Science.gov

Sample records for action finally economic

  1. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  2. Affirmative Action: Overcoming Disparities Yields Economic Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Amy

    1998-01-01

    Affirmative action is a necessary and effective strategy to end racial and gender inequalities. While moral and historical defenses of affirmative action have merit, economic reasoning is a more potent argument. Analysis of the economic costs and benefits of affirmative action in higher education illustrate its effectiveness in reducing income…

  3. 37 CFR 2.64 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Final action. (a) On the first or any subsequent reexamination or reconsideration the refusal of the... months after the date of the final action. The Office will enter amendments accompanying requests for reconsideration after final action if the amendments comply with the rules of practice in trademark cases and...

  4. Are You Ready for Economics in Action?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James Calvert

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Economics in Action program, which familiarizes an audience with a number of basic economic concepts operational in a prominent local business or industry and through that process builds understanding of economics and its applications. A sample program for secondary teachers that is focused on the iron and steel industry is…

  5. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 92.17 Section 92.17 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND... States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making a final determination whether to impose a penalty,...

  6. Action Sheet 36 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kips, R E; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D

    2012-02-24

    Pursuant to the Arrangement between the European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) to continue cooperation on research, development, testing, and evaluation of technology, equipment, and procedures in order to improve nuclear material control, accountancy, verification, physical protection, and advanced containment and surveillance technologies for international safeguards, dated 1 September 2008, the IRMM and LLNL established cooperation in a program on the Study of Chemical Changes in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles under IRMM-LLNL Action Sheet 36. The work under this action sheet had 2 objectives: (1) Achieve a better understanding of the loss of fluorine in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} particles after exposure to certain environmental conditions; and (2) Provide feedback to the EC-JRC on sample reproducibility and characteristics.

  7. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  8. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  9. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  10. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties for Misuse of Words, Letters, Symbols, or Emblems of the United States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making...

  11. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day of... is classified as a Category I Potential Carcinogen or as a Category II Potential Carcinogen. If...

  12. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day of... is classified as a Category I Potential Carcinogen or as a Category II Potential Carcinogen. If...

  13. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day of... is classified as a Category I Potential Carcinogen or as a Category II Potential Carcinogen. If...

  14. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day of... is classified as a Category I Potential Carcinogen or as a Category II Potential Carcinogen. If...

  15. 29 CFR 1990.147 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND REGULATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Regulation of Potential Occupational Carcinogens § 1990.147 Final action. (a) Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the last day of... is classified as a Category I Potential Carcinogen or as a Category II Potential Carcinogen. If...

  16. Final Action Plan to Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-28

    This document presents planned actions, and their associated costs, for addressing the findings in the Environmental, Safety and Health Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, May 1991, hereafter called the Assessment. This Final Action Plan should be read in conjunction with the Assessment to ensure full understanding of the findings addressed herein. The Assessment presented 353 findings in four general categories: (1)Environmental (82 findings); (2) Safety and Health (243 findings); (3) Management and Organization (18 findings); and (4) Self-Assessment (10 findings). Additionally, 436 noncompliance items with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards were addressed during and immediately after the Tiger Team visit.

  17. The collective action problem in primate territory economics

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Erik P.; Hellriegel, Barbara; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2013-01-01

    Group-living animals often do not maintain territories, but instead have highly overlapping ranges, even though in principle these are economically defendable. We investigate whether this absence of range defence reflects a collective action problem, since a territory can be considered a public good. In a comparative analysis comprising 135 primate species, we find a positive association between range overlap and group size, controlling for economic defendability and phylogenetic non-independence. We subsequently demonstrate that groups with multiple adults of both sexes suffer levels of range overlap twice as high as groups with only a single adult representative of either sex, consistent with the presence of a collective action problem. Finally, we reveal that this collective action problem can be overcome through philopatry of the larger sex. These results suggest that a social complication of group living is a stronger determinant of between-group relations among social animals than ecological factors, but also that collective defence is still achieved where the dominant sex is philopatric and effective defence is critical to reproductive success and survival. In addition, our findings support the idea that human-like warfare, defined as escalated collective territorial conflict, has an evolutionary basis reflected by cases of convergent evolution among non-human primates. PMID:23516240

  18. Final Federal Radon Action Plan Scorecard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information and a link to the draft Federal Radon Action Plan. It also contains a Federal Radon Action Plan Scorecard, a tool designed to display the current status of each federal agency commitments and outcomes to date.

  19. Final Natural Resource Actions Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-22

    f/J-1 o) JO L S. REESE, Colonel, USAF 319 ARW/CV, Chairman, Environmental Protection Committee ROD /051260006 (CLR2912.00C) 2 Architect...Safety and Occupational Health Proposed Action By following proper herbicide application procedures and construction techniques, the Proposed Action... construction season. 2.4.1.3 Prairie View Nature Preserve Management Guide The PVNP Management Guide (Grand Forks AFB, undated) was developed to ensure

  20. 22 CFR 1471.10 - Final action by the Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Final action by the Panel. 1471.10 Section 1471...; GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY; AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE IMPASSE DISPUTES PANEL FOREIGN SERVICE IMPASSE DISPUTES PANEL PROCEDURES OF THE PANEL § 1471.10 Final action by the Panel. (a)...

  1. 5 CFR 2472.11 - Final action by the Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final action by the Panel. 2472.11... LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY AND FEDERAL SERVICE IMPASSES PANEL FEDERAL SERVICE IMPASSES PANEL IMPASSES... SCHEDULES Procedures of the Panel § 2472.11 Final action by the Panel. (a) After due consideration of...

  2. 5 CFR 2471.11 - Final action by the Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final action by the Panel. 2471.11... LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY AND FEDERAL SERVICE IMPASSES PANEL FEDERAL SERVICE IMPASSES PANEL PROCEDURES OF THE PANEL § 2471.11 Final action by the Panel. (a) If the parties do not arrive at a settlement...

  3. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... prescribed in § 93.501, the ORI finding of research misconduct is the final HHS action on the research misconduct issues and the HHS administrative actions become final and will be implemented, except that...

  4. Economics in Action: A One Semester Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Chester School District, PA.

    Ten economics units are outlined for junior and senior high school use. Taken together the units comprise a one-semester (18 week) course. General objectives include understanding the differences between a free-enterprise economy, a mixed economy, and a planned economy; explaining how the government of a country controls the use of paper money;…

  5. MATS E-Reporting Final Action

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the interim final rule that will allow owners or operators of electric generating units to submit to EPA electronic emissions and compliance reports for the Mercury and Air Toxics rule.

  6. 32 CFR 856.7 - Action after final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... final decision. (a) Action by the Executive Director. The Executive Director or his/her designee will... relief was denied, the Executive Director will advise the applicant of reconsideration procedures and... Executive Director will send decisions requiring corrective action to the Chief of Staff, U.S. Air...

  7. 32 CFR 856.7 - Action after final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... final decision. (a) Action by the Executive Director. The Executive Director or his/her designee will... relief was denied, the Executive Director will advise the applicant of reconsideration procedures and... Executive Director will send decisions requiring corrective action to the Chief of Staff, U.S. Air...

  8. [Strategic planning: an important economic action for German hospitals].

    PubMed

    Wiese, Christoph H R; Zink, Wolfgang; Russo, Sebastian G

    2011-11-01

    In medical systems, economic issues and means of action are in the course of dwindling human (physicians and nurses) and financial resources are more important. For this reason, physicians must understand basic economic principles. Only in this way, there may be medical autonomy from social systems and hospital administrators. The current work is an approach to present a model for strategic planning of an anesthesia department. For this, a "strengths", "weaknesses", "opportunities", and "threats" (SWOT) analysis is used. This display is an example of an exemplary anaesthetic department.

  9. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Final HHS actions. 93.406 Section 93.406 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND...

  10. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final HHS actions. 93.406 Section 93.406 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND...

  11. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Final HHS actions. 93.406 Section 93.406 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND...

  12. 42 CFR 93.406 - Final HHS actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Final HHS actions. 93.406 Section 93.406 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND...

  13. 7 CFR 97.108 - Amendments after final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amendments after final action. 97.108 Section 97.108 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION Examinations, Allowances, and Denials § 97.108 Amendments after...

  14. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  15. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

  16. Enrichment of the Undergraduate Economics and Finance Curriculum through Economics U$A: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Paul W.

    This final report details the results of an experimental program sponsored by the Mississippi State University (MSU) Special Teaching Projects Program which examined the effectiveness of video materials in a college economics classroom. The empirical results indicate that when video lessons are used as part of a course, students demonstrate…

  17. Actionable Capability for Social and Economic Systems (ACSES)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Steven J; Brecke, Peter K; Carmichael, Theodore D; Eichelberger, Christopher N; Ganguly, Auroop R; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Jiao, Yu; Khouja, Moutaz J; McLean, Angus L; Middleton, Erin J; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Saric, Amar; Sun, Min; Whitmeyer, Joseph M; Gilman, Paul; O'Maonaigh, Heather C

    2008-05-01

    The foundation of the Actionable Capability for Social and Economic Systems (ACSES) project is a useful regional-scale social-simulation system. This report is organized into five chapters that describe insights that were gained concerning the five key feasibility questions pertaining to such a system: (1) Should such a simulation system exist, would the current state of data sets or collectible data sets be adequate to support such a system? (2) By comparing different agent-based simulation systems, is it feasible to compare simulation systems and select one appropriate for a given application with agents behaving according to modern social theory rather than ad hoc rule sets? (3) Provided that a selected simulation system for a region of interest could be constructed, can the simulation system be updated with new and changing conditions so that the universe of potential outcomes are constrained by events on the ground as they evolve? (4) As these results are constrained by evolving events on the ground, is it feasible to still generate surprise and emerging behavior to suggest outcomes from novel courses of action? (5) As these systems may for the first time require large numbers (hundreds of millions) of agents operating with complexities demanded of modern social theories, can results still be generated within actionable decision cycles?

  18. 31 CFR 800.601 - Finality of actions under section 721.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS, AND TAKEOVERS BY FOREIGN PERSONS Finality of Action § 800.601 Finality of actions under...

  19. 77 FR 37953 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... action relates to the proposed Fore River Bridge (State Route 3A over the Weymouth Fore River... bridge project. The actions by the USACE and USCG, related final actions by other Federal agencies, and... Federal Highway Administration Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge Replacement...

  20. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. When the final HHS action does not result in a settlement or finding of... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding...

  1. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. When a final HHS action results in a settlement or research misconduct... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding...

  2. Regulation of international energy markets: Economic effects of political actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, Anastasia V.

    Recent increases in volatility of energy prices have led many governments to reevaluate their regard of national energy reserves and reconsider future exploration, production, and consumption patterns. The flurry of activity that has been generated by such price volatility has included large-scale nationalizations of energy sectors, unilateral renegotiations of foreign energy development contracts, and expropriations of resources from foreign energy firms on one hand, and on the other hand more rapid energy sector liberalization, intensified search for and development of renewable fuels and technologies, and development of incentives for increased energy efficiency and conservation. The aim of this dissertation is to examine and quantify the extent of positive and negative effects that have resulted from some of these activities. The first chapter focuses on quantifying the effect that nationalistic sentiment has had on economic attractiveness of energy sectors during the decade prior to the recent global economic crisis, as measured by foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Empirical results demonstrate that both political and economic conditions play an important role in investors' decisions. A combination of investment friendliness, corruption levels, and democracy all help to explain the trends in energy-sector investment levels over time in my sample countries, although differences in the types of corruption existing in these nations do not. Investment levels, in turn, appear to influence future levels of oil production, underscoring the significance of good investment policies for future success of energy sectors. Chapter two considers the response of energy stock prices to severe regulatory actions. It employs an event study framework to examine causal effects of critical informational announcements (i.e. events of expropriation and nationalization) on daily returns and cumulative losses in firm value of energy corporations. Results show that a firm

  3. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  4. Final alternatives assessment: Other contamination sources: Interim response action, South Tank Farm Plume. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The South Tank Farm Plume (STFP) is located in the southern half of sections 1 and 2. It is a composite plume of C6H6, MEC6H5, XYLEN, DCPD, and BCHPD which is migrating from the area of tank 464A. Recent investigations have shown that the STFP is being biodegraded naturally and will not migrate into either Lake Ladora or Lower Derby Lake prior to implementation of the final remedy. Monitoring with the specific objectives of (1) Verifying the rate of migration and (2) Locating the leading edge of the plume over the time frame of the IRA is proposed as the preferred alternative action. Sections of this assessment provide information on: (1) Site description-history, previous investigations, hydrogeology, LNAPL plume; (2) IRA objectives and evaluation; and (3) Work plan of the IRA-well network, sampling frequency. Appendices include comments and responses.

  5. 77 FR 17565 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Transportation Improvements in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Transportation Improvements in Utah AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims...: Mr. Edward Woolford, Environmental Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 2520 West...

  6. 77 FR 22837 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial..., and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration--National Marine Fisheries Service....

  7. 75 FR 59787 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in New Hampshire

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in New Hampshire AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims for judicial.... Sikora, Environmental Programs Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 19 Chenell Drive, Suite...

  8. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of different issues identified by the Tiger Teams at the several locations of the Sandia National Laboratory. In this volume there are findings/concerns and the resultant responses and planned actions for these issues. Also included are the schedules and costs for the planned actions.

  9. Education and Economic Growth in Iowa; Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendening, Richard N.

    To study the relationship of education to economic growth for the state of Iowa, the hypothesis that increasing the level of education for the labor force would lead to higher levels of income or economic growth was tested for the period from 1950-1967. The Cobb-Douglas production was used to evaluate the relationship. The function used labor…

  10. Illinois Plan for Home Economics Education. FY89 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Univ., Normal.

    A project in Illinois created a 17-member committee, reviewed literature, and conducted a telephone survey of all 51 state home economics supervisors in the United States to create a conceptual framework for secondary home economics. The framework was reviewed and refined by the participants and is being published. Additional materials developed…

  11. Economic assessment of nine geothermal direct use applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.C.; Breton, T.R.

    1983-12-01

    This report provides an economic analysis of nine federally-supported geothermal direct heat applications which were part of DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program. Three of the projects analyzed were user-owned systems, and six were district heating systems. Five of the nine projects are successful from an economic standpoint and the majority of these projects are in areas where geothermal energy has long been used for heating. The results of this analysis indicate that geothermal energy projects can be economic under certain conditions, but these conditions may not be very widespread.

  12. Economics in Action: 14 Greatest Hits for Teaching High School Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopus, Jane S., Ed.; Willis, Amy M., Ed.

    Economics can be the most relevant and stimulating class students take in high school. One way to make this happen is to actively involve students in lessons that demonstrate important economic concepts and economic reasoning. This book contains a compilation of 14 popular lessons (all-time favorites from earlier publications by the National…

  13. 78 FR 40265 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in... final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. Sec. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the proposed Mitchell River Bridge (Bridge Street over the Mitchell River) Replacement Project in Chatham-Barnstable...

  14. 46 CFR 504.10 - Time constraints on final administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time constraints on final administrative actions. 504.10 Section 504.10 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.10 Time constraints on final administrative actions. No decision on...

  15. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  16. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  17. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  18. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  19. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  20. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  1. 76 FR 36173 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California... Review of Actions by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327... the State of California. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the project....

  2. 76 FR 42161 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California... Review of Actions by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327... Diego, State of California. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the project....

  3. 78 FR 28282 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California... Review of Actions by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327, U... County, in the State of California. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the...

  4. 77 FR 26601 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Connecticut

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Connecticut AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial... actions on the highway project will be barred unless the claim is filed on or before October 24, 2012....

  5. 78 FR 6845 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Interchange Project in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Interchange Project in Massachusetts AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitations on Claims for.... 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the proposed Route 79/I-195 Interchange Project in Fall...

  6. Vocational Home Economics Instructional Materials Exchange Network Plan. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    A project was undertaken to establish plans for a network through which postsecondary vocational home economics institutions in Texas could exchange instructional materials. After reviewing current literature on the idea of an instructional materials exchange, project staff mailed letters to the Board of Education in each of the 50 states…

  7. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  8. 7 CFR 97.107 - Reconsideration and final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION Examinations, Allowances, and Denials § 97.107... after the first examination. Any such denial shall be final unless appealed by the applicant to...

  9. Effects of Problem Based Economics on High School Economics Instruction. Final Report. NCEE 2010-4002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Neal; Hanson, Thomas; Huang, Chun-Wei; Hirschman, Becca; Huang, Min

    2010-01-01

    Since 1995, the Buck Institute has partnered with university economists and expert teachers to create the Problem Based Economics curriculum. The curriculum was developed to respond to NCEE (National Council on Economic Education) standards, and it is supported by professional development for teachers. This study examines whether the Problem Based…

  10. Economic analysis of wind-powered crop drying. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in crop drying. Drying of corn, soybeans, rice, peanuts, tobacco, and dehydrated alfalfa were addressed.

  11. Definition of primary mode of action of a combination product. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-08-25

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its combination product regulations to define "mode of action'' (MOA) and "primary mode of action" (PMOA). Along with these definitions, the final rule sets forth an algorithm the agency will use to assign combination products to an agency component for regulatory oversight when the agency cannot determine with reasonable certainty which mode of action provides the most important therapeutic action of the combination product. Finally, the final rule will require a sponsor to base its recommendation of the agency component with primary jurisdiction for regulatory oversight of its combination product by using the PMOA definition and, if appropriate, the assignment algorithm. The final rule is intended to promote the public health by codifying the agency's criteria for the assignment of combination products in transparent, consistent, and predictable terms.

  12. 75 FR 1114 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Doc No: 2010-110] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT..., 2007, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) assigned, and the California Department...

  13. 10 CFR 202.24 - Final action by the appropriate DOE official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Production or Disclosure in Response to Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 202.24 Final action by the appropriate DOE official. If the General Counsel approves a demand for the production...

  14. Final 2014 Remedial Action Report Project Chariot, Cape Thompson, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    This report was prepared to document remedial action (RA) work performed at the former Project Chariot site located near Cape Thompson, Alaska during 2014. The work was managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). Due to the short field season and the tight barge schedule, all field work was conducted at the site July 6 through September 12, 2014. Excavation activities occurred between July 16 and August 26, 2014. A temporary field camp was constructed at the site prior to excavation activities to accommodate the workers at the remote, uninhabited location. A total of 785.6 tons of petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL)-contaminated soil was excavated from four former drill sites associated with test holes installed circa 1960. Diesel was used in the drilling process during test hole installations and resulted in impacts to surface and subsurface soils at four of the five sites (no contamination was identified at Test Hole Able). Historic information is not definitive as to the usage for Test Hole X-1; it may have actually been a dump site and not a drill site. In addition to the contaminated soil, the steel test hole casings were decommissioned and associated debris was removed as part of the remedial effort.

  15. 78 FR 24292 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Fisheries, that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed... seven locations on SR 197 p.m. 3.2- 4.5, and US 199 20.5-26.5, and the replacement of a bridge on US 199... replacement of a bridge. The actions by the Federal agencies, and the laws under which such actions were...

  16. 77 FR 1782 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 39(l)(1). The action relates to the proposed Fore River Bridge (State... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in... bridge project in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The project proposes to replace the...

  17. 77 FR 48203 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139 (I)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency... other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139 (I)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, I-77 High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) lanes, from I-277 (Brookshire Freeway)...

  18. 77 FR 58906 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ...)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project on I-90 over the Mississippi River. The... River with a new bridge that meets structural and geometric standards as well as reconstruction of the I... public of final agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of...

  19. 78 FR 25524 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Populations; E.O. 11593 Protection and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment; E.O. 13007 Indian Sacred Sites... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California... Review of Actions by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), pursuant to 23 U.S.C....

  20. 75 FR 3522 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment; E.O. 13007 Indian Sacred Sites; E.O. 13287 Preserve... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California... Review of Actions by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), pursuant to 23 USC...

  1. 76 FR 81011 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Light Rail Project in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Light Rail Project in... meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the East Link Light Rail Transit Project in King... approvals for the following project in the State of Washington: East Link Light Rail Transit Project,...

  2. 12 CFR 563b.205 - May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C. 1464(i)(2)(B... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion? 563b.205 Section 563b.205 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 12 CFR 563b.205 - May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C. 1464(i)(2)(B... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion? 563b.205 Section 563b.205 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 12 CFR 563b.205 - May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C. 1464(i)(2)(B... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion? 563b.205 Section 563b.205 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 12 CFR 563b.205 - May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C. 1464(i)(2)(B... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion? 563b.205 Section 563b.205 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. 12 CFR 563b.205 - May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C. 1464(i)(2)(B... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May a court review OTS's final action on my conversion? 563b.205 Section 563b.205 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  7. 78 FR 45997 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Transportation Project in Washington State

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Transportation Project in... Project, located in the City of Puyallup (Milepost 6.40) in Pierce County, Washington. The action by FHWA... traffic, which will accommodate the future SR 167 Extension interchange and removes the existing...

  8. 78 FR 59085 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in California... Review of Actions by FHWA and other Federal agencies. SUMMARY: The FHWA, on behalf of the California... taken by the California Department of ] Transportation (Department) pursuant to its...

  9. 76 FR 53996 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims for judicial... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Effective July 1, 2007, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) assigned, and...

  10. 77 FR 52108 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial Review of..., Design Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 2520 West 4700 South, Suite 9A, Salt Lake...

  11. 77 FR 5617 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Utah AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitations on Claims for Judicial Review of..., Federal Highway Administration, 2520 West 4700 South, Suite 9A, Salt Lake City, Utah 84129; telephone...

  12. 76 FR 36614 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Illinois AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on claims for judicial...-controlled, four- lane expressway on new right-of-way between the proposed Macomb Bypass in McDonough...

  13. 76 FR 41554 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for Judicial...; 8. Endangered Species Act of 1973; 9. Migratory Bird Treaty Act; 10. Title VI of the Civil...

  14. Economical Production of Pu-238: NIAC Phase I Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Crawford, Douglas; Navarro, Jorge; O'Brien, Robert C.; Katalenich, Jeff; Ring, Terry

    2016-01-01

    All space exploration missions traveling beyond Jupiter must use radioisotopic power sources for electrical power. The best isotope to power these sources is plutonium-238 (Pu-238). The US supply of Pu-238 is almost exhausted and will be gone within the next decade. The Department of Energy has initiated a production program with a $10M allocation from NASA but the cost is estimated at over $100M to get to production levels. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) has conceived of a potentially better process to produce Pu-238 earlier and for significantly less cost. Potentially, the front end capital costs could be provided by private industry such that the government only had to pay for the product produced. In the Phase I NIAC (NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts) grant, the CSNR has evaluated the feasibility of using a low power, commercially available nuclear reactor to produce 1.5 kg of Pu-238 per year. The impact on the neutronics of the reactor have been assessed, the amount of Neptunium target material estimated, and the production rates calculated. In addition, the size of the post-irradiation processing facility has been established. Finally, as the study progressed, a new method for fabricating the Pu-238 product into the form used for power sources has been identified to reduce the cost of the final product. In short, the concept appears to be viable, can produce the amount of Pu-238 needed to support the NASA missions, can be available within a few years, and will cost significantly less than the current DOE program.

  15. Remedial action selection report Maybell, Colorado, site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The site is 2.5 mi (4 km) northeast of the Yampa River on relatively flat terrain broken by low, flat-topped mesas. U.S. Highway 40 runs east-west 2 mi (3.2 km) south of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. The site is situated between Johnson Wash to the east and Rob Pit Mine to the west. Numerous reclaimed and unreclaimed mines are in the immediate vicinity. Aerial photographs (included at the end of this executive summary) show evidence of mining activity around the Maybell site. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [ml]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd 3 (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3}(420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}).

  16. Bench-scale co-processing economic assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, H.B.; Marker, T.L.; Miller, E.N.

    1994-11-01

    The UOP Co-Processing scheme is a single-stage slurry catalyzed process in which petroleum vacuum resid and coal are simultaneously upgraded to a high-quality synthetic oil. A highly active dispersed catalyst has been developed which enables the operation of the co-processing unit at relatively moderate and high temperatures and relatively high pressure. Under the current contract, a multi-year research program was undertaken to study the technical and economic feasibility of this technology. All the contractual tasks were completed. Autoclave experiments were carried out to evaluate dispersed vanadium catalysts, molybdenum catalysts, and a less costly UOP-proprietary catalyst preparation technique. Autoclave experiments were also carried out in support of the continuous pilot plant unit operation and to study the effects of the process variables (pressure, temperature, and metal loading on the catalyst). A total of 24 continuous pilot plant runs were made. Research and development efforts during the pilot plant operations were concentrated on addressing the cost effectiveness of the UOP single-stage slurry catalyzed co-processing concept based on UOP experience gained in the previous DOE contract. To this end, effect of catalyst metal concentration was studied and a highly-active Mo-based catalyst was developed. This catalyst enabled successful long-term operation (924 hours) of the continuous bench-scale plant at highly severe operating conditions of 3,000 psig, 465{degree}C temperature, and 2:1 resid-to-MAF (moisture- and ash-free) coal ratio with 0.1 wt % active metal. The metal loading of the catalyst was low enough to consider the catalyst as a disposable slurry catalyst. Also, liquid recycle was incorporated in the pilot plant design to increase the, reactor back mixing and to increase the flow of liquid through the reactor (to introduce turbulence in the reactor) and to represent the design of a commercial-scale reactor.

  17. Jubba Environmental and Socio-economic Studies (JESS). Volume 3. Socio-economic studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Government of the Somali Democratic Republic (GSDR), with the support of the international donor community, is prepared to launch a comprehensive program for the development of Jubba Valley. The keystone of the program is construction of a dam on the Jubba River near Baardheere. Planners have been looking toward construction of the dam, among other things, to increase agricultural output by fostering irrigation development. The objectives of the Socio-economic Baseline Study (SEBS) report are to: present a body of a new information on socio-economic life in Jubba Valley; assess the impact of development efforts on socio-economic life; recommend measures to enhance beneficial impacts and mitigate adverse ones; and propose a program to monitor the progress of those impacts and interventions.

  18. Final Removal Action Report of the CPP-603A Basin Facility

    SciTech Connect

    D. V. Croson

    2007-01-04

    This Final Removal Action Report describes the actions that were taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Bason Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Removal Action implemented consolidation and recording the location of debris objects containing radioactive cobalt (cobalt-60), removal and management of a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1), the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) evaporation ponds, and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material.

  19. 22 CFR 134.8 - Official authorized to take final action under the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Act. 134.8 Section 134.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS EQUAL ACCESS TO... Act. The Department of State official who renders the final agency decision in a covered proceeding is authorized to take final action on matters pertaining to the Equal Access to Justice Act as applied to...

  20. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  1. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  2. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  3. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  4. 10 CFR 473.24 - Final action and certification by manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final action and certification by manager. 473.24 Section 473.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Review and Certification of Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Contracts, and Projects § 473.24 Final...

  5. The role of immediate and final goals in action planning: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Majdandzić, Jasminka; Grol, Meike J; van Schie, Hein T; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-08-15

    To interact effectively with our environment, we need to specify the intended outcomes (goals) of our actions. In this process, immediate goals and final goals can be regarded as different levels within a hierarchically organized system for action planning: immediate goals and movement details are selected to accomplish more remote goals. Behavioral studies support this notion of different levels of action planning, but the neurophysiological basis remains unclear. Using fMRI, we examined the neural correlates of preparing object manipulations based on either the desired end-state (the final goal) or the initial movement towards a target (the immediate goal). Subjects had to insert an object (consisting of a large and a small cube) into one of two corresponding large and small slots. The subjects were cued on either which slot to fill (Final Goal trials) or which object part to grasp (Immediate Goal trials). These actions required similar movements, but different planning. During Final Goal trials, there was differential preparatory activity along the superior frontal gyrus (bilaterally) and in left inferior parietal cortex. Immediate Goal trials evoked differential activity in occipito-parietal and occipito-temporal cortex. These findings support the notion that actions can be planned at different levels. We show that different fronto-parietal circuits plan the same action, by a relative emphasis on either selecting a sequence of movements to achieve a desired end-state, or selecting movements spatially compatible with given object properties.

  6. 78 FR 66419 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Pennsylvania

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ...(c)]; Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) . 6. Social and Economic: Civil... Floodplain Management; E.O. 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income Populations; E.O. 11593 Protection and Enhancement of Cultural Resources; E.O....

  7. Final Record of Decision/Remedial Action Plan, Nine Sites, Sierra Army Depot, Lassen County, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    section provides the declaration portion of the ROD /RAP for the Construction Debris Landfill. 5.1.1 Location The Construction Debris Landfill is...and Role of Response Action This ROD /RAP presents the final response action for the Construction Debris Landfill. This site poses no potential threat...AMMUNITION DEMILITARIZATION AND RENOVATION AREA BUILDING 1003 AREA CHEMICAL BURIAL SITE CONSTRUCTION DEBRIS LANDFILL EXISTING LANDFILL EXISTING

  8. 75 FR 62182 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139 (I)(1). A claim seeking judicial review of the Federal agency... by the FHWA and other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139 (I)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, NC 24 Improvements, from 2.8 miles east of I-95 to I-40...

  9. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  10. Financial and economic determinants of collective action: The case of wastewater management

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Norbert; Starkl, Markus

    2012-01-15

    Where public environmental funds support development of wastewater infrastructure, funding institutions ensure the economic use of funds, while the beneficiaries minimize their own costs. In rural areas, there is often a choice between decentralized or centralized (multi-village) systems: if the centralized system is most economic, then only this system is eligible for public funding. However, its implementation requires a voluntary cooperation of the concerned communities, who need to organize themselves to develop and run the infrastructure. The paper analyzes the social determinants of collaboration in a generic case study, using the following variables: method of (economic) assessment, modeled by the social discount rate, funding policy, modeled by the funding rate, and users' self-organization, modeled by cost sharing. In a borderline situation, where the centralized system turns out to be most economic, but this assessment is contingent on the assessment method, collective action may fail: the advantages of collective action from funding are too small to outweigh organizational deficiencies. Considering in this situation sanitation as a human right, authors recommend using innovative forms of organization and, if these fail, reassessing either the amount of funding or the eligibility for funding of more acceptable alternatives. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A generic case study models collective action and funding in wastewater management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determinants of success: economic assessment, funding policy and self-organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success indicators: conflict rate, funds needed to make cost shares fair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for analyzing centralized vs. decentralized disputes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer If collective action has less benefits, innovative cost sharing may ensure success.

  11. 78 FR 27473 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River... within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing... FHWA published a ``Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions'' on the Tappan Zee Hudson River...

  12. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 2, Change 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Two separate Tiger Team assessments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The first was conducted at the California site in Livermore between April 30, 1990, and May 18, 1990. A second Tiger Team assessment was conducted at the New Mexico site in Albuquerque between April 15 and May 24, 1991. This report is volume two, change one. One purpose of this Action Plan is to provide a formal written response to each of the findings and/or concerns cited in the SNL Tiger Team assessment reports. A second purpose is to present actions planned to be conducted to eliminate deficiencies identified by the Tiger Teams. A third purpose is to consolidate (group) related findings and to identify priorities assigned to the planned actions for improved efficiency and enhanced management of the tasks. A fourth and final purpose is to merge the two original SNL Action Plans for the New Mexico [Ref. a] and California [Ref. b] sites into a single Action Plan as a major step toward managing all SNL ES&H activities more similarly. Included in this combined SNL Action Plan are descriptions of the actions to be taken by SNL to liminate all problems identified in the Tiger Teams` findings/concerns, as well as estimated costs and schedules for planned actions.

  13. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1, Change 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Two separate Tiger Team assessments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The first was conducted at the California site in Livermore between April 30, 1990, and May 18, 1990. A second Tiger team assessment was conducted at the New Mexico site in Albuquerque between April 15 and May 24, 1991. One purpose of this Action Plan is to provide a formal written response to each of the findings and/or concerns cited in the SNL Tiger Team assessment reports. A second purpose is to present actions planned to be conducted to eliminate deficiencies identified by the Tiger Teams. A third purpose is to consolidate (group) related findings and to identify priorities assigned to the planned actions for improved efficiency and enhanced management of the tasks. A fourth and final purpose is to merge the two original SNL Action Plans for the New Mexico and California sites into a single Action Plan as a major step toward managing all SNL ES&H activities more similarly. Included in this combined SNL Action Plan are descriptions of the actions to be taken by SNL to liminate all problems identified in the Tiger Teams` findings/concerns, as well as estimated costs and schedules for planned actions.

  14. 21 CFR 10.45 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General... must first be the subject of a final administrative decision based on a petition submitted under § 10... the subject of an administrative decision based upon a petition for stay of action submitted...

  15. 18 CFR 401.90 - Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals. 401.90 Section 401.90 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and...

  16. 75 FR 27384 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California... Road interchange in the City of Stockton (post mile 15.0), in San Joaquin County, State of California...-mail: dominic.hoang@dot.gov . For the California Department of Transportation: Gail Miller,...

  17. 76 FR 46890 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... notice, FHWA is advising the public of final agency actions subject to 23 U.S.C. 139(1). A claim seeking... applies. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Pete Jilek, Urban Area Engineer, Federal Highway Administration...@.dot.gov. The FHWA Washington Division Urban Area Engineer's regular office hours are between 6...

  18. 25 CFR 83.11 - Independent review, reconsideration and final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Independent review, reconsideration and final action. 83.11 Section 83.11 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT PROCEDURES FOR ESTABLISHING THAT AN AMERICAN INDIAN GROUP EXISTS AS AN INDIAN TRIBE § 83.11...

  19. 25 CFR 83.11 - Independent review, reconsideration and final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Independent review, reconsideration and final action. 83.11 Section 83.11 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT PROCEDURES FOR ESTABLISHING THAT AN AMERICAN INDIAN GROUP EXISTS AS AN INDIAN TRIBE § 83.11...

  20. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.411 Section 93.411 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or...

  1. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... research misconduct. 93.410 Section 93.410 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement...

  2. 75 FR 51160 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... other Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a.... Wildlife: Endangered Species Act [16 U.S.C. 1531-1544 and Section 1536], Migratory Bird Treaty Act ....

  3. 18 CFR 401.90 - Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals. 401.90 Section 401.90 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and...

  4. 18 CFR 401.90 - Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals. 401.90 Section 401.90 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and...

  5. 18 CFR 401.90 - Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Appeals from final Commission action; Time for appeals. 401.90 Section 401.90 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and...

  6. Essential Communication and Documentation Skills. Module: Final Assessment and Action Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Muriel; And Others

    This module is the 10th of 10 in the Essential Communication and Documentation Skills curriculum. It develops final assessment and action planning, workplace literacy skills identified as being directly related to the job of the direct care worker. The curriculum is designed to improve the competence of New York State Division for Youth direct…

  7. Economic analysis of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This economic analysis (EA) examines compliance costs and economic impacts resulting from the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Final Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Industry Point Source Category. It also investigates the costs and impacts associated with an air rule requiring Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) to control air emissions, both separately and together with the Final Pharmaceutical Industry Effluent Guidelines. The EA estimates the economic effects of compliance with both final rules in terms of total aggregate annualized costs of compliance, facility closures, impacts on firms (likelihood of bankruptcy and effects on profit margins), and impacts on new sources. The EA also investigates secondary impacts on employment and communities, foreign trade, specific demographic groups, and environmental justice. This report includes a Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (FRFA) detailing the impacts on small businesses within the pharmaceutical industry to meet the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), as amended by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA). Finally, the EA presents a cost-benefit analysis to meet the requirements of Executive Order 12866 and the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.

  8. A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.

    2008-07-01

    The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

  9. Final Action Plan to Tiger Team. Environmental, safety and health assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-28

    This document presents planned actions, and their associated costs, for addressing the findings in the Environmental, Safety and Health Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, May 1991, hereafter called the Assessment. This Final Action Plan should be read in conjunction with the Assessment to ensure full understanding of the findings addressed herein. The Assessment presented 353 findings in four general categories: (1)Environmental (82 findings); (2) Safety and Health (243 findings); (3) Management and Organization (18 findings); and (4) Self-Assessment (10 findings). Additionally, 436 noncompliance items with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards were addressed during and immediately after the Tiger Team visit.

  10. Simulating the Epidemiological and Economic Impact of Paratuberculosis Control Actions in Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Græsbøll, Kaare; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Christiansen, Lasse E.; Toft, Nils; Rattenborg, Erik; Halasa, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new mechanistic bioeconomic model for simulating the spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) within a dairy cattle herd. The model includes age-dependent susceptibility for infection; age-dependent sensitivity for detection; environmental MAP build up in five separate areas of the farm; in utero infection; infection via colostrum and waste milk, and it allows for realistic culling (i.e., due to other diseases) by including a ranking system. We calibrated the model using a unique dataset from Denmark, including 102 random farms with no control actions against spread of MAP. Likewise, four control actions recommended in the Danish MAP control program were implemented in the model based on reported management strategies in Danish dairy herds in a MAP control scheme. We tested the model parameterization in a sensitivity analysis. We show that a test-and-cull strategy is on average the most cost-effective solution to decrease the prevalence and increase the total net revenue on a farm with low hygiene, but not more profitable than no control strategy on a farm with average hygiene. Although it is possible to eradicate MAP from the farm by implementing all four control actions from the Danish MAP control program, it was not economically attractive since the expenses for the control actions outweigh the benefits. Furthermore, the three most popular control actions against the spread of MAP on the farm were found to be costly and inefficient in lowering the prevalence when used independently. PMID:27777933

  11. 76 FR 54288 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge and Approach Roadways in Nevada and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Bridge and Approach... Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(I)(1). The actions relate to the proposed Laughlin-Bullhead City Bridge project in Laughlin, Clark County, Nevada; and in Bullhead...

  12. Final Actions in Arkansas; Governors' Proposals in Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Virginia. Legislative Report No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. This report presents final legislative and budget actions in…

  13. Neural mechanisms underlying immediate and final action goals in object use reflected by slow wave brain potentials.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Hein T; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-05-07

    Event-related brain potentials were used to study the neural mechanisms underlying goal-directed object use distinguishing between processes supporting immediate and final action goals during action planning and execution. Subjects performed a grasping and transportation task in which actions were cued either with the immediate action goal (the part of the object to grasp) or with the final action goal of the movement (the end position for transportation). Slow wave potentials dissociated between processes supporting immediate and final goals: reaching for the object was accompanied by the development of a parietal-occipital slow wave that peaked in congruency with the grasping event, whereas transport of the object towards the final goal location was found accompanied by slow wave components developing over left frontal regions with a peak towards the movement end. Source localization of cueing differences indicated activation centered around the parieto-occipital sulcus during reaching of the immediate action goal, followed by enhanced activation in the anterior prefrontal cortex during transport to the final action goal. These results suggest the existence of separate neural controllers for immediate and final action goals during the execution of goal-directed actions with objects.

  14. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE.

  15. Effects of Problem Based Economics on High School Economics Instruction. Final Report. NCEE 2010-4022rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Neal; Hanson, Thomas; Huang, Chun-Wei; Hirschman, Becca; Huang, Min

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether the Problem Based Economics curriculum developed by the Buck Institute for Education improves grade 12 students' content knowledge as measured by the Test of Economic Literacy, a test refined by the National Council on Economic Education (NCEE) over decades. Students' problem-solving skills in economics were also…

  16. Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2006-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees numerous sites on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other locations in the State of Nevada that have been impacted by activities related to the development and testing of nuclear devices and by other activities. NNSA/NSO is responsible for protecting members of the public, including site workers, from harmful exposure to both chemical and radiological contaminants at these sites as they remediate these sites. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) is the primary state agency responsible for protection of human health and the environment with respect to chemical and radiological wastes. In 1996 the DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada entered into an agreement known as the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Appendix VI to the FFACO describes the strategy employed to plan, implement, and complete environmental corrective action activities at NTS and other locations in the state of Nevada. One of the categories of corrective action units (CAUs) is Industrial Sites, which consists of approximately 1,150 locations that may require some level of investigation and corrective action. To evaluate the need for the extent of corrective action at a particular site, NNSA/NSO assesses the potential impacts to receptors by comparing measurements of contaminant concentrations to risk-based (chemical) and dose-based (radionuclide) standards (action levels). Preliminary action levels (PALs) are established as part of the data quality objective (DQO) process, and are presented in one or more FFACO documents generated as part of the corrective action process. This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process NNSA/NSO Industrial Sites Project uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process establishes final action levels (FALs) based on the risk

  17. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  18. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  19. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Falls City, Texas, site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This final audit report for the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site summarizes the radiological audits and the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, audits, and final close-out inspection performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). It also summarizes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) surveillances. One radiological audit and three radiological surveillances were performed at the Falls City site. These surveillances and audit, which resulted in 31 observations, focused primarily on processing site activities and were performed on the following dates: 3-6 August 1992, 29-30 October 1992, 22-26 March 1993, and 1-3 November 1993. All outstanding radiological issues were closed out at the completion of the construction activities. Six QA in-process surveillances, which resulted in 71 observations, were performed at the Falls City site on the following dates: 22-24 July 1992, 23-25 November 1992, 17-19 May 1993, 16-18 August 1993, 13-15 October 1993, and 2-4 February 1994. All outstanding issues were closed out with the February surveillance on 3 March 1994. The DOE/TAC remedial action close-out inspections of the Falls City site, which resulted in 56 observations, were conducted 9-10 June 1994 and 26 July 1994. The inspections were closed out on 26 January 1995. The NRC performed three on-site construction reviews (OSCR), resulting in seven observations of remedial action construction activities that occurred during site visits. The OSCRs were performed 9 December 1992, 12 May 1993, and 25 October 1993. Since all audit and surveillance observations and recommendations have been closed out, this final audit report segment of the site certification process is complete.

  20. Interim Response Action Basin F Liquid Incineration Project Final Draft Human Health Risk Assessment. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    91222R02 2ND COPY Interim Response Action Basin F Liquid Incineration Project FINAL DRAFT HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT V olumne I Preplaced Remedial...The Use of OELs and NAAQSs for Calculating Inhalation RfJ)s 9-13 9.4.2.2 Adjustments to Inhalation RfDs 9-14 793C/FM V 7/22/91 TABLE OF CONTENTS...HENDERSON RTHOL THOL HAZELTIN A I LE-- f V , Rocky Mountain WELB DA Arsenal A"ADA AA -AIL- VIM IT RUM Doi T p- 0 Denver kl& MOR SHER DAN r go, "- V

  1. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

  2. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project, Grand Junction, Colorado, processing site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This final audit report (FAR) for remedial action at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project processing site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/ audits, the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and the QA final close-out inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). The FAR also summarizes other surveillances performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). To summarize, a total of one finding and 127 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. The NRC noted general site-related observations during the OSCRs. Follow-up to responses required from MK-Ferguson for the DOE/TAC finding and observations indicated that all issues related to the Grand Junction processing site were resolved and closed out to the DOE`s satisfaction. The NRC OSCRs resulted in no issues related to the Grand Junction processing site requiring a response from MK-Ferguson.

  3. 12 CFR 192.205 - May a court review the appropriate Federal banking agency's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May a court review the appropriate Federal banking agency's final action on my conversion? 192.205 Section 192.205 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER...

  4. 12 CFR 192.205 - May a court review the appropriate Federal banking agency's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May a court review the appropriate Federal banking agency's final action on my conversion? 192.205 Section 192.205 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER...

  5. 12 CFR 192.205 - May a court review the appropriate Federal banking agency's final action on my conversion?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to review the action under 12 U.S.C... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May a court review the appropriate Federal banking agency's final action on my conversion? 192.205 Section 192.205 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER...

  6. 77 FR 65929 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River.... Sec. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project located in Rockland... the following highway project in the State of New York: Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing...

  7. 78 FR 42151 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Goethals Bridge Replacement Project in New York and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... of a replacement bridge with a new six-lane structure directly and entirely south of the existing... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Goethals Bridge Replacement... meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Goethals Bridge Replacement Project located...

  8. 75 FR 43160 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on One Arkansas Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on One Arkansas Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: This...

  9. 75 FR 3277 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment F-2) in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment F-2) in... actions relate to a proposed highway project, Grand Parkway (State Highway 99) Segment F-2, from State... the following highway project in the State of Texas: Grand Parkway (State Highway 99) Segment F-2...

  10. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

  11. Final decision document for other contamination sources, interim response action, shell section 36 trenches, RMA

    SciTech Connect

    1990-04-01

    The shell section 36 trenches were used from 1952 to 1966 for land disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated from pesticide manufacture. They have been shown to be a source of soil and ground water contamination for volatile and semivolatile compounds. A dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) is also believed to have originated from the area. The objective of the interim response action is to reduce the lateral migration of contaminants emanating from the trenches. The preferred IRA alternative consists of (1) A physical barrier encircling the trenches and (2) a soil and vegetative cover to eliminate recharge. This final decision document provides summaries of: (1). Alternatives considered (2). Significant events leading to the initiation of the IRA (3). The IRA project (4). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements, standards.

  12. Solar energy system economic evaluation: Fern Tunkhannock, Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The economic performance of an Operational Test Site (OTS) is described. The long term economic performance of the system at its installation site and extrapolation to four additional selected locations to demonstrate the viability of the design over a broad range of environmental and economic conditions is reported. Topics discussed are: system description, study approach, economic analysis and system optimization, and technical and economical results of analysis. Data for the economic analysis are generated through evaluation of the OTS. The simulation is based on the technical results of the seasonal report simulation. In addition localized and standard economic parameters are used for economic analysis.

  13. A Comprehensive Evaluation of OEO Community Action Programs on Six Selected American Indian Reservations. Report 4 - Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James G. E.; And Others

    The impact of the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) Community Action Programs (CAP) on 6 selected American Indian reservations (Gila River and Papago, Arizona; Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico; Pine Ridge, South Dakota; Turtle Mountain, North Dakota, and White Earth Chippewa, Minnesota) are evaluated. After considering the development of Indian…

  14. Intergranular attack of alloy 600: Simulation and remedial action tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Daret, J.; Feron, D.

    1989-02-01

    The intergranular attack (IGA) that affects alloy 600 tubes in the tube sheet crevices of PWR steam generators is hard to simulate in laboratory studies. For this study, a special apparatus was designed with a range of representative materials, mechanical conditions and geometry. The design also took account of sludge piles, thermal fluxes and water chemistry. During a first series of seven model boiler tests, chemical parameters and test procedures were adjusted to finally obtain a field prototypical degradation of tubing over a significant length within the tube sheet crevice for the case of caustic pollution. IGA was not produced for the river water in-leakage case. A second series of model boiler tests also showed the possibility of producing a representative IGA by initially filling the tube sheet crevices with concentrated caustic solutions. A third series of five model boiler tests aimed at studying in the effectiveness of remedial actions on either virgin of IGA affected tubing. Tube sheet crevice flushing operations using the natural circulation procedure showed a poor efficiency for moving concentrated contaminants, but they succeeded in forcing chemicals additives (acetic acid or boric acid) within the non-occluded portions of crevices. This off-line treatment resulted in a reduction in the progression rate of the pre-existing IGA by a factor of 2 to 3. Simulation of this treatment on virgin material showed that this result was obtained because acetate or borate shifted the cation-to-anion equivalent ratio to well under one. However this off-line treatment could not prevent the occurrence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) near the top of crevices, since caustic continued to hideout under full power operation. The best remedial action consisted of a combination of off-line and on-line boric acid treatment. IGSCC was prevented both on virgin and IGA affected tubes. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Final Report for Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Innis; Randy Udall; Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-09-30

    Final Report for ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America'': This project, ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop'', helped stimulate wind development by rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities in Colorado. To date most of the wind power development in the United States has been driven by large investor-owned utilities serving major metropolitan areas. To meet the 5% by 2020 goal of the Wind Powering America program the 2,000 municipal and 900 rural electric cooperatives in the country must get involved in wind power development. Public power typically serves rural and suburban areas and can play a role in revitalizing communities by tapping into the economic development potential of wind power. One barrier to the involvement of public power in wind development has been the perception that wind power is more expensive than other generation sources. This project focused on two ways to reduce the costs of wind power to make it more attractive to public power entities. The first way was to develop a revenue stream from the sale of green tags. By selling green tags to entities that voluntarily support wind power, rural coops and munis can effectively reduce their cost of wind power. Western Resource Advocates (WRA) and the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) worked with Lamar Light and Power and Arkansas River Power Authority to develop a strategy to use green tags to help finance their wind project. These utilities are now selling their green tags to Community Energy, Inc., an independent for-profit marketer who in turn sells the tags to consumers around Colorado. The Lamar tags allow the University of Colorado-Boulder, the City of Boulder, NREL and other businesses to support wind power development and make the claim that they are ''wind-powered''. This urban-rural partnership is an important development for the state of Colorado's rural communities get the economic benefits of wind power and urban businesses are

  16. Technical and economical feasibility of buffalo gourd as a novel energy crop: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, B.

    1988-02-01

    The New Mexico Solar Energy Institute at NMSU has conducted a two-year investigation into the technical and economic feasibility of using the buffalo gourd plant as an energy feedstock in eastern New Mexico. The New Mexico buffalo gourd project conducted field planting trials to determine optimum planting density, fertilizer levels, and irrigation regime. Starchy roots produced by the field plantings were evaluated as an ethanol feedstock at both laboratory and pilot scale. These studies indicate that buffalo gourd is well suited for root production in eastern New Mexico. Current cultivars of buffalo gourd can be most efficiently produced under dry land farming conditions with little, if any, supplemental fertilizer. Traditional plant breeding techniques can be profitably employed on the buffalo gourd to breed a size and shape of root more easily harvested by existing farm machinery. Because of its sensitivity to root rot, buffalo gourd must be grown in well drained soils. Finally, buffalo gourd has been shown to be an excellent feedstock for ethanol production provided necessary pre-fermentation processing (chopping of roots) is performed correctly. A model was created to determine the economic feasibility of growing buffalo gourd in eastern New Mexico. It was determined that the net return to a farmer in eastern New Mexico can be higher planting buffalo gourd than many traditionally grown crops because of buffalo gourd's low water and fertilizer requirements. The model further indicates that net return is heavily influenced by root yield. Continued research is needed to optimize buffalo gourd root yield, as well as root size and shape, disease resistance, etc. A clearly defined R and D agenda and commercialization strategy is presented and discussed. Buffalo gourd has been demonstrated to have high potential as an alternative feedstock for ethanol production in eastern New Mexico. 128 refs., 9 figs., 28 tabs.

  17. Seminar on the Economics of Education-Investment Decisions and Contributions to Income and Economic Growth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, W. Lee; Weisbrod, Burton A.

    A workshop on the Economics of Human Resources was initiated in 1966, at the University of Wisconsin to provide a vehicle for stimulating research by both faculty and graduate students and to provide a medium for disseminating the latest research findings of outside scholars, University of Wisconsin faculty and graduate students. This document is…

  18. Coal-gasification systems: a guide to status, applications, and economics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.R.; Dickenson, R.L.; Oliver, E.D.

    1983-06-01

    Coal gasification has been the subject of a great deal of study and development worldwide over the past decade. The open literature currently contains bewildering and often inconsistent information concerning the development status and economic viability of coal gasification systems. The Advanced Power Systems Division of EPRI has devoted considerable resources to the development and demonstration of coal gasification technology for ultimate use in electric-power-generation systems. The primary objective of this Guide is to provide current and consistent information concerning the status of commercial development, potential utility applications and EPRI-developed capital and operating costs for coal-gasification technologies that have already been demonstrated at commercial scale as well as for those that are close to commercial practice. Current commercial/developmental status of Lurgi, Koppers-Totzek, Texaco, Shell, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi, KILnGAS, Westinghouse and High Temperature Winkler is discussed. Environmental aspects, thermal performance, reliabiilty and cost information are provided for medium-Btu gas production; retrofitting and repowering existing steam plants; integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems; low-water-consumption IGCC systems; methanol from coal; once-through methanol production in an IGCC system; and IGCC systems employing advanced, molten-carbonate fuel cells. Finally, for comparison purposes, performance and cost estimates on a consistent basis are provided for coal-fired steam plants; oil-fired steam plants; oil- and gas-fired combined-cycle and combustion-turbine plants. 88 figures, 86 tables.

  19. Economic impacts of the S. S. Glacier Bay oil spill: Social and economic studies. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, P.; Isaacs, J.; Richardson, J.; Braund, S.; Witten, E.

    1990-11-01

    On July 2, 1987, an oil spill occurred in Cook Inlet when the S.S. Glacier Bay hit a submerged obstacle while enroute to Kenai Pipeline Company facilities to offload oil. The 1987 commercial fishery in Cook Inlet was barely underway when the S.S. Glacier Bay oil spill occurred, and the largest salmon return in history was moving up the inlet. The sockeye salmon run alone totaled over 12 million, providing a seasonal catch of 9.25 million salmon. The 1987 sport fishery in Cook Inlet was in mid-season at the time of the spill. The S.S. Glacier Bay oil spill represents an opportunity to study the economic impacts of an oil spill event in Alaska, particularly with regard to commercial fishing impacts and the public costs of cleanup. The report evaluates the existing information on the spill, response measures, and economic impacts, and adds discussions with individuals and groups involved in or affected by the spill to this data base. The report reviewed accounts of the oil spill and its costs; identified types and sources of data, developed protocol, and contacted groups and people for data collection and verification; and described, analyzed, and prepared reports of the economic effects of the S.S. Glacier Bay oil spill.

  20. Workshop on Utilization and Training of Auxiliary Personnel in Home Economics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Doris E.

    The 197 participants, representing all areas of home economics, attended a 3-day national workshop on the training and utilization of auxiliary workers within the field of home economics. Workshop activities included a symposium of auxiliary personnel employed as aides in home economics-related occupations and group discussions which followed…

  1. Economic Benefits and Impacts from Public Libraries in the State of Florida. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.; Fraser, Bruce T.; Nelson, Timothy W.; Robbins, Jane B.

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the economic impacts and benefits of Florida public libraries. The study objectives were to: describe the role of public libraries in economic development; identify and describe the range of specific activities and programs engaged in to support economic development; identify factors that…

  2. 76 FR 79755 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Interstate 95 High Occupancy Toll Lanes Project in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... facilitate movement between the HOV/HOT lanes and the general purpose lanes. Pull-off areas will also be... letter finalizing the Environmental Assessment process and requesting a Finding of No Significant Impact... Preservation Act of 1966, as amended [16 U.S.C. 470(f) et seq.]. 6. Social and Economic: Farmland...

  3. Reputation in an economic game modulates premotor cortex activity during action observation.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Harry; Apps, Matthew; Tsakiris, Manos

    2016-09-01

    Our interactions with other people - and our processing of their actions - are shaped by their reputation. Research has identified an Action Observation Network (AON) which is engaged when observing other people's actions. Yet, little is known about how the processing of others' actions is influenced by another's reputation. Is the response of the AON modulated by the reputation of the actor? We developed a variant of the ultimatum game in which participants watched either the visible or occluded actions of two 'proposers'. These actions were tied to decisions of how to split a pot of money although the proposers' decisions on each trial were not known to participants when observing the actions. One proposer made fair offers on the majority of trials, establishing a positive reputation, whereas the other made predominantly, unfair offers resulting in a negative reputation. We found significant activations in two regions of the left dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC). The first of these showed a main effect of reputation with greater activation for the negative reputation proposer than the positive reputation proposer. Furthermore individual differences in trust ratings of the two proposers covaried with activation in the right primary motor cortex (M1). The second showed an interaction between visibility and reputation driven by a greater effect of reputation when participants were observing an occluded action. Our findings show that the processing of others' actions in the AON is modulated by an actor's reputation, and suggest a predictive role for the PMC during action observation.

  4. 76 FR 10938 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock... a proposed highway project, Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction, Clackamas County, Oregon..., NE., Suite 100, Salem, Oregon 97301, Telephone: (503) 587-4716. The Sunrise Project, I-205 to...

  5. 77 FR 71207 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway and Bridge in the Cities of Cincinnati...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway and Bridge in... bridge over the Ohio River in the City of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, State of Ohio and the City...

  6. 37 CFR 1.111 - Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action. 1.111 Section 1.111 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED... claims present in view of the state of the art disclosed by the references cited or the objections...

  7. 37 CFR 1.111 - Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action. 1.111 Section 1.111 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED... claims present in view of the state of the art disclosed by the references cited or the objections...

  8. 37 CFR 1.111 - Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action. 1.111 Section 1.111 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED... claims present in view of the state of the art disclosed by the references cited or the objections...

  9. 37 CFR 1.111 - Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reply by applicant or patent owner to a non-final Office action. 1.111 Section 1.111 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED... claims present in view of the state of the art disclosed by the references cited or the objections...

  10. 78 FR 26739 - Notice of Final Action on Petition From Earthjustice To List Coal Mines as a Source Category and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 Notice of Final Action on Petition From Earthjustice To List Coal Mines as a Source Category and To Regulate Air Emissions From Coal Mines AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA..., the Acting EPA Administrator, Bob Perciasepe, signed a letter denying a petition to add coal mines...

  11. 75 FR 53735 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on East Lake Sammamish Master Plan Trail in King County, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 169 (Wednesday, September 1, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 53735-53736] [FR Doc No: 2010-21804] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on East Lake Sammamish Master Plan Trail in King County, WA AGENCY:...

  12. 24 CFR 180.700 - Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases. 180.700 Section 180.700 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,...

  13. 24 CFR 180.700 - Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases. 180.700 Section 180.700 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,...

  14. 24 CFR 180.700 - Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases. 180.700 Section 180.700 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,...

  15. 24 CFR 180.700 - Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases. 180.700 Section 180.700 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,...

  16. 24 CFR 180.700 - Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Action upon issuance of a final decision in Fair Housing Act cases. 180.700 Section 180.700 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,...

  17. 77 FR 66215 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York Correction In notice document 2012-26799, appearing on page 65929 in the...

  18. 78 FR 59754 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed U.S. 50 Study Crossing Over Sinepauxent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed U.S. 50 Study Crossing Over Sinepauxent Bay in the Town of Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland Correction In...

  19. 78 FR 26104 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on OR 62: I-5 to Dutton Road (Medford) Project: Jackson...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on OR 62: I-5 to Dutton Road (Medford) Project: Jackson County, OR AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Department of..., Program Development Team Leader, Federal Highway Administration, 530 Center Street NE., Suite 420,...

  20. Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-12

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

  1. 78 FR 13161 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2013 and 2014 Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...NMFS announces final 2013 and 2014 harvest specifications, apportionments, and Pacific halibut prohibited species catch limits for the groundfish fishery of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during the 2013 and 2014 fishing years and to accomplish the goals and objectives of the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the GOA. The......

  2. 76 FR 11111 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2011 and 2012 Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ...NMFS announces final 2011 and 2012 harvest specifications, apportionments, and Pacific halibut prohibited species catch limits for the groundfish fishery of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during the 2011 and 2012 fishing years and to accomplish the goals and objectives of the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the GOA. The......

  3. 75 FR 11749 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2010 and 2011 Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ...NMFS announces final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications, apportionments, and Pacific halibut prohibited species catch limits for the groundfish fishery of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during the 2010 and 2011 fishing years and to accomplish the goals and objectives of the Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Groundfish of the GOA.......

  4. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  5. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  6. Taking Action for America: A CEO Plan for Jobs and Economic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Roundtable, 2012

    2012-01-01

    America faces many challenges in working together to restore the promise of economic growth and security for the country, U.S. families and the American worker. The challenges are both real and serious. Despite hopeful signs of economic recovery, America remains mired in the deepest jobs crisis since the 1930s. One out of every 12 Americans who…

  7. Economics.

    PubMed

    Palley, Paul D; Parcero, Miriam E

    2016-10-01

    A review of literature in the calendar year 2015 dedicated to environmental policies and sustainable development, and economic policies. This review is divided into these sections: sustainable development, irrigation, ecosystems and water management, climate change and disaster risk management, economic growth, water supply policies, water consumption, water price regulation, and water price valuation.

  8. 77 FR 59035 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Rehabilitation and Restoration in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... compliance with modern standards, in particular the Americans with Disabilities Act. It is one of the largest... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... on Claims for Judicial Review of Action by FHWA. SUMMARY: This notice announces action taken by...

  9. 77 FR 6622 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Bridge Replacement in Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... review. It is one of ] the largest projects to be undertaken by MassDOT under the Commonwealth's $3... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Judicial Review of Action by FHWA. SUMMARY: This notice announces action taken by the FHWA that is...

  10. Final record of decision/remedial action plan, nine sites, Sierra Army Depot, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, S.L.; Larson, A.M.; Parent, M.M.; Silvers, J.M.; Weaverling, P.H.

    1996-10-01

    This ROD/RAP presents the selected response actions for nine sites at SIAD. The response actions were selected by the US Department of the Army (Army) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)(collectively referred to as CERCLA), the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), and Section 6.8 of the California Health and Safety Code. This ROD/RAP includes the factual and legal basis for selecting the response action at each of the nine sites listed above. The data used to support the selected response action are contained in the Administrative Record for each site. The State of California as represented by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) concur with the selected response action at each site.

  11. Remedial action at the Acid/Pueblo Canyon site, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    The Acid/Pueblo Canyon site (TA-45) was designated in 1976 for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). During the period 1943 to 1964 untreated and treated liquid wastes generated by nuclear weapons research activities at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) were discharged into the two canyons. A survey of the site conducted by LASL in 1976 to 1977 identified two areas where radiological contamination exceeded criteria levels. The selected remedial action was based on extensive radiological characterization and comprehensive engineering assessments and comprised the excavation and disposal of 390 yd/sup 3/ of contaminated soil and rock. This document describes the background to the remedial action, the parties involved in administering and executing it, the chronology of the work, verification of the adequacy of the remedial action, and the cost incurred. 14 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  12. Gaming via Computer Simulation Techniques for Junior College Economics Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Fred A.

    A study designed to answer the need for more attractive and effective economics education involved the teaching of one junior college economics class by the conventional (lecture) method and an experimental class by computer simulation techniques. Econometric models approximating the "real world" were computer programed to enable the experimental…

  13. Insitute for Home Economics Teacher Educators on Preparing Teachers for Occupational Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Alberta D.

    Thirty selected home economics teacher educators from 24 states participated in a 3-week summer institute which was devoted to (1) the identification and clarification of philosophies of vocational education affecting teacher education in home economics, (2) teacher qualifications, (3) program development, and (4) guidelines for evaluating teacher…

  14. Military construction program economic analysis manual: Text and appendixes: Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This manual enables the US Air Force to comprehensively and systematically analyze alternative approaches to meeting its military construction requirements. The manual includes step-by-step procedures for completing economic analyses for military construction projects, beginning with determining if an analysis is necessary. Instructions and a checklist of the tasks involved for each step are provided; and examples of calculations and illustrations of completed forms are included. The manual explains the major tasks of an economic analysis, including identifying the problem, selecting realistic alternatives for solving it, formulating appropriate assumptions, determining the costs and benefits of the alternatives, comparing the alternatives, testing the sensitivity of major uncertainties, and ranking the alternatives. Appendixes are included that contain data, indexes, and worksheets to aid in performing the economic analyses. For reference, Volume 2 contains sample economic analyses that illustrate how each form is filled out and that include a complete example of the documentation required. 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. 76 FR 77587 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    .... 470(f) et seq.]; 6. Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964 [42 U.S.C. 2000(d)- 2000(d)(1... Number 20.205, Highway Planning and Construction. The regulations implementing Executive Order...

  16. Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, L. D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the economic aspects of water pollution control covering publications of 1976-77. This review also includes the policy issues of water management. A list of 77 references is presented. (HM)

  17. 75 FR 78340 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Nevada

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to I-15 Corridor Improvements from Sahara Avenue to US... Interstate 15 (I-15) corridor and major street connections beginning south of the I-15/Sahara...

  18. Regulatory Actions - Final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page describes Federal regulatory actions.

  19. 77 FR 61825 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... actions relate to a proposed highway project, Willow Road (FAP 305) between Illinois Route 43 (Waukegan... in the State of Illinois: reconstruct and widen Willow Road (FAP 305) from Illinois Route...

  20. Economic Analysis of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Electronic Reporting Final Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Economic Analysis (EA) quantifies the costs and savings of the proposed NPDES Electronic Reporting Rule, while acknowledging many of the qualitative benefits that will result from its implementation.

  1. Economic assessment of acid deposition and ozone damage on the San Joaquin Valley agriculture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Howitt, R.

    1993-02-01

    The California Agricultural Resources Model (CARM) was used to estimate the economic impact of acidic deposition and ozone on crops in the San Joaquin Valley. Data on ozone exposure-crop response and agricultural markets are used in the CARM to estimate the potential economic benefits of an improvement in air quality. The study focused on the economic impact of two ozone reduction scenarios in agricultural regions of California. The CARM projected that if growing season concentrations of ozone were reduced to 0.04 ppm, annual benefits to consumers (higher availability and lower prices) and producers (higher production and lower production costs) would be approximately $489 million. In comparison, the benefit projected if statewide levels of ozone were uniformly reduced to 0.025 ppm was approximately $1.5 billion. Although the 0.025 ppm scenario is unlikely, the economic benefits were estimated to be correspondingly large.

  2. 77 FR 14857 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ..., Federal Highway Administration, 310 New Bern Avenue, Suite 410, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27601-1418... South Wilmington Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27601. A final decision regarding section 404...

  3. Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) - additional modifications to final report as per GTP's request.

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, Varun; Hogue, Michael

    2015-07-17

    This report will discuss the methods and the results from economic impact analysis applied to the development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. As part of this work, the Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI) has developed a web-based Geothermal Economics Calculator (Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC)) tool that is aimed at helping the industry perform geothermal systems analysis and study the associated impacts of specific geothermal investments or technological improvements on employment, energy and environment. It is well-known in the industry that geothermal power projects will generate positive economic impacts for their host regions. Our aim in the assessment of these impacts includes quantification of the increase in overall economic output due to geothermal projects and of the job creation associated with this increase. Such an estimate of economic impacts of geothermal investments on employment, energy and the environment will also help us understand the contributions that the geothermal industry will have in achieving a sustainable path towards energy production.

  4. Actions to alleviate the mental health impact of the economic crisis.

    PubMed

    Wahlbeck, Kristian; McDaid, David

    2012-10-01

    The current global economic crisis is expected to produce adverse mental health effects that may increase suicide and alcohol-related death rates in affected countries. In nations with greater social safety nets, the health impacts of the economic downturn may be less pronounced. Research indicates that the mental health impact of the economic crisis can be offset by various policy measures. This paper aims to outline how countries can safeguard and support mental health in times of economic downturn. It indicates that good mental health cannot be achieved by the health sector alone. The determinants of mental health often lie outside of the remits of the health system, and all sectors of society have to be involved in the promotion of mental health. Accessible and responsive primary care services support people at risk and can prevent mental health consequences. Any austerity measures imposed on mental health services need to be geared to support the modernization of mental health care provision. Social welfare supports and active labour market programmes aiming at helping people retain or re-gain jobs can counteract the mental health effects of the economic crisis. Family support programmes can also make a difference. Alcohol pricing and restrictions of alcohol availability reduce alcohol harms and save lives. Support to tackle unmanageable debt will also help to reduce the mental health impact of the crisis. While the current economic crisis may have a major impact on mental health and increase mortality due to suicides and alcohol-related disorders, it is also a window of opportunity to reform mental health care and promote a mentally healthy lifestyle.

  5. Actions to alleviate the mental health impact of the economic crisis

    PubMed Central

    WAHLBECK, KRISTIAN; MCDAID, DAVID

    2012-01-01

    The current global economic crisis is expected to produce adverse mental health effects that may increase suicide and alcohol-related death rates in affected countries. In nations with greater social safety nets, the health impacts of the economic downturn may be less pronounced. Research indicates that the mental health impact of the economic crisis can be offset by various policy measures. This paper aims to outline how countries can safeguard and support mental health in times of economic downturn. It indicates that good mental health cannot be achieved by the health sector alone. The determinants of mental health often lie outside of the remits of the health system, and all sectors of society have to be involved in the promotion of mental health. Accessible and responsive primary care services support people at risk and can prevent mental health consequences. Any austerity measures imposed on mental health services need to be geared to support the modernization of mental health care provision. Social welfare supports and active labour market programmes aiming at helping people retain or re-gain jobs can counteract the mental health effects of the economic crisis. Family support programmes can also make a difference. Alcohol pricing and restrictions of alcohol availability reduce alcohol harms and save lives. Support to tackle unmanageable debt will also help to reduce the mental health impact of the crisis. While the current economic crisis may have a major impact on mental health and increase mortality due to suicides and alcohol-related disorders, it is also a window of opportunity to reform mental health care and promote a mentally healthy lifestyle. PMID:23024664

  6. Business, Economic Development, and Employment in Rural New York State: An Action Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Legislative Commission on Rural Resources, Albany.

    Participants in a symposium on economic development in rural New York State analyzed existing strengths and weaknesses of the state's rural areas and made policy suggestions relating to three broad goals: (1) ease government constraints on rural businesses in order to encourage growth and development; (2) build on and strengthen the positive…

  7. The Economic, Legal, and Political Systems in Action, #4006. Ninth Grade, Required Semester, Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Kenneth; Webb, Patrick

    This course is designed to provide ninth grade students with a basic understanding of the U.S. political, legal, and economic systems and includes the purpose of government, the need for law within society, the framework of the U.S. legal system, the processes used by the U.S. government and citizens to accomplish goals, and the roles of…

  8. Mitigation Action Plan: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation by the East Tennessee Economic Council

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In April 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1113) for the proposed lease of 957-16 acres (Parcel ED-1) of the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation (ORR) by the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC) for industrial development. DOE plans to issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action, conditional upon the implementation of mitigation and monitoring to protect environmental resources. According to DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations (10 CFR 1021.322), a FONSI shall include {open_quotes}any commitments to mitigations that are essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, beyond those mitigations that are integral elements of the proposed action, and a reference to the Mitigation Action Plan prepared under 10 CTR 1021.331{close_quotes}. Terms of the lease offer DOE the option of terminating the lease with ETEC should the lessee and/or sublessees fail to implement the mitigation defined in the FONSI.

  9. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-04-20

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective

  10. Final Corrective Action Study for the Former CCC/USDA Facility in Hanover, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2013-11-01

    Low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and vapor intrusion into a limited number of residences (attributable to the contaminant concentrations in groundwater) have been identified in Hanover, Kansas, at and near a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). At the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009h), the CCC/USDA has prepared this Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address the contamination in groundwater and soil vapor.

  11. Social and economic consequences of onshore OCS-related activities in coastal Alabama: Final baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J.O.; Wade, W.W.

    1999-04-01

    This report documents existing economic conditions in the coastal Alabama region and highlights industry sectors important to the region`s economy. This report discusses the interplay among different users of the region`s natural resources, noting the tourism, fishing and offshore natural gas industries. Data are presented that show how the tourism and natural gas industries contribute to the economic growth of coastal Alabama and the State of Alabama. The recent conflict between the offshore gas and tourism industries over the use of coastal Alabama resources is discussed. Several case studies highlight local area experience relative to economic growth, industry coexistence and the importance of the coastal region`s natural resources to the local and state economies.

  12. An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee. Final report and appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

    1985-12-17

    The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

  13. Jubba Environmental and Socio-economic Studies (JESS). Volume 1. Executive report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Jubba Environmental and Socio-economic Studies (JESS) was carried out as a three-phase project to collect environmental and socio-economic data in Somalia's Jubba Valley, the site of proposed development of a large hydroelectric dam. Complementary to construction of the dam, various plans are being prepared for subsequent development of irrigated agriculture in the middle and lower Jubba Valley. Numerous environmental and socio-economic changes will occur with dam construction, filling of the reservoir, infrastructural enhancement, and intensification of agriculture. Volume I, the Executive Report, and reports based on JESS longer-term studies (TEBS and SEBS) represent the most comprehensive assessment of the overall JESS effort: these reports consider and, in most cases, summarize the findings of other investigations.

  14. Ethanol production in Northern New York: technical and economic feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not ethanol conversion facilities would be economically feasible in various regions of New York State. The regions under investigation are Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence Counties. Results indicate that ethanol conversion facilities are likely to be commercially feasible if either locally produced cheese whey and/or imported corn are used as feedstock. The study involves a systematic investigation of all aspects of the ethanol conversion process. Four factors are considered for each option: biomass availability, optimal plant site, plant design, and economic analysis of plant profitability.

  15. 77 FR 6171 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... . 5. Social and Economic: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended . 6. Executive Orders... Policy Act of 1969, as amended ; Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966, Section 4... Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) [Pub. L. 109-59]. 2. Air: Clean Air Act . 3. Wildlife:...

  16. 75 FR 41278 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Idaho

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964 [42 U..., including but not limited to: General: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) [42 U.S.C. 4321- 4351]; Federal-Aid Highway Act ; Public Hearing . Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation...

  17. 76 FR 1492 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... Historic Preservation Act [16 U.S.C. 469- 469(c)]. 5. Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964 [42 U.S... Policy Act (NEPA) [42 U.S.C. 4321-4351]; Federal-Aid Highway Act . 2. Land: Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 ; Landscaping and Scenic Enhancement (Wildflowers) . 3....

  18. 76 FR 16653 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) for the project, approved via... FHWA project records. The FEA, FONSI, and other project records are available by contacting Caltrans...

  19. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for... Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.34 Court review of final administrative...

  20. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for... Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.34 Court review of final administrative...

  1. Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Rodger

    This course presents basic economic concepts and explores issues such as how goods and services are produced and distributed, what affects costs and profits, and how wealth is spread around or concentrated. The course is designed to be used with students enrolled in an adult high school diploma program; course content is appropriate to meet social…

  2. Action Research: Measuring Literacy Programme Participants' Learning Outcomes. Results of the Final Phase (2011-2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolly, Madina; Jonas, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Action Research on Measuring Literacy Programme Participants' Learning Outcomes (RAMAA) aims to develop, implement and collaborate on the creation of a methodological approach to measure acquired learning and study the various factors that influence its development. This report examines how RAMAA I has been implemented over the past four years in…

  3. 75 FR 70349 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highways in Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Highway from Lucus Road to Big Lake Road, in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, State of Alaska. Those actions... improvements between Lucus Road and Big Lake Road, a distance of approximately eight miles. The five-lane... depressed grass median from Church Road west to Big Lake Road. Existing frontage roads would be...

  4. 77 FR 48586 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on United States Highway 77

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Corpus Christi, Texas to US 83 in Harlingen, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals..., Room 826, Austin, Texas 78701; telephone: (512) 536-5960; email: gregory.punske@dot.gov . The FHWA Texas Division Office's normal business hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. (central time) Monday...

  5. 75 FR 54420 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on US 290/Hempstead Corridor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    .... 1251- 1342]; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) . 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990 Protection of...) in Harris County, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the project..., District B (South), Federal Highway Administration, 300 East 8th Street, Room 826 Austin, Texas...

  6. 76 FR 16470 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Wisconsin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... water management ] measures. The project also includes mitigation and restoration actions which are...]; 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act (Section 404, Section 401, Section 319) ; Land and Water Conservation Fund ; Safe Drinking Water Act ; TEA-21 Wetlands Mitigation [23 U.S.C....

  7. 76 FR 410 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... and Low Income Populations; E.O. 11593 Protection and Enhancement of Cultural Resources; E.O. 13007... which such actions were taken, including but not limited to: 1. General: National Environmental Policy... Resources: Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended [16 U.S.C. 470(f)...

  8. 76 FR 44649 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... USACE involvement with this project is limited to approving the Section 404 permit for the project. This... notice and all laws under which such actions were taken, including but not limited to: 1. General.... 661- 667(d)]; and Migratory Bird Treaty Act . 5. Historic and Cultural Resources: Section 106 of...

  9. 76 FR 53706 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... and Low Income Populations; E.O. 11593 Protection and Enhancement of Cultural Resources; E.O. 13007..., as amended under which such actions were taken, including but not limited to: 1. General: National.... 1801 et seq.]. 5. Historic and Cultural Resources: Section 106 of the National Historic...

  10. 76 FR 60583 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ...) et seq.]. 7. Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act [16 U.S.C. 688-688d]. Previous actions taken by the... affect, but not jeopardize, the bald eagle. The USFWS also concluded that the project was not likely to... Bald Eagle Take Exempted Under ESA permit (No. MB218918-0) for the incidental take of the bald...

  11. 76 FR 1664 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment G)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... 45 (I-45) to US 59 in Harris and Montgomery Counties, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits...- 45 to US 59 in Harris and Montgomery Counties; FHWA Project Reference Number: FHWA-TX-EIS-03-03-F... in northern Harris County at I-45 and then proceed northeast through Montgomery County and end at...

  12. 76 FR 61476 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed multi-modal project (Provo-Orem Bus Rapid...: The Provo-Orem Bus Rapid Transit project number F- R399(83). The project has roadway and...

  13. 76 FR 77301 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway Project in Wisconsin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Todd Drive in Dane County, Wisconsin. Those actions grant approvals for the project. The project will... Nesbitt Road to Commerce Park Drive. Stage 2 is currently scheduled for construction from approximately.../14 (Beltline) Whitney Way to Todd Drive, Dane County, Wisconsin, Project ID 1206-07-03. The...

  14. 76 FR 65776 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway Project in Wisconsin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ...). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, US 41 (Memorial Drive to County M) in Brown County... from Memorial Drive to County M, The project will also reconstruct I-43 from US 41 to Atkinson Drive...-43 via US 41. The project limits on US 41 extend from Memorial Drive to County M, a distance...

  15. The Relationship between High School Students' Attitudes and Actions toward "Slow Learners." Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol T.; Gibbs, Elizabeth D.

    The relationship between high school students' attitudes and their involvement in a peer tutoring program for slow learners was examined, on the basis of M. Fishbein's theory of reasoned action, which suggests that the best predictor of behavior is the individual's intention to perform the behavior and that intentions are functions of attitude and…

  16. 77 FR 75254 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Transportation Project in Illinois

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... actions relate to a proposed highway and transit project within the Tier 2 Elgin O'Hare--West Bypass project corridor, which is located along the Elgin-O'Hare Expressway/Thorndale ] Avenue between Chicago O'Hare International Airport (O'Hare) and Lake Street/US Route 20, and on a proposed alignment...

  17. Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, R.C.; Collins, G.S.; Lacewell, R.D.; Chang, H.C.

    1983-08-01

    This study of expected economic impacts of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel consisted of two components: (1) analysis of oilseed production and oilseed crushing capacity in the US and Texas and (2) simulation of impacts on US cropping patterns, crop prices, producer rent, and consumer surplus. The primary oilseed crops considered were soybeans, cottonseed, sunflowers, and peanuts. 19 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

  18. An Economic Study of the Investment Effects of Education in Agriculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persons, Edgar A.; And Others

    To determine the absolute economic return to adult farm business management education, the diminishing marginal return effect from added increments of education, and benefit-cost ratio of the educational program for participants and the sponsoring community, data were collected from 3,578 farm business records representing farmers enrolled in farm…

  19. Economic Aspects of Higher Education Taken Under the World War II Bill of Rights. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggertsson, Thrainn

    The aim of this thesis is to bring to bear the concepts, tools, and theories of human capital and human resources economics to evaluate the Federal Government's massive involvement in higher education under the World War II GI Bill of Rights. The major findings include estimates of total human capital formation by education, both during and after…

  20. Labor market segmentation, human capital and the economics of crime. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McGahey, R.M.

    1982-08-24

    This dissertation analyzes the relationships between human capital, labor market structure and crime. Using a unique micro-level data base with individually matched crime and employment data for over 900 felony arrestees, it tests the relative explanatory power of neoclassical economic choice theory and labor market segmentation theory on the determinants of labor market outcomes, criminal behavior, and their interactions.

  1. A Role Model Approach to Job Transition for Disadvantaged Cooperative Home Economics Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestle, Ruth

    A pilot project implemented a role-model approach to job transition for disadvantaged cooperative home economics students in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. From 1974 through 1976, 21 students in four urban high schools were matched with role models on the job. Sixteen of these students retained their jobs. The matches included many different…

  2. Cross-border reproductive care: market forces in action or market failure? An economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mark

    2011-12-01

    From an economist's perspective, cross-border reproductive care (CBRC) reflects a global market economy bringing together the needs of patients and skills of doctors at an agreed price. From this perspective CBRC is neither wrong nor right, rather it reflects rational economic behaviour of couples to maximize their wellbeing. The major economic criticism of CBRC relates to the costs and risks of multiple pregnancies, as couples paying out-of-pocket may have more embryos transferred than is desirable to optimize their chances of having a live birth. This criticism is valid, suggesting a need to communicate the hidden costs of failing to adequately fund fertility services. However, under some circumstances health authorities may be willing to bear these additional costs if the savings from not providing fertility services are sufficiently large enough to warrant a no-funding policy. Because infertility is often viewed as a low health priority, the likelihood of CBRC persisting is real, particularly as many health services adjust to the challenges of ageing populations and decreased public financing. To counter funding challenges, there is a need to communicate the medical benefits of assisted reproduction and the economic benefits that these children will offer in an era of austerity and ageing populations.

  3. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document. Final report: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    A critical mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the late 1940s into the 1970s. Among these facilities are the 24 former uranium mill sites designed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.) Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designated sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project only; a separate MAP document has been prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project.

  4. Shemya Air Force Base, Alaska No Further Action Decision document for Hg-1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-05

    This document is being prepared to document that a No Further Action Decision (NFAD) document is appropriate for the Hg-1 site at Shemya Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The IRP is a Department of Defense (DOD) program established to identify and remediate hazardous waste problems on DOD property that result from past practices. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) draft document {open_quotes}No Further Action Criteria for DOD Military/FUD Sites{close_quotes} has been used as a guide in preparing this document. Air Force personnel have stated that the Hg-1 site may have been used to store mercury and PCB-contaminated material. The site was added to the IRP in 1987, and later that year a field investigation was conducted at the site. Soil samples were collected and analyzed for mercury, EP toxicity, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dioxin. All concentrations of contaminants found in Area Hg-1 are below regulatory action levels for PCBs (40 CFR 761) and mercury (55 FR 30798) or below detection levels for dioxin/furans. Therefore, leaving these soils in place is acceptable.

  5. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Lowman Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lowman, Idaho. Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document assesses the environmental impacts of stabilization on site of the contaminated materials at the Lowman uranium mill tailings site. The Lowman site is 0.5 road mile northeast of the unincorporated village of Lowman, Idaho, and 73 road miles from Boise, Idaho. The Lowman site consists of piles of radioactive sands, an ore storage area, abandoned mill buildings, and windblown/waterborne contaminated areas. A total of 29.5 acres of land are contaminated and most of this land occurs within the 35-acre designated site boundary. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings and other contaminated materials on the site. A radon barrier would be constructed over the consolidated residual radioactive materials and various erosion control measures would be implemented to ensure the long-term stability of the disposal cell. Radioactive constituents and other hazardous constituents were not detected in the groundwater beneath the Lowman site. The groundwater beneath the disposal cell would not become contaminated during or after remedial action so the maximum concentration limits or background concentrations for the contaminants listed in the draft EPA groundwater protection standards would be met at the point of compliance. No significant impacts were identified as a result of the proposed remedial action at the Lowman site.

  6. Geothermal resource, engineering and economic feasibility study for the City of Ouray, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.T.; Raskin, R.; Zocholl, J.R.

    1982-07-31

    A geothermal energy feasibility study has been performed for the City of Ouray, Colorado, to determine the potential economic development opportunities to the City. The resource assessment indicates the resource to be associated with the Ouray fault zone, the Leadville limestone formation, the high thermal gradient in the area of the San Juan mountains, and the recharge from precipitation in the adjacent mountains. Four engineering designs of alternative sizes, costs, applications, and years of start-up have been defined to offer the City a range of development scales. Life cycle cost analyses have been conducted for cases of both public and private ownership. All systems are found to be feasible on both economic and technical grounds. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Jubba Environmental and Socio-economic Studies (JESS). Volume 2. Environmental studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Jubba Environmental and Socio-economic Studies (JESS) investigated conditions in the Jubba Valley of southern Somalia. Projections from that baseline information were intended to elucidate changes likely to occur as a result of construction of a high dam near Baardheere and related developments. In particular, JESS was required to suggest ways of mitigating adverse impacts, enhancing potentially good impacts, and to draw up a program for future environmental and socio-economic monitoring. The report contains an analysis of the Terrestrial Ecology Baseline Studies (TEBS) section of the JESS project. Human use of biological resources is examined from the perspectives of land use, forestry, rangelands, and biological conservation. TEBS activities are used as the basis for a future monitoring program of terrestrial ecology.

  8. Ethanol production in southwestern New York: technical and economic feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Based upon the analysis conducted for this study, the development of centralized ethanol conversion facilities in the Steuben and Allegany Counties is likely to be commercially feasible if either locally produced cheese whey and/or imported corn are used as feedstocks. Development is shown to be profitable under a broad range of potential economic conditions and technical considerations. Four plant designs varying in annual production capacity from 1.675 to 27.5 million gallons of ethanol (and utilizing alternative conversion technologies and feedstocks) are investigated. In general, all of the various plant sizes investigated are economically viable. Although economic profitability is enhanced by the existence of federal subsidies, in the form of $0.40 per gallon from federal gasoline tax rebates, energy investment tax credits and low interest loans, a public subsidy is not necessary, under most conditions, to ensure the economic feasibility of any of the plant design investigated. In all cases, a by-product in the form of an animal feed is produced, thereby generating additional revenue for the conversion facility and adding to the likelihood of commercial feasibility. In the case of the corn/whey plant, the by-product takes the form of a distillers dried grain. In the case of the whey plants, it takes the form of a high mineral, medium protein feed supplement for low and moderate producing dairy cattle. Both have a ready market in the study region. Fermenting of deproteinized whey to produce ethanol and drying the resulting distillation slops for animal feed completely utilizes the original cheese whey. The techniques developed in this study produce three valuable products and leave no residual requiring disposal.

  9. Comparative economic analysis of three processes for mineral recovery from fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Doring, C.

    1983-12-30

    A review of the economic analyses of the lime-soda sinter, Hichlor, and direct acid leach processes to remove metals from flyash was conducted. Aluminum, iron, and possibly titanium recovery were emphasized. Data on the metals content of fly ash were collected and analyzed based on types of coal actually burned in coal-fired power plants in each state and DOE region. Results are presented. (PSB)

  10. The importance of actions and the worth of an object: dissociable neural systems representing core value and economic value.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tobias; Coppin, Géraldine; Schwartz, Sophie; Sander, David

    2012-06-01

    Neuroeconomic research has delineated neural regions involved in the computation of value, referring to a currency for concrete choices and decisions ('economic value'). Research in psychology and sociology, on the other hand, uses the term 'value' to describe motivational constructs that guide choices and behaviors across situations ('core value'). As a first step towards an integration of these literatures, we compared the neural regions computing economic value and core value. Replicating previous work, economic value computations activated a network centered on medial orbitofrontal cortex. Core value computations activated medial prefrontal cortex, a region involved in the processing of self-relevant information and dorsal striatum, involved in action selection. Core value ratings correlated with activity in precuneus and anterior prefrontal cortex, potentially reflecting the degree to which a core value is perceived as internalized part of one's self-concept. Distributed activation pattern in insula and ACC allowed differentiating individual core value types. These patterns may represent evaluation profiles reflecting prototypical fundamental concerns expressed in the core value types. Our findings suggest mechanisms by which core values, as motivationally important long-term goals anchored in the self-schema, may have the behavioral power to drive decisions and behaviors in the absence of immediately rewarding behavioral options.

  11. 75 FR 28317 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highways in Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Environmental Protection Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321, as amended and the Council on Environmental... shorter time period still applies. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. David Williams, Environmental... were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the project approved...

  12. Sunset Dates of Chemicals Subject to Final TSCA Section 4 and Related 12(b) Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Table lists, in ascending chemical Abstract Service (CAS) Registry number order, all chemical substances and mixtures that are and/or have been the subject of final TSCA Section 4 test rules and/or TSCA Section 4 enforceable consent agreements/orders.

  13. 75 FR 58016 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the project, both approved on July 30, 2010, and in other documents in Caltrans project records. The FEA, and... address provided above. The FEA can be viewed and downloaded from the project Web site at...

  14. 76 FR 54529 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) for the project. A Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) was approved on July 8, 2011. The FEA, FONSI, and other project records are available by contacting Caltrans at the addresses provided above. The Caltrans FEA and FONSI can be...

  15. Interim response action, basin F liquid incineration project. Draft final human health assessment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-02

    The multipathway human health risk assessment based on the SQ1 emission rates measured during the trial burn of basin F liquid indicates that the maximum level of human health risk associated with operation of this incinerator will not exceed the benchmark risk levels defined in the final decision document (Woodward-Clyde, 1990).

  16. Interim final guidance package on funding CERCLA State-enforcement actions at NPL sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-07

    The directive outlines requirements, conditions, and limitations for State funding under a CERCLA cooperative agreement of CERCLA enforcement actions at National Priorities List sites. The guidance is divided into four subcomponents: 9831.6 a, b, c, and d. The directive supersedes directive no. 9831.1-1a CERCLA Funding of State Oversight of Potentially Responsible Parties (PRPs), dated October 1, 1986, and directive no. 9831.3 dated October 1, 1986 CERCLA Funding of State Enforcement Activities at NPL Sites, - Interim Draft Guidance.

  17. Alternatives assessment other contamination sources, interim response action, shell section 36 trenches, RMA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    This document describes the process and results of the alternatives assessment conducted for the Shell Section 36 trenches (site 36-3), approximately 31 trenches used from 1952 to 1966 for land disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated from pesticide manufacture. They have been shown to be a source of ground water contamination. A dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) is also believed to have originated from the trenches. The assessment includes the following: (1) site characteristics. (2) discussion of alternative strategies and technologies, (3) evaluation of alternatives, and (4) conclusions. The preferred interim response action consists of a physical barrier encircling the trenches and a soil and vegetative cover.

  18. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

  19. Technical and economic barriers to innovative gas storage. Final report, November 1991-July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.A.; Hastings, G.A.

    1993-03-01

    To evaluate the technical and economic barriers to innovative natural gas storage technologies, advantages and disadvantages of several end use applications were analyzed, including on-grid deliverability of natural gas, transporting natural gas to off-grid end users, and storage of natural gas at an off-grid end user's site. Three basic innovative approaches were investigated: (1) separation of the higher molecular weight components of the pipeline gas and storage of the separated ethane, propane, butane, etc., as a liquid; (2) separation of the components with storage in the separating media; and (3) storage of the pipeline gas without changing its composition.

  20. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Town Garage Radio Beacon, Londonderry, NH. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The Town Garage Radio Beacon, NH, site includes the Holton Circle residential development of 23 homes, a town garage area, and an undeveloped hillslope and wetlands area in Londonderry, New Hampshire. From 1940 to 1968, the area was owned by the Department of Defense (DOD), who reportedly used it as a radio beacon facility from 1940 to 1947. The ROD provides a final remedy for the contaminated onsite ground water. No further remedial actions are anticipated for the site. The primary contaminants affecting the ground water are VOCs; and metals, including chromium.

  1. Ethanol production in southwestern New York: technical and economic feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalter, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The development of one or more centralized ethanol conversion facilities in the Southwestern portion of New York State is likely to be commercially feasible if either locally-produced cheese whey and/or imported corn are used as a feedstock. Development is shown to be highly profitable under a broad range of economic conditions and technical considerations. Four plant designs ranging in annual production capacity from 1.675 to 27.5 million gallons of ethanol (utilizing alternative feedstocks) are investigated. Although all are found to be economically viable, maximum profitability per unit production are obtained from a 2.5 million gallon plant using only whey. In all cases, a by-product in the form of animal feed is generated, which will result in additional revenue for the conversion facility. In the case of corn/whey plants it takes the form of a distillers dried grain. In the case of whey plants, it takes the form of a high-mineral, medium protein feed supplement for low and moderate producing dairy cattle. Both have a ready market in the region. Also the cheese whey is assumed to be deproteinized at the cheese manufacturing plant prior to delivery to an ethanol conversion plant to obtain a valuable, human-grade food protein.

  2. Economic effects of oil and gas development on marine aquaculture leases. Study 17. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Caswell, M.F.

    1991-03-01

    There are three primary mariculture products grown in California waters: oysters, mussels, and abalone. In total, the California mariculture industry earns revenues of about $6.5 million. Water quality degradation was the primary concern of most growers. Coliform bacteria and pesticide residues are currently threatening several shallow-water sites. Lease holders (and potential lease holders) for deep-water sites state that coliform bacteria from municipal sewer outfalls and offshore oil and gas drilling effluents are the greatest dangers to their profitability. The Southern California Educational Initiative is an attempt to determine whether such concerns are warranted. A simple model of economic externalities was described to highlight the scientific data one must gather so as to choose the optimal production levels for both energy and mariculture resources. That information is necessary to assess the economic consequences to the California mariculture industry of chronic exposure to oil and gas development. The co-development model shows that the marginal (incremental) effects of oil production on mariculture costs needs to be assessed. The model also shows that if the effects are moderated by distance from the point of discharge, such changes must be estimated in order to determine optimal lease boundaries. The report concludes that interdisciplinary cooperation is essential for designing a co-development plan that maximizes the social welfare to be gained from developing multiple coastal resources.

  3. Engineering and economic evaluation of integrated gasification compressed air storage with humidification (IGCASH). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, O.; McCone, A.; Nakhamkin, M.; Patel, M.

    1993-11-01

    Integrated Gasification Compressed Air Storage with Humidification (IGCASH) is concept for an intermediate-load, cycling-duty plant with the environmental advantages of coal gasification and the reliability benefits of continuous operation of the hot gasification and turbomachinery equipment. The IGCASH concept integrates a quench-type coal gasification system with an advanced compressed air storage system in which the compression heat is recovered and stored in water which is used to humidify and preheat the air and fuel gas sent to the turbine. Bechtel under contract to EPRI (RP 2834-3) performed an engineering and economic evaluation to verify the feasibility of IGCASH as an option for intermediate-load power generation from coal. A baseline design was developed for a conceptual 400 MW generic IGCASH plant using currently available technology, including the Texaco full-quench gasification process, Westinghouse turbomachinery, and solution-mined salt-dome cavern for air storage. Three alternatives to the baseline design were also developed to assess the effects of storage water temperature and next-generation turbomachinery on plant performance and economics. The IGCASH concept compared favorably with conventional pulverized coal fired steam (PCFS) power generation. The IGCASH baseline design showed a significantly lower heat rate and yielded a lower cost of electricity than a comparable PCFS plant operating on the same duty cycle.

  4. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  5. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, David; Ready, Carol A.

    2003-04-01

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage

  6. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The presence of contaminated uranium mill tailings adjacent to the city of Gunnison has been a local concern for many years. The following issues were identified during public meetings that were held by the DOE prior to distribution of an earlier version of this EA. Many of these issues will require mitigation. Groundwater contamination; in December 1989, a herd of 105 antelope were introduced in an area that includes the Landfill disposal site. There is concern that remedial action-related traffic in the area would result in antelope mortality. The proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road may restrict antelope access to their water supply; a second wildlife issue concerns the potential reduction in sage grouse use of breeding grounds (leks) and nesting habitat; the proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road would cross areas designated as wetlands by US Army Corps of Engineers (COE); the proposed disposal site is currently used for grazing by cattle six weeks a year in the spring. Additional concerns were stated in comments on a previous version of this EA. The proposed action is to consolidate and remove all contaminated materials associated with the Gunnison processing site to the Landfill disposal site six air miles east of Gunnison. All structures on the site (e.g., water tower, office buildings) were demolished in 1991. The debris is being stored on the site until it can be incorporated into the disposal cell at the disposal site. All contaminated materials would be trucked to the Landfill disposal site on a to-be-constructed haul road that crosses BLM-administered land.

  7. Final Technical Report on Development of an Economic and Efficient Biodiesel production Process (NC)

    SciTech Connect

    Tirla, Cornelia; Dooling, Thomas A.; Smith, Rachel B.; Shi, Xinyan; Shahbazi, Abolghasem

    2014-03-19

    The Biofuels Team at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke and North Carolina A&T State University carried out a joint research project aimed at developing an efficient process to produce biodiesel. In this project, the team developed and tested various types of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts which could replace the conventionally used soluble potassium hydroxide catalyst which, traditionally, must be separated and disposed of at the end of the process. As a result of this screening, the homogeneous catalyst choline hydroxide was identified as a potential replacement for the traditional catalyst used in this process, potassium hydroxide, due to its decreased corrosiveness and toxicity. A large number of heterogeneous catalysts were produced and tested in order to determine the scaffold, ion type and ion concentration which would produce optimum yield of biodiesel. The catalyst with 12% calcium on Zeolite β was identified as being highly effective and optimal reaction conditions were identified. Furthermore, a packed bed reactor utilizing this type of catalyst was designed, constructed and tested in order to further optimize the process. An economic analysis of the viability of the project showed that the cost of an independent farmer to produce the fuelstock required to produce biodiesel exceeds the cost of petroleum diesel under current conditions and that therefore without incentives, farmers would not be able to benefit economically from producing their own fuel. An educational website on biodiesel production and analysis was produced and a laboratory experiment demonstrating the production of biodiesel was developed and implemented into the Organic Chemistry II laboratory curriculum at UNCP. Five workshops for local farmers and agricultural agents were held in order to inform the broader community about the various fuelstock available, their cultivation and the process and advantages of biodiesel use and production. This project fits both

  8. Economic impact analysis of effluent limitations and standards for plastics molding and forming industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued effluent limitations and standards in December, 1984, for the Plastics Molding and Forming Industry. The report estimates the economic impacts associated with pollution control costs. Plant-specific treatment costs for 20 percent of the impacted plants are compared to estimated pre-tax plant income to assess the impact of treatment costs on plant liquidity. Then a closure analysis is performed, comparing the current salvage value of the plant's assets with the present value of the plant's cash flow plus the terminal value of its assets. The results are extrapolated to the 558 plants which, as direct dischargers, would be impacted. The results of this plant-level analysis are used to assess the indirect impacts of the regulation, e.g., price changes, unemployment and shifts, in the balance of foreign trade.

  9. Solar photo-catalytic hydrogen: systems considerations, economics, and potential markets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R V; Witwer, J G

    1981-05-01

    A three part analysis was done consisting of (1) an examination of the physical principles of solar photocatalytic energy conversion and the status of research in this area, (2) an economic analysis of the potential costs of producing hydrogen from such a system, and (3) an analysis of the markets for hydrogen and the possible penetration of these markets by solar photocatalytic hydrogen. The cost range of flat plate thermal collectors, heliostats, and a photovoltaic system are compared. The cost range of flat plate thermal collectors was used to represent the cost of photocatalytic systems. On the basis of the photovoltaics cost outlook, it is found that photocatalytic systems would not cost less than $180 to $330 per m/sup 2/ range. On the basis of the heliostat cost outlook, a cost lower than $180 to $330 per m could be projected only for very large production volumes and very large installations. (LEW)

  10. Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

  11. Jubba Environmental and Socio-economic Studies (JESS). Volume 4. Bibliography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography is a revised version of the Jubba Environmental and Socio-economic Study (JESS) bibliography that was published in 1986, relating specifically to social and environmental systems in Somalia as well as river-basin assessment and planning, in general. Many new references have been added and the bibliography has been organized into 22 different sections, corresponding to the subject codes (BIBCODE) being used by the JESS team in Somalia. The bibliography includes selected monographs, conference papers, journal articles, book chapters, reports, JESS studies and dissertations. Users should recognize that the bibliography is neither definitive nor comprehensive, and that an inclusion of a particular reference does not imply that its scientific merit has been substantiated.

  12. Process engineering and economic evaluations of diaphragm and membrane chlorine cell technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The chlor-alkali manufacturing technologies of (1), diaphragm cells (2), current technology membrane cells (3), catalytic cathode membrane cells (4), oxygen-cathode membrane cells and to a lesser extent several other related emerging processes are studied. Comparisons have been made on the two bases of (1) conventional industrial economics, and (2) energy consumption. The current diaphragm cell may have a small economic advantage over the other technologies at the plant size of 544 metric T/D (600 T/D). The three membrane cells all consume less energy, with the oxygen-cathode cell being the lowest. The oxygen-cathode cell appears promising as a low energy chlor-alkali cell where there is no chemical market for hydrogen. Federal funding of the oxygen-cathode cell has been beneficial to the development of the technology, to electrochemical cell research, and may help maintain the US's position in the international chlor-alkali technology marketplace. Tax law changes inducing the installation of additional cells in existing plants would produce the quickest reduction in power consumption by the chlor-alkali industry. Alternative technologies such as the solid polymer electrolyte cell, the coupling of diaphragm cells with fuel cells and the dynamic gel diaphragm have a strong potential for reducing chloralkali industry power consumption. Adding up all the recent and expected improvements that have become cost-effective, the electrical energy required to produce a unit of chlorine by 1990 should be only 50% to 60% of that used in 1970. In the United States the majority of the market does not demand salt-free caustic. About 75% of the electrolytic caustic is produced in diaphragm cells and only a small part of that is purified. This study indicates that unless membrane cell costs are greatly reduced or a stronger demand develops for salt-free caustic, the diaphragm cells will remain competitive. (WHK)

  13. SNOX demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The SNOX process, developed by Haldor Topsoe A/S and demonstrated and marketed in North America by ABB Environmental Systems (ABBES), is an innovative process which removes both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from power plant flue gases. Sulfur dioxide is recovered as high purity, concentrated sulfuric acid and nitrogen oxides are converted to nitrogen gas and water vapor; no additional waste streams are produced. As part of the Clean Coal Technology Program, this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Ohio Coal Development Office, ABBES, Snamprogetti, and Ohio Edison. The project objective was to demonstrate the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of the SNOX process on an electric power plant firing high-sulfur Ohio Coal. A 35-MWe demonstration has been conducted on a 108-MWe unit, Ohio Edison`s Niles Plant Unit 2, in Trumbull County, Ohio. The $31.4 million project began site preparation in November 1990 and commenced treating flue gas in March of 1992. A parametric test program has been completed. This report presents a description of the technology, results from the 33 month testing and operation phase, and information from a commercial scale economic evaluation. During the demonstration, the process met or exceeded its design goals of 95% SO{sub 2} removal, 90% NO{sub x} removal, and production of commercial grade (>93.2 wt.%) sulfuric acid. The plant was operated for approximately 8000 hours and produced more than 5600 tons of acid, which was purchased and distributed by a local supplier to end users. Projected economics for a 500 MWe commercial SNOX plant indicate a total capital requirement of 305 $/kW, levelized incremental cost of power at 6.1 mills/kWh, 219 $/ton of SO{sub 2} removed, and 198 $/ton of SO{sub 2}+NO{sub x} removed (all at constant dollars).

  14. Achieving the Security, Environmental, and Economic Potential of Bioenergy. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, John A

    2006-06-07

    A group of business, government, environmental and academic leaders convened in a dialogue by the Aspen Institute proposed a series of actions to promote the widespread commercialization of both corn and cellulosic ethanol to improve energy security, the environment, and the economy. Co-chaired by Booz Allen Hamilton Vice President and former CIA Director R. James Woolsey and former Congressman Tom Ewing (R. IL), they developed a series of recommendations involving improved crop yields, processing of biomass into ethanol, manufacture of more cars that can burn either ethanol or gasoline, and the provision of ethanol pumps at more filling stations. Their report, "A High Growth Strategy for Ethanol, includes a discussion of the potential of ethanol, the group's recommendations, and a series of discussion papers commissioned for the dialogue.

  15. Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 3: technical/economic evaluations. Final report, December 1982-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    This document contains the final report on four tasks performed by KRSI as part of the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analysis contract with GRI. It provides extensive, consistent technical and economic information regarding application of (1) Lurgi gasification, (2) Westinghouse (now KRW) gasification, and (3) Direct Methanation (with Lurgi gasifiers) processes to produce SNG from North Dakota lignite. The results of Lurgi and Westinghouse studies were used to develop a plant size vs. cost-of-SNG relationship. The report on each task consists of a block flow diagram, component material balance, process flow sheets showing operating conditions and principal equipment in each major process area, a narrative process description, utility balances, plant efficiency calculations, documentation of design and cost-estimation basis and an economic analysis performed in accordance with the GRI Guidelines. Economic analysis consisted of capital-cost breakdown according to plant areas, variable operating and maintenance costs, and calculation of levelized, constant-dollar cost-of-gas with and without process development allowances (PDA). The sensitivities of the gas cost to major variables are presented in graphical form. For the plant size vs. cost-of-SNG task, similar information is provided at eight different plant capacities based on both Lurgi or Westinghouse gasifiers.

  16. Comment and response document on the final remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report contains comments provided by the Oregon Department of Energy and responses to these comments on the final remedial action plan for the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lakeview, Oregon.

  17. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  18. Setting priorities for action plans at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C.

    1992-09-30

    This report summarizes work done by Applied Decision Analysis (ADA) for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under Subcontract Number 9-XQ2-Y3837-1 with the University of California. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of setting priorities for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) deficiencies at Los Alamos. The deficiencies were identified by a DOE Tiger Team that visited LANL in the fall of 1991, and by self assessments done by the Laboratory. ADA did the work described here between October 1991 and the end of September 1992. The ADA staff working on this project became part of a Risk Management Team in the Laboratory`s Integration and Coordination Office (ICO). During the project, the Risk Management Team produced a variety of documents describing aspects of the action-plan prioritization system. Some of those documents are attached to this report. Rather than attempt to duplicate their contents, this report provides a guide to those documents, and references them whenever appropriate.

  19. Economic and engineering evaluation of plant oils as a diesel fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, C.R.; LePori, W.A.; Johnson, L.A.; Griffin, R.C.; Diehl, K.C.; Moore, D.S.; Lacewell, R.D.; Coble, C.G.; Lusas, E.W.; Hiler, E.A.

    1982-04-15

    The annual total yield of plant oils in the US is about 3.7 billion gallons. Diesel use by agriculture is about 2.0 billion gallons annually and is growing rapidly relative to gasoline use. Based on these amounts, plant oils could satisfy agriculture's diesel fuel requirements during the near future. However, diversion of large quantities of plant oils for such purposes would have dramatic impacts on plant oil prices and be reflected in numerous adjustments throughout agriculture and other sectors of the economy. The competitive position of sunflowers for plant oil production in Texas was analyzed. In those regions with a cotton alternative, sunflowers were not, for the most part, economically competitive. However, sunflower production is competitive with grain sorghum in certain cases. To develop a meaningful production base for oilseed crops in Texas, yields need to be improved or increases in oilseed prices relative to cotton must take place. This implies some limitations for the potential of Texas to produce large quantities of plant oils.

  20. Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A.; Schoenung, S.M. |

    1998-04-01

    This report presents the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to accomplish two objectives: supply pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supply distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking energy and capacity to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs. The systems studied include a refueling station (including such components as an electrolyzer, storage, hydrogen dispensers, and compressors) plus on-site hydrogen fueled electricity generation units (e.g., fuel cells or combustion engines). The operational strategy is to use off-peak electricity in the electrolyzer to fill hydrogen storage, and to dispatch the electricity generation about one hour per day to meet the utility`s local and system peaks. The utility was assumed to be willing to pay for such service up to its avoided generation, fuel, transmission and distribution costs.

  1. Technical and economic feasibility of enzyme hydrolysis for ethanol production from wood. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, R.W.; Stahr, J.J.

    1985-06-01

    Under the sponsorship of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Arthur D. Little, Inc., examined the feasibility of enzyme hydrolysis for ethanol production from wood. The feasibility study included a plant location in Jefferson County, New York, and the use of deproteinated cheese whey as the substrate for enzyme production. Debarked northern hardwoods were selected as feedstock for the enzyme hydrolysis operation. The preliminary process engineering design was based on a plant receiving about 450 dry tons of hardwood per day and producing about 5.5 million gallons of denatured ethanol per year. By-products included cogenerated electricity and a protein-rich animal feed. Total capital investment for the facility was estimated to be $60.575 million in 1984. Two base case cash flow analyses were carried out, one with NYSERDA input variables and one with SERI input variables. These resulted in required ethanol selling prices of $3.87 per gallon and $4.45 per gallon, respectively. Given the disparity between these predictions and the current actual price of ethanol, it was concluded that the enzyme hydrolysis of wood is not presently economic. Further research and development are also needed to resolve remaining technological uncertainties and establish markets for new products. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  3. Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Raiji, A.M.; Renfroe, D.A.; Lalk, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC), a new concept in power generation, was investigated. Power is generated by exploiting the natural atmosheric temperature gradient. A low grade energy source is used to vaporize a fluid which rises in a pipe to a higher elevation where it is condensed. The cycle is completed by passing the condensed liquid through a turbine as it returns to the lower elevation. A digital computer model was developed and used to simulate the operation of the cycle and to conduct a parameteric study. Life cycle cost analysis and energy analyses were conducted for the specific case of a TGUC using the ambient air at the lower elevation as an energy source. Although the cycle has a low thermal efficiency and is site specific, it is technically feasible. Variations in mass flow rate of the working fluid and elevation were found to affect the cycle power output to a large extent. The investment cost of a hypothetical 10 megawatt TGUC power plant was determined to be $3,080 per kilowatt, with life cycle busbar costs of electricity ranging from 47 to 55 Mills per kilowatt-hour depending on the method of financing. Results of the energy analyses showed that a TGUC system would have a positive net energy and a second law efficiency of 23% for the case of a TGUC system using the atmosphere as an energy source.

  4. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  6. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

  7. Comment and response document for the final remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This document for the final remedial action plan and site design has been prepared for US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action plan. Comments and responses are included for the site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado.

  8. Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

  9. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect

    D. Vandel

    2003-09-01

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

  10. US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-21

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

  11. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Peerless Plating, Muskegon Township, MI. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-21

    The 1-acre Peerless Plating site is a former electroplating facility in Muskegon Township, Michigan, and is located northwest of Little Black Creek and 1 mile north of Mona Lake. Lake Michigan supplies drinking water for residential and commercial businesses within a 3-mile radius of the site. From 1937 to 1983, onsite electroplating operations and processes included copper, nickel, chromium, cadmium, and zinc plating, in addition to burnishing, polishing, pickling, oiling, passivating, stress relieving, and dichromate dipping. In the 1970s, the state directed Peerless Plating to monitor waste discharge daily and to install a treatment system to meet reduced effluent limitations. The site violated the requirements and was charged by the state. The ROD addresses the onsite contaminated soil and ground water as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern are VOCs, including benzene, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and inorganics, including cyanide. The selected remedial action for the site are included.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Stamina Mills site, North Smithfield, RI. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The five-acre Stamina Mills site is a former textile weaving and finishing facility in North Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island. A portion of the site is within the 100-year floodplain and wetland area of the Branch River. The manufacturing process used cleaning solvents, acids, bases and dyes for coloring, pesticides for moth proofing, and plasticizers to coat fabrics. Mill process wastes were placed in a landfill onsite. EPA initiated three removal actions from 1984 to 1990, including an extension of the municipal water supply to residents obtaining water from the affected aquifer; and treatment of two underground and one above-ground storage tanks, followed by offsite disposal. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides a final remedy and addresses both source control and management of contaminated ground water migration at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including TCE and PCE; other organics including pesticides; and metals including chromium.

  13. Economic-impact study for proposed Ground-water-Quality Standards 35 IL Admin. Code 260. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, R.; Buss, D.F.

    1990-12-01

    The state passed the Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (IGPA) in September 1987, which among other things, directed the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) to develop groundwater classification system and nondegradation procedures. The IGPA also mandated that the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources conduct an Economic Impact Study of the IEPA's proposed regulations. The report also analyzed alternatives considered during the development of the Code 620 regulations in addition to the final outcome. The proposed regulations would establish a groundwater classification which would be partially use-based and partially water quality-based. Numeric groundwater quality standards are also established which apply to General Resource and Potable Resource Groundwater. Cleanup criteria are identified for sites of contamination. As determined by this investigation, the most significant costs of the IEPA's proposed regulations could be expected to be groundwater remediation costs, which are those costs associated with returning contaminated groundwater to compliance with the standards.

  14. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room

  15. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in

  16. THE ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF URBANIZATION, ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS IN COMMUNITY ACTION. KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY SHORT COURSE SERIES IN PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCGRAW, EUGENE T.

    STATISTICAL DATA AND PROJECTIONS ON POPULATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND INCOME IN KANSAS, AS REPORTED IN 1966 BY THE KANSAS OFFICE OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, UNDERLINE THE FACT THAT KANSAS IS CHANGING FROM A LARGELY AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY TO A MANUFACTURING-CENTERED, URBAN-ORIENTED ECONOMY. HOWEVER, THE ANTICIPATED PATTERN OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IS…

  17. Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, F.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

  18. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect

    L. O. Nelson

    2003-09-01

    This operations and maintenance plan supports the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF) remedial action work plan and identifies the approach and requirements for the operations and maintenance activities specific to the final medical zone treatment remedy. The NPTF provides the treatment system necessary to remediate the medical zone portion of the OU 1-07B contaminated groundwater plume. Design and construction of the New Pump and Treat Facility is addressed in the NPTF remedial action work plan. The scope of this operation and maintenance plan includes facility operations and maintenance, remedy five-year reviews, and the final operations and maintenance report for the NPTF.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 5): Fultz Landfill, Byesville, OH. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The 30-acre Fultz Landfill site is a privately owned inactive sanitary landfill on the north slope of a ridge that overlies abandoned coal mines in Jackson Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. The site lies within the drainage basin of Wills Creek, which flows north adjacent to the site and is used by the city of Cambridge as the municipal water supply. The northern half of the landfill lies in an unreclaimed strip mine where surface mine spoil and natural soil form a shallow aquifer. During the 1970's, the landfill operator was cited for various violations. Investigations in 1988 by EPA indicated that ground water and leachate contaminants emanating from the site have contaminated the shallow aquifer and, to a lesser extent, the deep mine aquifer. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses all contaminated media, and provides a final remedy for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, ground water, and surface water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; other organics including PAHs and phenols; metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and other inorganics. The selected remedial action for this site is included.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Arkwood, Inc. , Omaha, AR. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 15-acre Arkwood site is a former wood treatment facility in Boone County, Arkansas. Land use in the vicinity of the site is primarily agricultural and light industrial. Ground water on, or near the site is highly susceptible to contamination as a result of underground cavities, enlarged fractures and conduits which hinder monitoring and pumping. State investigations conducted during the 1980s documented PCP and creosote contamination in surface water, soil, debris, and buildings throughout the site. Contaminated surface features at the site include the wood treatment facility, a sinkhole area contaminated with oily waste, a ditch area, a wood storage area, and an ash pile. In 1987, EPA ordered the site owner to perform an immediate removal action, which included implementing site access including fencing and sign postings. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses remediation of all affected media, and provides the final remedy for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sludge, debris, ground water and surface water are organics including pentachlorophenol (PCP), PAHs, and dioxin; and oils.

  1. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Appendix D, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the proposed disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  2. Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

  3. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  4. Economic Impact of the Hawaii State Public Library System (HSPLS) on the Business and Tourism Industries Study: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joe; McClure, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    Ryan Information Management conducted a return on investment (ROI) study of the economic value of the Hawaii State Public Library System (HSPLS) and identified potential additional sources of operating revenue. HSPLS economic value was examined from four viewpoints, HSPLS: direct economic impact, market value, peer comparison and value to library…

  5. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Economic analysis of the solar energy system installed at Loxahatchee, was developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis was accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  6. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    Economic analysis of the solar energy system installed at Loxahatchee, was developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis was accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  7. Final Legislative and Budget Actions in Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Texas: Notes from Other SREB States. Legislative Report No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions. The Legislative Reports follow education and budget issues from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in each of the 16 SREB states. The reports include bill numbers and legislative Web site…

  8. 77 FR 50207 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Project: I-5: Glendale-Hugo Paving/Sexton Climbing Lane...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Project: I-5: Glendale- Hugo... relate to a proposed highway project, I-5: Glendale-Hugo Paving/Sexton Climbing Lane, in Douglas and...) 231- 2336. The I-5: Glendale-Hugo Paving/Sexton Climbing Lane categorical exclusion and other...

  9. Problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks

    SciTech Connect

    Shorikov, A. F.

    2015-11-30

    This article discusses a discrete-time dynamical system consisting of a set a controllable objects (region and forming it municipalities). The dynamics each of these is described by the corresponding vector nonlinear discrete-time recurrent vector equations and its control system consist from two levels: basic (control level I) that is dominating and subordinate level (control level II). Both levels have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. In this paper we study the problem of optimization of guaranteed result for program control by the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks. For this problem we proposed in this work an economical and mathematical model of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks and the general scheme for its solving.

  10. Code development incorporating environmental, safety, and economic aspects of fusion reactors (FY 92--94). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.K.; Fowler, T.K.; Holdren, J.P.

    1994-11-01

    This is the Final Report for a three-year (FY 92--94) study of the Environmental, Safety, and Economic (ESE) aspects of fusion energy systems, emphasizing development of computerized approaches suitable for incorporation as modules in fusion system design codes. First, as is reported in Section 2, the authors now have operating a simplified but complete environment and safety evaluation code, BESAFE. The first tests of BESAFE as a module of the SUPERCODE, a design optimization systems code at LLNL, are reported in Section 3. Secondly, as reported in Section 4, the authors have maintained a strong effort in developing fast calculational schemes for activation inventory evaluation. In addition to these major accomplishments, considerable progress has been made on research on specific topics as follows. A tritium modeling code TRIDYN was developed in collaboration with the TSTA group at LANL and the Fusion Nuclear Technology group at UCLA. A simplified algorithm has been derived to calculate the transient temperature profiles in the blanket during accidents. The scheme solves iteratively a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing about 10 regions of the blanket by preserving energy balance. The authors have studied the physics and engineering aspects of divertor modeling for safety applications. Several modifications in the automation and characterization of environmental and safety indices have been made. They have applied this work to the environmental and safety comparisons of stainless steel with alternative structural materials for fusion reactors. A methodology in decision analysis utilizing influence and decision diagrams has been developed to model fusion reactor design problems. Most of the work during this funding period has been reported in 26 publications including theses, journal publications, conference papers, and technical reports, as listed in Section 11.

  11. Remedial Action Plan and final design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Alkema, K.

    1991-03-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities that are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Green River, Utah. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the state of Utah and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state of Utah, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix 8 of the Cooperative Agreement.

  12. 78 FR 23630 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment C) in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    .... 1251- 1342; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), 16 U.S.C. 4601-4604. 8. Executive Orders: E.O... Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on Claims for...) to SH 288 in Fort Bend and Brazoria Counties, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits,...

  13. 76 FR 68810 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Farm-to-Market 1626 in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    .... 1251- 1342]; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) [16 U.S.C. 4601-4604]. 8. Executive Orders: E.O... Federal Agency Actions on Farm-to-Market 1626 in Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT..., Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals for the project. DATES: By this notice,...

  14. 76 FR 26336 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Proposed Klingle Valley Trail in Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... in Washington, DC AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Limitation on...)(1). The actions relate to the proposed Klingle Valley Trail project in Northwest Washington, DC.../Urban Engineer, 1990 K Street, NW., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20006-1103, (202) 219-3536; or...

  15. Corridors to Economic Growth and Employment: 1994-95 Final Report to the Governor and the Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, Phoebe

    The Economic Development Network (ED>Net) of the California Community Colleges was designed to advance the state's economic growth and competitiveness by coordinating and facilitating workforce improvement, technology deployment, and business development initiatives. This report reviews outcomes for ED>Net for 1994-95 based on reports…

  16. Final Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Falls City uranium mill tailings site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This EA examines the short- and long-term effects of the DOE`s proposed remedial action for the Falls City tailings site. The no action alternative is also examined. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented here to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an EIS will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE will issue an official ``Finding of No Significant Impact`` and implement the proposed action.

  17. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Remedial Action Selection Report. Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This proposed remedial action plan incorporates the results of detailed investigation of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the proposed disposal site. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/waterborne materials to a permanent repository at the proposed Burro Canyon disposal cell. The proposed disposal site will be geomorphically stable. Seismic design parameters were developed for the geotechnical analyses of the proposed cell. Cell stability was analyzed to ensure long-term performance of the disposal cell in meeting design standards, including slope stability, settlement, and liquefaction potential. The proposed cell cover and erosion protection features were also analyzed and designed to protect the RRM (residual radioactive materials) against surface water and wind erosion. The location of the proposed cell precludes the need for permanent drainage or interceptor ditches. Rock to be used on the cell top-, side-, and toeslopes was sized to withstand probable maximum precipitation events.

  18. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report. Revised final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  19. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, Geology report: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  20. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

  1. Retaliation to a chemical attack in a major regional conflict: Courses of action and consequences. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crabbe, J.A.

    1996-02-12

    How should the Operational Commander address retaliation to chemical warfare in his deliberate planning process. Joint Doctrine and the Gulf War appear to indicate that nuclear weapons form the basis for an appropriate retaliation course of action. However, Nuclear Posture statements, policy discussions, and military engagement post facto revelations tend to minimize the employment probability of nuclear weapons. Nuclear weapons do not present viable courses of action around which an executable plan can be built. However, conventional courses of action do, through analysis of chemical weapons, current policy and doctrine, nuclear employment probability, and regional perspectives, conventional courses of action surface as the politically and militarily supportable basis for planning. In addition to being a credible deterrent, employment in a retaliatory mode is not likely to ignite the global political maelstrom incidental to instigating the potential for nuclear war.

  2. TODAY: EPA Administrator McCarthy Holding Facebook QandA on the Economic Need for Climate Action

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Facebook Q'A will be focused on the cost of inaction and how to turn climate challenges into opportunities to modernize our power sector, lay the foundation for a low-carbon economy, and fuel growth for decades to come. A world-leading econom

  3. Inclusive Transition Processes--Considering Socio-Economically Disadvantaged Parents' Views and Actions for Their Child's Successful School Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothe, Antje; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has noted that the transition to primary school is important for future school success. As a result, an inclusive transition process to school has become increasingly important. However, this process is particularly difficult for socio-economically disadvantaged children in Germany. The study considers parents' views and actions…

  4. 77 FR 34456 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Newberg Dundee Bypass Project Project: Yamhill and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    .... Social and Economic: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 [42 U.S.C. 2000(d) et seq.]; American... Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income Populations; E.O. 11593 Protection and Enhancement... Federal programs and activities apply to this program.) Authority: 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1) Issued On: June...

  5. 76 FR 45649 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on I-5: Fern Valley Interchange Project: Jackson County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    .... 469- 469(c)]. 6. Social and Economic: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ; American Indian... but not limited to: 1. General: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) [42 U.S.C. 4321-4347]; Federal-Aid Highway Act . 2. Air: Clean Air Act . 3. Land: Section 4(f) of the Department...

  6. Relaxation of Summer Gasoline Volatility Standard for Mecklenburg and Gaston counties, North Carolina Direct final action Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Supporting documents on EPA's final rule that relaxes the federal Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) standard applicable to gasoline sold in Mecklenburg and Gaston counties, North Carolina during the summer season (June 1st to September 15th) are provided.

  7. 76 FR 46355 - Notice of Statute of Limitations on Claims; Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... of California: The project will involve the removal of the existing bridge structure, construction of a new replacement of a new bridge structure, and improvements to bridge approaches and roadways in...). The actions relate to a proposed project to replace the Mt. Vernon Avenue Bridge (State Bridge No....

  8. 78 FR 77477 - Notice of Statute of Limitations on Claims; Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... with a fixed bridge. As a structure over navigable waters of the United States, the proposed bridge... the Interstate 5 Bridge across the Columbia River AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... the issuance of a Coast Guard bridge permit, adoption of the bridge related portions of the...

  9. 75 FR 25309 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Expanded Intermodal Freight Terminal in Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Freight Terminal in Michigan AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Yard, also known as the Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal (DIFT) and associated external-to-terminal... following expansion project in the State of Michigan: Detroit Intermodal Freight Terminal. The...

  10. 78 FR 64592 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Stehekin Valley Road Improvement Project From the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Improvement Project From the Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan: Chelan County, Washington AGENCY... Improvement project from the Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan in Chelan County, Washington. This action grants approval for the road improvement project element of the plan. DATES: By this notice,...

  11. 75 FR 10015 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Interchange of State Loop 1604 and United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... 1604 and United States Highway 281 in Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... State Loop 1604 (LP 1604) with United States Highway 281 (US 281). Project limits on LP 1604 are from Bitters Road to Redland Road and on US 281 are from LP 1604 to Bitters Road in Bexar County in the...

  12. 75 FR 80107 - Notice of Statute of Limitations on Claims; Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... actions were taken, including but not limited to: 1. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) ; Federal-Aid Highway Act 2. Clean Air Act 3. Migratory Bird Treaty Act 4. Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended 5. Civil Rights Act of 1964 6. Comprehensive Environmental...

  13. 75 FR 62919 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... at McIntire Road Project in Virginia AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road project in the City of Charlottesville, Virginia... approvals for the following project in the State of Virginia: Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire...

  14. Content and Instructional Methods of Education for the Economic-Political-Social Development of Nations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coladarci, Arthur P.

    This document reports on a project that developed, through case studies of various countries, empirical evidence of the impact of curriculum content and method on national economic, social, and political growth. Specific problems studied were (1) occupational education and training for development, (2) education's role in the formation of social…

  15. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report. [In Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept. Three different classes of building are investigated, namely: single-family residence; multi-family residence; and commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in three different climatic regions: Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. Computer programs - ACESIM for the residences and CACESS for the office building - were used, each comprised of four modules: loads; design; simulation; and economic. For each building type in each geographic location, the economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of a number of conventional systems. The results of this analysis indicate that the economic viability of the ACES is very sensitive to the assumed value of the property tax, maintenace cost, and fuel-escalation rates, while it is relatively insensitive to the assumed values of other parameters. Fortunately, any conceivable change in the fuel-escalation rates would tend to increase the viability of the ACES concept. An increase in the assumed value of the maintenance cost or property tax would tend to make the ACES concept less viable; a decrease in either would tend to make the ACES concept more viable. The detailed results of this analysis are given in Section 5.4 of Volume II. 2 figures, 21 tables.

  16. Post-Secondary Vocational Home Economics Instructional Materials Needs Assessment Project: State-of-the-Art and Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glosson, Linda R.; Bowers, Candice H.

    A Texas project assessed postsecondary vocational home economics instructors' needs for instructional media and materials as well as the need for training in the development of curriculum materials. Relevant post-secondary programs identified were child development, food service/dietetics, fashion design/tailoring, and interior design. In…

  17. 76 FR 20807 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Sellwood Bridge Project, SE Tacoma Street and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Preservation Act (AHPA) . 6. Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Civil Rights) [42 U.S.C. 2000(d... were taken include, but are not limited to: 1. General: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) [42 U.S.C. 4321-4351]; Federal-Aid Highway Act (FAHA) [23 U.S.C. 109 and 23 U.S.C. 128]. 2. Air: Clean...

  18. Economic impacts of SEPTA on the regional and state economy. Final report. [SouthEast Pennsylvania Transportation Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The report evaluates the economic and social impacts of supporting the Southeast Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) public transportation system. The study is comprehensive, considering travel times and costs for individual travelers, and how those changes would affect the cost of doing business, individual spending patterns, and the regional and State economies. Four alternatives were considered: rehabilitation of the system and continuation of services, a fifty-percent scaleback of services, gradual shutdown of the system over ten years, and immediate shutdown. The analysis showed that rehabilitation of the system would return three dollars to the region for every dollar spent on it, and that cutting back service would have economic costs far greater than any savings accrued. The methodology is general, and can be applied in other areas.

  19. 78 FR 40545 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Georgia the Interstate 75 (I-75...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Federal agencies that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The I-75 Express Lanes Project will design a managed lane system along I-75 from the SR 155 (Zack Hinton Parkway, South) interchange... Interstate 75 (I-75) Express, Clayton and Henry Counties, Georgia (Atlanta Metropolitan Area) AGENCY:...

  20. Sunset dates of chemicals subject to final TSCA section 4: test requirements and related section 12(b) actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This table lists all chemical substances and mixtures that are and/or have been the subject of final TSCA Section 4 test rules and/or TSCA Section 4 enforceable consent agreements/orders (ECAs) issued under the TSCA Existing Chemicals Testing Program.

  1. 77 FR 15193 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2012 and 2013 Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... of Decision (ROD), Supplementary Information Report (SIR) to the EIS, and the Final Regulatory... West 4th Avenue, Suite 306, Anchorage, AK 99510-2252, phone 907-271-2809, or from the Council's Web..., sablefish, deep-water flatfish, rex sole, Pacific ocean perch, northern rockfish, shortraker...

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Voortman Farm Site, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania (first remedial action) June 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-30

    The 43-acre Voortman Farm site is located in Upper Salucon Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. The site consists of a sinkhole that contained empty battery casings disposed of in late 1979 and early 1980. Citizen complaints in 1980 prompted the prohibition of dumping and subsequent site investigation. In September 1986, the battery casings in the sinkhole caught on fire. Since the battery casings were burning underground, attempts to extinguish the fire remained unsuccessful. There does not appear to be any leaching from any residual metals, contaminated soils or battery casings present. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  3. Proposed plan/Statement of basis for the Grace Road Site (631-22G) operable unit: Final action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-08-19

    This Statement of Basis/Proposed Plan is being issued by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), which functions as the lead agency for the Savannah River Site (SRS) remedial activities, with concurrence by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The purpose of this Statement of Basis/Proposed Plan is to describe the preferred alternative for addressing the Grace Road site (GRS) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process.

  4. Final decision document for the interim response action at the lime settling basins, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, version 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    1990-03-01

    The objective of the interim response action at the lime settling basins is to mitigate the threat of releases from the basins. The proposed IRA consists of: (1) relocation of sludge material to the settling basin; (2) construction of a 360 degree subsurface barrier around the basins; (3) construction of a soil and vegetative cover over the material; and (4) installation of a ground water extraction system. This decision document provides summaries of: (1) alternative technologies considered, (2) significant events leading to the initiation of the IRA, (3) the IRA Project, and (4) applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements, standards, criteria, and limitations (ARAR`s) associated with the program.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): John's Sludge Pond, Wichita, KS. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-22

    The Johns' Sludge Pond site is in a relatively undeveloped area in the city of Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas. During the 1950s and 1960s the Super Refined Oil Company used the sludge pond for the disposal of waste oil and up to 15,000 cubic yards of oily sludge generated by the oil recycling and reclamation operation. Because sulfuric acid was used to refine waste oil for recycling, the wastes dumped into the pond were very acidic. Additionally, high lead concentrations and low PCB concentrations (less than 50 ppm) were also detected in the sludge. As surface water flowed into the pond, an extremely acidic layer of water formed on top of the sludge which often overflowed into nearby surface waters. The city subsequently built berms to prevent further surface runoff. In 1983 EPA ordered the city to undertake interim cleanup activities which consisted of excavating and solidifying the sludge using cement kiln dust with redeposition of the treated sludge into a compacted clay-lined cell followed by capping using a compacted clay cap. Surface and ground water monitoring following the interim action have not detected any contaminant levels that would require further action.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): John's Sludge Pond, Wichita, KS. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-22

    The Johns' Sludge Pond site is in a relatively undeveloped area in the city of Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas. During the 1950s and 1960s the Super Refined Oil Company used the sludge pond for the disposal of waste oil and up to 15,000 cubic yards of oily sludge generated by the oil recycling and reclamation operation. Because sulfuric acid was used to refine waste oil for recycling, the wastes dumped into the pond were very acidic. Additionally, high lead concentrations and low PCB concentrations (less than 50 ppm) were also detected in the sludge. As surface water flowed into the pond, an extremely acidic layer of water formed on top of the sludge which often overflowed into nearby surface waters. The city subsequently built berms to prevent further surface runoff. In 1983 EPA ordered the city to undertake interim cleanup activities which consisted of excavating and solidifying the sludge using cement kilm dust with redeposition of the treated sludge into a compacted clay-lined cell followed by capping using a compacted clay cap. Surface and ground water monitoring following the interim action have not detected any contaminant levels that could require further action.

  7. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. One of these alternatives is the proposed action. These alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies because the PEIS is a planning document only. It assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. This PEIS differs substantially from a site-specific environmental impact statement because multiple ground water compliance strategies, each with its own set of potential impacts, could be used to implement all the alternatives except the no action alternative. In a traditional environmental impact statement, an impacts analysis leads directly to the defined alternatives. The impacts analysis for implementing alternatives in this PEIS first involves evaluating a ground water compliance strategy or strategies, the use of which will result in site-specific impacts. This PEIS impacts analysis assesses only the potential impacts of the various ground water compliance strategies, then relates them to the alternatives to provide a comparison of impacts.

  8. Food and Drug Administration Review and Action on Over-the-Counter Time and Extent Applications. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-11-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is amending its nonprescription (over-the-counter or OTC) drug regulations. This final rule supplements the time and extent application (TEA) process for OTC drugs by establishing timelines and performance metrics for FDA's review of non-sunscreen TEAs, as required by the Sunscreen Innovation Act (SIA). It also amends the existing TEA process to include filing determination and withdrawal provisions to make the TEA process more efficient.

  9. Positive Catch & Economic Benefits of Periodic Octopus Fishery Closures: Do Effective, Narrowly Targeted Actions ‘Catalyze’ Broader Management?

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas A.; Oleson, Kirsten L. L.; Ratsimbazafy, Hajanaina; Raberinary, Daniel; Benbow, Sophie; Harris, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    Overview Eight years of octopus fishery records from southwest Madagascar reveal significant positive impacts from 36 periodic closures on: (a) fishery catches and (b) village fishery income, such that (c) economic benefits from increased landings outweigh costs of foregone catch. Closures covered ~20% of a village’s fished area and lasted 2-7 months. Fishery Catches from Each Closed Site Octopus landings and catch per unit effort (CPUE) significantly increased in the 30 days following a closure’s reopening, relative to the 30 days before a closure (landings: +718%, p<0.0001; CPUE: +87%, p<0.0001; n = 36). Open-access control sites showed no before/after change when they occurred independently of other management (“no ban”, n = 17/36). On the other hand, open-access control sites showed modest catch increases when they extended a 6-week seasonal fishery shutdown (“ban”, n = 19/36). The seasonal fishery shutdown affects the entire region, so confound all potential control sites. Fishery Income in Implementing Villages In villages implementing a closure, octopus fishery income doubled in the 30 days after a closure, relative to 30 days before (+132%, p<0.001, n = 28). Control villages not implementing a closure showed no increase in income after “no ban” closures and modest increases after “ban” closures. Villages did not show a significant decline in income during closure events. Net Economic Benefits from Each Closed Site Landings in closure sites generated more revenue than simulated landings assuming continued open-access fishing at that site (27/36 show positive net earnings; mean +$305/closure; mean +57.7% monthly). Benefits accrued faster than local fishers’ time preferences during 17-27 of the 36 closures. High reported rates of illegal fishing during closures correlated with poor economic performance. Broader Co-Management We discuss the implications of our findings for broader co-management arrangements, particularly for catalyzing

  10. Final Characterization Report for Corrective Action Unit 109: Area 2 U-2BU Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    ITLV

    1998-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit 109, Area 2 U-2bu Crater, is an inactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Permit disposal unit located in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit has been characterized under the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265 (CFR, 1996). The site characterization was performed under the RCRA Part A Permit Characterization Plan for the U-2bu Subsidence Crater (DOE/NV, 1998c), as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Liebendorfer, 1998). The primary objective of the site characterization activities was to evaluate the presence, concentration, and extent of any Resource Conservation and Recovery Act contaminants in the crater. Surface soil samples were collected on April 22, 1998, and subsurface soil samples and geotechnical samples were collected from April 27-29, 1998. Soil samples were collected using a hand auger or a piston-type drive hammer to advance a 5-centimeter (2-inch) diameter steel sampling tool into the ground. The permit for the Nevada Test Site requires that Corrective Action Unit 109 be closed under 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265 Subpart G and 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265.310 (CFR, 1996). Analysis of the data collected during the characterization effort indicates that lead was detected in Study Area 1 at 5.7 milligrams per liter, above the regulatory level in 40 Code of Federal Regulations 261.24 of 5.0 milligrams per liter. Except for the lead detection at a single location within the crater, the original Resource Conservation Recovery Act constituents of potential concern determined between the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office and the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection during the Data Quality Objectives process (DOE/NV, 1998b) were not found to be present at Corrective Action Unit 109 above regulatory levels of

  11. Problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system with incomplete information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorikov, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    In this article we consider a discrete-time dynamical system consisting of a set a controllable objects (region and forming it municipalities). The dynamics each of these is described by the corresponding linear or nonlinear discrete-time recurrent vector relations and its control system consist from two levels: basic level (control level I) that is dominating level and auxiliary level (control level II) that is subordinate level. Both levels have different criterions of functioning and united by information and control connections which defined in advance. In this article we study the problem of optimization of guaranteed result for program control by the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks vectors. For this problem we propose a mathematical model in the form of two-level hierarchical minimax program control problem of the final states of this system with incomplete information and the general scheme for its solving.

  12. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Sinclair Refinery, Allegany County, Wellsville, NY. (Second remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Sinclair Refinery site is a former refinery in Wellsville, Allegany County, New York. The site is composed of a 90-acre refinery area, 10-acre landfill area, and 14-acre offsite tank farm. From 1901 to 1958, the site was used to process Pennsylvania grade crude oil until a fire in 1958 halted operations. Currently, some private companies and the State University of New York occupy the site. A 1981 site inspection revealed that debris from the eroding landfill area has washed into and contaminated the Genesee River. The ROD addresses OU2, remediation of the remaining contaminated areas at the site located within the 90-acre refinery area and the offsite tank farm including the contaminated ground water beneath the refinery. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene and xylenes, semi-volatile compounds including naphthalene and nitrobenzene, and metals including arsenic and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): South Brunswick, New Jersey (second remedial action), September 1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    The Browning-Ferris Industries South Brunswick Landfill (BFI) is a closed landfill in Middlesex County, New Jersey. The site is in close proximity to a brook that feeds into a public drinking water supply 10 miles downstream. For more than twenty years the site operated, under two separate owners, as a solid-waste landfill that received municipal refuse, pesticides, chemical wastes and hazardous wastes. The site was officially closed in December 1978. A site investigation revealed elevated levels of VOCs and iron in the ground water and surface water. The selected remedial action for the site includes onsite containment (leachate collection/treatment system, slurry wall, clay cap, gas venting system), which was initiated in May 1983 and completed on September 1985; and post-remedial ground water, surface and air monitoring.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Tabernacle Drum Dump, New Jersey (first remedial action), June 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-30

    The Tabernacle Drum Dump site is a one-acre facility located in Tabernacle Township, Burlington County, New Jersey. Drum-disposal activities, which resulted in contamination by hazardous substances, occurred on a 2,000 sq ft area portion of the site. During 1976 and 1977, the Atlantic Disposal Services (ADS), disposed of approximately 200 fifty-five gallon drums, twenty gallon containers, and five gallon paint cans, which were stored at the site from 1977 to 1984. Deterioration and leakage of some containers resulted in visible soil contamination and ultimately ground-water contamination. The principal threat posed at the site is potential ingestion of ground water including VOCs. Remedial actions for this site are discussed.

  16. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Kopper's (Oroville Plant), CA. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-13

    The Koppers (Oroville Plant) site is a 200-acre operating wood treating plant in Butte County, California, just south of Oroville. Although there is a history of wood-treating operations at the site, wood-treating operations were greatly expanded in 1955 when Koppers Company, Inc. became the owner and operator. Chemical preservatives including pentachlophenol (PCP), creosote, and chlorinated copper arsenate solution have been used in the wood treating processes. Waste-water discharge and other site activities have resulted in contamination of unlined ponds, soil, and debris. Pursuant to a State order, Koppers conducted cleanup activities from 1973-74, including ground-water pumping and discharge to spray fields and offsite disposal of contaminated debris, and process changes, including construction of a waste-water treatment plant. In 1986 Koppers provided an alternate water supply for domestic uses to affected residents. The selected remedial action for this site includes a soil component and a ground-water component.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 5): Tri-State Plating, Columbus, IN. (First remedial action), March 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-30

    The 3,900-square foot Tri-State Plating site is an abandoned metal plating facility in Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana. Land use in the vicinity of the site is residential and industrial. Metal plating operations at the site began during the 1940s. In 1983, the State identified soil contaminated with chromium, lead, and other metals, which was thought to be a result of an onsite waste spill. In 1984, following additional onsite waste disposal violations, onsite spills, and the failure of Tri-State plating to install an onsite waste treatment system, the State blocked sewers from the site and cut off the water supply. From 1987 to 1989, in two separate actions, EPA removed 27 drums of inorganic material from the storage building, excavated contaminated onsite soil, decontaminated and demolished all onsite structures. This ROD addresses the contaminated onsite ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are metals including chromium.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Revere textile prints, Sterling, CT. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 15-acre Revere Textile Prints site is an industrial facility, located in Sterling, Windham County, Connecticut. From 1879 to 1980, several textile processing facilities used the site to print colored and patterned fabrics, which involved using pigments, dyes, and solvents. Throughout the site's history, process rinse water and leftover printing pigments were disposed of into floor drains that drained into Moosup River. In 1980, the state ordered the PRP to dispose of the 1,500 drums offsite along with an unspecified amount of stained soils; the action was completed in 1983. Between 1982 and 1983, W. F. Norman Company purchased the site for metal stamping operations, and subsequently abandoned the site. The ROD addresses site soil, sediment, ground water, and surface water. The results of the RI have shown no evidence of significant site contamination, and where contaminants were detected, the levels were usually significantly below the federal MCLs.

  20. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  1. Draft Final Decision Document for Element One of the CERCLA Hazardous Wastes Interim Response Action at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    I ELECTE I •• 17 1993 D-A273 792 SA ":-: •I~lhh l~III gJ 5 Draft Final Decision Document for Element One of the CERCLA Hazardous Wastes Interim...ARARs FOR THE CERCLA WASTEWATER3 TREATMENT SYSTEM INTERIM RESPONSE I I Draft Fini DecWja Docameu for Eleana Ow of the CERCLA Luid Wades - ’ftm Responae...as a result of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act ( CERCLA ) I activities. This Decision Document, however, does not

  2. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-03-01

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  3. Assessment and economic analysis of the MOD III Stirling-engine driven chiller system. Final report, October 1989-July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Moryl, J.

    1990-07-01

    The Stirling engine is an inherently clean and efficient engine. With the requirements for environmentally benign emissions and high energy efficiency, the Stirling engine is an attractive alternative to both internal combustion (IC) engines and electric motors. The study evaluated a Stirling-engine-driven chiller package. Technically, the Stirling engine is a good selection as a compressor drive, with inherently low vibrations, quiet operation, long life, and low maintenance. Exhaust emissions are below the projected 1995 stringent California standards. Economically, the Stirling-engine-driven chiller is a viable alternative to both IV-engine and electric-driven chillers, trading off slightly higher installed cost against lower total operating expenses. The penetration of a small portion of the projected near-term stationary engine market opportunity will provide the volume production basis to achieve competitively priced engines.

  4. Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

  5. Phase II final report and second update of the energy economic data base (EEDB) program. Volume 1 of 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evaluating and monitoring US Civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option against alternatives. This report presents the Second Update of the EEDB for a cost and regulation date of January 1, 1979, prepared during Phase II of the EEDB Program. The Second Update is the first of a series of periodic updates marking the beginning of the next step in meeting the objective of the EEDB Program.

  6. National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: reporting on adverse and negative actions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-01-28

    This final rule revises existing regulations under sections 401 through 432 of the Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986, governing the National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners, to incorporate statutory requirements under section 1921 of the Social Security Act, as amended by section 5(b) of the Medicare and Medicaid Patient and Program Protection Act of 1987 (MMPPPA), and as amended by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA). The MMPPPA, along with certain additional provisions in the OBRA, was designed to protect program beneficiaries from unfit health care practitioners, and otherwise improve the anti-fraud provisions of Medicare and State health care programs. Section 1921, the statutory authority upon which this regulatory action is based, requires each State to adopt a system of reporting to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) certain adverse licensure actions taken against health care practitioners and health care entities licensed or otherwise authorized by a State (or a political subdivision thereof) to provide health care services. It also requires each State to report any negative actions or findings that a State licensing authority, peer review organization, or private accreditation entity has concluded against a health care practitioner or health care entity.

  7. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the state of Nevada: Mitigation action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The DOE Notice of Availability for this environmental impact statement was published in the Federal Register on Friday, October 18, 1996 (61 FR 54437). The final environmental impact statement identifies potential adverse effects resulting from the four use alternatives evaluated and discusses measures that DOE considered for the mitigation of these potential adverse effects. The Secretary of Energy signed the Record of Decision on the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site and other DOE sites in the state of Nevada on December 9, 1996. These decisions will result in the continuation of the multipurpose, multi-program use of the Nevada Test Site, under which DOE will pursue a further diversification of interagency, private industry, and public-education uses while meeting its Defense Program, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration mission requirements at the Nevada Test Site and other Nevada sites, including the Tonopah Test Range, the Project Shoal Site, the Central Nevada Test Area, and on the Nellis Air Force Range Complex. The Record of Decision also identifies specific mitigation actions beyond the routine day-to-day physical and administrative controls needed for implementation of the decisions. These specific mitigation actions are focused on the transportation of waste and on groundwater availability. This Mitigation Action Plan elaborates on these mitigation commitments.

  8. [Health Impact Assessments (HIA): an intersectoral process for action on the social, economic and environmental determinants of health].

    PubMed

    Saint-Pierre, Louise; Lamarre, Marie-Claude; Simos, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a practice that has grown in popularity worldwide, since the end of the 1990s. Originally used in the framework of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs), HIA has become enriched through the addition of knowledge and principles based on the social determinants of health and the tackling of health inequalities, and has been brought to bear on the policy-planning process at all levels of government. HIA has three overlapping objectives: to assess the potential effects of a policy on health, to encourage citizen and stakeholder participation in the impact analysis process, and to inform the decision-making process. This article briefly defines HIA; defines its standardized process in successive steps, which allows users to give structure to their actions and to establish the steps to be followed (detection, framing, analysis, recommendations and evaluation); and offers three examples of HIA in three different situations: the Geneva canton of Switzerland; Rennes, France; and in the Montérégie region of Quebec, Canada. Together, these illustrations show that HIA is a promising strategy to influence local decisions and to integrate health into projects and policies at the local and regional levels.

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): PSC Resources Site, Palmer, MA. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-15

    The 21.5-acre PSC Resources site is a former waste oil and solvent reclamation facility located in Palmer, Hampden County, Massachusetts. Since 1898, there have been several owners of the PSC property, most involved in oil industry functions. In 1974, PSC Resources, Inc., purchased the property to operate an oil storage and processing facility, and in 1976, the company name was changed to Ag-Met Oil Services, Inc. The company began accepting solvents and lacquers for collection and disposal. The ROD addresses the final remedy for the site, which includes both source control and management of migration components. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, ground water, and surface water are VOCs, including benzene, PCE, and TCE; other organics, including PAHs and PCBs; and metals, including arsenic and lead.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Coalinga Asbestos Mine, Fresno County, CA. (Second remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The 557-acre Coalinga Asbestos Mine site, a former asbestos processing area and chromite mine, comprises part of the Johns Manville Coalinga Asbestos Mill site in western Fresno County, California. This rural mountainous area is used primarily for recreational purposes. From 1962 to 1974, asbestos ore from several local mines was processed and sorted onsite, and the resulting asbestos mill tailings were periodically bulldozed into an intermittent stream channel. Subsequently, from 1975 to 1977, a chromite milling operation was conducted onsite. Tailings were often washed downstream during periods of stream flow, and the resuspension of asbestos fibers from the tailings into the air produced a significant inhalation hazard. As a result of these activities, approximately 450,000 cubic yards of mill tailings and asbestos ore remain onsite within a large tailing pile. In 1980 and 1987, State investigations indicated that the site was contributing a significant amount of asbestos into the surface water. The site will be remediated as two Operable Units (OU). The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remedial action for OU2, the Johns Manville Coalinga Asbestos Mill Area. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the surface water is asbestos.

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Midco II, IN. (First remedial action), June 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-30

    The MIDCO II site is a seven-acre storage and disposal facility in Gary, Indiana. The surrounding area is predominantly used for industrial purposes, and includes 34 other potential hazardous-waste sites. The underlying aquifer is highly susceptible to contamination from surface sources because of the high water table; however, in the vicinity of the site, the aquifer is used primarily for non-drinking-water purposes. The same operator as at another Superfund site, MIDCO I, began waste operations, including drum storage at MIDCO II during the summer of 1976. Following a major fire at the MIDCO I site in January 1977, MIDCO transferred the operations from the MIDCO I site to the MIDCO II site. Operations included temporarily storing bulk liquid and drum wastes; neutralizing acids and caustics; and disposing of wastes by dumping wastes into onsite pits, which allowed wastes to percolate into the ground water. The resulting PCB-contaminated soil pile was removed and disposed of in an offsite hazardous waste landfill in early 1986, and most of the cyanide-contaminated pile was also removed. Removal activities ended in January 1986. The primary contaminants of concern currently affecting the soil, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, TCE, and xylenes; other organics including PCBs; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Wedzeb enterprises, Lebanan, IN. (First Remedial Action), June 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-30

    The 0.75-acre Wedzeb Enterprises site is located in Lebanon, Indiana. Originally, two warehouses, one of which was used as a storage facility for electrical capacitors and transformers containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were located on site. In May 1981 the warehouse used for storage was completely destroyed by fire. Contaminants may have been washed into the sewer lines during the fire, providing a source of long-term contaminant release to the Lebanon publicly-owned treatment works (POTW). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the sewer sediment are PCBs. The selected remedial action for the site includes cleaning the sewer lines with hydraulic jets and vacuum pumping to remove contaminants, followed by filtering the resulting water and sediment to remove PCB-contaminated sediment, and discharging the water to the POTW; offsite incineration and disposal of the estimated 2 drums of sediment and 20 drums of remedial-investigation-generated waste if PCB levels are 50 mg/kg or greater, or offsite disposal only if PCB levels are below 50 mg/kg; and a television inspection of the pipeline to ensure structural integrity.

  13. US Department of Energy final response to standards for remedial actions at inactive uranium processing sites; Proposed rule

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-14

    This document revisits and supplements information and recommendations presented in the January 1988 US Department of Energy (DOE) submission to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding the proposed standards for Title I uranium processing sites (DOE, 1988). The clarifications and comments in this report are based on further DOE investigation, contemplation, and interpretation of the proposed standards. Since the January response, the DOE has undertaken a number of special studies to -investigate, evaluate, focus, and clarify issues relating to the standards. In addition, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a draft technical position outlining its interpretation of the proposed standards and clarifying how the standards will be implemented (NRC, 1988). Some issues presented are based on previous positions, and the original DOE position is restated for reference. Other issues or recommendations are more recent than the January DOE response; therefore, no former position was advanced. The order of presentation reflects the general order of significance to the DOE, specifically in regards to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Big D Campground, Kingsville, OH. (First Remedial Action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The Big D Campground site is in Kingsville, Ashtabula County, Ohio. The site consists of a 1.2-acre landfill created out of a former sand and gravel quarry. From 1964 to 1976 the site owner accepted approximately 28,000 cubic yards of hazardous materials for disposal which included up to 5,000 drums containing solvents, caustics, and oily substances. A 1986 remedial investigation identified the landfill as the primary source of contamination in soil outside the landfill and ground water underlying the landfill. Ground water contamination is of significant concern because it is migrating towards the drinking water supply wells of nearby residences and Conneaut Creek which is adjacent to and south of the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including PCE and TCE, other organics, and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes removing and incinerating up to 5,000 buried drums, bulk wastes, and up to 30,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil followed by onsite disposal of nonhazardous ash residue; pumping and treatment of 40,000,000 to 60,000,000 gallons of ground water.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): South Cavalcade Street Site, Houston, Texas (first remedial action) September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-26

    The 66-acre South Cavalcade site is located in northeast Houston, Texas. The surrounding areas are a mixture of residential, commercial, and industrial properties. Stormwater runoff flows to two stormwater drainage ditches, which flow into Hunting Bayou, a limited aquatic habitat as classified by Texas Water Quality Standards. The site was used as a wood-preserving and coal-tar distillation facility from 1910 to 1962. The wood preserving facility consisted of an operations area, a drip track, and treated and untreated-wood storage areas. The operations area included wood-treating cylinders, chemical storage tanks, and a waste-water lagoon. Creosote and metallic salts were used in the operation. PAHs, VOCs, metals and components of creosote were detected in the soil, sediments, and ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water, soils, and sediments are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes, other organics including PAHs, and metal including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is outlined.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Woodbury Chemical, Commerce City, CO. (Second remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The Woodbury Chemical Site is in Commerce City, a northern suburb of Denver, Colorado, and neighbors a primarily industrial area which includes automobile salvage yards and a petroleum refinery. From the 1950s to 1971, the Woodbury Chemical Company operated a pesticide formulation facility which was destroyed by fire in 1965 but was subsequently rebuilt. Contaminated rubble and debris from the fire was disposed of on a 2.2-acre vacant lot east of the Woodbury facility. During a 1985 remedial investigation of the 2.2-acre lot, EPA identified high levels of pesticides and metals in surface and subsurface soils. As a result of the discovery of additional contamination, EPA determined it would be more cost effective to simultaneously implement the cleanup activities at the 2.2-acre lot, the Woodbury chemical facility, and adjacent properties. The selected remedial action addressed in the Record of Decision (ROD) incorporates and builds upon the 1985 ROD. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs including PCE and TCE; other organics including pesticides; and metals including arsenic.

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report for "A Novel,Highly Efficient and Economic Purification Process Revolutionizing PTA Production"

    SciTech Connect

    Wytcherley, Randi; Balderston, Kristen; Ball,George; Chou, Tai-Li

    2008-06-06

    GTC Technology, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the DOE’s Industrial Technologies Program and in collaboration with Montana State University, has completed pilot scale testing of a revolutionary new process to produce purified terephthalic acid (PTA), a crucial chemical commodity manufactured worldwide. Purified terephthalic acid (PTA) is a starting material for the formation of polyester resin. Polyester resin is used to make many valuable commercial products, including clothing, plastic containers and films. In traditional PTA production, critical reactions are carried out at high temperatures and pressures, creating physically harsh and economically costly operating conditions. The chemical halide bromine is an essential ingredient for part of the conventional process. As a result of using bromine, the highly toxic and environmentally insidious compound methyl bromide is formed. The corrosive nature of bromine also mandates the use of specialized and expensive corrosion-resistant materials for plant construction. Plants processing PTA conventionally must also use copious amounts of precious water resources and manage costly water treatment operations. GTC’s new TA purification method employs a unique two-step crystallization process capable of operating at lower temperatures and pressures than traditional methods. Utilization of a highly selective, proprietary organic solvent blend also allows for the flexibility of accepting higher levels of impurities in the initial purification feedstock. The relaxed physical operating conditions combined with the effectiveness of the blended organic solvent allow for the efficient purification of feedstock created in a bromine free manner. Along with the elimination of bromine, the new purification technology drastically reduces energy costs and expensive wastewater treatment. Industry wide implementation in the United States alone could yield energy savings of 22 trillion BTU per year. In 2007, using the

  18. Integrating spatial support tools into strategic planning-SEA of the GMS North-South Economic Corridor Strategy and Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, Pavit; Linde, Lothar

    2011-11-15

    The GMS countries, supported by the Asian Development Bank, have adopted a holistic, multidimensional approach to strengthen infrastructural linkages and facilitate cross border trade through (i) the establishment of a trans-boundary road connecting two economic nodes across marginalised areas, followed by 2) facilitation of environmentally and socially sound investments in these newly connected areas as a means to develop livelihoods. The North-South Economic Corridor is currently in its second phase of development, with investment opportunities to be laid out in the NSEC Strategy and Action Plan (SAP). It targets the ecologically and culturally sensitive border area between PR China's Yunnan Province, Northern Lao PDR, and Thailand. A trans-boundary, cross-sectoral Strategic Environmental Assessment was conducted to support the respective governments in assessing potential environmental and social impacts, developing alternatives and mitigation options, and feeding the findings back into the SAP writing process. Given the spatial dimension of corridor development-both with regard to opportunities and risks-particular emphasis was put in the application of spatial modelling tools to help geographically locate and quantify impacts as a means to guide interventions and set priorities.

  19. 23 CFR 771.125 - Final environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Final environmental impact statements. 771.125 Section... ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.125 Final environmental impact statements. (a)(1..., economic, or environmental impacts of the action may need to be more fully explored; (iii) the impacts...

  20. 23 CFR 771.125 - Final environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Final environmental impact statements. 771.125 Section... ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.125 Final environmental impact statements. (a)(1..., economic, or environmental impacts of the action may need to be more fully explored; (iii) the impacts...

  1. 23 CFR 771.125 - Final environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Final environmental impact statements. 771.125 Section... ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.125 Final environmental impact statements. (a)(1..., economic, or environmental impacts of the action may need to be more fully explored; (iii) the impacts...

  2. 23 CFR 771.125 - Final environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Final environmental impact statements. 771.125 Section... ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.125 Final environmental impact statements. (a)(1..., economic, or environmental impacts of the action may need to be more fully explored; (iii) the impacts...

  3. The economic importance of acaricides in the control of phytophagous mites and an update on recent acaricide mode of action research.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Tirry, Luc; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Nauen, Ralf; Dermauw, Wannes

    2015-06-01

    Acaricides are one of the cornerstones of an efficient control program for phytophagous mites. An analysis of the global acaricide market reveals that spider mites such as Tetranychus urticae, Panonychus citri and Panonychus ulmi are by far the most economically important species, representing more than 80% of the market. Other relevant mite groups are false spider mites (mainly Brevipalpus), rust and gall mites and tarsonemid mites. Acaricides are most frequently used in vegetables and fruits (74% of the market), including grape vines and citrus. However, their use is increasing in major crops where spider mites are becoming more important, such as soybean, cotton and corn. As revealed by a detailed case study of the Japanese market, major shifts in acaricide use are partially driven by resistance development and the commercial availability of compounds with novel mode of action. The importance of the latter cannot be underestimated, although some compounds are successfully used for more than 30 years. A review of recent developments in mode of action research is presented, as such knowledge is important for devising resistance management programs. This includes spirocyclic keto-enols as inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the carbazate bifenazate as a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, a novel class of complex II inhibitors, and the mite growth inhibitors hexythiazox, clofentezine and etoxazole that interact with chitin synthase I.

  4. Economic evaluation of FGD systems. Volume 1. Throwaway FGD processes, high- and low-sulfur coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keeth, R.J.; Miranda, J.E.; Reisdorf, J.B.; Scheck, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    This volume presents the estimated cost for 10 throwaway FGD systems and a coal cleaning process based on December 1982 cost and technology. These systems were evaluated for operability, technical merit and commercial availability. The FGD systems were evaluated for both high and low sulfur coal applications at a hypothetical 1000 MW (two 500 MW units) power plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin. This arbitrary reference plant was selected to ensure consistent comparisons, and to increase the relative accuracy of the costs presented. A flow sheet, material balance, equipment list, system description and utility consumption list form the basis of each FGD evaluation. Cost information was obtained from process vendors, Stearns-Roger information, and published reports. Capital costs were estimated by factoring costs of process equipment (i.e., an EPRI Class II estimate.) Operating costs were estimated from reagent and utility consumption. The levelized capital and operating costs were developed using EPRI's standard economic premises. Costs have an absolute accuracy of +-30 percent. However, since methodology, scope and unit costs are consistent, the relative accuracy between process estimates probably is +-15 percent.

  5. Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.; Oswald, W.J.

    1996-03-21

    There is growing evidence that global warming could become a major global environmental threat during the 21st century. The precautionary principle commands preventive action, at both national and international levels, to minimize this potential threat. Many near-term, relatively inexpensive, mitigation options are available. In addition, long-term research is required to evaluate and develop advanced, possibly more expensive, countermeasures, in the eventuality that they may be required. The utilization of power plant CO{sub 2} and its recycling into fossil fuel substitutes by microalgae cultures could be one such long-term technology. Microalgae production is an expanding industry in the U.S., with three commercial systems (of approximately 10 hectare each) producing nutriceuticals, specifically beta-carotene, extracted from Dunaliella, and Spirulina biomass. Microalgae are also used in wastewater treatment. Currently production costs are high, about $10,000/ton of algal biomass, almost two orders of magnitude higher than acceptable for greenhouse gas mitigation. This report reviews the current state-of-the-art, including algal cultivation and harvesting-processing, and outlines a technique for achieving very high productivities. Costs of CO{sub 2} mitigation with microalgae production of oils ({open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes}) are estimated and future R&D needs outlined.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Marathon Battery, Cold Spring, NY. (Third remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The Marathon Battery site is a former battery-manufacturing plant in Cold Spring, Putnam County, New York. The site is composed of three study areas: Area I, which consists of East Foundry Cove Marsh and Constitution Marsh; Area II, which encompasses the former plant, presently a book-storage warehouse, the surrounding grounds, and a vault with cadmium contaminated sediment dredged from East Foundry Cove; and Area III, which includes East Foundry Cove (48 acres), West Foundry Cove and the Hudson River in the vicinity of Cold Spring pier and a sewer outfall. Contamination in Area III emanates from plant waste water that was discharged via the city sewer system into the Hudson River at Cold Spring Pier or, in some instances, through a storm sewer into East Foundry Cove. A Record of Decision (ROD) was signed for Area I in September 1986 with cleanup activities to include dredging the East Foundry Cove Marsh. The second ROD for the site was signed in September 1988 and included decontamination of the battery plant and soil excavation in Area II. The 1989 ROD represents the third and final operable unit for the site and addresses sediment contamination in Area III. The primary contaminants of concern affecting sediment at the site are metals, including cadmium and nickel.

  7. "An Economic Process for Coal Liquefaction to Liquid Fuels" SBIR Phase II -- Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, Partha Sarathi

    2009-02-19

    The current commercial processes for direct coal liquefaction utilize expensive backmix-flow reactor system and conventional catalysts resulting in incomplete and retrogressive reactions that produce low distillate liquid yield and high gas yield, with high hydrogen consumption. The new process we have developed, which uses a less expensive reactor system and highly active special catalysts, resulted in high distillate liquid yield, low gas yield and low hydrogen consumption. The new reactor system using the special catalyst can be operated smoothly for direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Due to high hydrogenation and hydrocracking activities of the special catalysts, moderate temperatures and high residence time in each stage of the reactor system resulted in high distillate yield in the C4-650°F range with no 650°F+ product formed except for the remaining unconverted coal residue. The C4-650°F distillate is more valuable than the light petroleum crude. Since there is no 650°F+ liquid product, simple reforming and hydrotreating of the C4-650°F product will produce the commercial grade light liquid fuels. There is no need for further refinement using catalytic cracking process that is currently used in petroleum refining. The special catalysts prepared and used in the experimental runs had surface area between 40-155 m2/gm. The liquid distillate yield in the new process is >20 w% higher than that in the current commercial process. Coal conversion in the experimental runs was moderate, in the range of 88 - 94 w% maf-coal. Though coal conversion can be increased by adjustment in operating conditions, the purpose of limiting coal conversion to moderate amounts in the process was to use the remaining unconverted coal for hydrogen production by steam reforming. Hydrogen consumption was in the range of 4.0 - 6.0 w% maf-coal. A preliminary economic analysis of the new coal liquefaction process was

  8. Supporting evaluation for the proposed plan for final remedial action for the groundwater operable unit at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    2003-08-06

    This report presents the technical information developed since the interim record of decision (IROD) was issued in September 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] 2000). The information was incorporated into the evaluation that was performed in selecting the preferred alternative for the Chemical Plant groundwater operable unit (GWOU) of the Weldon Spring site. The contaminants of concern (COCs) in groundwater and springs are trichloroethylene (TCE), nitrate, uranium, and nitroaromatic compounds. The preferred alternative of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) coupled with institutional controls (ICs) and contingency activities is described in the ''Proposed Plan (PP) for Final Remedial Action for the Groundwater Operable Unit at the Chemical Plant Area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri'' (DOE 2003b).

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Higgins Farm, Franklin Township, Somerset County, NJ. (Second remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 75-acre Higgins Farm site is a former cattle farm in Franklin Township, Somerset County, New Jersey. During the 1960's, municipal sludge and penicillin waste were used as fertilizers on Higgins Farm. The site also contains three holding tanks and drums containing material removed from previous remedial investigations. In 1986, the owner excavated 50 containers, including drums; however, during excavation activities, some of the containers were punctured and their contents spilled onto the ground. The ROD addresses the final action for ground water to limit future migration of contaminated ground water to offsite areas, as OU2. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs, including benzene, PCE, TCE, and xylene.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Broderick Wood Products, Operable Unit 2, Adams County, Co. (Second remedial action), March 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-24

    The 64-acre Broderick Wood Products (BWP) site is a former wood preserving facility in unincorporated Adams County, Colorado, located just outside of Denver, Colorado. Land use in the area is predominantly industrial. There are three aquifers below the site. Approximately 70 drums containing various chemicals, oils, and asbestos are stored in the process area, and 65 drums of oil from sludge are stored in the impoundment area of the site. The ROD addresses OU2, a final remedy for the BWP site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, sediment, and ground water are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; organics, including PAHs, dioxins, furans, and PCP and other phenolic compounds; and metals, including arsenic and lead. The selected remedial action for the site includes treatment of the debris, soil and sediments, and ground water.

  11. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): United Creosoting Company, Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas (Second remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The 100-acre United Creosoting site is in Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas. The site currently is occupied by a distributing company, a construction company, and a residential subdivision. From 1946 to 1972, the United Creosoting Company operated a wood preserving facility at the site which used PCPs and creosote in the wood preservation process. PCP and creosote wastes were stored in two waste ponds on the property of the distributing company. In 1983, due to the contaminated stormwater runoff from the former waste pond areas, the property owner was directed under terms of an EPA Administrative Order to regrade contaminated soil, divert surface water drainage away from the residential portion of the site, and cap contaminated soil. The Record of Decision (ROD) specifies a final remedy for the contaminated soil and complements a 1986 ROD which determined that no action is necessary to remediate shallow ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are organics including PAHs, PCPs, and dioxins. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

  13. Modification No. 2 to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah: Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Portions of the final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) for the Green River site, Volumes 1 and 2, Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-81AL16257, March 1991 (DOE, 1991) have been modified. The changes to the RAP are designated as RAP Modification No. 2. These changes have been placed in a three-ring binder that will supplement the original RAP (DOE, 1991), and include the following: addendum to the Executive Summary; Section 3.5 (Ground Water part of the Site Characterization Summary); Section 4.0 (Site Design); Section5.0 (Water Resources Protection Strategy Summary); Appendix D.5 (Ground Water Hydrology); and Appendix E (Ground Water Protection Strategy). In addition to these revisions, there have been editorial changes that clarify the text, but do not change the meaning. Also, certain sections of the document, which are included in the submittal for ease of review and continuity, have been updated to reflect the final ground water protection standards and the current UMTRA Project format and content of RAPs.

  14. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Christopher; Kothari, Vijendra; Starr, Ken; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey

    2012-02-26

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program: Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): New Hanover County Airport Burn Pit Site, New Hanover County, Wilmington, NC. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-29

    The New Hanover site was located on Gardner Road approximately 500 feet west of the New Hanover County Airport terminal, New Hanover, North Carolina. From 1968 to 1979, the site was used for fire-fighter training purposes. During training exercises, jet fuel, gasoline, petroleum storage bottoms, fuel oil, kerosene, and sorbent materials from oil spill cleanup were burned in a pit. During its active years, water from the pit was allowed to flow onto land surfaces. Inspections conducted after the pit was abandoned showed that most of the standing liquid in the pit was water. In addition to the burn pit area, fire-fighting activities resulted in contamination at several other site areas, including an auto burn area; a railroad tank burn area; an aircraft mock-up area; a fuel tank and pipelines area; and two stained soil areas north of the burn pit. The ROD addressed restoration of the aquifer to drinking water quality as a final action for the site. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil and ground water were VOCs, including benzene; and metals, including chromium and lead.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): American Lake Gardens (McCord AFB - Area D), Pierce County, WA. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-19

    The American Lake Gardens (McChord AFB-Area D) site is an active U.S. Air Force base located at McChord Air Force Base, Pierce County, Washington. The site consists of two areas, Area D and American Lake Garden Tract (ALGT). From the mid-1940's to the present, no known industrial activities have occurred in the ALGT area; however, seven waste disposal sites have operated within the Area D portion of the site. Concurrent with DOD investigations, EPA discovered TCE in ground water monitoring wells installed at the ALGT, and in 1984, concluded that waste disposal sites in Area D were the likely source of ground water contamination. The ROD addresses remediation of the contaminated onsite and offsite ground water plume, as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; other organics; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  17. Economic Impact Analysis: Final Revisions to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Subpart S (MACT I and MACT III) for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this July 2012 economic impact analysis (EIA) is to present the results of the Agency’s evaluation of the cost, economic impacts, and benefits from compliance with the requirements of these Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT).

  18. Characterization of Final Action Official Method(SM) 2011.19 and First Action Official Method 2015.06 Performance at Analyte Levels Corresponding to CODEX STAN 72 (1981) Minimum Levels.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joseph J; Pacquette, Lawrence H

    2017-03-01

    A limited single-laboratory validation (SLV) was conducted in the authors' laboratory to investigate the performance of AOAC Official MethodsSM 2011.19 Determination of Chromium (Cr), Selenium (Se), and Molybdenum (Mo) in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritional Products by Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometry and 2015.06 Determination of Minerals and Trace Elements in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometry at analyte levels below the practical LOQs (PLOQs) already published for these Final Action Official Methods. This work was needed to verify that the actual LOQs were below the minimum requirements for minerals in infant formula as given in CODEX STAN 72 (1981). Linearity studies at low levels were conducted as well as the analysis of blanks over multiple days to establish the LOQs (as opposed to PLOQs) for these nutrients. Several placebo matrixes from the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) program were tested over multiple days at two different sample sizes to quantitate the effect of doubling the sample size given in the original publications. The SLV results indicate that both methods can meet the Codex minimum requirements as-is, without modification of the methods, albeit with a relaxation of the stringent precision criteria originally established for these methods by SPIFAN. Precision can be improved by doubling the sample size, but this step is not necessary to use the method for its intended purpose. A concurrent collaborative study of Method 2015.06 showed that the RSDR obtained across eight laboratories for several infant formula placebos containing mineral concentrations between the PLOQ and LOQ were indeed worse than SPIFAN expectations, but reasonable Horwitz ratios (HorRat) were nonetheless obtained for these analytes.

  19. Personnel Development. A Plan to Produce and Distribute an Instructional Package for Teaching the Concepts of Competency-Based Instruction in Home Economics Pre-service Teacher Education Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg.

    Described in this final report is the development of a plan to produce and distribute an instructional package for teaching the concepts of competency-based instruction in home economics pre-service education programs in the state of Virginia. Nine Virginia Universities (Virginia Polytechnic Institution and State University, Radford College, James…

  20. Medicare program; prospective payment system for federally qualified health centers; changes to contracting policies for rural health clinics; and changes to Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 enforcement actions for proficiency testing referral. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2014-05-02

    This final rule with comment period implements methodology and payment rates for a prospective payment system (PPS) for federally qualified health center (FQHC) services under Medicare Part B beginning on October 1, 2014, in compliance with the statutory requirement of the Affordable Care Act. In addition, it establishes a policy which allows rural health clinics (RHCs) to contract with nonphysician practitioners when statutory requirements for employment of nurse practitioners and physician assistants are met, and makes other technical and conforming changes to the RHC and FQHC regulations. Finally, this final rule with comment period implements changes to the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations regarding enforcement actions for proficiency testing (PT) referrals.

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (Operable Unit 1), AL. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The 2,200-acre Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP) site was located in Talledega County, Alabama, near the junction of Talledega Creek and the Coosa River. AAAP was built in 1941 as a government-owned/contractor-operated facility that produced nitrocellulose, nitroaromatic explosives, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl methyl nitramine. Operations at AAAP were terminated in August 1945, and in 1973 several parcels of the original 13,233-acre property were sold. In 1978, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA), managing the Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP), identified soil, sediment, and ground water potentially contaminated by explosives, asbestos, and lead as a result of past site operations. During the RI/FS, the facility was divided into two general areas: the eastern area (Area A) and the western area (Area B). In 1985, investigations identified soil contamination by explosives, asbestos, and lead in Area A, and ground water contamination by these materials in Area B. Soil excavated from Area A was stockpiled in Area B in two covered buildings and on a concrete slab, which was subsequently covered with a membrane liner. A 1991 characterization study of Area B concluded that explosives, lead, and asbestos contamination were present above regulatory limits. The ROD addressed a final action for the contaminated soil in the Stockpile Soils Area (Area B). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris were explosives, including 2,4,6-TNT, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, and tetryl; metals, including lead; and asbestos, an inorganic.

  2. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  3. Pennsylvania Action Research Network (PA-ARN) Staff Development through Five Regional Staff Development Centers. Final Report, July 1998-June 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., McKeesport.

    With the existence of 67 monographs and approximately 60 practitioners trained in action research in the western and central parts of Pennsylvania from project years 1995-98, the 1998-99 Section 353 project expanded the action research network (ARN) to include teachers, administrators, and researchers in the northeastern and southeastern parts of…

  4. Pennsylvania Action Research Network (PA-ARN) Staff Development through Five Regional Staff Development Centers. Final Report. July 1997-June 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., McKeesport.

    The Pennsylvania Action Research Network project was initiated in 1995-1996 to provide Pennsylvania literacy educators with the following: a better method for taking published research findings and testing and adapting them in their own classrooms; a way to study their own research ideas on a daily-action basis; and a systematic way to share and…

  5. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-01

    This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Rifle sites. That remedial action consists of removing approximately 4,185,000 cubic yards (cy) of tailings and contaminated materials from their current locations, transporting, and stabilizing the tailings material at the Estes Gulch disposal site, approximately six miles north of Rifle. The tailings and contaminated materials are comprised of approximately 597,000 cy from Old Rifle, 3,232,000 cy from New Rifle, and 322,000 cy from vicinity properties and about 34,000 cy from demolition. The remedial action plan includes specific design requirements for the detailed design and construction of the remedial action. An extensive amount of data and supporting information have been generated for this remedial action and cannot all be incorporated into this document. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  6. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Final report, Appendixes to attachment 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document contains supporting appendices to attachment 3 for the remedial action and site stabilization plan for Maybell, Colorado UMTRA site. Appendix A includes the Hydrological Services Calculations and Appendix B contains Ground Water Quality by Location data.

  7. Comment and response document for the final remedial action plan site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites at Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This document consists of comments and responses; the reviewers are the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment, and the remedial action contractor (RAC).

  8. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

  9. Illinois Clean Coal Institute 2005 annual report. Final technical report for the period September 1st, 2004, through August 31, 2005 on projects funded by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    2005-11-08

    This final technical report contains the abstracts and executive summaries of projects funded through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute solicitation entitled 'Request for proposals No. 04-1(ICCI/RFP04-1)'. Support of these projects is by the Office of Coal Development and Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. The projects fall into the following categories: advanced coal mining technologies; coal preparation and coal production business practice; management of coal combustion byproducts; commercialization and technology transfer. Final project extensions are also recorded.

  10. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial Action Selection Report, Appendix B of Attachment 2: Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section} 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which describes the proposed remedial action for the Naturita site. An extensive amount of data and supporting information has been generated and evaluated for this remedial action. These data and supporting information are not incorporated into this single document but are included or referenced in the supporting documents. The RAP consists of this RAS and four supporting documents or attachments. This Attachment 2, Geology Report describes the details of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Dry Flats disposal site.

  11. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Nagel, J.

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho.

  12. Factors that influence small animal veterinarians' opinions and actions regarding cost of care and effects of economic limitations on patient care and outcome and professional career satisfaction and burnout.

    PubMed

    Kipperman, Barry S; Kass, Philip H; Rishniw, Mark

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine small animal veterinarians' opinions and actions regarding costs of care, obstacles to client education about veterinary care costs, and effects of economic limitations on patient care and outcome and professional career satisfaction and burnout. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SAMPLE 1,122 small animal practitioners in the United States and Canada. PROCEDURES An online survey was sent to 37,036 veterinarians. Respondents provided information regarding perceived effects of client awareness of costs and pet health insurance coverage on various aspects of practice, the influence of client economic limitations on professional satisfaction and burnout, and proposals for addressing those effects. RESULTS The majority (620/1,088 [57%]) of respondents indicated that client economic limitations affected their ability to provide the desired care for their patients on a daily basis. Approximately half (527/1,071 [49%]) of respondents reported a moderate-to-substantial level of burnout, and many cited client economic limitations as an important contributing factor to burnout. Only 31% and 23% of respondents routinely discussed veterinary costs and pet insurance, respectively, with clients before pets became ill, and lack of time was cited as a reason for forgoing those discussions. Most respondents felt improved client awareness of veterinary costs and pet health insurance would positively affect patient care and client and veterinarian satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested most small animal practitioners believe the veterinary profession needs to take action at educational and organizational levels to inform pet owners and educate and train veterinary students and veterinarians about the costs of veterinary care.

  13. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet background concentrations or the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLS) for hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer at the point of compliance (POC) at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site near Gunnison, Colorado. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment. A summary of the principal features of the water resources protection strategy for the Gunnison disposal site is included in this report.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Des Moines TCE Site, Operable Unit 3, Des Moines, IA. (Second remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-18

    The Des Moines TCE site is located southwest of downtown Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Land use in the area is predominantly industrial and commercial, and part of the site lies within the floodplain of the Raccoon River. Water from the Des Moines Water Works north infiltration gallery was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE), dichloroethylene (DCE), and vinyl chloride at levels above accepted drinking water standards. The ROD addresses OU3, which encompasses potential sources of ground water contamination in an area north of the Raccoon River. The selected remedial action for OU3 includes no action with periodic groundwater monitoring.

  15. Submittal of Final Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-02-05

    This letter serves as the post-closure monitoring letter report for the above Corrective Action Unit (CAU) for calendar year 2006. CAU 91 is inspected every six months. The first inspection was conducted on March 23, 2006, and the second inspection was conducted on September 19, 2006. All access roads, fences, gates, and signs were in excellent condition. No settling, cracking, or erosion was observed on the cover, and the use restriction had been maintained. No issues were identified, and no corrective actions were needed. The post-closure inspection checklists for CAU 91 are attached. Photographs and fields notes taken during site inspections are maintained in the project files.

  16. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final plans and specifications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This volume deals with the main construction subcontract for the uranium mill tailings remedial action of Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Contents of subcontract documents AMB-4 include: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications which cover general requirements and sitework; and subcontract drawings.

  17. Engineering and economic evaluation of direct hot-water geothermal energy applications on the University of New Mexico campus. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, D.; Houghton, A.V.

    1980-12-31

    The potential engineering and economic feasibility of low-temperature geothermal energy applications on the campus of the University of New Mexico is studied in detail. This report includes three phases of work: data acquisition and evaluation, system synthesis, and system refinement and implementation. Detailed process designs are presented for a system using 190/sup 0/F geothermal water to substitute for the use of 135 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/y (141 TJ/y) of fossil fuels to provide space and domestic hot water heating for approximately 23% of the campus. Specific areas covered in the report include economic evaluation, environmental impact and program implementation plans.

  18. Charter Schools As Seen by Those Who Know Them Best: Students, Teachers, and Parents. Charter Schools in Action Project, Final Report--Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanourek, Gregg; And Others

    Although charter schools have provoked much interest, there has not been a systematic nationwide effort to ask the clients and teachers of charter schools what they think about them. During the 1996-97 school year, Hudson Institute's Charter Schools in Action Project gathered quantitative data that describe 50 charter schools enrolling…

  19. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

  20. 78 FR 64593 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on US 26: MP 49.20-MP 57.45 Project: Clackamas County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... existing passing lanes and install new median barrier. The project will preserve the existing pavement by removing the top 2 to 3 inches of the existing asphalt concrete pavement, recycling it, and repaving it... Wetlands; E.O. 11988 Floodplain Management; E.O. 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice...

  1. A Descriptive Study of Full and Part-Time Home Economics Teachers in Florida with Implications for Inservice Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, Myrna P.; Baum, Rosemere

    Data were gathered to provide a descriptive profile of educational, employment, and experiential backgrounds of full- and part-time home economics teachers of adults in Florida. Those data were intended for use in designing inservice activities to provide professional development and more relevant programs for the adults being served. In phase 1,…

  2. Evaluation of Secondary School Programs to Prepare Students for Wage Earning in Health Care Occupations Related to Home Economics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Helen Y.; Jacoby, Gertrude P.

    To evaluate course effectiveness, determine relationship to selected characteristics of success in the course and on the job, and provide answers to a number of educational questions, 16 occupational home economics classes providing training for dietary aides, nurses aides, and health careers were selected for study. Course effectiveness was…

  3. Seat Belts Pay Off. The Use of Economic Incentives and Public Education to Increase Seat Belt Use in a Community. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, B. J.; And Others

    A six-month campaign to increase seat belt use in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, North Carolina centered around the idea of giving out economic incentives for seat belt wearing. The approach was to stop vehicles at random and give all belted vehicle occupants a small prize and a chance for a large cash prize. Precampaign activities involve collecting…

  4. Mathematical and Computer Skills and Workplace Literacy in Labor Markets: An Analysis of Their Actual and Potential Effect on the Economic Status of Women. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joel Popkin and Co., Washington, DC.

    Data from the Current Population Surveys of October 1984, October 1989, and January 1991 were used to examine the role of computer and mathematical skills in the U.S. labor market from 1984-91. Particular attention was given to their actual and potential effect on the economic status of women. Data confirmed the overall increase in the education…

  5. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report; Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report; Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoff, A.R.; Lacker, D.K.

    1992-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

  6. Participation in medical research as a resource-seeking strategy in socio-economically vulnerable communities: call for research and action.

    PubMed

    Ravinetto, Raffaella M; Afolabi, Muhammed O; Okebe, Joseph; Van Nuil, Jennifer Ilo; Lutumba, Pascal; Mavoko, Hypolite Muhindo; Nahum, Alain; Tinto, Halidou; Addissie, Adamu; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Grietens, Koen Peeters

    2015-01-01

    The freedom to consent to participate in medical research is a complex subject, particularly in socio-economically vulnerable communities, where numerous factors may limit the efficacy of the informed consent process. Informal consultation among members of the Switching the Poles Clinical Research Network coming from various sub-Saharan African countries, that is Burkina Faso, The Gambia, Rwanda, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Benin, seems to support the hypothesis that in socio-economical vulnerable communities with inadequate access to health care, the decision to participate in research is often taken irrespectively of the contents of the informed consent interview, and it is largely driven by the opportunity to access free or better quality care and other indirect benefits. Populations' vulnerability due to poverty and/or social exclusion should obviously not lead to exclusion from medical research, which is most often crucially needed to address their health problems. Nonetheless, to reduce the possibility of exploitation, there is the need to further investigate the complex links between socio-economical vulnerability, access to health care and individual freedom to decide on participation in medical research. This needs bringing together clinical researchers, social scientists and bioethicists in transdisciplinary collaborative research efforts that require the collective input from researchers, research sponsors and funders.

  7. 75 FR 19670 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on a Proposed New Road Connecting I-65 and U.S. 31W in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... (FPPA) [7 U.S.C. 4201-4209]. 6. Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964 [42 U.S.C. 2000(d)-2000(d... but not limited to the following: 1. General: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) [42 U.S.C. 4321-4351]; Federal-Aid Highway Act [23 U.S.C. 109 and 23 U.S.C. 128]; Public Hearing [23 U.S.C. 128]....

  8. National Biofuels Action Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Leading the Federal Interagency Biomass Research and Development Initiative October 2008 National Biofuels Action Plan Biomass Research and...REPORT DATE OCT 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE National Biofuels Action Plan 5a. CONTRACT...goal of the National Biofuels Action Plan is to maximize the environmental and economic benefi ts of biofuels use by advancing sustainable practices

  9. Technical and economical feasibility of buffalo gourd as a novel energy crop. Final report, 14 November 1983-31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, B.

    1988-02-01

    The New Mexico Solar Energy Institute has conducted a two-year investigation into the technical and economic feasibility of using the buffalo gourd plant as an energy feedstock in eastern New Mexico. The studies indicate that buffalo gourd is well suited for root production in eastern NM. Buffalo gourd has been shown to be an excellent feedstock for ethanol production provided necessary pre-fermentation processing (chopping of roots) is performed correctly. A model was created to determine the economic feasibility of growing buffalo gourd in eastern NM. It was determined that the net return to a farmer in eastern NM can be higher planting buffalo gourd than many traditionally grown crops because of buffalo gourd's low water and fertilizer requirements. A clearly defined RandD agenda and commercialization strategy is presented and discussed. Buffalo gourd has been demonstrated to have high potential as an alternative feedstock for ethanol production in eastern NM.

  10. Development of a residential gas fired absorption heat pump. Physical and thermodynamic properties of R123A/ETFE system development and testing economic analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K.; Simon, R.; Phillips, B.; Marsala, J.; Whitlow, E.

    1985-08-01

    This report covers the development work on the R123a/ETFE (ethyltetrahydro furfuryl ether) pair and an economic analysis of the system. Extensive thermodynamic and physical properties of the R123a/ETFE system were developed. Theoretical analysis of the data was made and showed very good performance. Subsequent testings on equipment not fully developed for R123a/ETFE confirmed this very good performance. The economic analysis showed the system competitive in most areas of the US if improved performance goals (COP = 1.5) can be met. The most important factors in determining the competitiveness are heating to cooling ratios and the relative cost of gas and electric.

  11. Xylo-Oligosaccharide Process Development, Composition, and Techno-Economic Analysis. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-483

    SciTech Connect

    Shekiro, Joe; Elander, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this cooperative work agreement between General Mills Inc. (GMI) and NREL is to determine the feasibility of producing a valuable food ingredient (xylo-oligosaccharides or XOS), a highly soluble fiber material, from agricultural waste streams, at an advantaged cost level relative to similar existing ingredients. The scope of the project includes pilot-scale process development (Task 1), compositional analysis (Task 2), and techno-economic analysis (Task 3).

  12. Measurement of mutation and repair in mammalian cells/action of specific mutagens and antimutagens/genome exposure reaction in cancer and other disease conditions. Final subcontract report, April 1, 1996- March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, T.T.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report for the project dealing with the the measurement of mutation and repair in mammalian cells, action of specific mutagens and antimutagens, and genome exposure reaction in cancer and other disease conditions. The overall objectives of this research are threefold: to develop and improve methodology for measurement of mutation and repair in mammalian cells and to apply it to measurement of the effectiveness of mutagens, antimutagens, and other molecules to as to achieve greater power in prevention of cancer and genetic disease; to analyze theoretically and experimentally the action of specific mutagens and antimutagens; and to investigate the role of genome exposure reaction in cancer and other disease conditions to secure improve preventive and treatment modalities.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): South Andover Salvage Yards, Operable Unit 2, Anoka County, Andover, MN. (Second remedial action), December 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-24

    The 50-acre South Andover site is composed of several privately owned parcels of land near Minneapolis in Anoka County, Minnesota. Land use in the area is predominately commercial and residential, and several auto salvage and repair yards are located at, or adjacent to, the site. The site contains part of a wetlands area with several small recreational lakes in the vicinity. The site overlies three aquifers, one of which supplies the surrounding community with drinking water. Between 1954 and 1981, multiple waste storage and disposal activities occurred on several properties within the site boundaries. The selected remedial action for this site includes excavating and onsite treatment of 2,100 cubic yards of PAH-contaminated soil using ex situ biological treatment; excavating and disposing of the remaining 9,300 cubic yards of PAH, PCB, and metal-contaminated soil from areas 2, 3, 4, and 7 in an offsite solid waste landfill; sampling and removing offsite approximately 20 onsite drums; and monitoring surface water and sediment. The estimated present worth cost for this remedial action is $2,470,000, which includes an O M cost of $195,000.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Alpha Chemical, Alpha Resins Corporation Site, Lakeland, Florida, May 1988. First remedial action. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The Alpha Chemical site, located in Kathleen, Florida, consists of over 32 acres, that comprise the Alpha Resins Corporation (ARC), a facility of the Alpha Chemical Corporation. Surface water from the site drains into a swampy, low-lying wetland area. The facility has produced unsaturated polyester resin for fiberglass manufacturers since 1967. After switching to incineration, Pond 4 dried up. A waste stream, referred to as the water of reaction, is produced as a by-product of polyester-resin formation. The percolation ponds have not been used since 1976. At that time, a thermal oxidizer was installed to incinerate the waste stream rather than place it in the percolation ponds. It was then used for one year as a solid-waste landfill by ARC. In April 1983, a ground-water assessment report indicated industrial impacts on the surficial aquifer. The selected remedial action for the site is discussed. The estimated capital cost for the remedial action is $142,400, with present worth OandM of $186,200.

  15. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 5, Supplemental radiological data: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Diffusion coefficients for radon gas in earthen materials are required to design suitable radon-barrier covers for uranium tailings impoundments and other materials that emit radon gas. Many early measurements of radon diffusion coefficients relied on the differences in steady-state radon fluxes measured from radon source before and after installation of a cover layer of the material being tested. More recent measurements have utilized the small-sample transient (SST) technique for greater control on moistures and densities of the test soils, greater measurement precision, and reduced testing time and costs. Several of the project sites for the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Program contain radiologically contaminated subsurface material composed predominantly of cobbles, gravels andsands. Since remedial action designs require radon diffusion coefficients for the source materials as well as the cover materials, these cobbly and gravelly materials also must be tested. This report contains the following information: a description of the test materials used and the methods developed to conduct the SST radon diffusion measurements on cobbly soils; the protocol for conducting radon diffusion tests oncobbly soils; the results of measurements on the test samples; and modifications to the FITS computer code for analyzing the time-dependent radon diffusion data.

  16. DOEGO85004_1: Final Non-proprietary Technical Report, Generating Process and Economic Data for Preliminary Design of PureVision Biorefineries DOEGO85004_2: One Original Final Proprietary Technical Report to be mailed to DOE Golden.

    SciTech Connect

    Kadam, Kiran L., Ph.D; Lehrburger, Ed

    2008-01-17

    The overall objective of the project was to define a two-stage reactive fractionation process for converting corn stover into a solid cellulose stream and two liquid streams containing mostly hemicellulosic sugars and lignin, respectively. Toward this goal, biomass fractionation was conducted using a small continuous pilot unit with a nominal capacity of 100 pounds per day of dry biomass to generate performance data using primarily corn stover as feedstock. In the course of the program, the PureVision process was optimized for efficient hemicellulose hydrolysis in the first stage employing autohydrolysis and delignification in the second stage using sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. The remaining cellulose was deemed to be an excellent substrate for producing fermentation sugars, requiring 40% less enzymes for hydrolysis than conventional pretreatment systems using dilute acid. The fractionated cellulose was also determined to have potential higher-value applications as a pulp product. The lignin coproduct was determined to be substantially lower in molecular weight (MW) compared to lignins produced in the kraft or sulfite pulping processes. This low-MW lignin can be used as a feed and concrete binder and as an intermediate for producing a range of high-value products including phenolic resins. This research adds to the understanding of the biomass conversion area in that a new process was developed in the true spirit of biorefineries. The work completed successfully demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process at the pilot level indicating the technology is ready to advance to a 2–3 ton per day scale. No technical showstoppers are anticipated in scaling up the PureVision fractionation process to commercial scale. Also, economic feasibility of using the PureVision process in a commercial-scale biorefinery was investigated and the minimum ethanol selling price for the PureVision process was calculated to be $0.94/gal ethanol vs. $1.07/gal ethanol for the

  17. High-intensity drying processes -- Impulse drying: Report 15 (final report). Production of linerboard on a pilot paper machine, subsequent commercial converting trials and preliminary economic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1999-04-01

    In September 1998, 33{number_sign} liner was produced on the {number_sign}4 pilot machine under both single-felted wet pressing and impulse drying conditions. In October 1998, the pilot produced liner and commercial liner were converted to combined board and corrugated boxes at a commercial box plant. In January 1999, linerboard, medium, and combined board and box testing were completed. The pilot trials demonstrated that 33{number_sign} liner could be impulse dried at a reel speed of 380 m/min. Press dryness was improved by as much as 4 points, while CD STFI and CD ring crush were improved by more than 10%. Improvements to the smoothness of heated side of sheet were also realized. Commercial box plant converting trials demonstrated that impulse dried linerboard can be used to increase ECT and box compression strength by as much as 10%. As anticipated, print quality was found to be superior. A preliminary economic analysis was performed in which an impulse dryer would increase press dryness by 4 points and would allow the basis weight to be reduced by 10%. The economic model showed that the 4 points in dryness would translate to a 17% tonnage increase. Applying the 10% basis weight reduction resulted in an increase in productivity, on an area basis, of 30%. The pulp cost savings was found to outweigh any additional electric power costs.

  18. Area terrace pit coal mining systems: volume 1--technical and economic evaluation of terrace pit mining systems. Open file report (final) Sep 1977-Jul 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F.; Simon, C.; Stoddard, M.; Verma, M.; White, M.

    1980-10-01

    This report is principally concerned with the engineering and economic feasibility of area surface coal mining systems other than draglines. This analysis evaluates shovel-trucks, shovel-crusher-conveyors, and shovel-rail excavation and haulage systems for an assortment of geologic environments and production rates in the Powder River Basin (PRB). Shovel-trucks, front-end loader-trucks, and shovel-crusher conveyors were studied in a multiseam, dipping geologic area of the Four Corners region. The Texas lignite engineering and economic research involved bucket-wheel excavators (BWE), BWE-backhoes, and scraper-backhoe combinations for overburden and coal excavation. The PRB truck-shovel study utilized the most recent computer simulation available in both the design and cost analysis. Detailed engineering analysis, followed by in-depth operating costs result in a complete evaluation of each mining system. Cost comparisons of the different mining systems under similar geologic and production constraints are presented to illustrate the estimated capital investment and production costs per ton of coal and bank cubic yard of overburden.

  19. Assessment of economic impact of offshore and coastal discharge requirements on present and future operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, R.

    1996-06-01

    The high potential costs of compliance associated with new effluent guidelines for offshore and coastal oil and gas operations could significantly affect the economics of finding, developing, and producing oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico. This report characterizes the potential economic impacts of alternative treatment and discharge regulations for produced water on reserves and production in Gulf of Mexico coastal, territorial and outer continental shelf (OCS) waters, quantifying the impacts of both recent regulatory changes and possible more stringent requirements. The treatment technologies capable of meeting these requirements are characterized in terms of cost, performance, and applicability to coastal and offshore situations. As part of this analysis, an extensive database was constructed that includes oil and gas production forecasts by field, data on existing platforms, and the current treatment methods in place for produced water treatment and disposal on offshore facilities. This work provides the first comprehensive evaluation of the impacts of alternative regulatory requirements for produced water management and disposal in coastal and offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico.

  20. The value of superpower-submitted INDCs in cooperative and non-cooperative action scenarios: economic impact, dynamic risk, and temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    As the 2015 Paris climate talks near, policy discussions are focused on "intended nationally determined contributions" (INDCs) submitted in advance of the discussions. As the major global emitters - specifically the United States and China - have already submitted their INDCs, we have a point of comparison for evaluating the relative potential impacts of the proposed targets. By applying integrated assessment models to robust, publicly available data sets,we aim to evaluate the interplay between climate change and economic development, comment on emissions reduction scenarios in cooperative and non-cooperative situations, and assess the dynamic risks of multiple regional emissions scenarios. We use both the RICE model and the C-ROADS model to examine alternative regional outcomes for emissions, climate change, and damages,under different reduction scenarios, including a scenario where geo-engineering plays a prominent role. These simulators allow us to vary emissions, population, and economic levels in China and the United States specifically to comment on the international climate risk impact of actors working jointly - or not - toward a global climate goal. In a complementary piece of analysis we seek to understand the value judgments, trade-offs, and regional policies that would lead to favorable climate finance flows. To reach an international sample of industry decision-makers, we propose a novel application of a standard discrete-choice survey methodology. A conjoint analysis requires a participant to chose between combinations of attributes and identify trade-offs while allowing the researcher to determine the relative importance of each individual attribute by mathematically assessing the impact each attribute could have on total item utility. As climate policy negotiations will consist of allocation of scarce resources and rejection of certain attributes, a conjoint analysis is an ideal tool for evaluating policy outcomes. This research program seeks to

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Oak Grove Sanitary Landfill, Anoka County, MN. (Second remedial action), December 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-21

    The 45-acre Oak Grove Sanitary Landfill is a former municipal and industrial solid waste landfill in Oak Grove Township, Anoka County, Minnesota. A 1988 Record of Decision (ROD) addressed the sources of contamination by containing the onsite waste and contaminated soil with a cover. EPA investigations in 1989 determined that the contaminated shallow aquifer discharges directly to the surface water of the adjoining wetlands where ground water contamination is being reduced by natural attenuation, and thus, limiting migration of contaminants to the surface water. The selected remedial action for the site includes long term monitoring of the shallow and deep aquifers, surface water, and sediment at a frequency of three times per year for the first year and semi-annually thereafter; natural attenuation of shallow ground water; abandoning non-essential wells; and implementing institutional controls including ground water use restrictions.

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Rhone Poulenc/Zoecon/Sandoz, San Mateo County, East Palo Alto, CA. (First remedial action), March 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-04

    The 13.19-acre Rhone-Poulenc/Zoecon site is located in East Palo Alto, San Mateo County, California. The site is composed of at least 12 separately owned parcels that include a 5.19-acre former pesticide manufacturing plant, a sludge pond, and a chemical storage facility owned by Sandoz Crop Protection Corporation. In 1980, an investigation by the new site owners revealed severe contamination of soil and ground water with arsenic, which resulted from improper handling of pesticides during unloading. The ROD addresses the contaminated soil and ground water in the upland operable unit. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water include arsenic, mercury, selenium, lead and cadmium. The selected remedial action for the site at the Sandoz and Bains properties includes removing and disposing of offsite soil from accessible areas with arsenic levels greater than 5,000 mg/kg and installing a cap; and removing or paving over soil.

  3. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Mid-State Disposal Landfill, Marathon County, Wisconsin (first remedial action), September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The Mid-State Disposal (MSD) site is an abandoned municipal and industrial waste landfill located in central Wisconsin, in Cleveland Township, Marathon County, about 4 miles northeast of Stratford. The area has two offsite sludge-disposal lagoons owned by Weyerhaeuser, Inc. to the northeast, and private property to the south. Specific wastes received included papermill sludges, asbestos dust, solvents, pesticides, paint sludges and metals. Four areas of contamination have been identified at the site. The selected remedial action for this site includes: Installation of new soil/clay caps for the lagoon and landfills; site monitoring that includes ground water, surface water, and landfill gas monitoring; offsite ground water monitoring; provision of an alternate water supply for nearby residences; and improvement of surface water drainage.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Petro-Chemical (Turtle Bayou), Liberty County, TX. (Second remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-06

    The 500-acre Petro-Chemical (Turtle Bayou) site is in Liberty County, Texas. Current land use in the area is divided among cropland, pasture, range, forest, and small rural communities. Since 1971, numerous undocumented disposal activities occurred onsite involving primarily petrochemical wastes. The ROD for OU2 focuses on three areas of contamination at the site affecting soil and ground water contamination, known as the main waste area, the east disposal area, and the Bayou disposal area. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene and xylenes; other organics including PAHs; and metals including lead. The selected remedial action for the site includes treating 302,800 cubic yards of contaminated soil onsite using in-situ vapor extraction to remove VOCs, controlling vertical air infiltration using an engineered soil and synthetic liner cap; consolidating lead-contaminated soil in the Main Waste Area, followed by capping.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Love Canal (93rd Street School), Niagara County, City of Niagara Falls, NY. (Third remedial action), (amendment), May 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-15

    The Love Canal (93rd Street) site is an inactive hazardous waste site located in Niagara Falls, New York. The 19-acre 93rd Street School site, one of several operable units for the Love Canal Superfund site, is the focus of the Record of Decision (ROD). The fill material is reported to contain fly ash and BHC (a pesticide) waste. The ROD amends the 1988 ROD, and addresses final remediation of onsite contaminated soil through excavation and offsite disposal. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs including toluene and xylenes; other organics including PAHs and pesticides; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

  6. Social indicators study of Alaskan Coastal Villages. 4. Postspill key informant summaries. Schedule C. Communities, part 1 (cordova, tatitlek, valdez). Social and economic studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Endter-Wada, J.; Hofmeister, J.; Mason, R.; McNabb, S.; Morrison, E.

    1993-02-01

    In the initial phase of the Social Indicators Study, Schedule A and B datasets were established. Because of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Minerals Management Service moved as fast as possible to secure funds to study the affected villages. The research design was modified and inquiries expanded to determine the consequences of the spill to the residents of the affected villages. The report (Schedule C (Part 1)) presents ethnographic summaries of selected communities in the spill zone. The study area consists of the communities of Cordova, Tatitlek, and Valdez. The introduction describes the political-economic contexts of the State and the regions in which Schedule C communities are located. The KI summaries that follow the introduction are descriptive ethnographies of spill-affected villages that provide substantial detail.

  7. Economics and operating characteristics of various materials-handling systems and wood fuels in small- to medium-sized boilers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.P.; Bradfield, J.; Elliott, R.N.; Holman, W.E.; O'Grady, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to study the cost and operating characteristics of various wood energy systems and to develop guidelines for the design for such systems. Emphasis was placed on whole-tree chips (WTC), and wood pellet fuels. The project evaluates the economics and some of the handling and burning characteristics of whole-tree chips burned in two commercial boilers designed to burn bark and refuse respectively, and of wood pellets burned in a small stoker-fed coal boiler; investigates the effect of storage conditions on the quality of pellets produced from southern pine; and develops guidelines to help plant managers, engineers, and other decision-makers become more familiar with wood energy systems.

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Tri County/Elgin Landfill Site, Elgin, IL. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 66-acre Tri County Landfill (TCL) site comprises two former landfills the Tri County Landfill and the Elgin Landfill, located near the junction of Kane, Cook and DuPage Counties, Illinois. The two disposal operations overlapped to the point where the two landfills were indistinguishable. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural. The local residents and businesses use private wells as their drinking water supply. Prior to the 1940's, both landfills were used for gravel mining operations. From 1968 to 1976, the TCL received liquid and industrial waste. State and county inspection reports revealed that open dumping, area filling, and dumping into the abandonded gravel quarry had occurred at the site. In addition, confined dumping, inadequate daily cover, blowing litter, fires, lack of access restrictions, and leachate flows were typical problems reported. In 1981, the landfill was closed with a final cover.

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Pester Refinery, Butler County, El Dorado, KS. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 10-acre Pester Refinery site is a former petroleum refining facility located in El Dorado, Butler County, Kansas. Petroleum refining operations in the area began in 1917, and from 1958 to 1977, Fina Oil Company operated a petroleum refinery at this site. Process wastes, such as slop-oil emulsion solids, API separator sludge, and heat exchanger bundle cleaning sludge were sent through a pipe to a burn pond. Gaseous waste products were ignited at the end of the pipe, and whatever did not burn was discharged to the pond. The ROD provides a final remedy for the principal source of contamination at the site, the burn pit sludge. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and sludge are VOCs, including ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes; other organics, including PAHs and phenols; and metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Buckeye Reclamation Landfill Site, Belmont County, OH. (First remedial action), August 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-19

    The 658-acre Buckeye Reclamation site contains a 50-acre former landfill in Richland Township, Belmont County, Ohio. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural, rural residential, and strip mining. A total of 46 domestic wells and springs are located within 1 mile of the site. The original topography of the valley has been altered by coal mining and landfill operations. Solid industrial wastes also were disposed of with municipal wastes elsewhere in the landfill. In 1980, the Waste Pit was filled with sludge, mine spoil, and overburden soil; covered with soil and garbage; and seeded. Results of the RI indicate various levels of contamination in all media sampled, except air. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remediation of contaminated leachate and ground water and eliminates exposure to contaminated surface soil. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, TCE, and toluene; other organics including PAHs; and metals including arsenic, chromium, beryllium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  11. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Lowman, Idaho. Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The DOE proposes to achieve compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards (Subparts A and B of 40 CFR 192) by meeting the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLs) or background concentrations for designated hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (alluvium/weathered granodiorite) at the point of compliance (POC) at the Lowman disposal site near Lowman, Idaho. The proposed remedial action in conjunction with existing hydrogeological conditions at the Lowman site will ensure sufficient protection of human health and the environment. The DOE has concluded that the EPA groundwater protection standards will be met at the POC because, with the exception of antimony, none of the hazardous constituents that exceed laboratory method detection limits within the radioactive sand pore fluids were above the proposed concentration limits. The DOE has demonstrated that antimony will meet the proposed concentration limits at the POC through attenuation in subsoils beneath the disposal cell and by dilution in groundwater underflow. The Lowman processing site is in compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 because statistical analyses of groundwater samples indicate no groundwater contamination.

  12. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-04

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (52 FR 36000 (1987)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, 42 USC {section}7901 et seq., the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has determined that for Slick Rock, this assessment shall include hydrogeologic site characterization for two separate uranium processing sites, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site, and for the proposed Burro Canyon disposal site. The water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4. The following site characterization activities are discussed in this attachment: Characterization of the hydrogeologic environment, including hydrostratigraphy, ground water occurrence, aquifer parameters, and areas of recharge and discharge. Characterization of existing ground water quality by comparison with background water quality and the maximum concentration limits (MCL) of the proposed EPA ground water protection standards. Definition of physical and chemical characteristics of the potential contaminant source, including concentration and leachability of the source in relation to migration in ground water and hydraulically connected surface water. Description of local water resources, including current and future use, availability, and alternative supplies.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Brown Wood Preserving site, Live Oak, Florida (First remedial action) August 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-08

    The Brown Wood Preserving site is located west of the City of Live Oak, Suwanee County, Florida. The site contains a former wood-preserving plant facility, which pressure treated timber products with creosote and some pentachlorophenol (PCP) for thirty years between 1948 and 1978. Sludge and contaminated soils have been identified in the immediate vicinity of the plant site and an upgradient lagoon. This three-acre lagoon drains approximately 74 acres and contains water provided above approximately 3,000 cu yd of creosote sludge and contaminated soil. In addition, small amounts of solidified creosote and PCP are contained in onsite storage tanks and retorts. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediments, sludge, and waste water are creosote constituents including PAHs. The selected remedial action for the site includes: removal and treatment, if necessary, of lagoon water; excavation, treatment, and offsite disposal of approximately 1,500 tons of the most severely contaminated soil and sludge; onsite biodegradation of approximately 10,000 tons of the remaining soils in a 14-acre treatment area constructed with a liner and an internal drainage and spray irrigation system; covering of the treatment area with clean fill after bioremediation; and ground water monitoring.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Midwest Manufacturing/North Farm Site, Midwest Operable Unit, Kellogg, IA. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-27

    The 8-acre Midwest Manufacturing/North Farm site is located on a manufacturing site owned and operated by Smith-Jones, Inc. in Kellog, Iowa. From 1973 to 1981, Smith-Jones engaged in electroplating and painting operations of manufactured products, which involved the use of TCE to clean the product before it was coated with the metal. In 1977, the State required treatment of the wastewaters to precipitate metals. Site inspections in the early 1980s, by EPA revealed elevated heavy metal concentrations. Ground water sampling revealed contamination of the alluvial aquifer underlying the site. The ROD addresses both source control and ground water remediation at the site. The primary contaminants are VOCs, including PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; and metals, including chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site includes installing a low permeability cap over the waste disposal cell in accordance with RCRA landfill closure requirements; treating ground water using air stripping, and possible treatment of vapor/air mixture using carbon adsorption, and filtering water to remove inorganics, if needed; discharging the treated water onsite to the Skunk River or offsite to a publicly owned treatment works (POTW); implementing institutional controls including deed and ground water use restrictions; and ground water monitoring for 30 years.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Pepe Field, Boonton, Morris County, New Jersey (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The Pepe Field site is a former disposal area in the town of Boonton, Morris County, New Jersey. From 1935 to 1950 the E.F. Drew Company used the site to dispose of wastes generated from processing vegetable oils and soap products. Materials reportedly deposited onsite by the E.F. Drew Company were diatomaceous earth and activated-carbon-filter residue; incinerator and boiler ash; boiler ash; lime sludge; and soap residue. Investigations revealed gas concentrations exceeding the lower explosive limit in the soil vapor at the perimeter of the site and in an apparent soil gas plume extending below the property adjacent to the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil found in the landfill include hydrogen sulfide and methane gases. The selected remedial action for this site includes maintaining the site cover; installing and maintaining a landfill gas-collection and treatment system using carbon adsorption; disposing of carbon offsite; upgrading and maintaining the existing leachage collection and treatment system; and ground water monitoring.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Nascolite Corporation, Doris Avenue, cities of Millville and Vineland, Cumberland County, NJ. (Second remedial action), June 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-28

    The 17.5-acre Nascolite site is an inactive acrylic and plexiglass sheet manufacturing plant in Millville, Cumberland County, New Jersey. The site lies within the New Jersey coastal plain and overlies clay, silt, sand, and gravel layers. The majority of the site is wooded, with a wetland located in the southwestern portion. In 1980, although the State ordered the plant to stop discharging wastewaters into the onsite drainage ditch, well water monitoring conducted during 1981 identified VOC-contamination in these wells. In 1984, the State identified over one hundred 55-gallon drums and several underground storage tanks buried onsite. In 1987, the State ordered Nascolite to remove some of the drums, and later during 1987 and 1988, EPA removed the remaining drums offsite. The ROD addresses contaminated onsite soil, sediment, and buildings. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil, sediment, and debris is the inorganic contaminant lead; and VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  17. 78 FR 67925 - Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... / Wednesday, November 13, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 770 RIN 1901-AA82 Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is adopting the...

  18. Determination of Vitamin B12 in Infant, Adult, and Pediatric Formulas by HPLC-UV and Column Switching: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2011.10.

    PubMed

    Butler-Thompson, Linda D; Jacobs, Wesley A; Schimpf, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    AOAC First Action Method 2011.10, Vitamin B12 in Infant and Pediatric Formulas and Adult Nutritionals, was collaboratively studied. This method uses a pH 4.5 sodium acetate buffer and potassium cyanide at 105°C to extract and convert all biologically active forms of vitamin B12 present to cyanocobalamin; octylsilyl (C8) or C18 SPE cartridges to purify and concentrate cyanocobalamin; a combination of size-exclusion and RPLC to isolate cyanocobalamin; and visible absorbance at 550 nm to detect and quantitate cyanocobalamin in infant, pediatric, and adult nutritionals with vitamin B12 concentrations greater than 0.025 μg/100 g ready-to-feed (RTF) liquid. During this collaborative study, nine to 11 laboratories from eight different countries analyzed blind duplicates of 12 infant, pediatric, and adult nutritional formulas. Per the AOAC Expert Review Panel (ERP) on Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) Nutrient Methods the method demonstrated acceptable repeatability and reproducibility and met SPIFAN Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPRs®) for the majority of product matrixes analyzed. Vitamin B12 SPIFAN SMPRs for repeatability were ≤15% RSD at vitamin B12 concentrations of 0.01 μg/100 g RTF liquid and ≤7% RSD at vitamin B12 concentrations of 0.2-5.0 μg/100 g RTF liquid. Vitamin B12 SPIFAN SMPRs for reproducibility were ≤11% RSD in products with vitamin B12 concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 5.0 μg/100 g RTF liquid. During this collaborative study, the RSDr ranged from 2.98 to 9.77%, and the RSDR ranged from 3.54 to 19.5%. During previous single-laboratory validation studies, the method LOQ was estimated to be 0.025 μg/100 g RTF liquid.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Golden Strip Septic Tank, Greenville County, Simpsonville, SC. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-12

    The 55-acre Golden Strip Septic Tank (GSST) site is an inactive waste hauling and disposal facility in Simpsonville, Greenville County, South Carolina. Land use in the area is predominantly residential. From 1960 to 1975, GSST used the site to dispose of industrial and septic wastes in five unlined lagoons. In 1975, GSST applied for an industrial solid waste permit to dispose of liquid wastes, but the State denied the permit because the proposed disposal method was unacceptable. The State continued its monitoring after the lagoons were filled and graded in 1978, and the results of the monitoring led to additional investigations by EPA in 1984 and 1986 and an RI and supplemental RI from 1989 to 1990 and 1990 to 1991, respectively. EPA identified metal contamination in lagoon soil and sludge, and limited contamination of ground water on the east side of the site. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses remediation of contaminated soil, as well as sludge and surface water from the lagoons, as a final remedy. Ground water contamination is expected to naturally attenuate within 2 to 5 years after source remediation occurs. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sludge, and surface water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, toluene, and xylenes; other organics; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Kin-Buc Landfill, Edison Township, Middlesex County, NJ. (Second remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-28

    The 200-acre Kin-Buc Landfill consists of several inactive disposal areas and is located in Edison Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Land use in the area is predominantly industrial and commercial, with some residences within 2 miles north of the site. No drinking water supply wells are located within a 2-mile radius of the site. As a result of an oil spill in 1976, EPA conducted an investigation of the property. In 1980, clean-up activities were initiated under the Clean Water Act and included removal, treatment, and disposal of leachate and drummed waste. The ROD addresses a final remedy for OU2 consisting of the sediment and groundwater in the Edmonds Creek wetlands area, Mill Brook/Martins Creek, Mound B, and the low-lying area. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the sediment and ground water are VOCs, including benzene and xylenes; other organics, including PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides; and metals, including arsenic and lead. The selected remedy for the site are included.

  1. Determination of Labeled Fatty Acids Content in Milk Products, Infant Formula, and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Capillary Gas Chromatography: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.13.

    PubMed

    Golay, Pierre-Alain; Moulin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2012.13 "Determination of Labeled Fatty Acids Content in Milk Products and Infant Formula by Capillary Gas Chromatography," which is based on an initial International Organization for Standardization (ISO)-International Dairy Federation (IDF) New Work Item that has been moved forward to ISO 16958:2015|IDF 231:2015 in November 2015. It was decided to merge the two activities after the agreement signed between ISO and AOAC in June 2012 to develop common standards and to avoid duplicate work. The collaborative study was performed after having provided highly satisfactory single-laboratory validation results [Golay, P.A., & Dong, Y. (2015) J. AOAC Int. 98, 1679-1696] that exceeded the performance criteria defined in AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement (SMPR(®)) 2012.011 (September 29, 2012) on 12 products selected by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula (SPIFAN). After a qualification period of 1 month, 18 laboratories participated in the fatty acids analysis of 12 different samples in duplicate. Six samples were selected to meet AOAC SPIFAN requirements (i.e., infant formula and adult nutritionals in powder and liquid formats), and the other Six samples were selected to meet ISO-IDF requirements (i.e., dairy products such as milk powder, liquid milk, cream, butter, infant formula with milk, and cheese). The fatty acids were analyzed directly in all samples without preliminary fat extraction, except in one sample (cheese). Powdered samples were analyzed after dissolution (i.e., reconstitution) in water, whereas liquid samples (or extracted fat) were analyzed directly. After addition of the internal standards solution [C11:0 fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and C13:0 triacylglycerols (TAG)] to the samples, fatty acids attached to lipids were transformed into FAMEs by direct transesterification using methanolic sodium methoxide. FAMEs were separated using highly polar capillary GLC and were

  2. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Building Site 421, United States, Watertown Arsenel, Watertown, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of surveys of the current radiological condition of the Building Site 421, United States Arsenal Watertown, Watertown, Massachusetts. Findings of this survey indicate there are four spots involving an area of less than 6000 cm/sup 2/ of identifiable low-level residual radioactivity on the concrete pad which is all that remains of Building Site 421. The largest spot is approximately 5000 cm/sup 2/. The other three spots are 100 cm/sup 2/ or less. The beta-gamma readings at these spots are 8.4 x 10/sup 2/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/ and 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/. No alpha contamination was found at these locations. Gamma spectral analysis of a chip of contaminated concrete from one of the spots indicates that the contaminant is natural uranium. This contamination is fixed in the concrete and does not present an internal or external exposure hazard under present conditions. A hypothetical hazard analysis under a conservative set of assumed conditions indicates minimal internal hazard. The highest End Window contact reading was 0.09 mR/h. None of the other three spots indicated an elevated direct reading with the End Window Detector. Radon daughter concentrations were determined at three locations on the Building 421 pad. These were 0.00013 WL, 0.00011 WL and 0.00009 WL. According to the Surgeon General's Guidelines found in 10 CFR 712, radon daughter concentrations below 0.03 WL do not require remedial action in structures other than private dwellings and schools. Soil samples taken about the site indicate no elevated levels above the natural background levels in the soil. A gamma spectral analysis of a water sample obtained from the storm sewer line near the Building 421 pad indicates no elevated radioactivity in the sample. It was therefore felt that no contamination is present in this sewer.

  3. Demonstration of scientific and economic feasibility of a solid-state heat engine. Final report, November 7, 1977-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the pyroelectric effet as a means for direct conversion of heat to electrical enrgy has been studied. Initial work concentrated on the Drummond-Carnot approach; later work focused upon a regenerative electric Ericsson approach. Demonstrated output power was raised from a previous high of 30 microwatts to 1 milliwatt, then 40 milliwatt, and then finally to 1.6 Watt (33 Watt/per liter of active pyroelectric) in separate experiments. Previous experiments had conversion efficiencies of roughly 0.001% (calculated). The 1.6 Watt device had a measured efficiency of 0.5% which is approximately one-tenth of the thermodynamic ideal (Carnot) limit. The active material for these pyroelectric conversion experiments was ceramic lead zirconate modified with Sn/sup 4 +/ and Ti/sup 4 +/ Pb./sub 99/Nb./sub 02/ (Zr./sub 68/Sn./sub 25/Ti./sub 07/)./sub 98/O/sub 3/ (PZST). In addition to its use in pyroelectric conversion experiments, PZST was the subject of several basic physical studies. These studies included the electric field dependence of the electrocaloric, polarocaloric and pyroelectric effects. PZST was also studied to determine its output electrical energy density (10mJ/cm/sup 3/K) as a function of electric field limits, cycle temperature limits, and type of thermodynamic cycle. Furthermore, the effects of hysteretic loss (approx. 10%) were quantified. Regenerative heat flow within the pyroelectric converter was also studied both experimentally and numerically. A plastic pyroelectric material with the required thermodynamic properties for pyroelectric conversion was found. The material is a copolymer of vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene and has a potential cycle energy density of 10 to 35 times greater than existing PZST ceramic. This increased energy density results from the much higher dielectric strength of the copolymer.

  4. The final spawning ground of Tachypleus gigas (Müller, 1785) on the east Peninsular Malaysia is at risk: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bryan Raveen; Satyanarayana, Behara; Moh, Julia Hwei Zhong; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd; Chatterji, Anil; Shaharom, Faizah

    2016-01-01

    (-1)) and moisture depth (6.2-10.2 cm). In view of the sustained anthropogenic pressure on the coastal habitats on one hand and decreasing horseshoe crabs population on the other, it is crucial to implement both conservation and management measures for T. gigas at Pantai Balok. Failing that may lead to the loss of this final spawning ground on the east coast of P. Malaysia.

  5. The final spawning ground of Tachypleus gigas (Müller, 1785) on the east Peninsular Malaysia is at risk: a call for action

    PubMed Central

    Moh, Julia Hwei Zhong; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd; Chatterji, Anil; Shaharom, Faizah

    2016-01-01

    oxygen (5.5–8.0 mg l−1) and moisture depth (6.2–10.2 cm). In view of the sustained anthropogenic pressure on the coastal habitats on one hand and decreasing horseshoe crabs population on the other, it is crucial to implement both conservation and management measures for T. gigas at Pantai Balok. Failing that may lead to the loss of this final spawning ground on the east coast of P. Malaysia. PMID:27547542

  6. Economic Sanctions and Zimbabwe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    continuing oppression and repressive authoritarian practices. Despite hope for improved economic activity and success, President Mugabe’s presence...experiencing “a nascent economic recovery”. 82 Human rights however, have been repressed or openly and wholly disregarded by the ruling ZANU-PF...intangible effect of advertising external disgust with Mugabe’s actions. However, the accompanying or resultant international withdrawal of regime

  7. Action principles in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Tipler, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Physical theories have their most fundamental expression as action integrals. This suggests that the total action of the universe is the most fundamental physical quantity, and hence finite. In this article it is argued that finite universal action implies that the universe is spatially closed. Further, the possible spatial topologies, the types of matter that can dominate the early universe dynamics, and the form of any quadratic additions to the lagrangian of general relativity are constrained. Initial and final cosmological curvature singularities are required to avoid a universal action singularity.

  8. Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) in Infant Formula and Adult/ Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Ultra-High Pressure Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.16.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frederic; Campos-Giménez, Esther

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine repeatability and reproducibility of AOAC First Action Method 2012.16 [Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Ultra-High Pressure Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry], a collaborative study was organized. The study was divided in two parts: method setup and qualification of participants (part 1) and collaborative study participation (part 2). For part 1, each participating laboratory was asked to analyze two practice samples using the aforementioned method. Laboratories that provided results within a range of expected levels were qualified for part 2, during which each laboratory received 10 samples in blind duplicates. Results have been compared to the Standard Method Performance Requirement (SMPR®) 2012.009 established for pantothenic acid. Precision results (repeatability and reproducibility) were within the limits stated in the SMPR. Repeatability ranged from 1.3 to 3.3%, and reproducibility ranged from 4.1 to 7.0%. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values were all <1, ranging from 0.33 to 0.69. The AOAC Expert Review Panel on Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals Nutrient Methods determined that the data presented met the SMPR and recommended the method for Final Action status, which was then granted by the AOAC Official Methods Board.

  9. COGNITIVE ECONOMICS.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Miles

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive economics is the economics of what is in people's minds. It is a vibrant area of research (much of it within behavioural economics, labour economics and the economics of education) that brings into play novel types of data, especially novel types of survey data. Such data highlight the importance of heterogeneity across individuals and highlight thorny issues for welfare economics. A key theme of cognitive economics is finite cognition (often misleadingly called "bounded rationality"), which poses theoretical challenges that call for versatile approaches. Cognitive economics brings a rich toolbox to the task of understanding a complex world.

  10. COGNITIVE ECONOMICS

    PubMed Central

    KIMBALL, MILES

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive economics is the economics of what is in people’s minds. It is a vibrant area of research (much of it within behavioural economics, labour economics and the economics of education) that brings into play novel types of data, especially novel types of survey data. Such data highlight the importance of heterogeneity across individuals and highlight thorny issues for welfare economics. A key theme of cognitive economics is finite cognition (often misleadingly called “bounded rationality”), which poses theoretical challenges that call for versatile approaches. Cognitive economics brings a rich toolbox to the task of understanding a complex world. PMID:28149186

  11. Advanced Economic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Marc W.; Laing, William

    2013-01-01

    An Economic Analysis (EA) is a systematic approach to the problem of choosing the best method of allocating scarce resources to achieve a given objective. An EA helps guide decisions on the "worth" of pursuing an action that departs from status quo ... an EA is the crux of decision-support.

  12. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  13. Behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Camerer, Colin F

    2014-09-22

    Behavioral economics uses evidence from psychology and other social sciences to create a precise and fruitful alternative to traditional economic theories, which are based on optimization. Behavioral economics may interest some biologists, as it shifts the basis for theories of economic choice away from logical calculation and maximization and toward biologically plausible mechanisms.

  14. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  15. Colorado Literacy Action: Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, Mary

    The goal of this program was to reach an unserved group of non-literate adults with limited English proficiency through the provision of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) tutoring by local library and community literacy programs. Nine area resource teachers and a master teacher trainer provided training for 211 teachers and volunteer tutors who,…

  16. 26 CFR 403.43 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., under which the Commissioner or his delegate allowed the petition. (b) Offers in compromise of liability to forfeiture. The Commissioner or his delegate shall accept or reject any offer in compromise of the liability to forfeiture of personal property seized pursuant to § 403.25 and such acceptance or...

  17. Home Economics I. Basic Core. Vocational Home Economics Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Irene; Coffey, Judy

    Eight home economics curriculum areas are presented in this guide, with each area consisting of one or more instructional units as follows: (1) Orientation (orientation to Future Homemakers of America--FHA, FHA in action, parliamentary procedure); (2) Career Exploration (home economics related occupations, locating a job, job success); (3) Child…

  18. Determination of Total Iodine in Infant Formula and Adult/ Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS): Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.15.

    PubMed

    Zywicki, Richard S; Sullivan, Darryl M

    2015-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to determine total iodine in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula by inductively coupled plasma-MS (ICP-MS) using AOAC First Action Official Method(SM) 2012.15. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the method's intralaboratory and interlaboratory performance and submit the results to AOAC INTERNATIONAL for adoption as a Final Action Official Method for the determination of total iodine in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula. Upon providing acceptable results for practice samples National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1849a and a low-fat adult nutritional powder, 13 laboratories analyzed seven various infant and adult nutritional products including a blind duplicate of each. Products were chosen with varying levels of iodine and included low-fat, soy-based, and milk-based formulas and NIST SRM 1849a. Random identification numbers were assigned to each of the seven fortified test materials. Digestion of the test samples occurred using a potassium hydroxide solution in an oven or open-vessel microwave system. Iodine was stabilized with ammonium hydroxide and sodium thiosulfate after digestion. The solutions were brought to volume followed by filtration. The filtrates were then analyzed by ICP-MS after dilution. Results for all seven test samples met all the AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPR(®) 2012.008) guidelines. The RSDr ranged from 0.77 to 4.78% and the RSDR from 5.42 to 11.5%. The Horwitz ratio (HorRat) for each result was excellent, ranging from 0.35 to 1.31%. The results demonstrate that the method is fit-for-purpose to determine iodine in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula.

  19. Affirmative Action: Is it Fair?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the fairness of affirmative action, suggesting it will be unfortunate if the Supreme Court reverses its ruling, because dramatic evidence of its value in elite higher education has just become available. After discussing legal rulings, the paper concludes that affirmative action makes the eventual economic and social structure of…

  20. Technology assessment and citizen action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mottur, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    Citizen participation in the nation's total social, political, economic decisionmaking processes was studied. Impediments are discussed which prevent citizens from taking effective assessment action; these include finance, organization and motivation, and information. The proposal for establishing citizens assessment associations is considered along with implications of citizen assessment action.

  1. Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

  2. Television Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Bruce M.; And Others

    Intended as an introduction to the economics of commercial television for the general reader, this volume considers the theory and analytical basis of television and the policy implications of those economics. Part I considers the economics of television markets with particular attention of the determinants of viewer markets; the supply of…

  3. Stimulating Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaian, King

    2009-01-01

    With the current economic slump possibly the deepest since the Great Depression, interest in the subject of macroeconomics has reignited, and the number of students majoring in economics has increased during the last two years. While this would appear to be good news for educators in the economics field, the profession is nervous about more than…

  4. Curriculum for the Twenty-First Century: Recent Advances in Economic Theory and Undergraduate Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate economics lags behind cutting-edge economic theory. The author briefly reviews six related advances that profoundly extend and deepen economic analysis: game-theoretic modeling, collective-action problems, information economics and contracting, social preference theory, conceptualizing rationality, and institutional theory. He offers…

  5. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  6. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  7. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  8. Data breaches. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-04-11

    This document adopts, without change, the interim final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2007, addressing data breaches of sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This final rule implements certain provisions of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006. The regulations prescribe the mechanisms for taking action in response to a data breach of sensitive personal information.

  9. 78 FR 44592 - Final General Management Plan, Final Wilderness Study, and Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... National Park Service Final General Management Plan, Final Wilderness Study, and Final Environmental Impact Statement, Fort Pulaski National Monument, Georgia AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of a...

  10. Economic Resources of the Union of Burma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    mineral resources and another the industries, transportation, trade and commerce. A final chapter analyzes and evaluates economic development in Burma, and especially the economic programs and policies which were formulated in the early years of independence from colonial

  11. 75 FR 63813 - Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Economic Development Administration Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board AGENCY: Economic Development Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of membership on the Economic Development Administration's Performance Review Board membership. SUMMARY:...

  12. 78 FR 68025 - Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... Economic Development Administration Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board AGENCY: Economic Development Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of membership on the Economic Development Administration's Performance Review Board Membership. SUMMARY:...

  13. 76 FR 64072 - Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Economic Development Administration Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board AGENCY: Economic Development Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of membership on the Economic Development Administration's Performance Review Board membership. SUMMARY:...

  14. 77 FR 64794 - Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Economic Development Administration Membership of the Economic Development Administration Performance Review Board AGENCY: Economic Development Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Membership on the Economic Development Administration's Performance Review Board Membership. SUMMARY:...

  15. Behavioral Economics

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Derek D.; Niileksela, Christopher R.; Kaplan, Brent A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, behavioral economics has gained much attention in psychology and public policy. Despite increased interest and continued basic experimental studies, the application of behavioral economics to therapeutic settings remains relatively sparse. Using examples from both basic and applied studies, we provide an overview of the principles comprising behavioral economic perspectives and discuss implications for behavior analysts in practice. A call for further translational research is provided. PMID:25729506

  16. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Decision document for no further response action planned: Barter Island Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report, December 1995-May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.; Madden, J.; Borsetti, R.

    1996-05-03

    This Decision Document discusses the selection of no further action as the recommended action for nine sites located at the Barter Island radar installation. The United States Air Force (Air Force) completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and a Risk Assessment for the 14 sites located at the Barter Island installation (U.S. Air Force 1996a,b). Based on the findings of these activities, nine sites are recommended for no further action.

  17. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Decision document for no further response action planned Oliktok Point Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-06-03

    This Decision Document discusses the selection of no further action as the recommended action for four sites located at the Oliktok Point radar installation. The United States Air Force (Air Force) completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and a Risk Assessment for the eight sites located at the Oliktok Point installation (U.S. Air Force 1996a,b). Based on the findings of these activities, four sites are recommended for no further action.

  18. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  19. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Decision document for no further response action planned: Bullen Point Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-05-24

    This Decision Document discusses the selection of no further action as the recommended action for two sites located at the Bullen Point radar installation. The United States Air Force (Air Force) completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and a Risk Assessment for the five sites located at the Bullen Point installation (U.S. Air Force 1996a,b). Based on the findings of these activities, two sites are recommended for no further action. Sites at the Bullen Point radar installation recommended for no further action are: Old Landfill/Dump Site East (LF06) and Drum Storage Area (SS10).

  20. 77 FR 47517 - Enforcement Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 573 Enforcement Actions AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC or Commission) is... INFORMATION CONTACT: Melissa Schlichting, National Indian Gaming Commission, 1441 L Street NW., Suite...