regulatory protein. PMID:11292797

  3. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J.; Bryant, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli. By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672157

  4. The PQQ biosynthetic operons and their transcriptional regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gliese, Nicole; Khodaverdi, Viola; Görisch, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Gene PA1990 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, located downstream of pqqE and encoding a putative peptidase, was shown to be involved in excretion of PQQ into the culture supernatant. This gene is cotranscribed with the pqqABCDE cluster and was named pqqH. A PA1990::Km(r) mutant (VK3) did not show any effect in growth behaviour; however, in contrast to the wild-type, no excretion of PQQ into the culture supernatant was observed. The putative pqqF gene of P. aeruginosa was shown to be essential for PQQ biosynthesis. A pqqF::Km(r) mutant did not grow aerobically on ethanol, because of its inability to produce PQQ. Transcription of the pqqABCDEH operon was induced upon aerobic growth on ethanol, 1-propanol, 1,2-propanediol and 1-butanol, while on glycerol, succinate and acetate, transcription was low. Transcription of the pqqABCDEH operon was also found upon anoxic growth on ethanol with nitrate as electron acceptor, but no PQQ was produced. Expression of the pqqABCDEH operon is regulated at the transcriptional level. In contrast, the pqqF operon appeared to be transcribed constitutively at a very low level under all growth conditions studied.

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae yfiRNB operon affects biofilm formation, polysaccharide production and drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Mónica G; Zárate, Lina; Acosta, Iván C; Posada, Leonardo; Cruz, Diana P; Lozano, Marcela; Zambrano, María M

    2014-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen important in hospital-acquired infections, which are complicated by the rise of drug-resistant strains and the capacity of cells to adhere to surfaces and form biofilms. In this work, we carried out an analysis of the genes in the K. pneumoniae yfiRNB operon, previously implicated in biofilm formation. The results indicated that in addition to the previously reported effect on type 3 fimbriae expression, this operon also affected biofilm formation due to changes in cellulose as part of the extracellular matrix. Deletion of yfiR resulted in enhanced biofilm formation and an altered colony phenotype indicative of cellulose overproduction when grown on solid indicator media. Extraction of polysaccharides and treatment with cellulase were consistent with the presence of cellulose in biofilms. The enhanced cellulose production did not, however, correlate with virulence as assessed using a Caenorhabditis elegans assay. In addition, cells bearing mutations in genes of the yfiRNB operon varied with respect to the WT control in terms of susceptibility to the antibiotics amikacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem and meropenem. These results indicated that the yfiRNB operon is implicated in the production of exopolysaccharides that alter cell surface characteristics and the capacity to form biofilms--a phenotype that does not necessarily correlate with properties related with survival, such as resistance to antibiotics.

  6. Identification and characterization of an iron ABC transporter operon in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal 5.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Lucia Soto; Vázquez-Candanedo, Ada P; Sánchez-Espíndola, Adriana; Ramírez, Carlos Ávila; Baca, Beatriz E

    2013-06-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium and endophyte of sugarcane. We have cloned and sequenced the genes coding for the components of the iron ABC-type acquisition system of G. diazotrophicus. Sequence analysis revealed three ORFs, (feuA, feuB, and feuC) organized as an operon and encoding polypeptides of 346 (38 kDa), 342 (34.2 kDa), and 240 (26 kDa) amino acids, respectively. The deduced translation products of the feu operon showed similarity with a periplasmic solute-binding protein (FeuA), permease (FeuB), and ATPase (FeuC) involved in Fe transport. The role of FeuB in the survival of G. diazotrophicus under iron depletion was evaluated by comparing the ability of wild-type and FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strains in a medium without iron supplementation and in a medium containing 2, 2'-dipyridyl (DP). Growth of the mutant was affected in the medium containing DP. The operon was expressed at higher levels in cells depleted for iron than in those that contained the metal. A decrease in nitrogenase activity was observed with the FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strain that with the wild-type under iron deficiency conditions, suggesting that the Feu operon play role in Fe nutrition of G. diazotrophicus.

  7. Bistable Behavior in a Model of the lac Operon in Escherichia coli with Variable Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Santillán, M.

    2008-01-01

    This work is a continuation from another study previously published in this journal. Both the former and the present works are dedicated to investigating the bistable behavior of the lac operon in Escherichia coli from a mathematical modeling point of view. In the previous article, we developed a detailed mathematical model that accounts for all of the known regulatory mechanisms in this system, and studied the effect of inducing the operon with lactose instead of an artificial inducer. In this article, the model is improved to account, in a more detailed way, for the interaction of the repressor molecules with the three lac operators. A recently discovered cooperative interaction between the CAP molecule (an activator of the lactose operon) and Operator 3 (which influences DNA folding) is also included in this new version of the model. The growth rate dependence on the rate of energy entering the bacteria (in the form of transported glucose molecules and of metabolized lactose molecules) is also considered. A large number of numerical experiments is carried out with this improved model. The results are discussed in regard to the bistable behavior of the lactose operon. Special attention is paid to the effect that a variable growth rate has on the system dynamics. PMID:18065471

  8. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession.

    PubMed

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution.

  9. ISOLATION OF AN OPERON INVOLVED IN XYLITOL METABOLISM FROM PANTOEA ANANATIS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An operon involved in xylitol metabolism in a xylitol-utilizing Pantoea ananatis mutant was cloned by the transposon tagging method. Sequencing analysis revealed that seven consecutive open reading frames (ORFs) are located in the same strand (xytA-G). Sequence homology search suggested that the o...

  10. The inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligonucleotides-mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, B; Fournier, R L; Relue, P A

    2000-11-20

    Gene transcription is regulated by transcription factors that can bind to specific regions on DNA. Antigene oligonucleotides (oligos) can bind to specific regions on DNA and form a triplex with the double-stranded DNA. The triplex can competitively inhibit the binding of transcription factors and, as a result, transcription can be inhibited. A genetically structured model has been developed to quantitatively describe the inhibition of the Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by triplex-forming oligos. The model predicts that the effect of triplex-forming oligos on the lac operon gene expression depends on their target sites. Oligonucleotides targeted to the operator are much more effective than those targeted to other regulatory sites on the lac operon. In some cases, the effect of oligo binding is similar to that of a mutation in the lac operon. The model provides insight as to the specific binding site to be targeted to achieve the most effective inhibition of gene expression. The model is also capable of predicting the oligo concentration needed to inhibit gene expression, which is in general agreement with results reported by other investigators.

  11. Bistable behavior in a model of the lac operon in Escherichia coli with variable growth rate.

    PubMed

    Santillán, M

    2008-03-15

    This work is a continuation from another study previously published in this journal. Both the former and the present works are dedicated to investigating the bistable behavior of the lac operon in Escherichia coli from a mathematical modeling point of view. In the previous article, we developed a detailed mathematical model that accounts for all of the known regulatory mechanisms in this system, and studied the effect of inducing the operon with lactose instead of an artificial inducer. In this article, the model is improved to account, in a more detailed way, for the interaction of the repressor molecules with the three lac operators. A recently discovered cooperative interaction between the CAP molecule (an activator of the lactose operon) and Operator 3 (which influences DNA folding) is also included in this new version of the model. The growth rate dependence on the rate of energy entering the bacteria (in the form of transported glucose molecules and of metabolized lactose molecules) is also considered. A large number of numerical experiments is carried out with this improved model. The results are discussed in regard to the bistable behavior of the lactose operon. Special attention is paid to the effect that a variable growth rate has on the system dynamics.

  12. Lack of evidence for horizontal transfer of the lac operon into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stoebel, Daniel M

    2005-03-01

    The idea that Escherichia coli gained the lac operon via horizontal transfer, allowing it to invade a new niche and form a new species, has become a paradigmatic example of bacterial nonpathogenic adaptation and speciation catalyzed by horizontal transfer. Surprisingly, empirical evidence for this event is essentially nonexistent. To see whether horizontal transfer occurred, I compared a phylogeny of 14 Enterobacteriaceae based on two housekeeping genes to a phylogeny of a part of their lac operon. Although several species in this clade appear to have acquired some or all of the operon via horizontal transfer, there is no evidence of horizontal transfer into E. coli. It is not clear whether the horizontal transfer events for which there is evidence were adaptive because those species which have acquired the operon are not thought to live in high lactose environments. I propose that vertical transmission from the common ancestor of the Enterobacteriaceae, with subsequent loss of these genes in many species can explain much of the patchy distribution of lactose use in this clade. Finally, I argue that we need new, well-supported examples of horizontal transfer spurring niche expansion and speciation, particularly in nonpathogenic cases, before we can accept claims that horizontal transfer is a hallmark of bacterial adaptation.

  13. DNA supercoiling, a critical signal regulating the basal expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fulcrand, Geraldine; Dages, Samantha; Zhi, Xiaoduo; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard S; Dunlap, David; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-01-14

    Escherichia coli lac repressor (LacI) is a paradigmatic transcriptional factor that controls the expression of lacZYA in the lac operon. This tetrameric protein specifically binds to the O1, O2 and O3 operators of the lac operon and forms a DNA loop to repress transcription from the adjacent lac promoter. In this article, we demonstrate that upon binding to the O1 and O2 operators at their native positions LacI constrains three (-) supercoils within the 401-bp DNA loop of the lac promoter and forms a topological barrier. The stability of LacI-mediated DNA topological barriers is directly proportional to its DNA binding affinity. However, we find that DNA supercoiling modulates the basal expression from the lac operon in E. coli. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that LacI functions as a topological barrier to constrain free, unconstrained (-) supercoils within the 401-bp DNA loop of the lac promoter. These constrained (-) supercoils enhance LacI's DNA-binding affinity and thereby the repression of the promoter. Thus, LacI binding is superhelically modulated to control the expression of lacZYA in the lac operon under varying growth conditions.

  14. Determining the bistability parameter ranges of artificially induced lac operon using the root locus method.

    PubMed

    Avcu, N; Alyürük, H; Demir, G K; Pekergin, F; Cavas, L; Güzeliş, C

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs the root locus method to conduct a detailed investigation of the parameter regions that ensure bistability in a well-studied gene regulatory network namely, lac operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In contrast to previous works, the parametric bistability conditions observed in this study constitute a complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions. These conditions were derived by applying the root locus method to the polynomial equilibrium equation of the lac operon model to determine the parameter values yielding the multiple real roots necessary for bistability. The lac operon model used was defined as an ordinary differential equation system in a state equation form with a rational right hand side, and it was compatible with the Hill and Michaelis-Menten approaches of enzyme kinetics used to describe biochemical reactions that govern lactose metabolism. The developed root locus method can be used to study the steady-state behavior of any type of convergent biological system model based on mass action kinetics. This method provides a solution to the problem of analyzing gene regulatory networks under parameter uncertainties because the root locus method considers the model parameters as variable, rather than fixed. The obtained bistability ranges for the lac operon model parameters have the potential to elucidate the appearance of bistability for E. coli cells in in vivo experiments, and they could also be used to design robust hysteretic switches in synthetic biology.

  15. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-05

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  16. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of Bacillus sp. CDB3 arsenic-resistance operon ars1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuefei; Zheng, Wei; Bhat, Somanath; Aquilina, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus sp. CDB3 possesses a novel eight-gene ars cluster (ars1, arsRYCDATorf7orf8) with some unusual features in regard to expression regulation. This study demonstrated that the cluster is a single operon but can also produce a short three-gene arsRYC transcript. A hairpin structure formed by internal inverted repeats between arsC and arsD was shown to diminish the expression of the full operon, thereby probably acting as a transcription attenuator. A degradation product of the arsRYC transcript was also identified. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis demonstrated that ArsR interacts with the ars1 promoter forming a protein-DNA complex that could be impaired by arsenite. However, no interaction was detected between ArsD and the ars1 promoter, suggesting that the CDB3 ArsD protein may not play a regulatory role. Compared to other ars gene clusters, regulation of the Bacillus sp. CDB3 ars1 operon is more complex. It represents another example of specific mRNA degradation in the transporter gene region and possibly the first case of attenuator-mediated regulation of ars operons. PMID:26355338

  17. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide.

  18. Functions of the Duplicated hik31 Operons in Central Metabolism and Responses to Light, Dark, and Carbon Sources in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Sowmya; Sherman, Debra M.; Shaw, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    There are two closely related hik31 operons involved in signal transduction on the chromosome and the pSYSX plasmid in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We studied the growth, cell morphology, and gene expression in operon and hik mutants for both copies, under different growth conditions, to examine whether the duplicated copies have the same or different functions and gene targets and whether they are similarly regulated. Phenotype analysis suggested that both operons regulated common and separate targets in the light and the dark. The chromosomal operon was involved in the negative control of autotrophic events, whereas the plasmid operon was involved in the positive control of heterotrophic events. Both the plasmid and double operon mutant cells were larger and had division defects. The growth data also showed a regulatory role for the chromosomal hik gene under high-CO2 conditions and the plasmid operon under low-O2 conditions. Metal stress experiments indicated a role for the chromosomal hik gene and operon in mediating Zn and Cd tolerance, the plasmid operon in Co tolerance, and the chromosomal operon and plasmid hik gene in Ni tolerance. We conclude that both operons are differentially and temporally regulated. We suggest that the chromosomal operon is the primarily expressed copy and the plasmid operon acts as a backup to maintain appropriate gene dosages. Both operons share an integrated regulatory relationship and are induced in high light, in glucose, and in active cell growth. Additionally, the plasmid operon is induced in the dark with or without glucose. PMID:22081400

  19. Genetic analysis of an incomplete bio operon in a biotin auxotrophic strain of Bacillus subtilis natto OK2.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Mayumi; Kawamura, Fujio; Kurusu, Yasurou

    2004-03-01

    We describe the genetic analysis of the bio operon of the biotin auxotrophic Bacillus subtilis natto OK2 strain. The OK2 strain would only cross-feed with the Escherichia coli bioB mutant and also grew well in medium containing dethiobiotin. Sequencing analysis revealed two significant genetic alterations in the bioW and bioF genes within the bio operon of the OK2 strain. Complementation analysis with B. subtilis 168 bio mutants demonstrated that only the bioB gene could complement, but other bio operon genes could not. A bio(+) transformant, isolated from an OK2 strain, has biotin autotrophy.

  20. rRNA (rrn) Operon-Engineered Bacillus subtilis as a Feasible Test Organism for Antibiotic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Yano, Koichi; Kakugawa, Koji; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis contains 10 rRNA (rrn) operons. We found that rRNA operon-engineered B. subtilis strain RIK543, with only the rrnO operon, is specifically hypersensitive to RNA polymerase inhibitors such as rifamycin SV and rifampin (80-fold and 20-fold, respectively). In pilot screening experiments, we found actinomycete isolates successfully at an incidence of 1.9% (18/945) that produced antibacterials that were detectable only with RIK543 as the test organism. Strain RIK543 may be a feasible test organism for the discovery of novel RNA polymerase inhibitors. PMID:23335737

  1. [UV-induction of the LT-toxin operon depending on genes lexA, recA, and umuD].

    PubMed

    Tiganova, I G; Rusina, O Iu; Andreeva, I V; Brukhanskiĭ, G V; Skavronskaia, A G

    1994-06-01

    UV induction of the elt operon (the LT-toxin operon in Escherichia coli) was demonstrated in experiments using fusion of elt::lac operons with the help of Mud1(Ap lac) phage. UV induction of the elt operon is lexA-dependent; thus, the possibility of SOS regulation of this process may be assumed. However, UV induction of the elt operon turned out to be recA-independent, which makes it impossible to consider this induction as a typical SOS response. UV induction of the elt operon is also observed in Salmonella typhimurium, which differs from E. coli in the product of umuD, which suggests that the UV induction of the elt operon is umuD independent.

  2. High Sensitivity Proteomics Assisted Discovery of a Novel Operon Involved in the Assembly of Photosystem II, a Membrane Protein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wegener, Kimberly M.; Welsh, Eric A.; Thornton, Leeann E.; Keren, Nir S.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Hixson, Kim K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-10-10

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large membrane protein complex that performs the water oxidation reactions of the photosynthetic electron transport chain in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Utilizing a high-throughput proteomic analysis of isolated PSII complexes from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have identified four PSII associated proteins that are encoded by the cofactor integration operon (cio). This operon contains genes with putative binding domains for chlorophyll, iron-sulfur centers, and bilins. Protein levels of this operon are more abundant in several PSII lumenal mutants, suggesting an accumulation of cio products in partially assembled PSII complexes. This provides a rare example of a bacterial operon whose protein products are translationally coordinated and associated with a single protein complex. Genetic deletion of cio results in decreased oxygen evolution by PSII, suggesting that cio products may function as regulators of PSII complex assembly or degradation, maybe facilitating an uncharacterized step in PSII assembly.

  3. NSR from Streptococcus agalactiae confers resistance against nisin and is encoded by a conserved nsr operon.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Sakshi; AlKhatib, Zainab; Smits, Sander H J

    2013-11-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic produced by Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), which is active against many Gram-positive bacteria. However, in various pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, the presence of a nisin resistance protein (NSR) confers resistance against nisin. Here, we show that NSR from Streptococcus agalactiae (SaNSR) confers 20-fold resistance when expressed in L. lactis. We also show that SaNSR is encoded by an operon structure comprising of a lipoprotein and an ATP-binding cassette transporter as well as a two-component system that is putatively involved in expression and regulation. This organization of the operon is conserved in several (non)pathogenic strains that do not produce nisin themselves.

  4. Gene inactivation of a chemotaxis operon in the pathogen Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ambroise; Wong Ng, Jérôme; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis may have an important role in the infection process of pathogenic Leptospira spp.; however, little is known about the regulation of flagellar-based motility in these atypical bacteria. We generated a library of random transposon mutants of the pathogen L. interrogans, which included a mutant with insertion in the first gene of an operon containing the chemotaxis genes cheA, cheW, cheD, cheB, cheY and mcp. The disrupted gene encodes a putative histidine kinase (HK). The HK mutant was motile and virulent, but swarm plate and capillary assays suggested that chemotaxis was reduced in this mutant. Further analysis of bacterial trajectories by videomicroscopy showed that the ability of this mutant to reverse was significantly impaired in comparison to wild-type strain. Our data therefore show that this operon is required for full chemotaxis of Leptospira spp.

  5. In Vitro Repression of Transcription of the Trytophan Operon by trp Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yoshiko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Hayashi, Masaki

    1973-01-01

    The in vitro repression of transcription of the tryptophan operon by the trp repressor from Escherichia coli was studied. By measuring the inhibitory effect for trp-specific RNA synthesis in an in vitro transcription system directed by DNA of trp-transducing phage, we have detected and concentrated a trp repressor in an eluate of a Φ80 ptED native DNA-cellulose column. The repression of transcription of trp operon required the addition of L-tryptophan in the system, and when several tryptophan analogues were added, the repression or derepression was similar to that observed in vivo. The repressor fraction was separated from the majority of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase activity by Bio-gel P60 column chromatography. PMID:4579009

  6. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  7. [Heterologous genes expression on Escherichia coli chromosome lac operon using Red recombination].

    PubMed

    Li, Shanhu; Shi, Qingguo; Huang, Cuifen; Zhou, Jianguang

    2008-04-01

    To achieve efficient and stable expression of heterologous exogenetic protein or antigen in E. coli chromosome, the luciferase report gene was knocked in lacZ site of chromosome lac operon by using Red recombination system and selection-counterselection kan/sacB technology. The quantitative analysis of exogenous gene expression indicated that the target gene could be efficiently expressed at lacZ site of lac operon. The results confirmed the efficient screening and stable expression of heterologous protein or antigen on chromosome by using the recombinant engineering technique. This study demonstrated that the chromosome could be used as a vector for heterologous protein or antigen and the stable expression of exogenous gene on E. coli chromosome had no side effect on the bacterial growth and propagation.

  8. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of the tetrameric form of SorC sorbitol operon regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sanctis, Daniele de; Rêgo, Ana T.; Marçal, David; McVey, Colin E.; Carrondo, Maria A.; Enguita, Francisco J.

    2008-01-01

    The sorbitol operon regulator from K. pneumoniae has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å. The sorbitol operon regulator (SorC) regulates the metabolism of l-sorbose in Klebsiella pneumonia. SorC was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified, and crystals were obtained of a tetrameric form. A single crystal showed X-ray diffraction to 3.20 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 91.6, b = 113.3, c = 184.1 Å. Analysis of the molecular-replacement solution indicates the presence of four SorC molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  9. Putative promoter region of rRNA operon from archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed Central

    Mankin, A S; Teterina, N L; Rubtsov, P M; Baratova, L A; Kagramanova, V K

    1984-01-01

    The 100 bp sequence from the beginning of the 16S rRNA gene of archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium and the adjacent 800 bp upstream sequence were determined. Four long (80 bp) direct repeats were found in the region preceeding the structural gene of the 16S rRNA. These repeats are proposed to constitute the promoter region of the rRNA operon of H. halobium. PMID:6089119

  10. Structural Insight into the Gene Expression Profiling of the hcn Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nilkanta; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen. It generally attacks immunosuppressed patients like AIDS, cancer, cystic fibrosis, etc. The virulence of P. aeruginosa is mediated by various virulence factors. One of such potential virulence factors is HCN synthesized by HCN synthase enzyme, which is encoded by the hcnABC operon. The expressions of the genes of this operon are regulated by three transcriptional regulators, viz., LasR, ANR, and RhlR. In our previous work, we analyzed the molecular details of the functionalities of LasR. In this work, we focused on ANR. ANR is a regulatory protein which belongs to the FNR family and works in anaerobic condition. ANR binds to the promoter DNA, named ANR box, as a dimer. The dimerization of this ANR protein is regulated by Fe4S4, an iron-sulfur cluster. This dimer of ANR (ANR-Fe4S4/ANR-Fe4S4) recognizes and binds the promoter DNA sequence and regulates the transcription of this hcnABC operon. Till date, the biomolecular details of the interactions of ANR dimer with the promoter DNA are not fully understood. Thus, we built the molecular model of ANR-Fe4S4/ANR-Fe4S4. We docked the complex with the corresponding promoter DNA region. We analyzed the mode of interactions with the promoter DNA under different conditions. Thus, we tried to analyze the functionality of the ANR protein during the expressions of the genes of the hcnABC operon. So far, this is the first report to detail the molecular mechanism of the gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Identification of nah-1 genes of the Pseudomonas putida naphthalene-degrading NPL-41 plasmid operon.

    PubMed

    Serebriiskaya, T S; Lenets, A A; Goldenkova, I V; Kobets, N S; Piruzian, E S

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida BS202 degrades naphthalene via a plasmid-encoded catabolic pathway. The nucleotide sequence of the nahC gene encoding one of this pathway enzymes, 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene dioxygenase, has been determined. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of its flanking regions identified partially the nahF and putative nahQ genes. Comparison of these three genes with corresponding ones in the NAH7 plasmid and DOX operon showed a high degree of homology.

  12. Silencing of Essential Genes within a Highly Coordinated Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hohmeier, Angela; Stone, Timothy C.; Offord, Victoria; Sarabia, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Cristina; Good, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Essential bacterial genes located within operons are particularly challenging to study independently because of coordinated gene expression and the nonviability of knockout mutants. Essentiality scores for many operon genes remain uncertain. Antisense RNA (asRNA) silencing or in-frame gene disruption of genes may help establish essentiality but can lead to polar effects on genes downstream or upstream of the target gene. Here, the Escherichia coli ribF-ileS-lspA-fkpB-ispH operon was used to evaluate the possibility of independently studying an essential gene using expressed asRNA and target gene overexpression to deregulate coupled expression. The gene requirement for growth in conditional silencing strains was determined by the relationship of target mRNA reduction with growth inhibition as the minimum transcript level required for 50% growth (MTL50). Mupirocin and globomycin, the protein inhibitors of IleS and LspA, respectively, were used in sensitization assays of strains containing both asRNA-expressing and open reading frame-expressing plasmids to examine deregulation of the overlapping ileS-lspA genes. We found upstream and downstream polar silencing effects when either ileS or lspA was silenced, indicating coupled expression. Weighted MTL50 values (means and standard deviations) of ribF, ileS, and lspA were 0.65 ± 0.18, 0.64 ± 0.06, and 0.76 ± 0.10, respectively. However, they were not significantly different (P = 0.71 by weighted one-way analysis of variance). The gene requirement for ispH could not be determined due to insufficient growth reduction. Mupirocin and globomycin sensitization experiments indicated that ileS-lspA expression could not be decoupled. The results highlight the inherent challenges associated with genetic analyses of operons; however, coupling of essential genes may provide opportunities to improve RNA-silencing antimicrobials. PMID:26070674

  13. Identification of regulatory elements that control expression of the tbpBA operon in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Vélez Acevedo, Rosuany N; Ronpirin, Chalinee; Kandler, Justin L; Shafer, William M; Cornelissen, Cynthia Nau

    2014-08-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for survival and establishment of infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The neisserial transferrin binding proteins (Tbps) comprise a bipartite system for iron acquisition from human transferrin. TbpA is the TonB-dependent transporter that accomplishes iron internalization. TbpB is a surface-exposed lipoprotein that makes the iron uptake process more efficient. Previous studies have shown that the genes encoding these proteins are arranged in a bicistronic operon, with the tbpB gene located upstream of tbpA and separated from it by an inverted repeat. The operon is under the control of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur); however, promoter elements necessary for regulated expression of the genes have not been experimentally defined. In this study, putative regulatory motifs were identified and confirmed by mutagenesis. Further examination of the sequence upstream of these promoter/operator motifs led to the identification of several novel repeats. We hypothesized that these repeats are involved in additional regulation of the operon. Insertional mutagenesis of regions upstream of the characterized promoter region resulted in decreased tbpB and tbpA transcript levels but increased protein levels for both TbpA and TbpB. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology, we determined that a long RNA was produced from the region upstream of tbpB. We localized the 5' endpoint of this transcript to between the two upstream insertions by qualitative RT-PCR. We propose that expression of this upstream RNA leads to optimized expression of the gene products from within the tbpBA operon.

  14. Influence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion on the bistable behavior of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C

    2004-03-01

    A mathematical model of the lac operon which includes all of the known regulatory mechanisms, including external-glucose-dependent catabolite repression and inducer exclusion, as well as the time delays inherent to transcription and translation, is presented. With this model we investigate the influence of external glucose, by means of catabolite repression and the regulation of lactose uptake, on the bistable behavior of this system.

  15. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae vceCAB Multiple-Drug Resistance Efflux Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Robin C.; Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Anderson, Matthew; Lackey, Melinda; Ramasubramanian, Bhagavathi; Jiangping, Bai; Borisova, Tatyana; Colmer, Jane A.; Hamood, Abdul N.; McVay, Catherine S.; Fralick, Joe A.

    2005-01-01

    Herein, we identify vceC as a component of a vceCAB operon, which codes for the Vibrio cholerae VceAB multiple-drug resistance (MDR) efflux pump, and vceR, which codes for a transcriptional autoregulatory protein that negatively regulates the expression of the vceCAB operon and is modulated by some of the substrates of this MDR efflux pump. PMID:16030246

  16. rRNA Operon Copy Number Can Explain the Distinct Epidemiology of Hospital-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, M. D.; Bosch, T.; Jansen, W. T. M.; Schouls, L.; Jonker, M. J.; Boel, C. H. E.

    2016-01-01

    The distinct epidemiology of original hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and early community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) is largely unexplained. S. aureus carries either five or six rRNA operon copies. Evidence is provided for a scenario in which MRSA has adapted to the hospital environment by rRNA operon loss (six to five copies) due to antibiotic pressure. Early CA-MRSA, in contrast, results from wild-type methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) that acquired mecA without loss of an rRNA operon. Of the HA-MRSA isolates (n = 77), 67.5% had five rRNA operon copies, compared to 23.2% of the CA-MRSA isolates (n = 69) and 7.7% of MSSA isolates (n = 195) (P < 0.001). In addition, 105 MSSA isolates from cystic fibrosis patients were tested, because these patients are repeatedly treated with antibiotics; 32.4% of these isolates had five rRNA operon copies. For all subsets, a correlation between resistance profile and rRNA copy number was found. Furthermore, we showed that in vitro antibiotic pressure may result in rRNA operon copy loss. We also showed that without antibiotic pressure, S. aureus isolates containing six rRNA copies are more fit than isolates with five copies. We conclude that HA-MRSA and cystic fibrosis isolates most likely have adapted to an environment with high antibiotic pressure by the loss of an rRNA operon copy. This loss has facilitated resistance development, which promoted survival in these niches. However, strain fitness decreased, which explains their lack of success in the community. In contrast, CA-MRSA isolates retained six rRNA operon copies, rendering them fitter and thereby able to survive and spread in the community. PMID:27671073

  17. rRNA Operon Copy Number Can Explain the Distinct Epidemiology of Hospital-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Fluit, A C; Jansen, M D; Bosch, T; Jansen, W T M; Schouls, L; Jonker, M J; Boel, C H E

    2016-12-01

    The distinct epidemiology of original hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and early community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) is largely unexplained. S. aureus carries either five or six rRNA operon copies. Evidence is provided for a scenario in which MRSA has adapted to the hospital environment by rRNA operon loss (six to five copies) due to antibiotic pressure. Early CA-MRSA, in contrast, results from wild-type methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) that acquired mecA without loss of an rRNA operon. Of the HA-MRSA isolates (n = 77), 67.5% had five rRNA operon copies, compared to 23.2% of the CA-MRSA isolates (n = 69) and 7.7% of MSSA isolates (n = 195) (P < 0.001). In addition, 105 MSSA isolates from cystic fibrosis patients were tested, because these patients are repeatedly treated with antibiotics; 32.4% of these isolates had five rRNA operon copies. For all subsets, a correlation between resistance profile and rRNA copy number was found. Furthermore, we showed that in vitro antibiotic pressure may result in rRNA operon copy loss. We also showed that without antibiotic pressure, S. aureus isolates containing six rRNA copies are more fit than isolates with five copies. We conclude that HA-MRSA and cystic fibrosis isolates most likely have adapted to an environment with high antibiotic pressure by the loss of an rRNA operon copy. This loss has facilitated resistance development, which promoted survival in these niches. However, strain fitness decreased, which explains their lack of success in the community. In contrast, CA-MRSA isolates retained six rRNA operon copies, rendering them fitter and thereby able to survive and spread in the community. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressedgenes in bacterial microarray experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2005-11-23

    Differentially expressed genes are typically identified by analyzing the variation between replicate measurements. These procedures implicitly assume that there are no systematic errors in the data even though several sources of systematic error are known. Results-OpWise estimates the amount of systematic error in bacterial microarray data by assuming that genes in the same operon have matching expression patterns. OpWise then performs a Bayesian analysis of a linear model to estimate significance. In simulations, OpWise corrects for systematic error and is robust to deviations from its assumptions. In several bacterial data sets, significant amounts of systematic error are present, and replicate-based approaches overstate the confidence of the changers dramatically, while OpWise does not. Finally, OpWise can identify additional changers by assigning genes higher confidence if they are consistent with other genes in the same operon. Although microarray data can contain large amounts of systematic error, operons provide an external standard and allow for reasonable estimates of significance. OpWise is available at http://microbesonline.org/OpWise.

  19. Organization and post-transcriptional processing of the psb B operon from chloroplasts of Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Dixit, R; Trivedi, P K; Nath, P; Sane, P V

    1999-09-01

    Chloroplast genes are typically organized into polycistronic transcription units that give rise to complex sets of mono- and oligo-cistronic overlapping RNAs through a series of processing steps. The psbB operon contains genes for the PSII (psbB, psbT, psbH) and cytochrome b(6)f (petB and petD) complexes which are needed in different amounts during chloroplast biogenesis. The functional significance of gene organization in this polycistronic unit, containing information for two different complexes, is not known and is of interest. To determine the organization and expression of these complexes, studies have been carried out on crop plants by different groups, but not much information is known about trees. We present the nucleotide sequences of PSII genes and RNA profiles of the genes located in the psbB operon from Populus deltoides, a tree species. Although the gene organization of this operon in P. deltoides is similar to that in other species, a few variations have been observed in the processing scheme.

  20. Cloning and properties of the Salmonella typhimurium tricarboxylate transport operon in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Widenhorn, K.A.; Boos, W.; Somers, J.M.; Kay, W.W.

    1988-02-01

    The tricarboxylate transport operon (tctI) was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 12-kilobase (kb) fragment from an EcoRI library of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome in lambdagtWES. It was further subcloned as a 12-kb fragment into pACYC184 and as an 8-kb fragment into pBR322. By insertional mutagenesis mediated by lambdaTn5, restriction mapping, and phenotypic testing, the tctI operon was localized to a 4.5-kb region. The tctC gene which encodes a periplasmic binding protein (C-protein) was located near the center of the insert. E. coli/tctI clones on either multicopy or single-copy vectors grew on the same tricarboxylates as S. typhimurium, although unusually long growth lags were observed. E. coli/tctI clones exhibited similar (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate transport kinetics to those of S. typhimurium, whereas E. coli alone was virtually impermeable to (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate. The periplasmic C proteins (C1 and C2 isoelectric forms) were produced in prodigious quantities from the cloned strains. Motile E. coli/tctI clones were not chemotactic toward citrate, whereas tctI deletion mutants of S. typhimurium were. Taken together, these observations indicate that tctI is not an operon involved in chemotaxis.

  1. Artificial Citrate Operon Confers Mineral Phosphate Solubilization Ability to Diverse Fluorescent Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Hemanta; Sanghavi, Paulomi B.; Macwan, Silviya R.; Archana, Gattupalli; Naresh Kumar, G.

    2014-01-01

    Citric acid is a strong acid with good cation chelating ability and can be very efficient in solubilizing mineral phosphates. Only a few phosphate solubilizing bacteria and fungi are known to secrete citric acids. In this work, we incorporated artificial citrate operon containing NADH insensitive citrate synthase (gltA1) and citrate transporter (citC) genes into the genome of six-plant growth promoting P. fluorescens strains viz., PfO-1, Pf5, CHAO1, P109, ATCC13525 and Fp315 using MiniTn7 transposon gene delivery system. Comprehensive biochemical characterization of the genomic integrants and their comparison with plasmid transformants of the same operon in M9 minimal medium reveals the highest amount of ∼7.6±0.41 mM citric and 29.95±2.8 mM gluconic acid secretion along with ∼43.2±3.24 mM intracellular citrate without affecting the growth of these P. fluorescens strains. All genomic integrants showed enhanced citric and gluconic acid secretion on Tris-Cl rock phosphate (TRP) buffered medium, which was sufficient to release 200–1000 µM Pi in TRP medium. This study demonstrates that MPS ability could be achieved in natural fluorescent pseudomonads by incorporation of artificial citrate operon not only as plasmid but also by genomic integration. PMID:25259527

  2. Amplification of the groESL operon in Pseudomonas putida increases siderophore gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Wolfs, K; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1994-10-17

    Pseudobactin 358 is the yellow-green fluorescent siderophore [microbial iron(III) transport agent] produced by Pseudomonas putida WCS358 under iron-limiting conditions. The genes encoding pseudobactin 358 biosynthesis are iron-regulated at the level of transcription. In this study, the molecular characterization is reported of a cosmid clone of WCS358 DNA that can stimulate, in an iron-dependent manner, the activity of a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in the heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region in the clone was identified by subcloning, transposon mutagenesis and DNA sequencing as the groESL operon of strain WCS358. This increase in promoter activity was not observed when the groESL genes of strain WCS358 were integrated via a transposon vector into the genome of Pseudomonas A225, indicating that multiple copies of the operon are necessary for the increase in siderophore gene promoter activity. Amplification of the Escherichia coli and WCS358 groESL genes also increased iron-regulated promoter activity in the parent strain WCS358. The groESL operon codes for the chaperone proteins GroES and GroEL, which are responsible for mediating the folding and assembly of many proteins.

  3. Structure and regulation of the Escherichia coli ruv operon involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Shinagawa, H; Makino, K; Amemura, M; Kimura, S; Iwasaki, H; Nakata, A

    1988-01-01

    The ruv gene of Escherichia coli, which is involved in DNA repair and recombination, was cloned on a plasmid vector. The DNA of the ruv region was sequenced; it had two open reading frames in tandem that could code for 22- and 37-kilodalton proteins. The proteins encoded by these open reading frames were identified by the maxicell method. The two genes were aligned in the same orientation and regulated by the SOS system, so the two genes probably constitute an operon. The distal one complemented the ruv mutations. Transcription of the operon was studied both in vivo and in vitro. Two transcription initiation sites were identified upstream of the coding frames, and the transcription from both sites was repressed by the LexA repressor. A DNA sequence that is homologous to the SOS box and bound by LexA protein was found in the regulatory region of the operon. The amino acid sequence of Ruv protein deduced from the DNA sequence shows a high degree of homology to the consensus sequence shared by ATP-binding proteins. Images PMID:2842314

  4. Selfish Operons: Horizontal Transfer May Drive the Evolution of Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. G.; Roth, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    A model is presented whereby the formation of gene clusters in bacteria is mediated by transfer of DNA within and among taxa. Bacterial operons are typically composed of genes whose products contribute to a single function. If this function is subject to weak selection or to long periods with no selection, the contributing genes may accumulate mutations and be lost by genetic drift. From a cell's perspective, once several genes are lost, the function can be restored only if all missing genes were acquired simultaneously by lateral transfer. The probability of transfer of multiple genes increases when genes are physically proximate. From a gene's perspective, horizontal transfer provides a way to escape evolutionary loss by allowing colonization of organisms lacking the encoded functions. Since organisms bearing clustered genes are more likely to act as successful donors, clustered genes would spread among bacterial genomes. The physical proximity of genes may be considered a selfish property of the operon since it affects the probability of successful horizontal transfer but may provide no physiological benefit to the host. This process predicts a mosaic structure of modern genomes in which ancestral chromosomal material is interspersed with novel, horizontally transferred operons providing peripheral metabolic functions. PMID:8844169

  5. Structural and physiological studies of the Escherichia coli histidine operon inserted into plasmid vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, C B; Musti, A M; Frunzio, R; Blasi, F

    1980-01-01

    A fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid 5,300 base paris long and containing the promoter-proximal portion of the histidine operon of Escherichia coli K-12, has been cloned in plasmid pBR313 (plasmids pCB2 and pCB3). Restriction mapping, partial nucleotide sequencing, and studies on functional expression in vivo and on protein synthesis in minicells have shown that the fragment contains the regulatory region of the operon, the hisG, hisD genes, and part of the hisC gene. Another plasmid (pCB5) contained the hisG gene and part of the hisD gene. Expression of the hisG gene in the latter plasmid was under control of the tetracycline promoter of the pBR313 plasmid. The in vivo expression of the two groups of plasmids described above, as well as their effect on the expression of the histidine genes not carried by the plasmids but present on the host chromosome, has been studied. The presence of multiple copies of pCB2 or pCB3, but not of pCB5, prevented derepression of the chromosomal histidine operon. Possible interpretations of this phenomenon are discussed. Images PMID:6246067

  6. Comparison of Deterministic and Stochastic Models of the lac Operon Genetic Network

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Michail; Mantzaris, Nikos V.

    2009-01-01

    The lac operon has been a paradigm for genetic regulation with positive feedback, and several modeling studies have described its dynamics at various levels of detail. However, it has not yet been analyzed how stochasticity can enrich the system's behavior, creating effects that are not observed in the deterministic case. To address this problem we use a comparative approach. We develop a reaction network for the dynamics of the lac operon genetic switch and derive corresponding deterministic and stochastic models that incorporate biological details. We then analyze the effects of key biomolecular mechanisms, such as promoter strength and binding affinities, on the behavior of the models. No assumptions or approximations are made when building the models other than those utilized in the reaction network. Thus, we are able to carry out a meaningful comparison between the predictions of the two models to demonstrate genuine effects of stochasticity. Such a comparison reveals that in the presence of stochasticity, certain biomolecular mechanisms can profoundly influence the region where the system exhibits bistability, a key characteristic of the lac operon dynamics. For these cases, the temporal asymptotic behavior of the deterministic model remains unchanged, indicating a role of stochasticity in modulating the behavior of the system. PMID:19186128

  7. The recA operon: A novel stress response gene cluster in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Samantha A; Smalley, Darren; Smith, C Jeffrey; Abratt, Valerie R

    2014-05-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, an opportunistic pathogen of humans, is a leading cause of bacteraemias and anaerobic abscesses which are often treated with metronidazole, a drug which damages DNA. This study investigated the responses of the B. fragilis recA three gene operon to the stress experienced during metronidazole treatment and exposure to reactive oxygen species simulating those generated by the host immune system during infection. A transcriptionally regulated response was observed using quantitative RT-PCR after metronidazole and hydrogen peroxide treatment, with all three genes being upregulated under stress conditions. In vivo and in vitro analysis of the functional role of the second gene of the operon was done using heterologous complementation and protein expression (in Escherichia coli), with subsequent biochemical assay. This gene encoded a functional bacterioferritin co-migratory protein (BCP) which was thiol-specific and had antioxidant properties, including protection of the glutamine synthetase III enzyme. This in vitro data supports the hypothesis that the genes of the operon may be involved in protection of the bacteria from the oxidative burst during tissue invasion and may play a significant role in bacterial survival and metronidazole resistance during treatment of B. fragilis infections. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis genes and operons in uncultured bacteria in the Delaware River.

    PubMed

    Waidner, Lisa A; Kirchman, David L

    2005-12-01

    Photosynthesis genes and operons of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic (AAP) bacteria have been examined in a variety of marine habitats, but genomic information about freshwater AAP bacteria is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine photosynthesis genes of AAP bacteria in the Delaware River. In a fosmid library, we found two clones bearing photosynthesis gene clusters with unique gene content and organization. Both clones contained 37 open reading frames, with most of those genes encoding known AAP bacterial proteins. The genes in one fosmid were most closely related to those of AAP bacteria in the Rhodobacter genus. The genes of the other clone were related to those of freshwater beta-proteobacteria. Both clones contained the acsF gene, which is required for aerobic bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, suggesting that these bacteria are not anaerobes. The beta-proteobacterial fosmid has the puf operon B-A-L-M-C and is the first example of an uncultured bacterium with this operon structure. The alpha-3-proteobacterial fosmid has a rare gene order (Q-B-A-L-M-X), previously observed only in the Rhodobacter genus. Phylogenetic analyses of photosynthesis genes revealed a possible freshwater cluster of AAP beta-proteobacteria. The data from both Delaware River clones suggest there are groups of freshwater or estuarine AAP bacteria distinct from those found in marine environments.

  9. The cytochrome c maturation operon is involved in manganese oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    SciTech Connect

    Vrind, J.P.M. de; Brouwers, G.J.; Corstijens, P.L.A.M.; Dulk, J. den; Vrind-de Jong, E.W. de

    1998-10-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain, strain GB-1, oxidizes Mn{sup 2+} to Mn oxide in the early stationary growth phase. It also secretes a siderophore (identified as pyoverdine) when it is subjected to iron limitation. After transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis several classes of mutants with differences in Mn{sup 2+} oxidation and/or secretion of the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing activity were identified. Preliminary analysis of the Tn5 insertion site in one of the nonoxidizing mutants suggested that a multicopper oxidase-related enzyme is involved in Mn{sup 2+} oxidation. The insertion site in another mutant was preliminarily identified as a gene involved in the general protein secretion pathway. Two mutants defective in Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing activity also secreted porphyrins into the medium and appeared to be derepressed for pyoverdine production. These strains were chosen for detailed analysis. Both mutants were shown to contain Tn5 insertions in the ccmF gene, which is part of the cytochrome c maturation operon. They were cytochrome oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Complementation with part of the ccm operon isolated from the wild type restored the phenotype of the parent strain. These results indicate that a functional ccm operon is required for Mn{sup 2+} oxidation in P. putida GB-1. A possible relationship between porphyrin secretion resulting from the ccm mutation and stimulation of pyoverdine production is discussed.

  10. Expression of an Entire Bacterial Operon in Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mozes-Koch, Rita; Gover, Ofer; Tanne, Edna; Peretz, Yuval; Maori, Eyal; Chernin, Leonid; Sela, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Multigene expression is required for metabolic engineering, i.e. coregulated expression of all genes in a metabolic pathway for the production of a desired secondary metabolite. To that end, several transgenic approaches have been attempted with limited success. Better success has been achieved by transforming plastids with operons. IL-60 is a platform of constructs driven from the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl virus. We demonstrate that IL-60 enables nontransgenic expression of an entire bacterial operon in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants without the need for plastid (or any other) transformation. Delivery to the plant is simple, and the rate of expressing plants is close to 100%, eliminating the need for selectable markers. Using this platform, we show the expression of an entire metabolic pathway in plants and delivery of the end product secondary metabolite (pyrrolnitrin). Expression of this unique secondary metabolite resulted in the appearance of a unique plant phenotype disease resistance. Pyrrolnitrin production was already evident 2 d after application of the operon to plants and persisted throughout the plant's life span. Expression of entire metabolic pathways in plants is potentially beneficial for plant improvement, disease resistance, and biotechnological advances, such as commercial production of desired metabolites. PMID:22353575

  11. Role of a Tannerella forsythia exopolysaccharide synthesis operon in biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Honma, Kiyonobu; Inagaki, Satoru; Okuda, Katsuji; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Sharma, Ashu

    2007-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacterial infections which leads to tooth loss if untreated. Since biofilms formed by periodontal bacteria are considered important in disease progression and pose difficulties in treatment, we sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms of T. forsythia biofilm formation. This was carried out by screening random insertion mutants of T. forsythia for alterations in biofilm development. This approach lead to the identification of an operon involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis. An isogenic mutant of one of the genes, wecC, contained within the operon was constructed. The isogenic wecC mutant showed increased ability to form biofilms as compared to the parent strain. The wecC mutant also formed aggregated microcolonies and showed increased cell-surface associated hydrophobicity as compared to the parent strain. Moreover, biochemical characterization of the wecC mutant indicated that glycosylation of surface glycoproteins was reduced. Therefore, our results suggest that the wecC operon is associated with glycosylation of surface-glycoprotein expression and likely plays an inhibitory role in T. forsythia biofilm formation.

  12. Artificial citrate operon confers mineral phosphate solubilization ability to diverse fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Hemanta; Sanghavi, Paulomi B; Macwan, Silviya R; Archana, Gattupalli; Naresh Kumar, G

    2014-01-01

    Citric acid is a strong acid with good cation chelating ability and can be very efficient in solubilizing mineral phosphates. Only a few phosphate solubilizing bacteria and fungi are known to secrete citric acids. In this work, we incorporated artificial citrate operon containing NADH insensitive citrate synthase (gltA1) and citrate transporter (citC) genes into the genome of six-plant growth promoting P. fluorescens strains viz., PfO-1, Pf5, CHAO1, P109, ATCC13525 and Fp315 using MiniTn7 transposon gene delivery system. Comprehensive biochemical characterization of the genomic integrants and their comparison with plasmid transformants of the same operon in M9 minimal medium reveals the highest amount of ∼7.6±0.41 mM citric and 29.95±2.8 mM gluconic acid secretion along with ∼43.2±3.24 mM intracellular citrate without affecting the growth of these P. fluorescens strains. All genomic integrants showed enhanced citric and gluconic acid secretion on Tris-Cl rock phosphate (TRP) buffered medium, which was sufficient to release 200-1000 µM Pi in TRP medium. This study demonstrates that MPS ability could be achieved in natural fluorescent pseudomonads by incorporation of artificial citrate operon not only as plasmid but also by genomic integration.

  13. Regulation of nrf operon expression in pathogenic enteric bacteria: sequence divergence reveals new regulatory complexity

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Rita E.; Lee, David J.; Busby, Stephen J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The Escherichia coli K‐12 nrf operon encodes a periplasmic nitrite reductase, the expression of which is driven from a single promoter, pnrf. Expression from pnrf is activated by the FNR transcription factor in response to anaerobiosis and further increased in response to nitrite by the response regulator proteins, NarL and NarP. FNR‐dependent transcription is suppressed by the binding of two nucleoid associated proteins, IHF and Fis. As Fis levels increase in cells grown in rich medium, the positioning of its binding site, overlapping the promoter −10 element, ensures that pnrf is sharply repressed. Here, we investigate the expression of the nrf operon promoter from various pathogenic enteric bacteria. We show that pnrf from enterohaemorrhagic E. coli is more active than its K‐12 counterpart, exhibits substantial FNR‐independent activity and is insensitive to nutrient quality, due to an improved −10 element. We also demonstrate that the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium core promoter is more active than previously thought, due to differences around the transcription start site, and that its expression is repressed by downstream sequences. We identify the CsrA RNA binding protein as being responsible for this, and show that CsrA differentially regulates the E. coli K‐12 and Salmonella nrf operons. PMID:28211111

  14. Bacterial clade with the ribosomal RNA operon on a small plasmid rather than the chromosome.

    PubMed

    Anda, Mizue; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Okubo, Takashi; Sugawara, Masayuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Mitsui, Hisayuki

    2015-11-17

    rRNA is essential for life because of its functional importance in protein synthesis. The rRNA (rrn) operon encoding 16S, 23S, and 5S rRNAs is located on the "main" chromosome in all bacteria documented to date and is frequently used as a marker of chromosomes. Here, our genome analysis of a plant-associated alphaproteobacterium, Aureimonas sp. AU20, indicates that this strain has its sole rrn operon on a small (9.4 kb), high-copy-number replicon. We designated this unusual replicon carrying the rrn operon on the background of an rrn-lacking chromosome (RLC) as the rrn-plasmid. Four of 12 strains close to AU20 also had this RLC/rrn-plasmid organization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that those strains having the RLC/rrn-plasmid organization represented one clade within the genus Aureimonas. Our finding introduces a previously unaddressed viewpoint into studies of genetics, genomics, and evolution in microbiology and biology in general.

  15. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic models of the lac operon genetic network.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Michail; Mantzaris, Nikos V

    2009-02-01

    The lac operon has been a paradigm for genetic regulation with positive feedback, and several modeling studies have described its dynamics at various levels of detail. However, it has not yet been analyzed how stochasticity can enrich the system's behavior, creating effects that are not observed in the deterministic case. To address this problem we use a comparative approach. We develop a reaction network for the dynamics of the lac operon genetic switch and derive corresponding deterministic and stochastic models that incorporate biological details. We then analyze the effects of key biomolecular mechanisms, such as promoter strength and binding affinities, on the behavior of the models. No assumptions or approximations are made when building the models other than those utilized in the reaction network. Thus, we are able to carry out a meaningful comparison between the predictions of the two models to demonstrate genuine effects of stochasticity. Such a comparison reveals that in the presence of stochasticity, certain biomolecular mechanisms can profoundly influence the region where the system exhibits bistability, a key characteristic of the lac operon dynamics. For these cases, the temporal asymptotic behavior of the deterministic model remains unchanged, indicating a role of stochasticity in modulating the behavior of the system.

  16. Transcription termination within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Stork, Michiel; Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Welch, Timothy J; Crosa, Jorge H

    2007-05-01

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric siderophore transport, fatD, -C, -B, and -A, and two genes for siderophore biosynthesis, angR and angT. This cluster plays an important role in the virulence mechanisms of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polycistronic mRNA, the relative levels of transcription for the fat portion and for the whole ITB message differ profoundly, the levels of the fat transcript being about 17-fold higher. Using S1 nuclease mapping, lacZ transcriptional fusions, and in vitro studies, we were able to show that the differential gene expression within the ITB operon is due to termination of transcription between the fatA and angR genes, although a few transcripts proceeded beyond the termination site to the end of this operon. This termination process requires a 427-nucleotide antisense RNA that spans the intergenic region and acts as a novel transcriptional terminator.

  17. A powerful hybrid puc operon promoter tightly regulated by both IPTG and low oxygen level.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zongli; Zhao, Zhiping; Pan, Yu; Tu, Yun; Chen, Guoping

    2010-04-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been intensively studied and provides an excellent model for studying both photosynthesis and membrane development. The photosynthetic apparatus (LH2 and LH1-RC complexes) can be synthesized in large scale and integrated into the intracytoplasmic membrane system under specific conditions, which thus provides us insight to utilize the puc or(and) puf operon to heterologously express recombinant proteins in the intracytoplasmic membrane using Rb. sphaeroides as a novel expression system. However, basal level of expression of puc and puf promoter is uncontrolled. We report the construction of LH2 polypeptide expression vector that contains a reengineered lacI(q)-puc promoter-lac operator hybrid promoter, which allows the puc operon to be regulated by both IPTG and low oxygen level. Synthesis of LH2 complexes was completely repressed in the absence of isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG), and the degree of induction was controlled by varying the concentration of IPTG. The optimal concentration of IPTG was determined. SDS-PAGE and Western blot were employed for further analysis. Our results suggest that the reengineered hybrid promoter is efficient to tightly regulate the expression of the puc operon, and our strategy can open up a new approach in the study of the membrane protein expression system.

  18. The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M; Horer, S; Clancy, S; Moy, S; Volkart, LL; Sassoon, J; Baumann, U; Joachimiak, A

    2009-12-25

    Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representing a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.

  19. The Legionella pneumophila GIG operon responds to gold and copper in planktonic and biofilm cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jwanoswki, Kathleen; Wells, Christina; Bruce, Terri; Rutt, Jennifer; Banks, Tabitha; McNealy, Tamara L.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila contaminates man-made water systems and creates numerous exposure risks for Legionnaires’ Disease. Because copper/silver ionization is commonly used to control L. pneumophila, its mechanisms of metal response and detoxification are of significant interest. Here we describe an L. pneumophila operon with significant similarity to the GIG operon of Cupriavidus metallidurans. The Legionella GIG operon is present in a subset of strains and has been acquired as part of the ICE-βox 65-kB integrative conjugative element. We assessed GIG promoter activity following exposure of L. pneumophila to multiple concentrations of HAuCl4, CuSO4 and AgNO3. At 37°C, control stationary phase cultures exhibited GIG promoter activity. This activity increased significantly in response to 20 and 50uM HAuCl4 and CuSO4 but not in response to AgNO3. Conversely, at 26°C, cultures exhibited decreased promoter response to copper. GIG promoter activity was also induced by HAuCl4 or CuSO4 during early biofilm establishment at both temperatures. When an L. pneumophila GIG promoter construct was transformed into E. coli DH5α, cultures showed baseline expression levels that did not increase following metal addition. Analysis of L. pneumophila transcriptional regulatory mutants suggested that GIG up-regulation in the presence of metal ions may be influenced by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS. PMID:28463986

  20. The Xis2d protein of CTnDOT binds to the intergenic region between the mob and tra operons

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Crystal M.; Gardner, Jeffrey F.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2015-01-01

    CTnDOT is a 65kbp integrative and conjugative element (ICE) that carries genes encoding both tetracycline and erythromycin resistances. The Excision operon of this element encodes Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc proteins involved in the excision of CTnDOT from host chromosomes. These proteins are also required in the complex transcriptional regulation of the divergently transcribed transfer (tra) and mobilization (mob) operons of CTnDOT. Transcription of the tra operon is positively regulated by Xis2c and Xis2d, whereas, transcription of the mob operon is positively regulated by Xis2d and Exc. Xis2d is the only protein that is involved in the excision reaction, as well as the transcriptional regulation of both the mob and tra operons. This paper helps establish how Xis2d binds the DNA in the mob and tra region. Unlike other excisionase proteins, Xis2d binds a region of dyad symmetry. The binding site is located in the intergenic region between the mob and tra promoters, and once bound Xis2d induces a bend in the DNA. Xis2d binding to this region could be the preliminary step for the activation of both operons. Then the other proteins, like Exc, can interact with Xis2d and form higher order complexes. PMID:26212728

  1. The Xis2d protein of CTnDOT binds to the intergenic region between the mob and tra operons.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Crystal M; Gardner, Jeffrey F; Salyers, Abigail A

    2015-09-01

    CTnDOT is a 65kbp integrative and conjugative element (ICE) that carries genes encoding both tetracycline and erythromycin resistances. The excision operon of this element encodes Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc proteins involved in the excision of CTnDOT from host chromosomes. These proteins are also required in the complex transcriptional regulation of the divergently transcribed transfer (tra) and mobilization (mob) operons of CTnDOT. Transcription of the tra operon is positively regulated by Xis2c and Xis2d, whereas, transcription of the mob operon is positively regulated by Xis2d and Exc. Xis2d is the only protein that is involved in the excision reaction, as well as the transcriptional regulation of both the mob and tra operons. This paper helps establish how Xis2d binds the DNA in the mob and tra region. Unlike other excisionase proteins, Xis2d binds a region of dyad symmetry. The binding site is located in the intergenic region between the mob and tra promoters, and once bound Xis2d induces a bend in the DNA. Xis2d binding to this region could be the preliminary step for the activation of both operons. Then the other proteins, like Exc, can interact with Xis2d and form higher order complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of cbbR, a positive regulator of the Calvin cycle operons of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J L; Tabita, F R

    1993-01-01

    Structural genes encoding Calvin cycle enzymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides are duplicated and organized within two physically distinct transcriptional units, the form I and form II cbb operons. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region upstream of the form I operon revealed a divergently transcribed open reading frame, cbbR, that showed significant similarity to the LysR family of transcriptional regulatory proteins. Mutants containing an insertionally inactivated cbbR gene were impaired in photoheterotrophic growth and completely unable to grow photolithoautotrophically with CO2 as the sole carbon source. In the cbbR strain, expression of genes within the form I operon was completely abolished and that of the form II operon was reduced to about 30% of the wild-type level. The cloned cbbR gene complemented the mutant for wild-type growth characteristics, and normal levels of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) were observed. However, rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed that the wild-type level of RubisCO was due to overexpression of the form II enzyme, whereas expression of the form I RubisCO was 10% of that of the wild-type strain. The cbbR insertional inactivation did not appear to affect aerobic expression of either CO2 fixation operon, but preliminary evidence suggests that the constitutive expression of the form II operon observed in the cbbR strain may be subject to repression during aerobic growth. PMID:8376325

  3. Cloning and Molecular Analysis of a Mannitol Operon of Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent Phosphotransferase (PTS) type From Vibrio cholerae O395

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Smith, Kenneth P.; Floyd, Jody L.; Varela, Manuel F.

    2010-01-01

    A putative mannitol operon of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase (PTS) type was cloned from Vibrio cholerae O395 and its activity studied in Escherichia coli. The 3.9 kb operon comprising of three genes is organized as mtlADR. Based on the sequence analysis, these were identified as genes encoding a putative mannitol-specific enzyme IICBA (EIIMtl) component (MtlA), a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (MtlD) and a mannitol operon repressor (MtlR). The transport of [3H]mannitol by the cloned mannitol operon in E. coli was 13.8±1.4 nmol/min/mg protein. The insertional inactivation of EIIMtl abolished mannitol and sorbitol transport in V. cholerae O395. Comparison of the mannitol utilization apparatus of V. cholerae with those of Gram-negative and Gram positive bacteria suggests highly conserved nature of the system. MtlA and MtlD exhibit 75% similarity with corresponding sequences of E. coli mannitol operon genes, while MtlR has 63% similarity with MtlR of E. coli. The cloning of V. cholerae mannitol utilization system in an E. coli background will help in elucidating the functional properties of this operon. PMID:21184218

  4. Functional Analysis of the Magnetosome Island in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense: The mamAB Operon Is Sufficient for Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Lohße, Anna; Ullrich, Susanne; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah; Wanner, Gerd; Richter, Michael; Voigt, Birgit; Schweder, Thomas; Schüler, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial magnetosomes are membrane-enveloped, nanometer-sized crystals of magnetite, which serve for magnetotactic navigation. All genes implicated in the synthesis of these organelles are located in a conserved genomic magnetosome island (MAI). We performed a comprehensive bioinformatic, proteomic and genetic analysis of the MAI in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. By the construction of large deletion mutants we demonstrate that the entire region is dispensable for growth, and the majority of MAI genes have no detectable function in magnetosome formation and could be eliminated without any effect. Only <25% of the region comprising four major operons could be associated with magnetite biomineralization, which correlated with high expression of these genes and their conservation among magnetotactic bacteria. Whereas only deletion of the mamAB operon resulted in the complete loss of magnetic particles, deletion of the conserved mms6, mamGFDC, and mamXY operons led to severe defects in morphology, size and organization of magnetite crystals. However, strains in which these operons were eliminated together retained the ability to synthesize small irregular crystallites, and weakly aligned in magnetic fields. This demonstrates that whereas the mamGFDC, mms6 and mamXY operons have crucial and partially overlapping functions for the formation of functional magnetosomes, the mamAB operon is the only region of the MAI, which is necessary and sufficient for magnetite biomineralization. Our data further reduce the known minimal gene set required for magnetosome formation and will be useful for future genome engineering approaches. PMID:22043287

  5. Nebulon: a system for the inference of functional relationships of gene products from the rearrangement of predicted operons

    PubMed Central

    Janga, Sarath Chandra; Collado-Vides, Julio; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Since operons are unstable across Prokaryotes, it has been suggested that perhaps they re-combine in a conservative manner. Thus, genes belonging to a given operon in one genome might re-associate in other genomes revealing functional relationships among gene products. We developed a system to build networks of functional relationships of gene products based on their organization into operons in any available genome. The operon predictions are based on inter-genic distances. Our system can use different kinds of thresholds to accept a functional relationship, either related to the prediction of operons, or to the number of non-redundant genomes that support the associations. We also work by shells, meaning that we decide on the number of linking iterations to allow for the complementation of related gene sets. The method shows high reliability benchmarked against knowledge-bases of functional interactions. We also illustrate the use of Nebulon in finding new members of regulons, and of other functional groups of genes. Operon rearrangements produce thousands of high-quality new interactions per prokaryotic genome, and thousands of confirmations per genome to other predictions, making it another important tool for the inference of functional interactions from genomic context. PMID:15867197

  6. Role of Ribosome Release in Regulation of tna Operon Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Konan, Kouacou Vincent; Yanofsky, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Expression of the degradative tryptophanase (tna) operon of Escherichia coli is regulated by catabolite repression and tryptophan-induced transcription antitermination. In cultures growing in the absence of added tryptophan, transcription of the structural genes of the tna operon is limited by Rho-dependent transcription termination in the leader region of the operon. Tryptophan induction prevents this Rho-dependent termination, and requires in-frame translation of a 24-residue leader peptide coding region, tnaC, that contains a single, crucial, Trp codon. Studies with a lacZ reporter construct lacking the spacer region between tnaC and the first major structural gene, tnaA, suggested that tryptophan induction might involve cis action by the TnaC leader peptide on the ribosome translating the tnaC coding region. The leader peptide was hypothesized to inhibit ribosome release at the tnaC stop codon, thereby blocking Rho’s access to the transcript. Regulatory studies with deletion constructs of the tna operon of Proteus vulgaris supported this interpretation. In the present study the putative role of the tnaC stop codon in tna operon regulation in E. coli was examined further by replacing the natural tnaC stop codon, UGA, with UAG or UAA in a tnaC-stop codon-tnaA′-′lacZ reporter construct. Basal level expression was reduced to 20 and 50% when the UGA stop codon was replaced by UAG or UAA, respectively, consistent with the finding that in E. coli translation terminates more efficiently at UAG and UAA than at UGA. Tryptophan induction was observed in strains with any of the stop codons. However, when UAG or UAA replaced UGA, the induced level of expression was also reduced to 15 and 50% of that obtained with UGA as the tnaC stop codon, respectively. Introduction of a mutant allele encoding a temperature-sensitive release factor 1, prfA1, increased basal level expression 60-fold when the tnaC stop codon was UAG and 3-fold when this stop codon was UAA; basal level

  7. Characterization of the Operon Encoding the Alternative ςB Factor from Bacillus anthracis and Its Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Fouet, Agnès; Namy, Olivier; Lambert, Guillaume

    2000-01-01

    The operon encoding the general stress transcription factor ςB and two proteins of its regulatory network, RsbV and RsbW, was cloned from the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis by PCR amplification of chromosomal DNA with degenerate primers, by inverse PCR, and by direct cloning. The gene cluster was very similar to the Bacillus subtilis sigB operon both in the primary sequences of the gene products and in the order of its three genes. However, the deduced products of sequences upstream and downstream from this operon showed no similarity to other proteins encoded by the B. subtilis sigB operon. Therefore, the B. anthracis sigB operon contains three genes rather than eight as in B. subtilis. The B. anthracis operon is preceded by a ςB-like promoter sequence, the expression of which depends on an intact ςB transcription factor in B. subtilis. It is followed by another open reading frame that is also preceded by a promoter sequence similarly dependent on B. subtilis ςB. We found that in B. anthracis, both these promoters were induced during the stationary phase and induction required an intact sigB gene. The sigB operon was induced by heat shock. Mutants from which sigB was deleted were constructed in a toxinogenic and a plasmidless strain. These mutants differed from the parental strains in terms of morphology. The toxinogenic sigB mutant strain was also less virulent than the parental strain in the mouse model. B. anthracis ςB may therefore be a minor virulence factor. PMID:10960085

  8. The effect of iatrogenic Staphylococcus epidermidis intercellar adhesion operon on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lianhua, Ye; Yunchao, Huang; Guangqiang, Zhao; Kun, Yang; Xing, Liu; Fengli, Guo

    2014-12-01

    The intercellular adhesion gene (ica) of Staphylococcus epidermidis is a key factor for bacterial aggregation. This study explored the effect of ica on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces. Genes related to bacterial biofilm formation, including 16S rRNA, autolysin (atlE), fibrinogen binding protein gene (fbe), and ica were identified and sequenced from 112 clinical isolates of iatrogenic S. epidermidis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Based on the sequencing result, ica operon-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) and ica operon-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains were separated and co-cultivated with PVC material. After 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 h of co-culture, the thickness of the bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on the PVC surface were measured under the confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope. The positive rate of S. epidermidis-specific 16SrRNA in 112 iatrogenic strains was 100% (112/112). The genotype of ica-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 57.1% (64/112), and genotype of ica-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 37.5% (42/112). During 30 h of co-culture, no obvious bacterial biofilm formed on the surface of PVC in the ica-positive group, however, mature bacterial biofilm structure formed after 24 h. For all time points, thickness of bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on PVC surfaces in the ica operon-positive group were significantly higher than those in ica operon-negative group (p<0.01). Iatrogenic S. epidermidis can be categorized into ica operon-negative and ica operon-positive strains. The ica operon plays an important role in bacterial biofilm formation and bacterial multiplication on PVC material.

  9. The Effect of Stochasticity on the Lac Operon: An Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Milan; Hogeweg, Paulien

    2007-01-01

    The role of stochasticity on gene expression is widely discussed. Both potential advantages and disadvantages have been revealed. In some systems, noise in gene expression has been quantified, in among others the lac operon of Escherichia coli. Whether stochastic gene expression in this system is detrimental or beneficial for the cells is, however, still unclear. We are interested in the effects of stochasticity from an evolutionary point of view. We study this question in the lac operon, taking a computational approach: using a detailed, quantitative, spatial model, we evolve through a mutation–selection process the shape of the promoter function and therewith the effective amount of stochasticity. We find that noise values for lactose, the natural inducer, are much lower than for artificial, nonmetabolizable inducers, because these artificial inducers experience a stronger positive feedback. In the evolved promoter functions, noise due to stochasticity in gene expression, when induced by lactose, only plays a very minor role in short-term physiological adaptation, because other sources of population heterogeneity dominate. Finally, promoter functions evolved in the stochastic model evolve to higher repressed transcription rates than those evolved in a deterministic version of the model. This causes these promoter functions to experience less stochasticity in gene expression. We show that a high repression rate and hence high stochasticity increases the delay in lactose uptake in a variable environment. We conclude that the lac operon evolved such that the impact of stochastic gene expression is minor in its natural environment, but happens to respond with much stronger stochasticity when confronted with artificial inducers. In this particular system, we have shown that stochasticity is detrimental. Moreover, we demonstrate that in silico evolution in a quantitative model, by mutating the parameters of interest, is a promising way to unravel the functional

  10. Functional characterization and evolution of the isotuberculosinol operon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Francis M.; Xu, Meimei; Davenport, Emily K.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2012-01-01

    Terpenoid metabolites are important to the cellular function, structural integrity, and pathogenesis of the human-specific pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Genetic and biochemical investigations have indicated a role for the diterpenoid isotuberculosinol (isoTb) early in the infection process. There are only two genes (Rv3377c and Rv3378c) required for production of isoTb, yet these are found in what appears to be a five-gene terpenoid/isoprenoid biosynthetic operon. Of the three remaining genes (Rv3379c, Rv3382c, and Rv3383c), previous work has indicated that Rv3379c is an inactive pseudo-gene. Here we demonstrate that Rv3382c and Rv3383c encode biochemically redundant machinery for isoprenoid metabolism, encoding a functional 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (LytB) for isoprenoid precursor production and a geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthase, respectively, for which the Mtb genome contains other functional isozymes (Rv1110 and Rv0562, respectively). These results complete the characterization of the isoTb biosynthetic operon, as well as further elucidating isoprenoid metabolism in Mtb. In addition, we have investigated the evolutionary origin of this operon, revealing Mtb-specific conservation of the diterpene synthase genes responsible for isoTb biosynthesis, which supports our previously advanced hypothesis that isoTb acts as a human-specific pathogenic metabolite and is consistent with the human host specificity of Mtb. Intriguingly, our results revealed that many mycobacteria contain orthologs for both Rv3383c and Rv0562, suggesting a potentially important role for these functionally redundant GGPP synthases in the evolution of terpenoid/isoprenoid metabolism in the mycobacteria. PMID:23091471

  11. A Novel lux Operon in the Cryptically Bioluminescent Fish Pathogen Vibrio salmonicida Is Associated with Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Eric J.; Tunsjø, Hege S.; Fidopiastis, Pat M.; Sørum, Henning; Ruby, Edward G.

    2007-01-01

    The cold-water-fish pathogen Vibrio salmonicida expresses a functional bacterial luciferase but produces insufficient levels of its aliphatic-aldehyde substrate to be detectably luminous in culture. Our goals were to (i) better explain this cryptic bioluminescence phenotype through molecular characterization of the lux operon and (ii) test whether the bioluminescence gene cluster is associated with virulence. Cloning and sequencing of the V. salmonicida lux operon revealed that homologs of all of the genes required for luminescence are present: luxAB (luciferase) and luxCDE (aliphatic-aldehyde synthesis). The arrangement and sequence of these structural lux genes are conserved compared to those in related species of luminous bacteria. However, V. salmonicida strains have a novel arrangement and number of homologs of the luxR and luxI quorum-sensing regulatory genes. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis suggests that this novel arrangement of quorum-sensing genes generates antisense transcripts that may be responsible for the reduced production of bioluminescence. In addition, infection with a strain in which the luxA gene was mutated resulted in a marked delay in mortality among Atlantic salmon relative to infection with the wild-type parent in single-strain challenge experiments. In mixed-strain competition between the luxA mutant and the wild type, the mutant was attenuated up to 50-fold. It remains unclear whether the attenuation results from a direct loss of luciferase or a polar disturbance elsewhere in the lux operon. Nevertheless, these findings document for the first time an association between a mutation in a structural lux gene and virulence, as well as provide a new molecular system to study Vibrio pathogenesis in a natural host. PMID:17277225

  12. arc-dependent thermal regulation and extragenic suppression of the Escherichia coli cytochrome d operon.

    PubMed

    Wall, D; Delaney, J M; Fayet, O; Lipinska, B; Yamamoto, T; Georgopoulos, C

    1992-10-01

    In a screen for Escherichia coli genes whose products are required for high-temperature growth, we identified and characterized a mini-Tn10 insertion that allows the formation of wild-type-size colonies at 30 degrees C but results in microcolony formation at 36 degrees C and above (Ts- phenotype). Mapping, molecular cloning, and DNA sequencing analyses showed that the mini-Tn10 insertion resides in the cydB gene, the distal gene of the cydAB operon (cytochrome d). The Ts- growth phenotype was also shown to be associated with previously described cyd alleles. In addition, all cyd mutants were found to be extremely sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that cyd-specific mRNA levels accumulate following a shift to high temperature. Interestingly, this heat shock induction of the cyd operon was not affected in an rpoH delta background but was totally absent in an arcA or arcB mutant background. Extragenic suppressors of the Cyd Ts- phenotype are found at approximately 10(-3). Two extragenic suppressors were shown to be null alleles in either arcA or arcB. One interpretation of our results is that in the absence of ArcA or ArcB, which are required for the repression of the cyo operon (cytochrome o), elevated levels of Cyo are produced, thus compensating for the missing cytochrome d function. Consistent with this interpretation, the presence of the cyo gene on a multicopy plasmid suppressed the Ts- and hydrogen peroxide-sensitive phenotypes of cyd mutants.

  13. A Fluorescent Bioreporter for Acetophenone and 1-Phenylethanol derived from a Specifically Induced Catabolic Operon

    PubMed Central

    Muhr, Enrico; Leicht, Oliver; González Sierra, Silvia; Thanbichler, Martin; Heider, Johann

    2016-01-01

    The β-proteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum degrades the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a key intermediate of anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism, either aerobically or anaerobically via a complex ATP-dependent acetophenone carboxylase and a benzoylacetate-CoA ligase. The genes coding for these enzymes (apcABCDE and bal) are organized in an apparent operon and are expressed in the presence of the substrate acetophenone. To study the conditions under which this operon is expressed in more detail, we constructed a reporter strain by inserting a gene fusion of apcA, the first gene of the apc-bal operon, with the gene for the fluorescent protein mCherry into the chromosome of A. aromaticum. The fusion protein indeed accumulated consistently with the expression pattern of the acetophenone-metabolic enzymes under various growth conditions. After evaluating and quantifying the data by fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence-based flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, mCherry production was found to be proportional to the applied acetophenone concentrations. The reporter strain allowed quantification of acetophenone within a concentration range of 50 μM (detection limit) to 250 μM after 12 and 24 h. Moreover, production of the Apc-mCherry fusion protein in the reporter strain was highly specific and responded to acetophenone and both enantiomers of 1-phenylethanol, which are easily converted to acetophenone. Other analogous substrates showed either a significantly weaker response or none at all. Therefore, the reporter strain provides a basis for the development of a specific bioreporter system for acetophenone with an application potential reaching from environmental monitoring to petroleum prospecting. PMID:26858693

  14. Role of Tellurite Resistance Operon in Filamentous Growth of Yersinia pestis in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis initiates infection by parasitism of host macrophages. In response to macrophage infections, intracellular Y. pestis can assume a filamentous cellular morphology which may mediate resistance to host cell innate immune responses. We previously observed the expression of Y. pestis tellurite resistance proteins TerD and TerE from the terZABCDE operon during macrophage infections. Others have observed a filamentous response associated with expression of tellurite resistance operon in Escherichia coli exposed to tellurite. Therefore, in this study we examine the potential role of Y. pestis tellurite resistance operon in filamentous cellular morphology during macrophage infections. In vitro treatment of Y. pestis culture with sodium tellurite (Na2TeO3) caused the bacterial cells to assume a filamentous phenotype similar to the filamentous phenotype observed during macrophage infections. A deletion mutant for genes terZAB abolished the filamentous morphologic response to tellurite exposure or intracellular parasitism, but without affecting tellurite resistance. However, a terZABCDE deletion mutant abolished both filamentous morphologic response and tellurite resistance. Complementation of the terZABCDE deletion mutant with terCDE, but not terZAB, partially restored tellurite resistance. When the terZABCDE deletion mutant was complemented with terZAB or terCDE, Y. pestis exhibited filamentous morphology during macrophage infections as well as while these complemented genes were being expressed under an in vitro condition. Further in E. coli, expression of Y. pestis terZAB, but not terCDE, conferred a filamentous phenotype. These findings support the role of Y. pestis terZAB mediation of the filamentous response phenotype; whereas, terCDE confers tellurite resistance. Although the beneficial role of filamentous morphological responses by Y. pestis during macrophage infections is yet to be fully defined, it may be a bacterial adaptive strategy to macrophage

  15. Characterization of heterologous multigene operons in transgenic chloroplasts: transcription, processing, and translation.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Vargas, Tania; Ruiz, Oscar N; Daniell, Henry

    2005-07-01

    The first characterization of transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and translational processes of heterologous operons expressed via the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) chloroplast genome is reported here. Northern-blot analyses performed on chloroplast transgenic lines harboring seven different heterologous operons revealed that polycistronic mRNA was the predominant transcript produced. Despite the lack of processing of such polycistrons, large amounts of foreign protein accumulation was observed in these transgenic lines, indicating abundant translation of polycistrons. This is supported by polysome fractionation assays, which allowed detection of polycistronic RNA in lower fractions of the sucrose gradients. These results show that the chloroplast posttranscriptional machinery can indeed detect and translate multigenic sequences that are not of chloroplast origin. In contrast to native transcripts, processed and unprocessed heterologous polycistrons were stable, even in the absence of 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Unlike native 5'UTRs, heterologous secondary structures or 5'UTRs showed efficient translational enhancement independent of cellular control. Abundant read-through transcripts were observed in the presence of chloroplast 3'UTRs but they were efficiently processed at introns present within the native operon. Heterologous genes regulated by the psbA (the photosystem II polypeptide D1) promoter, 5' and 3'UTRs have greater abundance of transcripts than the endogenous psbA gene because transgenes were integrated into the inverted repeat region. Addressing questions about polycistrons, and the sequences required for their processing and transcript stability, are essential in chloroplast metabolic engineering. Knowledge of such factors would enable engineering of foreign pathways independent of the chloroplast complex posttranscriptional regulatory machinery.

  16. The effect of stochasticity on the lac operon: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, Milan; Hogeweg, Paulien

    2007-06-01

    The role of stochasticity on gene expression is widely discussed. Both potential advantages and disadvantages have been revealed. In some systems, noise in gene expression has been quantified, in among others the lac operon of Escherichia coli. Whether stochastic gene expression in this system is detrimental or beneficial for the cells is, however, still unclear. We are interested in the effects of stochasticity from an evolutionary point of view. We study this question in the lac operon, taking a computational approach: using a detailed, quantitative, spatial model, we evolve through a mutation-selection process the shape of the promoter function and therewith the effective amount of stochasticity. We find that noise values for lactose, the natural inducer, are much lower than for artificial, nonmetabolizable inducers, because these artificial inducers experience a stronger positive feedback. In the evolved promoter functions, noise due to stochasticity in gene expression, when induced by lactose, only plays a very minor role in short-term physiological adaptation, because other sources of population heterogeneity dominate. Finally, promoter functions evolved in the stochastic model evolve to higher repressed transcription rates than those evolved in a deterministic version of the model. This causes these promoter functions to experience less stochasticity in gene expression. We show that a high repression rate and hence high stochasticity increases the delay in lactose uptake in a variable environment. We conclude that the lac operon evolved such that the impact of stochastic gene expression is minor in its natural environment, but happens to respond with much stronger stochasticity when confronted with artificial inducers. In this particular system, we have shown that stochasticity is detrimental. Moreover, we demonstrate that in silico evolution in a quantitative model, by mutating the parameters of interest, is a promising way to unravel the functional

  17. Determinants of bistability in induction of the Escherichia coli lac operon.

    PubMed

    Dreisigmeyer, D W; Stajic, J; Nemenman, I; Hlavacek, W S; Wall, M E

    2008-09-01

    The authors have developed a mathematical model of regulation of expression of the Escherichia coli lac operon, and have investigated bistability in its steady-state induction behaviour in the absence of external glucose. Numerical analysis of equations describing regulation by artificial inducers revealed two natural bistability parameters that can be used to control the range of inducer concentrations over which the model exhibits bistability. By tuning these bistability parameters, the authors found a family of biophysically reasonable systems that are consistent with an experimentally determined bistable region for induction by thio-methylgalactoside (TMG) (in Ozbudak et al. Nature, 2004, 427; p. 737). To model regulation by lactose, the authors developed similar equations in which allolactose, a metabolic intermediate in lactose metabolism and a natural inducer of lac, is the inducer. For biophysically reasonable parameter values, these equations yield no bistability in response to induction by lactose - only systems with an unphysically small permease-dependent export effect can exhibit small amounts of bistability for limited ranges of parameter values. These results cast doubt on the relevance of bistability in the lac operon within the natural context of E. coli, and help shed light on the controversy among existing theoretical studies that address this issue. The results also motivate a deeper experimental characterisation of permease-independent transport of lac inducers, and suggest an experimental approach to address the relevance of bistability in the lac operon within the natural context of E. coli. The sensitivity of lac bistability to the type of inducer emphasises the importance of metabolism in determining the functions of genetic regulatory networks.

  18. An Operon for a Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transport System Involved in Acetoin Utilization of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Fujita, Yasutaro; Ehrlich, S. Dusko

    2000-01-01

    The ytrABCDEF operon of Bacillus subtilis was deduced to encode a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system. YtrB and YtrE could be the ABC subunits, and YtrC and YtrD are highly hydrophobic and could form a channel through the cell membrane, while YtrF could be a periplasmic lipoprotein for substrate binding. Expression of the operon was examined in cells grown in a minimal medium. The results indicate that the expression was induced only early in the stationary phase. The six ytr genes form a single operon, transcribed from a putative ςA-dependent promoter present upstream of ytrA. YtrA, which possesses a helix-turn-helix motif of the GntR family, acts probably as a repressor and regulates its own transcription. Inactivation of the operon led to a decrease in maximum cell yield and less-efficient sporulation, suggesting its involvement in the growth in stationary phase and sporulation. It is known that B. subtilis produces acetoin as an external carbon storage compound and then reuses it later during stationary phase and sporulation. When either the entire ytr operon or its last gene, ytrF, was inactivated, the production of acetoin was not affected, but the reuse of acetoin became less efficient. We suggest that the Ytr transport system plays a role in acetoin utilization during stationary phase and sporulation. PMID:10986249

  19. An operon for a putative ATP-binding cassette transport system involved in acetoin utilization of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K I; Fujita, Y; Ehrlich, S D

    2000-10-01

    The ytrABCDEF operon of Bacillus subtilis was deduced to encode a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system. YtrB and YtrE could be the ABC subunits, and YtrC and YtrD are highly hydrophobic and could form a channel through the cell membrane, while YtrF could be a periplasmic lipoprotein for substrate binding. Expression of the operon was examined in cells grown in a minimal medium. The results indicate that the expression was induced only early in the stationary phase. The six ytr genes form a single operon, transcribed from a putative sigma(A)-dependent promoter present upstream of ytrA. YtrA, which possesses a helix-turn-helix motif of the GntR family, acts probably as a repressor and regulates its own transcription. Inactivation of the operon led to a decrease in maximum cell yield and less-efficient sporulation, suggesting its involvement in the growth in stationary phase and sporulation. It is known that B. subtilis produces acetoin as an external carbon storage compound and then reuses it later during stationary phase and sporulation. When either the entire ytr operon or its last gene, ytrF, was inactivated, the production of acetoin was not affected, but the reuse of acetoin became less efficient. We suggest that the Ytr transport system plays a role in acetoin utilization during stationary phase and sporulation.

  20. Involvement of the ribose operon repressor RbsR in regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Kori, Ayako; Ishihama, Akira

    2013-07-01

    Escherichia coli is able to utilize d-ribose as its sole carbon source. The genes for the transport and initial-step metabolism of d-ribose form a single rbsDACBK operon. RbsABC forms the ABC-type high-affinity d-ribose transporter, while RbsD and RbsK are involved in the conversion of d-ribose into d-ribose 5-phosphate. In the absence of inducer d-ribose, the ribose operon is repressed by a LacI-type transcription factor RbsR, which is encoded by a gene located downstream of this ribose operon. At present, the rbs operon is believed to be the only target of regulation by RbsR. After Genomic SELEX screening, however, we have identified that RbsR binds not only to the rbs promoter but also to the promoters of a set of genes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism. Northern blotting analysis indicated that RbsR represses the purHD operon for de novo synthesis of purine nucleotide but activates the add and udk genes involved in the salvage pathway of purine nucleotide synthesis. Taken together, we propose that RbsR is a global regulator for switch control between the de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides and its salvage pathway.

  1. Identification of a protein glycosylation operon from Campylobacter jejuni JCM 2013 and its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Ohashi, Takao; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a human enteropathogenic bacterium possessing an N-glycosylation system. In this work, a protein glycosylation (pgl) operon conferring prokaryotic N-glycosylation in C. jejuni JCM 2013 was cloned and identified. Fourteen open reading frames (ORFs) were found in the pgl operon. The operon organization was similar to that of C. jejuni NCTC 11168, with 98% and 99% identities in overall nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence, respectively. The pgl operon was heterologously co-expressed with model protein CmeA in the Escherichia coli BL21 ΔwaaL mutant. The immuno- and lectin-blotting analysis indicated the protein glycosylation on the recombinant CmeA. In addition, to analyze the glycan composition, the recombinant CmeA was purified and subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion followed by mass spectrometry analysis. The mass spectrometry analysis showed the presence of the N-acetylhexosamine residue at the reducing end but not the predicted di-N-acetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) residue. Further glycan structural study using the conventional fluorophore-labeling method revealed the GalNAcα-GalNAcα-(Hex-)HexNAc-HexNAc-HexNAc-HexNAc structure. Transcriptional analysis showed that UDP-diNAcBac synthases and diNAcBac transferase are transcribed but might not function in the constructed system. In conclusion, a pgl operon from C. jejuni JCM 2013 successfully functioned in E. coli, resulting in the observed prokaryotic glycosylation.

  2. UlaR activates expression of the ula operon in Streptococcus pneumoniae in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the regulatory mechanism of the ula (utilization of l-ascorbic acid) operon, putatively responsible for transport and utilization of ascorbic acid in Streptococcus pneumoniae strain D39, is studied. β-Galactosidase assay data demonstrate that expression of the ula operon is increased in the presence of ascorbic acid as compared with the effects of other sugar sources including glucose. The ula operon consists of nine genes, including a transcriptional regulator UlaR, and is transcribed as a single transcriptional unit. We demonstrate the role of the transcriptional regulator UlaR as a transcriptional activator of the ula operon in the presence of ascorbic acid and show that activation of the ula operon genes by UlaR is CcpA-independent. Furthermore, we predict a 16 bp regulatory site (5'-AACAGTCCGCTGTGTA-3') for UlaR in the promoter region of ulaA. Deletion of the half or full UlaR regulatory site in PulaA confirmed that the UlaR regulatory site present in PulaA is functional.

  3. Loss of the lac operon contributes to Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through derepression of flagellar synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Ni, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella, a genus that is closely related to Escherichia coli, includes many pathogens of humans and other animals. A notable feature that distinguishes Salmonella from E. coli is lactose negativity, because the lac operon is lost in most Salmonella genomes. Here, we expressed the lac operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the Lac(+) strain to that of the wild-type strain in a murine model, invasion assays, and macrophage replication assays. We showed that the Lac(+) strain is attenuated in vivo and the attenuation of virulence is caused by its defect in epithelial cell invasion. However, the invasion-defective phenotype is unrelated to lactose utilization. Through sequencing and the comparison of the transcriptome profile between the Lac(+) and wild-type strains during invasion, we found that most flagellar genes were markedly downregulated in the Lac(+) strain, while other genes associated with invasion, such as the majority of genes encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, were not differentially expressed. Moreover, we discovered that lacA is the major repressor of flagellar gene expression in the lac operon. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the lac operon decreases Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through repression of flagellar biosynthesis. As the ability to invade epithelial cells is a critical virulence determinant of Salmonella, our results provide important evidence that the loss of the lac operon contributes to the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity.

  4. The mercury resistance operon: from an origin in a geothermal environment to an efficient detoxification machine.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Barkay, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Mercuric mercury (Hg[II]) is a highly toxic and mobile element that is likely to have had a pronounced and adverse effect on biology since Earth's oxygenation ∼2.4 billion years ago due to its high affinity for protein sulfhydryl groups, which upon binding destabilize protein structure and decrease enzyme activity, resulting in a decreased organismal fitness. The central enzyme in the microbial mercury detoxification system is the mercuric reductase (MerA) protein, which catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to volatile Hg(0). In addition to MerA, mer operons encode for proteins involved in regulation, Hg binding, and organomercury degradation. Mer-mediated approaches have had broad applications in the bioremediation of mercury-contaminated environments and industrial waste streams. Here, we examine the composition of 272 individual mer operons and quantitatively map the distribution of mer-encoded functions on both taxonomic SSU rRNA gene and MerA phylogenies. The results indicate an origin and early evolution of MerA among thermophilic bacteria and an overall increase in the complexity of mer operons through evolutionary time, suggesting continual gene recruitment and evolution leading to an improved efficiency and functional potential of the Mer detoxification system. Consistent with a positive relationship between the evolutionary history and topology of MerA and SSU rRNA gene phylogenies (Mantel R = 0.81, p < 0.01), the distribution of the majority of mer functions, when mapped on these phylograms, indicates an overall tendency to inherit mer-encoded functions through vertical descent. However, individual mer functions display evidence of a variable degree of vertical inheritance, with several genes exhibiting strong evidence for acquisition via lateral gene transfer and/or gene loss. Collectively, these data suggest that (i) mer has evolved from a simple system in geothermal environments to a widely distributed and more complex and efficient

  5. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of pst2 operon expression in Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    da C Leite, Daniel M; Barbosa, Livia C; Mantuano, Nathalia; Goulart, Carolina L; Veríssimo da Costa, Giovani C; Bisch, Paulo M; von Krüger, Wanda M A

    2017-02-27

    One of the most abundant proteins in V. cholerae O1 cells grown under inorganic phosphate (Pi) limitation is PstS, the periplasmic Pi-binding component of the high-affinity Pi transport system Pst2 (PstSCAB), encoded in pst2 operon (pstS-pstC2-pstA2-pstB2). Besides its role in Pi uptake, Pst2 has been also associated with V. cholerae virulence. However, the mechanisms regulating pst2 expression and the non-stoichiometric production of the Pst2 components under Pi-limitation are unknown. A computational-experimental approach was used to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms behind pst2 expression in V. cholerae O1. Bioinformatics analysis of pst2 operon nucleotide sequence revealed start codons for pstS and pstC genes distinct from those originally annotated, a regulatory region upstream pstS containing potential PhoB-binding sites and a pstS-pstC intergenic region longer than predicted. Analysis of nucleotide sequence between pstS-pstC revealed inverted repeats able to form stem-loop structures followed by a potential RNAse E-cleavage site. Another putative RNase E recognition site was identified within the pstA-pstB intergenic sequence. In silico predictions of pst2 operon expression regulation were subsequently tested using cells grown under Pi limitation by promoter-lacZ fusion, gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay and quantitative RT-PCR. The experimental and in silico results matched very well and led us to propose a pst2 promoter sequence upstream of pstS gene distinct from the previously annotated. Furthermore, V. cholerae O1 pst2 operon transcription is PhoB-dependent and generates a polycistronic mRNA molecule that is rapidly processed into minor transcripts of distinct stabilities. The most stable was the pstS-encoding mRNA, which correlates with PstS higher levels relative to other Pst2 components in Pi-starved cells. The relatively higher stability of pstS and pstB transcripts seems to rely on the secondary structures at their 3' untranslated regions

  6. Repression of the Histidine Operon: Effect of the First Enzyme on the Kinetics of Repression

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, John S.; Berberich, M. A.; Venetianer, Pál; Goldberger, Robert F.

    1969-01-01

    Kinetic studies on repression of the enzymes for histidine biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium showed that, upon addition of histidine to a derepressed culture, the enzymes became repressed in a temporal sequence which corresponds with the positional sequence of the genes in the histidine operon. This serial pattern of repression occurred under conditions in which the feedback site of the first enzyme for histidine biosynthesis is intact. When this site was rendered nonfunctional the pattern of repression was changed so that all of the enzymes became repressed concomitantly. These results suggest that the first enzyme for histidine biosynthesis plays a hitherto unrecognized role in control of the histidine system. PMID:4887508

  7. Hopf Bifurcation and Delay-Induced Turing Instability in a Diffusive lac Operon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xin; Song, Yongli; Zhang, Tonghua

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a lac operon model with delayed feedback and diffusion effect. If the system is without delay or the delay is small, the positive equilibrium is stable so that there are no spatial patterns formed; while the time delay is large enough the equilibrium becomes unstable so that rich spatiotemporal dynamics may occur. We have found that time delay can not only incur temporal oscillations but also induce imbalance in space. With different initial values, the system may have different spatial patterns, for instance, spirals with one head, four heads, nine heads, and even microspirals.

  8. Transcription of the extended hyp-operon in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Agervald, Åsa; Stensjö, Karin; Holmqvist, Marie; Lindblad, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background The maturation of hydrogenases into active enzymes is a complex process and e.g. a correctly assembled active site requires the involvement of at least seven proteins, encoded by hypABCDEF and a hydrogenase specific protease, encoded either by hupW or hoxW. The N2-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 may contain both an uptake and a bidirectional hydrogenase. The present study addresses the presence and expression of hyp-genes in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. Results RT-PCRs demonstrated that the six hyp-genes together with one ORF may be transcribed as a single operon. Transcriptional start points (TSPs) were identified 280 bp upstream from hypF and 445 bp upstream of hypC, respectively, demonstrating the existence of several transcripts. In addition, five upstream ORFs located in between hupSL, encoding the small and large subunits of the uptake hydrogenase, and the hyp-operon, and two downstream ORFs from the hyp-genes were shown to be part of the same transcript unit. A third TSP was identified 45 bp upstream of asr0689, the first of five ORFs in this operon. The ORFs are annotated as encoding unknown proteins, with the exception of alr0692 which is identified as a NifU-like protein. Orthologues of the four ORFs asr0689-alr0692, with a highly conserved genomic arrangement positioned between hupSL, and the hyp genes are found in several other N2-fixing cyanobacteria, but are absent in non N2-fixing cyanobacteria with only the bidirectional hydrogenase. Short conserved sequences were found in six intergenic regions of the extended hyp-operon, appearing between 11 and 79 times in the genome. Conclusion This study demonstrated that five ORFs upstream of the hyp-gene cluster are co-transcribed with the hyp-genes, and identified three TSPs in the extended hyp-gene cluster in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. This may indicate a function related to the assembly of a functional uptake hydrogenase, hypothetically in the assembly of the small subunit of

  9. Silencing of Essential Genes within a Highly Coordinated Operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shan; Hohmeier, Angela; Stone, Timothy C; Offord, Victoria; Sarabia, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Cristina; Good, Liam

    2015-08-15

    Essential bacterial genes located within operons are particularly challenging to study independently because of coordinated gene expression and the nonviability of knockout mutants. Essentiality scores for many operon genes remain uncertain. Antisense RNA (asRNA) silencing or in-frame gene disruption of genes may help establish essentiality but can lead to polar effects on genes downstream or upstream of the target gene. Here, the Escherichia coli ribF-ileS-lspA-fkpB-ispH operon was used to evaluate the possibility of independently studying an essential gene using expressed asRNA and target gene overexpression to deregulate coupled expression. The gene requirement for growth in conditional silencing strains was determined by the relationship of target mRNA reduction with growth inhibition as the minimum transcript level required for 50% growth (MTL50). Mupirocin and globomycin, the protein inhibitors of IleS and LspA, respectively, were used in sensitization assays of strains containing both asRNA-expressing and open reading frame-expressing plasmids to examine deregulation of the overlapping ileS-lspA genes. We found upstream and downstream polar silencing effects when either ileS or lspA was silenced, indicating coupled expression. Weighted MTL50 values (means and standard deviations) of ribF, ileS, and lspA were 0.65 ± 0.18, 0.64 ± 0.06, and 0.76 ± 0.10, respectively. However, they were not significantly different (P = 0.71 by weighted one-way analysis of variance). The gene requirement for ispH could not be determined due to insufficient growth reduction. Mupirocin and globomycin sensitization experiments indicated that ileS-lspA expression could not be decoupled. The results highlight the inherent challenges associated with genetic analyses of operons; however, coupling of essential genes may provide opportunities to improve RNA-silencing antimicrobials. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Gene copy number effects in the mer operon of plasmid NR1.

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, H; Kinscherf, T G; Silver, S; Miki, T; Easton, A M; Rownd, R H

    1979-01-01

    The level of resistance to Hg2+ determined by the inducible mer operon of plasmid NR1 was essentially the same for three gene copy number variants in Escherichia coli, less in Proteus mirabilis, and intermediate in P. mirabilis "transitioned" to a high r-determinant gene copy number. Cell-free volatilization rates of radioactive mercury indicated increasing levels of intracellular mercuric reductase enzyme from low- to high-gene copy number forms in P. mirabilis and from low- to high-copy number forms in E. coli, but the additional enzyme in E. coli was effectively cryptic. PMID:374374

  11. Involvement of an inducible fructose phosphotransferase operon in Streptococcus gordonii biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Loo, C Y; Mitrakul, K; Voss, I B; Hughes, C V; Ganeshkumar, N

    2003-11-01

    Oral streptococci, such as Streptococcus gordonii, are the predominant early colonizers that initiate biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. Investigation of an S. gordonii::Tn917-lac biofilm-defective mutant isolated by using an in vitro biofilm formation assay showed that the transposon insertion is near the 3' end of an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein homologous to Streptococcus mutans FruK. Three genes, fruR, fruK, and fruI, were predicted to encode polypeptides that are part of the fructose phosphotransferase system (PTS) in S. gordonii. These proteins, FruR, FruK, and FruI, are homologous to proteins encoded by the inducible fruRKI operon of S. mutans. In S. mutans, FruR is a transcriptional repressor, FruK is a fructose-1-phosphate kinase, and FruI is the fructose-specific enzyme II (fructose permease) of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar PTS. Reverse transcription-PCR confirmed that fruR, fruK, and fruI are cotranscribed as an operon in S. gordonii, and the transposon insertion in S. gordonii fruK::Tn917-lac resulted in a nonpolar mutation. Nonpolar inactivation of either fruK or fruI generated by allelic replacement resulted in a biofilm-defective phenotype, whereas a nonpolar mutant with an inactivated fruR gene retained the ability to form a biofilm. Expression of fruK, as measured by the beta-galactosidase activity of the fruK::Tn917-lac mutant, was observed to be growth phase dependent and was enhanced when the mutant was grown in media with high levels of fructose, sucrose, xylitol, and human serum, indicating that the fructose PTS operon was fructose and xylitol inducible, similar to the S. mutans fructose PTS. The induction by fructose was inhibited by the presence of glucose, indicating that glucose is able to catabolite repress fruK expression. Nonpolar inactivation of the fruR gene in the fruK::Tn917-lac mutant resulted in a greater increase in beta-galactosidase activity when the organism was grown in media supplemented with

  12. The Mercury Resistance Operon: From an Origin in a Geothermal Environment to an Efficient Detoxification Machine

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Barkay, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Mercuric mercury (Hg[II]) is a highly toxic and mobile element that is likely to have had a pronounced and adverse effect on biology since Earth’s oxygenation ∼2.4 billion years ago due to its high affinity for protein sulfhydryl groups, which upon binding destabilize protein structure and decrease enzyme activity, resulting in a decreased organismal fitness. The central enzyme in the microbial mercury detoxification system is the mercuric reductase (MerA) protein, which catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to volatile Hg(0). In addition to MerA, mer operons encode for proteins involved in regulation, Hg binding, and organomercury degradation. Mer-mediated approaches have had broad applications in the bioremediation of mercury-contaminated environments and industrial waste streams. Here, we examine the composition of 272 individual mer operons and quantitatively map the distribution of mer-encoded functions on both taxonomic SSU rRNA gene and MerA phylogenies. The results indicate an origin and early evolution of MerA among thermophilic bacteria and an overall increase in the complexity of mer operons through evolutionary time, suggesting continual gene recruitment and evolution leading to an improved efficiency and functional potential of the Mer detoxification system. Consistent with a positive relationship between the evolutionary history and topology of MerA and SSU rRNA gene phylogenies (Mantel R = 0.81, p < 0.01), the distribution of the majority of mer functions, when mapped on these phylograms, indicates an overall tendency to inherit mer-encoded functions through vertical descent. However, individual mer functions display evidence of a variable degree of vertical inheritance, with several genes exhibiting strong evidence for acquisition via lateral gene transfer and/or gene loss. Collectively, these data suggest that (i) mer has evolved from a simple system in geothermal environments to a widely distributed and more complex and efficient

  13. Genome-wide analysis of trans-splicing in the nematode Pristionchus pacificus unravels conserved gene functions for germline and dauer development in divergent operons

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Amit; Langnick, Claudia; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of trans-splicing in multiple metazoan lineages led to the identification of operon-like gene organization in diverse organisms, including trypanosomes, tunicates, and nematodes, but the functional significance of such operons is not completely understood. To see whether the content or organization of operons serves similar roles across species, we experimentally defined operons in the nematode model Pristionchus pacificus. We performed affinity capture experiments on mRNA pools to specifically enrich for transcripts that are trans-spliced to either the SL1- or SL2-spliced leader, using spliced leader–specific probes. We obtained distinct trans-splicing patterns from the analysis of three mRNA pools (total mRNA, SL1 and SL2 fraction) by RNA-seq. This information was combined with a genome-wide analysis of gene orientation and spacing. We could confirm 2219 operons by RNA-seq data out of 6709 candidate operons, which were predicted by sequence information alone. Our gene order comparison of the Caenorhabditis elegans and P. pacificus genomes shows major changes in operon organization in the two species. Notably, only 128 out of 1288 operons in C. elegans are conserved in P. pacificus. However, analysis of gene-expression profiles identified conserved functions such as an enrichment of germline-expressed genes and higher expression levels of operonic genes during recovery from dauer arrest in both species. These results provide support for the model that a necessity for increased transcriptional efficiency in the context of certain developmental processes could be a selective constraint for operon evolution in metazoans. Our method is generally applicable to other metazoans to see if similar functional constraints regulate gene organization into operons. PMID:25015138

  14. Structure of wild-type and mutant repressors and of the control region of the rbt operon of Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Anderton-Loviny, T; Smith, C A; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Pentitol metabolism in Klebsiella aerogenes is encoded by continuous ribitol (rbt) and D-arabitol (dal) operons transcribed in bipolar fashion and sandwiched between long stretches of homologous DNA. The operons are separated by a central control region (2.2 kb) which encodes both the repressors and all the control sequences. The rbt repressor (270 amino acids) shows homology to the Escherichia coli lac repressor and other DNA-binding proteins. It is transcribed from the strand opposite the rbt operon and the intervening control region (254-bp) contains features which reflect the complex regulation. A rbt-constitutive mutant strain used in previous studies of experimental enzyme evolution encodes a truncated rbt-peptide of 133 residues due to a frameshift mutation. PMID:3891331

  15. Structure and function of the internal promoter (hisBp) of the Escherichia coli K-12 histidine operon.

    PubMed Central

    Grisolia, V; Riccio, A; Bruni, C B

    1983-01-01

    The entire histidine operon of Escherichia coli K-12 was cloned in the vector plasmid pBR313, and a complete restriction map of the operon was determined. By using subclones, complementation tests, and enzyme assays, we were able to make a correlation between the physical map and the genetic map of the operon. We determined the sequence of a fragment of DNA 665 base pairs long, comprising the distal portion of the hisC gene, the proximal portion of the hisB gene, and the internal transcription initiation site hisBp. The efficiency of this promoter was assessed under different physiological conditions by cloning the DNA fragment in a recombinant vector system used to study transcriptional regulatory signals. The precise point at which transcription initiates was determined by S1 nuclease mapping. Images PMID:6309747

  16. Characterization of a β-Glucoside Operon (bgc) Prevalent in Septicemic and Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sankar, T. Sabari; Schnetz, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains, in general, do not ferment cellobiose and aryl-β-d-glucosidic sugars, although “cryptic” β-d-glucoside systems have been characterized. Here we describe an additional cryptic operon (bgc) for the utilization of cellobiose and the aryl-β-d-glucosides arbutin and salicin at low temperature. The bgc operon was identified by the characterization of β-glucoside-positive mutants of an E. coli septicemia strain (i484) in which the well-studied bgl (aryl-β-d-glucoside) operon was deleted. These bgc* mutants appeared after 5 days of incubation on salicin indicator plates at 28°C. The bgc operon codes for proteins homologous to β-glucoside/cellobiose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransfer system permease subunits IIB (BgcE), IIC (BgcF), and IIA (BgcI); a porin (BgcH); and a phospho-β-d-glucosidase (BgcA). Next to the bgc operon maps the divergent bgcR gene, which encodes a GntR-type transcriptional regulator. Expression of the bgc operon is dependent on the cyclic-AMP-dependent regulator protein CRP and positively controlled by BgcR. In the bgc* mutants, a single nucleotide exchange enhances the activity of the bgc promoter, rendering it BgcR independent. Typing of a representative collection of E. coli demonstrated the prevalence of bgc in strains of phylogenetic group B2, representing mainly extraintestinal pathogens, while it is rare among commensal E. coli strains. The bgc locus is also present in the closely related species Escherichia albertii. Further, bioinformatic analyses demonstrated that homologs of the bgc genes exist in the enterobacterial Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Citrobacter spp. and also in gram-positive bacteria, indicative of horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:19233952

  17. The lumQ gene is linked to the lumP gene and the lux operon in Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Yu, K Y; Chao, Y F; Weng, S F

    1995-12-14

    The nucleotide sequence of the designated lumQ gene (EMBL accession No. U35231) from Photobacterium leiognathi PL741 has been determined, and the encoded amino acid sequence is deduced. The LumQ protein has a calculated M(r) of 28,416 and comprises 248 amino acid residues. The lumQ gene is identified as the envY-like gene by significant similarity of the encoded protein with the EnvY and AdiY proteins of E. coli; there the envY gene encodes the porin thermoregulatory protein EnvY, and the adiY gene encodes the putative transcriptional regulator protein AdiY. It suggests that the lumQ gene of P. leiognathi is orthologous to the envY and adiY genes of E. coli. The function of the protein encoded by the lumQ gene from P. leiognathi is not really defined yet, it is likely to be the DNA-binding protein related to the araC and xylS family of transcriptional regulators. The lumQ and lumP genes form the lum operon which linked to the lux operon, but run in the opposite direction. The gene order of the lum and the lux operon is < -ter-lumQ-lumP-R&R-luxC-luxD-luxA-luxB- luxN-luxE- > (R&R: regulatory region; ter: transcriptional terminator); whereas the regulatory region (R&R) includes two promoter systems, PR-promoter for the lux operon and PL-promoter for the lum operon; ter is the transcriptional terminator of the lum operon.

  18. Multiple promoters control expression of the Yersinia enterocolitica phage-shock-protein A (pspA) operon.

    PubMed

    Maxson, Michelle E; Darwin, Andrew J

    2006-04-01

    The widely conserved phage-shock-protein A (pspA) operon encodes an extracytoplasmic stress response system that is essential for virulence in Yersinia enterocolitica, and has been linked to other important phenotypes in Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Shigella flexneri. Regulation of pspA operon expression is mediated through a promoter upstream of pspA that depends on sigma factor RpoN (sigma(54)) and the enhancer binding protein PspF. PspA, PspB and PspC, encoded within the pspA operon, also regulate expression by participating in a putative signal transduction pathway that probably serves to modulate PspF activity. All of this suggests that appropriate expression of the pspA operon is critical. Previous genetic analysis of the Y. enterocolitica pspA operon suggested that an additional level of complexity might be mediated by PspF/RpoN-independent expression of some psp genes. Here, an rpoN null mutation and interposon analysis were used to confirm that PspF/RpoN-independent gene expression does originate within the psp locus. Molecular genetic approaches were used to systematically analyse the two large non-coding regions within the psp locus. Primer extension, control region deletion and site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of RpoN-independent promoters both upstream and downstream of pspA. The precise location of the PspF/RpoN-dependent promoter upstream of pspA was also determined. The discovery of these RpoN-independent promoters reveals yet another level of transcriptional complexity for the Y. enterocolitica pspA operon that may function to allow low-level constitutive expression of psp genes and/or additional regulation under some conditions.

  19. Complex RNA maturation pathway for a chloroplast ribosomal protein operon with an internal tRNA cistron.

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, D A; Hallick, R B

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the expression of a large chloroplast ribosomal protein operon from Euglena gracilis that resembles the Escherichia coli S10 and spc ribosomal protein operons. We present evidence that 11 ribosomal protein genes, a tRNA gene, and a new locus, orf214/orf302, are expressed as a single transcription unit. The primary transcript also contains at least 15 group II and group III introns. Gene-specific probes for each ribosomal protein gene, orf214/orf302, and for trnl hybridized to a common pre-mRNA of an estimated size of 8.3 kilobases. This is the RNA size predicted for a full-length transcript of the entire operon after splicing of all 15 introns. Polycistronic ribosomal protein mRNAs accumulated primarily as spliced hepta-, hexa-, penta-, tetra-, tri-, and dicistronic mRNAs, which were presumed to arise by stepwise processing of the 8.3-kilobase pre-mRNA. A novel finding was the cotranscription of the trnl gene as an internal cistron within the ribosomal protein operon. Several combined mRNA/tRNA molecules, such as the pentacistronic rpl5-rps8-rpl36-trnl-rps14, were characterized. The occurrence of the orf214/orf302 is a unique feature of the Euglena operon, distinguishing it from all chloroplast and prokaryotic ribosomal protein operons characterized to date. The orf214/orf302 are not similar to any known genes but are cotranscribed with the ribosomal protein loci and encode stable RNA species of 2.4, 1.8, and 1.4 kilobases. PMID:2136640

  20. Genomics of pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic loci: evidence for conservation and whole-operon mobility within gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rodrigo; van Aarle, Ingrid M; Mendes, Rodrigo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) is a tryptophan-derived secondary metabolite produced by a narrow range of gram-negative bacteria. The PRN biosynthesis by rhizobacteria presumably has a key role in their life strategies and in the biocontrol of plant diseases. The biosynthetic operon that encodes the pathway that converts tryptophan to PRN is composed of four genes, prnA through D, whose diversity, genomic context and spread over bacterial genomes are poorly understood. Therefore, we launched an endeavour aimed at retrieving, by in vitro and in silico means, diverse bacteria carrying the prnABCD biosynthetic loci in their genomes. Analysis of polymorphisms of the prnD gene sequences revealed a high level of conservation between Burkholderia, Pseudomonas and Serratia spp. derived sequences. Whole-operon- and prnD-based phylogeny resulted in tree topologies that are incongruent with the taxonomic status of the evaluated strains as predicted by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The genomic composition of c. 20 kb DNA fragments containing the PRN operon varied in different strains. Highly conserved and distinct transposase-encoding genes surrounding the PRN biosynthetic operons of Burkholderia pseudomallei strains were found. A prnABCD-deprived genomic region in B. pseudomallei strain K96243 contained the same gene composition as, and shared high homology with, the flanking regions of the PRN operon in B. pseudomallei strains 668, 1106a and 1710b. Our results strongly suggest that the PRN biosynthetic operon is mobile. The extent, frequency and promiscuity of this mobility remain to be understood.

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of L4-Mediated Autogenous Control of the S10 Ribosomal Protein Operon

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Todd; Shen, Ping; Samsel, Leigh; Liu, Raymond; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the regulation of the S10 ribosomal protein (r-protein) operon among members of the gamma subdivision of the proteobacteria, which includes Escherichia coli. In E. coli, this 11-gene operon is autogenously controlled by r-protein L4. This regulation requires specific determinants within the untranslated leader of the mRNA. Secondary structure analysis of the S10 leaders of five enterobacteria (Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter freundii, Yersinia enterocolitica, Serratia marcescens, and Morganella morganii) and two nonenteric members of the gamma subdivision (Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae) shows that these foreign leaders share significant structural homology with the E. coli leader, particularly in the region which is critical for L4-mediated autogenous control in E. coli. Moreover, these heterologous leaders produce a regulatory response to L4 oversynthesis in E. coli. Our results suggest that an E. coli-like L4-mediated regulatory mechanism may operate in all of these species. However, the mechanism is not universally conserved among the gamma subdivision members, since at least one, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, does not contain the required S10 leader features, and its leader cannot provide the signals for regulation by L4 in E. coli. We speculate that L4-mediated autogenous control developed during the evolution of the gamma branch of proteobacteria. PMID:10498727

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of L4-mediated autogenous control of the S10 ribosomal protein operon.

    PubMed

    Allen, T; Shen, P; Samsel, L; Liu, R; Lindahl, L; Zengel, J M

    1999-10-01

    We investigated the regulation of the S10 ribosomal protein (r-protein) operon among members of the gamma subdivision of the proteobacteria, which includes Escherichia coli. In E. coli, this 11-gene operon is autogenously controlled by r-protein L4. This regulation requires specific determinants within the untranslated leader of the mRNA. Secondary structure analysis of the S10 leaders of five enterobacteria (Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter freundii, Yersinia enterocolitica, Serratia marcescens, and Morganella morganii) and two nonenteric members of the gamma subdivision (Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae) shows that these foreign leaders share significant structural homology with the E. coli leader, particularly in the region which is critical for L4-mediated autogenous control in E. coli. Moreover, these heterologous leaders produce a regulatory response to L4 oversynthesis in E. coli. Our results suggest that an E. coli-like L4-mediated regulatory mechanism may operate in all of these species. However, the mechanism is not universally conserved among the gamma subdivision members, since at least one, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, does not contain the required S10 leader features, and its leader cannot provide the signals for regulation by L4 in E. coli. We speculate that L4-mediated autogenous control developed during the evolution of the gamma branch of proteobacteria.

  3. Expression, purification and functional characterization of AmiA of acetamidase operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, Balaji; Palaniyandi, Kannan; Venkatesan, Arunkumar; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2014-11-01

    Regulation of gene expression is one of the mechanisms of virulence in pathogenic organisms. In this context, we would like to understand the gene regulation of acetamidase enzyme of Mycobacterium smegmatis, which is the first reported inducible enzyme in mycobacteria. The acetamidase is highly inducible and the expression of this enzyme is increased 100-fold when the substrate acetamide is added. The acetamidase structural gene (amiE) is found immediately downstream of three predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Three of these genes along with a divergently expressed ORF are predicted to form an operon and involved in the regulation of acetamidase enzyme. Here we report expression, purification and functional characterization of AmiA which is one of these predicted ORFs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that AmiA binds to the region between the amiA and amiD near the predicted promoter (P2). Over-expression of AmiA significantly lowered the expression of acetamidase compared to the wild type as demonstrated by qRT-PCR and SDS-PAGE. We conclude that AmiA binds near P2 promoter and acts as a repressor in the regulation of acetamidase operon. The described work is a further step forward toward broadening the knowledge on understanding of the complex gene regulatory mechanism of Mycobacterium sp.

  4. Characterization of a Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium Operon Associated with Virulence and Drug Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Imperiale, Belén; Gioffre, Andrea Karina; Colombatti Olivieri, María Alejandra; Moyano, Roberto Damián; Morcillo, Nora; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Davis, William; Romano, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The lprG-p55 operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis is involved in the transport of toxic compounds. P55 is an efflux pump that provides resistance to several drugs, while LprG is a lipoprotein that modulates the host's immune response against mycobacteria. The knockout mutation of this operon severely reduces the replication of both mycobacterial species during infection in mice and increases susceptibility to toxic compounds. In order to gain insight into the function of LprG in the Mycobacterium avium complex, in this study, we assayed the effect of the deletion of lprG gene in the D4ER strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The replacement of lprG gene with a hygromycin cassette caused a polar effect on the expression of p55. Also, a twofold decrease in ethidium bromide susceptibility was observed and the resistance to the antibiotics rifampicin, amikacin, linezolid, and rifabutin was impaired in the mutant strain. In addition, the mutation decreased the virulence of the bacteria in macrophages in vitro and in a mice model in vivo. These findings clearly indicate that functional LprG and P55 are necessary for the correct transport of toxic compounds and for the survival of MAA in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24967408

  5. Derepression and repression of the histidine operon: role of the feedback site of the first enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, V M; Martíndelrío, R; Tébar, A R; Guisán, J M; Ballesteros, A O

    1975-01-01

    Thiazolealanine, a false feedback inhibitor, causes transient repression of the his operon previously derepressed by a severe histidine limitation in strains with a wild-type or feedback-hypersensitive first enzyme but not in feedback-resistant mutants. Since experiments reported here clearly demonstrate that thiazolealanine is not transferred to tRNAHis, it is proposed that this "transient repression" is effected through the interaction of thiazolealanine with the feedback site of the enzyme. Experiments in the presence of rifampin indicate that this thiazolealanine-mediated effect is exerted at the level of translation. We conclude that histidine (free), in addition to forming co-repressor, also represses the operon at the level of translation through feedback interaction with the first enzyme of the pathway (adenosine 5'-triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase). Rates of derepression in feedback-resistant strains are roughly half of those observed in controls, suggesting a positive role played by a first enzyme with a normal but unoccupied feedback site. Some feedback-resistant mutants, in contrast to the wild type, were unable to exhibit derepression under histidine limitation caused by aminotriazole. PMID:1104584

  6. Pathways Regulating the pbgP Operon and Colistin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Jin; Kim, Sunju; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2016-09-28

    In this study, we investigated colistin resistance mechanisms associated with the regulation of the pbgP operon in Klebsiella pneumoniae, using four isogenic pairs of colistin-susceptible strains and their colistin-resistant derivatives and two colistin-resistant clinical isolates. Amino acid sequence alterations of PhoPQ, PmrAB, and MgrB were investigated, and mRNA expression levels of phoQ, pmrB, pmrD, and pbgP were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The phoQ and pmrB genes were deleted from two colistin-resistant derivatives, 134R and 063R. We found that phoQ, pmrD, and pbgP were significantly upregulated in all colistin-resistant derivatives. However, pmrB was significantly upregulated in only two colistin-resistant derivatives and one clinical strain. pmrB was not overexpressed in the other strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration of colistin was drastically lower in both phoQ- and pmrB-deleted mutants from a colistin-resistant derivative (134R) that was overexpressing phoQ and pmrB. However, colistin susceptibility was restored only in a phoQ-deleted mutant from a colistin-resistant derivative (063R) without overexpression of pmrB. In conclusion, two different regulations of the pbgP operon may associate with the development of colistin-resisant K. pneumoniae.

  7. The Cry Toxin Operon of Clostridium bifermentans subsp. malaysia Is Highly Toxic to Aedes Larval Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Nadia; Chawla, Swati; Likitvivatanavong, Supaporn; Lee, Han Lim

    2014-01-01

    The management and control of mosquito vectors of human disease currently rely primarily on chemical insecticides. However, larvicidal treatments can be effective, and if based on biological insecticides, they can also ameliorate the risk posed to human health by chemical insecticides. The aerobic bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and Lysinibacillus sphaericus have been used for vector control for a number of decades. But a more cost-effective use would be an anaerobic bacterium because of the ease with which these can be cultured. More recently, the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium bifermentans subsp. malaysia has been reported to have high mosquitocidal activity, and a number of proteins were identified as potentially mosquitocidal. However, the cloned proteins showed no mosquitocidal activity. We show here that four toxins encoded by the Cry operon, Cry16A, Cry17A, Cbm17.1, and Cbm17.2, are all required for toxicity, and these toxins collectively show remarkable selectivity for Aedes rather than Anopheles mosquitoes, even though C. bifermentans subsp. malaysia is more toxic to Anopheles. Hence, toxins that target Anopheles are different from those expressed by the Cry operon. PMID:25002432

  8. DNA bending and expression of the divergent nagE-B operons.

    PubMed Central

    Plumbridge, J; Kolb, A

    1998-01-01

    Repression of the divergent nagE - B operons requires NagC binding to two operators which overlap the nagE and nagB promoters, resulting in formation of a DNA loop. Binding of the cAMP/CAP activator to its site, adjacent to the nagE operator, stabilizes the DNA loop in vitro. The DNA of the nagE-B intergenic region is intrinsically bent, with the bend centred on the CAP site. We show that displacement of the CAP site by 6 bp results in complete derepression of the two operons. This derepression is observed even in the absence of cAMP/CAP binding and despite the fact that the two NagC operators are still in phase, demonstrating that the inherently bent structure of the DNA loop is important for repression. Since no interaction between NagC and CAP has been detected, we propose that the role of CAP in the repression loop is architectural, stabilizing the intrinsic bend. The cAMP/CAP complex is necessary for activation of the nagE-B promoters. In this case protein-protein contacts between CAP and RNA polymerase are necessary for full activation, but at least a part of the activation is likely due to an effect of CAP binding altering DNA structure. PMID:9469834

  9. IHF Is Required for the Transcriptional Regulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough orp Operons

    PubMed Central

    Fiévet, Anouchka; Cascales, Eric; Valette, Odile; Dolla, Alain; Aubert, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of σ54-dependent promoters is usually tightly regulated in response to environmental cues. The high abundance of potential σ54-dependent promoters in the anaerobe bacteria, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, reflects the high versatility of this bacteria suggesting that σ54 factor is the nexus of a large regulatory network. Understanding the key players of σ54-regulation in this organism is therefore essential to gain insights into the adaptation to anaerobiosis. Recently, the D. vulgaris orp genes, specifically found in anaerobe bacteria, have been shown to be transcribed by the RNA polymerase coupled to the σ54 alternative sigma factor. In this study, using in vitro binding experiments and in vivo reporter fusion assays in the Escherichia coli heterologous host, we showed that the expression of the divergent orp promoters is strongly dependent on the integration host factor IHF. Bioinformatic and mutational analysis coupled to reporter fusion activities and mobility shift assays identified two functional IHF binding site sequences located between the orp1 and orp2 promoters. We further determined that the D. vulgaris DVU0396 (IHFα) and DVU1864 (IHFβ) subunits are required to control the expression of the orp operons suggesting that they form a functionally active IHF heterodimer. Interestingly results obtained from the in vivo inactivation of DVU0396, which is required for orp operons transcription, suggest that several functionally IHF active homodimer or heterodimer are present in D. vulgaris. PMID:24466126

  10. IHF is required for the transcriptional regulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough orp operons.

    PubMed

    Fiévet, Anouchka; Cascales, Eric; Valette, Odile; Dolla, Alain; Aubert, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of σ(54)-dependent promoters is usually tightly regulated in response to environmental cues. The high abundance of potential σ(54)-dependent promoters in the anaerobe bacteria, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, reflects the high versatility of this bacteria suggesting that σ(54) factor is the nexus of a large regulatory network. Understanding the key players of σ(54)-regulation in this organism is therefore essential to gain insights into the adaptation to anaerobiosis. Recently, the D. vulgaris orp genes, specifically found in anaerobe bacteria, have been shown to be transcribed by the RNA polymerase coupled to the σ(54) alternative sigma factor. In this study, using in vitro binding experiments and in vivo reporter fusion assays in the Escherichia coli heterologous host, we showed that the expression of the divergent orp promoters is strongly dependent on the integration host factor IHF. Bioinformatic and mutational analysis coupled to reporter fusion activities and mobility shift assays identified two functional IHF binding site sequences located between the orp1 and orp2 promoters. We further determined that the D. vulgaris DVU0396 (IHFα) and DVU1864 (IHFβ) subunits are required to control the expression of the orp operons suggesting that they form a functionally active IHF heterodimer. Interestingly results obtained from the in vivo inactivation of DVU0396, which is required for orp operons transcription, suggest that several functionally IHF active homodimer or heterodimer are present in D. vulgaris.

  11. Relationship between the persistence of mer operon sequences in Escherichia coli and their resistance to mercury.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Dutt, Amit; Ali, Arif

    2002-03-01

    Studies related to geographic distribution of E. coli carrying mer operon sequences were carried out on the Indian subcontinent. Out of the 80 E. coli isolates, collected from five geographically distinct regions of India, 68 were found to be resistant to one or the other heavy metal used in the study. Among these isolates, 36 were found to be resistant to the inorganic form (HgCl2) and only 5 to resist both the inorganic and organic forms of mercury. Colony hybridization studies revealed 35 isolates out of 68 to hybridize with the probe. Interestingly, some of the mercury-sensitive isolates (Hgs), especially from the Dal Lake, were found positive in hybridization studies. These findings, supported by mercury volatilization studies, indicate the presence of nonfunctional/vestigial mer sequences in the isolates collected from different environments. On the other hand, few of the mercury-resistant isolates (Hgr) from the Yamuna River did not show any sign of hybridization. Further, volatilization studies also indicated an alternate mode of resistance mechanism operating in them. The studies demonstrate that the mer operon sequences share very high homology among the E. coli isolates collected from different geographical locations, and this metal resistance may be a genetic character that arose from a common ancestral background.

  12. Toward Bioremediation of Methylmercury Using Silica Encapsulated Escherichia coli Harboring the mer Operon.

    PubMed

    Kane, Aunica L; Al-Shayeb, Basem; Holec, Patrick V; Rajan, Srijay; Le Mieux, Nicholas E; Heinsch, Stephen C; Psarska, Sona; Aukema, Kelly G; Sarkar, Casim A; Nater, Edward A; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal and the ability of the neurotoxin methylmercury to biomagnify in the food chain is a serious concern for both public and environmental health globally. Because thousands of tons of mercury are released into the environment each year, remediation strategies are urgently needed and prompted this study. To facilitate remediation of both organic and inorganic forms of mercury, Escherichia coli was engineered to harbor a subset of genes (merRTPAB) from the mercury resistance operon. Protein products of the mer operon enable transport of mercury into the cell, cleavage of organic C-Hg bonds, and subsequent reduction of ionic mercury to the less toxic elemental form, Hg(0). E. coli containing merRTPAB was then encapsulated in silica beads resulting in a biological-based filtration material. Performing encapsulation in aerated mineral oil yielded silica beads that were smooth, spherical, and similar in diameter. Following encapsulation, E. coli containing merRTPAB retained the ability to degrade methylmercury and performed similarly to non-encapsulated cells. Due to the versatility of both the engineered mercury resistant strain and silica bead technology, this study provides a strong foundation for use of the resulting biological-based filtration material for methylmercury remediation.

  13. Dynamics and bistability in a reduced model of the lac operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Necmettin; Santillán, Moisés; Horike, Daisuke; Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-06-01

    It is known that the lac operon regulatory pathway is capable of showing bistable behavior. This is an important complex feature, arising from the nonlinearity of the involved mechanisms, which is essential to understand the dynamic behavior of this molecular regulatory system. To find which of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the lac operon is the origin of bistability, we take a previously published model which accounts for the dynamics of mRNA, lactose, allolactose, permease and β-galactosidase involvement and simplify it by ignoring permease dynamics (assuming a constant permease concentration). To test the behavior of the reduced model, three existing sets of data on β-galactosidase levels as a function of time are simulated and we obtain a reasonable agreement between the data and the model predictions. The steady states of the reduced model were numerically and analytically analyzed and it was shown that it may indeed display bistability, depending on the extracellular lactose concentration and growth rate.

  14. Features of dnaK operon genes of the obligate thermophile Bacillus thermoglucosidasius KP1006.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Iwashiro, T; Suzuki, Y

    2000-04-01

    The dnaK gene was cloned from the obligate thermophile Bacillus thermoglucosidasius KP1006, together with the grpE and dnaJ genes in the same operon. The dnaK, grpE and dnaJ genes showed high identity with those of other bacterial strains, particularly with those of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36, despite an extremely low homology for the corresponding total genomic DNA. There were significant differences in the proline content of the DnaK operon proteins which is closely correlated with the thermostability of enzyme proteins. The proline content was higher in the GrpE, DnaK and DnaJ proteins of the thermophilic as opposed to the mesophilic strains. The overexpression of the B. thermoglucosidasius DnaK protein in Escherichia coli MV1184 results in extreme filamentation without inhibition on cell growth. The B. thermoglucosidasius DnaK protein seemed to exclusively disturb septation in E. coli cells which suggests that it interacts with key protein(s) involved in cell septation.

  15. Toward Bioremediation of Methylmercury Using Silica Encapsulated Escherichia coli Harboring the mer Operon

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Al-Shayeb, Basem; Holec, Patrick V.; Rajan, Srijay; Le Mieux, Nicholas E.; Heinsch, Stephen C.; Psarska, Sona; Aukema, Kelly G.; Sarkar, Casim A.; Nater, Edward A.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal and the ability of the neurotoxin methylmercury to biomagnify in the food chain is a serious concern for both public and environmental health globally. Because thousands of tons of mercury are released into the environment each year, remediation strategies are urgently needed and prompted this study. To facilitate remediation of both organic and inorganic forms of mercury, Escherichia coli was engineered to harbor a subset of genes (merRTPAB) from the mercury resistance operon. Protein products of the mer operon enable transport of mercury into the cell, cleavage of organic C-Hg bonds, and subsequent reduction of ionic mercury to the less toxic elemental form, Hg(0). E. coli containing merRTPAB was then encapsulated in silica beads resulting in a biological-based filtration material. Performing encapsulation in aerated mineral oil yielded silica beads that were smooth, spherical, and similar in diameter. Following encapsulation, E. coli containing merRTPAB retained the ability to degrade methylmercury and performed similarly to non-encapsulated cells. Due to the versatility of both the engineered mercury resistant strain and silica bead technology, this study provides a strong foundation for use of the resulting biological-based filtration material for methylmercury remediation. PMID:26761437

  16. Cytochrome bd Biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis: Characterization of the cydABCD Operon

    PubMed Central

    Winstedt, Lena; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Fujita, Yasutaro; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    1998-01-01

    Under aerobic conditions Bacillus subtilis utilizes a branched electron transport chain comprising various cytochromes and terminal oxidases. At present there is evidence for three types of terminal oxidases in B. subtilis: a caa3-, an aa3-, and a bd-type oxidase. We report here the cloning of the structural genes (cydA and cydB) encoding the cytochrome bd complex. Downstream of the structural genes, cydC and cydD are located. These genes encode proteins showing similarity to bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transporters. Analysis of isolated cell membranes showed that inactivation of cydA or deletion of cydABCD resulted in the loss of spectral features associated with cytochrome bd. Gene disruption experiments and complementation analysis showed that the cydC and cydD gene products are required for the expression of a functional cytochrome bd complex. Disruption of the cyd genes had no apparent effect on the growth of cells in broth or defined media. The expression of the cydABCD operon was investigated by Northern blot analysis and by transcriptional and translational cyd-lacZ fusions. Northern blot analysis confirmed that cydABCD is transcribed as a polycistronic message. The operon was found to be expressed maximally under conditions of low oxygen tension. PMID:9852001

  17. The Brucella suis virB operon is induced intracellularly in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Foulongne, Vincent; Michaux-Charachon, Sylvie; Bourg, Gisele; Allardet-Servent, Annick; Cazevieille, Chantal; Liautard, Jean Pierre; Ramuz, Michel; O'Callaghan, David

    2002-01-01

    A type IV secretion system similar to the VirB system of the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens is essential for the intracellular survival and multiplication of the mammalian pathogen Brucella. Reverse transcriptase–PCR showed that the 12 genes encoding the Brucella suis VirB system form an operon. Semiquantitative measurements of virB mRNA levels by slot blotting showed that transcription of the virB operon, but not the flanking genes, is regulated by environmental factors in vitro. Flow cytometry used to measure green fluorescent protein expression from the virB promoter confirmed the data from slot blots. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and fluorescence microscopy showed that the virB promoter is induced in macrophages within 3 h after infection. Induction only occurred once the bacteria were inside the cells, and phagosome acidification was shown to be the major signal inducing intracellular expression. Because phagosome acidification is essential for the intracellular multiplication of Brucella, we suggest that it is the signal that triggers the secretion of unknown effector molecules. These effector molecules play a role in the remodeling of the phagosome to create the unique intracellular compartment in which Brucella replicates. PMID:11830669

  18. Functional Analysis of the Fructooligosaccharide Utilization Operon in Lactobacillus paracasei 1195▿

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yong Jun; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Hutkins, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The fosABCDXE operon encodes components of a putative fructose/mannose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system and a β-fructosidase precursor (FosE) that are involved in the fructooligosaccharide (FOS) utilization pathway of Lactobacillus paracasei 1195. The presence of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence and an LPQAG cell wall anchor motif in the C-terminal region of the deduced FosE precursor amino acid sequence predicted that the enzyme is cell wall associated, indicating that FOS may be hydrolyzed extracellularly. In this study, cell fractionation experiments demonstrated that the FOS hydrolysis activity was present exclusively in the cell wall extract of L. paracasei previously grown on FOS. In contrast, no measurable FOS hydrolysis activity was detected in the cell wall extract from the isogenic fosE mutant. Induction of β-fructosidase activity was observed when cells were grown on FOS, inulin, sucrose, or fructose but not when cells were grown on glucose. A diauxic growth pattern was observed when cells were grown on FOS in the presence of limiting glucose (0.1%). Analysis of the culture supernatant revealed that glucose was consumed first, followed by the longer-chain FOS species. Transcription analysis further showed that the fos operon was expressed only after glucose was depleted in the medium. Expression of fosE in a non-FOS-fermenting strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, enabled the recombinant strain to metabolize FOS, inulin, sucrose, and levan. PMID:17644636

  19. Functional and comparative genomic analyses of an operon involved in fructooligosaccharide utilization by Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Altermann, Eric; Hutkins, Robert; Cano, Raul; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2003-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a probiotic organism that displays the ability to use prebiotic compounds such as fructooligosaccharides (FOS), which stimulate the growth of beneficial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. However, little is known about the mechanisms and genes involved in FOS utilization by Lactobacillus species. Analysis of the L. acidophilus NCFM genome revealed an msm locus composed of a transcriptional regulator of the LacI family, a four-component ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system, a fructosidase, and a sucrose phosphorylase. Transcriptional analysis of this operon demonstrated that gene expression was induced by sucrose and FOS but not by glucose or fructose, suggesting some specificity for nonreadily fermentable sugars. Additionally, expression was repressed by glucose but not by fructose, suggesting catabolite repression via two cre-like sequences identified in the promoter–operator region. Insertional inactivation of the genes encoding the ABC transporter substrate-binding protein and the fructosidase reduced the ability of the mutants to grow on FOS. Comparative analysis of gene architecture within this cluster revealed a high degree of synteny with operons in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, the association between a fructosidase and an ABC transporter is unusual and may be specific to L. acidophilus. This is a description of a previously undescribed gene locus involved in transport and catabolism of FOS compounds, which can promote competition of beneficial microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:12847288

  20. Function of RNA secondary structures in transcriptional attenuation of the Bacillus subtilis pyr operon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Turner, Robert J.; Switzer, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis pyr operon is regulated by exogenous pyrimidines by a transcriptional attenuation mechanism. Transcription in vitro from pyr DNA templates specifying attenuation regions yielded terminated and read-through transcripts of the expected lengths. Addition of the PyrR regulatory protein plus UMP led to greatly increased termination. Synthetic antisense deoxyoligonucleotides were used to probe possible secondary structures in the pyr mRNA that were proposed to play roles in controlling attenuation. Oligonucleotides predicted to disrupt terminator structures suppressed termination, whereas oligonucleotides predicted to disrupt the stem of antiterminator stem-loops strongly promoted termination at the usual termination site. Oligonucleotides that disrupt a previously unrecognized stem-loop structure, called the anti-antiterminator, the formation of which interferes with formation of the downstream antiterminator, suppressed termination. We propose that transcriptional attenuation of the pyr operon is governed by switching between alternative antiterminator versus anti-antiterminator plus terminator structures, and that PyrR acts by UMP-dependent binding to and stabilization of the anti-antiterminator. PMID:8962074

  1. Identification of a Group 1-Like Capsular Polysaccharide Operon for Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Anita C.; Powell, Jan L.; Kaper, James B.; Morris, J. Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Virulence of Vibrio vulnificus correlates with changes in colony morphology that are indicative of a reversible phase variation for expression of capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Encapsulated variants are virulent with opaque colonies, whereas phase variants with reduced CPS expression are attenuated and are translucent. Using TnphoA mutagenesis, we identified a V. vulnificus CPS locus, which included an upstream ops element, a wza gene (wzaVv), and several open reading frames with homology to CPS biosynthetic genes. This genetic organization is characteristic of group 1 CPS operons. The wza gene product is required for transport of CPS to the cell surface in Escherichia coli. Polar transposon mutations in wzaVv eliminated expression of downstream biosynthetic genes, confirming operon structure. On the other hand, nonpolar inactivation of wzaVv was specific for CPS transport, did not alter CPS biosynthesis, and could be complemented in trans. Southern analysis of CPS phase variants revealed deletions or rearrangements at this locus. A survey of environmental isolates indicated a correlation between deletions in wzaVv and loss of virulent phenotype, suggesting a genetic mechanism for CPS phase variation. Full virulence in mice required surface expression of CPS and supported the essential role of capsule in the pathogenesis of V. vulnificus. PMID:11598064

  2. Crystal structure of the lactose operon repressor and its complexes with DNA and inducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Chang, G.; Horton, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor a product of the lacl gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-B-D-1thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21 base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and the repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quarternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites in the genomic DNA. 76 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Dynamics and bistability in a reduced model of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin; Santillan, Moises; Horike, Daisuke; Mackey, Michael C

    2004-06-01

    It is known that the lac operon regulatory pathway is capable of showing bistable behavior. This is an important complex feature, arising from the nonlinearity of the involved mechanisms, which is essential to understand the dynamic behavior of this molecular regulatory system. To find which of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the lac operon is the origin of bistability, we take a previously published model which accounts for the dynamics of mRNA, lactose, allolactose, permease and beta-galactosidase involvement and simplify it by ignoring permease dynamics (assuming a constant permease concentration). To test the behavior of the reduced model, three existing sets of data on beta-galactosidase levels as a function of time are simulated and we obtain a reasonable agreement between the data and the model predictions. The steady states of the reduced model were numerically and analytically analyzed and it was shown that it may indeed display bistability, depending on the extracellular lactose concentration and growth rate.

  4. From binary to multivalued to continuous models: the lac operon as a case study.

    PubMed

    Franke, Raimo; Theis, Fabian J; Klamt, Steffen

    2010-12-14

    Using the lac operon as a paradigmatic example for a gene regulatory system in prokaryotes, we demonstrate how qualitative knowledge can be initially captured using simple discrete (Boolean) models and then stepwise refined to multivalued logical models and finally to continuous (ODE) models. At all stages, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation is integrated in the model description. We first show the potential benefit of a discrete binary approach and discuss then problems and limitations due to indeterminacy arising in cyclic networks. These limitations can be partially circumvented by using multilevel logic as generalization of the Boolean framework enabling one to formulate a more realistic model of the lac operon. Ultimately a dynamic description is needed to fully appreciate the potential dynamic behavior that can be induced by regulatory feedback loops. As a very promising method we show how the use of multivariate polynomial interpolation allows transformation of the logical network into a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), which then enables the analysis of key features of the dynamic behavior.

  5. Repression and catabolite gene activation in the araBAD operon.

    PubMed

    Lichenstein, H S; Hamilton, E P; Lee, N

    1987-02-01

    Catabolite gene activation of the araBAD operon was examined by using catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) site deletion mutants. A high-affinity CAP-binding site between the divergently orientated araBAD and araC operons has been previously identified by DNase I footprinting techniques. Subsequent experiments disagreed as to whether this site is directly involved in stimulating araBAD expression. In this paper, we present data showing that deletions generated by in vitro mutagenesis of the CAP site led to a five- to sixfold reduction in single-copy araBAD promoter activity in vivo. We concluded that catabolite gene activation of araBAD involves this CAP site. The hypothesis that CAP stimulates the araBAD promoter primarily by relieving repression was then tested. The upstream operator araO2 was required for repression, but we observed that the magnitude of CAP stimulation was unaffected by the presence or absence of araO2. We concluded that CAP plays no role in relieving repression. Other experiments showed that when CAP binds it induces a bend in the ara DNA; similar bending has been reported upon CAP binding to lac DNA. This conformational change in the DNA may be essential to the mechanism of CAP activation.

  6. Operon mRNAs are organized into ORF-centric structures that predict translation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, David H; Rouskin, Silvi; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gene-Wei; Weissman, Jonathan S; Gross, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial mRNAs are organized into operons consisting of discrete open reading frames (ORFs) in a single polycistronic mRNA. Individual ORFs on the mRNA are differentially translated, with rates varying as much as 100-fold. The signals controlling differential translation are poorly understood. Our genome-wide mRNA secondary structure analysis indicated that operonic mRNAs are comprised of ORF-wide units of secondary structure that vary across ORF boundaries such that adjacent ORFs on the same mRNA molecule are structurally distinct. ORF translation rate is strongly correlated with its mRNA structure in vivo, and correlation persists, albeit in a reduced form, with its structure when translation is inhibited and with that of in vitro refolded mRNA. These data suggest that intrinsic ORF mRNA structure encodes a rough blueprint for translation efficiency. This structure is then amplified by translation, in a self-reinforcing loop, to provide the structure that ultimately specifies the translation of each ORF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22037.001 PMID:28139975

  7. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA.

  8. The mechanistic-holistic divide revisited: The case of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Racine, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, I revisit the development of the repression model of genetic regulation in the lac operon to challenge a common application of a conceptual framework in the history of biology. I take Allen's (1978) account of the changes in the life sciences during the early and mid-twentieth century as an example of a common application of a framework based on the dichotomy between a mechanistic, or reductionist, approach to science and a holistic one. From this conceptual framework, Allen infers two general claims about the process of science and its goals: (1) that "mechanistic materialism" has often presented a more practical way to begin the study of complex phenomena in the life sciences, and (2) that the approach described as "holistic materialism" provides a more complete or accurate description of the natural world. The development of the lac operon model does not fit Allen's generalizations about scientific developments, and it can be used to cast some doubt on the scope of application of that conceptual framework. I argue that a better framework to interpret particular episodes in the history of molecular biology is to consider the ways in which biologists prioritize and track different aspects of the phenomena under study, rather than to focus on whether certain scientific practices are best described as developing from mechanistic to more holistic approaches. I end with some implications for the historiography of science by considering the appropriateness of different conceptual frameworks for different grains of resolution in the history of biology.

  9. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-09-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L. acidophilus NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP-amy-pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and growth phase-dependent, and were repressed by glucose. The highest intracellular glycogen content was observed in early log-phase cells grown on trehalose, which was followed by a drastic decrease of glycogen content prior to entering stationary phase. In raffinose-grown cells, however, glycogen accumulation gradually declined following early log phase and was maintained at stable levels throughout stationary phase. Raffinose also induced an overall higher temporal glg expression throughout growth compared with trehalose. Isogenic ΔglgA (glycogen synthase) and ΔglgB (glycogen-branching enzyme) mutants are glycogen-deficient and exhibited growth defects on raffinose. The latter observation suggests a reciprocal relationship between glycogen synthesis and raffinose metabolism. Deletion of glgB or glgP (glycogen phosphorylase) resulted in defective growth and increased bile sensitivity. The data indicate that glycogen metabolism is involved in growth maintenance, bile tolerance and complex carbohydrate utilization in L. acidophilus. © 2013 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L. acidophilus NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP-amy-pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and growth phase-dependent, and were repressed by glucose. The highest intracellular glycogen content was observed in early log-phase cells grown on trehalose, which was followed by a drastic decrease of glycogen content prior to entering stationary phase. In raffinose-grown cells, however, glycogen accumulation gradually declined following early log phase and was maintained at stable levels throughout stationary phase. Raffinose also induced an overall higher temporal glg expression throughout growth compared with trehalose. Isogenic ΔglgA (glycogen synthase) and ΔglgB (glycogen-branching enzyme) mutants are glycogen-deficient and exhibited growth defects on raffinose. The latter observation suggests a reciprocal relationship between glycogen synthesis and raffinose metabolism. Deletion of glgB or glgP (glycogen phosphorylase) resulted in defective growth and increased bile sensitivity. The data indicate that glycogen metabolism is involved in growth maintenance, bile tolerance and complex carbohydrate utilization in L. acidophilus. PMID:23879596

  11. In vitro transcription of the Escherichia coli K-12 argA, argE, and argCBH operons.

    PubMed Central

    Sens, D; Natter, W; James, E

    1977-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid isolated from argA and argECBH transducing phages was utilized to study the in vitro synthesis of argA, argE, and argCBH messenger ribonucleic acid. The specific regulation of these operons by the arginine holorepressor was demonstrated, providing evidence that the majority, if not all, of the control of these operons is exercised at the transcriptional level. Data are presented which indicate that the arginine holorepressor functions by binding to the operator region and concomitantly prevents the binding of ribonucleic acid polymerase to the corresponding promoter region. PMID:400784

  12. Organization, Structure, and Variability of the rRNA Operon of the Whipple's Disease Bacterium (Tropheryma whippelii)

    PubMed Central

    Maiwald, Matthias; von Herbay, Axel; Lepp, Paul W.; Relman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Whipple's disease is a systemic disorder associated with a cultivation-resistant, poorly characterized actinomycete, Tropheryma whippelii. We determined a nearly complete rRNA operon sequence of T. whippelii from specimens from 3 patients with Whipple's disease, as well as partial operon sequences from 43 patients. Variability was observed in the 16S-23S rRNA spacer sequences, leading to the description of five distinct sequence types. One specimen contained two spacer sequence types, raising the possibility of a double infection. Secondary structure models for the primary rRNA transcript and mature rRNAs revealed rare or unique features. PMID:10809715

  13. Identification of a novel operon in Lactococcus lactis encoding three enzymes for lactic acid synthesis: phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, R M; Harris, C J; Hillier, A J; Davidson, B E

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of a novel multicistronic operon that encodes phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is reported. The three genes in the operon, designated pfk, pyk, and ldh, contain 340, 502, and 325 codons, respectively. The intergenic distances are 87 bp between pfk and pyk and 117 bp between pyk and ldh. Plasmids containing pfk and pyk conferred phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, respectively, on their host. The identity of ldh was established previously by the same approach (R. M. Llanos, A. J. Hillier, and B. E. Davidson, J. Bacteriol. 174:6956-6964, 1992). Each of the genes is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site. The operon is expressed in a 4.1-kb transcript. The 5' end of the transcript was determined to be a G nucleotide positioned 81 bp upstream from the pfk start codon. The pattern of codon usage within the operon is highly biased, with 11 unused amino acid codons. This degree of bias suggests that the operon is highly expressed. The three proteins encoded on the operon are key enzymes in the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway, the central pathway of energy production and lactic acid synthesis in L. lactis. For this reason, we have called the operon the las (lactic acid synthesis) operon. Images PMID:8478320

  14. Differential expression of two members of Rv1922-LipD operon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Does rv1923 qualify for membership?

    PubMed

    Dogra, Nandita; Arya, Stuti; Singh, Kashmir; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2015-07-01

    rv1922 and rv1923 (lipD) are members of Rv1922-LipD operon in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. rv1922 was expressed under aerobic and stress conditions, whereas rv1923 was not expressed in aerobically grown bacteria but expressed moderately under oxidative stress conditions. Different expression of both the operonic genes under normal and stress conditions posed apprehensions for the inclusion of rv1922 and rv1923 in the same operon. The results from this study indicated that although the genes were expressed in an operonic manner, there existed the possibility of differential regulation for rv1923 which has been supported by in silico analysis for the presence of putative internal regulatory sites in the operon.

  15. Cross-Regulation between the phz1 and phz2 Operons Maintain a Balanced Level of Phenazine Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bei; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Linde; Ge, Yihe; Hu, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication often provides selective advantages for the survival of microorganisms in adapting to varying environmental conditions. P. aeruginosa PAO1 possesses two seven-gene operons [phz1 (phzA1B1C1D1E1F1G1) and phz2 (phzA2B2C2D2E2F2G2)] that are involved in the biosynthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its derivatives. Although the two operons are highly homologous and their functions are well known, it is unclear how the two phz operons coordinate their expressions to maintain the phenazine biosynthesis. By constructing single and double deletion mutants of the two phz operons, we found that the phz1-deletion mutant produced the same or less amount of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin in GA medium than the phz2-knockout mutant while the phz1-phz2 double knockout mutant did not produce any phenazines. By generating phzA1 and phzA2 translational and transcriptional fusions with a truncated lacZ reporter, we found that the expression of the phz1 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and did not alter at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz2 operon. Surprisingly, the expression the phz2 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and only moderately at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz1 operon. Our findings suggested that a complex cross-regulation existed between the phz1 and phz2 operons. By mediating the upregulation of one phz operon expression while the other was deleted, this crosstalk would maintain the homeostatic balance of phenazine biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:26735915

  16. Complex processing patterns of mRNAs of the large ATP synthase operon in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Malik Ghulam, Mustafa; Ghulam, Mustafa Malik; Courtois, Florence; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Merendino, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic cell organelles which have evolved from endosymbiosis of the cyanobacterial ancestor. In chloroplasts, genes are still organized into transcriptional units as in bacteria but the corresponding poly-cistronic mRNAs undergo complex processing events, including inter-genic cleavage and 5' and 3' end-definition. The current model for processing proposes that the 3' end of the upstream cistron transcripts and the 5' end of the downstream cistron transcripts are defined by the same RNA-binding protein and overlap at the level of the protein-binding site. We have investigated the processing mechanisms that operate within the large ATP synthase (atp) operon, in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. This operon is transcribed by the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase starting from two promoters, which are upstream and within the operon, respectively, and harbors four potential sites for RNA-binding proteins. In order to study the functional significance of the promoters and the protein-binding sites for the maturation processes, we have performed a detailed mapping of the atp transcript ends. Our data indicate that in contrast to maize, atpI and atpH transcripts with overlapping ends are very rare in Arabidopsis. In addition, atpA mRNAs, which overlap with atpF mRNAs, are even truncated at the 3' end, thus representing degradation products. We observe, instead, that the 5' ends of nascent poly-cistronic atp transcripts are defined at the first protein-binding site which follows either one of the two transcription initiation sites, while the 3' ends are defined at the subsequent protein-binding sites or at hairpin structures that are encountered by the progressing RNA polymerase. We conclude that the overlapping mechanisms of mRNA protection have only a limited role in obtaining stable processed atp mRNAs in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that during evolution of different plant species as maize and Arabidopsis, chloroplasts have evolved multiple

  17. Complex Processing Patterns of mRNAs of the Large ATP Synthase Operon in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Ghulam, Mustafa Malik; Courtois, Florence; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Merendino, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic cell organelles which have evolved from endosymbiosis of the cyanobacterial ancestor. In chloroplasts, genes are still organized into transcriptional units as in bacteria but the corresponding poly-cistronic mRNAs undergo complex processing events, including inter-genic cleavage and 5′ and 3′ end-definition. The current model for processing proposes that the 3′ end of the upstream cistron transcripts and the 5′ end of the downstream cistron transcripts are defined by the same RNA-binding protein and overlap at the level of the protein-binding site. We have investigated the processing mechanisms that operate within the large ATP synthase (atp) operon, in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. This operon is transcribed by the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase starting from two promoters, which are upstream and within the operon, respectively, and harbors four potential sites for RNA-binding proteins. In order to study the functional significance of the promoters and the protein-binding sites for the maturation processes, we have performed a detailed mapping of the atp transcript ends. Our data indicate that in contrast to maize, atpI and atpH transcripts with overlapping ends are very rare in Arabidopsis. In addition, atpA mRNAs, which overlap with atpF mRNAs, are even truncated at the 3′ end, thus representing degradation products. We observe, instead, that the 5′ ends of nascent poly-cistronic atp transcripts are defined at the first protein-binding site which follows either one of the two transcription initiation sites, while the 3′ ends are defined at the subsequent protein-binding sites or at hairpin structures that are encountered by the progressing RNA polymerase. We conclude that the overlapping mechanisms of mRNA protection have only a limited role in obtaining stable processed atp mRNAs in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that during evolution of different plant species as maize and Arabidopsis, chloroplasts have

  18. Role of the ganSPQAB Operon in Degradation of Galactan by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Watzlawick, Hildegard; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus subtilis possesses different enzymes for the utilization of plant cell wall polysaccharides. This includes a gene cluster containing galactan degradation genes (ganA and ganB), two transporter component genes (ganQ and ganP), and the sugar-binding lipoprotein-encoding gene ganS (previously known as cycB). These genes form an operon that is regulated by GanR. The degradation of galactan by B. subtilis begins with the activity of extracellular GanB. GanB is an endo-β-1,4-galactanase and is a member of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 53. This enzyme was active on high-molecular-weight arabinose-free galactan and mainly produced galactotetraose as well as galactotriose and galactobiose. These galacto-oligosaccharides may enter the cell via the GanQP transmembrane proteins of the galactan ABC transporter. The specificity of the galactan ABC transporter depends on the sugar-binding lipoprotein, GanS. Purified GanS was shown to bind galactotetraose and galactotriose using thermal shift assay. The energy for this transport is provided by MsmX, an ATP-binding protein. The transported galacto-oligosaccharides are further degraded by GanA. GanA is a β-galactosidase that belongs to GH family 42. The GanA enzyme was able to hydrolyze short-chain β-1,4-galacto-oligosaccharides as well as synthetic β-galactopyranosides into galactose. Thermal shift assay as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that galactobiose is the inducer of the galactan operon regulated by GanR. DNase I footprinting revealed that the GanR protein binds to an operator overlapping the −35 box of the σA-type promoter of Pgan, which is located upstream of ganS. IMPORTANCE Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive soil bacterium that utilizes different types of carbohydrates, such as pectin, as carbon sources. So far, most of the pectin degradation systems and enzymes have been thoroughly studied in B. subtilis. Nevertheless, the B. subtilis utilization system of galactan

  19. Role of the ganSPQAB Operon in Degradation of Galactan by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Watzlawick, Hildegard; Morabbi Heravi, Kambiz; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2016-10-15

    Bacillus subtilis possesses different enzymes for the utilization of plant cell wall polysaccharides. This includes a gene cluster containing galactan degradation genes (ganA and ganB), two transporter component genes (ganQ and ganP), and the sugar-binding lipoprotein-encoding gene ganS (previously known as cycB). These genes form an operon that is regulated by GanR. The degradation of galactan by B. subtilis begins with the activity of extracellular GanB. GanB is an endo-β-1,4-galactanase and is a member of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 53. This enzyme was active on high-molecular-weight arabinose-free galactan and mainly produced galactotetraose as well as galactotriose and galactobiose. These galacto-oligosaccharides may enter the cell via the GanQP transmembrane proteins of the galactan ABC transporter. The specificity of the galactan ABC transporter depends on the sugar-binding lipoprotein, GanS. Purified GanS was shown to bind galactotetraose and galactotriose using thermal shift assay. The energy for this transport is provided by MsmX, an ATP-binding protein. The transported galacto-oligosaccharides are further degraded by GanA. GanA is a β-galactosidase that belongs to GH family 42. The GanA enzyme was able to hydrolyze short-chain β-1,4-galacto-oligosaccharides as well as synthetic β-galactopyranosides into galactose. Thermal shift assay as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that galactobiose is the inducer of the galactan operon regulated by GanR. DNase I footprinting revealed that the GanR protein binds to an operator overlapping the -35 box of the σ(A)-type promoter of Pgan, which is located upstream of ganS IMPORTANCE: Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive soil bacterium that utilizes different types of carbohydrates, such as pectin, as carbon sources. So far, most of the pectin degradation systems and enzymes have been thoroughly studied in B. subtilis Nevertheless, the B. subtilis utilization system of galactan, which is

  20. Effect of DNA looping on the induction kinetics of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul

    2007-08-21

    The induction of the lac operon follows cooperative kinetics. The first mechanistic model of these kinetics is the de facto standard in the modeling literature [Yagil, G., Yagil, E., 1971. On the relation between effector concentration and the rate of induced enzyme synthesis. Biophys. J. 11, 11-17]. Yet, subsequent studies have shown that the model is based on incorrect assumptions. Specifically, the repressor is a tetramer with four (not two) inducer-binding sites, and the operon contains two auxiliary operators (in addition to the main operator). Furthermore, these structural features are crucial for the formation of DNA loops, the key determinants of lac repression and induction. Indeed, the repression is determined almost entirely (>95%) by the looped complexes [Oehler, S., Eismann, E.R., Krämer, H., Müller-Hill, B., 1990. The three operators of the lac operon cooperate in repression. EMBO J. 9(4), 973-979], and the pronounced cooperativity of the induction curve hinges upon the existence of the looped complexes [Oehler, S., Alberti, S., Müller-Hill, B., 2006. Induction of the lac promoter in the absence of DNA loops and the stoichiometry of induction. Nucleic Acids Res. 34(2), 606-612]. Here, we formulate a model of lac induction taking due account of the tetrameric structure of the repressor and the existence of looped complexes. We show that: (1) The kinetics are significantly more cooperative than those predicted by the Yagil and Yagil model. The cooperativity is higher because the formation of looped complexes is easily abolished by repressor-inducer binding. (2) The model provides good fits to the repression data for cells containing wild-type tetrameric or mutant dimeric repressor, as well as the induction curves for 6 different strains of Escherichia coli. It also implies that the ratios of certain looped and non-looped complexes are independent of inducer and repressor levels, a conclusion that can be rigorously tested by gel electrophoresis. (3

  1. A Quantitative bgl Operon Model for E. coli Requires BglF Conformational Change for Sugar Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Paras; Bender, Andreas

    The bgl operon is responsible for the metabolism of β-glucoside sugars such as salicin or arbutin in E. coli. Its regulatory system involves both positive and negative feedback mechanisms and it can be assumed to be more complex than that of the more closely studied lac and trp operons. We have developed a quantitative model for the regulation of the bgl operon which is subject to in silico experiments investigating its behavior under different hypothetical conditions. Upon administration of 5mM salicin as an inducer our model shows 80-fold induction, which compares well with the 60-fold induction measured experimentally. Under practical conditions 5-10mM inducer are employed, which is in line with the minimum inducer concentration of 1mM required by our model. The necessity of BglF conformational change for sugar transport has been hypothesized previously, and in line with those hypotheses our model shows only minor induction if conformational change is not allowed. Overall, this first quantitative model for the bgl operon gives reasonable predictions that are close to experimental results (where measured). It will be further refined as values of the parameters are determined experimentally. The model was developed in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) and it is available from the authors and from the Biomodels repository [www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels].

  2. Influence of the feedback loops in the trp operon of B. subtilis on the system dynamic response and noise amplitude.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Chimal, Criseida; Santillán, Moisés; Rodríguez-González, Jesús

    2012-10-07

    In this paper we introduce a mathematical model for the tryptophan operon regulatory pathway in Bacillus subtilis. This model considers the transcription-attenuation, and the enzyme-inhibition regulatory mechanisms. Special attention is paid to the estimation of all the model parameters from reported experimental data. With the aid of this model we investigate, from a mathematical-modeling point of view, whether the existing multiplicity of regulatory feedback loops is advantageous in some sense, regarding the dynamic response and the biochemical noise in the system. The tryptophan operon dynamic behavior is studied by means of deterministic numeric simulations, while the biochemical noise is analyzed with the aid of stochastic simulations. The model feasibility is tested comparing its stochastic and deterministic results with experimental reports. Our results for the wildtype and for a couple of mutant bacterial strains suggest that the enzyme-inhibition feedback loop, dynamically accelerates the operon response, and plays a major role in the reduction of biochemical noise. Also, the transcription-attenuation feedback loop makes the trp operon sensitive to changes in the endogenous tryptophan level, and increases the amplitude of the biochemical noise.

  3. QapR (PA5506) Represses an Operon That Negatively Affects the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Kyle A.; Coleman, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can cause disease in varied sites within the human body and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in those afflicted with cystic fibrosis. P. aeruginosa is able to coordinate group behaviors, such as virulence factor production, through the process of cell-to-cell signaling. There are three intercellular signaling systems employed by P. aeruginosa, and one of these systems utilizes the small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS]). PQS is required for virulence in multiple infection models and has been found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients colonized by P. aeruginosa. In this study, we have identified an RpiR family transcriptional regulator, QapR, which is an autoregulatory repressor. We found that mutation of qapR caused overexpression of the qapR operon. We characterized the qapR operon to show that it contains genes qapR, PA5507, PA5508, and PA5509 and that QapR directly controls the transcription of these genes in a negative manner. We also show that derepression of this operon greatly reduces PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa. Our results suggest that qapR affects PQS concentration by repressing an enzymatic pathway that acts on PQS or a PQS precursor to lower the PQS concentration. We believe that this operon comprises a novel mechanism to regulate PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa. PMID:23708133

  4. ["Quorum sensing" regulation of lux gene expression and the structure of lux operon in marine bacteria Alivibrio logei].

    PubMed

    Khrul'nova, S A; Manukhov, I V; Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B

    2011-12-01

    A group of luminescent strains of marine bacteria Alivibrio logei has been isolated (basins of the Okhotsk, White and Bering Seas). Strains A. logei were shown to be psycrophiic bacteria with an optimal growth temperature of approximately 15 degrees C. Biolumiscent characteristics of strains were studied, and the expression of lux genes was shown to be regulated by the "quorum sensing" system. The A. logei lux operon was cloned in Escherichia coli cells and the structure of this operon and its nucleotide sequence were determined. The structure of A. logei lux operon differs markedly from that in the closely related species of luminescent marine bacteria A. fischeri. In the structure of the A. logei lux operon, the the luxI gene is absent in front of luxC, and a fragment containing luxR2-luxI genes is located immediately after luxG gene. Luminescent psycrophiic marine bacteria of A. logei are assumed to be widely distributed in cold waters of northern seas.

  5. Transformation and characterization of an arsenic gene operon from urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, M; Kuribayashi, T; Yamamoto, S; Millar, B C; Moore, J E

    2016-01-01

    An arsenate susceptibility test was performed with transformed and cultured Escherichia coli DH5α cells, which carried recombinant DNA of full-length arsenic (ars) operon, namely a putative membrane permease, ArsP; a transcriptional repressor, ArsR; an arsenate reductase, ArsC; and an arsenical-resistance membrane transporter, Acr3, from the Japanese urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter lari (UPTC) CF89-12. The E. coli DH5α transformant showed reduced susceptibility to arsenate (~1536 μg/mL), compared to the control. Thus, these ars four-genes from the UPTC CF89-12 strain cells could confer a reduced susceptibility to arsenate in the transformed and E. coli DH5α cells. E. coli transformants with truncated ars operons, acr3 (acr3) and arsC-acr3 (∆arsC-acr3), of the ars operon, showed an MIC value of 384 μg/mL (~384 μg/mL), similar to the E. coli cells which carried the pGEM-T vector (control). Reverse transcription PCR confirmed in vivo transcription of recombinant full-length ars operon and deletion variants (∆acr3 and ∆arsC-acr3) in the transformed E. coli cells.

  6. Functional Conservation of the Capacity for ent-Kaurene Biosynthesis and an Associated Operon in Certain Rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    Hershey, David M.; Lu, Xuan; Zi, Jiachen

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial interactions with plants are accompanied by complex signal exchange processes. Previously, the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic (rhizo)bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum was found to carry adjacent genes encoding two sequentially acting diterpene cyclases that together transform geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurene, the olefin precursor to the gibberellin plant hormones. Species from the three other major genera of rhizobia were found to have homologous terpene synthase genes. Cloning and functional characterization of a representative set of these enzymes confirmed the capacity of each genus to produce ent-kaurene. Moreover, comparison of their genomic context revealed that these diterpene synthases are found in a conserved operon which includes an adjacent isoprenyl diphosphate synthase, shown here to produce the geranylgeranyl diphosphate precursor, providing a critical link to central metabolism. In addition, the rest of the operon consists of enzymatic genes that presumably lead to a more elaborated diterpenoid, although the production of gibberellins was not observed. Nevertheless, it has previously been shown that the operon is selectively expressed during nodulation, and the scattered distribution of the operon via independent horizontal gene transfer within the symbiotic plasmid or genomic island shown here suggests that such diterpenoid production may modulate the interaction of these particular symbionts with their host plants. PMID:24142247

  7. Cyanobacterial flv4-2 Operon-Encoded Proteins Optimize Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chukhutsina, Volha; Bersanini, Luca; Aro, Eva-Mari; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) complexes drive the water-splitting reaction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. However, too much light can damage and disrupt PSII. In cyanobacteria, the flv4-2 operon encodes three proteins (Flv2, Flv4, and Sll0218), which safeguard PSII activity under air-level CO2 and in high light conditions. However, the exact mechanism of action of these proteins has not been clarified yet. We demonstrate that the PSII electron transfer properties are influenced by the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins. Accelerated secondary charge separation kinetics was observed upon expression/overexpression of the flv4-2 operon. This is likely induced by docking of the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer in the vicinity of the QB pocket of PSII, which, in turn, increases the QB redox potential and consequently stabilizes forward electron transfer. The alternative electron transfer route constituted by Flv2/Flv4 sequesters electrons from QB(-) guaranteeing the dissipation of excess excitation energy in PSII under stressful conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that in the absence of the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins, about 20% of the phycobilisome antenna becomes detached from the reaction centers, thus decreasing light harvesting. Phycobilisome detachment is a consequence of a decreased relative content of PSII dimers, a feature observed in the absence of the Sll0218 protein.

  8. Functional conservation of the capacity for ent-kaurene biosynthesis and an associated operon in certain rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Hershey, David M; Lu, Xuan; Zi, Jiachen; Peters, Reuben J

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial interactions with plants are accompanied by complex signal exchange processes. Previously, the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic (rhizo)bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum was found to carry adjacent genes encoding two sequentially acting diterpene cyclases that together transform geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurene, the olefin precursor to the gibberellin plant hormones. Species from the three other major genera of rhizobia were found to have homologous terpene synthase genes. Cloning and functional characterization of a representative set of these enzymes confirmed the capacity of each genus to produce ent-kaurene. Moreover, comparison of their genomic context revealed that these diterpene synthases are found in a conserved operon which includes an adjacent isoprenyl diphosphate synthase, shown here to produce the geranylgeranyl diphosphate precursor, providing a critical link to central metabolism. In addition, the rest of the operon consists of enzymatic genes that presumably lead to a more elaborated diterpenoid, although the production of gibberellins was not observed. Nevertheless, it has previously been shown that the operon is selectively expressed during nodulation, and the scattered distribution of the operon via independent horizontal gene transfer within the symbiotic plasmid or genomic island shown here suggests that such diterpenoid production may modulate the interaction of these particular symbionts with their host plants.

  9. QapR (PA5506) represses an operon that negatively affects the Pseudomonas quinolone signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Kyle A; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can cause disease in varied sites within the human body and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in those afflicted with cystic fibrosis. P. aeruginosa is able to coordinate group behaviors, such as virulence factor production, through the process of cell-to-cell signaling. There are three intercellular signaling systems employed by P. aeruginosa, and one of these systems utilizes the small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS]). PQS is required for virulence in multiple infection models and has been found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients colonized by P. aeruginosa. In this study, we have identified an RpiR family transcriptional regulator, QapR, which is an autoregulatory repressor. We found that mutation of qapR caused overexpression of the qapR operon. We characterized the qapR operon to show that it contains genes qapR, PA5507, PA5508, and PA5509 and that QapR directly controls the transcription of these genes in a negative manner. We also show that derepression of this operon greatly reduces PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa. Our results suggest that qapR affects PQS concentration by repressing an enzymatic pathway that acts on PQS or a PQS precursor to lower the PQS concentration. We believe that this operon comprises a novel mechanism to regulate PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Organization and regulation of the arsenite oxidase operon of the moderately acidophilic and facultative chemoautotrophic Thiomonas arsenitoxydans.

    PubMed

    Slyemi, Djamila; Moinier, Danielle; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-11-01

    Thiomonas arsenitoxydans is an acidophilic and facultatively autotrophic bacterium that can grow by oxidizing arsenite to arsenate. A comparative genomic analysis showed that the T. arsenitoxydans aioBA cluster encoding the two subunits of arsenite oxidase is distinct from the other clusters, with two specific genes encoding a cytochrome c and a metalloregulator belonging to the ArsR/SmtB family. These genes are cotranscribed with aioBA, suggesting that these cytochromes c are involved in arsenite oxidation and that this operon is controlled by the metalloregulator. The growth of T. arsenitoxydans in the presence of thiosulfate and arsenite, or arsenate, is biphasic. Real-time PCR experiments showed that the operon is transcribed during the second growth phase in the presence of arsenite or arsenate, whereas antimonite had no effect. These results suggest that the expression of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans is regulated by the electron donor present in the medium, i.e., is induced in the presence of arsenic but is repressed by more energetic substrates. Our data indicate that the genetic organization and regulation of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans differ from those of the other arsenite oxidizers.

  11. Horizontal transfer of iturin A operon, itu, to Bacillus subtilis 168 and conversion into an iturin A producer.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Kenji; Inoue, Satoka; Ano, Takashi; Itaya, Mitsuhiro; Shoda, Makoto

    2005-11-01

    Iturin A and its derivatives are lipopeptide antibiotics produced by Bacillus subtilis and several closely related bacteria. Three iturin group operons (i.e., iturin A, mycosubtilin, and bacillomycin D) of those antibiotic-producing strains have been cloned and sequenced thus far, strongly implying the horizontal transfer of these operons. To examine the nature of such horizontal transfer in terms of antibiotic production, a 42-kb region of the B. subtilis RB14 genome, which contains a complete 38-kb iturin A operon, was transferred via competent cell transformation to the genome of a non-iturin A producer, B. subtilis 168, using a method based on double-crossover homologous recombination with two short landing pad sequences (LPSs) in the genome. The recombinant was positively selected by confirming the elimination of the cI repressor gene, which was localized between the two LPSs and substituted by the transferred segment. The iturin A operon-transferred strain 168 was then converted into an iturin A producer by the introduction of an sfp gene, which encodes 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase and is mutated in strain 168. By inserting the pleiotropic regulator degQ, the productivity of iturin A increased sevenfold and was restored to about half that of the donor strain RB14, without the transfer of additional genes, such as regulatory or self-resistance genes.

  12. [Activation of the expression of the microcin C51 operon upon glucose starvation of cells at the exponential growth phase].

    PubMed

    Veselovskiĭ, A M; Metlitskaia, A Z; Lipasova, V A; Bass, I A; Khmel', I A

    2005-01-01

    It was earlier shown that expression of the microcin C51 operon in Escherichia coli cells is activated upon decelerated growth of cells during their transition to the stationary growth phase and depends on the sigmaS subunit of RNA polymerase. Using a single-copy construct containing the cloned promoter region of the microcin C51 operon and a promoterless lac operon (P(mcc)-lac), it was shown that the promoter of the microcin operon was also induced by stress caused by the transition of cells at the exponential growth phase into the medium without glucose as a sole carbon source. Activation of P(mcc)-lac expression upon severe glucose starvation occurred in rpoS+ and rpoS- strains. In cells carrying the rpoD800 mutation that renders the sigma70 subunit of RNA polymerase temperature-sensitive, an activation of P(mcc)-lac expression was observed at nonpermissive temperature, in contrast to its complete inhibition in E. coli cells at the phase of delayed growth. Other stressors-nitrogen starvation, high temperatures, osmotic shock, tetracycline and chloramphenicol-did not activate P(mcc)-lac expression in cells at the exponential growth phase.

  13. Analysis of the alcABC operon encoding alcaligin biosynthesis enzymes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Giardina, P C; Foster, L A; Toth, S I; Roe, B A; Dyer, D W

    1997-07-18

    We previously cloned a B. bronchiseptica (Bb) genomic DNA fragment that complements a Bb alcaligin biosynthesis mutant, and reported the identification of a gene, alcA, with predicted protein sequence similarity to siderophore biosynthesis enzymes from other organisms. In the present study we show that further nt sequencing of this region revealed two open reading frames (ORFs) 3' to alcA that encode putative proteins AlcB and AlcC, with significant sequence similarity to the aerobactin biosynthesis enzymes IucB and IucC, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the three ORFs are encoded on a single transcript, and that this operon is repressed at the transcriptional level by Fe. Primer extension analysis placed the transcriptional start point (tsp) 35 nt from the 5' end of the Fur consensus sequence and 188 nt from the putative start of translation of AlcA.

  14. Orf5/SolR: a transcriptional repressor of the sol operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum?

    PubMed

    Thormann, K; Dürre, P

    2001-11-01

    The gene of Orf5 (SolR) of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 was subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified with Ni-NTA agarose and used for DNA binding assays. No DNA binding of Orf5 to regions upstream of the sol operon from C. acetobutylicum was observed. Overexpression of Orf5 in C. acetobutylicum led to a change in the organism's pattern of glycosylated exoproteins. The Orf5 protein was localized in the cell membrane fraction and to a small extent in the supernatant medium. Based on these results Orf5 (SolR) appears not to act as a transcriptional repressor in C. acetobutylicum, but instead may be an enzyme involved in glycosylation or deglycosylation.

  15. Sequence of the luxD gene encoding acyltransferase of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Chao, Y F; Weng, S F; Lin, J W

    1993-04-15

    The nucleotide sequence of luxD (EMBL accession No. X65611), encoding acyltransferase (ACT), of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi PL741 was determined, and the amino acid (aa) sequence was deduced. ACT is a component of the fatty acid reductase complex, which is responsible for converting fatty acid to aldehyde that serves as the substrate in the luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescent reactions. The protein has a calculated M(r) of 34,384 and comprises 305 aa residues. Alignment and comparison of the ACT of P. leiognathi with that of Vibrio fischeri ATCC7744, V. harveyi B392 and Xenorhabdus luminescens Hm shows that there is 66%, 59% and 61% aa identity, respectively.

  16. Operon structure and cotranslational subunit association direct protein assembly in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yu-Wei; Minguez, Pablo; Bork, Peer; Auburger, Josef J; Guilbride, D Lys; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-11-06

    Assembly of protein complexes is considered a posttranslational process involving random collision of subunits. We show that within the Escherichia coli cytosol, bacterial luciferase subunits LuxA and LuxB assemble into complexes close to the site of subunit synthesis. Assembly efficiency decreases markedly if subunits are synthesized on separate messenger RNAs from genes integrated at distant chromosomal sites. Subunit assembly initiates cotranslationally on nascent LuxB in vivo. The ribosome-associated chaperone trigger factor delays the onset of cotranslational interactions until the LuxB dimer interface is fully exposed. Protein assembly is thus directly coupled to the translation process and involves spatially confined, actively chaperoned cotranslational subunit interactions. Bacterial gene organization into operons therefore reflects a fundamental cotranslational mechanism for spatial and temporal regulation that is vital to effective assembly of protein complexes. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. The fas operon of Rhodococcus fascians encodes new genes required for efficient fasciation of host plants.

    PubMed

    Crespi, M; Vereecke, D; Temmerman, W; Van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1994-05-01

    Three virulence loci (fas, att, and hyp) of Rhodococcus fascians D188 have been identified on a 200-kb conjugative linear plasmid (pFiD188). The fas locus was delimited to a 6.5-kb DNA fragment by insertion mutagenesis, single homologous disruptive recombination, and in trans complementation of different avirulent insertion mutants. The locus is arranged as a large operon containing six open reading frames whose expression is specifically induced during the interaction with host plants. One predicted protein is homologous to P-450 cytochromes from actinomycetes. The putative ferredoxin component is of a novel type containing additional domains homologous to transketolases from chemoautotrophic, photosynthetic, and methylotrophic microorganisms. Genetic analysis revealed that fas encodes, in addition to the previously identified ipt, at least two new genes that are involved in fasciation development, one of which is only required on older tobacco plants.

  18. Modelling gene expression control using P systems: The Lac Operon, a case study.

    PubMed

    Romero-Campero, Francisco José; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J

    2008-03-01

    In this paper P systems are used as a formal framework for the specification and simulation of biological systems. In particular, we will deal with gene regulation systems consisting of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that take place in different compartments of the hierarchical structure of the living cell or in different individual cells from a colony. We will explicitly model transcription and translation as concurrent and discrete processes using rewriting rules on multisets of objects and strings. Our approach takes into account the discrete character of the components of the system, its random behaviour and the key role played by membranes in processes involving signalling at the cell surface and selective uptake of substances from the environment. Our systems will evolve according to an extension of Gillespie's algorithm, called Multicompartmental Gillespie's Algorithm. The well known gene regulation system in the Lac Operon in Escherichia coli will be modelled as a case study to benchmark our approach.

  19. The presence of the glycolysis operon in SAR11 genomes is positively correlated with ocean productivity.

    PubMed

    Schwalbach, M S; Tripp, H J; Steindler, L; Smith, D P; Giovannoni, S J

    2010-02-01

    Bacteria in the SAR11 clade are highly abundant in marine surface waters, but currently little is known about the carbon compounds that support these large heterotrophic populations. To better understand the carbon requirements of these organisms, we conducted a multiphasic exploration of carbohydrate utilization among SAR11 isolates from the Northeast Pacific Ocean and the Sargasso Sea. A comparison of three SAR11 genomes showed they all lacked a recognizable PTS system, the oxidative portion of the pentose phosphate shunt (zwf-, pgl-), genes for the Embden-Meyerhoff-Parnas (pfk-, pyk-) and Entner-Doudoroff (eda-) pathways of glycolysis. Strain HTCC7211, isolated from an ocean gyre, was missing other glycolysis genes as well. Growth assays, radioisotopes, metagenomics and microarrays were used to test the hypothesis that these isolates might be limited in their abilities to transport and oxidize exogenous carbohydrates. Galactose, fucose, rhamnose, arabinose, ribose and mannose could not serve as carbon sources for the isolates tested. However, differences in glucose utilization were detected between coastal and ocean gyre isolates, with the coastal isolates capable of transporting, incorporating and oxidizing glucose while the open ocean isolate could not. Subsequent microarray analysis of a coastal isolate suggested that an operon encoding a variant of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway is likely responsible for the observed differences in glucose utilization. Metagenomic analysis indicated this operon is more commonly found in coastal environments and is positively correlated with chlorophyll a concentrations. Our results indicated that glycolysis is a variable metabolic property of SAR11 metabolism and suggest that glycolytic SAR11 are more common in productive marine environments.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus ArcR controls expression of the arginine deiminase operon.

    PubMed

    Makhlin, Julia; Kofman, Tzili; Borovok, Ilya; Kohler, Christian; Engelmann, Susanne; Cohen, Gerald; Aharonowitz, Yair

    2007-08-01

    We identified a single open reading frame that is strongly similar to ArcR, a member of the Crp/Fnr family of bacterial transcriptional regulators, in all sequenced Staphylococcus aureus genomes. The arcR gene encoding ArcR forms an operon with the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway genes arcABDC that enable the utilization of arginine as a source of energy for growth under anaerobic conditions. In this report, we show that under anaerobic conditions, S. aureus growth is subject to glucose catabolic repression and is enhanced by arginine. Likewise, glucose and arginine have reciprocal effects on the transcription of the arcABDCR genes. Furthermore, we show using a mutant deleted for arcR that the transcription of the arc operon under anaerobic conditions depends strictly on a functional ArcR. These findings are supported by proteome analyses, which showed that under anaerobic conditions the expression of the ADI catabolic proteins depends on ArcR. Bioinformatic analysis of S. aureus ArcR predicts an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. ArcR binds to a conserved Crp-like sequence motif, TGTGA-N(6)-TCACA, present in the arc promoter region and thereby activates the expression of the ADI pathway genes. Crp-like sequence motifs were also found in the regulatory regions of some 30 other S. aureus genes mostly encoding anaerobic enzymatic systems, virulence factors, and regulatory systems. ArcR was tested and found to bind to the regulatory regions of four such genes, adh1, lctE, srrAB, and lukM. In one case, for lctE, encoding l-lactate dehydrogenase, ArcR was able to bind only in the presence of cyclic AMP. These observations suggest that ArcR is likely to play an important role in the expression of numerous genes required for anaerobic growth.

  1. Contribution of the nos-pdt operon to virulence phenotypes in methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sapp, April M; Mogen, Austin B; Almand, Erin A; Rivera, Frances E; Shaw, Lindsey N; Richardson, Anthony R; Rice, Kelly C

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as an important regulator of bacterial stress resistance, biofilm development, and virulence. One potential source of endogenous NO production in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is its NO-synthase (saNOS) enzyme, encoded by the nos gene. Although a role for saNOS in oxidative stress resistance, antibiotic resistance, and virulence has been recently-described, insights into the regulation of nos expression and saNOS enzyme activity remain elusive. To this end, transcriptional analysis of the nos gene in S. aureus strain UAMS-1 was performed, which revealed that nos expression increases during low-oxygen growth and is growth-phase dependent. Furthermore, nos is co-transcribed with a downstream gene, designated pdt, which encodes a prephenate dehydratase (PDT) enzyme involved in phenylalanine biosynthesis. Deletion of pdt significantly impaired the ability of UAMS-1 to grow in chemically-defined media lacking phenylalanine, confirming the function of this enzyme. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the operon organization of nos-pdt appears to be unique to the staphylococci. As described for other S. aureus nos mutants, inactivation of nos in UAMS-1 conferred sensitivity to oxidative stress, while deletion of pdt did not affect this phenotype. The nos mutant also displayed reduced virulence in a murine sepsis infection model, and increased carotenoid pigmentation when cultured on agar plates, both previously-undescribed nos mutant phenotypes. Utilizing the fluorescent stain 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2',7'-Difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) diacetate, decreased levels of intracellular NO/reactive nitrogen species (RNS) were detected in the nos mutant on agar plates. These results reinforce the important role of saNOS in S. aureus physiology and virulence, and have identified an in vitro growth condition under which saNOS activity appears to be upregulated. However, the significance of the operon organization of nos-pdt and potential

  2. HIV-1 Tat regulates the expression of the dcw operon and stimulates the proliferation of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinsong; Zhang, Yumin; Knapp, Pamela E; Zhao, Tianyong

    2016-01-01

    Infections of pathogenic bacteria are very common in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. However, the biological effects of HIV-1 Tat on bacteria are incompletely understood. In this study, HIV-1 Tat was expressed in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) to investigate its biological effects on bacteria. Bacterial cells expressing either HIV-1 Tat1-86 (Tat1-86) or HIV-1 Tat1-72 (Tat1-72) grow significantly faster than those with either only an empty vector or an unrelated control (GFP or Rluc). Supplementation of purified HIV-1 Tat1-86 or Tat1-101 protein into bacterial culture medium stimulated the growth of both E. coli and PA01. The expression profile of certain cell division-associated genes, such as those in the division cell wall (dcw) operon (ftsA, ftsQ, ftsW and ftsZ), yafO and zipA, was altered in HIV-1 Tat1-86 expressing E. coli BL21(DE3). Furthermore, the expression of firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter gene, when engineered for control by the dcw promoter and terminator, was enhanced by HIV-1 Tat in E. coli, confirming that HIV-1 Tat transcriptionally regulates the expression of the dcw operon. The finding that HIV-1 Tat stimulates bacterial growth whether it is produced intracellularly or applied extracellularly may have relevance for HIV patients who are highly susceptible to opportunistic bacterial infections. Contents category: Viruses -Retroviruses. The GenBank accession number for the sequence of HIV-1 Tat1-86 is AF324439.1.

  3. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose.

  4. Role of Operon aaoSo-mutT in Antioxidant Defense in Streptococcus oligofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Liu, Lei; Tong, Huichun; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have found that an insertional inactivation of aaoSo, a gene encoding L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), causes marked repression of the growth of Streptococcus oligofermentans. Here, we found that aaoSo and mutT, a homolog of pyrophosphohydrolase gene of Escherichia coli, constituted an operon. Deletion of either gene did not impair the growth of S. oligofermentans, but double deletion of both aaoSo and mutT was lethal. Quantitative PCR showed that the transcript abundance of mutT was reduced for 13-fold in the aaoSo insertional mutant, indicating that gene polarity derived from the inactivation of aaoSo attenuated the expression of mutT. Enzymatic assays were conducted to determine the biochemical functions of LAAO and MutT of S. oligofermentans. The results indicated that LAAO functioned as an aminoacetone oxidase [47.75 nmol H2O2 (min·mg protein)–1]; and MutT showed the pyrophosphohydrolase activity, which removed mutagens such as 8-oxo-dGTP. Like paraquat, aaoSo mutations increased the expression of SOD, and addition of aminoacetone (final concentration, 5 mM) decreased the mutant’s growth by 11%, indicating that the aaoSo mutants are under ROS stress. HPLC did reveal elevated levels of cytoplasmic aminoacetone in both the deletion and insertional gene mutants of aaoSo. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy showed increased hydroxyl radicals in both types of aaoSo mutant. This demonstrated that inactivation of aaoSo caused the elevation of the prooxidant aminoacetone, resulting the cellular ROS stress. Our study indicates that the presence of both LAAO and MutT can prevent endogenous metabolites-generated ROS and mutagens. In this way, we were able to determine the role of the aaoSo-mutT operon in antioxidant defense in S. oligofermentans. PMID:22666463

  5. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-01-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose. PMID:2834341

  6. Role of the Escherichia coli glnALG operon in regulation of ammonium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakuman, A.; Schulman, I.; MacNeil, D.; Barnes, E.M. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    Escherichia coli expresses a specific ammonium (methylammonium) transport system (Amt) when cultured with glutamate or glutamine as the nitrogen source. Over 95% of this Amt activity is repressed by growth of wild-type cells on media containing ammonia. The control of Amt expression was studied with strains containing specific mutations in the glnALG operon. GlnA/sup -/ (glutamine synthetase deficient) mutants, which contain polar mutations on glnL and glnG genes and therefore have the Reg/sup -/ phenotype (fail to turn on nitrogen-regulated operons such as histidase), expressed less than 10% of the Amt activity observed for the parental strain. Similarly, low levels of Amt were found in GlnG mutants having the GlnA/sup +/ Reg/sup -/ phenotype. However, GlnA/sup -/ RegC mutants (a phenotype constitutive for histidase) contained over 70% of the parental Amt activity. At steady-state levels, GlnA/sup -/ RegC mutants accumulated chemically unaltered (/sup 14/C)methylammonium against a 60- to 80-fold concentration gradient, whereas the labeled substrate was trapped within parental cells as ..gamma..-glutamylmethylamide. GlnL Reg/sup -/ mutants (normal glutamine synthetase regulation) had less than 4% of the Amt activity observed for the parental strain. However, the Amt activity of GlnL RegC mutants was slightly higher than that of the parental strain and was not repressed during growth of cells in media containing ammonia. These findings demonstrate that glutamine synthetase is not required for Amt in E. coli. The loss of Amt in certain GlnA/sup -/ strains is due to polar effects on glnL nd glnG genes, whose products are involved in expression of nitrogen-regulated genes, including that for Amt.

  7. Characterization of the mgl operon of Escherichia coli by transposon mutagenesis and molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Harayama, S; Bollinger, J; Iino, T; Hazelbauer, G L

    1983-01-01

    We used transposon insertion mutagenesis, molecular cloning, and a novel procedure for in vitro construction of polar and nonpolar insertion mutations to characterize the genetic organization and gene products of the beta-methylgalactoside (Mgl) transport system, which utilizes the galactose-binding protein. The data indicate that the mgl operon contained three genes, which were transcribed in the order mglB, mglA, and mglC. The first gene coded for the 31,000 Mr galactose-binding protein, which was synthesized as a 3,000-dalton-larger precursor form. The mglA product was a 50,000 Mr protein which was tightly associated with the membrane, and the mglC product was a 38,000 Mr protein which was apparently loosely associated with the membrane and was probably located on the internal face of the cytoplasmic membrane. Identification of gene products was facilitated by in vitro insertion of a fragment of Tn5 containing the gene conferring kanamycin resistance into a restriction site in the operon. The fragment proved to have a polar effect on the expression of promoter-distal genes only when inserted in one of the two possible orientations. The three identified gene products were necessary and apparently sufficient for transport activity, but only the binding protein was required for chemotaxis towards galactose. The transport system appeared to contain the minimum number of components for a binding protein-related system: a periplasmic recognition component, a transmembrane protein, and a peripheral membrane protein that may be involved in energy linkage.

  8. Using the TxtAB operon to quantify pathogenic Streptomyces in potato tubers and soil.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xinshun; Wanner, Leslie A; Christ, Barbara J

    2008-04-01

    The phytotoxin thaxtomin, produced by plant pathogenic Streptomyces species, is the only known pathogenicity determinant for common scab diseases of potato and other root and tuber crops. Genes encoding thaxtomin synthetase (txtAB) are found on a pathogenicity island characteristic of genetically diverse plant pathogenic Streptomyces species. In this study, an SYBR Green quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using primers designed to anneal to the txtAB operon of Streptomyces was developed to quantify pathogenic bacterial populations in potatoes and soil. The real-time PCR assay was specific for pathogenic Streptomyces strains. The detection limit of the assay was 10 fg of the target DNA, or one genome equivalent. Cycle threshold (Ct) values were linearly correlated with the concentration of the target DNA (correlation coefficient R(2) = 0.99) and were not affected by the presence of plant DNA extracts, indicating the usefulness of the assay for quantitative analyses of the pathogenic bacteria in plant tissues. The amount of pathogenic Streptomyces DNA in total DNA extracts from 1 g asymptomatic and symptomatic tubers was quantified using the assay and ranged from 10(1) to 10(6) pg. A standard curve was established to quantify pathogenic Streptomyces in soil. Using the standard curve, numbers of pathogenic Streptomyces colony forming units were extrapolated to range from 10(3) to 10(6) per gram of soil from potato fields where common scab was found. This real-time PCR assay using primers designed from the txtAB operon allows rapid, accurate, and cost effective quantification of pathogenic Streptomyces strains in potato tubers and in soil.

  9. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Xylella fastidiosa Is Dependent on tra and trb Operon Functions

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative type IV secretion system, are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strain M23 (X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa) or Dixon (X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex) as the donor strain and Temecula (X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa, possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts. IMPORTANCE Xylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen worldwide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. The emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa, or host switching of existing strains, is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time, compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT, adaptation, and disease emergence

  10. Programmed translational frameshift in the bacteriophage P2 FETUD tail gene operon.

    PubMed

    Christie, Gail E; Temple, Louise M; Bartlett, Becky A; Goodwin, Tina S

    2002-12-01

    The major structural components of the P2 contractile tail are encoded in the FETUD tail gene operon. The sequences of genes F(I) and F(II), encoding the major tail sheath and tail tube proteins, have been reported previously (L. M. Temple, S. L. Forsburg, R. Calendar, and G. E. Christie, Virology 181:353-358, 1991). Sequence analysis of the remainder of this operon and the locations of amber mutations Eam30, Tam5, Tam64, Tam215, Uam25, Uam77, Uam92, and Dam6 and missense mutation Ets55 identified the coding regions for genes E, T, U, and D, completing the sequence determination of the P2 genome. Inspection of the DNA sequence revealed a new open reading frame overlapping the end of the essential tail gene E. Lack of an apparent translation initiation site and identification of a putative sequence for a programmed translational frameshift within the E gene suggested that this new reading frame (E') might be translated as an extension of gene E, following a -1 translational frameshift. Complementation analysis demonstrated that E' was essential for P2 lytic growth. Analysis of fusion polypeptides verified that this reading frame was translated as a -1 frameshift extension of gpE, with a frequency of approximately 10%. The arrangement of these two genes within the tail gene cluster of phage P2 and their coupling via a translational frameshift appears to be conserved among P2-related phages. This arrangement shows a striking parallel to the organization in the tail gene cluster of phage lambda, despite a lack of amino acid sequence similarity between the tail gene products of these phage families.

  11. Molecular characterization of a chemotaxis operon in the oral spirochete, Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Greene, S R; Stamm, L V

    1999-05-17

    A chemotaxis gene cluster from Treponema denticola (Td), a pathogenic spirochete associated with human periodontal diseases, was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed. The gene cluster contained three chemotaxis (che) genes (cheA, cheW, and cheY) and an open reading frame (cheX) that is homologous with Treponema pallidum (Tp) and Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) cheX. The Td che genes have the same transcriptional orientation with a sigma 70-like promoter located upstream of cheA and a stem-loop structure characteristic of a Rho-independent transcriptional terminator downstream of cheY. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start point six nucleotides (nt) downstream of the -10 (TAAAAA) promoter sequence. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) data indicated that cheA through cheY are co-transcribed and suggested that transcription is terminated after cheY. The gene organization of the Td che operon is identical to that of the Tp che operon. Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of one copy of each che gene on the Td genome. The cheA, cheW, cheX, and cheY genes are 2403, 1332, 462, and 438nt long, respectively, and encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 88.2, 49.7, 16.8, and 16. 0kDa, respectively. Functional domains of the T. denticola CheA and CheY proteins are highly conserved with those of the Escherichia coli (Ec) CheA and CheY proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of Td CheY indicated that it is closely related to Tp CheY and Bb CheY3.

  12. Genetic analysis of transcriptional activation and repression in the Tn21 mer operon. [Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.; Park, S.J.; Summers, A.O. )

    1989-07-01

    Transcription of the Tn21 mercury resistance operon (mer) is controlled by the toxic metal cation Hg(II). This control is mediated by the product of the merR gene, a 144-amino-acid protein which represses transcription of the structural genes (merTPCAD) in the absence of Hg(II) and activates transcription in the presence of Hg(II). We have used a mer-lac transcriptional fusion to obtain regulatory mutants in this metal-responsive system. Some mutants were defective in Hg(II)-induced activation while retaining repression function, others were defective in repression but not activation, and some had lost both functions. Mutations in three of the four cysteine residues of merR resulted in complete loss of Hg(II)-inducible activation but retention of the repressor function. Other lesions adjacent to or very near these cysteines exhibited severely reduced activation and also retained repressor function. There were two putative helix-turn-helix (HTH) domains in merR, and mutants in each had very different phenotypes. A partially dominant mutation in the more amino-terminal region of the two putative HTH regions resulted in loss of both activation and repression, consistent with a role for this region in DNA binding. Mutations in the more centrally located HTH region resulted only in loss of Hg(II)-induced activation. Lesions in the central and in the carboxy-terminal regions of merR exhibited both Hg(II)-independent and Hg(II)-dependent transcriptional activation. The sole cis-acting mutant obtained with this operon fusion strategy, a down-promoter mutation, lies in a highly conserved base in the -35 region of the merTPCAD promoter.

  13. Conjugative plasmid transfer in Xylella fastidiosa is dependent on tra and trb operon functions.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Van Horn, Christopher R

    2017-08-14

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative Type IV secretion system are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies, and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strains M23 (subspecies fastidiosa) or Dixon (subspecies multiplex) as the donor strain and Temecula (subspecies fastidiosa) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad host range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains, and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa, possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts.IMPORTANCEXylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen world-wide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. Emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa, or host-switching of existing strains is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT and adaptation, and disease emergence in this diverse pathogen. This is a work

  14. Mercuric ion-resistance operons of plasmid R100 and transposon Tn501: the beginning of the operon including the regulatory region and the first two structural genes.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, T K; Brown, N L; Fritzinger, D C; Pridmore, R D; Barnes, W M; Haberstroh, L; Silver, S

    1984-01-01

    The mercuric ion-resistance operons of plasmid R100 (originally from Shigella) and transposon Tn501 (originally from a plasmid isolated in Pseudomonas) have been compared by DNA sequence analysis. The sequences for the first 1340 base pairs of Tn501 are given with the best alignment with the comparable 1319 base pairs of R100. The homology between the two sequences starts at base 58 after the end of the insertion sequence IS-1 of R100. The sequences include the transcriptional regulatory region, and the homology is particularly strong in regions just upstream from potential transcriptional initiation sites. The trans-acting regulatory gene merR consists of 180 base pairs in both cases and codes for a highly basic polypeptide of 60 amino acids, which is also rich in serine. The Tn501 and R100 merR genes differ in 25 of the 180 base positions, and the resulting polypeptides differ in seven amino acids. The regulatory region before the major transcription initiation site contains potential -35 and -10 sequences and dyad symmetrical sequences, which may be the merR binding sites for transcriptional regulation. The first structural gene, merT, encodes a highly hydrophobic polypeptide of 116 amino acids. The R100 and Tn501 merT genes differ in 17% of their positions, leading to 14 (12%) amino acid changes. This region had previously been shown to encode a protein governing membrane transport of mercuric ions. The second structural gene, merC, would give a 91 amino acid polypeptide with a hydrophobic amino-terminal segment. The Tn501 and R100 merC genes differ at 37 base positions, leading to 10 amino acid changes. PMID:6091128

  15. Regulation of pga Operon Expression and Biofilm Formation in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by σE and H-NS▿

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Janine T.; Sinha, Sunita; Li, Ming-Shi; O'Dwyer, Clíona A.; Nash, John H. E.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Kroll, J. Simon; Langford, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical isolates of the porcine pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae often form adherent colonies on agar plates due to expression of an operon, pgaABCD, encoding a poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PGA) extracellular matrix. The adherent colony phenotype, which correlates with the ability to form biofilms on the surfaces of polystyrene plates, is lost following serial passage in broth culture, and repeated passage of the nonadherent variants on solid media does not result in reversion to the adherent colony phenotype. In order to investigate the regulation of PGA expression and biofilm formation in A. pleuropneumoniae, we screened a bank of transposon mutants of the nonadherent serovar 1 strain S4074T and identified mutations in two genes, rseA and hns, which resulted in the formation of the adherent colony phenotype. In other bacteria, including the Enterobacteriaceae, H-NS acts as a global gene regulator, and RseA is a negative regulator of the extracytoplasmic stress response sigma factor σE. Transcription profiling of A. pleuropneumoniae rseA and hns mutants revealed that both σE and H-NS independently regulate expression of the pga operon. Transcription of the pga operon is initiated from a σE promoter site in the absence of H-NS, and upregulation of σE is sufficient to displace H-NS, allowing transcription to proceed. In A. pleuropneumoniae, H-NS does not act as a global gene regulator but rather specifically regulates biofilm formation via repression of the pga operon. Positive regulation of the pga operon by σE indicates that biofilm formation is part of the extracytoplasmic stress response in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:20207760

  16. Plasmid-Encoded asp Operon Confers a Proton Motive Metabolic Cycle Catalyzed by an Aspartate-Alanine Exchange Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I.; Maloney, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of l-alanine and CO2. This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon in pD1 were in the following order: promoter → aspD → aspT. The deduced amino acid sequence of AspD showed similarity to the sequences of two known l-aspartate-β-decarboxylases from Pseudomonas dacunhae and Alcaligenes faecalis. Hydropathy analyses suggested that the aspT gene product encodes a hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning regions. The operon was subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pTrc99A, and the two genes were cotranscribed in the resulting plasmid, pTrcAsp. Expression of the asp operon in E. coli coincided with appearance of the capacity to catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate to alanine. Histidine-tagged AspD (AspDHis) was also expressed in E. coli and purified from cell extracts. The purified AspDHis clearly exhibited activity of l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase. Recombinant AspT was solubilized from E. coli membranes and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The reconstituted AspT catalyzed self-exchange of aspartate and electrogenic heterologous exchange of aspartate with alanine. Thus, the asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle consisting of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter and the aspartate decarboxylase, which keeps intracellular levels of alanine, the countersubstrate for aspartate, high. PMID:12003930

  17. Plasmid-encoded asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle catalyzed by an aspartate-alanine exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I; Maloney, Peter C

    2002-06-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of L-alanine and CO(2). This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon in pD1 were in the following order: promoter --> aspD --> aspT. The deduced amino acid sequence of AspD showed similarity to the sequences of two known L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylases from Pseudomonas dacunhae and Alcaligenes faecalis. Hydropathy analyses suggested that the aspT gene product encodes a hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning regions. The operon was subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pTrc99A, and the two genes were cotranscribed in the resulting plasmid, pTrcAsp. Expression of the asp operon in E. coli coincided with appearance of the capacity to catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate to alanine. Histidine-tagged AspD (AspDHis) was also expressed in E. coli and purified from cell extracts. The purified AspDHis clearly exhibited activity of L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase. Recombinant AspT was solubilized from E. coli membranes and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The reconstituted AspT catalyzed self-exchange of aspartate and electrogenic heterologous exchange of aspartate with alanine. Thus, the asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle consisting of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter and the aspartate decarboxylase, which keeps intracellular levels of alanine, the countersubstrate for aspartate, high.

  18. Identification of a Positive Transcription Regulatory Element within the Coding Region of the nifLA Operon in Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Ranjana; Das, Hirendra K.; Dixit, Aparna

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in Azotobacter vinelandii is regulated by the nifLA operon. NifA activates the transcription of nif genes, while NifL antagonizes the transcriptional activator NifA in response to fixed nitrogen and molecular oxygen levels. However, transcriptional regulation of the nifLA operon of A. vinelandii itself is not fully understood. Using the S1 nuclease assay, we mapped the transcription start site of the nifLA operon, showing it to be similar to the σ54-dependent promoters. We also identified a positive cis-acting regulatory element (+134 to +790) of the nifLA operon within the coding region of the nifL gene of A. vinelandii. Deletion of this element results in complete loss of promoter activity. Several protein factors bind to this region, and the specific binding sites have been mapped by DNase I foot printing. Two of these sites, namely dR1 (+134 to +204) and dR2 (+745 to +765), are involved in regulating the nifLA promoter activity. The absence of NtrC-like binding sites in the upstream region of the nifLA operon in A. vinelandii makes the identification of these downstream elements a highly significant finding. The interaction of the promoter with the proteins binding to the dR2 region spanning +745 to +765 appears to be dependent on the face of the helix as introduction of 4 bases just before this region completely disrupts promoter activity. Thus, the positive regulatory element present within the BglII-BglII fragment may play, in part; an important role in nifLA regulation in A. vinelandii. PMID:16000781

  19. Cloning and characterization of a glutamine transport operon of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36: effect of temperature on regulation of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L; Welker, N E

    1991-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a fragment of the Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 chromosome that contains two open reading frames (ORFs) whose products were detected only in cells of cultures grown in complex medium at high temperature. The nucleotide sequence of the two ORFs exhibited significant identity to the sequence of the glnQ and glnH loci of the glutamine transport system in enteric bacteria. In addition, growth response to glutamine, sensitivity to the toxic glutamine analog gamma-L-glutamylhydrazide, and glutamine transport assays with parental strain NUB3621 and mutant strain NUB36500, in which the ORF1 coding segment in the chromosome was interrupted with the cat gene, demonstrated that glnQ and glnH encode proteins that are active in the glutamine transport system in B. stearothermophilus. The inferred promoter for the glnQH operon exhibited a low homology to the -35 and -10 regions of the consensus promoter sequences of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli genes. In addition, the inferred promoter for the glnQH operon also exhibited a low homology with the consensus promoter sequence deduced from the sequences of the promoters of nine different genes from B. stearothermophilus. Transcription of the glnQH operon was activated in a nitrogen-rich medium at high temperature and inhibited under the same conditions at low temperature. Transcription of the glnQH operon was partially activated in a nitrogen-poor medium at low temperature. The region upstream from glnQ contains sequences that have a low homology with the nitrogen regulator I-binding sequences and the nitrogen-regulated promoters of enteric bacteria. The effect of temperature on the regulation of the glnQH operon is discussed. Images PMID:1856180

  20. The use of amino sugars by Bacillus subtilis: presence of a unique operon for the catabolism of glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Gaugué, Isabelle; Oberto, Jacques; Putzer, Harald; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    B. subtilis grows more rapidly using the amino sugar glucosamine as carbon source, than with N-acetylglucosamine. Genes for the transport and metabolism of N-acetylglucosamine (nagP and nagAB) are found in all the sequenced Bacilli (except Anoxybacillus flavithermus). In B. subtilis there is an additional operon (gamAP) encoding second copies of genes for the transport and catabolism of glucosamine. We have developed a method to make multiple deletion mutations in B. subtilis employing an excisable spectinomycin resistance cassette. Using this method we have analysed the contribution of the different genes of the nag and gam operons for their role in utilization of glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Faster growth on glucosamine is due to the presence of the gamAP operon, which is strongly induced by glucosamine. Although the gamA and nagB genes encode isozymes of GlcN6P deaminase, catabolism of N-acetylglucosamine relies mostly upon the gamA gene product. The genes for use of N-acetylglucosamine, nagAB and nagP, are repressed by YvoA (NagR), a GntR family regulator, whose gene is part of the nagAB yvoA(nagR) operon. The gamAP operon is repressed by YbgA, another GntR family repressor, whose gene is expressed divergently from gamAP. The nagAB yvoA synton is found throughout the Bacilli and most firmicutes. On the other hand the ybgA-gamAP synton, which includes the ybgB gene for a small protein of unknown provenance, is only found in B. subtilis (and a few very close relatives). The origin of ybgBA-gamAP grouping is unknown but synteny analysis suggests lateral transfer from an unidentified donor. The presence of gamAP has enabled B. subtilis to efficiently use glucosamine as carbon source.

  1. RepA and RepB exert plasmid incompatibility repressing the transcription of the repABC operon.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Oseguera, Angeles; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 has a multipartite genome composed of one chromosome and six large plasmids with low copy numbers, all belonging to the repABC plasmid family. All elements essential for replication and segregation of these plasmids are encoded within the repABC operon. RepA and RepB direct plasmid segregation and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the operon, and RepC is the initiator protein of the plasmid. Here we show that in addition to RepA (repressor) and RepB (corepressor), full transcriptional repression of the operon located in the symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) of this strain requires parS, the centromere-like sequence, and the operator sequence. However, the co-expression of RepA and RepB is sufficient to induce the displacement of the parental plasmid. RepA is a Walker-type ATPase that self associates in vivo and in vitro and binds specifically to the operator region in its RepA-ADP form. In contrast, RepA-ATP is capable of binding to non-specific DNA. RepA and RepB form high molecular weight DNA-protein complexes in the presence of ATP and ADP. RepA carrying ATP-pocket motif mutations induce full repression of the repABC operon without the participation of RepB and parS. These mutants specifically bind the operator sequence in their ATP or ADP bound forms. In addition, their expression in trans exerts plasmid incompatibility against the parental plasmid. RepA and RepB expressed in trans induce plasmid incompatibility because of their ability to repress the repABC operon and not only by their capacity to distort the plasmid segregation process.

  2. Comparative analysis of the mechanisms of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by dsr operon to maintain environmental sulfur balance.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Semanti; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur metabolism is one of the oldest known redox geochemical cycles in our atmosphere. These redox processes utilize different sulfur anions and the reactions are performed by the gene products of dsr operon from phylogenetically diverse sets of microorganisms. The operon is involved in the maintenance of environmental sulfur balance. Interestingly, the dsr operon is found to be present in both sulfur anion oxidizing and reducing microorganisms and in both types of organisms DsrAB protein complex plays a vital role. Though there are various reports regarding the genetics of dsr operon there are practically no reports dealing with the structural aspects of sulfur metabolism by dsr operon. In our present study, we tried to compare the mechanisms of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by Allochromatium vinosum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris respectively through DsrAB protein complex. We analyzed the modes of bindings of sulfur anions to the DsrAB protein complex and observed that for sulfur anion oxidizers, sulfide and thiosulfate are the best substrates whereas for reducers sulfate and sulfite have the best binding abilities. We analyzed the binding interaction pattern of the DsrA and DsrB proteins while forming the DsrAB protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Allochromatium vinosum. To our knowledge this is the first report that analyzes the differences in binding patterns of sulfur substrates with DsrAB protein from these two microorganisms. This study would therefore be essential to predict the biochemical mechanism of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by these two microorganisms i.e., Desulfovibrio vulgaris (sulfur anion reducer) and Allochromatium vinosum (sulfur anion oxidizer). Our observations also highlight the mechanism of sulfur geochemical cycle which has important implications in future study of sulfur metabolism as it has a huge application in waste remediation and production of industrial bio-products viz. vitamins, bio-polyesters and bio-hydrogen.

  3. An experimental and theoretical study of the inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, B; Fournier, R L; Relue, P A; Schisler, J

    2001-08-05

    Previously, we have developed a genetically structured mathematical model to describe the inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligos. Our model predicted that antigene oligos targeted to the operator region of the lac operon would have a significant inhibitory effect on beta-galactosidase production. In this investigation, the E. coli lac operon gene expression in the presence of antigene oligos was studied experimentally. A 21-mer oligo, which was designed to form a triplex with the operator, was found to be able to specifically inhibit beta-galactosidase production in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to the 21-mer triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), several control oligos showed no inhibitory effect. The ineffectiveness of the various control oligos, along with the fact that the 21-mer oligo has no homology sequence with lacZYA, and no mRNA is transcribed from the operator, suggests that the 21-mer oligo inhibits target gene expression by an antigene mechanism. To simulate the kinetics of lac operon gene expression in the presence of antigene oligos, a genetically structured kinetic model, which includes transport of oligo into the cell, growth of bacteria cells, and lac operon gene expression, was developed. Predictions of the kinetic model fit the experimental data quite well after adjustment of the value of the oligonucleotide transport rate constant (9.0 x 10(-)(3) min(-)(1)) and oligo binding affinity constant (1.05 x 10(6) M(-)(1)). Our values for these two adjusted parameters are in the range of reported literature values.

  4. Transcriptional Control of the Citrate-Inducible citMCDEFGRP Operon, Encoding Genes Involved in Citrate Fermentation in Leuconostoc paramesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Mauricio; Magni, Christian; López, Paloma; de Mendoza, Diego

    2000-01-01

    In this study we describe the expression pattern of the Leuconostoc paramesenteroides citMCDEFGRP operon in response to the addition of citrate to the growth medium. An 8.8-kb polycistronic transcript, which includes the citMCDEFGRP genes, was identified; its synthesis was dramatically induced upon addition of citrate to the growth medium. We also found that expression of the cit operon is subjected to posttranscriptional regulation, since processing sites included in four complex secondary structures (I, II, III, and IV) were identified by Northern blot analysis and mapped by primer extension. Upstream of the citMCDEFGRP operon a divergent open reading frame, whose expression was also increased by citrate, was identified by DNA sequencing and designated citI. The start and end sites of transcription of the cit operon and citI gene were mapped. The start sites are separated by a stretch of 188 bp with a very high A+T content of 77% and are preceded by transcriptional promoters. The end sites of the transcripts are located next to the 3′ end of two secondary structures characteristic of ρ-independent transcriptional terminators. The effect of the citI gene on expression of the cit operon was studied in Escherichia coli. The presence of the citI gene in cis and in trans resulted in increased activity of the cit promoter. These data provide the first evidence that citrate fermentation in Leuconostoc is regulated at the transcriptional level by a transcriptional activator rather than by a repressor. PMID:10869065

  5. Characterization of the opposing roles of H-NS and TraJ in transcriptional regulation of the F-plasmid tra operon.

    PubMed

    Will, William R; Frost, Laura S

    2006-01-01

    The transfer (tra) operon of the conjugative F plasmid of Escherichia coli is a polycistronic 33-kb operon which encodes most of the proteins necessary for F-plasmid transfer. Here, we report that transcription from PY, the tra operon promoter, is repressed by the host nucleoid-associated protein, H-NS. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that H-NS binds preferentially to the tra promoter region, while Northern blot and transcriptional fusion analyses indicate that transcription of traY, the first gene in the tra operon, is derepressed in an hns mutant throughout growth. The plasmid-encoded regulatory protein TraJ is essential for transcription of the tra operon in wild-type Escherichia coli; however, TraJ is not necessary for plasmid transfer or traY operon transcription in an hns mutant. This indicates that H-NS represses transcription from PY directly and not indirectly via its effects on TraJ levels. These results suggest that TraJ functions to disrupt H-NS silencing at PY, allowing transcription of the tra operon.

  6. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  7. Histidine Operon Deattenuation in dnaA Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium Correlates with a Decrease in the Gene Dosage Ratio between tRNAHis and Histidine Biosynthetic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Blanc-Potard, Anne-Beatrice; Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Bossi, Lionello

    1999-01-01

    Expression of the histidine operon of Salmonella typhimurium is increased in dnaA(Ts) mutants at 37°C. This effect requires an intact his attenuator and can be suppressed by increasing the gene copy number of the hisR locus, which encodes the tRNAHis. We present data which suggest that the his deattenuation defect in dnaA(Ts) mutants results from the loss of a gene dosage gradient between the hisR locus, close to oriC, and the his operon, far from oriC. Some of the conclusions drawn here may apply to other operons as well. PMID:10217789

  8. Geodermatophilus, a new genus of the Dermatophilaceae (Actinomycetales).

    PubMed

    Luedemann, G M

    1968-11-01

    Organisms having a complex life cycle similar to the animal pathogen Dermatophilus congolensis have been isolated from soils of the United States. The soil isolates grow readily on agar media producing a black, friable, or sooty colony; in broth, the isolates produce a thick sediment with a clear supernatant fluid and occasionally a black surface pellicle. The generic taxon Geodermatophilus is proposed for these soil isolates. Geodermatophilus differs morphologically from Dermatophilus in thallus shape, ensheathment, and branching, and physiologically in respect to blood hemolysis, casein hydrolysis, carbohydrate utilization, acid production, and media requirements. The type species proposed is G. obscurus. Three subspecies are recognized.

  9. Geodermatophilus, a New Genus of the Dermatophilaceae (Actinomycetales)

    PubMed Central

    Luedemann, George M.

    1968-01-01

    Organisms having a complex life cycle similar to the animal pathogen Dermatophilus congolensis have been isolated from soils of the United States. The soil isolates grow readily on agar media producing a black, friable, or sooty colony; in broth, the isolates produce a thick sediment with a clear supernatant fluid and occasionally a black surface pellicle. The generic taxon Geodermatophilus is proposed for these soil isolates. Geodermatophilus differs morphologically from Dermatophilus in thallus shape, ensheathment, and branching, and physiologically in respect to blood hemolysis, casein hydrolysis, carbohydrate utilization, acid production, and media requirements. The type species proposed is G. obscurus. Three subspecies are recognized. Images PMID:5726312

  10. Successful immunotherapy of canine flea allergy with injected Actinomycetales preparations.

    PubMed

    Marro, Alicia; Pirles, Mónica; Schiaffino, Laura; Bin, Liliana; Dávila, Héctor; Bottasso, Oscar A; McIntyre, Graham; Ripley, Paul R; Stanford, Cynthia A; Stanford, John L

    2011-08-01

    Can heat-killed, borate-buffered suspensions of Gordonia bronchialis, Rhodococcus coprophilus or Tsukamurella inchonensis be used to treat canine flea allergy? Organisms cultured on Sauton's medium into stationary phase were autoclaved in borate-buffered saline and stored at 10 mg wet weight/ml. Intradermal injections of 0.1 ml containing 1 mg of bacilli were administered on the first and 20th days of the study. G. bronchialis and R. coprophilus were most effective in a pilot study of a small number of dogs with flea allergy. A larger number of affected dogs were then randomized to receive placebo or either of the two selected reagents. The extent and severity of allergic signs and symptoms were scored and blood samples were collected just before the first injection and 28 days after the second. Both selected reagents reduced the extent and severity of lesions (p < 0.001) and reduced scratching. Eosinophil numbers were reduced (p < 0.0001) between the first and second assessment. Injections of G. bronchialis or R. coprophilus effectively reduce the signs and symptoms of flea allergy in dogs.

  11. [Antimicrobial activity of Actinomycetale isolated from the lagoon in Algeria].

    PubMed

    Alliouch-Kerboua, Chérifa; Gacemi Kirane, Djamila; La Scola, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the aim of the study of the taxonomy and the antimicrobial activity, a strain of actinomycete SM2/2GF which was isolated from sediment of the lagoon El-Mellah which is situated in the city of El-Kala in the Northeast of Algeria, was tested against diverse pathogenic microorganisms and against a Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila which was isolated from water of the lagoon El-Mellah. The phenotypic and the molecular characteristics show that the isolate SM2/2GF belongs to the kind Streptomyces. This strain showed an antimicrobial activity against a Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila and the positive-Gram bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, as well as the yeast Candida albicans. It has no activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The interesting antimicrobial activity of the strain SM2/2GF against the pathogenic microorganisms could encourage further researches on one or several bioactive molecules which it secretes.

  12. An Inducible Operon Is Involved in Inulin Utilization in Lactobacillus plantarum Strains, as Revealed by Comparative Proteogenomics and Metabolic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Buntin, Nirunya; Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Ritari, Jarmo; Douillard, François P.; Paulin, Lars; Boeren, Sjef; Shetty, Sudarshan A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Asian fermented foods, infant feces, and shrimp intestines were sequenced and compared to those of well-studied strains. Among 28 strains of L. plantarum, variations in the genomic features involved in ecological adaptation were elucidated. The genome sizes ranged from approximately 3.1 to 3.5 Mb, of which about 2,932 to 3,345 protein-coding sequences (CDS) were predicted. The food-derived isolates contained a higher number of carbohydrate metabolism-associated genes than those from infant feces. This observation correlated to their phenotypic carbohydrate metabolic profile, indicating their ability to metabolize the largest range of sugars. Surprisingly, two strains (P14 and P76) isolated from fermented fish utilized inulin. β-Fructosidase, the inulin-degrading enzyme, was detected in the supernatants and cell wall extracts of both strains. No activity was observed in the cytoplasmic fraction, indicating that this key enzyme was either membrane-bound or extracellularly secreted. From genomic mining analysis, a predicted inulin operon of fosRABCDXE, which encodes β-fructosidase and many fructose transporting proteins, was found within the genomes of strains P14 and P76. Moreover, pts1BCA genes, encoding sucrose-specific IIBCA components involved in sucrose transport, were also identified. The proteomic analysis revealed the mechanism and functional characteristic of the fosRABCDXE operon involved in the inulin utilization of L. plantarum. The expression levels of the fos operon and pst genes were upregulated at mid-log phase. FosE and the LPXTG-motif cell wall anchored β-fructosidase were induced to a high abundance when inulin was present as a carbon source. IMPORTANCE Inulin is a long-chain carbohydrate that may act as a prebiotic, which provides many health benefits to the host by selectively stimulating the growth and activity of beneficial bacteria in the colon. While certain

  13. Natural merodiploidy of the lux-rib operon of Photobacterium leiognathi from coastal waters of Honshu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ast, Jennifer C; Urbanczyk, Henryk; Dunlap, Paul V

    2007-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the bacterial luminescence (lux) genes has proven effective in helping resolve evolutionary relationships among luminous bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis using lux genes, however, is based on the assumptions that the lux genes are present as single copies on the bacterial chromosome and are vertically inherited. We report here that certain strains of Photobacterium leiognathi carry multiple phylogenetically distinct copies of the entire operon that codes for luminescence and riboflavin synthesis genes, luxCDABEG-ribEBHA. Merodiploid lux-rib strains of P. leiognathi were detected during sequence analysis of luxA. To define the gene content, organization, and sequence of each lux-rib operon, we constructed a fosmid library of genomic DNA from a representative merodiploid strain, lnuch.13.1. Sequence analysis of fosmid clones and genomic analysis of lnuch.13.1 defined two complete, physically separate, and apparently functional operons, designated lux-rib1 and lux-rib2. P. leiognathi strains lelon.2.1 and lnuch.21.1 were also found to carry lux-rib1 and lux-rib2, whereas ATCC 25521T apparently carries only lux-rib1. In lnuch.13.1, lelon.2.1, lnuch.21.1, and ATCC 25521T, lux-rib1 is flanked upstream by lumQ and putA and downstream by a gene for a hypothetical multidrug efflux pump. In contrast, transposase genes flank lux-rib2 of lnuch.13.1, and the chromosomal location of lux-rib2 apparently differs in lnuch.13.1, lelon.2.1, and lnuch.21.1. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that lux-rib1 and lux-rib2 are more closely related to each other than either one is to the lux and rib genes of other bacterial species, which rules out interspecies lateral gene transfer as the origin of lux-rib2 in P. leiognathi; lux-rib2 apparently arose within a previously unsampled or extinct P. leiognathi lineage. Analysis of 170 additional strains of P. leiognathi, for a total of 174 strains examined from coastal waters of Japan, Taiwan, the Philippine Islands, and

  14. Natural Merodiploidy of the lux-rib Operon of Photobacterium leiognathi from Coastal Waters of Honshu, Japan▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ast, Jennifer C.; Urbanczyk, Henryk; Dunlap, Paul V.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the bacterial luminescence (lux) genes has proven effective in helping resolve evolutionary relationships among luminous bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis using lux genes, however, is based on the assumptions that the lux genes are present as single copies on the bacterial chromosome and are vertically inherited. We report here that certain strains of Photobacterium leiognathi carry multiple phylogenetically distinct copies of the entire operon that codes for luminescence and riboflavin synthesis genes, luxCDABEG-ribEBHA. Merodiploid lux-rib strains of P. leiognathi were detected during sequence analysis of luxA. To define the gene content, organization, and sequence of each lux-rib operon, we constructed a fosmid library of genomic DNA from a representative merodiploid strain, lnuch.13.1. Sequence analysis of fosmid clones and genomic analysis of lnuch.13.1 defined two complete, physically separate, and apparently functional operons, designated lux-rib1 and lux-rib2. P. leiognathi strains lelon.2.1 and lnuch.21.1 were also found to carry lux-rib1 and lux-rib2, whereas ATCC 25521T apparently carries only lux-rib1. In lnuch.13.1, lelon.2.1, lnuch.21.1, and ATCC 25521T, lux-rib1 is flanked upstream by lumQ and putA and downstream by a gene for a hypothetical multidrug efflux pump. In contrast, transposase genes flank lux-rib2 of lnuch.13.1, and the chromosomal location of lux-rib2 apparently differs in lnuch.13.1, lelon.2.1, and lnuch.21.1. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that lux-rib1 and lux-rib2 are more closely related to each other than either one is to the lux and rib genes of other bacterial species, which rules out interspecies lateral gene transfer as the origin of lux-rib2 in P. leiognathi; lux-rib2 apparently arose within a previously unsampled or extinct P. leiognathi lineage. Analysis of 170 additional strains of P. leiognathi, for a total of 174 strains examined from coastal waters of Japan, Taiwan, the Philippine Islands, and

  15. FlrA Represses Transcription of the Biofilm-Associated bpfA Operon in Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Jia-Yi; Jia, Hui-Ling; Wang, Ming-Yu; Wang, Huan-Yu; Zou, Si-Min; Sun, Rui-Rui; Jia, Rong; Xiao, Ya-Zhong

    2017-02-15

    Manipulation of biofilm formation in Shewanella is beneficial for application to industrial and environmental biotechnology. BpfA is an adhesin largely responsible for biofilm formation in many Shewanella species. However, the mechanism underlying BpfA production and the resulting biofilm remains vaguely understood. We previously described the finding that BpfA expression is enhanced by DosD, an oxygen-stimulated diguanylate cyclase, under aerobic growth. In the present work, we identify FlrA as a critical transcription regulator of the bpfA operon in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 by transposon mutagenesis. FlrA acted as a repressor of the operon promoter by binding to two boxes overlapping the -10 and -35 sites recognized by σ(70) DosD regulation of the expression of the bpfA operon was mediated by FlrA, and cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) abolished FlrA binding to the operon promoter. We also demonstrate that FlhG, an accessory protein for flagellum synthesis, antagonized FlrA repression of the expression of the bpfA operon. Collectively, this work demonstrates that FlrA acts as a central mediator in the signaling pathway from c-di-GMP to BpfA-associated biofilm formation in S. putrefaciens CN32. Motility and biofilm are mutually exclusive lifestyles, shifts between which are under the strict regulation of bacteria attempting to adapt to the fluctuation of diverse environmental conditions. The FlrA protein in many bacteria is known to control motility as a master regulator of flagellum synthesis. This work elucidates its effect on biofilm formation by controlling the expression of the adhesin BpfA in S. putrefaciens CN32 in response to c-di-GMP. Therefore, FlrA plays a dual role in controlling motility and biofilm formation in S. putrefaciens CN32. The cooccurrence of flrA, bpfA, and the FlrA box in the promoter region of the bpfA operon in diverse Shewanella strains suggests that bpfA is a common mechanism that controls biofilm formation in this bacterial

  16. FlrA Represses Transcription of the Biofilm-Associated bpfA Operon in Shewanella putrefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Wu, Jia-Yi; Jia, Hui-Ling; Wang, Ming-Yu; Wang, Huan-Yu; Zou, Si-Min; Sun, Rui-Rui; Jia, Rong; Xiao, Ya-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Manipulation of biofilm formation in Shewanella is beneficial for application to industrial and environmental biotechnology. BpfA is an adhesin largely responsible for biofilm formation in many Shewanella species. However, the mechanism underlying BpfA production and the resulting biofilm remains vaguely understood. We previously described the finding that BpfA expression is enhanced by DosD, an oxygen-stimulated diguanylate cyclase, under aerobic growth. In the present work, we identify FlrA as a critical transcription regulator of the bpfA operon in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 by transposon mutagenesis. FlrA acted as a repressor of the operon promoter by binding to two boxes overlapping the −10 and −35 sites recognized by σ70. DosD regulation of the expression of the bpfA operon was mediated by FlrA, and cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) abolished FlrA binding to the operon promoter. We also demonstrate that FlhG, an accessory protein for flagellum synthesis, antagonized FlrA repression of the expression of the bpfA operon. Collectively, this work demonstrates that FlrA acts as a central mediator in the signaling pathway from c-di-GMP to BpfA-associated biofilm formation in S. putrefaciens CN32. IMPORTANCE Motility and biofilm are mutually exclusive lifestyles, shifts between which are under the strict regulation of bacteria attempting to adapt to the fluctuation of diverse environmental conditions. The FlrA protein in many bacteria is known to control motility as a master regulator of flagellum synthesis. This work elucidates its effect on biofilm formation by controlling the expression of the adhesin BpfA in S. putrefaciens CN32 in response to c-di-GMP. Therefore, FlrA plays a dual role in controlling motility and biofilm formation in S. putrefaciens CN32. The cooccurrence of flrA, bpfA, and the FlrA box in the promoter region of the bpfA operon in diverse Shewanella strains suggests that bpfA is a common mechanism that controls biofilm formation

  17. Differential regulation of the leukotoxin operon in highly leukotoxic and minimally leukotoxic strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, M; Fisher, E; Demuth, D R

    1996-01-01

    The expression of the leukotoxin (ltx) operon varies significantly among Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains. The dual promoters driving ltx expression in the highly toxic strain JP2 have been previously characterized (J. M. Brogan, E. T. Lally, K. Poulsen, M. Kilian, and D. R. Demuth, Infect. Immun. 62:501-508, 1994), and genetic analyses of A. actinomycetemcomitans suggest that highly toxic strains like JP2 arose from minimally toxic strains, presumably by deletion of a 530-bp domain within the ltx promoter region (K. Poulsen, E. Theilade, E.T. Lally, D. R. Demuth, and M. Kilian, Microbiology 140:2049-2060, 1994). However, the ltx promoter of minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has not been well characterized. In this study, deletion and primer extension analyses showed that the ltx promoter of A. actinomycetemcomitans 652 is situated approximately 150 bp upstream of the ltxC gene and initiates transcription 138 nucleotides upstream of ltxC. In contrast to strain JP2, only a single promoter appears to drive ltx expression in 652. The 652 promoter resides within the 530-bp region that is absent from the JP2 promoter sequence, suggesting that the specific sequences controlling ltx expression differ in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. In addition, ltx expression in strain 652 was shown to be induced three- to fourfold when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. The induction of whole cell leukotoxicity, was accompanied by increases in the levels of Ltx polypeptide and the steady-state levels of ltx mRNA, suggesting that regulation occurred at the level of transcription. In contrast, the levels of leukotoxicity, Ltx polypeptide, and fix mRNA in strain JP2 were unaffected by anaerobic growth. These results suggest that the ltx operon is differentially regulated in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and that the sequences controlling the oxygen-dependent regulation of ltx

  18. Proteus mirabilis urease: operon fusion and linker insertion analysis of ure gene organization, regulation, and function.

    PubMed Central

    Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1995-01-01

    Urease is an inducible virulence factor of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Although eight contiguous genes necessary for urease activity have been cloned and sequenced, the transcriptional organization and regulation of specific genes within the Proteus gene cluster has not been investigated in detail. The first gene, ureR, is located 400 bp upstream and is oriented in the direction opposite the other seven genes, ureDABCEFG. The structural subunits of urease are encoded by ureABC. Previously, UreR was shown to contain a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif 30 residues upstream of a consensus sequence which is a signature for the AraC family of positive regulators; this polypeptide is homologous to other DNA-binding regulatory proteins. Nested deletions of ureR linked to either ureD-lacZ or ureA-lacZ operon fusions demonstrated that an intact ureR is required for urea-induced synthesis of LacZ from either ureA or ureD and identified a urea-regulated promoter in the ureR-ureD intergenic region. However, lacZ operon fusions to fragments encompassing putative promoter regions upstream of ureA and ureF demonstrated that no urea-regulated promoters occur upstream of these open reading frames; regions upstream of ureR, ureE, and ureG were not tested. These data suggest that UreR acts as a positive regulator in the presence of urea, activating transcription of urease structural and accessory genes via sequences upstream of ureD. To address the role of the nonstructural regulatory and accessory genes, we constructed deletion, cassette, and linker insertion mutations throughout the ure gene cluster and determined the effect of these mutations on production and regulation of urease activity in Escherichia coli. Mutations were obtained, with locations determine by DNA sequencing, in all genes except ureA and ureE. In each case, the mutation resulted in a urease-negative phenotype. PMID:7559355

  19. Bistability of the lac operon during growth of Escherichia coli on lactose and lactose+glucose.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul; Pilyugin, Sergei S

    2008-05-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli can exhibit bistability. Early studies showed that bistability occurs during growth on TMG/succinate and lactose+glucose, but not during growth on lactose. More recently, studies with lacGFP-transfected cells show bistability during growth on TMG/succinate, but not during growth on lactose and lactose+glucose. In the literature, these results are invariably attributed to variations in the destabilizing effect of the positive feedback generated by induction. Specifically, during growth on TMG/succinate, lac induction generates strong positive feedback because the permease stimulates the accumulation of intracellular TMG, which in turn, promotes the synthesis of even more permease. This positive feedback is attenuated during growth on lactose because hydrolysis of intracellular lactose by beta-galactosidase suppresses the stimulatory effect of the permease. It is attenuated even more during growth on lactose + glucose because glucose inhibits the uptake of lactose. But it is clear that the stabilizing effect of dilution also changes dramatically as a function of the medium composition. For instance, during growth on TMG/succinate, the dilution rate of lac permease is proportional to its activity, e, because the specific growth rate is independent of e (it is completely determined by the concentration of succinate). However, during growth on lactose, the dilution rate of the permease is proportional to e2 because the specific growth rate is proportional to the specific lactose uptake rate, which in turn, proportional to e. We show that: (a) This dependence on e2 creates such a strong stabilizing effect that bistability is virtually impossible during growth on lactose, even in the face of the intense positive feedback generated by induction. (b) This stabilizing effect is weakened during growth on lactose+glucose because the specific growth rate on glucose is independent of e, so that the dilution rate once again contains a term that

  20. RepA negatively autoregulates the transcription of the repABC operon of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid basic replicon.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Romero, M A; Téllez-Sosa, J; Barrios, H; Pérez-Oseguera, A; Rosas, V; Cevallos, M A

    2001-10-01

    The basic replicon of Rhizobium etli CE3, like other members of the repABC plasmid family, is constituted by the repABC operon. RepC is essential for replication, and RepA and RepB play a role in plasmid segregation. It has been shown that deletion derivatives lacking the repAB genes have an increased copy number, indicating that these genes participate in the control of plasmid copy number. RepA is also a trans-incompatibility factor. To understand the regulation of the repABC operon, in this paper: (i) the transcription start site of the repABC operon was determined; (ii) the promoter region was identified by site-directed mutagenesis of the putative -35 and -10 hexameric elements; and (iii) RepA was recognized as a negative regulator of the transcription of the repABC operon.

  1. A cis/trans Test of the Effect of the First Enzyme for Histidine Biosynthesis on Regulation of the Histidine Operon

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, John S.; Ballesteros, Antonio O.; Meyers, Marilyn; Soria, Marco; Goldberger, Robert F.

    1973-01-01

    Previous studies showed that when triazolalanine was added to a derepressed culture of a histidine auxotroph, repression of the histidine operon occurred as though histidine had been added (6). However, when triazolalanine was added to a derepressed culture of a strain with a mutation in the first gene of the histidine operon which rendered the first enzyme for histidine biosynthesis resistant to inhibition by histidine, repression did not occur. The studies reported here represent a cis/trans test of this effect of mutations to feedback resistance. Using specially constructed merodiploid strains, we were able to show that the wild-type allele is dominant to the mutant (feedback resistant) allele and that the effect operates in trans. We conclude that the enzyme encoded by the first gene of the histidine operon exerts its regulatory effect on the operon not by acting locally at its site of synthesis, but by acting as a freely diffusible protein. PMID:4572718

  2. Simple whole-cell biodetection and bioremediation of heavy metals based on an engineered lead-specific operon.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Xiangzhi; Sun, Peiqing; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Hong; Hong, Mei; Mao, Zong-Wan; Zhao, Jing

    2014-03-18

    A lead-specific binding protein, PbrR, and promoter pbr from the lead resistance operon, pbr, of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was incorporated into E. coli in conjunction with an engineered downstream RFP (red fluorescence protein), which allowed for highly sensitive and selective whole-cell detection of lead ions. The subsequent display of PbrR on the E. coli cell surface permitted selective adsorption of lead ions from solution containing various heavy metal ions. The surface-engineered E. coli bacteria effectively protected Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination from the toxicity of lead ions at high concentrations. Engineering the E. coli bacteria harboring these lead-specific elements from the pbr operon may potentially be a valuable general strategy for biodetection and bioremediation of toxic heavy metal ions in the environment.

  3. Constructing a recombinant hyaluronic acid biosynthesis operon and producing food-grade hyaluronic acid in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Juzheng; Ling, Peixue; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural high molecular weight polysaccharide, is produced by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. However, Streptococcus has several drawbacks including its potential to produce exotoxins, so there is demand for an alternative HA source. Here, a recombinant HA biosynthesis operon, as well as the HA biosynthesis operon of S. zooepidemicus were introduced into L. lactis using the nisin-controlled expression system, respectively. HA was successfully synthesized by recombinant L. lactis. Furthermore, overexpression of the endogenous enzymes directing the synthesis of precursor sugars was effective at increasing HA production, and increasing the supply of UDP-activated monosaccharide donors aided synthesis of monodisperse HA polysaccharides. Besides GRAS host strain (L. lactis) and NICE system, the selecting marker (lacF gene) of the recombinant strain is also food grade. Therefore, HA produced by recombinant L. lactis overcomes the problems associated with Streptococcus and provides a source of food-grading HA appropriate for widespread biotechnological applications.

  4. RegulonDB (version 3.0): transcriptional regulation and operon organization in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Salgado, H; Santos-Zavaleta, A; Gama-Castro, S; Millán-Zárate, D; Blattner, F R; Collado-Vides, J

    2000-01-01

    RegulonDB is a database on transcription regulation and operon organization in Escherichia coli. The current version describes regulatory signals of transcription initiation, promoters, regulatory binding sites of specific regulators, ribosome binding sites and terminators, as well as information on genes clustered in operons. These specific annotations have been gathered from a constant search in the literature, as well as based on computational sequence predictions. The genomic coordinates of all these objects in the E.coli K-12 chromosome are clearly indicated. Every known object has a link to at least one MEDLINE reference. We have also added direct links to recent expression data of E.coli K-12. The version presented here has important modifications both in the structure of the database, as well as in the amount and type of information encoded in the database. RegulonDB can be accessed on the web at URL: http://www.cifn.unam. mx/Computational_Biology/regulondb/

  5. RegulonDB (version 3.0): transcriptional regulation and operon organization in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Millán-Zárate, Dulce; Blattner, Frederick R.; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2000-01-01

    RegulonDB is a database on transcription regulation and operon organization in Escherichia coli. The current version describes regulatory signals of transcription initiation, promoters, regulatory binding sites of specific regulators, ribosome binding sites and terminators, as well as information on genes clustered in operons. These specific annotations have been gathered from a constant search in the literature, as well as based on computational sequence predictions. The genomic coordinates of all these objects in the E.coli K-12 chromosome are clearly indicated. Every known object has a link to at least one MEDLINE reference. We have also added direct links to recent expression data of E.coli K-12. The version presented here has important modifications both in the structure of the database, as well as in the amount and type of information encoded in the database. RegulonDB can be accessed on the web at URL: http://www.cifn.unam.mx/Computational_Biology/regulondb/ PMID:10592182

  6. Bistable behavior of the lac operon in E. coli when induced with a mixture of lactose and TMG.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hernández, Orlando; Santillán, Moisés

    2010-01-01

    In this work we investigate multistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli when it is induced by a mixture of lactose and the non-metabolizable thiomethyl galactoside (TMG). In accordance with previously published experimental results and computer simulations, our simulations predict that: (1) when the system is induced by TMG, the system shows a discernible bistable behavior while, (2) when the system is induced by lactose, bistability does not disappear but excessively high concentrations of lactose would be required to observe it. Finally, our simulation results predict that when a mixture of lactose and TMG is used, the bistability region in the extracellular glucose concentration vs. extracellular lactose concentration parameter space changes in such a way that the model predictions regarding bistability could be tested experimentally. These experiments could help to solve a recent controversy regarding the existence of bistability in the lac operon under natural conditions.

  7. Bistable Behavior of the Lac Operon in E. Coli When Induced with a Mixture of Lactose and TMG

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Hernández, Orlando; Santillán, Moisés

    2010-01-01

    In this work we investigate multistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli when it is induced by a mixture of lactose and the non-metabolizable thiomethyl galactoside (TMG). In accordance with previously published experimental results and computer simulations, our simulations predict that: (1) when the system is induced by TMG, the system shows a discernible bistable behavior while, (2) when the system is induced by lactose, bistability does not disappear but excessively high concentrations of lactose would be required to observe it. Finally, our simulation results predict that when a mixture of lactose and TMG is used, the bistability region in the extracellular glucose concentration vs. extracellular lactose concentration parameter space changes in such a way that the model predictions regarding bistability could be tested experimentally. These experiments could help to solve a recent controversy regarding the existence of bistability in the lac operon under natural conditions. PMID:21423364

  8. Regulation of the putative bglPH operon for aryl-beta-glucoside utilization in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, S; Hecker, M

    1995-01-01

    The expression of the putative operon bglPH of Bacillus subtilis was studied by using bglP'-lacZ transcriptional fusions. The bglP gene encodes an aryl-beta-glucoside-specific enzyme II of the phosphoenolpyruvate sugar:phosphotransferase system, whereas the bglH gene product functions as a phospho-beta-glucosidase. Expression of bglPH is regulated by at least two different mechanisms: (i) carbon catabolite repression and (ii) induction via an antitermination mechanism. Distinct deletions of the promoter region were created to determine cis-acting sites for regulation. An operatorlike structure partially overlapping the -35 box of the promoter of bglP appears to be the catabolite-responsive element of this operon. The motif is similar to that of amyO and shows no mismatches with respect to the consensus sequence established as the target of carbon catabolite repression in B. subtilis. Catabolite repression is abolished in both ccpA and ptsH1 mutants. The target of the induction by the substrate, salicin or arbutin, is a transcriptional terminator located downstream from the promoter of bglP. This structure is very similar to that of transcriptional terminators which regulate the induction of the B. subtilis sacB gene, the sacPA operon, and the Escherichia coli bgl operon. The licT gene product, a member of the BglG-SacY family of antitermination proteins, is essential for the induction process. Expression of bglP is under the negative control of its own gene product. The general proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system are required for bglP expression. Furthermore, the region upstream from bglP, which reveals a high AT content, exerts a negative regulatory effect on bglP expression. PMID:7559347

  9. Characterization of PaxA and Its Operon: a Cohemolytic RTX Toxin Determinant from Pathogenic Pasteurella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnert, Peter; Heyberger-Meyer, Bénédicte; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella aerogenes is known as a commensal bacterium or as an opportunistic pathogen, as well as a primary pathogen found to be involved in abortion cases of humans, swine, and other mammals. Using broad-range DNA probes for bacterial RTX toxin genes, we cloned and subsequently sequenced a new operon named paxCABD encoding the RTX toxin PaxA in P. aerogenes. The pax operon is organized analogous to the classical RTX operons containing the activator gene paxC upstream of the structural toxin gene paxA, which is followed by the secretion protein genes paxB and paxD. The highest sequence similarity of paxA with known RTX toxin genes is found with apxIIIA (82%). PaxA is structurally similar to ApxIIIA and also shows functional analogy to ApxIIIA, since it shows cohemolytic activity with the sphingomyelinase of Staphylococcus aureus, known as the CAMP effect, but is devoid of direct hemolytic activity. In addition, it shows to some extent immunological cross-reactions with ApxIIIA. P. aerogenes isolated from various specimens showed that the pax operon was present in about one-third of the strains. All of the pax-positive strains were specifically related to swine abortion cases or septicemia of newborn piglets. These strains were also shown to produce the PaxA toxin as determined by the CAMP phenomenon, whereas none of the pax-negative strains did. This indicated that the PaxA toxin is involved in the pathogenic potential of P. aerogenes. The examined P. aerogenes isolates were phylogenetically analyzed by 16S rRNA gene (rrs) sequencing in order to confirm their species. Only a small heterogeneity (<0.5%) was observed between the rrs genes of the strains originating from geographically distant farms and isolated at different times. PMID:10603361

  10. Role of hha and ler in transcriptional regulation of the esp operon of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Zuerner, Richard L

    2004-11-01

    The locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which includes five major operons (LEE1 through LEE4 and tir), enables enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 to produce attaching and effacing lesions on host cells. Expression of LEE2, LEE3, and tir is positively regulated by ler, a gene located in LEE1. Transcriptional regulation of the esp operon (LEE4), however, is not well defined. Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify transcriptional regulators of the esp operon by screening for mutants with increased beta-galactosidase activity in an EHEC O157:H7 strain harboring an esp::lac transcriptional fusion. All mutants with significant increases in beta-galactosidase activity had transposon insertions in hha (hha::Tn). Specific complementation of the hha::Tn mutation with a plasmid-encoded copy of hha reduced beta-galactosidase activity to the level expressed in the parental esp::lac strain. Purified Hha, however, bound poorly to the esp promoter, suggesting that Hha might repress the transcription of a positive regulator of esp. Transposon mutagenesis of a Deltahha esp::lac strain expressing elevated levels of beta-galactosidase resulted in ler mutants with reduced beta-galactosidase activity. Purified Hha bound to the ler promoter with a higher affinity, and complementation of a Deltahha mutation in a Deltahha ler::lac strain repressed beta-galactosidase activity to the level expressed in a ler::lac strain. A positive regulatory role of ler in esp expression was demonstrated by specific binding of Ler to the esp promoter, reduced expression of beta-galactosidase in Deltaler esp::lac strains with and without hha, and severalfold-increased transcription of ler and espA in strains lacking hha. These results indicate that hha-mediated repression of ler causes reduced expression of the esp operon.

  11. Direct Cloning from Enrichment Cultures, a Reliable Strategy for Isolation of Complete Operons and Genes from Microbial Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Entcheva, Plamena; Liebl, Wolfgang; Johann, Andre; Hartsch, Thomas; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2001-01-01

    Enrichment cultures of microbial consortia enable the diverse metabolic and catabolic activities of these populations to be studied on a molecular level and to be explored as potential sources for biotechnology processes. We have used a combined approach of enrichment culture and direct cloning to construct cosmid libraries with large (>30-kb) inserts from microbial consortia. Enrichment cultures were inoculated with samples from five environments, and high amounts of avidin were added to the cultures to favor growth of biotin-producing microbes. DNA was extracted from three of these enrichment cultures and used to construct cosmid libraries; each library consisted of between 6,000 and 35,000 clones, with an average insert size of 30 to 40 kb. The inserts contained a diverse population of genomic DNA fragments isolated from the consortia organisms. These three libraries were used to complement the Escherichia coli biotin auxotrophic strain ATCC 33767 Δ(bio-uvrB). Initial screens resulted in the isolation of seven different complementing cosmid clones, carrying biotin biosynthesis operons. Biotin biosynthesis capabilities and growth under defined conditions of four of these clones were studied. Biotin measured in the different culture supernatants ranged from 42 to 3,800 pg/ml/optical density unit. Sequencing the identified biotin synthesis genes revealed high similarities to bio operons from gram-negative bacteria. In addition, random sequencing identified other interesting open reading frames, as well as two operons, the histidine utilization operon (hut), and the cluster of genes involved in biosynthesis of molybdopterin cofactors in bacteria (moaABCDE). PMID:11133432

  12. PCR Amplification and Phylogenetic Analysis of groESL Operon Sequences from Ehrlichia ewingii and Ehrlichia muris

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, John W.; Storch, Gregory A.; Buller, Richard S.; Liddell, Allison M.; Stockham, Steven L.; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Messenger, Sharon; Paddock, Christopher D.

    2000-01-01

    Broad-range PCR primers were used to amplify part of the groESL operon of the canine pathogen Ehrlichia ewingii, recently recognized as a human pathogen, and the murine pathogen Ehrlichia muris. Phylogenetic analysis supported the relationships among Ehrlichia species previously determined by comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences. These sequences provide additional PCR targets for species for which few gene sequences have been determined. PMID:10878077

  13. Molecular Characterization and Regulation of the aguBA Operon, Responsible for Agmatine Utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Yuji; Jiang, Ying; Nishijyo, Takayuki; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 utilizes agmatine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source via two reactions catalyzed successively by agmatine deiminase (encoded by aguA; also called agmatine iminohydrolase) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (encoded by aguB). The aguBA and adjacent aguR genes were cloned and characterized. The predicted AguB protein (Mr 32,759; 292 amino acids) displayed sequence similarity (≤60% identity) to enzymes of the β-alanine synthase/nitrilase family. While the deduced AguA protein (Mr 41,190; 368 amino acids) showed no significant similarity to any protein of known function, assignment of agmatine deiminase to AguA in this report discovered a new family of carbon-nitrogen hydrolases widely distributed in organisms ranging from bacteria to Arabidopsis. The aguR gene encoded a putative regulatory protein (Mr 24,424; 221 amino acids) of the TetR protein family. Measurements of agmatine deiminase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase activities indicated the induction effect of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine on expression of the aguBA operon. The presence of an inducible promoter for the aguBA operon in the aguR-aguB intergenic region was demonstrated by lacZ fusion experiments, and the transcription start of this promoter was localized 99 bp upstream from the initiation codon of aguB by S1 nuclease mapping. Experiments with knockout mutants of aguR established that expression of the aguBA operon became constitutive in the aguR background. Interaction of AguR overproduced in Escherichia coli with the aguBA regulatory region was demonstrated by gel retardation assays, supporting the hypothesis that AguR serves as the negative regulator of the aguBA operon, and binding of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine to AguR would antagonize its repressor function. PMID:11673419

  14. Molecular characterization and regulation of the aguBA operon, responsible for agmatine utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Y; Jiang, Y; Nishijyo, T; Itoh, Y; Lu, C D

    2001-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 utilizes agmatine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source via two reactions catalyzed successively by agmatine deiminase (encoded by aguA; also called agmatine iminohydrolase) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (encoded by aguB). The aguBA and adjacent aguR genes were cloned and characterized. The predicted AguB protein (M(r) 32,759; 292 amino acids) displayed sequence similarity (< or =60% identity) to enzymes of the beta-alanine synthase/nitrilase family. While the deduced AguA protein (M(r) 41,190; 368 amino acids) showed no significant similarity to any protein of known function, assignment of agmatine deiminase to AguA in this report discovered a new family of carbon-nitrogen hydrolases widely distributed in organisms ranging from bacteria to Arabidopsis. The aguR gene encoded a putative regulatory protein (M(r) 24,424; 221 amino acids) of the TetR protein family. Measurements of agmatine deiminase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase activities indicated the induction effect of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine on expression of the aguBA operon. The presence of an inducible promoter for the aguBA operon in the aguR-aguB intergenic region was demonstrated by lacZ fusion experiments, and the transcription start of this promoter was localized 99 bp upstream from the initiation codon of aguB by S1 nuclease mapping. Experiments with knockout mutants of aguR established that expression of the aguBA operon became constitutive in the aguR background. Interaction of AguR overproduced in Escherichia coli with the aguBA regulatory region was demonstrated by gel retardation assays, supporting the hypothesis that AguR serves as the negative regulator of the aguBA operon, and binding of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine to AguR would antagonize its repressor function.

  15. BadR and BadM Proteins Transcriptionally Regulate Two Operons Needed for Anaerobic Benzoate Degradation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Hidetada; Hirakawa, Yuko; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris grows with the aromatic acid benzoate and the alicyclic acid cyclohexanecarboxylate (CHC) as sole carbon sources. The enzymatic steps in an oxygen-independent pathway for CHC degradation have been elucidated, but it was unknown how the CHC operon (badHI aliAB badK) encoding the enzymes for CHC degradation was regulated. aliA and aliB encode enzymes for the conversion of CHC to cyclohex-1-enecarboxyl–coenzyme A (CHene-CoA). At this point, the pathway for CHC degradation merges with the pathway for anaerobic benzoate degradation, as CHene-CoA is an intermediate in both degradation pathways. Three enzymes, encoded by badK, badH, and badI, prepare and cleave the alicyclic ring of CHene-CoA to yield pimelyl-CoA. Here, we show that the MarR transcription factor family member, BadR, represses transcription of the CHC operon by binding near the transcription start site of badH. 2-Ketocyclohexane-1-carboxyl–CoA, an intermediate of CHC and benzoate degradation, interacts with BadR to abrogate repression. We also present evidence that the transcription factor BadM binds to the promoter of the badDEFGAB (Bad) operon for the anaerobic conversion of benzoate to CHene-CoA to repress its expression. Contrary to previous reports, BadR does not appear to control expression of the Bad operon. These data enhance our view of the transcriptional regulation of anaerobic benzoate degradation by R. palustris. PMID:25888170

  16. Regulation of the dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is governed by HspR, an autoregulatory repressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bucca, G; Hindle, Z; Smith, C P

    1997-01-01

    The dnaK operon of Streptomyces coelicolor contains four genes (5'-dnaK-grpE-dnaJ-hspR). The fourth gene encodes a novel heat shock protein, HspR, which appears so far to be unique to the high-G+C actinomycete group of bacteria. HspR binds with high specificity to three inverted repeat sequences in the promoter region of the S. coelicolor dnaK operon, strongly suggesting a direct role for HspR in heat shock gene regulation. Here we present genetic and biochemical evidence that HspR is the repressor of the dnaK operon. Disruption of hspR leads to high-level constitutive transcription of the dnaK operon. Parallel transcriptional analyses of groESL1 and groEL2 expression demonstrated that heat shock regulation of the groE genes was essentially unaffected in an hspR null mutant, although the basal (uninduced) level of groEL2 transcription was slightly elevated compared with the wild type. The results of HspR titration experiments, where the dnaK operon promoter region was cloned at ca. 50 copies per chromosome, were consistent with the prediction that HspR functions as a negative autoregulator. His-tagged HspR, overproduced and purified from Escherichia coli, was shown to repress transcription from the dnaK operon promoter in vitro, providing additional evidence for the proposal that HspR directly regulates transcription of the dnaK operon. These studies indicate that there are at least two transcriptional mechanisms for controlling heat shock genes in S. coelicolor--one controlling the dnaK operon and another controlling the groE genes. PMID:9324243

  17. stg fimbrial operon from S. Typhi STH2370 contributes to association and cell disruption of epithelial and macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Liliana; Fuentes, Juan A; Trombert, A Nicole; Jofré, Matías R; Villagra, Nicolás A; Valenzuela, Luis M; Mora, Guido C

    2015-07-07

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) stg operon, encoding a chaperone/usher fimbria (CU), contributes to an increased adherence to human epithelial cells. However, one report suggests that the presence of the Stg fimbria impairs the monocyte--bacteria association, as deduced by the lower level of invasion to macrophage-like cells observed when the stg fimbrial cluster was overexpressed. Nevertheless, since other CU fimbrial structures increase the entry of S. Typhi into macrophages, and considering that transcriptomic analyses revealed that stg operon is indeed expressed in macrophages, we reassessed the role of the stg operon in the interaction between S. Typhi strain STH2370 and human cells, including macrophage-like cells and mononuclear cells directly taken from human peripheral blood. We compared S. Typhi STH2370 WT, a Chilean clinical strain, and the S. Typhi STH2370 Δstg mutant with respect to association and invasion using epithelial and macrophage-like cells. We observed that deletion of stg operon reduced the association and invasion of S. Typhi, in both cellular types. The presence of the cloned stg operon restored the WT phenotype in all the cases. Moreover, we compared Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium 14028s (S. Typhimurium, a serovar lacking stg operon) and S. Typhimurium heterologously expressing S. Typhi stg. We found that the latter presents an increased cell disruption of polarized epithelial cells and an increased association in both epithelial and macrophage-like cells. S. Typhi stg operon encodes a functional adhesin that participates in the interaction bacteria-eukaryotic cells, including epithelial cells and macrophages-like cells. The phenotypes associated to stg operon include increased association and consequent invasion in bacteria-eukaryotic cells, and cell disruption.

  18. DNA topoisomerases regulate R-loop formation during transcription of the rrnB operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Massé, E; Phoenix, P; Drolet, M

    1997-05-09

    Recent in vivo and in vitro studies have suggested an important role for DNA topoisomerases in regulating R-loop formation during transcription in Escherichia coli. In the present report we present genetic and biochemical evidence strongly suggesting that R-loop formation can occur during transcription of a portion of the rrnB operon and that it is regulated by DNA topoisomerase activity. We found that a multicopy plasmid (pBR322) carrying an heavily transcribed portion of the rrnB operon cannot be transformed in topA mutants unless RNase H is overproduced. Transcription of the 567-base pair HindIII fragment from the rrnB operon allows the extraction of large amount of R-looped plasmid DNAs from a topA mutant, in a manner that depends on the intracellular level of RNase H activity. When DNA gyrase is sufficiently active, hypernegatively supercoiled plasmid DNA is produced if the same DNA fragment is transcribed in a topA mutant. The formation of such topoisomers most likely reflect the presence of extensive R-loops since it is sensitive to the intracellular level of RNase H activity. Finally, the formation of R-looped plasmid DNAs in an in vitro transcription system using phage RNA polymerases is also detected when the 567-base pair HindIII fragment is transcribed on a negatively supercoiled DNA template.

  19. A distinct alleles and genetic recombination of pmrCAB operon in species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate pmrCAB sequence divergence in 5 species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex, a total of 80 isolates from a Korean hospital were explored. We evaluated nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms of pmrCAB operon, and phylogenetic trees were constructed for each gene of prmCAB operon. Colistin and polymyxin B susceptibility was determined for all isolates, and multilocus sequence typing was also performed for A. baumannii isolates. Our results showed that each species of A. baumannii complex has divergent pmrCAB operon sequences. We identified a distinct pmrCAB allele allied with Acinetobacter nosocomialis in gene trees. Different grouping in each gene tree suggests sporadic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes among Acinetobacter species. Sequence polymorphisms among Acinetobacter species might not be associated with colistin resistance. We revealed that a distinct pmrCAB allele may be widespread across the continents such as North America and Asia and that sporadic genetic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes might occur. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nucleotide sequences and operon structure of plasmid-borne genes mediating uptake and utilization of raffinose in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, C; Schmid, K; Schmitt, R

    1989-01-01

    The plasmid-borne raf operon encodes functions required for inducible uptake and utilization of raffinose by Escherichia coli. Raf functions include active transport (Raf permease), alpha-galactosidase, and sucrose hydrolase, which are negatively controlled by the Raf repressor. We have defined the order and extent of the three structural genes, rafA, rafB, and rafD; these are contained in a 5,284-base-pair nucleotide sequence. By comparisons of derived primary structures with known subunit molecular weights and an N-terminal peptide sequence, rafA was assigned to alpha-galactosidase (708 amino acids), rafB was assigned to Raf permease (425 amino acids), and rafD was assigned to sucrose hydrolase (476 amino acids). Transcription was shown to initiate 13 nucleotides upstream of rafA; a putative promoter, a ribosome-binding site, and a transcription termination signal were identified. Striking similarities between Raf permease and lacY-encoded lactose permease, revealed by high sequence conservation (76%), overlapping substrate specificities, and similar transport kinetics, suggest a common origin of these transport systems. alpha-Galactosidase and sucrose hydrolase are not related to host enzymes but have their counterparts in other species. We propose a modular origin of the raf operon and discuss selective forces that favored the given gene organization also found in the E. coli lac operon. Images PMID:2556373

  1. Organization and codon usage of the streptomycin operon in Micrococcus luteus, a bacterium with a high genomic G + C content.

    PubMed Central

    Ohama, T; Yamao, F; Muto, A; Osawa, S

    1987-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the Micrococcus luteus str operon, which includes genes for ribosomal proteins S12 (str or rpsL) and S7 (rpsG) and elongation factors (EF) G (fus) and Tu (tuf), has been determined and compared with the corresponding sequence of Escherichia coli to estimate the effect of high genomic G + C content (74%) of M. luteus on the codon usage pattern. The gene organization in this operon and the deduced amino acid sequence of each corresponding protein are well conserved between the two species. The mean G + C content of the M. luteus str operon is 67%, which is much higher than that of E. coli (51%). The codon usage pattern of M. luteus is very different from that of E. coli and extremely biased to the use of G and C in silent positions. About 95% (1,309 of 1,382) of codons have G or C at the third position. Codon GUG is used for initiation of S12, EF-G, and EF-Tu, and AUG is used only in S7, whereas GUG initiates only one of the EF-Tu's in E. coli. UGA is the predominant termination codon in M. luteus, in contrast to UAA in E. coli. PMID:3654584

  2. Synthetic operon for (R,R)-2,3-butanediol production in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rafael R; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    To reduce dependence on petroleum, an alternative route to production of the chemical feedstock 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from renewable lignocellulosic sources is desirable. In this communication, the genes encoding the pathway from pyruvate to 2,3-BD (alsS, alsD, and bdhA encoding acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and butanediol dehydrogenase, respectively) from Bacillus subtilis were engineered into a single tricistronic operon under control of the isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible Pspac promoter in a shuttle plasmid capable of replication and expression in either B. subtilis or Escherichia coli. We describe the construction and performance of a shuttle plasmid carrying the IPTG-inducible synthetic operon alsSDbdhA coding for 2,3-BD pathway capable of (i) expression in two important representative model microorganisms, the gram-positive B. subtilis and the gram-negative E. coli; (ii) increasing 2,3-BD production in B. subtilis; and (iii) successfully introducing the B. subtilis 2,3-BD pathway into E. coli. The synthetic alsSDbdhA operon constructed using B. subtilis native genes not only increased the 2,3-BD production in its native host but also efficiently expressed the pathway in the heterologous organism E. coli. Construction of an efficient shuttle plasmid will allow investigation of 2,3-BD production performance in related organisms with industrial potential for production of bio-based chemicals.

  3. Supra-operonic clusters of functionally related genes (SOCs) are a source of horizontal gene co-transfers

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tin Yau; Lercher, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of bacteria occurs predominantly via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). While it is widely recognized that horizontal acquisitions frequently encompass multiple genes, it is unclear what the size distribution of successfully transferred DNA segments looks like and what evolutionary forces shape this distribution. Here, we identified 1790 gene family pairs that were consistently co-gained on the same branches across a phylogeny of 53 E. coli strains. We estimated a lower limit of their genomic distances at the time they were transferred to their host genomes; this distribution shows a sharp upper bound at 30 kb. The same gene-pairs can have larger distances (up to 70 kb) in other genomes. These more distant pairs likely represent recent acquisitions via transduction that involve the co-transfer of excised prophage genes, as they are almost always associated with intervening phage-associated genes. The observed distribution of genomic distances of co-transferred genes is much broader than expected from a model based on the co-transfer of genes within operons; instead, this distribution is highly consistent with the size distribution of supra-operonic clusters (SOCs), groups of co-occurring and co-functioning genes that extend beyond operons. Thus, we propose that SOCs form a basic unit of horizontal gene transfer. PMID:28067311

  4. A tricistronic heat shock operon is important for stress tolerance of Pseudomonas putida and conserved in many environmental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie S; Joswig, Matthias; Nagel, Miriam; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-06-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) including the well-studied IbpA protein from Escherichia coli are molecular chaperones that bind to non-native proteins and prevent them from aggregation. We discovered an entirely unexplored tricistronic small heat shock gene cluster in Pseudomonas putida. The genes pp3314, pp3313 and pp3312 (renamed to hspX, hspY and hspZ respectively) are transcribed in a single transcript. In addition to σ(32) -dependent transcriptional control, translation of the first and second gene of the operon is controlled by RNA thermometers with novel architectures. Biochemical analysis of HspY, HspZ and P. putida IbpA demonstrated that they assemble into homo-oligomers of different sizes whose quaternary structures alter in a temperature-dependent manner. IbpA and HspY are able to prevent the model substrate citrate synthase from thermal aggregation in vitro. Increased stress sensitivity of a P. putida strain lacking HspX, HspY and HspZ revealed an important role of these sHsps in stress adaptation. The hspXYZ operon is conserved among metabolically related bacteria that live in hostile environments including polluted soils. This heat shock operon might act as a protective system to promote survival in such ecological niches.

  5. Expression of the Escherichia coli malPQ operon remains unaffected after drastic alteration of its promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Débarbouillé, M; Raibaud, O

    1983-01-01

    The malPQ operon, one of the three operons of the maltose regulon, is positively controlled by the product of gene malT. The starting point for malPQ transcription was deduced from experiments which involved a hybridization of in vivo-synthesized malPQ mRNA with adequate DNA probes, followed either by a digestion of nonhybridized DNA (S1 nuclease mapping) or by an extension of the hybridized probe (reverse transcriptase mapping). In the wild-type strain, this starting point was 37 nucleotides upstream from the initiation codon for malP. This analysis was also performed on a double mutant which contained both a 13-base pair deletion and a 3-base pair insertion in the promoter region. This double mutant expressed the malPQ operon exactly as the wild-type strain did, in a maltose-inducible manner. In this strain, the starting point for malPQ transcription was shifted 11 nucleotides downstream from the wild-type location. An analysis of these results suggests that (i) the binding site for the malT product is located upstream from the region which is severely altered in the double mutant, i.e., upstream from position -31; and (ii) the 30-base pair sequence which precedes the transcription starting point contains very few positions which are essential for promoter activity. Images PMID:6186658

  6. Identification of the virB operon genes encoding the type IV secretion system, in Colombian Brucella canis isolates.

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta-Zuluaga, Juan Jacobo; Sánchez-Jiménez, Miryan Margot; Martínez-Garro, Juliana; Olivera-Angel, Martha

    2013-04-12

    Canine brucellosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Brucella canis. The establishment of intracellular replicative niches of B. canis is mediated by proteins secreted by the type IV secretion system, which is encoded by the virB operon. The characterization of such genes has been conducted in other species of the genus, but not in B. canis. We report the design of a multiplex PCR test for the detection of the virB operon genes of B. canis. Primers for each of the 12 genes were designed and evaluated using bioinformatics tools. A multiplex PCR assay was standardized and applied to 36 isolates obtained from infected dogs of Aburrá Valley kennels, as well to the Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Brucella suis and Brucella ovis DNA strains. As a result of the in silico design, a pair of primers for each gene was selected. All species and isolates evaluated showed evidence of the presence of the entire virB operon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The excision proteins of CTnDOT positively regulate the transfer operon.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Carolyn M; Park, Jiyeon; Wang, Gui-Rong; Hopp, Crystal M; Shoemaker, Nadja B; Gardner, Jeffrey F; Salyers, Abigail A

    2013-03-01

    The Bacteroides conjugative transposon, CTnDOT, is an integrated conjugative element (ICE), found in many human colonic Bacteroides spp. strains. It has a complex regulatory system for both excision from the chromosome and transfer and mobilization into a new host. It was previously shown that a cloned DNA segment encoding the xis2c, xis2d, orf3, and exc genes was required for tetracycline dependent activation of the P(tra) promoter. The Xis2c and Xis2d proteins are required for excision while the Exc protein stimulates excision. We report here that neither the Orf3 nor the Exc proteins are involved in activation of the P(tra) promoter. Deletion analysis and electromobility shift assays showed that the Xis2c and Xis2d proteins bind to the P(tra) promoter to activate the tra operon. Thus, the recombination directionality factors of CTnDOT excision also function as activator proteins of the P(tra) promoter.

  8. Structure of Salmonella FlhE, conserved member of a flagellar Type III secretion operon

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jaemin; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.; ...

    2014-12-26

    In this paper, the bacterial flagellum is assembled by a multicomponent transport apparatus categorized as a type III secretion system. The secretion of proteins that assemble into the flagellum is driven by the proton motive force. The periplasmic protein FlhE is a member of the flhBAE operon in the majority of bacteria where FlhE is found. FlhA and FlhB are established components of the flagellar type III secretion system. The absence of FlhE results in a proton leak through the flagellar system, inappropriate secretion patterns, and cell death, indicating that FlhE regulates an important aspect of proper flagellar biosynthesis. Wemore » isolated FlhE from the periplasm of Salmonella and solved its structure to 1.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals a β-sandwich fold, with no close structural homologs. Finally, possible roles of FlhE, including that of a chaperone, are discussed.« less

  9. The Rhizobium etli bioMNY operon is involved in biotin transport.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Navarro, Karina; Araíza, Gisela; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Mora, Yolanda; Dunn, Michael F

    2005-09-15

    Because Rhizobium etli CE3 is normally dependent on an external source of biotin and lacks orthodox biotin biosynthesis genes, we undertook an analysis of biotin uptake in this organism. By complementation of a Sinorhizobium meliloti bioM mutant we isolated an R. etli chromosomal region encoding homologs of the S. meliloti bioMNB genes, whose products have been implicated in intracellular biotin retention in that organism. Disruption of the R. etli bioM resulted in a mutant which took up biotin at a lower rate and accumulated significantly less biotin than the wild type. As in S. meliloti, the R. etli bioMN gene-products resemble the ATPase and permease components, respectively, of an ABC-type transporter. The bioB gene product is in fact similar to members of the BioY family, which has been postulated to function in biotin transport, and we refer to this gene as bioY. An R. etli bioY mutant exhibited lower biotin uptake than the wild-type, providing the first experimental evidence for a role of BioY in biotin transport. We show that the bioMNY operon is transcriptionally repressed by biotin. An analysis of the competitiveness of the wild-type strain versus the bioM mutant showed that the mutant had a diminished capacity to form nodules on bean plants.

  10. The Legionella pneumophila kai operon is implicated in stress response and confers fitness in competitive environments

    PubMed Central

    Loza-Correa, Maria; Sahr, Tobias; Rolando, Monica; Daniels, Craig; Petit, Pierre; Skarina, Tania; Valero, Laura Gomez; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Honoré, Nadine; Savchenko, Aleksey; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Legionella pneumophila uses aquatic protozoa as replication niche and protection from harsh environments. Although L. pneumophila is not known to have a circadian clock, it encodes homologues of the KaiBC proteins of Cyanobacteria that regulate circadian gene expression. We show that L. pneumophila kaiB, kaiC and the downstream gene lpp1114, are transcribed as a unit under the control of the stress sigma factor RpoS. KaiC and KaiB of L. pneumophila do not interact as evidenced by yeast and bacterial two-hybrid analyses. Fusion of the C-terminal residues of cyanobacterial KaiB to Legionella KaiB restores their interaction. In contrast, KaiC of L. pneumophila conserved autophosphorylation activity, but KaiB does not trigger the dephosphorylation of KaiC like in Cyanobacteria. The crystal structure of L. pneumophila KaiB suggests that it is an oxidoreductase-like protein with a typical thioredoxin fold. Indeed, mutant analyses revealed that the kai operon-encoded proteins increase fitness of L. pneumophila in competitive environments, and confer higher resistance to oxidative and sodium stress. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that L. pneumophila KaiBC resemble Synechosystis KaiC2B2 and not circadian KaiB1C1. Thus, the L. pneumophila Kai proteins do not encode a circadian clock, but enhance stress resistance and adaption to changes in the environments. PMID:23957615

  11. Regulation and Adaptive Evolution of Lactose Operon Expression in Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Luciane; Mollet, Beat; Germond, Jacques-Edouard

    2002-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis are both used in the dairy industry as homofermentative lactic acid bacteria in the production of fermented milk products. After selective pressure for the fast fermentation of milk in the manufacture of yogurts, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus loses its ability to regulate lac operon expression. A series of mutations led to the constitutive expression of the lac genes. A complex of insertion sequence (IS) elements (ISL4 inside ISL5), inserted at the border of the lac promoter, induced the loss of the palindromic structure of one of the operators likely involved in the binding of regulatory factors. A lac repressor gene was discovered downstream of the β-galactosidase gene of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis and was shown to be inactivated by several mutations in L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Regulatory mechanisms of the lac gene expression of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis were compared by heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis of the two lac promoters in front of a reporter gene (β-glucuronidase) in the presence or absence of the lac repressor gene. Insertion of the complex of IS elements in the lac promoter of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus increased the promoter's activity but did not prevent repressor binding; rather, it increased the affinity of the repressor for the promoter. Inactivation of the lac repressor by mutations was then necessary to induce the constitutive expression of the lac genes in L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. PMID:11807052

  12. Catabolite responsive element deficiency of xyl operon resulting in carbon catabolite derepression in Lactobacillus fermentum 1001.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Guo, T; Xin, Y; Gao, X; Kong, J

    2016-01-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of the carbon catabolite derepression in Lactobacillus fermentum 1001 when this strain consumed xylose and glucose simultaneously. The transcriptional level of ccpAf was measured by real-time qPCR, revealing that ccpAf transcribed mRNA normally in Lact. fermentum 1001. The ccpAf gene could complement the ccpA-deficiency of a Lactococcus lactis mutant. Moreover, when the phosphofructokinase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 was expressed in Lact. fermentum 1001, the recombinant preferred glucose to fructose rather than to xylose. All data suggested that CcpAf was functional in Lact. fermentum 1001. In addition, the promoter (Plx) activity of the xyl operon from Lact. fermentum 1001 was further test in Lactobacillus casei BL23, and it could drive the expression of green fluorescent protein in the presence of glucose. The ability of Lact. fermentum 1001 to co-utilize xylose and glucose resulted from the deficiency of catabolite responsive element in P1x rather than the null mutation of the ccpAf gene. Lactobacillus fermentum 1001 is a potential candidate as a CCR-absent cell factory to transform biomass to high-value-added products. P1x was provided for engineering LAB to enhance fermentation efficiency by avoiding CCR. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Mutations in the lux Operon of Natural Dark Mutants in the Genus Vibrio▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, Elizabeth A.; Wimpee, Charles F.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence can display a wide range of intensities among strains, from very bright to undetectable, and it has been shown previously that there are nonluminous vibrios that possess lux genes. In this paper, we report the isolation and characterization of completely dark natural mutants in the genus Vibrio. Screening of over 600 Vibrio isolates with a luxA gene probe revealed that approximately 5% carried the luxA gene. Bioluminescence assays of the luxA-positive isolates, followed by repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR fingerprinting, showed three unique genotypes that are completely dark. The dark mutants show a variety of lesions, including an insertion sequence, point mutations, and deletions. Strain BCB451 has an IS10 insertion sequence in luxA, a mutated luxE stop codon, and a truncated luxH. Strain BCB494 has a 396-bp deletion in luxC, and strain BCB440 has a frameshift in luxC. This paper represents the first molecular characterization of natural dark mutants and the first demonstration of incomplete lux operons in natural isolates. PMID:17981944

  14. Gene position in a long operon governs motility development in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Cozy, Loralyn M.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Growing cultures of Bacillus subtilis bifurcate into subpopulations of motile individuals and non-motile chains of cells that are differentiated at the level of gene expression. The motile cells are ON and the chaining cells are OFF for transcription that depends on RNA polymerase and the alternative sigma factor σD. Here we show that chaining cells were OFF for σD-dependent gene expression because σD levels fell below a threshold, and σD activity was inhibited by the anti-sigma factor FlgM. The probability that σD exceeded the threshold was governed by the position of the sigD genes. The proportion of ON cells increased when sigD was artificially moved forward in the 27kb fla/che operon. In addition, we identified a new σD-dependent promoter that increases sigD expression and may provide positive feedback to stabilize the ON state. Finally, we demonstrate that ON/OFF motility states in B. subtilis are a form of development because mosaics of stable and differentiated epigenotypes were evident when the normally dispersed bacteria were forced to grow in one dimension. PMID:20233303

  15. Cloning and Expression of Poly 3-Hydroxybutyrate Operon Into Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jari, Maryam; Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Shafiei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poly 3-Hydroxybutyrate (PHB), a class of Poly Hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), is a group of bacterial storage polymers, produced by various microorganisms in response to nutrient limitation. PHAs are biodegradable polymers which could be a good substitute for current petrochemical plastics. PHB has been synthesized during three enzymatic steps including three genes. Objectives: Our aim was PHB production from recombinant bacteria. Materials and Methods: Ralstonia eutropha was cultured and its genomic DNA was extracted. The phbCAB operon was amplified using designed primers. The fragment was cloned into pET-28a expression vector and then transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. Sudan black staining was used to show the production of PHB. Results: The extracted recombinant plasmid was digested with restriction enzymes. Separation of the desired fragment from the vector was performed to prove the correct insertion of the PCR products into the vector. The colony PCR and sequencing results confirmed the successful transformation. The production of PHB was confirmed by Sudan Black B staining under a light microscope. Conclusions: Various metabolic and fermentation methods have been used in some bacterial strains for PHB production. The use of a recombinant system harboring PHB synthesis genes can produce PHB in higher concentrations compare to natural PHA-producing bacteria. The present study was one of the most important and basic steps of designing a recombinant E. coli that can produce PHB. PMID:25834710

  16. Acetoin catabolic system of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43: sequence, expression, and organization of the aco operon.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W L; Chang, H Y; Peng, H L

    1994-01-01

    A cosmid clone which was capable of depleting acetoin in vivo was isolated from a library of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43 cosmids. The smallest functional subclone contained a 3.9-kb DNA fragment of the cosmid clone. Sequencing of the DNA fragment revealed three open reading frames (ORFs A, B, and C) encoding polypeptides of 34, 36, and 52 kDa, respectively. The presence of these proteins was demonstrated by expression of the recombinant DNA clone in Escherichia coli. Considerable similarities between the deduced amino acid sequences of the ORFs and those of the following enzymes were found: acetoin dissimilation enzymes, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex of various origins. Activities of these enzymes, including acetoin-dependent dichlorophenolin-dohenol oxidoreductase and dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, were detected in the extracts of E. coli harboring the genes encoding products of the three ORFs. Although not required for acetoin depletion in vivo, a possible fourth ORF (ORF D), located 39 nucleotides downstream of ORF C, was also identified. The deduced N-terminal sequence of the ORF D product was highly homologous to the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases of several organisms. Primer extension analysis identified the transcriptional start of the operon as an A residue 72 nucleotides upstream of ORF A. Images PMID:8206829

  17. Riboflavin synthesis genes are linked with the lux operon of Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C Y; O'Kane, D J; Meighen, E A

    1994-01-01

    Four genes immediately downstream of luxG in the Photobacterium phosphoreum lux operon (ribEBHA) have been sequenced and shown to be involved in riboflavin synthesis. Sequence analyses and complementation of Escherichia coli riboflavin auxotrophs showed that the gene products of ribB and ribA are 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate (DHBP) synthetase and GTP cyclohydrolase II, respectively. By expression of P. phosphoreum ribE in E. coli using the bacteriophage T7 promoter-RNA polymerase system, ribE was shown to code for riboflavin synthetase, which catalyzes the conversion of lumazine to riboflavin. Increased thermal stability of RibE on expression with RibH indicated that ribH coded for lumazine synthetase. The organization of the rib genes in P. phosphoreum is quite distinct, with ribB and ribA being linked but separated by ribH, whereas in E. coli, they are unlinked and in Bacillus subtilis, RibB and RibA functions are coded by a single gene. Images PMID:8144477

  18. Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbrial operon: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and conditions for expression.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an agent of urinary tract infection, expresses at least four fimbrial types. Among these are the MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. MrpA, the structural subunit, is optimally expressed at 37 degrees C in Luria broth cultured statically for 48 h by each of seven strains examined. Genes encoding this fimbria were isolated, and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The mrp gene cluster encoded by 7,293 bp predicts eight polypeptides: MrpI (22,133 Da), MrpA (17,909 Da), MrpB (19,632 Da), MrpC (96,823 Da), MrpD (27,886 Da), MrpE (19,470 Da), MrpF (17,363 Da), and MrpG (13,169 Da). mrpI is upstream of the gene encoding the major structural subunit gene mrpA and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the rest of the operon. All predicted polypeptides share > or = 25% amino acid identity with at least one other enteric fimbrial gene product encoded by the pap, fim, smf, fan, or mrk gene clusters.

  19. Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbrial operon: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and conditions for expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an agent of urinary tract infection, expresses at least four fimbrial types. Among these are the MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. MrpA, the structural subunit, is optimally expressed at 37 degrees C in Luria broth cultured statically for 48 h by each of seven strains examined. Genes encoding this fimbria were isolated, and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The mrp gene cluster encoded by 7,293 bp predicts eight polypeptides: MrpI (22,133 Da), MrpA (17,909 Da), MrpB (19,632 Da), MrpC (96,823 Da), MrpD (27,886 Da), MrpE (19,470 Da), MrpF (17,363 Da), and MrpG (13,169 Da). mrpI is upstream of the gene encoding the major structural subunit gene mrpA and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the rest of the operon. All predicted polypeptides share > or = 25% amino acid identity with at least one other enteric fimbrial gene product encoded by the pap, fim, smf, fan, or mrk gene clusters. Images PMID:7910820

  20. Comparative genomics provides a timeframe for Wolbachia evolution and exposes a recent biotin synthesis operon transfer.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Michael; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2016-12-22

    The genus Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria) comprises the most abundant inherited intracellular bacteria(1). Despite their relevance as manipulators of human pathogen transmission(2) and arthropod reproduction(3), many aspects of their evolutionary history are not well understood(4). In arthropods, Wolbachia infections are typically transient on evolutionary timescales(5,6) and co-divergence between hosts and Wolbachia is supposedly rare. Consequently, much of our knowledge of Wolbachia genome evolution derives from very recently diverged strains, and a timescale for Wolbachia is lacking. Here, we investigated the genomes of four Wolbachia strains that have persisted within and co-diverged with their host lineage for ∼2 million years. Although the genomes showed very little evolutionary change on a nucleotide level, we found evidence for a recent lateral transfer of a complete biotin synthesis operon that has the potential to transform Wolbachia-host relationships(7). Furthermore, this evolutionary snapshot enabled us to calibrate the divergence times of the supergroup A and B Wolbachia lineages using genome-wide data sets and relaxed molecular clock models. We estimated the origin of Wolbachia supergroups A and B to be ∼200 million years ago (Ma), which is considerably older than previously appreciated. This age coincides with the diversification of many insect lineages(8) that represent most of Wolbachia's host spectrum.

  1. Secrets of the lac operon. Glucose hysteresis as a mechanism in dietary restriction, aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Charles V; Mastaitis, Jason W; Zhang, Minhua; Isoda, Fumiko; Cheng, Hui; Yen, Kelvin

    2007-01-01

    Elevated blood glucose associated with diabetes produces progressive and apparently irreversible damage to many cell types. Conversely, reduction of glucose extends life span in yeast, and dietary restriction reduces blood glucose. Therefore it has been hypothesized that cumulative toxic effects of glucose drive at least some aspects of the aging process and, conversely, that protective effects of dietary restriction are mediated by a reduction in exposure to glucose. The mechanisms mediating cumulative toxic effects of glucose are suggested by two general principles of metabolic processes, illustrated by the lac operon but also observed with glucose-induced gene expression. First, metabolites induce the machinery of their own metabolism. Second, induction of gene expression by metabolites can entail a form of molecular memory called hysteresis. When applied to glucose-regulated gene expression, these two principles suggest a mechanism whereby repetitive exposure to postprandial excursions of glucose leads to an age-related increase in glycolytic capacity (and reduction in beta-oxidation of free fatty acids), which in turn leads to an increased generation of oxidative damage and a decreased capacity to respond to oxidative damage, independent of metabolic rate. According to this mechanism, dietary restriction increases life span and reduces pathology by reducing exposure to glucose and therefore delaying the development of glucose-induced glycolytic capacity.

  2. Discoordinate gene expression in the dnaA-dnaN operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, A; Messer, W

    1988-07-01

    The dnaN gene of Escherichia coli encodes the beta-subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. Previous work has established that dnaN lies immediately downstream of dnaA and that both genes may be cotranscribed from the dnaA promoters; no promoter for dnaN has been described. We investigated the in vivo regulation of transcription of the dnaN gene by transcriptional fusions to the galK gene, translational fusion to the lacZ gene and S1 mapping analysis. We found that there are at least three dnaN promoters residing entirely in the reading frame of the preceding dnaA gene, and that transcription from these promoters can occur independently of dnaA transcription which, however, extends at least up to dnaN. Furthermore, we found evidence for the inducibility of the dnaN promoters in a dam background under conditions of simultaneously reduced dnaA transcription. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that although dnaA and dnaN are organized in an operon considerable discoordinate transcription can occur, thus uncoupling dnaN and dnaA regulation, when needed.

  3. Biofilm formation of ica operon-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis from different sources.

    PubMed

    Argudín, Maria Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Vandendriessche, Stien; Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Denis, Olivier; Coenye, Tom; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Information on the prevalence of biofilm-related factors (PIA, Bhp, Aap, Embp) in Staphylococcus epidermidis of animal origin is scarce. In this study, 263 S. epidermidis isolates of diverse origin (animal, farmers, patients, and laboratory staff) were investigated for the presence of the ica operon (icaRADBC). The icaRADBC-positive isolates were further characterized by means of biofilm formation, presence of other biofilm-related genes, antimicrobial resistance, and population structure. Of all isolates, 28.5% (n = 75) were icaRADBC-positive, including 16.5% of animal origin, 29.1% farmer isolates, and 44.6% hospital-associated isolates (including patients and laboratory staff isolates). Most icaRADBC-positive isolates carried embp (n = 73), aap (n = 57), bhp (n = 22), and IS256 (n = 29). Statistical differences were found between animal and patient isolates for the presence of icaRADBC, bhp, and aap. No statistically significant relation was found between the presence of one or more genes and the level of biofilm formation. Most icaRADBC-positive isolates belonged to the clonal complex 5 (formerly 2) and most sequence types corresponded to types previously observed in community and nosocomial S. epidermidis populations. Although the prevalence of S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity of bovines and poultry is low, some isolates belong to STs related to ica-positive clinical strains. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Molecular study on the carAB operon reveals that carB gene is required for swimming and biofilm formation in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Tao; Rou, Wei; Song, Xue; Guo, Jing; Fan, Xiaojing; Kamau, Gicharu Gibson; Zou, Huasong

    2015-10-23

    The carA and carB genes code the small and large subunits of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase (CPS) that responsible for arginine and pyrimidine production. The purpose of this work was to study the gene organization and expression pattern of carAB operon, and the biological functions of carA and carB genes in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. RT-PCR method was employed to identify the full length of carAB operon transcript in X. citri subsp. citri. The promoter of carAB operon was predicted and analyzed its activity by fusing a GUS reporter gene. The swimming motility was tested on 0.25% agar NY plates with 1% glucose. Biofilm was measured by cell adhesion to polyvinyl chloride 96-well plate. The results indicated that carAB operon was composed of five gene members carA-orf-carB-greA-rpfE. A single promoter was predicted from the nucleotide sequence upstream of carAB operon, and its sensitivity to glutamic acid, uracil and arginine was confirmed by fusing a GUS reporter gene. Deletion mutagenesis of carB gene resulted in reduced abilities in swimming on soft solid media and in forming biofilm on polystyrene microtiter plates. From these results, we concluded that carAB operon was involved in multiple biological processes in X. citri subsp. citri.

  5. Molecular characterization of the operon comprising the spoIV gene of Bacillus megaterium DSM319 and generation of a deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Klaus-Detlev; Strey, Jan; Bültmann, Andreas

    1998-10-01

    According to sequence analysis, the spoIV-locus of Bacillus megaterium DSM 319 is 1,185 bp long; it is the second gene of a sporulation operon, which altogether contains three open reading frames. The ORF preceding spoIV encodes a putative polypeptide with 94 amino acids; the 3rd ORF of the operon has 972 bp corresponding to 324 amino acids. The operon is flanked on both sides by palindromic sequences, probably representing Rho-independent terminators. A primer extension analysis revealed that mRNA synthesis starts immediately downstream of a promoter, which is similar to the consensus sequence of Bacillus subtilis sigma(E) dependent promoters. Both the -35 and the -10 region are within the terminator region of the preceding operon. Gene knockout experiments and reporter gene assays with a newly developed system based on the heterologous Paenibacillus macerans glucanase gene (bgl) confirmed sigma(E)-dependent transcription. Two open reading frames of a further upstream operon were also identified. Northern analysis revealed that transcription of these ORFs comes about in late sporulation phases. The genetic organization of the spoIV comprising operon and adjacent loci clearly resembles that of the B. subtilis yqfa-phoH gene cluster. Thus our findings are of general significance for endospore-forming bacteria.

  6. An operon for production of bioactive gibberellin A4 phytohormone with wide distribution in the bacterial rice leaf streak pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Raimund; Turrini, Paula C G; Nett, Ryan S; Leach, Jan E; Verdier, Valérie; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Peters, Reuben J

    2017-05-01

    Phytopathogens have developed elaborate mechanisms to attenuate the defense response of their host plants, including convergent evolution of complex pathways for production of the GA phytohormones, which were actually first isolated from the rice fungal pathogen Gibberella fujikuroi. The rice bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) has been demonstrated to contain a biosynthetic operon with cyclases capable of producing the universal GA precursor ent-kaurene. Genetic (knock-out) studies indicate that the derived diterpenoid serves as a virulence factor for this rice leaf streak pathogen, serving to reduce the jasmonic acid-mediated defense response. Here the functions of the remaining genes in the Xoc operon are elucidated and the distribution of the operon in X. oryzae is investigated in over 100 isolates. The Xoc operon leads to production of the bioactive GA4 , an additional step beyond production of the penultimate precursor GA9 mediated by the homologous operons recently characterized from rhizobia. Moreover, this GA biosynthetic operon was found to be widespread in Xoc (> 90%), but absent in the other major X. oryzae pathovar. These results indicate selective pressure for production of GA4 in the distinct lifestyle of Xoc, and the importance of GA to both fungal and bacterial pathogens of rice. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Growth, pigmentation, and expression of the puf and puc operons in a light-responding-repressor (SPB)-disrupted Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K; Shimada, H; Hatanaka, S; Mizoguchi, H; Ohta, H; Masuda, T; Takamiya, K

    1998-04-01

    We previously cloned a trans-repressor, SPB, for the puf operon of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Shimada et al. 1996) and revealed that SPB was a putative genetic counterpart to HvrA in Rhodobacter capsulatus, a trans-activator for the puf and puh operons (Mizoguchi et al. 1997). In this study we constructed a spb-disrupted R. sphaeroides, strain L-7, to elucidate the function of SPB. This disruption of the spb gene increased the photosynthetic growth rate and the cellular levels of photopigments under low-intensity light conditions. The disruption also derepressed the expression of the puf and puc operons under high-intensity light conditions. In strain L-7, however, strong illumination still reduced the cellular levels of photopigments as it did in the wild strain, suggesting that SPB did not directly affect the formation of photopigments. These results support our previous suggestion that SPB functions as a high-light repressor for puf operon in R. sphaeroides in striking contrast to HvrA, which is a low-light activator for puf and puh operons in R. capsulatus, even though SPB and HvrA are highly homologous. Disruption of spb gene had no effect on the oxygen-mediated regulation of the pigmentation or the expression of puf and puc operons.

  8. Repression of the pyr operon in Lactobacillus plantarum prevents its ability to grow at low carbon dioxide levels.

    PubMed

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Elagöz, Aram; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Kammerer, Benoît; Martinussen, Jan; Bringel, Françoise

    2005-03-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate is a precursor for both arginine and pyrimidine biosynthesis. In Lactobacillus plantarum, carbamoyl phosphate is synthesized from glutamine, ATP, and carbon dioxide by two sets of identified genes encoding carbamoyl phosphate synthase (CPS). The expression of the carAB operon (encoding CPS-A) responds to arginine availability, whereas pyrAaAb (encoding CPS-P) is part of the pyrR1BCAaAbDFE operon coding for the de novo pyrimidine pathway repressed by exogenous uracil. The pyr operon is regulated by transcription attenuation mediated by a trans-acting repressor that binds to the pyr mRNA attenuation site in response to intracellular UMP/phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate pools. Intracellular pyrimidine triphosphate nucleoside pools were lower in mutant FB335 (carAB deletion) harboring only CPS-P than in the wild-type strain harboring both CPS-A and CPS-P. Thus, CPS-P activity is the limiting step in pyrimidine synthesis. FB335 is unable to grow in the presence of uracil due to a lack of sufficient carbamoyl phosphate required for arginine biosynthesis. Forty independent spontaneous FB335-derived mutants that have lost regulation of the pyr operon were readily obtained by their ability to grow in the presence of uracil and absence of arginine; 26 harbored mutations in the pyrR1-pyrB loci. One was a prototroph with a deletion of both pyrR1 and the transcription attenuation site that resulted in large amounts of excreted pyrimidine nucleotides and increased intracellular UTP and CTP pools compared to wild-type levels. Low pyrimidine-independent expression of the pyr operon was obtained by antiterminator site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting AE1023 strain had reduced UTP and CTP pools and had the phenotype of a high-CO2-requiring auxotroph, since it was able to synthesize sufficient arginine and pyrimidines only in CO2-enriched air. Therefore, growth inhibition without CO2 enrichment may be due to low carbamoyl phosphate pools from lack of CPS activity.

  9. Transcriptional inhibition of the operon for the spermidine uptake system by the substrate-binding protein PotD.

    PubMed

    Antognoni, F; Del Duca, S; Kuraishi, A; Kawabe, E; Fukuchi-Shimogori, T; Kashiwagi, K; Igarashi, K

    1999-01-22

    Inhibition of spermidine uptake in Escherichia coli, which occurs in the presence of accumulated polyamines, has been studied using the spermidine uptake operon consisting of the potA, -B, -C, and -D genes. Transcription of the potABCD operon was inhibited by PotD, a spermidine-binding protein usually found in the periplasm, and the inhibitory effect of PotD was increased by spermidine. Transcription was not affected by bovine serum albumin, PotA, or PotF, suggesting that the effects of PotD are specific to the PotD protein. In the presence of 8 mM spermidine, a 50% inhibition of transcription was observed with a molar ratio of approximately 1:500 of template DNA:PotD. It was found that PotD bound to regions -258 to -209 nucleotides upstream and +66 to +135 nucleotides downstream of the ATG initiation codon of the potA gene. Binding of PotD to the downstream site was stimulated by spermidine. Overexpression of PotD in Escherichia coli DH5alpha inhibited the uptake of spermidine, the synthesis of PotABCD mRNA, and expression of a lacZ reporter gene fused downstream of a potA gene containing the PotD binding sites. In cells overexpressing PotD, a large amount of PotD existed as PotD precursor in spheroplasts. Our results indicate that PotD precursor can also inhibit spermidine transport. The amino acid residues in PotD that are involved in its interaction with the potABCD operon were determined using mutated PotD proteins. Thr-35 and Ser-85 of PotD were found to be important for this interaction. These results suggest that transcription of the spermidine transport (potABCD) operon is inhibited in vivo by PotD precursor rather than PotD through its binding to two regions close to the transcriptional initiation site of the operon.

  10. The role of the Staphylococcal VraTSR regulatory system on vancomycin resistance and vanA operon expression in vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Nadia K; Yin, Shaohui; Boyle-Vavra, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin is often the preferred treatment for invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. With the increase in incidence of MRSA infections, the use of vancomycin has increased and, as feared, isolates of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) have emerged. VRSA isolates have acquired the entercoccal vanA operon contained on transposon (Tn) 1546 residing on a conjugal plasmid. VraTSR is a vancomycin and β-lactam-inducible three-component regulatory system encoded on the S. aureus chromosome that modulates the cell-wall stress response to cell-wall acting antibiotics. Mutation in vraTSR has shown to increase susceptibility to β-lactams and vancomycin in clinical VISA strains and in recombinant strain COLVA-200 which expresses a plasmid borne vanA operon. To date, the role of VraTSR in vanA operon expression in VRSA has not been demonstrated. In this study, the vraTSR operon was deleted from the first clinical VRSA strain (VRS1) by transduction with phage harvested from a USA300 vraTSR operon deletion strain. The absence of the vraTSR operon and presence of the vanA operon were confirmed in the transductant (VRS1Δvr