Science.gov

Sample records for action finally economic

  1. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  2. 40 CFR 66.81 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 66.81 Section 66.81... COLLECTION OF NONCOMPLIANCE PENALTIES BY EPA Final Action § 66.81 Final action. (a) A final Agency action... State action pursuant to part 67. (b) The actions listed in paragraph (a) of this section...

  3. 20 CFR 636.11 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final action. 636.11 Section 636.11 Employees... HEARINGS § 636.11 Final action. The final decision of the Secretary pursuant to section 166(b) of the Act... Officer's final determination where there has been no such hearing, constitutes final agency action...

  4. 27 CFR 72.39 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final action. 72.39... Remission or Mitigation of Forfeitures § 72.39 Final action. (a) Petitions for remission or mitigation of forfeiture. (1) The Director shall take final action on any petition filed pursuant to these...

  5. 33 CFR 52.64 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 52.64 Section 52.64... OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Judgment and Disposition § 52.64 Final action. (a) The Board, provided that it acts unanimously, may take final action on behalf of the Secretary, pursuant to 10...

  6. Are You Ready for Economics in Action?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James Calvert

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Economics in Action program, which familiarizes an audience with a number of basic economic concepts operational in a prominent local business or industry and through that process builds understanding of economics and its applications. A sample program for secondary teachers that is focused on the iron and steel industry is…

  7. 37 CFR 2.64 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 2.64 Section 2... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Examination of Application and Action by Applicants § 2.64 Final action. (a) On the first or any subsequent reexamination or reconsideration the refusal of...

  8. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 92.17 Section 92.17 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND... States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making a final determination whether to impose a penalty,...

  9. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 1990.147 Section 1990.147 Labor Regulations...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day...

  10. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final action. 1990.147 Section 1990.147 Labor Regulations...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day...

  11. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final action. 1990.147 Section 1990.147 Labor Regulations...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day...

  12. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final action. 1990.147 Section 1990.147 Labor Regulations...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day...

  13. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final action. 1990.147 Section 1990.147 Labor Regulations...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day...

  14. Action Sheet 36 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kips, R E; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D

    2012-02-24

    Pursuant to the Arrangement between the European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) to continue cooperation on research, development, testing, and evaluation of technology, equipment, and procedures in order to improve nuclear material control, accountancy, verification, physical protection, and advanced containment and surveillance technologies for international safeguards, dated 1 September 2008, the IRMM and LLNL established cooperation in a program on the Study of Chemical Changes in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles under IRMM-LLNL Action Sheet 36. The work under this action sheet had 2 objectives: (1) Achieve a better understanding of the loss of fluorine in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} particles after exposure to certain environmental conditions; and (2) Provide feedback to the EC-JRC on sample reproducibility and characteristics.

  15. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  16. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  17. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  18. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  19. 37 CFR 2.64 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... registration or the insistence upon a requirement may be stated to be final, whereupon applicant's response is... for filing a response to an outstanding Office action, appeal to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board... amendment to allege use under § 2.76, the applicant is found not entitled to registration for any reason...

  20. 37 CFR 2.64 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... registration or the insistence upon a requirement may be stated to be final, whereupon applicant's response is... for filing a response to an outstanding Office action, appeal to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board... amendment to allege use under § 2.76, the applicant is found not entitled to registration for any reason...

  1. 37 CFR 2.64 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... registration or the insistence upon a requirement may be stated to be final, whereupon applicant's response is... for filing a response to an outstanding Office action, appeal to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board... amendment to allege use under § 2.76, the applicant is found not entitled to registration for any reason...

  2. 37 CFR 2.64 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... registration or the insistence upon a requirement may be stated to be final, whereupon applicant's response is... for filing a response to an outstanding Office action, appeal to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board... amendment to allege use under § 2.76, the applicant is found not entitled to registration for any reason...

  3. Final Action Plan to Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-28

    This document presents planned actions, and their associated costs, for addressing the findings in the Environmental, Safety and Health Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, May 1991, hereafter called the Assessment. This Final Action Plan should be read in conjunction with the Assessment to ensure full understanding of the findings addressed herein. The Assessment presented 353 findings in four general categories: (1)Environmental (82 findings); (2) Safety and Health (243 findings); (3) Management and Organization (18 findings); and (4) Self-Assessment (10 findings). Additionally, 436 noncompliance items with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards were addressed during and immediately after the Tiger Team visit.

  4. Key science legislation awaits final action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard M.

    Congress is now in recess and will return to work on September 7, leaving only 4 weeks to complete action on a number of key science funding bills. Fiscal year 1994 begins on October 1.On the “must-do” list for Congress upon its return is Senate consideration and final House and Senate passage of HR2491, the VA, HUD, Independent Agencies Appropriations bill. Both the National Science Foundation and NASA are independent agencies funded under HR2491.

  5. 37 CFR 1.113 - Final rejection or action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final rejection or action. 1... Applicant and Further Consideration § 1.113 Final rejection or action. (a) On the second or any subsequent examination or consideration by the examiner the rejection or other action may be made final,...

  6. 37 CFR 1.113 - Final rejection or action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final rejection or action. 1... Applicant and Further Consideration § 1.113 Final rejection or action. (a) On the second or any subsequent examination or consideration by the examiner the rejection or other action may be made final,...

  7. 37 CFR 1.113 - Final rejection or action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final rejection or action. 1... Applicant and Further Consideration § 1.113 Final rejection or action. (a) On the second or any subsequent examination or consideration by the examiner the rejection or other action may be made final,...

  8. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document contains the planned actions to correct the deficiences identified in the Tiger Team Assessments of Sandia California (August 1990) and Sandia New Mexico (May 1991). Information is also included on the management structures, estimated costs, root causes, prioritization and schedules for the Action Plan. This Plan is an integration of the two individual Action Plans to provide a cost effective, integrated program for implementation by Sandia and monitoring by DOE. This volume (I) contains the findings and actions concerning the environment. Tables 4.2 and 4.7 summarize the annual costs estimated for completing the actions. The total costs for completion of all the actions are estimated to be $283 million over a 12 year period; the majority of the actions to be completed and costs incurred in the first five years. Resources are provided from DOE-ER/WM, the DOE/DP landlord funds (one time, physical fixes), and from the Sandia Indirect Budget.

  9. Administrative Actions for Noncompliance; Lesser Administrative Actions. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the regulation describing lesser administrative actions that may be imposed on an Institutional Review Board (IRB) that has failed to comply with FDA's IRB regulations. We are clarifying that FDA may require the IRB to withhold approval of new FDA-regulated studies, stop the enrollment of new subjects in ongoing studies, and terminate ongoing studies, or any combination of these actions until the noncompliance with FDA's IRB regulations is corrected. We are taking this action to ensure clarity and improve the accuracy of the regulations. PMID:27044118

  10. Final Consolidated action plan to Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document contains the planned actions to correct the deficiences identified in the Tiger Team Assessments of Sandia California (August 1990) and Sandia New Mexico (May 1991). Information is also included on the management structures, estimated costs, root causes, prioritization and schedules for the Action Plan. This Plan is an integration of the two individual Action Plans to provide a cost effective, integrated program for implemenation by Sandia and monitoring by DOE. This volume (2) contains information and corrective action plans pertaining to safety and health and management practices.

  11. 40 CFR 24.20 - Final agency action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final agency action. 24.20 Section 24.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL RULES GOVERNING ISSUANCE OF AND ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS ON INTERIM STATUS CORRECTIVE ACTION ORDERS Post-Hearing Procedures § 24.20 Final...

  12. 40 CFR 24.20 - Final agency action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final agency action. 24.20 Section 24.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL RULES GOVERNING ISSUANCE OF AND ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS ON INTERIM STATUS CORRECTIVE ACTION ORDERS Post-Hearing Procedures § 24.20 Final...

  13. 40 CFR 24.20 - Final agency action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final agency action. 24.20 Section 24.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL RULES GOVERNING ISSUANCE OF AND ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS ON INTERIM STATUS CORRECTIVE ACTION ORDERS Post-Hearing Procedures § 24.20 Final...

  14. 40 CFR 24.20 - Final agency action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final agency action. 24.20 Section 24.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL RULES GOVERNING ISSUANCE OF AND ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS ON INTERIM STATUS CORRECTIVE ACTION ORDERS Post-Hearing Procedures § 24.20 Final...

  15. 40 CFR 24.20 - Final agency action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final agency action. 24.20 Section 24.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL RULES GOVERNING ISSUANCE OF AND ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS ON INTERIM STATUS CORRECTIVE ACTION ORDERS Post-Hearing Procedures § 24.20 Final...

  16. 24 CFR 7.37 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Department dismisses an entire complaint under 29 CFR 1614.107, receives a request for an immediate final decision or does not receive a reply to the notice issued under 29 CFR 1614.108(f), the Department shall... with 29 CFR part 1614, subpart E. The Department shall issue the final decision within 60 days...

  17. 24 CFR 7.37 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Department dismisses an entire complaint under 29 CFR 1614.107, receives a request for an immediate final decision or does not receive a reply to the notice issued under 29 CFR 1614.108(f), the Department shall... with 29 CFR part 1614, subpart E. The Department shall issue the final decision within 60 days...

  18. 24 CFR 7.37 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Department dismisses an entire complaint under 29 CFR 1614.107, receives a request for an immediate final decision or does not receive a reply to the notice issued under 29 CFR 1614.108(f), the Department shall... with 29 CFR part 1614, subpart E. The Department shall issue the final decision within 60 days...

  19. 24 CFR 7.37 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Department dismisses an entire complaint under 29 CFR 1614.107, receives a request for an immediate final decision or does not receive a reply to the notice issued under 29 CFR 1614.108(f), the Department shall... with 29 CFR part 1614, subpart E. The Department shall issue the final decision within 60 days...

  20. 24 CFR 7.37 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Department dismisses an entire complaint under 29 CFR 1614.107, receives a request for an immediate final decision or does not receive a reply to the notice issued under 29 CFR 1614.108(f), the Department shall... with 29 CFR part 1614, subpart E. The Department shall issue the final decision within 60 days...

  1. VTAE Economic Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzke, Elizabeth

    A project was undertaken to redefine the role of vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE) in economic development in Wisconsin. Included among the objectives of the project were the following: to produce a statewide plan for economic development identifying new linkages among business, industry, labor, and the VTAE system; to develop…

  2. 29 CFR 1614.110 - Final action by agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION FEDERAL SECTOR EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Agency Program To Promote Equal Employment Opportunity § 1614.110 Final action by... right to appeal to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the right to file a civil action...

  3. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... prescribed in § 93.501, the ORI finding of research misconduct is the final HHS action on the research... EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct...

  4. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... prescribed in § 93.501, the ORI finding of research misconduct is the final HHS action on the...

  5. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final HHS actions. 93.406 Section 93.406 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the...

  6. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... prescribed in § 93.501, the ORI finding of research misconduct is the final HHS action on the...

  7. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... prescribed in § 93.501, the ORI finding of research misconduct is the final HHS action on the...

  8. Final Legislative and Budget Actions. Legislative Report No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Gale F.

    2006-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  9. 12 CFR 268.109 - Final action by the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... file a civil action in federal district court, the name of the proper defendant in any such lawsuit and the applicable time limits for appeals and lawsuits. If the final order does not fully implement the... district court, the name of the proper defendant in any such lawsuit and the applicable time limits...

  10. 37 CFR 1.113 - Final rejection or action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Applicant and Further Consideration § 1.113 Final rejection or action. (a) On the second or any subsequent... in the case of rejection of any claim (§ 41.31 of this title), or to amendment as specified in §...

  11. 37 CFR 1.113 - Final rejection or action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Applicant and Further Consideration § 1.113 Final rejection or action. (a) On the second or any subsequent... in the case of rejection of any claim (§ 41.31 of this title), or to amendment as specified in §...

  12. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

  13. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  14. Actionable Capability for Social and Economic Systems (ACSES)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Steven J; Brecke, Peter K; Carmichael, Theodore D; Eichelberger, Christopher N; Ganguly, Auroop R; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Jiao, Yu; Khouja, Moutaz J; McLean, Angus L; Middleton, Erin J; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Saric, Amar; Sun, Min; Whitmeyer, Joseph M; Gilman, Paul; O'Maonaigh, Heather C

    2008-05-01

    The foundation of the Actionable Capability for Social and Economic Systems (ACSES) project is a useful regional-scale social-simulation system. This report is organized into five chapters that describe insights that were gained concerning the five key feasibility questions pertaining to such a system: (1) Should such a simulation system exist, would the current state of data sets or collectible data sets be adequate to support such a system? (2) By comparing different agent-based simulation systems, is it feasible to compare simulation systems and select one appropriate for a given application with agents behaving according to modern social theory rather than ad hoc rule sets? (3) Provided that a selected simulation system for a region of interest could be constructed, can the simulation system be updated with new and changing conditions so that the universe of potential outcomes are constrained by events on the ground as they evolve? (4) As these results are constrained by evolving events on the ground, is it feasible to still generate surprise and emerging behavior to suggest outcomes from novel courses of action? (5) As these systems may for the first time require large numbers (hundreds of millions) of agents operating with complexities demanded of modern social theories, can results still be generated within actionable decision cycles?

  15. Economic justification for the Tennessee Lead Elimination Action Program.

    PubMed

    Welborn, Cliff; Boraiko, Carol; Ralston, Faye; Mera, Jessica

    2011-03-01

    Ingestion of lead by children can cause physical health issues and learning development issues. A primary source of lead as a hazard for children is found in deteriorating lead-based paint. The Tennessee Lead Elimination Action Program (TN LEAP) is a grant-funded initiative designed to identify and control lead poisoning hazards in Tennessee homes. TN LEAP conducted a study to evaluate the economic justification for the control of lead hazards through TN LEAP efforts. Using lead remediation cost information, the previously established relationship between child blood lead levels and loss of potential income, a loss-of-lifetime earnings was calculated for affected children. The economic Net Present Value (NPV) was calculated based on the expenses of lead hazard control and savings of lifetime earnings potential. Although blood lead levels for Tennessee children have significantly increased over the past 10 years, the current average for tested children is 2.51 microg/dL. The average remediation expense for houses affected by TN LEAP is $7,598 per unit. The NPV for the loss of lifetime income per housing unit is $17,035. Evaluating the total project yields a result of a positive NPV of $9,437. The study found that using an NPV analysis, there is a positive economic payback for reducing lead hazards in Tennessee homes. The future savings realized from lifetime income earnings will exceed the current remediation expenses. PMID:21818933

  16. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. When the final HHS action does not result in a settlement or finding of... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding...

  17. 22 CFR 134.8 - Official authorized to take final action under the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Official authorized to take final action under... JUSTICE ACT; IMPLEMENTATION General Provisions § 134.8 Official authorized to take final action under the... authorized to take final action on matters pertaining to the Equal Access to Justice Act as applied to...

  18. Regulation of international energy markets: Economic effects of political actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, Anastasia V.

    Recent increases in volatility of energy prices have led many governments to reevaluate their regard of national energy reserves and reconsider future exploration, production, and consumption patterns. The flurry of activity that has been generated by such price volatility has included large-scale nationalizations of energy sectors, unilateral renegotiations of foreign energy development contracts, and expropriations of resources from foreign energy firms on one hand, and on the other hand more rapid energy sector liberalization, intensified search for and development of renewable fuels and technologies, and development of incentives for increased energy efficiency and conservation. The aim of this dissertation is to examine and quantify the extent of positive and negative effects that have resulted from some of these activities. The first chapter focuses on quantifying the effect that nationalistic sentiment has had on economic attractiveness of energy sectors during the decade prior to the recent global economic crisis, as measured by foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Empirical results demonstrate that both political and economic conditions play an important role in investors' decisions. A combination of investment friendliness, corruption levels, and democracy all help to explain the trends in energy-sector investment levels over time in my sample countries, although differences in the types of corruption existing in these nations do not. Investment levels, in turn, appear to influence future levels of oil production, underscoring the significance of good investment policies for future success of energy sectors. Chapter two considers the response of energy stock prices to severe regulatory actions. It employs an event study framework to examine causal effects of critical informational announcements (i.e. events of expropriation and nationalization) on daily returns and cumulative losses in firm value of energy corporations. Results show that a firm

  19. 77 FR 59035 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Rehabilitation and Restoration in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Rehabilitation and... Longfellow Bridge Rehabilitation and Restoration Project in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts. The action... final agency action subject to 23 U.S.C. Sec. 139(l)(1) by issuing approval for the following...

  20. 75 FR 37878 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Review of Actions by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 326... other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a... final agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the...

  1. 39 CFR 960.8 - Official authorized to take final action under the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Official authorized to take final action under the... Official authorized to take final action under the Act. The Postal Service official who renders the final... appeal before the Board of Contract Appeals under part 955 procedures, as the case may be, is...

  2. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

  3. Legal and Economic Implications of Truancy. Truancy Prevention in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smink, Jay; Heilbrunn, Joanna Zorn

    2006-01-01

    The myriad legal and economic issues that surround truancy are intertwined and interdependent. The first section describes school attendance laws, how they are applied, and the most commonly used methods of curbing truancy. Sections two and three discuss legal issues and economic issues, respectively. They address issues facing schools, truant…

  4. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document contains the planned actions to correct the deficiences identified in the Tiger Team Assessments of Sandia California (August 1990) and Sandia New Mexico (May 1991). Information is also included on the management structures, estimated costs, root causes, prioritization and schedules for the Action Plan. This Plan is an integration of the two individual Action Plans to provide a cost effective, integrated program for implementation by Sandia and monitoring by DOE. This volume (I) contains the findings and actions concerning the environment. Tables 4.2 and 4.7 summarize the annual costs estimated for completing the actions. The total costs for completion of all the actions are estimated to be $283 million over a 12 year period; the majority of the actions to be completed and costs incurred in the first five years. Resources are provided from DOE-ER/WM, the DOE/DP landlord funds (one time, physical fixes), and from the Sandia Indirect Budget.

  5. Final Consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document contains the planned actions to correct the deficiences identified in the Tiger Team Assessments of Sandia California (August 1990) and Sandia New Mexico (May 1991). Information is also included on the management structures, estimated costs, root causes, prioritization and schedules for the Action Plan. This Plan is an integration of the two individual Action Plans to provide a cost effective, integrated program for implemenation by Sandia and monitoring by DOE. This volume (2) contains information and corrective action plans pertaining to safety and health and management practices.

  6. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of different issues identified by the Tiger Teams at the several locations of the Sandia National Laboratory. In this volume there are findings/concerns and the resultant responses and planned actions for these issues. Also included are the schedules and costs for the planned actions.

  7. Economics in Action: 14 Greatest Hits for Teaching High School Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopus, Jane S., Ed.; Willis, Amy M., Ed.

    Economics can be the most relevant and stimulating class students take in high school. One way to make this happen is to actively involve students in lessons that demonstrate important economic concepts and economic reasoning. This book contains a compilation of 14 popular lessons (all-time favorites from earlier publications by the National…

  8. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  9. 78 FR 6845 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Interchange Project in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... notice announces actions taken by the FHWA and the USACE that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C... given that the USACE has taken final agency actions within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. Sec. 139(l)(1)...

  10. Microstructures of economic action: talk, interaction and the bottom line.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Nick

    2015-09-01

    This paper contributes to an expanding body of research that has analysed the interactional foundations of economic activity, and price determination, by quantifying the financial implications of different micro-interactional practices. Drawing on video recordings of naturalistic interaction the paper analyses a simple consumer choice, whether to pay one of two prices, the lower 'standard' price (£ 8.00) or the higher 'gift aid' (£ 8.80) price, to enter an arts institution. Utilizing resources from conversation analysis, the paper analyses different ways of posing this choice. It describes how, as interactional constraints tighten, standard prices become less socially desirable and customers increasingly 'volunteer' to pay the higher price. The paper contributes to sociological understandings of economic activity, demonstrating how simple one-off choices, and prices, are accountably responsive to micro-interactional structures. PMID:26364575

  11. 77 FR 26601 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Connecticut

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the North Hillside Road Extension in Mansfield, Connecticut. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  12. 76 FR 81011 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Light Rail Project in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Administration on December 16, 2011 (76 FR 78332). This notice applies to all Federal agency decisions, actions... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Light Rail Project in... meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the East Link Light Rail Transit Project in...

  13. 76 FR 31677 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial... agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before November...

  14. 77 FR 66910 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial... of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on...

  15. 77 FR 37953 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge in Massachusetts'' in the Federal Register at 77 FR 1782. The proposed... Federal Highway Administration Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge Replacement in... action relates to the proposed Fore River Bridge (State Route 3A over the Weymouth Fore...

  16. 76 FR 9632 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California... Review of Actions by California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327... Bernardino County, State of California. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  17. 77 FR 61825 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, Willow Road (FAP 305) between Illinois Route 43 (Waukegan Road) and Interstate 94 (Edens Expressway) in Cook County, Illinois. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  18. 75 FR 29601 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on a Proposed Highway Project in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ...(1)(1). This action relates to an approval of a proposed highway project corridor. DATES: By this notice, the FHWA is advising the public of final agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(1)(1). A claim... agency actions by issuing approvals for the Placer Parkway Corridor Preservation Project--Tier 1 in...

  19. 25 CFR 83.11 - Independent review, reconsideration and final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... review, reconsideration and final action. (a)(1) Upon publication of the Assistant Secretary's... received by the Board no later than 90 days after the date of publication of the Assistant Secretary's... Secretary's decision shall be final for the Department 90 days after publication of the final...

  20. 25 CFR 83.11 - Independent review, reconsideration and final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... review, reconsideration and final action. (a)(1) Upon publication of the Assistant Secretary's... received by the Board no later than 90 days after the date of publication of the Assistant Secretary's... Secretary's decision shall be final for the Department 90 days after publication of the final...

  1. Assessment of secondary residues. Engineering and economic analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Leuschner, A.P.; West, C.E.; Ashare, E.

    1981-08-01

    Secondary agricultural residues are defined as those residues resulting from biomass processing to produce primary products; e.g., whey from cheese processing, vegetable processing wastes, and residues from pulp and paper processing. The analyses consist of specific case studies investigating the costs of converting liquid and/or solid residue streams to methane and/or ethanol. Several economically feasible examples were found: methane production from potato processing liquid residues, ethanol from potato processing solid residues, methane from cheese processing wastes, and methane from poultry processing liquid wastes. In facilities which operate year round, energy recovery is often feasible, whereas in seasonal operations, economic feasibility is not possible. Economic feasibility of energy production from secondary residues is strongly dependent on the current use of the solid and liquid residue. If the solid residue is sold as an animal feed, energy production is usually not economical. High solid and liquid residue disposal costs often make energy conversion economically feasible.

  2. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  3. Economic assessment of nine geothermal direct use applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.C.; Breton, T.R.

    1983-12-01

    This report provides an economic analysis of nine federally-supported geothermal direct heat applications which were part of DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program. Three of the projects analyzed were user-owned systems, and six were district heating systems. Five of the nine projects are successful from an economic standpoint and the majority of these projects are in areas where geothermal energy has long been used for heating. The results of this analysis indicate that geothermal energy projects can be economic under certain conditions, but these conditions may not be very widespread.

  4. 78 FR 11267 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... laws under which such actions were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) for..., and in other documents in the FHWA project records. The FEA, FONSI, and other project records...

  5. 46 CFR 504.10 - Time constraints on final administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.10 Time constraints on final administrative actions. No decision on a... reduced pursuant to 40 CFR 1506.10(d), or unless required by a statutorily-prescribed deadline on...

  6. 46 CFR 504.10 - Time constraints on final administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.10 Time constraints on final administrative actions. No decision on a... reduced pursuant to 40 CFR 1506.10(d), or unless required by a statutorily-prescribed deadline on...

  7. 46 CFR 504.10 - Time constraints on final administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.10 Time constraints on final administrative actions. No decision on a... reduced pursuant to 40 CFR 1506.10(d), or unless required by a statutorily-prescribed deadline on...

  8. 78 FR 59085 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... responsibilities under 23 U.S.C. 327, as well as actions by other Federal agencies, are final within the meaning of..., as well as by other Federal agencies. A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency...

  9. 17 CFR 240.19d-1 - Notices by self-regulatory organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association... actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association, participation, or access to... relevant. (e) Notice of final denial, bar, prohibition, termination or limitation based on qualification...

  10. 17 CFR 240.19d-1 - Notices by self-regulatory organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association... actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association, participation, or access to... relevant. (e) Notice of final denial, bar, prohibition, termination or limitation based on qualification...

  11. 17 CFR 240.19d-1 - Notices by self-regulatory organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association... actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association, participation, or access to... relevant. (e) Notice of final denial, bar, prohibition, termination or limitation based on qualification...

  12. 17 CFR 240.19d-1 - Notices by self-regulatory organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association... actions, denials, bars, or limitations respecting membership, association, participation, or access to... relevant. (e) Notice of final denial, bar, prohibition, termination or limitation based on qualification...

  13. 78 FR 70093 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ...This notice announces action taken by the FHWA and other Federal Agencies that is final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). This final agency action relates to a proposed highway project, Bonner Bridge Replacement Project along NC 12, from Rodanthe to Bodie Island in Dare County, North Carolina. The FHWA's Record of Decision (ROD) identifies the Bridge within the Existing NC 12 Easement......

  14. 75 FR 18253 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...The FHWA, on behalf of Caltrans, is issuing this notice to announce actions taken by Caltrans that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, State Route 28 between State Route 267 and Chipmunk Street in the community of Kings Beach, in the County of Placer, State of California. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for......

  15. 75 FR 65052 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ...The FHWA, on behalf of Caltrans, is issuing this notice to announce actions taken by Caltrans and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway interchange project, improvements along State Route 163 (SR-163) at the Friars Road Interchange in the County of San Diego, State of California. Those actions grant licenses,......

  16. 77 FR 48203 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139 (I)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, I-77 High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) lanes, from I-277 (Brookshire Freeway) to West Catawba Avenue (Exit 28), Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  17. 75 FR 43611 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ...This notice announces actions taken by FHWA that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, the SR 502 Corridor Widening Project, in the State of Washington. Those actions grant approval for the project. The project will widen the existing two-lane roadway to four travel lanes with a median for a 5-mile segment of SR 502 between NE......

  18. 78 FR 28282 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...The FHWA, on behalf of Caltrans, is issuing this notice to announce actions taken by Caltrans, USACE and USFWS that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed State Route 41 Madera Passing Lanes project 0.3 miles north of Road 208 to 2.2 miles north of Road 208 in Madera County, in the State of California. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and......

  19. 75 FR 75721 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Wisconsin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ...This notice announces actions taken by FHWA that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(1)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, the WIS 23 Corridor Expansion Project, in the State of Wisconsin. Those actions grant approval for the project. The project will widen the existing two-lane roadway to four travel lanes with a median for an 18.6-mile segment of WIS 23 between......

  20. 17 CFR 1.67 - Notification of final disciplinary action involving financial harm to a customer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... disciplinary action involving financial harm to a customer. 1.67 Section 1.67 Commodity and Securities... Miscellaneous § 1.67 Notification of final disciplinary action involving financial harm to a customer. (a... transaction for a customer, whether executed or not, and that resulted in financial harm to the customer:...

  1. 76 FR 2949 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Project in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Construction Project in the State of Washington. Those actions grant approval for the project. DATES: By this... Construction Project. The project includes constructing pontoons sufficient to replace the existing traffic... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Project in...

  2. 77 FR 1782 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in... within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 39(l)(1). The action relates to the proposed Fore River Bridge (State... bridge project in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The project proposes to replace the...

  3. 77 FR 6622 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in... within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The action relates to the proposed Whittier Bridge (Interstate... subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1) by issuing approval for the following bridge/highway improvement project...

  4. 78 FR 40265 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in... Bridge (Bridge Street over the Mitchell River) Replacement Project in Chatham-Barnstable County... Federal agency actions on the bridge project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or...

  5. 76 FR 61476 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ...: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review of... advising the public of final agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review... before April 1, 2012. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a claim provides a...

  6. An Economic Evaluation of Asthma Action Plans for Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Polisena, Julie; Tam, Susanna; Lodha, Abhay; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C.; Ungar, Wendy J.

    2016-01-01

    The costs and effectiveness of asthma action plans for children were evaluated in a cross-sectional economic analysis. Direct health care and indirect costs, nights with symptoms, and asthma attacks were measured in 879 Ontario children with asthma. From a societal perspective, the total annual costs of the asthma action plan and the control groups were CDN$6, 948 and CDN$6, 140 per patient, respectively. Health outcomes were similar. The difference in cost was attributable to greater medication and health services use in the intervention group. Prospective randomized trials are necessary to measure potential improvements in control of asthma using asthma action plans. PMID:17885851

  7. Final Removal Action Report of the CPP-603A Basin Facility

    SciTech Connect

    D. V. Croson

    2007-01-04

    This Final Removal Action Report describes the actions that were taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Bason Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Removal Action implemented consolidation and recording the location of debris objects containing radioactive cobalt (cobalt-60), removal and management of a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1), the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) evaporation ponds, and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material.

  8. Final 2014 Remedial Action Report Project Chariot, Cape Thompson, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    This report was prepared to document remedial action (RA) work performed at the former Project Chariot site located near Cape Thompson, Alaska during 2014. The work was managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). Due to the short field season and the tight barge schedule, all field work was conducted at the site July 6 through September 12, 2014. Excavation activities occurred between July 16 and August 26, 2014. A temporary field camp was constructed at the site prior to excavation activities to accommodate the workers at the remote, uninhabited location. A total of 785.6 tons of petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL)-contaminated soil was excavated from four former drill sites associated with test holes installed circa 1960. Diesel was used in the drilling process during test hole installations and resulted in impacts to surface and subsurface soils at four of the five sites (no contamination was identified at Test Hole Able). Historic information is not definitive as to the usage for Test Hole X-1; it may have actually been a dump site and not a drill site. In addition to the contaminated soil, the steel test hole casings were decommissioned and associated debris was removed as part of the remedial effort.

  9. Community Action and Urban Institutional Change. A National Evaluation of the Community Action Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barass, Reitzel, and Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    Focusing on the Community Action Program, an assessment was made of how much change has occurred in institutions which deal with the poor; what role CAP has played in realizing these changes, which CAP aspects or activities were related to institutional change; and community characteristics which might explain the changes or the role of CAP.…

  10. An Evaluation of the McDowell County Community Action Agency Home Economics Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jeanne

    The document reports on the activities of the home economics component of the community action program of McDowell County as falling within socialization and training emphasis and consisting of services to promote an eventual attainment of independence. The stated basis is assistance in the integration of the members of the target population into…

  11. 75 FR 72862 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... announces actions taken by the FHWA and the USACE that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1...) and are final within the meaning of that law. A claim seeking judicial review of those Federal agency... Indiana'' in the Federal Register at (75 FR 49547) for the Section 3, 25.73 mile I-69 project in...

  12. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  13. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  14. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  15. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  16. Economic impact study of consumer product efficiencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-30

    The economic impact study of household appliance efficiencies is briefly reported. Task I, Direct Impact on Industry, contains 4 subtasks: materials, labor inputs, energy inputs, and investment. Task II, Direct Impact on Consumers, contains 3 subtasks: life-cycle cost to the consumer, usage patterns, and long-term demand forecast and analysis. The 2 subtasks in Task III, Energy Savings and Impact on Utilities, are residential energy savings and cost and impact on utility generating capacity.

  17. Economic evaluation of FGD systems. Volume 3. Appendixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keeth, R.J.; Miranda, J.E.; Reisdorf, J.B.; Scheck, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    This volume presents the appendices for the study which estimated costs for throw-away and regenerable FGD systems and a coal cleaning process based on December 1982 cost and technology. The appendices enclosed include the detailed lists and costs of equipment utilized in each of the 17 FGD processes evaluated as well as EPRI's Economic Premises used in costing the total levelized busbar costs.

  18. Effects of Problem Based Economics on High School Economics Instruction. Final Report. NCEE 2010-4002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Neal; Hanson, Thomas; Huang, Chun-Wei; Hirschman, Becca; Huang, Min

    2010-01-01

    Since 1995, the Buck Institute has partnered with university economists and expert teachers to create the Problem Based Economics curriculum. The curriculum was developed to respond to NCEE (National Council on Economic Education) standards, and it is supported by professional development for teachers. This study examines whether the Problem Based…

  19. Remedial action selection report Maybell, Colorado, site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The site is 2.5 mi (4 km) northeast of the Yampa River on relatively flat terrain broken by low, flat-topped mesas. U.S. Highway 40 runs east-west 2 mi (3.2 km) south of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. The site is situated between Johnson Wash to the east and Rob Pit Mine to the west. Numerous reclaimed and unreclaimed mines are in the immediate vicinity. Aerial photographs (included at the end of this executive summary) show evidence of mining activity around the Maybell site. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [ml]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd 3 (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3}(420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}).

  20. Economic analysis of wind-powered crop drying. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in crop drying. Drying of corn, soybeans, rice, peanuts, tobacco, and dehydrated alfalfa were addressed.

  1. Financial and economic determinants of collective action: The case of wastewater management

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Norbert; Starkl, Markus

    2012-01-15

    Where public environmental funds support development of wastewater infrastructure, funding institutions ensure the economic use of funds, while the beneficiaries minimize their own costs. In rural areas, there is often a choice between decentralized or centralized (multi-village) systems: if the centralized system is most economic, then only this system is eligible for public funding. However, its implementation requires a voluntary cooperation of the concerned communities, who need to organize themselves to develop and run the infrastructure. The paper analyzes the social determinants of collaboration in a generic case study, using the following variables: method of (economic) assessment, modeled by the social discount rate, funding policy, modeled by the funding rate, and users' self-organization, modeled by cost sharing. In a borderline situation, where the centralized system turns out to be most economic, but this assessment is contingent on the assessment method, collective action may fail: the advantages of collective action from funding are too small to outweigh organizational deficiencies. Considering in this situation sanitation as a human right, authors recommend using innovative forms of organization and, if these fail, reassessing either the amount of funding or the eligibility for funding of more acceptable alternatives. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A generic case study models collective action and funding in wastewater management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determinants of success: economic assessment, funding policy and self-organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success indicators: conflict rate, funds needed to make cost shares fair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for analyzing centralized vs. decentralized disputes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer If collective action has less benefits, innovative cost sharing may ensure success.

  2. 75 FR 27384 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA, USACE, and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project to widen State Route 99 from the existing four-lane facility to six lanes from the Austin Road interchange in the City of Manteca (post mile 4.9) to the Arch Road interchange in the City of Stockton (post......

  3. Economical Production of Pu-238: NIAC Phase I Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Crawford, Douglas; Navarro, Jorge; O'Brien, Robert C.; Katalenich, Jeff; Ring, Terry

    2016-01-01

    All space exploration missions traveling beyond Jupiter must use radioisotopic power sources for electrical power. The best isotope to power these sources is plutonium-238 (Pu-238). The US supply of Pu-238 is almost exhausted and will be gone within the next decade. The Department of Energy has initiated a production program with a $10M allocation from NASA but the cost is estimated at over $100M to get to production levels. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) has conceived of a potentially better process to produce Pu-238 earlier and for significantly less cost. Potentially, the front end capital costs could be provided by private industry such that the government only had to pay for the product produced. In the Phase I NIAC (NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts) grant, the CSNR has evaluated the feasibility of using a low power, commercially available nuclear reactor to produce 1.5 kg of Pu-238 per year. The impact on the neutronics of the reactor have been assessed, the amount of Neptunium target material estimated, and the production rates calculated. In addition, the size of the post-irradiation processing facility has been established. Finally, as the study progressed, a new method for fabricating the Pu-238 product into the form used for power sources has been identified to reduce the cost of the final product. In short, the concept appears to be viable, can produce the amount of Pu-238 needed to support the NASA missions, can be available within a few years, and will cost significantly less than the current DOE program.

  4. Economic development through biomass systems integration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report (RP3407-20) presents the results of an upstate New York study to evaluate the use of short-rotation willow as an energy crop feedstock along with available wood wastes in an integrated biomass system. Such a system is economically viable because (1) the high-productivity tree species, with available wood waste, provides a fuel that is cost-competitive with delivered coal, and (2) costs for retrofitting four pulverized-coal plants to co-fire at 10 percent by heat content are acceptable. Research indicates that this shift in the fuel mix would decrease NO{sub x} emissions more than 16 percent and SO{sub x} nearly 9 percent. The annual CO{sub 2} offsets would be more than 6,000 tons for each MW of coal displaced. With all costs accounted for, net levelized energy costs would remain at 2.3 cents/kWh. Due to the loss of agricultural markets and improved agricultural productivity, New York state cropland has decreased by more than 14 percent since 1987. The members of the Empire State Biopower Consortium will encourage the establishment of about 10 farmer cooperatives to manage the planting of 30,000 idle acres in this new tree crop. This could result in a direct contribution to annual rural incomes of perhaps as much as $9 million by 2006.

  5. New York State technical and economic MAGLEV evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The study is the preliminary evaluation of magnetically levitated ground transportation systems (MAGLEV). The evaluation focuses on using the New York State Thruway right-of-way in combination with MAGLEV systems currently in development in Germany and Japan and those proposed for development in the United States. The Energy Authority's goal in cosponsoring the study was to determine if MAGLEV offered the potential to meet future New York State transportation demands cost-effectively, and to evaluate the benefits that the State might expect from supporting MAGLEV technology development and system implementation. According to the preliminary report, substantial economic benefits could accrue to the State through MAGLEV-related research, development, manufacturing and construction. Implementation would have a favorable impact on issues related to transportation, the environment and energy conservation. With the exception of the German Transrapid system, developing a domestic prototype MAGLEV vehicle would take seven to nine years; no insurmountable technical barriers are apparent. EMF shielding (electromagnetic fields) is, however, a concern. It will cost an estimated $1 billion to develop a new MAGLEV system design; however, innovative designs may reduce the price.

  6. Bench-scale co-processing economic assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, H.B.; Marker, T.L.; Miller, E.N.

    1994-11-01

    The UOP Co-Processing scheme is a single-stage slurry catalyzed process in which petroleum vacuum resid and coal are simultaneously upgraded to a high-quality synthetic oil. A highly active dispersed catalyst has been developed which enables the operation of the co-processing unit at relatively moderate and high temperatures and relatively high pressure. Under the current contract, a multi-year research program was undertaken to study the technical and economic feasibility of this technology. All the contractual tasks were completed. Autoclave experiments were carried out to evaluate dispersed vanadium catalysts, molybdenum catalysts, and a less costly UOP-proprietary catalyst preparation technique. Autoclave experiments were also carried out in support of the continuous pilot plant unit operation and to study the effects of the process variables (pressure, temperature, and metal loading on the catalyst). A total of 24 continuous pilot plant runs were made. Research and development efforts during the pilot plant operations were concentrated on addressing the cost effectiveness of the UOP single-stage slurry catalyzed co-processing concept based on UOP experience gained in the previous DOE contract. To this end, effect of catalyst metal concentration was studied and a highly-active Mo-based catalyst was developed. This catalyst enabled successful long-term operation (924 hours) of the continuous bench-scale plant at highly severe operating conditions of 3,000 psig, 465{degree}C temperature, and 2:1 resid-to-MAF (moisture- and ash-free) coal ratio with 0.1 wt % active metal. The metal loading of the catalyst was low enough to consider the catalyst as a disposable slurry catalyst. Also, liquid recycle was incorporated in the pilot plant design to increase the, reactor back mixing and to increase the flow of liquid through the reactor (to introduce turbulence in the reactor) and to represent the design of a commercial-scale reactor.

  7. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1, Change 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Two separate Tiger Team assessments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The first was conducted at the California site in Livermore between April 30, 1990, and May 18, 1990. A second Tiger team assessment was conducted at the New Mexico site in Albuquerque between April 15 and May 24, 1991. One purpose of this Action Plan is to provide a formal written response to each of the findings and/or concerns cited in the SNL Tiger Team assessment reports. A second purpose is to present actions planned to be conducted to eliminate deficiencies identified by the Tiger Teams. A third purpose is to consolidate (group) related findings and to identify priorities assigned to the planned actions for improved efficiency and enhanced management of the tasks. A fourth and final purpose is to merge the two original SNL Action Plans for the New Mexico and California sites into a single Action Plan as a major step toward managing all SNL ES&H activities more similarly. Included in this combined SNL Action Plan are descriptions of the actions to be taken by SNL to liminate all problems identified in the Tiger Teams` findings/concerns, as well as estimated costs and schedules for planned actions.

  8. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 2, Change 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Two separate Tiger Team assessments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The first was conducted at the California site in Livermore between April 30, 1990, and May 18, 1990. A second Tiger Team assessment was conducted at the New Mexico site in Albuquerque between April 15 and May 24, 1991. This report is volume two, change one. One purpose of this Action Plan is to provide a formal written response to each of the findings and/or concerns cited in the SNL Tiger Team assessment reports. A second purpose is to present actions planned to be conducted to eliminate deficiencies identified by the Tiger Teams. A third purpose is to consolidate (group) related findings and to identify priorities assigned to the planned actions for improved efficiency and enhanced management of the tasks. A fourth and final purpose is to merge the two original SNL Action Plans for the New Mexico [Ref. a] and California [Ref. b] sites into a single Action Plan as a major step toward managing all SNL ES&H activities more similarly. Included in this combined SNL Action Plan are descriptions of the actions to be taken by SNL to liminate all problems identified in the Tiger Teams` findings/concerns, as well as estimated costs and schedules for planned actions.

  9. 18 CFR 401.90 - Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals. 401.90 Section 401.90 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and...

  10. 42 CFR 1004.70 - QIO action on final finding of a violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false QIO action on final finding of a violation. 1004.70 Section 1004.70 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES IMPOSITION OF SANCTIONS ON HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS AND PROVIDERS OF HEALTH...

  11. Teens in Action: In Pursuit of Peace Curriculum. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Stephen; Price-Johnson, Connie

    The purpose of this final report is to provide a description and evaluation to the Camp Fire Greater Arizona Council of the results of Teens in Action: In Pursuit of Peace Curriculum delinquency prevention program. A total of 94 youths in grades 6 through 12 participated in the program in the spring of 2002 at four sites in Chandler. The Student…

  12. 29 CFR 1614.504 - Compliance with settlement agreements and final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance with settlement agreements and final action. 1614.504 Section 1614.504 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION FEDERAL SECTOR EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Remedies and Enforcement § 1614.504 Compliance...

  13. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT... concurrence of the DOE if the manager is not an employee of the DOE; (3) Shall, in the event of a...

  14. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES...

  15. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement...

  16. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement...

  17. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement...

  18. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or...

  19. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES...

  20. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or...

  1. 76 FR 41554 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ...: 619-688-0224, e-mail: david.nagy@dot.ca.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Effective July 1, 2007, the..., Federal Highway Administration, Sacramento, California. BILLING CODE 4910-RY-P ... Caltrans, that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a...

  2. Final Actions in Arkansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, Virginia and West Virginia. Legislative Report No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  3. Final Actions in Florida, Georgia, Oklahoma and Texas. Legislative Report No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  4. 10 CFR 202.24 - Final action by the appropriate DOE official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 202.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production or Disclosure in Response to Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 202.24 Final action by the appropriate DOE official. If the General Counsel approves a demand for the production...

  5. 10 CFR 202.24 - Final action by the appropriate DOE official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Section 202.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production or Disclosure in Response to Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 202.24 Final action by the appropriate DOE official. If the General Counsel approves a demand for the production...

  6. 10 CFR 202.24 - Final action by the appropriate DOE official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Section 202.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production or Disclosure in Response to Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 202.24 Final action by the appropriate DOE official. If the General Counsel approves a demand for the production...

  7. 10 CFR 202.24 - Final action by the appropriate DOE official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 202.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production or Disclosure in Response to Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 202.24 Final action by the appropriate DOE official. If the General Counsel approves a demand for the production...

  8. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or...

  9. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or...

  10. Essential Communication and Documentation Skills. Module: Final Assessment and Action Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Muriel; And Others

    This module is the 10th of 10 in the Essential Communication and Documentation Skills curriculum. It develops final assessment and action planning, workplace literacy skills identified as being directly related to the job of the direct care worker. The curriculum is designed to improve the competence of New York State Division for Youth direct…

  11. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies. 8.34 Section 8.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures...

  12. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies. 8.34 Section 8.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures...

  13. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies. 8.34 Section 8.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures...

  14. 77 FR 55896 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Loop 1 in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Act (FPPA) [7 U.S.C. 4201- 4209]. 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act (Section 404, Section 401, Section 319) ; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) ; Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) [42 U... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Loop 1 in Texas AGENCY:...

  15. 76 FR 44649 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... 1899 ; and Land and Water Conservation Fund . 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990 Protection of Wetlands; E... ; Farmland Protection Policy Act [7 U.S.C. 4201-4209]. 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act [33 U... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Texas...

  16. 78 FR 58381 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 288 in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... U.S.C. 4201-4209]. 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251- 1387; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), 16 U.S.C. 4601-4604. 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990 Protection of... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 288 in Texas...

  17. 77 FR 32172 - Environmental Assessment: Notice of Final Federal Actions on Improvements to U.S. 60 in Union and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(1)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project... advising the public of final actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(1)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the... INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given that the FHWA has taken final agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C....

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  19. Remedial-Action Costing procedures manual. Final report, January 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Burgher, B.; Culpepper, M.; Zieger, W.

    1987-10-01

    This manual provides specific procedures for the cost estimating and economic analysis steps required for preparing engineering cost estimates for selecting remedial-action alternatives in response to the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The manual is designed to be used in conjunction with EPA's manual entitled Guidance on Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (1985). The audience for the manual includes EPA Regional Project Officers, remedial investigation/feasibility study contractors, and state and local remedial action personnel and other Federal agencies. Detailed procedures are provided for generating estimated capital and annual operating costs, calculating annual costs and present worth for each remedial-action alternative, and performing sensitivity analyses of the cost estimates to determine the impact of changes to various cost input parameters. Worksheets are provided to assist the user in developing the feasibility cost analyses. An example cost analysis is provided to illustrate these procedures.

  20. A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.

    2008-07-01

    The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

  1. Final Action Plan to Tiger Team. Environmental, safety and health assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-28

    This document presents planned actions, and their associated costs, for addressing the findings in the Environmental, Safety and Health Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, May 1991, hereafter called the Assessment. This Final Action Plan should be read in conjunction with the Assessment to ensure full understanding of the findings addressed herein. The Assessment presented 353 findings in four general categories: (1)Environmental (82 findings); (2) Safety and Health (243 findings); (3) Management and Organization (18 findings); and (4) Self-Assessment (10 findings). Additionally, 436 noncompliance items with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards were addressed during and immediately after the Tiger Team visit.

  2. Sequential selection of economic good and action in medial frontal cortex of macaques during value-based decisions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaomo; Stuphorn, Veit

    2015-01-01

    Value-based decisions could rely either on the selection of desired economic goods or on the selection of the actions that will obtain the goods. We investigated this question by recording from the supplementary eye field (SEF) of monkeys during a gambling task that allowed us to distinguish chosen good from chosen action signals. Analysis of the individual neuron activity, as well as of the population state-space dynamic, showed that SEF encodes first the chosen gamble option (the desired economic good) and only ~100 ms later the saccade that will obtain it (the chosen action). The action selection is likely driven by inhibitory interactions between different SEF neurons. Our results suggest that during value-based decisions, the selection of economic goods precedes and guides the selection of actions. The two selection steps serve different functions and can therefore not compensate for each other, even when information guiding both processes is given simultaneously. PMID:26613409

  3. Final Actions in Arkansas; Governors' Proposals in Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Virginia. Legislative Report No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. This report presents final legislative and budget actions in…

  4. Economic analysis of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This economic analysis (EA) examines compliance costs and economic impacts resulting from the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Final Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Industry Point Source Category. It also investigates the costs and impacts associated with an air rule requiring Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) to control air emissions, both separately and together with the Final Pharmaceutical Industry Effluent Guidelines. The EA estimates the economic effects of compliance with both final rules in terms of total aggregate annualized costs of compliance, facility closures, impacts on firms (likelihood of bankruptcy and effects on profit margins), and impacts on new sources. The EA also investigates secondary impacts on employment and communities, foreign trade, specific demographic groups, and environmental justice. This report includes a Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (FRFA) detailing the impacts on small businesses within the pharmaceutical industry to meet the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), as amended by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA). Finally, the EA presents a cost-benefit analysis to meet the requirements of Executive Order 12866 and the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.

  5. International energy cooperation: The mismatch between IEA policy actions and policy goals: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    This analysis discusses the link, if any, between IEA policy actions and stated goals of the Program. Understanding the reasons for success or failure of IEA actions identifies which policies achieve real gains from international energy cooperation, and which are counterproductive. Section I is an overview of the structural framework of the IEA. Section II describes the institutional and organizational background, including the policy mechanisms, of the IEA. Section III looks at specific policy actions undertaken by the agency, particularly during the Iranian revolution and at the outbreak of the Iran-Iraq War. The economic consequences of oil sharing are examined in section IV, which simulates a world oil supply disruption affecting IEA member countries differentially. Section V analyzes import controls, focusing on coordination problems and possible OPEC pricing responses, and examines the actual record of general petroleum consumption restraints in 1980. Oil stockpiling is analyzed both as a general economic phenomenon and an object of IEA coordination in section VI, which also offers an econometric analysis of actual experience in the 1970s and 1980s. Section VII considers a number of less formal assessments of IEA policies, including self-evaluations by the IEA itself.

  6. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  7. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  8. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE.

  9. Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2006-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees numerous sites on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other locations in the State of Nevada that have been impacted by activities related to the development and testing of nuclear devices and by other activities. NNSA/NSO is responsible for protecting members of the public, including site workers, from harmful exposure to both chemical and radiological contaminants at these sites as they remediate these sites. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) is the primary state agency responsible for protection of human health and the environment with respect to chemical and radiological wastes. In 1996 the DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada entered into an agreement known as the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Appendix VI to the FFACO describes the strategy employed to plan, implement, and complete environmental corrective action activities at NTS and other locations in the state of Nevada. One of the categories of corrective action units (CAUs) is Industrial Sites, which consists of approximately 1,150 locations that may require some level of investigation and corrective action. To evaluate the need for the extent of corrective action at a particular site, NNSA/NSO assesses the potential impacts to receptors by comparing measurements of contaminant concentrations to risk-based (chemical) and dose-based (radionuclide) standards (action levels). Preliminary action levels (PALs) are established as part of the data quality objective (DQO) process, and are presented in one or more FFACO documents generated as part of the corrective action process. This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process NNSA/NSO Industrial Sites Project uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process establishes final action levels (FALs) based on the risk

  10. Inhaled Oxygen for Cluster Headache: Efficacy, Mechanism of Action, Utilization, and Economics.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    Inhaled normobaric oxygen is an essential abortive treatment of cluster headache. Recognition of its efficacy for cluster headache goes back a half a century, but very little has actually been written on the use of inhaled oxygen for cluster headache. This article examines various issues regarding inhaled oxygen and cluster headache, including efficacy, proposed mechanism of action, utilization, and the economics of oxygen usage for cluster headache patients. Much of the data analyzed comes from the recently published United States Cluster Headache Survey. This is the largest study of cluster headache patients ever published and is the first study to focus on inhaled oxygen and cluster headache in a large, non-clinic-based population. PMID:22286556

  11. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Falls City, Texas, site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This final audit report for the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site summarizes the radiological audits and the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, audits, and final close-out inspection performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). It also summarizes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) surveillances. One radiological audit and three radiological surveillances were performed at the Falls City site. These surveillances and audit, which resulted in 31 observations, focused primarily on processing site activities and were performed on the following dates: 3-6 August 1992, 29-30 October 1992, 22-26 March 1993, and 1-3 November 1993. All outstanding radiological issues were closed out at the completion of the construction activities. Six QA in-process surveillances, which resulted in 71 observations, were performed at the Falls City site on the following dates: 22-24 July 1992, 23-25 November 1992, 17-19 May 1993, 16-18 August 1993, 13-15 October 1993, and 2-4 February 1994. All outstanding issues were closed out with the February surveillance on 3 March 1994. The DOE/TAC remedial action close-out inspections of the Falls City site, which resulted in 56 observations, were conducted 9-10 June 1994 and 26 July 1994. The inspections were closed out on 26 January 1995. The NRC performed three on-site construction reviews (OSCR), resulting in seven observations of remedial action construction activities that occurred during site visits. The OSCRs were performed 9 December 1992, 12 May 1993, and 25 October 1993. Since all audit and surveillance observations and recommendations have been closed out, this final audit report segment of the site certification process is complete.

  12. Domestic waste recycling, collective action and economic incentive: the case in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yau, Yung

    2010-12-01

    Efficacy of waste recycling is one of the key determinants of environmental sustainability of a city. Like other pro-environmental activities, waste recycling cannot be successfully accomplished by just one or two people, but only by a concerted effort of the community. The collective-action dilemma creates a common underlying difficulty in formulating workable solutions to many environmental problems. With a view to the non-excludability of the outcome, rationality drives people to free-ride efforts of others in waste recycling. To solve this free-rider problem, some scholars suggest the use of economic incentive. This article attempts to study the impacts of reward schemes on waste recycling behaviour of residents in 122 private housing estates in Hong Kong. The study is differentiable from the others as the latter mainly focus on domestic waste recycling in low-rise low-density housing while this one looks into the same in a high-rise high-density residential setting. According to the results of analyses on a set of aggregate data, reward schemes are found to have a significant positive relationship with the per-household weight of recyclables collected, keeping other things constant. The research findings suggest that economic incentives do work in promoting waste recycling in Hong Kong. Practical and policy implications follow. PMID:20619628

  13. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

  14. 75 FR 36151 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California; Notice of Statute of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... the laws under which such actions were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA..., 2010, and in other documents in the FHWA project records. The FEA, FONSI, and other project records...

  15. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

  16. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project, Grand Junction, Colorado, processing site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This final audit report (FAR) for remedial action at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project processing site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/ audits, the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and the QA final close-out inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). The FAR also summarizes other surveillances performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). To summarize, a total of one finding and 127 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. The NRC noted general site-related observations during the OSCRs. Follow-up to responses required from MK-Ferguson for the DOE/TAC finding and observations indicated that all issues related to the Grand Junction processing site were resolved and closed out to the DOE`s satisfaction. The NRC OSCRs resulted in no issues related to the Grand Junction processing site requiring a response from MK-Ferguson.

  17. 78 FR 58382 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed U.S. 50 Study Crossing Over Sinepauxent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The action relates to the U.S. 50 Crossing over Sinepauxent Bay Study from MD 611 to MD 378 and 5th Street to Somerset Street located in the Town of Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland. This action grants approval for the...

  18. 37 CFR 1.111 - Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action. 1.111 Section 1.111 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Action by...

  19. 76 FR 45649 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on I-5: Fern Valley Interchange Project: Jackson County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on I-5: Fern Valley Interchange... the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, I-5: Fern Valley... Administration, 530 Center Street, NE., Suite 420, Salem, Oregon 97301, Telephone: (503) 316-2559. The I-5:...

  20. 77 FR 65929 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River.... Sec. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project located in Rockland... the following highway project in the State of New York: Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing...

  1. 78 FR 27473 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... (New NY Bridge) Project in New York, in the Federal Register at FR Doc. 2012-26799. Tappan Zee Hudson... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River... within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Tappan Zee Hudson River...

  2. 76 FR 54288 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge and Approach Roadways in Nevada and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge and Approach... proposed Laughlin-Bullhead City Bridge project in Laughlin, Clark County, Nevada; and in Bullhead City... claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the bridge and roadway project will...

  3. 78 FR 42151 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Goethals Bridge Replacement Project in New York and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Goethals Bridge Replacement... meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Goethals Bridge Replacement Project located in... New York and New Jersey: Goethals Bridge Replacement Project. The Goethals Bridge provides a...

  4. The Impact of the Community Action Program on Institutional Change; Assistance to Community Organization as a Successful Strategy. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanecko, James J.; Jacobs, Bruce

    Part of a Community Action Program (CAP) final report evaluating the effects of community action agencies (CAAs) on institutional change, these appendixes analyze various dependent and independent variables, including social services, public schools, employment, neighborhood and community political organizations, CAP pressure and impact,…

  5. 78 FR 26104 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on OR 62: I-5 to Dutton Road (Medford) Project: Jackson...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on OR 62: I-5 to Dutton Road... project, OR 62: I-5 to Dutton Road (Medford) in Jackson County, Oregon. This action grants approval for...: (503) 231-6179. The OR62: I-5 to Dutton Road Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is available...

  6. 37 CFR 1.111 - Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... owner to a non-final Office action. 1.111 Section 1.111 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED... National Processing Provisions Action by Applicant and Further Consideration § 1.111 Reply by applicant or...) Supplemental replies. (i) A reply that is supplemental to a reply that is in compliance with § 1.111(b)...

  7. 37 CFR 1.111 - Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... owner to a non-final Office action. 1.111 Section 1.111 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED... National Processing Provisions Action by Applicant and Further Consideration § 1.111 Reply by applicant or...) Supplemental replies. (i) A reply that is supplemental to a reply that is in compliance with § 1.111(b)...

  8. 76 FR 26336 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed Klingle Valley Trail in Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed Klingle Valley Trail...)(1). The actions relate to the proposed Klingle Valley Trail project in Northwest Washington, DC... Northwest Washington, DC: The Klingle Valley Trail project. The project includes construction of a...

  9. 76 FR 68810 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Farm-to-Market 1626 in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... and Water Resources: Clean Water Act [33 U.S.C. 1251- 1342]; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Farm-to-Market 1626 in Texas... Lane in Hays and Travis Counties, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for...

  10. Effects of Problem Based Economics on High School Economics Instruction. Final Report. NCEE 2010-4022rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Neal; Hanson, Thomas; Huang, Chun-Wei; Hirschman, Becca; Huang, Min

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether the Problem Based Economics curriculum developed by the Buck Institute for Education improves grade 12 students' content knowledge as measured by the Test of Economic Literacy, a test refined by the National Council on Economic Education (NCEE) over decades. Students' problem-solving skills in economics were also…

  11. Economic evidence on identifying clinically actionable findings with whole-genome sequencing: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Michael P; Ladabaum, Uri; Pletcher, Mark J; Marshall, Deborah A; Phillips, Kathryn A

    2016-02-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommends that mutations in 56 genes for 24 conditions are clinically actionable and should be reported as secondary findings after whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Our aim was to identify published economic evaluations of detecting mutations in these genes among the general population or among targeted/high-risk populations and conditions and identify gaps in knowledge. A targeted PubMed search from 1994 through November 2014 was performed, and we included original, English-language articles reporting cost-effectiveness or a cost-to-utility ratio or net benefits/benefit-cost focused on screening (not treatment) for conditions and genes listed by the ACMG. Articles were screened, classified as targeting a high-risk or general population, and abstracted by two reviewers. General population studies were evaluated for actual cost-effectiveness measures (e.g., incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER)), whereas studies of targeted populations were evaluated for whether at least one scenario proposed was cost-effective (e.g., ICER of ≤$100,000 per life-year or quality-adjusted life-year gained). A total of 607 studies were identified, and 32 relevant studies were included. Identified studies addressed fewer than one-third (7 of 24; 29%) of the ACMG conditions. The cost-effectiveness of screening in the general population was examined for only 2 of 24 conditions (8%). The cost-effectiveness of most genetic findings that the ACMG recommends for return has not been evaluated in economic studies or in the context of screening in the general population. The individual studies do not directly address the cost-effectiveness of WGS. PMID:25996638

  12. Focus on SREB States' Responses to the Economic Slowdown: Budget Actions Affecting Education in 2008-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Gale

    2008-01-01

    Unfortunately, Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states are not immune to the economic slowdown sweeping the nation. States are taking action to bring budgets into balance while working to protect essential services and programs. In a 1991 report, "Coping With the Sluggish Economy," SREB noted the accelerated efforts to reshape schools and…

  13. Sequential selection of economic good and action in medial frontal cortex of macaques during value-based decisions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaomo; Stuphorn, Veit

    2015-01-01

    Value-based decisions could rely either on the selection of desired economic goods or on the selection of the actions that will obtain the goods. We investigated this question by recording from the supplementary eye field (SEF) of monkeys during a gambling task that allowed us to distinguish chosen good from chosen action signals. Analysis of the individual neuron activity, as well as of the population state-space dynamic, showed that SEF encodes first the chosen gamble option (the desired economic good) and only ~100 ms later the saccade that will obtain it (the chosen action). The action selection is likely driven by inhibitory interactions between different SEF neurons. Our results suggest that during value-based decisions, the selection of economic goods precedes and guides the selection of actions. The two selection steps serve different functions and can therefore not compensate for each other, even when information guiding both processes is given simultaneously. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09418.001 PMID:26613409

  14. 75 FR 10015 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Interchange of State Loop 1604 and United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, the interchange of Texas State Loop 1604 (LP 1604) with United States Highway 281 (US 281). Project limits on LP 1604 are from Bitters Road to Redland Road and on US 281 are from LP 1604 to Bitters Road in Bexar......

  15. Grand Junction remedial action program. Analysis of currently approved and proposed procedures for establishing eligibility for remedial action. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    This analysis of the Grand Junction Remedial Action Program has been undertaken at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) in response to proposals submitted by the Colorado Department of Health (CHD). In essence those proposals are for approval by DOE of alternative procedures for establishing the eligibility of structures for remedial action. Regardless of the preeminence accorded the RPISU method in the regulation, it is appropriate to question the assumption that this method gives better estimates of average long-term exposure than other potential methods of evaluation. The objectives here are to (1) review the reliability of the methods of measurement authorized by 10 CFR 12, i.e. the RPISU 6 sample method for determining RDC and the presumptive tests based on the indoor net average gamma exposure rate; (2) evaluate the reliability of the alternative measurement methods proposed by the CDH for determining eligibility for remedial action; and (3) recommend for DOE approval specific methods and applicable procedures that may be used to determine eligibility for remedial action with at least the same reliability as presently achieved with the RPISU 6 sample method.

  16. 78 FR 64593 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on US 26: MP 49.20-MP 57.45 Project: Clackamas County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...This notice announces final environmental actions taken by the FHWA, USACE, USFS, USF&WS, NMFS and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, US 26: MP 49.20-MP 57.45. This action grants approval for the...

  17. Reputation in an economic game modulates premotor cortex activity during action observation.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Harry; Apps, Matthew; Tsakiris, Manos

    2016-09-01

    Our interactions with other people - and our processing of their actions - are shaped by their reputation. Research has identified an Action Observation Network (AON) which is engaged when observing other people's actions. Yet, little is known about how the processing of others' actions is influenced by another's reputation. Is the response of the AON modulated by the reputation of the actor? We developed a variant of the ultimatum game in which participants watched either the visible or occluded actions of two 'proposers'. These actions were tied to decisions of how to split a pot of money although the proposers' decisions on each trial were not known to participants when observing the actions. One proposer made fair offers on the majority of trials, establishing a positive reputation, whereas the other made predominantly, unfair offers resulting in a negative reputation. We found significant activations in two regions of the left dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC). The first of these showed a main effect of reputation with greater activation for the negative reputation proposer than the positive reputation proposer. Furthermore individual differences in trust ratings of the two proposers covaried with activation in the right primary motor cortex (M1). The second showed an interaction between visibility and reputation driven by a greater effect of reputation when participants were observing an occluded action. Our findings show that the processing of others' actions in the AON is modulated by an actor's reputation, and suggest a predictive role for the PMC during action observation. PMID:27364606

  18. Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-12

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

  19. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  20. 78 FR 52999 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Review of Actions by FHWA and United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI. ] SUMMARY: This... Actions by FHWA and United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI, was published in the Federal... Judicial Review of these actions and decisions by the USFWS, DOI, was published in the Federal Register...

  1. 76 FR 60583 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Review of Actions by FHWA and United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI. SUMMARY: This notice... Actions by FHWA and United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI, was published in the Federal... these actions and decisions by the USFWS, DOI, was published in the Federal Register on April 17,...

  2. 76 FR 51462 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), USDOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review... actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions that... the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a claim provides a time period of less than...

  3. Solar energy system economic evaluation: Fern Tunkhannock, Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The economic performance of an Operational Test Site (OTS) is described. The long term economic performance of the system at its installation site and extrapolation to four additional selected locations to demonstrate the viability of the design over a broad range of environmental and economic conditions is reported. Topics discussed are: system description, study approach, economic analysis and system optimization, and technical and economical results of analysis. Data for the economic analysis are generated through evaluation of the OTS. The simulation is based on the technical results of the seasonal report simulation. In addition localized and standard economic parameters are used for economic analysis.

  4. Taking Action for America: A CEO Plan for Jobs and Economic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Roundtable, 2012

    2012-01-01

    America faces many challenges in working together to restore the promise of economic growth and security for the country, U.S. families and the American worker. The challenges are both real and serious. Despite hopeful signs of economic recovery, America remains mired in the deepest jobs crisis since the 1930s. One out of every 12 Americans who…

  5. Learning Economics: Empowering Women for Action. Facilitator's Guide and Participant Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Religious Network for Equality for Women, New York, NY.

    This facilitator's guide and participant packet were designed to teach women how the U.S. economic system works and were developed by a coalition of more than 40 national religious groups working toward economic justice for women. The facilitator's guide consists of a section explaining the coalition, a section on the development of the materials…

  6. 75 FR 80107 - Notice of Statute of Limitations on Claims; Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Statute of Limitations on Claims; Notice of Final Federal Agency...: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review of Actions by the California Department...

  7. 78 FR 26739 - Notice of Final Action on Petition From Earthjustice To List Coal Mines as a Source Category and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 Notice of Final Action on Petition From Earthjustice To List Coal Mines as a Source Category and To Regulate Air Emissions From Coal Mines AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA..., the Acting EPA Administrator, Bob Perciasepe, signed a letter denying a petition to add coal mines...

  8. 76 FR 10938 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock... a proposed highway project, Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction, Clackamas County, Oregon..., NE., Suite 100, Salem, Oregon 97301, Telephone: (503) 587-4716. The Sunrise Project, I-205 to...

  9. 75 FR 60164 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Shared-Use Path in New York State

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... relate to a proposed Shared-Use Path Construction Project: PIN 4760.35 Auburn Trail Extension, Town of... the connection to Powder Mills Park of 2.5 miles. The project primarily provides for the construction... project. DATES: By this notice, the FHWA is advising the public of final agency actions subject to 23...

  10. 77 FR 66215 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York Correction In notice document 2012-26799, appearing on page 65929 in the...

  11. 77 FR 71207 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway and Bridge in the Cities of Cincinnati...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... on November 2, 2012, at 77 FR 66215. That notice provided an incorrect reference to a statute of...: (513) 933-6639. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On November 2, 2012, at 77 FR 66215, the FHWA published a... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway and Bridge...

  12. Final Actions in Delaware, Louisiana, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia; Notes from Other SREB States. Legislative Report No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  13. Final Actions in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Maryland and Virginia; Notes from Other SREB States. Legislative Report No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  14. Final Actions in Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee. Updates from Florida, Maryland and Texas. Legislative Report No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  15. Final Actions in Delaware, Louisiana and North Carolina. Updates from Florida and Virginia. Legislative Report No. 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  16. 75 FR 45695 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Policy Act (FPPA) [7 U.S.C. 4201-4209]. 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251- 1342; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), 16 U.S.C. 4601-4604. 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990... Federal Highway Administration Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in...

  17. Final Report for Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Innis; Randy Udall; Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-09-30

    Final Report for ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America'': This project, ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop'', helped stimulate wind development by rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities in Colorado. To date most of the wind power development in the United States has been driven by large investor-owned utilities serving major metropolitan areas. To meet the 5% by 2020 goal of the Wind Powering America program the 2,000 municipal and 900 rural electric cooperatives in the country must get involved in wind power development. Public power typically serves rural and suburban areas and can play a role in revitalizing communities by tapping into the economic development potential of wind power. One barrier to the involvement of public power in wind development has been the perception that wind power is more expensive than other generation sources. This project focused on two ways to reduce the costs of wind power to make it more attractive to public power entities. The first way was to develop a revenue stream from the sale of green tags. By selling green tags to entities that voluntarily support wind power, rural coops and munis can effectively reduce their cost of wind power. Western Resource Advocates (WRA) and the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) worked with Lamar Light and Power and Arkansas River Power Authority to develop a strategy to use green tags to help finance their wind project. These utilities are now selling their green tags to Community Energy, Inc., an independent for-profit marketer who in turn sells the tags to consumers around Colorado. The Lamar tags allow the University of Colorado-Boulder, the City of Boulder, NREL and other businesses to support wind power development and make the claim that they are ''wind-powered''. This urban-rural partnership is an important development for the state of Colorado's rural communities get the economic benefits of wind power and urban businesses are

  18. Technical and economical feasibility of buffalo gourd as a novel energy crop: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, B.

    1988-02-01

    The New Mexico Solar Energy Institute at NMSU has conducted a two-year investigation into the technical and economic feasibility of using the buffalo gourd plant as an energy feedstock in eastern New Mexico. The New Mexico buffalo gourd project conducted field planting trials to determine optimum planting density, fertilizer levels, and irrigation regime. Starchy roots produced by the field plantings were evaluated as an ethanol feedstock at both laboratory and pilot scale. These studies indicate that buffalo gourd is well suited for root production in eastern New Mexico. Current cultivars of buffalo gourd can be most efficiently produced under dry land farming conditions with little, if any, supplemental fertilizer. Traditional plant breeding techniques can be profitably employed on the buffalo gourd to breed a size and shape of root more easily harvested by existing farm machinery. Because of its sensitivity to root rot, buffalo gourd must be grown in well drained soils. Finally, buffalo gourd has been shown to be an excellent feedstock for ethanol production provided necessary pre-fermentation processing (chopping of roots) is performed correctly. A model was created to determine the economic feasibility of growing buffalo gourd in eastern New Mexico. It was determined that the net return to a farmer in eastern New Mexico can be higher planting buffalo gourd than many traditionally grown crops because of buffalo gourd's low water and fertilizer requirements. The model further indicates that net return is heavily influenced by root yield. Continued research is needed to optimize buffalo gourd root yield, as well as root size and shape, disease resistance, etc. A clearly defined R and D agenda and commercialization strategy is presented and discussed. Buffalo gourd has been demonstrated to have high potential as an alternative feedstock for ethanol production in eastern New Mexico. 128 refs., 9 figs., 28 tabs.

  19. Military construction program economic analysis manual: Text and appendixes: Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This manual enables the US Air Force to comprehensively and systematically analyze alternative approaches to meeting its military construction requirements. The manual includes step-by-step procedures for completing economic analyses for military construction projects, beginning with determining if an analysis is necessary. Instructions and a checklist of the tasks involved for each step are provided; and examples of calculations and illustrations of completed forms are included. The manual explains the major tasks of an economic analysis, including identifying the problem, selecting realistic alternatives for solving it, formulating appropriate assumptions, determining the costs and benefits of the alternatives, comparing the alternatives, testing the sensitivity of major uncertainties, and ranking the alternatives. Appendixes are included that contain data, indexes, and worksheets to aid in performing the economic analyses. For reference, Volume 2 contains sample economic analyses that illustrate how each form is filled out and that include a complete example of the documentation required. 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Seminar on the Economics of Education-Investment Decisions and Contributions to Income and Economic Growth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, W. Lee; Weisbrod, Burton A.

    A workshop on the Economics of Human Resources was initiated in 1966, at the University of Wisconsin to provide a vehicle for stimulating research by both faculty and graduate students and to provide a medium for disseminating the latest research findings of outside scholars, University of Wisconsin faculty and graduate students. This document is…

  1. Economic evaluation of kraft black liquor freeze concentration for the pulp and paper industry: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, T.C.

    1986-09-01

    The system was conceptually incorporated into several paper mill liquor concentration systems. Three fundamental scenarios were considered: a small, sulphite mill expansion comparing freeze concentration to evaporators and vapor recompression; a ''greenfield'' mill which evaluated the use of a freeze concentration process to achieve varying degrees of liquor concentration before achieving final concentration using traditional evaporation; and a kraft mill expansion which explored the use of freeze concentration to achieve a mill capacity expansion using a freeze concentrator in tandem with an existing evaporator set. The performance of these various scenarios were evaluated using a heat balance analysis and the comparative net present value of each arrangement was determined using a traditional evaporator system as a reference. Results indicate that generally the freeze concentration process is not economically attractive relative to traditional evaporator systems at the present time. At a fuel cost of $28.77/barrel, the freeze concentration process becomes attractive. However, this study was performed considering a fuel oil cost of $23.63 per barrel and the world fuel oil price has declined markedly since then.

  2. 76 FR 78332 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Review of Actions by California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327... seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before June 13, 2012. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a...

  3. 75 FR 49547 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... 25, 2010 (75 FR 8786-01). A claim seeking judicial review of the Tier 2, Section 3 decisions must be... Review of Actions by FHWA, United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI, and United States Army... Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review of these actions and decisions by the USFWS, DOI,...

  4. 75 FR 8786 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Review of Actions by FHWA and United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI. SUMMARY: This notice... States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI, was published in the Federal Register on April 17, 2007. A... Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review of these actions and decisions by the USFWS, DOI,...

  5. 75 FR 59787 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in New Hampshire

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Agency Actions on the Proposed Highway in New Hampshire'' in the Federal Register at 72 FR 30047-01 for... interchange in the City of Manchester. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the project...-mile segment of the Interstate 93 corridor between Salem and Manchester, New Hampshire....

  6. 76 FR 37392 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before December 27, 2011. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a claim... AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for...

  7. 78 FR 10249 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ...). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before July 13, 2013. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review... AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for...

  8. 75 FR 62919 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Vermont

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the... that authorizes judicial review of a claim provides a time period of less than 180 days for filing such... AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims for...

  9. 76 FR 80447 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highways in Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review of Actions by FHWA and Other Federal Agencies. SUMMARY: This notice...(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before June 20, 2012. If the Federal law that authorizes...

  10. 75 FR 28851 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the... this notice. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a claim provides a time period of... AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims for...

  11. 78 FR 58380 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before February 20, 2014. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a claim... AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims for...

  12. 78 FR 64595 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before March 28, 2014. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a... AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for...

  13. 75 FR 11749 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2010 and 2011 Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ...NMFS announces final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications, apportionments, and Pacific halibut prohibited species catch limits for the groundfish fishery of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during the 2010 and 2011 fishing years and to accomplish the goals and objectives of the Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Groundfish of the GOA.......

  14. 76 FR 81860 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2011 and 2012 Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... 1, 2011 (76 FR 74670) and is effective January 1, 2012. Amendment 83 to the FMP allocates the... rule published for that action (76 FR 44700, July 26, 2011), as well as in the final rule noted above... small proportion of the annual TAC has been harvested. Fishing sector characteristics also are...

  15. 75 FR 11778 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands; Final 2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ...NMFS announces final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications and prohibited species catch allowances for the groundfish fishery of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands management area (BSAI). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during the 2010 and 2011 fishing years, and to accomplish the goals and objectives of the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the BSAI......

  16. 45 CFR 1606.7 - Corrective action, informal conference, review of written materials, and final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... final decision need not engage in a detailed analysis of the failure to resolve the substantial... presented in any written materials. The draft final decision need not engage in a detailed analysis of all... written materials, and final decision. 1606.7 Section 1606.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to...

  17. 45 CFR 1606.7 - Corrective action, informal conference, review of written materials, and final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... final decision need not engage in a detailed analysis of the failure to resolve the substantial... presented in any written materials. The draft final decision need not engage in a detailed analysis of all... written materials, and final decision. 1606.7 Section 1606.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to...

  18. Economic impacts of the S. S. Glacier Bay oil spill: Social and economic studies. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, P.; Isaacs, J.; Richardson, J.; Braund, S.; Witten, E.

    1990-11-01

    On July 2, 1987, an oil spill occurred in Cook Inlet when the S.S. Glacier Bay hit a submerged obstacle while enroute to Kenai Pipeline Company facilities to offload oil. The 1987 commercial fishery in Cook Inlet was barely underway when the S.S. Glacier Bay oil spill occurred, and the largest salmon return in history was moving up the inlet. The sockeye salmon run alone totaled over 12 million, providing a seasonal catch of 9.25 million salmon. The 1987 sport fishery in Cook Inlet was in mid-season at the time of the spill. The S.S. Glacier Bay oil spill represents an opportunity to study the economic impacts of an oil spill event in Alaska, particularly with regard to commercial fishing impacts and the public costs of cleanup. The report evaluates the existing information on the spill, response measures, and economic impacts, and adds discussions with individuals and groups involved in or affected by the spill to this data base. The report reviewed accounts of the oil spill and its costs; identified types and sources of data, developed protocol, and contacted groups and people for data collection and verification; and described, analyzed, and prepared reports of the economic effects of the S.S. Glacier Bay oil spill.

  19. Final record of decision/remedial action plan, nine sites, Sierra Army Depot, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, S.L.; Larson, A.M.; Parent, M.M.; Silvers, J.M.; Weaverling, P.H.

    1996-10-01

    This ROD/RAP presents the selected response actions for nine sites at SIAD. The response actions were selected by the US Department of the Army (Army) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)(collectively referred to as CERCLA), the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), and Section 6.8 of the California Health and Safety Code. This ROD/RAP includes the factual and legal basis for selecting the response action at each of the nine sites listed above. The data used to support the selected response action are contained in the Administrative Record for each site. The State of California as represented by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) concur with the selected response action at each site.

  20. Actions to alleviate the mental health impact of the economic crisis

    PubMed Central

    WAHLBECK, KRISTIAN; MCDAID, DAVID

    2012-01-01

    The current global economic crisis is expected to produce adverse mental health effects that may increase suicide and alcohol-related death rates in affected countries. In nations with greater social safety nets, the health impacts of the economic downturn may be less pronounced. Research indicates that the mental health impact of the economic crisis can be offset by various policy measures. This paper aims to outline how countries can safeguard and support mental health in times of economic downturn. It indicates that good mental health cannot be achieved by the health sector alone. The determinants of mental health often lie outside of the remits of the health system, and all sectors of society have to be involved in the promotion of mental health. Accessible and responsive primary care services support people at risk and can prevent mental health consequences. Any austerity measures imposed on mental health services need to be geared to support the modernization of mental health care provision. Social welfare supports and active labour market programmes aiming at helping people retain or re-gain jobs can counteract the mental health effects of the economic crisis. Family support programmes can also make a difference. Alcohol pricing and restrictions of alcohol availability reduce alcohol harms and save lives. Support to tackle unmanageable debt will also help to reduce the mental health impact of the crisis. While the current economic crisis may have a major impact on mental health and increase mortality due to suicides and alcohol-related disorders, it is also a window of opportunity to reform mental health care and promote a mentally healthy lifestyle. PMID:23024664

  1. Economics.

    PubMed

    Palley, Paul D; Parcero, Miriam E

    2016-10-01

    A review of literature in the calendar year 2015 dedicated to environmental policies and sustainable development, and economic policies. This review is divided into these sections: sustainable development, irrigation, ecosystems and water management, climate change and disaster risk management, economic growth, water supply policies, water consumption, water price regulation, and water price valuation. PMID:27620113

  2. Mitigation Action Plan: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation by the East Tennessee Economic Council

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In April 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1113) for the proposed lease of 957-16 acres (Parcel ED-1) of the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation (ORR) by the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC) for industrial development. DOE plans to issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action, conditional upon the implementation of mitigation and monitoring to protect environmental resources. According to DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations (10 CFR 1021.322), a FONSI shall include {open_quotes}any commitments to mitigations that are essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, beyond those mitigations that are integral elements of the proposed action, and a reference to the Mitigation Action Plan prepared under 10 CTR 1021.331{close_quotes}. Terms of the lease offer DOE the option of terminating the lease with ETEC should the lessee and/or sublessees fail to implement the mitigation defined in the FONSI.

  3. Economic Benefits and Impacts from Public Libraries in the State of Florida. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.; Fraser, Bruce T.; Nelson, Timothy W.; Robbins, Jane B.

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the economic impacts and benefits of Florida public libraries. The study objectives were to: describe the role of public libraries in economic development; identify and describe the range of specific activities and programs engaged in to support economic development; identify factors that…

  4. To Design and Evaluate a 12th Grade Course in the Principles of Economics; Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Suzanne E.; Sperling, John G.

    Reported is the design, development, and evaluation of a one-semester course on the principles of economics for twelfth grade students. The course is intended to develop students' capacity for economic reasoning through economic theory and empirical research. To do this, teaching materials and innovative techniques for teacher training were…

  5. Understanding Naltrexone Mechanism of Action and Pharmacogenetics in Asian Americans via Behavioral Economics: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bujarski, Spencer; MacKillop, James; Ray, Lara A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale A behavioral economic approach to understanding the relative value of alcohol may be useful for advancing medication development for alcoholism. Naltrexone is a heavily researched and moderately effective treatment for alcohol dependence making it a good candidate for a proof-of-concept study of behavioral economics and alcoholism pharmacotherapy. Objectives This study examines naltrexone efficacy and pharmacogenetics in terms of the relative value of alcohol, assessed via demand curve analysis. Materials and Methods Participants were 35 heavy drinking (AUDIT ≥ 8) Asian Americans. A within-subjects cross-over medication design was used along with an intravenous alcohol challenge completed after four days of both naltrexone and placebo. At baseline and BrAC = 0.06 g/dl, participants completed an Alcohol Purchase Task, which assessed estimated alcohol consumption along escalating prices. Behavioral economic demand curve analysis yielded measures of Intensity, Elasticity, maximum expenditure (Omax), proportionate price insensitivity (Pmax) and breakpoint. Results Compared to placebo, naltrexone significantly reduced Intensity, Omax and breakpoint. There were also a trend level medication effects on Pmax. BrAC was associated with increases in Pmax and breakpoint. A significant naltrexone × OPRM1 genotype interaction was observed for intensity of demand. Conclusion The present study extends the literature on naltrexone’s mechanisms through the application of a novel behavioral economic paradigm. These results indicate that naltrexone reduces several indices of demand for alcohol. This preliminary report provides further evidence for the effectiveness of naltrexone and supports the utility of a behavioral economic approach to alcoholism pharmacotherapy development. PMID:22429255

  6. Revised Total Coliform Rule Assessments and Corrective Actions Guidance Manual, Interim Final

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guidance manual provides information on how to conduct assessments to identify the causes of total coliform and E. coli occurrence in the distribution system, and on the corresponding corrective actions that systems can take to correct the problem.

  7. 77 FR 14464 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway Project in Wisconsin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...-94, I-894, and U.S. Highway 45 (Zoo Interchange) in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Those actions grant.... Highway 45 (Zoo Interchange) in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, Project I.D. 1060-33-01. The project...

  8. 78 FR 25524 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... project would improve safety and operations, local road access to State Route 156, interregional traffic flow along State Route 156 and relieve existing congestion. The actions by the Federal agencies,...

  9. 77 FR 26355 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Avenida Rio Salado/Broadway Road

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... may also contact: Mr. Ken Davis, Senior Engineering Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 4000 N... (NAGPRA) . 6. Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964 [42 U.S.C. 2000(d)-2000(d)(1)];...

  10. Whole Tree Energy{trademark} design. Volume 1, Engineering and economic evaluation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S.A.; Cleland, J.G.; Truesdale, R.S.; Clark, T.C.; Stancil, W.D.; Ostlie, L.D.; Weigel, B.

    1993-12-01

    EPRI researchers have designed a renewable, wood-fired power system based on economic evaluation and field testing. The results suggest that Whole Tree Energy{trademark} is a cost-effective, baseload, 100-MWe or greater option for new capacity using wood fuel from trees grown in a sustainable manner. The project team conducted an initial evaluation of WTE technology. Based on this evaluation, EPRI sponsored large-scale field tests. Finally, the team prepared documentation on the design for a 100-MWe power plant. The design presents a 100-MWe WTE power plant with a total capital requirement of $1400/kW, a fuel cost of $1.60/MBtu, a net heat rate of 10,500 Btu/kWh, and a busbar cost (10-year levelized in constant 1993 dollars) of $0.05/kWh. The design includes stacking of trees (for drying) to a 25-m height, drying the stacked whole trees from 50% to 25% moisture in 30 days, heating the drying air with flue gas waste heat, and burning whole tree sections in a deep bed. This combustion involves a three-stage process, featuring a tall, narrow boiler for overfire air and a deep bed having a very high heat release rate (10 MWth/m{sup 2}). The field tests verified the heat release rate and the stacking and drying operations. Compared to conventional wood-fired power plants, WTE offers a low excess air requirement (15%) and a high boiler efficiency (82%) due to the combined effects of the dried fuel; the substoichiometric pyrolysis zone in the deep bed; and the tall, narrow, well-mixed zone for gas burnout above the bed.

  11. Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, L. D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the economic aspects of water pollution control covering publications of 1976-77. This review also includes the policy issues of water management. A list of 77 references is presented. (HM)

  12. National call to action: Working toward the elimination of child maltreatment. The economics.

    PubMed

    Courtney, M E

    1999-10-01

    No reliable estimates exist of the overall costs to society of child maltreatment that will withstand serious examination. Arguably some of the most important human costs of maltreatment are unquantifiable. Moreover, in many cases it is difficult if not impossible to separate the economics of child abuse and neglect from the economics of a host of other problems facing families. Still, even conservative estimates of government spending on behalf of abused and neglected children and their families illustrate that child maltreatment costs society a great deal, with much of that expense going for deep-end intervention rather than family support and prevention. Government expenditures directed at this social problem have grown rapidly since the rediscovery of child abuse in the 1960s and now exceed spending for a number of essential supports for children and families. Moreover, the new era of continuing commitment to child protection in the context of a revised social contract with the nation's poor raises serious questions about the economics of child maltreatment in the future. PMID:10574319

  13. Cross-border reproductive care: market forces in action or market failure? An economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mark

    2011-12-01

    From an economist's perspective, cross-border reproductive care (CBRC) reflects a global market economy bringing together the needs of patients and skills of doctors at an agreed price. From this perspective CBRC is neither wrong nor right, rather it reflects rational economic behaviour of couples to maximize their wellbeing. The major economic criticism of CBRC relates to the costs and risks of multiple pregnancies, as couples paying out-of-pocket may have more embryos transferred than is desirable to optimize their chances of having a live birth. This criticism is valid, suggesting a need to communicate the hidden costs of failing to adequately fund fertility services. However, under some circumstances health authorities may be willing to bear these additional costs if the savings from not providing fertility services are sufficiently large enough to warrant a no-funding policy. Because infertility is often viewed as a low health priority, the likelihood of CBRC persisting is real, particularly as many health services adjust to the challenges of ageing populations and decreased public financing. To counter funding challenges, there is a need to communicate the medical benefits of assisted reproduction and the economic benefits that these children will offer in an era of austerity and ageing populations. PMID:22019620

  14. Solar energy system economic evaluation for Seeco Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Lincoln, Nebraska is developed for this and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over projected twenty year life: life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated.

  15. The importance of actions and the worth of an object: dissociable neural systems representing core value and economic value.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tobias; Coppin, Géraldine; Schwartz, Sophie; Sander, David

    2012-06-01

    Neuroeconomic research has delineated neural regions involved in the computation of value, referring to a currency for concrete choices and decisions ('economic value'). Research in psychology and sociology, on the other hand, uses the term 'value' to describe motivational constructs that guide choices and behaviors across situations ('core value'). As a first step towards an integration of these literatures, we compared the neural regions computing economic value and core value. Replicating previous work, economic value computations activated a network centered on medial orbitofrontal cortex. Core value computations activated medial prefrontal cortex, a region involved in the processing of self-relevant information and dorsal striatum, involved in action selection. Core value ratings correlated with activity in precuneus and anterior prefrontal cortex, potentially reflecting the degree to which a core value is perceived as internalized part of one's self-concept. Distributed activation pattern in insula and ACC allowed differentiating individual core value types. These patterns may represent evaluation profiles reflecting prototypical fundamental concerns expressed in the core value types. Our findings suggest mechanisms by which core values, as motivationally important long-term goals anchored in the self-schema, may have the behavioral power to drive decisions and behaviors in the absence of immediately rewarding behavioral options. PMID:21642352

  16. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  17. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-04-20

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective

  18. 76 FR 16653 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) for the project, approved via... FHWA project records. The FEA, FONSI, and other project records are available by contacting Caltrans...

  19. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for... Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.34 Court review of final administrative...

  20. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for... Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.34 Court review of final administrative...

  1. Action Research: Measuring Literacy Programme Participants' Learning Outcomes. Results of the Final Phase (2011-2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolly, Madina; Jonas, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Action Research on Measuring Literacy Programme Participants' Learning Outcomes (RAMAA) aims to develop, implement and collaborate on the creation of a methodological approach to measure acquired learning and study the various factors that influence its development. This report examines how RAMAA I has been implemented over the past four years in…

  2. 77 FR 52108 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Hills Parkway in the city of St. George, Washington County, Utah. The project will include widening of... proposed highway project, State Route 18 (Bluff Street); from St. George Boulevard to Red Hills Parkway, in Washington County in the State of Utah. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  3. 78 FR 17748 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... MP 16 project in Washington County in the State of Utah. These actions grant approvals for the... and MP 16 in Washington County, Utah. The project consists of the following improvements: Constructing..., between Brigham Road and Dixie Drive, and between Washington Parkway and SR-9; removing the...

  4. 75 FR 62182 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Cumberland, Sampson, and Duplin Counties, North Carolina (T.I.P Project R-2303). Those actions grant licenses... Bern Avenue, Ste 410, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27601-1418; Telephone: (919) 747-7014; e-mail: clarence.coleman@dot.gov . FHWA North Carolina Division Office's normal business hours are 8 a.m. to 5...

  5. 77 FR 17565 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Transportation Improvements in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... West Project) in Draper, Salt Lake County in the State of Utah. These actions grant licenses, permits... in the State of Utah: The Bangerter 600 West Project in Draper, Salt Lake County, Utah, project... Railroad (UPRR) line at about 900 West in the city of Draper in Salt Lake County. The Selected...

  6. 77 FR 17564 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... Lake County in the State of Utah). These actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the project... of Utah: Cottonwood Street; 4500 South to Vine Street in Murray City, Salt Lake County, project..., Environmental Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 2520 West 4700 South, Suite 9A, Salt Lake...

  7. 77 FR 66500 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... the City of Riverside, in the counties of Orange and Riverside, State of California. Those actions... to Pierce Street in the City of Riverside. The existing express lanes in Orange County will be extended east from the Orange/County line to Interstate 15 (I-15) in the City of Corona. The existing...

  8. 75 FR 70349 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highways in Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Highway from Lucus Road to Big Lake Road, in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, State of Alaska. Those actions... improvements between Lucus Road and Big Lake Road, a distance of approximately eight miles. The five-lane section east of the project would be extended one mile west from Lucus Road to Church Road and...

  9. 77 FR 5617 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. MST. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given that the... Protection Act . 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990, Protection of Wetlands; E.O. 11988, Floodplain Management; E.O. 12898, Federal Actions to address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low...

  10. 77 FR 58906 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ...)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project on I-90 over the Mississippi River. The... River with a new bridge that meets structural and geometric standards as well as reconstruction of the I...: I-90 Bridge over the Mississippi River and I-90/U.S. 14/U.S. 61 approach roadway interchange....

  11. 76 FR 2948 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Wing County) to the County Road 2/42 intersection in Pine River (Cass County), Minnesota. Those actions... County Road 2/42 intersection in Pine River. The project is located in Crow Wing and Cass Counties. A Record of Decision (ROD) for the TH 371 corridor from Nisswa to Pine River was signed by FHWA in 2005....

  12. 76 FR 43372 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... April 17, 2007 (at 72 FR 19228-02). A claim seeking judicial review of the Tier 1 decisions must have... the Federal Register (at 73 FR 6241- 01) for the Section 1, 13.1 mile segment of I-69 in the Counties... Review of Actions by FHWA, United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DOI, and United States...

  13. 76 FR 65776 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway Project in Wisconsin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ...). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, US 41 (Memorial Drive to County M) in Brown County... Department of Transportation, US 41 Brown County Project Office, 1940 West Mason Street, Green Bay, Wisconsin... approvals for the following highway project: US 41 (Memorial Drive to County M), Brown County,...

  14. 75 FR 36150 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Transportation Project in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... actions relate to a proposed highway and transit project within the Tier 1 Elgin O'Hare--West Bypass study... Elgin O'Hare Expressway on the west and located in Cook and DuPage Counties in Illinois just northwest... within the Elgin O'Hare--West Bypass study area in Cook and DuPage Counties in Illinois. Decisions in...

  15. 77 FR 75254 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Transportation Project in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... actions relate to a proposed highway and transit project within the Tier 2 Elgin O'Hare--West Bypass project corridor, which is located along the Elgin-O'Hare Expressway/Thorndale ] Avenue between Chicago O'Hare International Airport (O'Hare) and Lake Street/US Route 20, and on a proposed alignment...

  16. 77 FR 48586 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on United States Highway 77

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Corpus Christi, Texas to US 83 in Harlingen, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals..., Room 826, Austin, Texas 78701; telephone: (512) 536-5960; email: gregory.punske@dot.gov . The FHWA Texas Division Office's normal business hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. (central time) Monday...

  17. 75 FR 54420 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on US 290/Hempstead Corridor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Protection Policy Act (FPPA) [7 U.S.C. 4201-4209]. 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act [33 U.S.C. 1251- 1342]; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) . 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990 Protection of...) in Harris County, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  18. 76 FR 1664 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment G)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... and Water Resources: Clean Water Act [33 U.S.C. 1251- 1342]; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF... 45 (I-45) to US 59 in Harris and Montgomery Counties, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits... Street, Room 826 Austin, Texas 78701; telephone: (512) 536-5960; e- mail: gregory.punske@dot.gov ....

  19. 77 FR 24255 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highways in Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency... October 22, 2012. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a claim provides a time period of... given by the Federal Transit Administration on September 23, 2010 related to U.S. 36 (75 FR 58017)....

  20. 77 FR 6171 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... segments. The existing two-lane, two-span, steel stringer/multi-beam bridge would be replaced with a two....C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed local assistance bridge replacement project on Main... Creek Bridge Replacement Project on Main Street (former State Route 49) in Amador City, Amador...

  1. Solar energy system economic evaluation. Final report for SEECO Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Lincoln, Nebraska is developed for this and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. Although budget constraints preclude an economic reevaluation of each of the sites, a similar site, Carlsbad, New Nexico, was done. When 1985 escalated values for fuel, costs, mass production, and improved design and installation techniques were applied, a significantly higher degree of savings was realized.

  2. Solar Energy System Economic Evaluation final report for IBM System 4, Clinton, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Clinton, Mississippi is developed for this and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. Although budget constraints preclude an economic reevaluation of each of the sites, a similar site, Carlsbad, New Mexico, was done. When 1985 escalated values for fuel, costs, mass production, and improved design and installation techniques were applied, a significantly higher degree of savings was realized.

  3. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for Wormser Columbia, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Columbia, South Carolina is developed for this and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. Although budget constraints preclude an economic reevaluation of each of the sites, a similar site, Carlsbad, New Mexico, was done. When 1985 escalated values for fuel, costs, mass production, and improved design and installation techniques were applied, a significantly higher degree of savings was realized.

  4. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

  5. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Lowman Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lowman, Idaho. Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document assesses the environmental impacts of stabilization on site of the contaminated materials at the Lowman uranium mill tailings site. The Lowman site is 0.5 road mile northeast of the unincorporated village of Lowman, Idaho, and 73 road miles from Boise, Idaho. The Lowman site consists of piles of radioactive sands, an ore storage area, abandoned mill buildings, and windblown/waterborne contaminated areas. A total of 29.5 acres of land are contaminated and most of this land occurs within the 35-acre designated site boundary. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings and other contaminated materials on the site. A radon barrier would be constructed over the consolidated residual radioactive materials and various erosion control measures would be implemented to ensure the long-term stability of the disposal cell. Radioactive constituents and other hazardous constituents were not detected in the groundwater beneath the Lowman site. The groundwater beneath the disposal cell would not become contaminated during or after remedial action so the maximum concentration limits or background concentrations for the contaminants listed in the draft EPA groundwater protection standards would be met at the point of compliance. No significant impacts were identified as a result of the proposed remedial action at the Lowman site.

  6. Shemya Air Force Base, Alaska No Further Action Decision document for Hg-1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-05

    This document is being prepared to document that a No Further Action Decision (NFAD) document is appropriate for the Hg-1 site at Shemya Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The IRP is a Department of Defense (DOD) program established to identify and remediate hazardous waste problems on DOD property that result from past practices. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) draft document {open_quotes}No Further Action Criteria for DOD Military/FUD Sites{close_quotes} has been used as a guide in preparing this document. Air Force personnel have stated that the Hg-1 site may have been used to store mercury and PCB-contaminated material. The site was added to the IRP in 1987, and later that year a field investigation was conducted at the site. Soil samples were collected and analyzed for mercury, EP toxicity, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dioxin. All concentrations of contaminants found in Area Hg-1 are below regulatory action levels for PCBs (40 CFR 761) and mercury (55 FR 30798) or below detection levels for dioxin/furans. Therefore, leaving these soils in place is acceptable.

  7. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document. Final report: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    A critical mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the late 1940s into the 1970s. Among these facilities are the 24 former uranium mill sites designed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.) Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designated sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project only; a separate MAP document has been prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project.

  8. Economic impact analysis of proposed effluent standards and limitations for the coil coating industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    The report provides an identification and analysis of the economic impacts which are likely to result from the promulgation of EPA's effluent regulations on the Coil Coating Industry. The primary economic impact variables assessed in the study include the costs of the proposed regulations and potential for these regulations to cause plant closures, price changes, unemployment, changes in industry profitability, structure and competition, shifts in the balance of foreign trade, new source impacts, and impacts on small businesses.

  9. 76 FR 46356 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Idaho

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...) 334-8203; e-mail: sue.sullivan@itd.idaho.gov . Normal business hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Mountain...: [23 U.S.C. 138 and 49 U.S.C. 303]; The Farmland Protection Policy Act (FPPA) ; 6. Social and Economic... properties to public ROWs. The project will be constructed in phases, designated as Phase 1 and Phase...

  10. Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) - additional modifications to final report as per GTP's request.

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, Varun; Hogue, Michael

    2015-07-17

    This report will discuss the methods and the results from economic impact analysis applied to the development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. As part of this work, the Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI) has developed a web-based Geothermal Economics Calculator (Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC)) tool that is aimed at helping the industry perform geothermal systems analysis and study the associated impacts of specific geothermal investments or technological improvements on employment, energy and environment. It is well-known in the industry that geothermal power projects will generate positive economic impacts for their host regions. Our aim in the assessment of these impacts includes quantification of the increase in overall economic output due to geothermal projects and of the job creation associated with this increase. Such an estimate of economic impacts of geothermal investments on employment, energy and the environment will also help us understand the contributions that the geothermal industry will have in achieving a sustainable path towards energy production.

  11. Economic losses due to cystic echinococcosis in India: Need for urgent action to control the disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Balbir B; Dhand, Navneet K; Ghatak, Sandeep; Gill, Jatinder P S

    2014-01-01

    Cystic ehinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains a neglected zoonotic disease despite its considerable human and animal health concerns. This is the first systematic analysis of the livestock and human related economic losses due to cystic echinococcosis in India. Data about human cases were obtained from a tertiary hospital. Human hydatidosis cases with and without surgical interventions were extrapolated to be 5647 and 17075 per year assuming a total human population of 1210193422 in India. Data about prevalence of hydatid cysts in important food producing animals were obtained from previously published abattoir based epidemiological surveys that reported a prevalence of 5.39% in cattle, 4.36% in buffaloes, 3.09% in pigs, 2.23% in sheep and 0.41% in goats. Animal population data were sourced from the latest census conducted by the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries, India. Other input parameters were obtained from published scientific literature. Probability distributions were included for many input values to account for variability and uncertainty. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect of important parameters on the estimated economic losses. The analysis revealed a total annual median loss of Rs. 11.47 billion (approx. US $ 212.35 million). Cattle and buffalo industry accounted for most of the losses: 93.05% and 88.88% of the animal and total losses, respectively. Human hydatidosis related losses were estimated to be Rs. 472.72 million (approx. US $ 8.75 million) but are likely to be an under-estimate due to under-reporting of the disease in the country. The human losses more than quadrupled to Rs. 1953 million i.e. approx. US $ 36.17 million, when the prevalence of human undiagnosed cases was increased to 0.2% in the sensitivity analyses. The social loss and psychological distress were not taken into account for calculating human loss. The results highlight an urgent need for a science based policy

  12. Interim response action, basin F liquid incineration project. Draft final human health assessment. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The multipathway human health risk assessment based on the SQI emission rate measured during the trial burn of basin F liquid indicates that the maximum level of human health risk associated with operation of this incinerator will not exceed the benchmark risk levels defined in the final decision document (Woodward-Clyde, 1990).

  13. 75 FR 58016 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the project, both approved on July 30, 2010, and in other documents in Caltrans project records. The FEA, and... address provided above. The FEA can be viewed and downloaded from the project Web site at...

  14. 76 FR 54529 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) for the project. A Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) was approved on July 8, 2011. The FEA, FONSI, and other project records are available by contacting Caltrans at the addresses provided above. The Caltrans FEA and FONSI can be...

  15. Interim response action, basin F liquid incineration project. Draft final human health assessment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-02

    The multipathway human health risk assessment based on the SQ1 emission rates measured during the trial burn of basin F liquid indicates that the maximum level of human health risk associated with operation of this incinerator will not exceed the benchmark risk levels defined in the final decision document (Woodward-Clyde, 1990).

  16. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Town Garage Radio Beacon, Londonderry, NH. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The Town Garage Radio Beacon, NH, site includes the Holton Circle residential development of 23 homes, a town garage area, and an undeveloped hillslope and wetlands area in Londonderry, New Hampshire. From 1940 to 1968, the area was owned by the Department of Defense (DOD), who reportedly used it as a radio beacon facility from 1940 to 1947. The ROD provides a final remedy for the contaminated onsite ground water. No further remedial actions are anticipated for the site. The primary contaminants affecting the ground water are VOCs; and metals, including chromium.

  17. 1991 New Mexico economic impact study for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research completed an abbreviated cost-benefit analysis of the income and employment impact of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor offices in Albuquerque. Since the Project Office will have a significant positive impact on the State`s economy (shown on Table 8), the impact is combined with the impact of remedial actions at the Ambrosia Lake site to highlight the cost-benefit of the entire Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project at the Ambrosia Lake site will generate $12.509 million in gross labor income in New Mexico between 1989 and 1994. This includes $1.161 million in federal tax revenue, $1.015 million in State personal income tax revenue, and seven thousand in local tax revenue. The UMTRA Project will generate the equivalent of 84 full-time jobs during the peak year of remedial action at Ambrosia Lake site. New Mexico`s total funding requirement for the UMTRA Project is estimated to be $2.963 million. The net economic benefit of the Ambrosia Lake portion of the UMTRA Project to New Mexico after the State`s share of the project`s cost, the federal income tax, and the $0.936 million income impact of the alternate use of the State funding are subtracted, will be $7.451 million between 1990 and 1994. In Fiscal Year 1990 the UMTRA Project DOE and contractor offices in Albuquerque directly employed 163 people. Another 78 jobs were also maintained in support of the industry sector and 166 jobs were also maintained in other sections of the New Mexico economy. It is estimated that $19 million dollars of income was generated and 1.949 million of State and local taxes were collected. The University of New Mexico study shows that for every dollar the State of New Mexico invests in the UMTRA Project, it will realize $95.05 in gross labor income. This corresponds to a net return on the States investment in the Project of $97.20 for every dollar invested.

  18. Comment and response document on the final remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report contains comments provided by the Oregon Department of Energy and responses to these comments on the final remedial action plan for the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lakeview, Oregon.

  19. Economic and environmental benefits of product substitution for organic solvents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, S.C.

    1991-05-01

    U.S. Army installations require solvents for effective maintenance and equipment refurbishing operations. Spent solvent generation has become a significant environmental and economic concern. Of increasing concern are toxic air emissions, threshold limit values, and increasing restriction on land disposal. Coupled with these environmental issues is the rising cost of both waste disposal and new solvent purchase. This manuscript evaluates the environmental protection and economic benefits of substituting aqueous terpene-based cleaners for petroleum-based Stoddard solvent, currently used in parts cleaning. With characteristics such as low volatility, biodegradability, and reduction of land disposal, terpene cleaners have become the favored substitution alternative. This research showed that implementing terpene cleaner substitution for Stoddard solvent requires a site-specific study of each installation which will include waste recycling, disposal of sludge and rinse water, landfills, contamination of soils and economic analysis.

  20. Social and economic consequences of onshore OCS-related activities in coastal Alabama: Final baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J.O.; Wade, W.W.

    1999-04-01

    This report documents existing economic conditions in the coastal Alabama region and highlights industry sectors important to the region`s economy. This report discusses the interplay among different users of the region`s natural resources, noting the tourism, fishing and offshore natural gas industries. Data are presented that show how the tourism and natural gas industries contribute to the economic growth of coastal Alabama and the State of Alabama. The recent conflict between the offshore gas and tourism industries over the use of coastal Alabama resources is discussed. Several case studies highlight local area experience relative to economic growth, industry coexistence and the importance of the coastal region`s natural resources to the local and state economies.

  1. An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee. Final report and appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

    1985-12-17

    The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

  2. Economics of PPP-insulated pipe-type cable: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, A.

    1987-10-01

    This study has been designed to establish the economic range of application and the potential cost advantage of PPP-insulated pipe-type cable compared with presently utilized paper-insulated designs. The study is in two parts. In the first part the electrical and thermal characteristics of a range of cable sizes are tabulated. This data can be utilized for planning and economic comparison purposes. In the second part 12 transmission load scenarios are studied to determine the relative cost of various designs considering materials, installation and the losses over a wide range of assumptions.

  3. The SocioEconomic analysis of repository siting (SEARS): Guide to data base preparation: Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.R.; Murdock, S.H.; Leistritz, F.L.; Kiel, B.; Parpia, B.

    1984-11-01

    This guide describes the data bases in the SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS) modeling system. This model is a user-interactive, computerized model for projecting the economic, demographic, public service, and fiscal impacts of repository siting. This guide provides a description of the data bases, sources of data, data formats, and preprocessing programs for adapting and implementing the SEARS system and is seen as an essential reference for technical users of the model. It should be used in conjunction with reports describing the model's features and characteristics. 95 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

  5. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  6. Comment and response document for the final remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This document for the final remedial action plan and site design has been prepared for US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action plan. Comments and responses are included for the site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado.

  7. 75 FR 19670 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on a Proposed New Road Connecting I-65 and U.S. 31W in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on a Proposed New Road Connecting I... meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project: a new connector road... following highway project in the State of Kentucky: The project involves the construction of a new...

  8. Rrecord of Decision (EPA Region 1): Groveland Wells, Operable Unit 1, Groveland, MA. (Second remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The 850-acre Groveland Wells site is a municipal well field in Groveland, Massachusetts. The site is underlain by a surfical unconsolidated aquifer, which is a source of ground water for the well field, and a deeper bedrock aquifer. In 1979, elevated levels of TCE were discovered in the onsite water supply wells, resulting in the closure of the wells, development of alternate water supplies, and investigations by EPA. EPA investigations identifed three likely sources of contamination: the A.W. Chesterton Company, currently being remediated under RCRA corrective action and closure activities; the Haverhill Municipal Landfill, which has been addressed as a separate CERCLA action; and the Valley Manufactured Products Company (Valley), a screw machine products manufacturer and finisher. The ROD addresses management of migration of contamination in the surfical and bedrock aquifers extending from the valley site, as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and toluene; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  9. On the Economics of Library Operation. Final Report Submitted to National Advisory Commission on Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Commission on Libraries, Washington, DC.

    Both an analysis of the sources of cost trends in libraries and the relationship of the prospective role of automation in library operations to the causes of cost trends and the predicted shortage of trained librarians are examined in the study of the economic structure of the library. Issues investigated are those particularly relating to current…

  10. Ixtoc I oil spill economic impact study. Volume II. executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, C.E.; Lamphear, F.C.; Gunn, C.A.; Ditton, R.B.; Nichols, J.P.

    1982-04-01

    This Executive Summary is a nontechnical companion volume reviewing the results of a study of the economic impact of the 1979 Ixtoc I and Burmah Agate oil spills on Texas coastal counties. The report analyzes impacts on tourism, recreation, and commercial fisheries.

  11. Ixtoc I oil spill economic impact study. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, C.E.; Lamphear, F.C.; Gunn, C.A.; Ditton, R.B.; Nichols, J.P.

    1982-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the economic impact of the Ixtoc I and Burmah Agate oil spill on recreation, tourism, and commercial fishing in the Texas coastal region. In addition, a summary of oil resource and equipment losses, compensation for damages, clean-up and containment costs, and news media coverage was required.

  12. Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, R.C.; Collins, G.S.; Lacewell, R.D.; Chang, H.C.

    1983-08-01

    This study of expected economic impacts of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel consisted of two components: (1) analysis of oilseed production and oilseed crushing capacity in the US and Texas and (2) simulation of impacts on US cropping patterns, crop prices, producer rent, and consumer surplus. The primary oilseed crops considered were soybeans, cottonseed, sunflowers, and peanuts. 19 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

  13. The Importance of Economic Incentives in the Recruitment of Teachers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarkin, Gary A.

    In light of the current increase in elementary and secondary school attendance coupled with a simultaneous decrease in college-age population between now and the end of the decade, this study assesses (1) the role of economic factors in determining the number of teachers certified and (2) the responsiveness of teachers in the "reserve pool" to…

  14. Economic Aspects of Higher Education Taken Under the World War II Bill of Rights. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggertsson, Thrainn

    The aim of this thesis is to bring to bear the concepts, tools, and theories of human capital and human resources economics to evaluate the Federal Government's massive involvement in higher education under the World War II GI Bill of Rights. The major findings include estimates of total human capital formation by education, both during and after…

  15. Labor market segmentation, human capital and the economics of crime. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McGahey, R.M.

    1982-08-24

    This dissertation analyzes the relationships between human capital, labor market structure and crime. Using a unique micro-level data base with individually matched crime and employment data for over 900 felony arrestees, it tests the relative explanatory power of neoclassical economic choice theory and labor market segmentation theory on the determinants of labor market outcomes, criminal behavior, and their interactions.

  16. A Pilot Study for Gainful Employment in Home Economics. Final Report. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozine, June; And Others

    The major purpose of the study was to develop and test curriculum materials for three entry level gainful employment courses: Child Care Services, Clothing Services, Food Services. A second objective was to formulate recommendations for policies and procedures to follow in initiating and developing gainful employment programs in home economics.…

  17. Home Economics Competency-Based Teacher Education Instructional Materials. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everts, Joanne; Eads, Sally

    A study was conducted to research and develop a statewide project for the improvement of home economics teacher education programs in Texas. The steering committee, composed of representatives from the Texas Education Agency, colleges and universities, and public school districts, directed a select group of forty-five state, area, and local home…

  18. An Economic Study of the Investment Effects of Education in Agriculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persons, Edgar A.; And Others

    To determine the absolute economic return to adult farm business management education, the diminishing marginal return effect from added increments of education, and benefit-cost ratio of the educational program for participants and the sponsoring community, data were collected from 3,578 farm business records representing farmers enrolled in farm…

  19. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, David; Ready, Carol A.

    2003-04-01

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The presence of contaminated uranium mill tailings adjacent to the city of Gunnison has been a local concern for many years. The following issues were identified during public meetings that were held by the DOE prior to distribution of an earlier version of this EA. Many of these issues will require mitigation. Groundwater contamination; in December 1989, a herd of 105 antelope were introduced in an area that includes the Landfill disposal site. There is concern that remedial action-related traffic in the area would result in antelope mortality. The proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road may restrict antelope access to their water supply; a second wildlife issue concerns the potential reduction in sage grouse use of breeding grounds (leks) and nesting habitat; the proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road would cross areas designated as wetlands by US Army Corps of Engineers (COE); the proposed disposal site is currently used for grazing by cattle six weeks a year in the spring. Additional concerns were stated in comments on a previous version of this EA. The proposed action is to consolidate and remove all contaminated materials associated with the Gunnison processing site to the Landfill disposal site six air miles east of Gunnison. All structures on the site (e.g., water tower, office buildings) were demolished in 1991. The debris is being stored on the site until it can be incorporated into the disposal cell at the disposal site. All contaminated materials would be trucked to the Landfill disposal site on a to-be-constructed haul road that crosses BLM-administered land.

  1. NGV stations based on mobile tube trailers: An economic analysis. Final report, June 1994-January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Keder, J.; Darrow, K.

    1995-01-01

    This report assesses the technical and economic issues associated with the use of mobile tube trailers for Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) refueling stations. Specifically, this report examines the mobile tube trailer concept developed by Pacific Cryongenics, Inc. and Pacific Gas and Electric. Mobile tube trailers are filled with compressed natural gas (CNG) at an underutilized compressor station and transported to satellite station locations. NGVs are filled at the satellite stations usig compressed gas from the tube trailer. Results of the economic analysis show that, under various operating conditions, the mobile tube trailer concept provides a cost effective alternative to NGV refueling stations with permanent compressors. In addition, the tube trailers were found to provide a substantial load for undertutilized compressor stations, resulting in reduced CNG costs at existing stations.

  2. Geothermal resource, engineering and economic feasibility study for the City of Ouray, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.T.; Raskin, R.; Zocholl, J.R.

    1982-07-31

    A geothermal energy feasibility study has been performed for the City of Ouray, Colorado, to determine the potential economic development opportunities to the City. The resource assessment indicates the resource to be associated with the Ouray fault zone, the Leadville limestone formation, the high thermal gradient in the area of the San Juan mountains, and the recharge from precipitation in the adjacent mountains. Four engineering designs of alternative sizes, costs, applications, and years of start-up have been defined to offer the City a range of development scales. Life cycle cost analyses have been conducted for cases of both public and private ownership. All systems are found to be feasible on both economic and technical grounds. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Ethanol production in southwestern New York: technical and economic feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Based upon the analysis conducted for this study, the development of centralized ethanol conversion facilities in the Steuben and Allegany Counties is likely to be commercially feasible if either locally produced cheese whey and/or imported corn are used as feedstocks. Development is shown to be profitable under a broad range of potential economic conditions and technical considerations. Four plant designs varying in annual production capacity from 1.675 to 27.5 million gallons of ethanol (and utilizing alternative conversion technologies and feedstocks) are investigated. In general, all of the various plant sizes investigated are economically viable. Although economic profitability is enhanced by the existence of federal subsidies, in the form of $0.40 per gallon from federal gasoline tax rebates, energy investment tax credits and low interest loans, a public subsidy is not necessary, under most conditions, to ensure the economic feasibility of any of the plant design investigated. In all cases, a by-product in the form of an animal feed is produced, thereby generating additional revenue for the conversion facility and adding to the likelihood of commercial feasibility. In the case of the corn/whey plant, the by-product takes the form of a distillers dried grain. In the case of the whey plants, it takes the form of a high mineral, medium protein feed supplement for low and moderate producing dairy cattle. Both have a ready market in the study region. Fermenting of deproteinized whey to produce ethanol and drying the resulting distillation slops for animal feed completely utilizes the original cheese whey. The techniques developed in this study produce three valuable products and leave no residual requiring disposal.

  4. Setting priorities for action plans at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C.

    1992-09-30

    This report summarizes work done by Applied Decision Analysis (ADA) for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under Subcontract Number 9-XQ2-Y3837-1 with the University of California. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of setting priorities for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) deficiencies at Los Alamos. The deficiencies were identified by a DOE Tiger Team that visited LANL in the fall of 1991, and by self assessments done by the Laboratory. ADA did the work described here between October 1991 and the end of September 1992. The ADA staff working on this project became part of a Risk Management Team in the Laboratory`s Integration and Coordination Office (ICO). During the project, the Risk Management Team produced a variety of documents describing aspects of the action-plan prioritization system. Some of those documents are attached to this report. Rather than attempt to duplicate their contents, this report provides a guide to those documents, and references them whenever appropriate.

  5. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  6. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect

    D. Vandel

    2003-09-01

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

  7. Analysis of the economic impacts from ethanol production in three New York State regions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, J.C.; Boisvert, R.N.; Kalter, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    This report describes the potential local economic impact of ethanol production industries for three multi-county regions of New York State. The study's input-output analysis suggests that investment in a small cheese whey-ethanol plant would generate far more local employment, per gallon of annual capacity, than a large corn-based plant which would rely more heavily on feedstocks from the outside region. In addition, a cheese whey ethanol plant's impact on dairies in the region would have a greater effect on the local economy than the ethanol plant itself.

  8. Economics and feasibility of co-composting solid waste in McHenry County. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, J.

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of composting various segments of the waste stream produced in McHenry County, IL. In particular, the study emphasized co-composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) with septage, co-composting of MSW with septage and sludge, leaf- and yard-waste composting, and composting various animal wastes. In addition to specific analysis of co-composting in McHenry, the report includes chapters on the technical description and implementation of composting, environmental considerations of co-composting, comparisons of different proprietary systems, the economics of composting, and an analysis of compost markets.

  9. Technical and economic barriers to innovative gas storage. Final report, November 1991-July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.A.; Hastings, G.A.

    1993-03-01

    To evaluate the technical and economic barriers to innovative natural gas storage technologies, advantages and disadvantages of several end use applications were analyzed, including on-grid deliverability of natural gas, transporting natural gas to off-grid end users, and storage of natural gas at an off-grid end user's site. Three basic innovative approaches were investigated: (1) separation of the higher molecular weight components of the pipeline gas and storage of the separated ethane, propane, butane, etc., as a liquid; (2) separation of the components with storage in the separating media; and (3) storage of the pipeline gas without changing its composition.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Stamina Mills site, North Smithfield, RI. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The five-acre Stamina Mills site is a former textile weaving and finishing facility in North Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island. A portion of the site is within the 100-year floodplain and wetland area of the Branch River. The manufacturing process used cleaning solvents, acids, bases and dyes for coloring, pesticides for moth proofing, and plasticizers to coat fabrics. Mill process wastes were placed in a landfill onsite. EPA initiated three removal actions from 1984 to 1990, including an extension of the municipal water supply to residents obtaining water from the affected aquifer; and treatment of two underground and one above-ground storage tanks, followed by offsite disposal. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides a final remedy and addresses both source control and management of contaminated ground water migration at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including TCE and PCE; other organics including pesticides; and metals including chromium.

  11. US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-21

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Washington County Landfill, lake Elmo, MN. (Second remedial action), November 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-15

    The 40-acre Washington County Landfill site is an inactive sanitary landfill in Lake Elmo, Washington County, Minnesota. Land use in the area is predominantly residential and agricultural. From 1969 to 1975, Washington and Ramsey counties used the site as a sanitary landfill. Monitoring by Washington County in 1981 revealed low level VOC contamination, which poses a health risk based on long-term ingestion of ground water. The ROD addresses a final remedy for drinking water supply as part of a second operable unit. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and xylenes. The selected remedial action for the site includes providing a municipal drinking water supply system to supply drinking water to 10 homes with private wells that have been affected by the contaminant plume; and continuing operation of the gradient control well and spray-irrigation treatment system for the first operable unit.

  13. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Peerless Plating, Muskegon Township, MI. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-21

    The 1-acre Peerless Plating site is a former electroplating facility in Muskegon Township, Michigan, and is located northwest of Little Black Creek and 1 mile north of Mona Lake. Lake Michigan supplies drinking water for residential and commercial businesses within a 3-mile radius of the site. From 1937 to 1983, onsite electroplating operations and processes included copper, nickel, chromium, cadmium, and zinc plating, in addition to burnishing, polishing, pickling, oiling, passivating, stress relieving, and dichromate dipping. In the 1970s, the state directed Peerless Plating to monitor waste discharge daily and to install a treatment system to meet reduced effluent limitations. The site violated the requirements and was charged by the state. The ROD addresses the onsite contaminated soil and ground water as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern are VOCs, including benzene, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and inorganics, including cyanide. The selected remedial action for the site are included.

  14. Engineering and economic evaluation of integrated gasification compressed air storage with humidification (IGCASH). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, O.; McCone, A.; Nakhamkin, M.; Patel, M.

    1993-11-01

    Integrated Gasification Compressed Air Storage with Humidification (IGCASH) is concept for an intermediate-load, cycling-duty plant with the environmental advantages of coal gasification and the reliability benefits of continuous operation of the hot gasification and turbomachinery equipment. The IGCASH concept integrates a quench-type coal gasification system with an advanced compressed air storage system in which the compression heat is recovered and stored in water which is used to humidify and preheat the air and fuel gas sent to the turbine. Bechtel under contract to EPRI (RP 2834-3) performed an engineering and economic evaluation to verify the feasibility of IGCASH as an option for intermediate-load power generation from coal. A baseline design was developed for a conceptual 400 MW generic IGCASH plant using currently available technology, including the Texaco full-quench gasification process, Westinghouse turbomachinery, and solution-mined salt-dome cavern for air storage. Three alternatives to the baseline design were also developed to assess the effects of storage water temperature and next-generation turbomachinery on plant performance and economics. The IGCASH concept compared favorably with conventional pulverized coal fired steam (PCFS) power generation. The IGCASH baseline design showed a significantly lower heat rate and yielded a lower cost of electricity than a comparable PCFS plant operating on the same duty cycle.

  15. Economic evaluation of particulate control technologies. Volume 1, New units, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaikwad, R.P.; Sloat, D.G.

    1992-09-01

    This report compares the installed capital and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs of reverse-air baghouses, pulse-jet baghouses, and electrostatic precipitators (ESPS) for utility coal-fired applications. For a 250-MW boiler, the pulse-jet baghouse capital cost ($50/kW installed) is 20% lower than an ESP with a 400 SCA ($63/kW installed) and 30% lower than a reverse-air baghouse ($71/kW installed). The levelized cost for the pulse-jet baghouse and the ESP is similar (3.4 mill/kWh) and lower than the reverse-air baghouse (3. 8 M/kWh). In general, ESPs are the economic choice for coals with high-sulfur content or low-resistivity fly ash, whereas baghouses are the choice for coals with low-sulfur content and high fly ash resistivity. When controls for increasingly stringent emission limits were evaluated, baghouses became increasingly attractive for all coals. However, even at emission limits less than the current New Source Performance Standards (less than 0.03 lb/MBtu), the ESP still has an economic advantage for very precipitable, low-resistivity fly ash from high-sulfur coals.

  16. Ethanol production in southwestern New York: technical and economic feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalter, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The development of one or more centralized ethanol conversion facilities in the Southwestern portion of New York State is likely to be commercially feasible if either locally-produced cheese whey and/or imported corn are used as a feedstock. Development is shown to be highly profitable under a broad range of economic conditions and technical considerations. Four plant designs ranging in annual production capacity from 1.675 to 27.5 million gallons of ethanol (utilizing alternative feedstocks) are investigated. Although all are found to be economically viable, maximum profitability per unit production are obtained from a 2.5 million gallon plant using only whey. In all cases, a by-product in the form of animal feed is generated, which will result in additional revenue for the conversion facility. In the case of corn/whey plants it takes the form of a distillers dried grain. In the case of whey plants, it takes the form of a high-mineral, medium protein feed supplement for low and moderate producing dairy cattle. Both have a ready market in the region. Also the cheese whey is assumed to be deproteinized at the cheese manufacturing plant prior to delivery to an ethanol conversion plant to obtain a valuable, human-grade food protein.

  17. Economic effects of oil and gas development on marine aquaculture leases. Study 17. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Caswell, M.F.

    1991-03-01

    There are three primary mariculture products grown in California waters: oysters, mussels, and abalone. In total, the California mariculture industry earns revenues of about $6.5 million. Water quality degradation was the primary concern of most growers. Coliform bacteria and pesticide residues are currently threatening several shallow-water sites. Lease holders (and potential lease holders) for deep-water sites state that coliform bacteria from municipal sewer outfalls and offshore oil and gas drilling effluents are the greatest dangers to their profitability. The Southern California Educational Initiative is an attempt to determine whether such concerns are warranted. A simple model of economic externalities was described to highlight the scientific data one must gather so as to choose the optimal production levels for both energy and mariculture resources. That information is necessary to assess the economic consequences to the California mariculture industry of chronic exposure to oil and gas development. The co-development model shows that the marginal (incremental) effects of oil production on mariculture costs needs to be assessed. The model also shows that if the effects are moderated by distance from the point of discharge, such changes must be estimated in order to determine optimal lease boundaries. The report concludes that interdisciplinary cooperation is essential for designing a co-development plan that maximizes the social welfare to be gained from developing multiple coastal resources.

  18. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES). Volume II. Detailed results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept are examined. ACES is studied in a variety of different applications and compared to a number of conventional systems. The different applications are studied in two groups: the class of building into which the ACES is incorporated and the climatic region in which the ACES is located. Buildings investigated include single-family and multi-family residences and a commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. The economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of conventional systems; namely, electric resistance heating, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; air-to-air heat pump and electric domestic water heating; oil-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; and gas-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and gas domestic water heating.

  19. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room

  20. Final Technical Report on Development of an Economic and Efficient Biodiesel production Process (NC)

    SciTech Connect

    Tirla, Cornelia; Dooling, Thomas A.; Smith, Rachel B.; Shi, Xinyan; Shahbazi, Abolghasem

    2014-03-19

    The Biofuels Team at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke and North Carolina A&T State University carried out a joint research project aimed at developing an efficient process to produce biodiesel. In this project, the team developed and tested various types of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts which could replace the conventionally used soluble potassium hydroxide catalyst which, traditionally, must be separated and disposed of at the end of the process. As a result of this screening, the homogeneous catalyst choline hydroxide was identified as a potential replacement for the traditional catalyst used in this process, potassium hydroxide, due to its decreased corrosiveness and toxicity. A large number of heterogeneous catalysts were produced and tested in order to determine the scaffold, ion type and ion concentration which would produce optimum yield of biodiesel. The catalyst with 12% calcium on Zeolite β was identified as being highly effective and optimal reaction conditions were identified. Furthermore, a packed bed reactor utilizing this type of catalyst was designed, constructed and tested in order to further optimize the process. An economic analysis of the viability of the project showed that the cost of an independent farmer to produce the fuelstock required to produce biodiesel exceeds the cost of petroleum diesel under current conditions and that therefore without incentives, farmers would not be able to benefit economically from producing their own fuel. An educational website on biodiesel production and analysis was produced and a laboratory experiment demonstrating the production of biodiesel was developed and implemented into the Organic Chemistry II laboratory curriculum at UNCP. Five workshops for local farmers and agricultural agents were held in order to inform the broader community about the various fuelstock available, their cultivation and the process and advantages of biodiesel use and production. This project fits both

  1. Achieving the Security, Environmental, and Economic Potential of Bioenergy. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, John A

    2006-06-07

    A group of business, government, environmental and academic leaders convened in a dialogue by the Aspen Institute proposed a series of actions to promote the widespread commercialization of both corn and cellulosic ethanol to improve energy security, the environment, and the economy. Co-chaired by Booz Allen Hamilton Vice President and former CIA Director R. James Woolsey and former Congressman Tom Ewing (R. IL), they developed a series of recommendations involving improved crop yields, processing of biomass into ethanol, manufacture of more cars that can burn either ethanol or gasoline, and the provision of ethanol pumps at more filling stations. Their report, "A High Growth Strategy for Ethanol, includes a discussion of the potential of ethanol, the group's recommendations, and a series of discussion papers commissioned for the dialogue.

  2. Economic impact analysis of effluent limitations and standards for plastics molding and forming industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued effluent limitations and standards in December, 1984, for the Plastics Molding and Forming Industry. The report estimates the economic impacts associated with pollution control costs. Plant-specific treatment costs for 20 percent of the impacted plants are compared to estimated pre-tax plant income to assess the impact of treatment costs on plant liquidity. Then a closure analysis is performed, comparing the current salvage value of the plant's assets with the present value of the plant's cash flow plus the terminal value of its assets. The results are extrapolated to the 558 plants which, as direct dischargers, would be impacted. The results of this plant-level analysis are used to assess the indirect impacts of the regulation, e.g., price changes, unemployment and shifts, in the balance of foreign trade.

  3. Solar photo-catalytic hydrogen: systems considerations, economics, and potential markets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R V; Witwer, J G

    1981-05-01

    A three part analysis was done consisting of (1) an examination of the physical principles of solar photocatalytic energy conversion and the status of research in this area, (2) an economic analysis of the potential costs of producing hydrogen from such a system, and (3) an analysis of the markets for hydrogen and the possible penetration of these markets by solar photocatalytic hydrogen. The cost range of flat plate thermal collectors, heliostats, and a photovoltaic system are compared. The cost range of flat plate thermal collectors was used to represent the cost of photocatalytic systems. On the basis of the photovoltaics cost outlook, it is found that photocatalytic systems would not cost less than $180 to $330 per m/sup 2/ range. On the basis of the heliostat cost outlook, a cost lower than $180 to $330 per m could be projected only for very large production volumes and very large installations. (LEW)

  4. Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

  5. SNOX demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The SNOX process, developed by Haldor Topsoe A/S and demonstrated and marketed in North America by ABB Environmental Systems (ABBES), is an innovative process which removes both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from power plant flue gases. Sulfur dioxide is recovered as high purity, concentrated sulfuric acid and nitrogen oxides are converted to nitrogen gas and water vapor; no additional waste streams are produced. As part of the Clean Coal Technology Program, this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Ohio Coal Development Office, ABBES, Snamprogetti, and Ohio Edison. The project objective was to demonstrate the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of the SNOX process on an electric power plant firing high-sulfur Ohio Coal. A 35-MWe demonstration has been conducted on a 108-MWe unit, Ohio Edison`s Niles Plant Unit 2, in Trumbull County, Ohio. The $31.4 million project began site preparation in November 1990 and commenced treating flue gas in March of 1992. A parametric test program has been completed. This report presents a description of the technology, results from the 33 month testing and operation phase, and information from a commercial scale economic evaluation. During the demonstration, the process met or exceeded its design goals of 95% SO{sub 2} removal, 90% NO{sub x} removal, and production of commercial grade (>93.2 wt.%) sulfuric acid. The plant was operated for approximately 8000 hours and produced more than 5600 tons of acid, which was purchased and distributed by a local supplier to end users. Projected economics for a 500 MWe commercial SNOX plant indicate a total capital requirement of 305 $/kW, levelized incremental cost of power at 6.1 mills/kWh, 219 $/ton of SO{sub 2} removed, and 198 $/ton of SO{sub 2}+NO{sub x} removed (all at constant dollars).

  6. Process engineering and economic evaluations of diaphragm and membrane chlorine cell technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The chlor-alkali manufacturing technologies of (1), diaphragm cells (2), current technology membrane cells (3), catalytic cathode membrane cells (4), oxygen-cathode membrane cells and to a lesser extent several other related emerging processes are studied. Comparisons have been made on the two bases of (1) conventional industrial economics, and (2) energy consumption. The current diaphragm cell may have a small economic advantage over the other technologies at the plant size of 544 metric T/D (600 T/D). The three membrane cells all consume less energy, with the oxygen-cathode cell being the lowest. The oxygen-cathode cell appears promising as a low energy chlor-alkali cell where there is no chemical market for hydrogen. Federal funding of the oxygen-cathode cell has been beneficial to the development of the technology, to electrochemical cell research, and may help maintain the US's position in the international chlor-alkali technology marketplace. Tax law changes inducing the installation of additional cells in existing plants would produce the quickest reduction in power consumption by the chlor-alkali industry. Alternative technologies such as the solid polymer electrolyte cell, the coupling of diaphragm cells with fuel cells and the dynamic gel diaphragm have a strong potential for reducing chloralkali industry power consumption. Adding up all the recent and expected improvements that have become cost-effective, the electrical energy required to produce a unit of chlorine by 1990 should be only 50% to 60% of that used in 1970. In the United States the majority of the market does not demand salt-free caustic. About 75% of the electrolytic caustic is produced in diaphragm cells and only a small part of that is purified. This study indicates that unless membrane cell costs are greatly reduced or a stronger demand develops for salt-free caustic, the diaphragm cells will remain competitive. (WHK)

  7. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in

  8. Technical and economic feasibility of enzyme hydrolysis for ethanol production from wood. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, R.W.; Stahr, J.J.

    1985-06-01

    Under the sponsorship of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Arthur D. Little, Inc., examined the feasibility of enzyme hydrolysis for ethanol production from wood. The feasibility study included a plant location in Jefferson County, New York, and the use of deproteinated cheese whey as the substrate for enzyme production. Debarked northern hardwoods were selected as feedstock for the enzyme hydrolysis operation. The preliminary process engineering design was based on a plant receiving about 450 dry tons of hardwood per day and producing about 5.5 million gallons of denatured ethanol per year. By-products included cogenerated electricity and a protein-rich animal feed. Total capital investment for the facility was estimated to be $60.575 million in 1984. Two base case cash flow analyses were carried out, one with NYSERDA input variables and one with SERI input variables. These resulted in required ethanol selling prices of $3.87 per gallon and $4.45 per gallon, respectively. Given the disparity between these predictions and the current actual price of ethanol, it was concluded that the enzyme hydrolysis of wood is not presently economic. Further research and development are also needed to resolve remaining technological uncertainties and establish markets for new products. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  10. Preliminary design and economic investigations of diffuser-augmented wind turbines (DAWT). Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, K.M.

    1981-12-01

    A preferred design and configuration approach for the DAWT innovative wind energy conversion system is suggested. A preliminary economic assessment is made for limited production rates of units between 5 and 150 kW rated output. Nine point designs are used to arrive at the conclusions regarding best construction material for the diffuser and busbar cost of electricity (COE). It is estimated that for farm and REA cooperative end users, the COE can range between 2 and 3.5 cents/kWh for sites with annual average wind speeds of 16 and 12 mph (25.7 and 19.3 km/h) respectively, and 150 kW rated units. No tax credits are included in these COE figures. For commercial end users of these 150 kW units, the COE ranges between 4.0 and 6.5 cents/kWh for 16 and 12 mph sites. These estimates in 1971 dollars are lower than DOE goals set in 1978 for the rating size and end applications. Recommendations are made for future activities to maintain steady, systematic progress toward mature development of the DAWT.

  11. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Technical and economic feasibility of membrane technology. Final report, September 17, 1979-November 16, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The first phase of the project involved the development of a literature survey relative to the state-of-the-art for reverse osmosis (RO), electrodialysis (ED), and ultra filtration (UF). A comprehensive examination of both domestic and foreign literature provided a basis for selection of membrane candidates evaluated in Phase II and III of the project. In addition, an investigation was conducted identifying the development of other commercial membrane materials for use other than in the sugar industry (cheese industry). During Phase II, selected membranes were evaluated using a prototype mounting configuration, different temperatures, pressures, feed streams as well as some preliminary testing on ED and UF. The feed streams evaluated included diffusion juice, thin juice, hot Steffan waste, and ion exchanged purified effluents. Replicated runs were performed on several different batches of membranes and feeds to establish significant differences. The activity conducted during Phase III consisted of evaluating selected membranes over a long-term performance basis, i.e., pilot plant evaluation. Membrane material were mounted in pilot hardware for testing purposes. Determinations of membrane life cycles were made as well as establishing the preliminary economics of the operation as related to replacement module service life and on-line operating characteristics.

  13. Economic and engineering evaluation of plant oils as a diesel fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, C.R.; LePori, W.A.; Johnson, L.A.; Griffin, R.C.; Diehl, K.C.; Moore, D.S.; Lacewell, R.D.; Coble, C.G.; Lusas, E.W.; Hiler, E.A.

    1982-04-15

    The annual total yield of plant oils in the US is about 3.7 billion gallons. Diesel use by agriculture is about 2.0 billion gallons annually and is growing rapidly relative to gasoline use. Based on these amounts, plant oils could satisfy agriculture's diesel fuel requirements during the near future. However, diversion of large quantities of plant oils for such purposes would have dramatic impacts on plant oil prices and be reflected in numerous adjustments throughout agriculture and other sectors of the economy. The competitive position of sunflowers for plant oil production in Texas was analyzed. In those regions with a cotton alternative, sunflowers were not, for the most part, economically competitive. However, sunflower production is competitive with grain sorghum in certain cases. To develop a meaningful production base for oilseed crops in Texas, yields need to be improved or increases in oilseed prices relative to cotton must take place. This implies some limitations for the potential of Texas to produce large quantities of plant oils.

  14. Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A.; Schoenung, S.M. |

    1998-04-01

    This report presents the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to accomplish two objectives: supply pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supply distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking energy and capacity to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs. The systems studied include a refueling station (including such components as an electrolyzer, storage, hydrogen dispensers, and compressors) plus on-site hydrogen fueled electricity generation units (e.g., fuel cells or combustion engines). The operational strategy is to use off-peak electricity in the electrolyzer to fill hydrogen storage, and to dispatch the electricity generation about one hour per day to meet the utility`s local and system peaks. The utility was assumed to be willing to pay for such service up to its avoided generation, fuel, transmission and distribution costs.

  15. Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

  16. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect

    L. O. Nelson

    2003-09-01

    This operations and maintenance plan supports the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF) remedial action work plan and identifies the approach and requirements for the operations and maintenance activities specific to the final medical zone treatment remedy. The NPTF provides the treatment system necessary to remediate the medical zone portion of the OU 1-07B contaminated groundwater plume. Design and construction of the New Pump and Treat Facility is addressed in the NPTF remedial action work plan. The scope of this operation and maintenance plan includes facility operations and maintenance, remedy five-year reviews, and the final operations and maintenance report for the NPTF.

  17. Determination and confirmation of narasin and monensin in chicken, swine, and bovine tissues by LC/MS/MS: Final Action 2011.24.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Kimberly R; Burnett, Thomas J; Brunelle, Sharon L; Ulrey, W Dennis; Coleman, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    A multilaboratory study was conducted to validate the reproducibility of AOAC Official Method 2011.24 for determination of narasin and monensin in chicken, swine, and bovine tissues. This study was intended to satisfy requirements for Final Action status through the AOAC Expert Review Panel process. Ten laboratories participated in the study, analyzing blind duplicates of five incurred residue materials for each analyte. After removal of invalid data sets, the method reproducibility (RSDR 12.8-60.6%, HorRat 0.45-1.47) was within AOAC acceptance criteria. The method was awarded Final Action status by the Official Methods Board on October 4, 2012. PMID:24000767

  18. Economic-impact study for proposed Ground-water-Quality Standards 35 IL Admin. Code 260. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, R.; Buss, D.F.

    1990-12-01

    The state passed the Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (IGPA) in September 1987, which among other things, directed the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) to develop groundwater classification system and nondegradation procedures. The IGPA also mandated that the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources conduct an Economic Impact Study of the IEPA's proposed regulations. The report also analyzed alternatives considered during the development of the Code 620 regulations in addition to the final outcome. The proposed regulations would establish a groundwater classification which would be partially use-based and partially water quality-based. Numeric groundwater quality standards are also established which apply to General Resource and Potable Resource Groundwater. Cleanup criteria are identified for sites of contamination. As determined by this investigation, the most significant costs of the IEPA's proposed regulations could be expected to be groundwater remediation costs, which are those costs associated with returning contaminated groundwater to compliance with the standards.

  19. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Appendix D, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the proposed disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Arkwood, Inc. , Omaha, AR. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 15-acre Arkwood site is a former wood treatment facility in Boone County, Arkansas. Land use in the vicinity of the site is primarily agricultural and light industrial. Ground water on, or near the site is highly susceptible to contamination as a result of underground cavities, enlarged fractures and conduits which hinder monitoring and pumping. State investigations conducted during the 1980s documented PCP and creosote contamination in surface water, soil, debris, and buildings throughout the site. Contaminated surface features at the site include the wood treatment facility, a sinkhole area contaminated with oily waste, a ditch area, a wood storage area, and an ash pile. In 1987, EPA ordered the site owner to perform an immediate removal action, which included implementing site access including fencing and sign postings. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses remediation of all affected media, and provides the final remedy for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sludge, debris, ground water and surface water are organics including pentachlorophenol (PCP), PAHs, and dioxin; and oils.

  1. 76 FR 20807 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Sellwood Bridge Project, SE Tacoma Street and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims for judicial review of actions by FHWA... subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions that are... Federal law that authorizes judicial review of a claim provides a time period of less than 180 days...

  2. Final Legislative and Budget Actions in Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Texas: Notes from Other SREB States. Legislative Report No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  3. Governors' Proposals in Delaware, Louisiana, North Carolina and Tennessee; Final Actions in Georgia and Kentucky; Notes from Other SREB States. Legislative Report No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  4. Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, F.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

  5. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  6. Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

  7. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Remedial Action Selection Report. Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This proposed remedial action plan incorporates the results of detailed investigation of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the proposed disposal site. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/waterborne materials to a permanent repository at the proposed Burro Canyon disposal cell. The proposed disposal site will be geomorphically stable. Seismic design parameters were developed for the geotechnical analyses of the proposed cell. Cell stability was analyzed to ensure long-term performance of the disposal cell in meeting design standards, including slope stability, settlement, and liquefaction potential. The proposed cell cover and erosion protection features were also analyzed and designed to protect the RRM (residual radioactive materials) against surface water and wind erosion. The location of the proposed cell precludes the need for permanent drainage or interceptor ditches. Rock to be used on the cell top-, side-, and toeslopes was sized to withstand probable maximum precipitation events.

  8. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report. Revised final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  9. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, Geology report: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  10. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

  11. Remedial Action Plan and final design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Alkema, K.

    1991-03-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities that are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Green River, Utah. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the state of Utah and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state of Utah, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix 8 of the Cooperative Agreement.

  12. 78 FR 77477 - Notice of Statute of Limitations on Claims; Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Register on September 23, 2011, FR Doc. 2011-24504, page 59125, and in the FHWA/FTA ROD issued on December... January 5, 2012, FR Doc. 2011-33784, pages 531- 532, by the FHWA and FTA regarding environmental actions... the Interstate 5 Bridge across the Columbia River AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...

  13. 78 FR 54947 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed US 1 Improvements-Rockingham, Richmond County, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... County, NC ] from Sandhill Road (SR 1971) to Marston Road (SR 1001). Those actions grant licenses... proposed action will improve 19 miles of US 1 from Sandhill Road (SR 1971) south of Rockingham to Marston... on new location, and widens about five miles of existing US 1. From Sandhill Road (SR 1971) to...

  14. 78 FR 23630 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment C) in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    .... 1251- 1342; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), 16 U.S.C. 4601-4604. 8. Executive Orders: E.O... Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for...) to SH 288 in Fort Bend and Brazoria Counties, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits,...

  15. 77 FR 34456 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Newberg Dundee Bypass Project Project: Yamhill and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...: Notice of Limitations on Claims for Judicial Review of Actions by FHWA. SUMMARY: This notice announces... seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before December 10, 2012. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial review of...

  16. 75 FR 53735 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on East Lake Sammamish Master Plan Trail in King County, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review of Actions by FHWA and Other Federal Agencies. SUMMARY: This notice... seeking judicial review of the Federal agency actions on the transportation project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before February 28, 2011. If the Federal law that authorizes judicial...

  17. Final Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Falls City uranium mill tailings site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This EA examines the short- and long-term effects of the DOE`s proposed remedial action for the Falls City tailings site. The no action alternative is also examined. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented here to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an EIS will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE will issue an official ``Finding of No Significant Impact`` and implement the proposed action.

  18. Economic Impact of the Hawaii State Public Library System (HSPLS) on the Business and Tourism Industries Study: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joe; McClure, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    Ryan Information Management conducted a return on investment (ROI) study of the economic value of the Hawaii State Public Library System (HSPLS) and identified potential additional sources of operating revenue. HSPLS economic value was examined from four viewpoints, HSPLS: direct economic impact, market value, peer comparison and value to library…

  19. Problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorikov, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    This article discusses a discrete-time dynamical system consisting of a set a controllable objects (region and forming it municipalities). The dynamics each of these is described by the corresponding vector nonlinear discrete-time recurrent vector equations and its control system consist from two levels: basic (control level I) that is dominating and subordinate level (control level II). Both levels have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. In this paper we study the problem of optimization of guaranteed result for program control by the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks. For this problem we proposed in this work an economical and mathematical model of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks and the general scheme for its solving.

  20. Problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks

    SciTech Connect

    Shorikov, A. F.

    2015-11-30

    This article discusses a discrete-time dynamical system consisting of a set a controllable objects (region and forming it municipalities). The dynamics each of these is described by the corresponding vector nonlinear discrete-time recurrent vector equations and its control system consist from two levels: basic (control level I) that is dominating and subordinate level (control level II). Both levels have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. In this paper we study the problem of optimization of guaranteed result for program control by the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks. For this problem we proposed in this work an economical and mathematical model of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks and the general scheme for its solving.

  1. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    Economic analysis of the solar energy system installed at Loxahatchee, was developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis was accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  2. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Economic analysis of the solar energy system installed at Loxahatchee, was developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis was accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  3. Solar energy system economic evaluation: final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Loxahatchee, Florida Operational Test Site (OTS) is developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  4. Determination and confirmation of parent and total ractopamine in bovine, swine, and turkey tissues by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: Final Action 2011.23.

    PubMed

    Ulrey, W Dennis; Burnett, Thomas J; Brunelle, Sharon L; Lombardi, Kimberly R; Coleman, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    A multilaboratory study of AOAC Official Method 2011.23 was performed to satisfy requirements for Final Action status through the AOAC expert review panel process. The study included nine collaborating laboratories from the United States, Canada, Brazil, and The Netherlands. Five incurred residue materials (bovine muscle, bovine liver, swine muscle, swine liver, and turkey muscle) were analyzed by each laboratory as blind duplicates for parent and total ractopamine content. After removal of invalid data, the parent and total ractopamine methods demonstrated acceptable reproducibility (RSDR 11.4-42.4%, HorRatR 0.34-2.01) based on AOAC criteria. The method was awarded Final Action status by the Official Methods Board on October 4, 2012. PMID:24000769

  5. The Social, Political, Economic, and Legal Aspects of Affirmative Action Admission Litigation from 2002-2007 for Five Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Mars, Douglas V.

    2010-01-01

    Litigation against colleges and universities has prompted the need to re-examine the legalities of the means by which they strive for a diverse student population. Court decisions have resulted in mixed signals about the use of various types of affirmative action policies. This study' method presented an analysis of archival data to provide a…

  6. Code development incorporating environmental, safety, and economic aspects of fusion reactors (FY 92--94). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.K.; Fowler, T.K.; Holdren, J.P.

    1994-11-01

    This is the Final Report for a three-year (FY 92--94) study of the Environmental, Safety, and Economic (ESE) aspects of fusion energy systems, emphasizing development of computerized approaches suitable for incorporation as modules in fusion system design codes. First, as is reported in Section 2, the authors now have operating a simplified but complete environment and safety evaluation code, BESAFE. The first tests of BESAFE as a module of the SUPERCODE, a design optimization systems code at LLNL, are reported in Section 3. Secondly, as reported in Section 4, the authors have maintained a strong effort in developing fast calculational schemes for activation inventory evaluation. In addition to these major accomplishments, considerable progress has been made on research on specific topics as follows. A tritium modeling code TRIDYN was developed in collaboration with the TSTA group at LANL and the Fusion Nuclear Technology group at UCLA. A simplified algorithm has been derived to calculate the transient temperature profiles in the blanket during accidents. The scheme solves iteratively a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing about 10 regions of the blanket by preserving energy balance. The authors have studied the physics and engineering aspects of divertor modeling for safety applications. Several modifications in the automation and characterization of environmental and safety indices have been made. They have applied this work to the environmental and safety comparisons of stainless steel with alternative structural materials for fusion reactors. A methodology in decision analysis utilizing influence and decision diagrams has been developed to model fusion reactor design problems. Most of the work during this funding period has been reported in 26 publications including theses, journal publications, conference papers, and technical reports, as listed in Section 11.

  7. 29 CFR 37.80 - What happens if a recipient fails to issue a Notice of Final Action within 90 days of the date on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What happens if a recipient fails to issue a Notice of Final Action within 90 days of the date on which a complaint was filed? 37.80 Section 37.80 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998...

  8. 29 CFR 37.79 - If, before the 90-day period has expired, a recipient issues a Notice of Final Action with which...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true If, before the 90-day period has expired, a recipient issues a Notice of Final Action with which the complainant is dissatisfied, how long does the complainant have to file a complaint with the Director? 37.79 Section 37.79 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION...

  9. 17 CFR 171.42 - Notice of a final decision of the National Futures Association in a member responsibility action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the National Futures Association in a member responsibility action. 171.42 Section 171.42 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION RULES RELATING TO REVIEW OF NATIONAL FUTURES ASSOCIATION DECISIONS IN DISCIPLINARY, MEMBERSHIP DENIAL, REGISTRATION AND MEMBER...

  10. 78 FR 24794 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed Presque Isle Bypass in Aroostook County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Isle Bypass FEIS located in the Town of Presque Isle, Aroostook County, Maine. Those actions grant... Governments. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Number 20.205, Highway Planning and...

  11. Feasibility study of contamination remediation at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, California. Volume 1. Remedial-action alternatives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cullinane, M.J.; Lee, C.R.; O'Neil, L.J.

    1988-09-01

    This report identifies and describes potential remedial actions to eliminate or mitigate the release of hazardous substances onto lands of the Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA. Hazardous substances identified as necessitating remedial actions include lead, cadmium, zinc, copper, selenium, and arsenic. The proposed remedial actions are designed to address existing or potential impacts identified in a separate study. These identified impacts include: contamination of soil with metals; contamination and toxicity in plants and soil invertebrates; reduced plant growth; increased soil acidity; surface water contamination; air contamination; loss of quantity and quality of wildlife habitat; loss of wetland function; and loss of ultimate land use. The release of hazardous substances at seven sites was identified in the remedial investigation. The seven individual areas were consolidated into four remedial action subsites (RASS's) based on an analysis of the topography and nature of the habitat.

  12. 76 FR 18548 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on Three Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Louisiana AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: This... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... an inspection. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Diane Smith, Environmental Protection...

  13. Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the Grace Road site (631-22G) operable unit: Final action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Grace Road Site located at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The selected action was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy satisfies both CERCLA and RCRA 3004 requirements. This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA unit.

  14. Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the Gunsite 113 Access Road (631-24G) Operable Unit: Final Action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit located at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. The selected action was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy satisfies both CERCLA and RCRA 3004(U) requirements. This decision is based ont he Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA Unit.

  15. Male Enrollment in Secondary Home Economics Programs in Pennsylvania Public Schools. Final Report, July 1, 1978, to June 30, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamason, Carolyn Starner

    A study was conducted to (1) describe male enrollment in secondary home economics programs, (2) compile data on the home economics teachers and departments, and (3) gain insight into factors the school superintendents saw as having the most effect on male enrollment in the public secondary schools in Pennsylvania. Data were collected through…

  16. THE PRODUCTION AND EVALUATION OF THREE COMPUTER-BASED ECONOMICS GAMES FOR THE SIXTH GRADE. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WING, RICHARD L.; AND OTHERS

    THE PURPOSE OF THE EXPERIMENT WAS TO PRODUCE AND EVALUATE 3 COMPUTER-BASED ECONOMICS GAMES AS A METHOD OF INDIVIDUALIZING INSTRUCTION FOR GRADE 6 STUDENTS. 26 EXPERIMENTAL SUBJECTS PLAYED 2 ECONOMICS GAMES, WHILE A CONTROL GROUP RECEIVED CONVENTIONAL INSTRUCTION ON SIMILAR MATERIAL. IN THE SUMERIAN GAME, STUDENTS SEATED AT THE TYPEWRITER TERMINALS…

  17. 77 FR 39795 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Interstate 395 High Occupancy (HOV) Vehicle Ramp at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Occupancy (HOV) Vehicle Ramp at Seminary Road Project in Virginia AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration...). The actions relate to the Interstate 395 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Ramp at Seminary Road project in... 395 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Ramp at Seminary Road. The project would involve construction of...

  18. The Law and Collective Negotiations in Education. Volume II, Collective Action by Public School Teachers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Wesley A.

    This volume on law and collective negotiations in the schools is the second in a series of 4 monographs comprising a broad investigation of teacher collective action in local school districts in the United States. Part I (30 pages) of this volume deals with emerging local doctrine relating to the rights of teachers and other public employees to…

  19. 75 FR 62919 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... at McIntire Road Project in Virginia AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road project in the City of Charlottesville, Virginia... approvals for the following project in the State of Virginia: Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire...

  20. 75 FR 32835 - Notice of Statute of Limitations on Claims; Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ...). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, the Interstate 10 High Occupancy Toll Lanes project... Occupancy Vehicle Lane into a High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane on I-10 San Bernardino Freeway/El Monte Busway. Work involves installation of signage and toll infrastructure, restriping of the existing lanes...

  1. 75 FR 25309 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Expanded Intermodal Freight Terminal in Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Freight Terminal in Michigan AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Yard, also known as the Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (DIFT) and associated external-to-terminal... following expansion project in the State of Michigan: Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal. The...

  2. 17 CFR 240.19d-1 - Notices by self-regulatory organizations of final disciplinary actions, denials, bars, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... required in the statement supporting the organization's determination required by section 6(d) (1) or (2... action in which a national securities exchange imposes a fine not exceeding $1000 or suspends floor... imposed consists of a fine not exceeding $2500 and the sanctioned person has not sought an...

  3. 75 FR 3277 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment F-2) in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Protection Policy Act (FPPA) [7 U.S.C. 4201-4209]. 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act [33 U.S.C. 1251- 1342]; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) . 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990 Protection of... Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims...

  4. 76 FR 9641 - Delegation of Authority to Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ..., and Economics AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule reaffirms..., Education, and Economics for requests for the United States Department of Agriculture Interested Government... Economics as USDA's authorized signatory for requests for all 2-year foreign residence waivers. Pursuant...

  5. Positive Catch & Economic Benefits of Periodic Octopus Fishery Closures: Do Effective, Narrowly Targeted Actions ‘Catalyze’ Broader Management?

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas A.; Oleson, Kirsten L. L.; Ratsimbazafy, Hajanaina; Raberinary, Daniel; Benbow, Sophie; Harris, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    Overview Eight years of octopus fishery records from southwest Madagascar reveal significant positive impacts from 36 periodic closures on: (a) fishery catches and (b) village fishery income, such that (c) economic benefits from increased landings outweigh costs of foregone catch. Closures covered ~20% of a village’s fished area and lasted 2-7 months. Fishery Catches from Each Closed Site Octopus landings and catch per unit effort (CPUE) significantly increased in the 30 days following a closure’s reopening, relative to the 30 days before a closure (landings: +718%, p<0.0001; CPUE: +87%, p<0.0001; n = 36). Open-access control sites showed no before/after change when they occurred independently of other management (“no ban”, n = 17/36). On the other hand, open-access control sites showed modest catch increases when they extended a 6-week seasonal fishery shutdown (“ban”, n = 19/36). The seasonal fishery shutdown affects the entire region, so confound all potential control sites. Fishery Income in Implementing Villages In villages implementing a closure, octopus fishery income doubled in the 30 days after a closure, relative to 30 days before (+132%, p<0.001, n = 28). Control villages not implementing a closure showed no increase in income after “no ban” closures and modest increases after “ban” closures. Villages did not show a significant decline in income during closure events. Net Economic Benefits from Each Closed Site Landings in closure sites generated more revenue than simulated landings assuming continued open-access fishing at that site (27/36 show positive net earnings; mean +$305/closure; mean +57.7% monthly). Benefits accrued faster than local fishers’ time preferences during 17-27 of the 36 closures. High reported rates of illegal fishing during closures correlated with poor economic performance. Broader Co-Management We discuss the implications of our findings for broader co-management arrangements, particularly for catalyzing

  6. Malczyce, Poland: a multifaceted community action project in eastern Europe in a time of rapid economic change.

    PubMed

    Moskalewicz, J; Swiatktewicz, G

    2000-01-01

    The major focus of this paper is the sustainability of a one-year demonstration project on drug misuse prevention, which was implemented in a local community affected by acute economic crisis and high unemployment. The project was initiated by the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, and supported by the European Commission. The primary goal of the project was to demonstrate that community-based prevention is possible and feasible within the context of current transitions in Poland. Its major outcome was a community prevention package consisting of a number of booklets and videos to assist other communities in their prevention efforts. Experiences from this study suggest that factors contributing to the sustainability of a community prevention project can be identified and emphasized through simple analysis of community surveys, as well as focus group discussion. PMID:10677883

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Brio Refining Site, Harris County, Texas, March 1988. First remedial action. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-31

    The 58-acre Brio Refining site is located in Harris County, Texas, approximately 20 miles southeast of Houston. The site is broken into two parcels, 49-acre Brio North and 9-acre Brio South, separated by Drive Farm Road. Between 1957 and 1982 the site refined crude oil and styrene tars to produce toluene, ethylbenzene, solvents, naphthalene, diesel fuel and kerosene. Site investigation indicate that between 500,000-700,000 sq yds of onsite soil have measurable contamination, and that high levels of VOCs exist in ground water underlying the site. The selected remedial action for the Brio Refining site includes: Excavation and incineration or biological treatment of all onsite soils, sludges, and liquids found to be above action levels defined in the Endangerment Assessment, with backfilling of all treated material passing the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Raymark Site, operable unit 1, Montgomery County, PA. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-30

    The 7-acre Raymark site is an active metal manufacturing and electroplating plant in the Borough of Hatboro, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The site, located in an industrial area, is approximately 100 feet from the nearest residence. The nearest surface water is Pennypack Creek, which flows 4,000 feet southwest of the site. As part of the rivet manufacturing processes at the plant, VOCs, including 30 to 40 gallons of TCE, were used daily at the site to clean and degrease metal parts. The ROD addresses the soil/source of contamination as the final action at the site and is referred to as OU1. The drinking water and risks posed by groundwater (OU2 and OU3, respectively) were addressed in a previous 1990 ROD. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil/source are VOCs, including 1,2-DCE, PCE, and TCE. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Pagano Salvage site, Los Lunas, NM. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-27

    The 1.4-acre Pagano Salvage site is in Los Lunas, Valencia County, New Mexico, and consists of a family-run salvage business and a residence. During 1983, salvage operations at the site included purchasing high technology scrap material from Federal facilities such as transformers, drums containing waste fluids, and capacitors. Site inspections in 1984, 1985, and 1986 revealed several areas of soil contamination in the yard due to leaks from scrap materials, which released PCB-contaminated oil into the soil. These areas included two surface burn areas, a stained soil area, and a surface pool of oil. In 1990, EPA removed approximately 5,100 cubic yards (i.e., soil in excess of 10 mg/kg PCBs based on TSCA cleanup policy) of contaminated soil and debris for disposal in an approved RCRA facility offsite. Soil containing less than 10 mg/kg PCB was covered with a 10-12 inch soil cover. Soil sampling has confirmed that this removal has resolved the PCB contamination at the site and EPA proposes no additional remedial action. Based on this rationale, there are no primary contaminants of concern affecting the site. The selected remedial action for the site is a no action remedy with ground water monitoring for one year at the request of the State.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Dublin Water Supply, Bucks County, PA. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-30

    The 4.5-acre Dublin Water Supply is a former manufacturing facility located in Dublin Borough, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The site consists of a one-story tower building and parking lot. The surrounding area is mixed commercial and residential, with a fruit orchard bordering the site to the north and west. Groundwater beneath the site contributes to the aquifer by providing a drinking water source to area residents. In 1986, the current owner purchased the site for antique car restoration. A portion of the site is currently leased to Laboratory Testing, Inc., for metallurgical testing. During a routine drinking water survey in 1986, the state discovered elevated levels of TCE affecting approximately 170 area homes. The early action ROD addresses the provision of a permanent clean drinking water supply to affected area residents and businesses. An additional RI/FS, which commenced in 1991, will focus on remediation of the soil, ground water, and surface water in a separate clean-up action. The primary contaminants of concern affecting ground water are VOCs, including TCE, PCE, and vinyl chloride. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  11. 75 FR 43160 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on One Arkansas Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    .../region6/water/npdes/tmdl/index.htm . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Diane Smith at (214) 665-2145. EPA... Final TMDL may be found at http://www.epa.gov/region6/water/npdes/tmdl/index.htm . Dated: July 15, 2010. Claudia V. Hosch, Acting Director, Water Quality Protection Division, EPA Region 6. BILLING CODE 6560-50-P...

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Central Illinois Public Service, Taylorville Manufactured Gas Plant Site, Christian County, IL. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 1-acre Central Illinois Public Service (CIPS) site is a former manufactured gas plant in Taylorville, Christian County, Illinois. The plant produced a low-quality gas from coal, which was used for lighting and heating. Onsite contamination by coal tar was discovered in 1985 during site construction. The ROD addressesses a final remedy for the remaining principal threat posed by ground water contamination at the site, and also documents the prior 1987 removal action. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, and ground water at the site are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; and other organics, including PAHs and phenols.

  13. Counterfactual Processing of Economic Action-Outcome Alternatives in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Further Evidence of Impaired Goal-Directed Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Claire M.; Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Kaser, Muzaffer; Fineberg, Naomi A.; Sule, Akeem; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Cardinal, Rudolf N.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disorder of automatic, uncontrollable behaviors and obsessive rumination. There is evidence that OCD patients have difficulties performing goal-directed actions, instead exhibiting repetitive stimulus-response habit behaviors. This might result from the excessive formation of stimulus-response habit associations or from an impairment in the ability to use outcome value to guide behavior. We investigated the latter by examining counterfactual decision making, which is the ability to use comparisons of prospective action-outcome scenarios to guide economic choice. Methods We tested decision making (forward counterfactual) and affective responses (backward counterfactual) in 20 OCD patients and 20 matched healthy control subjects using an economic choice paradigm that previously revealed attenuation of both the experience and avoidance of counterfactual emotion in schizophrenia patients and patients with orbitofrontal cortex lesions. Results The use of counterfactual comparison to guide decision making was diminished in OCD patients, who relied primarily on expected value. Unlike the apathetic affective responses previously shown to accompany this decision style, OCD patients reported increased emotional responsivity to the outcomes of their choices and to the counterfactual comparisons that typify regret and relief. Conclusions Obsessive-compulsive disorder patients exhibit a pattern of decision making consistent with a disruption in goal-directed forward modeling, basing decisions instead on the temporally present (and more rational) calculation of expected value. In contrast to this style of decision making, emotional responses in OCD were more extreme and reactive than control subjects. These results are in line with an account of disrupted goal-directed cognitive control in OCD. PMID:23452663

  14. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

  15. Proposed plan/Statement of basis for the Grace Road Site (631-22G) operable unit: Final action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-08-19

    This Statement of Basis/Proposed Plan is being issued by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), which functions as the lead agency for the Savannah River Site (SRS) remedial activities, with concurrence by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The purpose of this Statement of Basis/Proposed Plan is to describe the preferred alternative for addressing the Grace Road site (GRS) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Fulbright/Sac River Landfill, Missouri (first remedial action), September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Fulbright and Sac River Landfills are located just north of the City of Springfield, Missouri, in a semirural area. The landfills were operated by the city for the disposal of municipal and industrial solid wastes. The site, however, could endanger human health or the environment in the future through exposure of the industrial wastes through erosion of the landfill cover. The selected remedial action for this site includes: removal of the drum and drum remnants found in the sinkhole and associated trench east of the Fulbright Landfill; sampling the removed contents to determine hazardous characteristics; proper offsite treatment or disposal.

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Voortman Farm Site, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania (first remedial action) June 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-30

    The 43-acre Voortman Farm site is located in Upper Salucon Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. The site consists of a sinkhole that contained empty battery casings disposed of in late 1979 and early 1980. Citizen complaints in 1980 prompted the prohibition of dumping and subsequent site investigation. In September 1986, the battery casings in the sinkhole caught on fire. Since the battery casings were burning underground, attempts to extinguish the fire remained unsuccessful. There does not appear to be any leaching from any residual metals, contaminated soils or battery casings present. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  18. The economic importance of acaricides in the control of phytophagous mites and an update on recent acaricide mode of action research.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Tirry, Luc; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Nauen, Ralf; Dermauw, Wannes

    2015-06-01

    Acaricides are one of the cornerstones of an efficient control program for phytophagous mites. An analysis of the global acaricide market reveals that spider mites such as Tetranychus urticae, Panonychus citri and Panonychus ulmi are by far the most economically important species, representing more than 80% of the market. Other relevant mite groups are false spider mites (mainly Brevipalpus), rust and gall mites and tarsonemid mites. Acaricides are most frequently used in vegetables and fruits (74% of the market), including grape vines and citrus. However, their use is increasing in major crops where spider mites are becoming more important, such as soybean, cotton and corn. As revealed by a detailed case study of the Japanese market, major shifts in acaricide use are partially driven by resistance development and the commercial availability of compounds with novel mode of action. The importance of the latter cannot be underestimated, although some compounds are successfully used for more than 30 years. A review of recent developments in mode of action research is presented, as such knowledge is important for devising resistance management programs. This includes spirocyclic keto-enols as inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the carbazate bifenazate as a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, a novel class of complex II inhibitors, and the mite growth inhibitors hexythiazox, clofentezine and etoxazole that interact with chitin synthase I. PMID:26047107

  19. Integrating spatial support tools into strategic planning-SEA of the GMS North-South Economic Corridor Strategy and Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, Pavit; Linde, Lothar

    2011-11-15

    The GMS countries, supported by the Asian Development Bank, have adopted a holistic, multidimensional approach to strengthen infrastructural linkages and facilitate cross border trade through (i) the establishment of a trans-boundary road connecting two economic nodes across marginalised areas, followed by 2) facilitation of environmentally and socially sound investments in these newly connected areas as a means to develop livelihoods. The North-South Economic Corridor is currently in its second phase of development, with investment opportunities to be laid out in the NSEC Strategy and Action Plan (SAP). It targets the ecologically and culturally sensitive border area between PR China's Yunnan Province, Northern Lao PDR, and Thailand. A trans-boundary, cross-sectoral Strategic Environmental Assessment was conducted to support the respective governments in assessing potential environmental and social impacts, developing alternatives and mitigation options, and feeding the findings back into the SAP writing process. Given the spatial dimension of corridor development-both with regard to opportunities and risks-particular emphasis was put in the application of spatial modelling tools to help geographically locate and quantify impacts as a means to guide interventions and set priorities.

  20. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. One of these alternatives is the proposed action. These alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies because the PEIS is a planning document only. It assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. This PEIS differs substantially from a site-specific environmental impact statement because multiple ground water compliance strategies, each with its own set of potential impacts, could be used to implement all the alternatives except the no action alternative. In a traditional environmental impact statement, an impacts analysis leads directly to the defined alternatives. The impacts analysis for implementing alternatives in this PEIS first involves evaluating a ground water compliance strategy or strategies, the use of which will result in site-specific impacts. This PEIS impacts analysis assesses only the potential impacts of the various ground water compliance strategies, then relates them to the alternatives to provide a comparison of impacts.

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Cannon Engineering, MA. (First Remedial Action), March 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-31

    The Cannon Engineering Corporation (CEC) facility is located in a small industrial park in the western part of the Town of Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. CEC, which has owned the property since 1974, handled, stored, and incinerated chemical waste onsite from 1974 to 1980. EPA conducted site investigations between 1980 and 1982, and in October 1982, Massachusetts contracted for the removal of sludge and liquid waste from onsite tanks and drums. In January 1988, EPA provided for the removal and disposal of numerous hazardous materials abandoned at the site. This remedial action addresses three discrete areas of soil and sediment contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water, soil, and debris are VOCs including benzene, TCE, and vinyl chloride, and other organics including PCBs and PAHs. The selected remedial action includes: excavation and onsite treatment of VOC-contaminated soil by thermal aeration, and excavation and offsite treatment of PCB-contaminated soil by incineration; decontamination, removal, and disposal of contaminated buildings, tanks, and structures; additional soil sampling; ground water monitoring.

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Hedblum Industries, MI. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    Hedblum Industries site, an automotive parts manufacturing plant, is approximately one mile southwest of the town of Oscoda, in AuSable Township, Iosco County, Michigan. Ground water flows beneath the plant and subdivision and discharges via a bayou into the AuSable River. Between 1968 and 1972 the previous plant operators discharged cooling water, rinse water, and approximately 4,000 gallons of waste TCE onto the ground. In 1973 VOCs were detected in residential wells in the AuSable subdivision. Contaminated wells were replaced with deeper wells which by 1977 also showed traces of contamination. Subsequently, the Oscoda Township Municipal Supply System was extended to residents through the installation of a new water main. An underground storage tank containing TCE, TCA, and PCE was removed from the site in 1980. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, xylenes, TCE, and PCE; and metals including lead. The selected remedial action for the site includes ground water pumping and treatment using activated carbon adsorption with discharge to the bayou; and ground water and soil monitoring. The estimated present worth cost of the remedial action is $2,379,000, which includes an annual O M cost of $264,000 over 4-5 years.

  3. Final Characterization Report for Corrective Action Unit 109: Area 2 U-2BU Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    ITLV

    1998-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit 109, Area 2 U-2bu Crater, is an inactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Permit disposal unit located in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit has been characterized under the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265 (CFR, 1996). The site characterization was performed under the RCRA Part A Permit Characterization Plan for the U-2bu Subsidence Crater (DOE/NV, 1998c), as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Liebendorfer, 1998). The primary objective of the site characterization activities was to evaluate the presence, concentration, and extent of any Resource Conservation and Recovery Act contaminants in the crater. Surface soil samples were collected on April 22, 1998, and subsurface soil samples and geotechnical samples were collected from April 27-29, 1998. Soil samples were collected using a hand auger or a piston-type drive hammer to advance a 5-centimeter (2-inch) diameter steel sampling tool into the ground. The permit for the Nevada Test Site requires that Corrective Action Unit 109 be closed under 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265 Subpart G and 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265.310 (CFR, 1996). Analysis of the data collected during the characterization effort indicates that lead was detected in Study Area 1 at 5.7 milligrams per liter, above the regulatory level in 40 Code of Federal Regulations 261.24 of 5.0 milligrams per liter. Except for the lead detection at a single location within the crater, the original Resource Conservation Recovery Act constituents of potential concern determined between the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office and the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection during the Data Quality Objectives process (DOE/NV, 1998b) were not found to be present at Corrective Action Unit 109 above regulatory levels of

  4. A Survey of Training Needs and Internships for Non-Teaching Positions in Home Economics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Dorothy F.

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of selected undergraduate programs of home economics, questionnaire data on 294 graduates employed in non-teaching settings were collected from executive officers, personnel managers, and directors of consumer, home, food, laboratory, and research sciences. Through their replies, these individuals warned that…

  5. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report. [In Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept. Three different classes of building are investigated, namely: single-family residence; multi-family residence; and commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in three different climatic regions: Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. Computer programs - ACESIM for the residences and CACESS for the office building - were used, each comprised of four modules: loads; design; simulation; and economic. For each building type in each geographic location, the economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of a number of conventional systems. The results of this analysis indicate that the economic viability of the ACES is very sensitive to the assumed value of the property tax, maintenace cost, and fuel-escalation rates, while it is relatively insensitive to the assumed values of other parameters. Fortunately, any conceivable change in the fuel-escalation rates would tend to increase the viability of the ACES concept. An increase in the assumed value of the maintenance cost or property tax would tend to make the ACES concept less viable; a decrease in either would tend to make the ACES concept more viable. The detailed results of this analysis are given in Section 5.4 of Volume II. 2 figures, 21 tables.

  6. Post-Secondary Vocational Home Economics Instructional Materials Needs Assessment Project: State-of-the-Art and Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glosson, Linda R.; Bowers, Candice H.

    A Texas project assessed postsecondary vocational home economics instructors' needs for instructional media and materials as well as the need for training in the development of curriculum materials. Relevant post-secondary programs identified were child development, food service/dietetics, fashion design/tailoring, and interior design. In…

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Miami County Incinerator, OH. (First Remedial Action), June 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-30

    The Miami County Incinerator site is in Concord Township, Ohio. The site consists of the incinerator building and adjacent property, including a former scrubber waste water lagoon, an ash-disposal pit, an ash pile, a liquid-disposal area, and trench and fill landfill areas north and south of the Eldean Tributary. Operations began in 1968, when large quantities of spent solvents, soils, and drummed and bulk industrial sludges were accepted for disposal. After closure of the facility in 1983, the Ohio EPA found detectable levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons in drinking water wells near the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including PCE, toluene, and TCE; other organics including PCBs, PAHs, dioxin, and pesticides; and metals including lead. The selected remedial actions for the site are included.

  8. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): FMC Corporation, Fridley, Minnesota (second remedial action), September 1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    The FMC site, in the City of Fridley, Minnesota is approximately 1,000 feet east of the Mississippi River, just north of the City of Minneapolis, and upstream of the City of Minneapolis drinking-water intake. Investigation revealed historical waste-disposal practices and found contamination of the ground water and Mississippi River. Currently underlying ground water and alluvial aquifers with discharge to the Mississippi River are contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE), Porchloroethylene (PCE), benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). TCE has been estimated to account for 98% of the contaminant loading. The selected remedial action for the site includes: ground-water pump and treatment with discharge to a sewer system; ground-water monitoring; and implementation of institutional controls with land-use restrictions to mitigate against near-term usage of contaminated ground water between the site and the Mississippi River.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Republic Steel Quarry Site, Elyria, Ohio (first remedial action), September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Republic Steel Quarry site is located in the City of Elyria in Lorain County, Ohio, southwest of Cleveland. From 1950 to 1972, approximately 200,000 gallons of waste pickle liquor (acid wastes used in steel processing) were discharged to a ditch located on the east side of the steel plant, which flowed north into the quarry. From 1972 to 1975 the ditch was used for disposing of rinse water from pickling operations. The primary contaminants of concern affecting surface water, sediments, and soil are VOCs including toluene, and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes: excavation and offsite disposal an a RCRA landfill of approximately 100 cu yds of contaminated surface soil from the pickle-liquor discharge ditch and from along the southern end of the quarry; and implementation of a five-year monitoring plan including a fish-species survey.

  11. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  12. Economic impacts of SEPTA on the regional and state economy. Final report. [SouthEast Pennsylvania Transportation Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The report evaluates the economic and social impacts of supporting the Southeast Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) public transportation system. The study is comprehensive, considering travel times and costs for individual travelers, and how those changes would affect the cost of doing business, individual spending patterns, and the regional and State economies. Four alternatives were considered: rehabilitation of the system and continuation of services, a fifty-percent scaleback of services, gradual shutdown of the system over ten years, and immediate shutdown. The analysis showed that rehabilitation of the system would return three dollars to the region for every dollar spent on it, and that cutting back service would have economic costs far greater than any savings accrued. The methodology is general, and can be applied in other areas.

  13. Technical and economic comparison of steam-injected versus combined- cycle retrofits on FT-4 engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Silaghy, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation of the technical and economic aspects of converting the TPM FT4 simple cycle combustion turbines into either the steam injected gas turbine (SIGT) cycle or the combined cycle (CC). It describes the selection of the best retrofit alternatives through the evaluation and data analysis of a large number of sites and units at two utilities. Conceptual designs are performed on the best retrofit alternatives. Flow diagrams and general arrangement drawings are developed for various configurations utilizing drum type and once-through type multipressure heat recovery steam generators. Auxiliary power consumption and capital cost estimates are presented together with an economic evaluation and comparison of the retrofit alternatives. While the investigation is performed utilizing the FT4 combustion turbines, the steps presented in the report may be used as a guide for investigating the conversion of other gas turbines to either cycle at any utility site.

  14. 76 FR 11111 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2011 and 2012 Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... allowances were published in the Federal Register on December 8, 2010 (75 FR 76352). Comments were invited... the 2010 ABC sum of 565,499 mt (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). Specification and Apportionment of TAC... published a final rule to implement Amendment 87 to the FMP on October 6, 2010 (75 FR 61639),...

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Shenandoah Stables, Lincoln County, MO. (Second remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The Shenandoah Stables (SS) site is located in a rural area near Moscow Mills, Lincoln County, Missouri, within the upper floodplain of Crooked Creek. The property includes an enclosed arena and horse stables building, a number of single family residences, a livestock operation, and other small businesses on approximately 5- to 10-acre land parcels around the facility. In 1971, the area inside the arena was sprayed with approximately 1,500 gallons of dioxin-contaminated waste oil for dust control purposes. Subsequently, a number of adverse effects were noted in horses, other animals, and in humans. The ROD addresses the final remedy for the site, the removal of 3,471 cubic yards of contaminated materials currently stored onsite in 2,660 separate containers. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil and debris is dioxin.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Cape Fear Wood Preserving, NC. (First Remedial Action), June 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-30

    The 9-acre Cape Fear Wood Preserving site is in Cumberland County, North Carolina. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, ground water, and surface water are VOCs including benzene, other organics including PAHs, and metals including arsenic and chromium. The selected remedial action for the site includes offsite disposal of CCA salt crystals found in the drainage system and solidified creosote at a RCRA landfill and offsite disposal of asbestos-containing pipe insulation in the county solid-waste facility; removal and decontamination of onsite pipes and tanks to be sold for scrap metal or disposed of in the county solid waste facility; excavation and onsite treatment of soil and sediment using soil flushing as the preferred alternative or a low thermal-desorption process to remove organics followed by soil washing or fixation/stabilization/solidification to address inorganics followed by placement of treated soil and sediment in the excavated area and revegetation; pumping with onsite treatment of ground water and surface water with offsite discharge at a POTW or a surface stream; sale of 50,000 gallons of CCA solution to a buyer; if no buyer is found, CCA solution and CCA-contaminated waste water will be treated using the ground water treatment system; and ground water monitoring.

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Todtz, Lawrence Farm, IA. (First Remedial Action), November 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-04

    The 2.7-acre Dupont Impoundment of the Todtz Farm site is located on a 120-acre farm 1.25 miles west of Camanche, Iowa. Originally a sand and gravel mine, the landfill received municipal waste from 1969 to 1975. Dupont disposed of an estimated 4,300 tons of wet end cellophane process wastes from 1971 until its closure in 1975. Impoundment wastes are periodically in direct contact with the ground water beneath the site, which flows southeasterly toward the Mississippi River. Domestic wells and the municipal water-supply wells for Camanche located downgradient of the site may be affected by contamination from the site. In addition, several ponds and lakes in the vicinity are potential receptors for contaminated runoff and recharge. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including toluene and benzene, and metals including arsenic, lead, and chromium. The selected remedial action for the site includes installation of a soil cover over the Dupont Impoundment; implementation of institutional controls including deed and land-use restrictions; provision of an alternate water supply for an affected residence by relocating an existing well; and ground-water monitoring.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Summit National Site, Deerfield, OH. June 1988. First Remedial Action. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The 11.5-acre Summit National site is a former coal strip mine approximately 45 miles southeast of Cleveland. Summit National Liquid Services operated a solvent-recycling and waste-disposal facility on the site from 1973 to 1978. Solvents, paint sludges, phenols, cyanide, arsenic, and other liquid wastes were stored, incinerated, and buried or dumped during site operations. All onsite media are contaminated with a variety of organic and inorganic compounds, and investigations indicate that offsite areas also are affected. The primary contaminants of concern affecting soil, sediments, ground water, and surface water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, TCE and xylenes, other organics including phenols, PAHs and PCBs, and metals including arsenic and chromium. The selected remedial action for the site includes: excavation and onsite incineration of contaminated soil and sediments and the contents of approximately 1,600 buried drums and 4 tanks, with disposal of incinerator residuals in an onsite RCRA landfill; ground-water pump and treatment and onsite surface-water treatment and discharge of treated water to downgradient surface water; dismantling and onsite disposal of all onsite structures; ground-water and surface water monitoring; and residence relocation.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Vogel Paint and Wax, Maurice, IA. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-20

    The Vogel Paint and Wax (VPW) site is an approximately two-acre disposal area two miles southwest of the town of Maurice, in Sioux County, Iowa. Adjacent land uses are primarily agricultural; however, several private residences are within one-quarter mile of the site. A surficial sand and gravel aquifer underlies the site and supplies nearby private wells and the Southern Sioux County Rural Water System, located a mile and one half southeast of the site. Paint sludge, resins, solvents, and other paint-manufacturing wastes were disposed of at the site between 1971 and 1979. VPW records indicate that approximately 43,000 gallons of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and 6,000 pounds of metals waste were buried at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes excavation of contaminated soil and separation of solid and liquid wastes; onsite bioremediation of 3,000 cubic yards of the contaminated soil in a fully contained surface impoundment unit, or onsite thermal treatment if soil contains high metal content; and stabilization of treated soil, if necessary to prevent leaching of metals, followed by disposal in the excavated area.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Silver Mountain Mine, WA. (First remedial action), March 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-27

    The five-acre Silver Mountain Mine site is an abandoned mine dump in Okanogan County, north-central Washington. Land in the site vicinity is used primarily for cattle grazing, and the nearest well, two miles away, is used for cattle watering and irrigation. The nearest residence is three miles south of the site. Operations at the mine were initiated in 1902 to extract silver, gold, and copper from soil and ore. From 1980 to 1981, a cyanide leach heap of previously mined material was constructed in an attempt to extract (leach out) silver and gold. The heap consisted of 5,300 tons of ore on top of a 20 ml plastic liner. About 4,400 pounds of sodium cyanide was mixed with water and sprayed on the top of the heap. The cyanide-laden effluent was then collected in a leachate pond at the base of the heap. The heap leaching operation was abandoned in late 1981 without cleanup of contaminated material. In addition, approximately 5,200 tons of unprocessed mixed material (mine dump) lie to the west of the leach heap. In 1982, the State took action to treat the cyanide at the site using sodium hypochlorite to partially neutralize the leachate pond and heap. In 1985, the State conducted a site stabilization effort, which included removal of liquids from the leachate pond and installation of a 33 ml plastic cover over the heap and pond.

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Charlevoix Site, Michigan (second remedial action), September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-30

    The City of Charlevoix is located on the shores of Lake Michigan in Charlevoix County. The City's single municipal well supplies potable water to a year-round population of 3500 which increases to approximately 5,000 during the summer tourist season. In September 1981, while conducting tests for trihalogenated methane compounds, the Michigan Department of Public Health (MDPH) detected trichloroethylene (TCE) ranging in concentrations from 13 to 30 ppb in the Charlevoix water supply. Data from the monitoring program showed gradually rising levels of TCE and perchloroethylene (PCE) in the raw water. In June 1984, a Record of Decision was signed which approved an initial remedial measure (IRM) for an alternative water supply to replace the contaminated municipal well. The selected IRM consisted of a Lake Michigan water intake structure and a water filtration/flocculation treatment plant. The selected remedial action involves discharging the TCE and PCE plumes, under natural flow conditions, to Lake Michigan. The aquifer would be useable after 50 years. During that 50-year purging period, institutional restrictions on the installation of private wells in the contaminated aquifer will be enforced by local health officials. In addition, long-term monitoring of the plumes will continue. The estimated annual OandM costs for monitoring are $17,000.

  2. Analysis of Nucleotide 5'-Monophosphates in Infant Formulas by HPLC-UV: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2011.20.

    PubMed

    Gill, Brendon D; Indyk, Harvey E

    2015-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2011.20: 5'-Mononucleotides in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula. After the successful analysis of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 1849a Standard Reference Material (SRM) as a practice sample, 12 laboratories participated in the analysis of duplicate samples of six different infant formula products. The samples were dissolved in high-salt solution to inhibit protein and fat interactions, with the nucleotides [uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP), and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP)] separated from the sample matrix by strong-anion exchange SPE, followed by chromatographic analysis using a C18 stationary phase with gradient elution, UV detection, and quantitation by an internal standard technique using thymidine 5'-monophosphate. For nucleotide-supplemented products, precision is within the Standard Method Performance RequirementsSM (SMPR) 2011.008 target reproducibility limit of ≤11%, with the reproducibility RSD (RSDR) estimated at 7.1-8.7% for CMP, 7.9-9.0% for UMP, 2.8-7.7% for GMP, 5.5-10.3% for IMP, and 2.7-6.2% for AMP, and Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values of 0.9-1.0 for CMP, 0.9-1.0 for UMP, 0.3-0.7 for GMP, 0.6-1.0 for IMP, and 0.3-0.7 for AMP. PMID:26268980

  3. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Fort Wayne Reduction, Fort Wayne, Indiana (first remedial action) August 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-28

    The 35-acre Fort Wayne site (FW) is a former municipal landfill/waste disposal facility located along the Maumee River just east of the city of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana. Two onsite areas are designated as wetlands. In addition, the site lies within a 100-year flood plain. The site accepted residential and industrial wastes from 1967 to 1976. From May 1967 to August 1970, FW was issued a county permit for public disposal of garbage and rubbish. Wastes were incinerated and the residual ash disposed of onsite. In 1970, FW changed its name to National Recycling Corporation. All solid waste was to be processed through the plant. It was torn down in 1985. Inspection reports indicated that deposited refuse included: industrial and liquid wastes, municipal wastes, garbage, paper, and wood. The site consists of two characteristically different areas reflecting its historical use: the eastern half of the site was used as the municipal/general refuse landfill (approximately 15 acres), and the western half of the site (approximately 5 acres) was used for disposal of industrial wastes, building debris, barrels of unidentified wastes, and residual ash from earlier incineration operations. Presently, soil and ground water are contaminated with 43 chemicals of concern including: metals, organics, PCBs, PAHs, phenols, and VOCs. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Coalinga Asbestos Mine, Fresno County, CA. (Second remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The 557-acre Coalinga Asbestos Mine site, a former asbestos processing area and chromite mine, comprises part of the Johns Manville Coalinga Asbestos Mill site in western Fresno County, California. This rural mountainous area is used primarily for recreational purposes. From 1962 to 1974, asbestos ore from several local mines was processed and sorted onsite, and the resulting asbestos mill tailings were periodically bulldozed into an intermittent stream channel. Subsequently, from 1975 to 1977, a chromite milling operation was conducted onsite. Tailings were often washed downstream during periods of stream flow, and the resuspension of asbestos fibers from the tailings into the air produced a significant inhalation hazard. As a result of these activities, approximately 450,000 cubic yards of mill tailings and asbestos ore remain onsite within a large tailing pile. In 1980 and 1987, State investigations indicated that the site was contributing a significant amount of asbestos into the surface water. The site will be remediated as two Operable Units (OU). The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remedial action for OU2, the Johns Manville Coalinga Asbestos Mill Area. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the surface water is asbestos.

  5. Economic impact of proposed site-specific changes to water-pollution regulation affecting Joliet, Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pershall, R.B.

    1988-05-01

    This report provides an analysis of the economic and environmental impacts of a petition filed by the City of Joliet requesting site-specific relief from Illinois state water-quality regulations for biological oxygen demands (BOD) and suspended solids. Joliet proposes that its Eastside Wastewater Treatment plant be allowed to meet effluent limitations established for the Des Plains River rather than the effluent limitations for Hickory Creek. The study examines two general strategies for complying with the existing standards. One possibility is to upgrade the current treatment system. The other option analyzes relocating the outfall to the Des Plaines River.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Marathon Battery, Cold Spring, NY. (Third remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The Marathon Battery site is a former battery-manufacturing plant in Cold Spring, Putnam County, New York. The site is composed of three study areas: Area I, which consists of East Foundry Cove Marsh and Constitution Marsh; Area II, which encompasses the former plant, presently a book-storage warehouse, the surrounding grounds, and a vault with cadmium contaminated sediment dredged from East Foundry Cove; and Area III, which includes East Foundry Cove (48 acres), West Foundry Cove and the Hudson River in the vicinity of Cold Spring pier and a sewer outfall. Contamination in Area III emanates from plant waste water that was discharged via the city sewer system into the Hudson River at Cold Spring Pier or, in some instances, through a storm sewer into East Foundry Cove. A Record of Decision (ROD) was signed for Area I in September 1986 with cleanup activities to include dredging the East Foundry Cove Marsh. The second ROD for the site was signed in September 1988 and included decontamination of the battery plant and soil excavation in Area II. The 1989 ROD represents the third and final operable unit for the site and addresses sediment contamination in Area III. The primary contaminants of concern affecting sediment at the site are metals, including cadmium and nickel.

  7. An assessment of district heating and cooling potential in Joliet, Illinois: Phase I technical and economic feasibility study, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    A preliminary assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of a district heating and cooling (DHC) system serving a portion of Joliet, Illinois, has been completed. The basic system, which was designed to provide thermal and electrical energy services to the assessment area, was found to be economically feasible while providing energy services at prices that are less than or equal to current costs. The DHC assessment area included the following: the Downtown Business District; the newly-designated Heritage Business Park; and the Joliet Correctional Center. The Heritage Business Park is the site of a former steel wire and rod mill. Approximately one-third of the site is currently occupied by a rod mill operated by American Steel and Wire while the rest of the Park is essentially undeveloped. In late 1985, plans were formulated to redevelop the site into an industrial park for light industry, offices and research and development facilities. The installation of a DHC system over the next five to ten years would not only complement the redevelopment of the Downtown Business District that was recently begun, but would help to encourage the eventual development of the Heritage Business Park as well.

  8. Supporting evaluation for the proposed plan for final remedial action for the groundwater operable unit at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    2003-08-06

    This report presents the technical information developed since the interim record of decision (IROD) was issued in September 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] 2000). The information was incorporated into the evaluation that was performed in selecting the preferred alternative for the Chemical Plant groundwater operable unit (GWOU) of the Weldon Spring site. The contaminants of concern (COCs) in groundwater and springs are trichloroethylene (TCE), nitrate, uranium, and nitroaromatic compounds. The preferred alternative of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) coupled with institutional controls (ICs) and contingency activities is described in the ''Proposed Plan (PP) for Final Remedial Action for the Groundwater Operable Unit at the Chemical Plant Area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri'' (DOE 2003b).

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Higgins Farm, Franklin Township, Somerset County, NJ. (Second remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 75-acre Higgins Farm site is a former cattle farm in Franklin Township, Somerset County, New Jersey. During the 1960's, municipal sludge and penicillin waste were used as fertilizers on Higgins Farm. The site also contains three holding tanks and drums containing material removed from previous remedial investigations. In 1986, the owner excavated 50 containers, including drums; however, during excavation activities, some of the containers were punctured and their contents spilled onto the ground. The ROD addresses the final action for ground water to limit future migration of contaminated ground water to offsite areas, as OU2. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs, including benzene, PCE, TCE, and xylene.

  10. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Berlin and Farro site, Swartz Creek, MI. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The 40-acre Berlin and Farro site is a former liquid incineration and landfill facility in Gaines Township, Genessee County, Michigan. The site overlies two aquifers, which provide well water to the approximately 80 permanent homes located within a 1/2 mile radius of the site. From 1971 to 1975, Berlin and Farro Liquid Incineration, Inc., used the site to accept and store industrial wastes prior to incineration, and disposed of crushed drums in a 1.1-acre onsite landfill. In 1975, Berlin and Farro's permits were revoked; however, illegal dumping of industrial waste into the lagoons apparently continued after the site was closed. Several separate clean-up actions were undertaken by the PRPs, the State, and EPA during the early to mid-1980's. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the final remedy for contaminated soil, sediment, and ground water at the Berlin and Farro site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for this site is included.

  12. Economic Studies, Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II, Final Report, Volume VI

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Claude

    1982-01-01

    At the time that the analyses contained in this volume were performed, the avoided energy costs of California's regulated electric utilities were at historic highs and were projected to continue to increase at double-digit annual rates. Since that time, oil prices have slipped, the general rate of inflation has abated, domestic electric power consumption has fallen short of expectations, and a host of other economic elements have shifted in directions which have resulted in substantial reductions in current California avoided energy costs. The question of whether these changes are merely short-term aberrations or represent a fundamental shift in the long-term energy supply and demand balance is beyond the scope of this report. Although the present depressed avoided electric energy prices are not consistent with the projections on which this report's analyses are based, a fact which results in significant discrepancies between the absolute financial returns predicted and those achievable under current circumstances, the comparative results of the study remain valid. The basic thrust of the studies represented in this report was to compare the overall economics of the Gravity Head system with that of optimized conventional binary generating plants. The study is site-specific to the East Mesa geothermal reservoir. It begins with an analysis of optimum individual well production based on the known characteristics of the reservoir. The limiting factors at East Mesa are reservoir drawdown and maximum practical brine pump impeller setting depth. The individual-well production limit is achieved when brine pressure at the pump inlet is reduced to the point at which CO{sub 2} starts to come out of solution, and fouling and impeller cavitation become imminent. The optimum pumping rate was found to be 1300 gpm (at 360 F density) and required that the Gravity Head pump impeller be set 2,033 feet below grade. The required conventional plant pump setting was 1,887 feet below

  13. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-03-01

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  14. Assessment and economic analysis of the MOD III Stirling-engine driven chiller system. Final report, October 1989-July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Moryl, J.

    1990-07-01

    The Stirling engine is an inherently clean and efficient engine. With the requirements for environmentally benign emissions and high energy efficiency, the Stirling engine is an attractive alternative to both internal combustion (IC) engines and electric motors. The study evaluated a Stirling-engine-driven chiller package. Technically, the Stirling engine is a good selection as a compressor drive, with inherently low vibrations, quiet operation, long life, and low maintenance. Exhaust emissions are below the projected 1995 stringent California standards. Economically, the Stirling-engine-driven chiller is a viable alternative to both IV-engine and electric-driven chillers, trading off slightly higher installed cost against lower total operating expenses. The penetration of a small portion of the projected near-term stationary engine market opportunity will provide the volume production basis to achieve competitively priced engines.

  15. Phase II final report and second update of the energy economic data base (EEDB) program. Volume 1 of 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evaluating and monitoring US Civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option against alternatives. This report presents the Second Update of the EEDB for a cost and regulation date of January 1, 1979, prepared during Phase II of the EEDB Program. The Second Update is the first of a series of periodic updates marking the beginning of the next step in meeting the objective of the EEDB Program.

  16. Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

  17. Economic Evaluations of Energy Recovery options for oxygen- and enriched air-blown Texaco GCC power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, R.F.; Coleman, B.S.; Dawkins, R.P.; Rao, A.D.; Ravikumar, R.H.; Smelser, S.C.; Stock, R.M.

    1980-11-01

    This report presents the results of preliminary process design and economic screening studies of seven integrated Texaco-based coal gasification/combined-cycle power plant systems. Previous reports have indicated that the oxidant feed and hot gasifier effluent cooling units are the most costly items in the gasification system and, thus, hold the greatest possibility of being reduced. Therefore, the systems examined reflect combinations of two types of coal oxidant (98 percent oxygen and enriched air containing 35 percent oxygen) and four gas cooling options. Also presented is an eighth process design (without economics) of the most efficient of the seven systems under the more favorable ISO ambient conditions, rather than summer conditions. Except for the gasifiers and associated high-temperature heat recovery equipment, all of the combined-cycle designs in this report use commercially available components, including the gas turbines. The gasifier performances are based on extrapolations of the pilot plant gasifiers from mid- to the late 1980s. The high-temperature heat recovery equipment designs have not been demonstrated as full-sized equipment. The first and major objective was to determine whether or not oxygen-blown Texaco-based gasification combined-cycle power plants employing current technology combustion turbine (2000/sup 0/F), could produce electricity at a competitive cost to that produced in a conventional coal-fired steam plant using limestone scrubbers for SO/sub 2/ removal. When all the cases are compared and referred to earlier studies, it is concluded that oxygen-blown Texaco GCC plants employing current technology (2000/sup 0/F) combustion turbines produce electricity that is cost competitive with electricity produced by a conventional coal-fired steam plant with stack gas scrubbers designed to meet 1978 New Source Performance Standards.

  18. Modification No. 2 to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah: Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Portions of the final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) for the Green River site, Volumes 1 and 2, Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-81AL16257, March 1991 (DOE, 1991) have been modified. The changes to the RAP are designated as RAP Modification No. 2. These changes have been placed in a three-ring binder that will supplement the original RAP (DOE, 1991), and include the following: addendum to the Executive Summary; Section 3.5 (Ground Water part of the Site Characterization Summary); Section 4.0 (Site Design); Section5.0 (Water Resources Protection Strategy Summary); Appendix D.5 (Ground Water Hydrology); and Appendix E (Ground Water Protection Strategy). In addition to these revisions, there have been editorial changes that clarify the text, but do not change the meaning. Also, certain sections of the document, which are included in the submittal for ease of review and continuity, have been updated to reflect the final ground water protection standards and the current UMTRA Project format and content of RAPs.

  19. Final Scientific/Technical Report for "A Novel,Highly Efficient and Economic Purification Process Revolutionizing PTA Production"

    SciTech Connect

    Wytcherley, Randi; Balderston, Kristen; Ball,George; Chou, Tai-Li

    2008-06-06

    GTC Technology, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the DOE’s Industrial Technologies Program and in collaboration with Montana State University, has completed pilot scale testing of a revolutionary new process to produce purified terephthalic acid (PTA), a crucial chemical commodity manufactured worldwide. Purified terephthalic acid (PTA) is a starting material for the formation of polyester resin. Polyester resin is used to make many valuable commercial products, including clothing, plastic containers and films. In traditional PTA production, critical reactions are carried out at high temperatures and pressures, creating physically harsh and economically costly operating conditions. The chemical halide bromine is an essential ingredient for part of the conventional process. As a result of using bromine, the highly toxic and environmentally insidious compound methyl bromide is formed. The corrosive nature of bromine also mandates the use of specialized and expensive corrosion-resistant materials for plant construction. Plants processing PTA conventionally must also use copious amounts of precious water resources and manage costly water treatment operations. GTC’s new TA purification method employs a unique two-step crystallization process capable of operating at lower temperatures and pressures than traditional methods. Utilization of a highly selective, proprietary organic solvent blend also allows for the flexibility of accepting higher levels of impurities in the initial purification feedstock. The relaxed physical operating conditions combined with the effectiveness of the blended organic solvent allow for the efficient purification of feedstock created in a bromine free manner. Along with the elimination of bromine, the new purification technology drastically reduces energy costs and expensive wastewater treatment. Industry wide implementation in the United States alone could yield energy savings of 22 trillion BTU per year. In 2007, using the

  20. Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.; Oswald, W.J.

    1996-03-21

    There is growing evidence that global warming could become a major global environmental threat during the 21st century. The precautionary principle commands preventive action, at both national and international levels, to minimize this potential threat. Many near-term, relatively inexpensive, mitigation options are available. In addition, long-term research is required to evaluate and develop advanced, possibly more expensive, countermeasures, in the eventuality that they may be required. The utilization of power plant CO{sub 2} and its recycling into fossil fuel substitutes by microalgae cultures could be one such long-term technology. Microalgae production is an expanding industry in the U.S., with three commercial systems (of approximately 10 hectare each) producing nutriceuticals, specifically beta-carotene, extracted from Dunaliella, and Spirulina biomass. Microalgae are also used in wastewater treatment. Currently production costs are high, about $10,000/ton of algal biomass, almost two orders of magnitude higher than acceptable for greenhouse gas mitigation. This report reviews the current state-of-the-art, including algal cultivation and harvesting-processing, and outlines a technique for achieving very high productivities. Costs of CO{sub 2} mitigation with microalgae production of oils ({open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes}) are estimated and future R&D needs outlined.

  1. "An Economic Process for Coal Liquefaction to Liquid Fuels" SBIR Phase II -- Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, Partha Sarathi

    2009-02-19

    The current commercial processes for direct coal liquefaction utilize expensive backmix-flow reactor system and conventional catalysts resulting in incomplete and retrogressive reactions that produce low distillate liquid yield and high gas yield, with high hydrogen consumption. The new process we have developed, which uses a less expensive reactor system and highly active special catalysts, resulted in high distillate liquid yield, low gas yield and low hydrogen consumption. The new reactor system using the special catalyst can be operated smoothly for direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Due to high hydrogenation and hydrocracking activities of the special catalysts, moderate temperatures and high residence time in each stage of the reactor system resulted in high distillate yield in the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F range with no 650{degrees}F{sup +} product formed except for the remaining unconverted coal residue. The C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F distillate is more valuable than the light petroleum crude. Since there is no 650{degrees}F{sup +} liquid product, simple reforming and hydrotreating of the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F product will produce the commercial grade light liquid fuels. There is no need for further refinement using catalytic cracking process that is currently used in petroleum refining. The special catalysts prepared and used in the experimental runs had surface area between 40-155 m{sup 2}/gm. The liquid distillate yield in the new process is >20 w% higher than that in the current commercial process. Coal conversion in the experimental runs was moderate, in the range of 88 - 94 w% maf-coal. Though coal conversion can be increased by adjustment in operating conditions, the purpose of limiting coal conversion to moderate amounts in the process was to use the remaining unconverted coal for hydrogen production by steam reforming. Hydrogen consumption was in the range of 4.0 - 6.0 w% maf-coal. A preliminary economic analysis of the new coal liquefaction process was

  2. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Christopher; Kothari, Vijendra; Starr, Ken; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey

    2012-02-26

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program:  Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns.  DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk.  DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships

  3. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): American Lake Gardens (McCord AFB - Area D), Pierce County, WA. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-19

    The American Lake Gardens (McChord AFB-Area D) site is an active U.S. Air Force base located at McChord Air Force Base, Pierce County, Washington. The site consists of two areas, Area D and American Lake Garden Tract (ALGT). From the mid-1940's to the present, no known industrial activities have occurred in the ALGT area; however, seven waste disposal sites have operated within the Area D portion of the site. Concurrent with DOD investigations, EPA discovered TCE in ground water monitoring wells installed at the ALGT, and in 1984, concluded that waste disposal sites in Area D were the likely source of ground water contamination. The ROD addresses remediation of the contaminated onsite and offsite ground water plume, as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; other organics; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Carolina Transformer site, Cumberland County, Fayetteville, NC. (First remedial action), August 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-29

    The 4.8-acre Carolina Transformer site is a former electrical transformer rebuilding and repair facility in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, North Carolina. The site may overlie as many as three aquifers, of which only the shallow confined aquifer has been found to be contaminated. From 1978 to 1982, a number of EPA and State investigations identified PCB-contaminated soil and ground water. In 1982, the State determined that runoff from the site violated surface water quality standards for PCBs. In 1984, EPA began clean-up operations at the site, and removed and disposed of 975 tons of contaminated soil offsite in a RCRA-permitted landfill. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses final remediation of contaminated soil, sediment, debris, and ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, and ground water are VOCs including benzene and toluene; other organics including dioxin and PCBs; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for this site is included.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): People's Natural Gas Coal-gasification site, Dubuque, IA. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-16

    The 5-acre People's Natural Gas site is a former coal gasification plant in Dubuque County, Iowa. The city of Dubuque maintains a public works garage on the eastern portion of the site, and the Iowa Department of Transportation owns the western portion. In addition, the site overlies a silty sand unit and an alluvial aquifer, which has been determined to be a potential source of drinking water. In 1986, EPA investigations identified extensive contamination of onsite soil and ground water at the site. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses both soil and ground water contamination, as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; and other organics including PAHs. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating and incinerating an estimated 18,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil offsite; treating the soil and ground water within the silty sand unit, which are contaminated with coal tar wastes using in-situ bioremediation; pumping and onsite treatment of contaminated ground water using air stripping.

  6. 78 FR 18562 - Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... QUALITY Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources Implementation Studies; Final AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality. ACTION: Notice of Availability of Final... Quality at (202) 395-5750. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 2031 of the Water Resources Development...

  7. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, L. O.

    2007-06-12

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

  8. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (Operable Unit 1), AL. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The 2,200-acre Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP) site was located in Talledega County, Alabama, near the junction of Talledega Creek and the Coosa River. AAAP was built in 1941 as a government-owned/contractor-operated facility that produced nitrocellulose, nitroaromatic explosives, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl methyl nitramine. Operations at AAAP were terminated in August 1945, and in 1973 several parcels of the original 13,233-acre property were sold. In 1978, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA), managing the Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP), identified soil, sediment, and ground water potentially contaminated by explosives, asbestos, and lead as a result of past site operations. During the RI/FS, the facility was divided into two general areas: the eastern area (Area A) and the western area (Area B). In 1985, investigations identified soil contamination by explosives, asbestos, and lead in Area A, and ground water contamination by these materials in Area B. Soil excavated from Area A was stockpiled in Area B in two covered buildings and on a concrete slab, which was subsequently covered with a membrane liner. A 1991 characterization study of Area B concluded that explosives, lead, and asbestos contamination were present above regulatory limits. The ROD addressed a final action for the contaminated soil in the Stockpile Soils Area (Area B). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris were explosives, including 2,4,6-TNT, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, and tetryl; metals, including lead; and asbestos, an inorganic.

  9. 75 FR 63823 - Final Guidance, “Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance.'' 74 FR 52117, Oct. 8, 2009. The purpose of... QUALITY Final Guidance, ``Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting'' AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality. ACTION: Notice of availability of Final Guidance. SUMMARY: On October 5, 2009,...

  10. Personnel Development. A Plan to Produce and Distribute an Instructional Package for Teaching the Concepts of Competency-Based Instruction in Home Economics Pre-service Teacher Education Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg.

    Described in this final report is the development of a plan to produce and distribute an instructional package for teaching the concepts of competency-based instruction in home economics pre-service education programs in the state of Virginia. Nine Virginia Universities (Virginia Polytechnic Institution and State University, Radford College, James…

  11. Pennsylvania Action Research Network (PA-ARN) Staff Development through Five Regional Staff Development Centers. Final Report. July 1997-June 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., McKeesport.

    The Pennsylvania Action Research Network project was initiated in 1995-1996 to provide Pennsylvania literacy educators with the following: a better method for taking published research findings and testing and adapting them in their own classrooms; a way to study their own research ideas on a daily-action basis; and a systematic way to share and…

  12. Pennsylvania Action Research Network (PA-ARN) Staff Development through Five Regional Staff Development Centers. Final Report, July 1998-June 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., McKeesport.

    With the existence of 67 monographs and approximately 60 practitioners trained in action research in the western and central parts of Pennsylvania from project years 1995-98, the 1998-99 Section 353 project expanded the action research network (ARN) to include teachers, administrators, and researchers in the northeastern and southeastern parts of…

  13. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  14. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Rifle sites. That remedial action consists of removing approximately 4,185,000 cubic yards (cy) of tailings and contaminated materials from their current locations, transporting, and stabilizing the tailings material at the Estes Gulch disposal site, approximately six miles north of Rifle. The tailings and contaminated materials are comprised of approximately 597,000 cy from Old Rifle, 3,232,000 cy from New Rifle, and 322,000 cy from vicinity properties and about 34,000 cy from demolition. The remedial action plan includes specific design requirements for the detailed design and construction of the remedial action. An extensive amount of data and supporting information have been generated for this remedial action and cannot all be incorporated into this document. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  15. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial Action Selection Report, Appendix B of Attachment 2: Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section} 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which describes the proposed remedial action for the Naturita site. An extensive amount of data and supporting information has been generated and evaluated for this remedial action. These data and supporting information are not incorporated into this single document but are included or referenced in the supporting documents. The RAP consists of this RAS and four supporting documents or attachments. This Attachment 2, Geology Report describes the details of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Dry Flats disposal site.

  16. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing sites Mexican Hat, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Audit date: May 3--7, 1993, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing sites in Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona. This audit was conducted May 3--7, 1993, by Bill James and Gerry Simiele of the TAC. Three site-specific findings and four observations were identified during the audit and are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the audit is that the majority of the radiological aspects of the Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona, remedial action programs are performed adequately. However, the findings identify that there is some inconsistency in following procedures and meeting requirements for contamination control, and a lack of communication between the RAC and the DOE on variances from the published remedial action plan (RAP).

  17. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

  18. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Final report, Appendixes to attachment 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document contains supporting appendices to attachment 3 for the remedial action and site stabilization plan for Maybell, Colorado UMTRA site. Appendix A includes the Hydrological Services Calculations and Appendix B contains Ground Water Quality by Location data.

  19. Comment and response document for the final remedial action plan site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites at Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This document consists of comments and responses; the reviewers are the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment, and the remedial action contractor (RAC).

  20. Education and Training in the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences: A Plan of Action. A Report to the National Science Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Felice J.; Abler, Ronald F.; Rosich, Katherine J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last quarter of a century, the world has undergone rapid change. Almost every aspect of human life is more complex and interdependent, requiring knowledge of human and social systems as well as physical and biological systems. The social, behavioral, and economic (SBE) sciences contribute penetrating insights on such issues as the causes…

  1. Inclusive Transition Processes--Considering Socio-Economically Disadvantaged Parents' Views and Actions for Their Child's Successful School Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothe, Antje; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has noted that the transition to primary school is important for future school success. As a result, an inclusive transition process to school has become increasingly important. However, this process is particularly difficult for socio-economically disadvantaged children in Germany. The study considers parents' views and…

  2. Delay of actions involves large risks in estimations of economic damages and reduction ratios of carbon dioxide emission for lower climate targets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Y.; Emori, S.; Takahashi, K.; Shiogama, H.; Yokohata, T.

    2014-12-01

    Because future projections by AOGCMs require huge computer and human resources, simple climate models are used under a wide range of emission scenarios. The observation obtained in the past cannot provide a strong constraint on equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) and thus the future projections by simple climate models. However, when observations are obtained more in future, the uncertainty of future projections is expected to reduce. There is a public debate over whether to start to reduce carbon dioxide emissions now or to delay implementing mitigation policy in future. If the observation obtained in future can provide substantive benefits to climate policy, a climate policy of "wait and see", or a sequential-decision strategy for climate change would be useful. We investigated how much the uncertainty in economic damage and reduction ratios of CO2 emission, by which a climate target can be achieved, will reduce in future after future observation can be obtained. To conduct this, we first produced hypothetical observations of different ECSs using a simple climate model, and then validated whether the sequential decision strategy is useful or not for the estimations of economic damages and reduction ratios of carbon dioxide emissions. In low ECS, the magnitudes of the uncertainty for future projections in global mean SAT changes are small, and they reduce rapidly after observations are obtained in future. On the other hand, in high ECS, the magnitudes of the uncertainty for future projections in global mean SAT changes are large, and they still remain large in future. Because economic damages increase nonlinearly for the global mean SAT changes, the uncertainty of future projections in the economic damages is larger, and still remains larger after obtaining observations in future in high ECS. In particular, peaks of the pdfs of the economic damages shift to more serious values after obtaining observations in future in high ECS.

  3. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Nagel, J.

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho.

  4. Teacher Organizations and Collective Action: A Review of History and a Survey of School District Activity, 1964-65. Volume I, Collective Action by Public School Teachers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Wesley A.; Burns, Robert K.

    This first of 4 volumes comprising a broad investigation of teacher collective action in local school districts focuses on the history of such activity. Part I (42 pages) of this volume traces the history of the major teacher organizations--local, state, and national--from 1857 to 1967 with respect to their concern for teacher welfare and their…

  5. Economic Commission Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Summarizing presentations and discussions of the Economic Commission of the International Non-Governmental Organizations Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations (1977), this report addresses: multinational corporations; the land question; and the Commission's recommended "Plan of Action". (JC)

  6. Participation in medical research as a resource-seeking strategy in socio-economically vulnerable communities: call for research and action.

    PubMed

    Ravinetto, Raffaella M; Afolabi, Muhammed O; Okebe, Joseph; Van Nuil, Jennifer Ilo; Lutumba, Pascal; Mavoko, Hypolite Muhindo; Nahum, Alain; Tinto, Halidou; Addissie, Adamu; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Grietens, Koen Peeters

    2015-01-01

    The freedom to consent to participate in medical research is a complex subject, particularly in socio-economically vulnerable communities, where numerous factors may limit the efficacy of the informed consent process. Informal consultation among members of the Switching the Poles Clinical Research Network coming from various sub-Saharan African countries, that is Burkina Faso, The Gambia, Rwanda, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Benin, seems to support the hypothesis that in socio-economical vulnerable communities with inadequate access to health care, the decision to participate in research is often taken irrespectively of the contents of the informed consent interview, and it is largely driven by the opportunity to access free or better quality care and other indirect benefits. Populations' vulnerability due to poverty and/or social exclusion should obviously not lead to exclusion from medical research, which is most often crucially needed to address their health problems. Nonetheless, to reduce the possibility of exploitation, there is the need to further investigate the complex links between socio-economical vulnerability, access to health care and individual freedom to decide on participation in medical research. This needs bringing together clinical researchers, social scientists and bioethicists in transdisciplinary collaborative research efforts that require the collective input from researchers, research sponsors and funders. PMID:25302444

  7. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12184

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Christopher; Kothari, Vijendra; Starr, Ken; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) program: - Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. - DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. - DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with

  8. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet background concentrations or the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLS) for hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer at the point of compliance (POC) at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site near Gunnison, Colorado. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment. A summary of the principal features of the water resources protection strategy for the Gunnison disposal site is included in this report.

  9. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site Grand Junction, Colorado: Audit date, August 9--11, 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site in Grand Junction, Colorado. Jim Hylko and Bill James of the TAC conducted this audit August 9 through 11, 1993. Bob Cornish and Frank Bosiljevec represented the US Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents one programmatic finding, eleven site-specific observations, one good practice, and four programmatic observations.

  10. Submittal of Final Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-02-05

    This letter serves as the post-closure monitoring letter report for the above Corrective Action Unit (CAU) for calendar year 2006. CAU 91 is inspected every six months. The first inspection was conducted on March 23, 2006, and the second inspection was conducted on September 19, 2006. All access roads, fences, gates, and signs were in excellent condition. No settling, cracking, or erosion was observed on the cover, and the use restriction had been maintained. No issues were identified, and no corrective actions were needed. The post-closure inspection checklists for CAU 91 are attached. Photographs and fields notes taken during site inspections are maintained in the project files.

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Des Moines TCE Site, Operable Unit 3, Des Moines, IA. (Second remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-18

    The Des Moines TCE site is located southwest of downtown Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Land use in the area is predominantly industrial and commercial, and part of the site lies within the floodplain of the Raccoon River. Water from the Des Moines Water Works north infiltration gallery was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE), dichloroethylene (DCE), and vinyl chloride at levels above accepted drinking water standards. The ROD addresses OU3, which encompasses potential sources of ground water contamination in an area north of the Raccoon River. The selected remedial action for OU3 includes no action with periodic groundwater monitoring.

  12. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report; Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report; Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoff, A.R.; Lacker, D.K.

    1992-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

  13. Alaska OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) social and economic studies program. Technical report Number 99. A description of the socioeconomics of Norton Sound. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McNabb, S.; Robbins, L.; Waring, K.; Wasserman, P.; Weber, K.

    1984-03-01

    The study focuses on three main variables, (economic activity, employment opportunity, and inflation) which may be expected to change significantly in the Norton Sound region of Alaska as a result of OCS activities. Five primary categories (demography, economics, social organization, values and attitudes, and infrastructure) were studied. Field data were collected from 82 families in the villages of Savoonga, Nome, Golovin, Unalakleet, and Emmoank. Some primary data from Alakanuk and Gambell were also used in portion of the analysis. The region lacks the geographical, infrastructural, commercial, and other economic assets to attract offshore industries and workers.

  14. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

  15. An Action Resarch Proposal: Identifying and Addressing Problems Related to RACC's Writing Laboratory. Title III Curriculum Enrichment Activity: Faculty Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Annette; Jacobson, Karen H.

    An action research project was undertaken to understand how the Writing Laboratory at Reading Area Community College (RACC) defines and accomplishes its work, what faculty and students expect of the lab, and how they make use of it. The investigation sought to foster discussion and reflection on the appropriate role and staffing of a college…

  16. Collaborative Action Team Process: Bringing Home, School, Community, and Students Together To Improve Results for Children and Families. Final Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudo, Zena H.; Achacoso, Michelle; Perez, Delia

    This report details a study designed to test the sustainability of a school-based Collaborative Action Team (CAT) process, which attempted to address the need to enhance family and community involvement in education and to be self-sustaining over time. Based in communities across five Southwestern states, the intervention tested the sustainability…

  17. SILVERLEAF WHITEFLY: NATIONAL RESEARCH ACTION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PLAN: FOURTH ANNUAL REVIEW OF THE SECOND 5-YEAR PLAN AND FINAL REPORT FOR 1992-2002

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Sweetpotato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Strain B (= Silverleaf Whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring), National Research and Action Plans (1992-1997 and 1997-2002) were developed by USDA agencies (ARS, APHIS, and CSREES), state agencies, state agricultural experimental stat...

  18. 77 FR 50207 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Project: I-5: Glendale-Hugo Paving/Sexton Climbing Lane...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ...) 316-2559; Dominic Yballe, US Army Corps of Engineers, P.O. Box 2946, Portland, Oregon 97208-2946... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), [42 U.S.C. 6901- 6992(k)]. 9. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990 Protection of Wetlands; E.O. 11988 Floodplain Management; E.O. 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice...

  19. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix A to Attachment 3, tables; Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    This appendix contains the supporting tables for the remedial action plan for uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, CO. The tables contain monitoring well information, background groundwater quality data, regulated constituent summaries, tailings pore fluid sample analyses, and other data for each of the sites studied.

  20. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final plans and specifications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This volume deals with the main construction subcontract for the uranium mill tailings remedial action of Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Contents of subcontract documents AMB-4 include: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications which cover general requirements and sitework; and subcontract drawings.