Science.gov

Sample records for action including inhibition

  1. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  2. Representing the consequences of intentionally inhibited actions.

    PubMed

    Haggard, Patrick; Poonian, Simmy; Walsh, Eamonn

    2009-08-25

    The experience of planning an action but then changing our minds and cancelling the action at the last instant is a common one. Here, we instructed participants to prepare voluntary (keypress) actions and sometimes intentionally inhibit them at the last possible moment. Participants could freely choose between left and right hand actions. Keypresses produced either a congruent (80% probability) or an incongruent (20% probability) tone after a short delay. If no voluntary action was made within a defined response window, one of the tones was nevertheless presented a short time later. At the end of the trial, participants judged the time of tone onset. We used an established marker to measure the experience of control, namely the intentional binding of the tone backwards in time towards the action that caused it. Results showed that voluntary actions produced the expected temporal binding of tones back towards the preceding action. In contrast, we found an opposite trend towards repulsion of the tone in intentional inhibition trials. When people intentionally inhibit a planned action, their experience of a subsequent event that was associated with the action is severely affected. Our results suggest that intentional inhibition is a specific cognitive process that strongly influences action prediction and action experience. PMID:19524558

  3. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  4. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  5. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  6. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  7. The action principle for generalized fluid motion including gyroviscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, M.; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-11-01

    A general set of fluid equations that allow for energy-conserving momentum transport by gyroscopic motion of fluid elements is obtained. The equations are produced by a class of action principles that yield a large subset of the known fluid and magnetofluid models, including gyroviscosity. Analysis of the action principle yields broad, model-independent results regarding the conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momenta. The formalism is illustrated by studying fluid models with intrinsic angular momentum that may appear in the contexts of condensed matter, biological, and other areas of physics.

  8. Mechanisms of Hop Inhibition Include the Transmembrane Redox Reaction▿

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under “highly reducing” conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and “antioxidative” hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of

  9. Mechanisms of hop inhibition include the transmembrane redox reaction.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under "highly reducing" conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and "antioxidative" hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of hop

  10. Hedonic value of intentional action provides reinforcement for voluntary generation but not voluntary inhibition of action.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Jim; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Intentional inhibition refers to stopping oneself from performing an action at the last moment, a vital component of self-control. It has been suggested that intentional inhibition is associated with negative hedonic value, perhaps due to the frustration of cancelling an intended action. Here we investigate hedonic implications of the free choice to act or inhibit. Participants gave aesthetic ratings of arbitrary visual stimuli that immediately followed voluntary decisions to act or to inhibit action. We found that participants for whom decisions to act produced a strong positive hedonic value for the immediately following visual stimulus made more choices to act than those with weaker hedonic value for action. This finding is consistent with reinforcement learning of action decisions. However, participants who experienced inhibition as generating more positive hedonic value did not choose to inhibit more than other participants. Thus, voluntary inhibition of action did not act as reinforcement for future inhibitory behaviour. Our finding that inhibition of action lacks motivational capacity may explain why self-control is both difficult and limited.

  11. Henri Laborit and the inhibition of action.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Henri Laborit was one of the founders of modern neuropsychopharmacology, having discovered, or participated in, the discovery of chlorpromazine, gamma-OH, clomethiazole, and minaprine. He also put forward a theory regarding the necessity of counteracting the negative consequences of defense mechanisms during anesthesia or behavioral inhibition. The scope of his work covers neurophysiology, pharmacology, psychiatry, and psychosomatics. His independence of spirit meant that most of his research was not done within university settings.

  12. Leishmania donovani: amastigote inhibition and mode of action of berberine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A K; Bhattacharyya, F K; Ghosh, D K

    1985-12-01

    Berberine, an alkaloid from Berberis aristata Linnaeus, may be a useful drug for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis. In both the 8-day and long-term models of Leishmania donovani infection in hamsters, it markedly diminished the parasitic load and proved to be less toxic than pentamidine. It rapidly improved the hematological picture of infected animals. Like pentamidine, it inhibited in vitro multiplication of amastigotes in macrophage culture and their transformation to promastigotes in cell free culture. Manometric studies showed that both drugs had inhibitory action on both the endogenous and the glucose-stimulated respiration of amastigotes. They inhibited incorporation of [14C]adenine, [14C]uracil, and [3H]thymidine into nucleic acids, and of [14C]leucine into the protein of amastigotes, indicating an inhibitory action on macromolecular biosynthesis. They also decreased deoxyglucose uptake. Using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorimetric, and circular dichroism techniques, berberine was found to interact in vitro with nuclear DNA from L. donovani promastigotes.

  13. "Don׳t" versus "won׳t": principles, mechanisms, and intention in action inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Brass, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present review is to provide a theoretical analysis of the role of intentions in inhibition. We will first outline four dimensions along which inhibition can be categorized: intentionality, timing, specificity, and the nature of the to-be-inhibited action. Next, we relate the concept of inhibition to theories of intentional action. In particular, we integrate ideomotor theory with motor control theories that involve predictive forward modeling of the consequences of one׳s action, and evaluate how the dimensional classification of inhibition fits into such an integrative approach. Furthermore, we will outline testable predictions that derive from this novel hypothesis of ideomotor inhibition. We then discuss the viability of the ideomotor inhibition hypothesis and our classification in view of the available evidence on the neural mechanisms of action inhibition, indicating that sensorimotor and ideomotor inhibition engages largely overlapping networks with additional recruitment of dFMC for ideomotor inhibition.

  14. 36 CFR 72.17 - Preliminary Action Program-commitments to be included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preliminary Action Program-commitments to be included. 72.17 Section 72.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR URBAN PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Local Recovery Action Programs §...

  15. Rugulactone and its analogues exert antibacterial effects through multiple mechanisms including inhibition of thiamine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nodwell, Matthew B; Menz, Helge; Kirsch, Stefan F; Sieber, Stephan A

    2012-07-01

    Rugulactone is a dihydro-α-pyrone isolated from the plant Cryptocarya rugulosa in 2009. It has been reported to display IkB kinase (IKK) inhibitory activity, as well as antibiotic activity in several strains of pathogenic bacteria. However, its biological targets and mode of action in bacteria have not yet been explored. Here we present enantioselective syntheses of rugulactone and of some corresponding activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes. We found that the ABPP probes in this study are more potent than rugulactone against Staphyloccocus aureus NCTC 8325, S. aureus Mu50, Listeria welshimeri SLCC 5334 and Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e, and that molecules of this class probably exert their antibacterial effect through a combination of targets. These targets include covalent inhibition of 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate (HMPP) kinase (ThiD), which is an essential component of the thiamine biosynthesis pathway in bacteria. This represents the first example of a small-molecule inhibitor of ThiD.

  16. Mode of action of triflumezopyrim: A novel mesoionic insecticide which inhibits the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Daniel; Benner, Eric A; Schroeder, Mark E; Holyoke, Caleb W; Zhang, Wenming; Pahutski, Thomas F; Leighty, Robert M; Vincent, Daniel R; Hamm, Jason C

    2016-07-01

    Triflumezopyrim, a newly commercialized molecule from DuPont Crop Protection, belongs to the novel class of mesoionic insecticides. This study characterizes the biochemical and physiological action of this novel insecticide. Using membranes from the aphid, Myzus persicae, triflumezopyrim was found to displace (3)H-imidacloprid with a Ki value of 43 nM with competitive binding results indicating that triflumezopyrim binds to the orthosteric site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). In voltage clamp studies using dissociated Periplaneta americana neurons, triflumezopyrim inhibits nAChR currents with an IC50 of 0.6 nM. Activation of nAChR currents was minimal and required concentrations ≥100 μM. Xenopus oocytes expressing chimeric nAChRs (Drosophila α2/chick β2) showed similar inhibitory effects from triflumezopyrim. In P. americana neurons, co-application experiments with acetylcholine reveal the inhibitory action of triflumezopyrim to be rapid and prolonged in nature. Such physiological action is distinct from other insecticides in IRAC Group 4 in which the toxicological mode of action is attributed to nAChR agonism. Mesoionic insecticides act via inhibition of the orthosteric binding site of the nAChR despite previous beliefs that such action would translate to poor insect control. Triflumezopyrim is the first commercialized insecticide from this class and provides outstanding control of hoppers, including the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, which is already displaying strong resistance to neonicotinoids such as imidacloprid.

  17. Bioorganometallic mechanism of action, and inhibition, of IspH

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weixue; Wang, Ke; Liu, Yi-Liang; No, Joo-Hwan; Li, Jikun; Nilges, Mark J.; Oldfield, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of action of Aquifex aeolicus IspH [E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) reductase], together with its inhibition, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis (K M,V max), EPR and 1H, 2H, 13C, 31P, and 57Fe-electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy. On addition of HMBPP to an (unreactive) E126A IspH mutant, a reaction intermediate forms that has a very similar EPR spectrum to those seen previously with the HMBPP “parent” molecules, ethylene and allyl alcohol, bound to a nitrogenase FeMo cofactor. The EPR spectrum is broadened on 57Fe labeling and there is no evidence for the formation of allyl radicals. When combined with ENDOR spectroscopy, the results indicate formation of an organometallic species with HMBPP, a π/σ “metallacycle” or η 2-alkenyl complex. The complex is poised to interact with H+ from E126 (and H124) in reduced wt IspH, resulting in loss of water and formation of an η 1-allyl complex. After reduction, this forms an η 3-allyl π-complex (i.e. containing an allyl anion) that on protonation (at C2 or C4) results in product formation. We find that alkyne diphosphates (such as propargyl diphosphate) are potent IspH inhibitors and likewise form metallacycle complexes, as evidenced by 1H, 2H, and 13C ENDOR, where hyperfine couplings of approximately 6 MHz for 13C and 10 MHz for 1H, are observed. Overall, the results are of broad general interest because they provide new insights into IspH catalysis and inhibition, involving organometallic species, and may be applicable to other Fe4S4-containing proteins, such as IspG. PMID:20173096

  18. Inhibition of Action, Thought, and Emotion: A Selective Neurobiological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Daniel G.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2007-01-01

    The neural bases of inhibitory function are reviewed, covering data from paradigms assessing inhibition of motor responses (antisaccade, go/nogo, stop-signal), cognitive sets (e.g., Wisconsin Card Sort Test), and emotion (fear extinction). The frontal cortex supports performance on these paradigms, but the specific neural circuitry varies: response inhibition depends upon fronto-basal ganglia networks, inhibition of cognitive sets is supported by orbitofrontal cortex, and retention of fear extinction reflects ventromedial prefrontal cortexamygdala interactions. Inhibition is thus neurobiologically heterogeneous, although right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may support a general inhibitory process. Dysfunctions in these circuits may contribute to psychopathological conditions marked by inhibitory deficits. PMID:19050749

  19. 24 CFR 968.320 - HUD review and approval of comprehensive plan (including five-year action plan).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... comprehensive plan (including five-year action plan). 968.320 Section 968.320 Housing and Urban Development... approval of comprehensive plan (including five-year action plan). (a) Submission of comprehensive plan. (1... Plan. After HUD approves the Comprehensive Plan (including the Five-Year Action Plan), or...

  20. 24 CFR 968.320 - HUD review and approval of comprehensive plan (including five-year action plan).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... comprehensive plan (including five-year action plan). 968.320 Section 968.320 Housing and Urban Development... approval of comprehensive plan (including five-year action plan). (a) Submission of comprehensive plan. (1... Plan. After HUD approves the Comprehensive Plan (including the Five-Year Action Plan), or...

  1. Inhibition Potentiates the Synchronizing Action of Electrical Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Golomb, David; Mato, Germán; Hansel, David

    2007-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro experimental studies have found that blocking electrical interactions connecting GABAergic interneurons reduces oscillatory activity in the γ range in cortex. However, recent theoretical works have shown that the ability of electrical synapses to promote or impede synchrony, when alone, depends on their location on the dendritic tree of the neurons, the intrinsic properties of the neurons and the connectivity of the network. The goal of the present paper is to show that this versatility in the synchronizing ability of electrical synapses is greatly reduced when the neurons also interact via inhibition. To this end, we study a model network comprising two-compartment conductance-based neurons interacting with both types of synapses. We investigate the effect of electrical synapses on the dynamical state of the network as a function of the strength of the inhibition. We find that for weak inhibition, electrical synapses reinforce inhibition-generated synchrony only if they promote synchrony when they are alone. In contrast, when inhibition is sufficiently strong, electrical synapses improve synchrony even if when acting alone they would stabilize asynchronous firing. We clarify the mechanism underlying this cooperative interplay between electrical and inhibitory synapses. We show that it is relevant in two physiologically observed regimes: spike-to-spike synchrony, where neurons fire at almost every cycle of the population oscillations, and stochastic synchrony, where neurons fire irregularly and at a rate which is substantially lower than the frequency of the global population rhythm. PMID:18946530

  2. Do displacement activities help preschool children to inhibit a forbidden action?

    PubMed

    Pecora, Giulia; Addessi, Elsa; Schino, Gabriele; Bellagamba, Francesca

    2014-10-01

    Displacement activities are commonly recognized as behavioral patterns, mostly including self-directed actions (e.g., scratching, self-touching), that often occur in situations involving conflicting motivational tendencies. In ethology, several researchers have suggested that displacement activities could facilitate individuals in dealing with the stress experienced in a frustrating context. In child developmental research, some authors have assessed whether distraction strategies could help children to inhibit a dominant response during delay of gratification tasks. However, little is known about the displacement activities that young children may produce in such situations. This study was aimed at investigating whether displacement activities had an effect on preschool children's ability to postpone an immediate gratification (i.e., interacting with an attractive toy, a musical box), thereby functioning as regulators of their emotional state. To this end, we administered 143 2- to 4-year-olds with a delay maintenance task and related their performance with displacement activities they produced during the task and with actions with an external object. Children's latency to touch the musical box was positively related to their rate of displacement activities. However, the rate of displacement activities increased progressively as long as the children were able to inhibit the interaction with the musical box. In addition, the rate of displacement activities during the first 1 min of test did not predict the ability of children to inhibit the interaction with the box. These results suggest that displacement activities represented a functionless by-product of motivational conflict rather than a strategy that children used to inhibit their response to an attractive stimulus. PMID:24907630

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's corrective action alternative recommendation for each of the corrective action sites (CASs) within Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. An evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of current and future operations at each CAS, and a detailed comparative analysis of potential corrective action alternatives were used to determine the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. There are six CASs in CAU 204, which are all located between Areas 1, 2, 3, and 5 on the NTS. The No Further Action alternative was recommended for CASs 01-34-01, 02-34-01, 03-34-01, and 05-99-02; and a Closure in Place with Administrative Controls recommendation was the preferred corrective action for CASs 05-18-02 and 05-33-01. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 204.

  4. Action Video Gaming and Cognitive Control: Playing First Person Shooter Games Is Associated with Improved Action Cascading but Not Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a constantly growing interest in developing efficient methods to enhance cognitive functioning and/or to ameliorate cognitive deficits. One particular line of research focuses on the possibly cognitive enhancing effects that action video game (AVG) playing may have on game players. Interestingly, AVGs, especially first person shooter games, require gamers to develop different action control strategies to rapidly react to fast moving visual and auditory stimuli, and to flexibly adapt their behaviour to the ever-changing context. This study investigated whether and to what extent experience with such videogames is associated with enhanced performance on cognitive control tasks that require similar abilities. Experienced action videogame-players (AVGPs) and individuals with little to no videogame experience (NVGPs) performed a stop-change paradigm that provides a relatively well-established diagnostic measure of action cascading and response inhibition. Replicating previous findings, AVGPs showed higher efficiency in response execution, but not improved response inhibition (i.e. inhibitory control), as compared to NVGPs. More importantly, compared to NVGPs, AVGPs showed enhanced action cascading processes when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, as well as when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. Our findings suggest that playing AVGs is associated with enhanced action cascading and multi-component behaviour without affecting inhibitory control. PMID:26655929

  5. Action Video Gaming and Cognitive Control: Playing First Person Shooter Games Is Associated with Improved Action Cascading but Not Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    There is a constantly growing interest in developing efficient methods to enhance cognitive functioning and/or to ameliorate cognitive deficits. One particular line of research focuses on the possibly cognitive enhancing effects that action video game (AVG) playing may have on game players. Interestingly, AVGs, especially first person shooter games, require gamers to develop different action control strategies to rapidly react to fast moving visual and auditory stimuli, and to flexibly adapt their behaviour to the ever-changing context. This study investigated whether and to what extent experience with such videogames is associated with enhanced performance on cognitive control tasks that require similar abilities. Experienced action videogame-players (AVGPs) and individuals with little to no videogame experience (NVGPs) performed a stop-change paradigm that provides a relatively well-established diagnostic measure of action cascading and response inhibition. Replicating previous findings, AVGPs showed higher efficiency in response execution, but not improved response inhibition (i.e. inhibitory control), as compared to NVGPs. More importantly, compared to NVGPs, AVGPs showed enhanced action cascading processes when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, as well as when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. Our findings suggest that playing AVGs is associated with enhanced action cascading and multi-component behaviour without affecting inhibitory control. PMID:26655929

  6. Action Video Gaming and Cognitive Control: Playing First Person Shooter Games Is Associated with Improved Action Cascading but Not Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    There is a constantly growing interest in developing efficient methods to enhance cognitive functioning and/or to ameliorate cognitive deficits. One particular line of research focuses on the possibly cognitive enhancing effects that action video game (AVG) playing may have on game players. Interestingly, AVGs, especially first person shooter games, require gamers to develop different action control strategies to rapidly react to fast moving visual and auditory stimuli, and to flexibly adapt their behaviour to the ever-changing context. This study investigated whether and to what extent experience with such videogames is associated with enhanced performance on cognitive control tasks that require similar abilities. Experienced action videogame-players (AVGPs) and individuals with little to no videogame experience (NVGPs) performed a stop-change paradigm that provides a relatively well-established diagnostic measure of action cascading and response inhibition. Replicating previous findings, AVGPs showed higher efficiency in response execution, but not improved response inhibition (i.e. inhibitory control), as compared to NVGPs. More importantly, compared to NVGPs, AVGPs showed enhanced action cascading processes when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, as well as when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. Our findings suggest that playing AVGs is associated with enhanced action cascading and multi-component behaviour without affecting inhibitory control.

  7. Programming or inhibiting action: evidence for differential autonomic nervous system response patterns.

    PubMed

    Collet, C; Dittmar, A; Vernet-Maury, E

    1999-06-01

    In the general context of decision-making analysis, the aim of this study was to investigate autonomic nervous system activity when movement execution is inhibited just before onset. Using a 'Go/NoGo' paradigm, 16 subjects (nine males and seven females) had to intercept green table-tennis balls thrown by a robot, with the inner side of their hand and by arm extension. Conversely, they had to inhibit movement programming when a red ball was thrown. Results were displayed in terms of success or failure in view of the aim of each trial. Electrodermal, thermo-vascular and cardio-respiratory parameters were continuously recorded from the non-dominant hand. Results showed that the duration of autonomic responses was significantly longer in action than in inhibition. Temperature responses were negative but significantly more marked in action. Instantaneous respiratory frequency amplitude responses were positive in both action and inhibition conditions, but higher in action. Instantaneous heart rate responses confirmed that inhibition elicits cardiac deceleration. Autonomic responses were shown capable of distinguishing action from inhibition, thus reflecting central nervous system functioning. Results are discussed in terms of autonomic response specificity. PMID:10437637

  8. All optical experimental design for neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Tolstykh, Gleb; Martens, Stacey; Sedelnikova, Anna; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, infrared light has been shown to both stimulate and inhibit excitatory cells. However, studies of infrared light for excitatory cell inhibition have been constrained by the use of invasive and cumbersome electrodes for cell excitation and action potential recording. Here, we present an all optical experimental design for neuronal excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection. Primary rat neurons were transfected with plasmids containing the light sensitive ion channel CheRiff. CheRiff has a peak excitation around 450 nm, allowing excitation of transfected neurons with pulsed blue light. Additionally, primary neurons were transfected with QuasAr2, a fast and sensitive fluorescent voltage indicator. QuasAr2 is excited with yellow or red light and therefore does not spectrally overlap CheRiff, enabling imaging and action potential activation, simultaneously. Using an optic fiber, neurons were exposed to blue light sequentially to generate controlled action potentials. A second optic fiber delivered a single pulse of 1869nm light to the neuron causing inhibition of the evoked action potentials (by the blue light). When used in concert, these optical techniques enable electrode free neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential recording, allowing research into neuronal behaviors with high spatial fidelity.

  9. Solar urticaria. Determinations of action and inhibition spectra.

    PubMed

    Hasei, K; Ichihashi, M

    1982-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman acquired solar urticaria approximately ten minutes after exposure to sunlight. Urticaria developed from visible light emitted from a projector lamp after a similar time lag. Monochromatic rays between 400 and 500 nm induced immediate urticaria by irradiation, with four times the minimal urticarial dose. Urticaria that was induced by monochromatic rays of the projector lamp was completely inhibited by immediate reirradiation of test sites with light waves longer that 530 nm. Radiant heat exposure from an electric hair dryer at 50 degrees C had no suppressive effects on the development of urticarial lesions.

  10. Solar urticaria. Determinations of action and inhibition spectra.

    PubMed

    Hasei, K; Ichihashi, M

    1982-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman acquired solar urticaria approximately ten minutes after exposure to sunlight. Urticaria developed from visible light emitted from a projector lamp after a similar time lag. Monochromatic rays between 400 and 500 nm induced immediate urticaria by irradiation, with four times the minimal urticarial dose. Urticaria that was induced by monochromatic rays of the projector lamp was completely inhibited by immediate reirradiation of test sites with light waves longer that 530 nm. Radiant heat exposure from an electric hair dryer at 50 degrees C had no suppressive effects on the development of urticarial lesions. PMID:7082028

  11. EEG activations during intentional inhibition of voluntary action: an electrophysiological correlate of self-control?

    PubMed

    Walsh, E; Kühn, S; Brass, M; Wenke, D; Haggard, P

    2010-01-01

    An important aspect of volition is the internal decision whether to act or to withhold an action. We used EEG frequency analysis of sensorimotor rhythms to investigate brain activity when people prepare and then cancel a voluntary action. Participants used a rotating clock-hand to report when they experienced the intention to press a key with their right hand, even on trials where they freely decided to inhibit movement at the last moment. On action trials, we observed the classical pattern of reduced beta-band spectral power prior to movement, followed by beta rebound after movement. On inhibition trials where participants prepared but then cancelled a movement, we found a left frontal increase in spectral power (event-related synchronisation: ERS) peaking 12 ms before the perceived intention to move. This neural correlate of intentional inhibition was significantly different from the activity at the corresponding moment in action trials. The results are discussed in the context of a recent model of voluntary action (WWW model; Brass & Haggard, 2008). Planned actions can be subjected to a final predictive check which either commits actions for execution or suspends and withholds them. The neural mechanism of intentional inhibition may play an important role in self-control.

  12. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  13. Mechanism of Action and Inhibition of dehydrosqualene Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    F Lin; C Liu; Y Liu; Y Zhang; K Wang; W Jeng; T Ko; R Cao; A Wang; E Oldfield

    2011-12-31

    'Head-to-head' terpene synthases catalyze the first committed steps in sterol and carotenoid biosynthesis: the condensation of two isoprenoid diphosphates to form cyclopropylcarbinyl diphosphates, followed by ring opening. Here, we report the structures of Staphylococcus aureus dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM) complexed with its reaction intermediate, presqualene diphosphate (PSPP), the dehydrosqualene (DHS) product, as well as a series of inhibitors. The results indicate that, on initial diphosphate loss, the primary carbocation so formed bends down into the interior of the protein to react with C2,3 double bond in the prenyl acceptor to form PSPP, with the lower two-thirds of both PSPP chains occupying essentially the same positions as found in the two farnesyl chains in the substrates. The second-half reaction is then initiated by the PSPP diphosphate returning back to the Mg{sup 2+} cluster for ionization, with the resultant DHS so formed being trapped in a surface pocket. This mechanism is supported by the observation that cationic inhibitors (of interest as antiinfectives) bind with their positive charge located in the same region as the cyclopropyl carbinyl group; that S-thiolo-diphosphates only inhibit when in the allylic site; activity results on 11 mutants show that both DXXXD conserved domains are essential for PSPP ionization; and the observation that head-to-tail isoprenoid synthases as well as terpene cyclases have ionization and alkene-donor sites which spatially overlap those found in CrtM.

  14. A global call for action to include gender in research impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Adam, Paula; Grant, Jonathan; Hinrichs-Krapels, Saba; Graham, Kathryn E; Valentine, Pamela A; Sued, Omar; Boukhris, Omar F; Al Olaqi, Nada M; Al Rahbi, Idrees S; Dowd, Anne-Maree; Bice, Sara; Heiden, Tamika L; Fischer, Michael D; Dopson, Sue; Norton, Robyn; Pollitt, Alexandra; Wooding, Steven; Balling, Gert V; Jakobsen, Ulla; Kuhlmann, Ellen; Klinge, Ineke; Pololi, Linda H; Jagsi, Reshma; Smith, Helen Lawton; Etzkowitz, Henry; Nielsen, Mathias W; Carrion, Carme; Solans-Domènech, Maite; Vizcaino, Esther; Naing, Lin; Cheok, Quentin H N; Eckelmann, Baerbel; Simuyemba, Moses C; Msiska, Temwa; Declich, Giovanna; Edmunds, Laurel D; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki; Buchan, Alison M J; Williamson, Catherine; Lord, Graham M; Channon, Keith M; Surender, Rebecca; Buchan, Alastair M

    2016-07-19

    Global investment in biomedical research has grown significantly over the last decades, reaching approximately a quarter of a trillion US dollars in 2010. However, not all of this investment is distributed evenly by gender. It follows, arguably, that scarce research resources may not be optimally invested (by either not supporting the best science or by failing to investigate topics that benefit women and men equitably). Women across the world tend to be significantly underrepresented in research both as researchers and research participants, receive less research funding, and appear less frequently than men as authors on research publications. There is also some evidence that women are relatively disadvantaged as the beneficiaries of research, in terms of its health, societal and economic impacts. Historical gender biases may have created a path dependency that means that the research system and the impacts of research are biased towards male researchers and male beneficiaries, making it inherently difficult (though not impossible) to eliminate gender bias. In this commentary, we - a group of scholars and practitioners from Africa, America, Asia and Europe - argue that gender-sensitive research impact assessment could become a force for good in moving science policy and practice towards gender equity. Research impact assessment is the multidisciplinary field of scientific inquiry that examines the research process to maximise scientific, societal and economic returns on investment in research. It encompasses many theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used to investigate gender bias and recommend actions for change to maximise research impact. We offer a set of recommendations to research funders, research institutions and research evaluators who conduct impact assessment on how to include and strengthen analysis of gender equity in research impact assessment and issue a global call for action.

  15. A global call for action to include gender in research impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Adam, Paula; Grant, Jonathan; Hinrichs-Krapels, Saba; Graham, Kathryn E; Valentine, Pamela A; Sued, Omar; Boukhris, Omar F; Al Olaqi, Nada M; Al Rahbi, Idrees S; Dowd, Anne-Maree; Bice, Sara; Heiden, Tamika L; Fischer, Michael D; Dopson, Sue; Norton, Robyn; Pollitt, Alexandra; Wooding, Steven; Balling, Gert V; Jakobsen, Ulla; Kuhlmann, Ellen; Klinge, Ineke; Pololi, Linda H; Jagsi, Reshma; Smith, Helen Lawton; Etzkowitz, Henry; Nielsen, Mathias W; Carrion, Carme; Solans-Domènech, Maite; Vizcaino, Esther; Naing, Lin; Cheok, Quentin H N; Eckelmann, Baerbel; Simuyemba, Moses C; Msiska, Temwa; Declich, Giovanna; Edmunds, Laurel D; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki; Buchan, Alison M J; Williamson, Catherine; Lord, Graham M; Channon, Keith M; Surender, Rebecca; Buchan, Alastair M

    2016-01-01

    Global investment in biomedical research has grown significantly over the last decades, reaching approximately a quarter of a trillion US dollars in 2010. However, not all of this investment is distributed evenly by gender. It follows, arguably, that scarce research resources may not be optimally invested (by either not supporting the best science or by failing to investigate topics that benefit women and men equitably). Women across the world tend to be significantly underrepresented in research both as researchers and research participants, receive less research funding, and appear less frequently than men as authors on research publications. There is also some evidence that women are relatively disadvantaged as the beneficiaries of research, in terms of its health, societal and economic impacts. Historical gender biases may have created a path dependency that means that the research system and the impacts of research are biased towards male researchers and male beneficiaries, making it inherently difficult (though not impossible) to eliminate gender bias. In this commentary, we - a group of scholars and practitioners from Africa, America, Asia and Europe - argue that gender-sensitive research impact assessment could become a force for good in moving science policy and practice towards gender equity. Research impact assessment is the multidisciplinary field of scientific inquiry that examines the research process to maximise scientific, societal and economic returns on investment in research. It encompasses many theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used to investigate gender bias and recommend actions for change to maximise research impact. We offer a set of recommendations to research funders, research institutions and research evaluators who conduct impact assessment on how to include and strengthen analysis of gender equity in research impact assessment and issue a global call for action. PMID:27432056

  16. Aqueous Leaf Extract of Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae) Inhibits Enzymatic and Biological Actions of Bothrops jararaca Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Félix-Silva, Juliana; Souza, Thiago; Menezes, Yamara A. S.; Cabral, Bárbara; Câmara, Rafael B. G.; Silva-Junior, Arnóbio A.; Rocha, Hugo A. O.; Rebecchi, Ivanise M. M.; Zucolotto, Silvana M.; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F.

    2014-01-01

    Snakebites are a serious public health problem due their high morbi-mortality. The main available specific treatment is the antivenom serum therapy, which has some disadvantages, such as poor neutralization of local effects, risk of immunological reactions, high cost and difficult access in some regions. In this context, the search for alternative therapies is relevant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antiophidic properties of Jatropha gossypiifolia, a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat snakebites. The aqueous leaf extract of the plant was prepared by decoction and phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of sugars, alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes and/or steroids and proteins. The extract was able to inhibit enzymatic and biologic activities induced by Bothrops jararaca snake venom in vitro and in vivo. The blood incoagulability was efficiently inhibited by the extract by oral route. The hemorrhagic and edematogenic local effects were also inhibited, the former by up to 56% and the latter by 100%, in animals treated with extract by oral and intraperitoneal routes, respectively. The inhibition of myotoxic action of B. jararaca reached almost 100%. According to enzymatic tests performed, it is possible to suggest that the antiophidic activity may be due an inhibitory action upon snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) and/or serine proteinases (SVSPs), including fibrinogenolytic enzymes, clotting factors activators and thrombin like enzymes (SVTLEs), as well upon catalytically inactive phospholipases A2 (Lys49 PLA2). Anti-inflammatory activity, at least partially, could also be related to the inhibition of local effects. Additionally, protein precipitating and antioxidant activities may also be important features contributing to the activity presented. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the potential antiophidic activity of J. gossypiifolia extract, including its significant action upon local effects, suggesting that

  17. Selective inhibition of cancer cells' proliferation by compounds included in extracts from Baltic Sea cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Pawlik, Anna; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Toruńska-Sitarz, Anna; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Richert, Malwina; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna

    2015-12-15

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of biologically active compounds used in pharmacology and biotechnology. Due to their high capacity of adaptation, which is reflected in the production of diverse metabolites, including toxins, these microorganisms are able to inhabit very different environments. In this work, water and ethanol extracts from 11 cyanobacterial strains derived from the Baltic Sea (Microcystis, Synechocystis, Leptolyngbya, Pseudanabaena, Lyngbya, Phormidium, Nodularia and Anabaena genera) were screened for anticancer activity. MCF-7 human breast cancer and HeLa cervical cancer cell lines, as well as HDFa normal human fibroblasts, were used. Three extracts derived from Pseudanabaena sp., Pseudanabaena cf. galeata and Microcystis aeruginosa revealed potent and selective antiproliferative activities against cancer cells. The mechanism of the anticancer activity was explored in MCF-7 cells, and was found to rely on the inhibition of the pro-survival Akt kinase and induction of cell death. The peptide profiles of selected cyanobacterial extracts were determined using LC-MS/MS, and classes of bioactive compounds that might be potentially responsible for the observed anticancer activities are presented.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NSO

    2002-12-12

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations, and step-out sampling to define the extent of

  19. Inhibition of acute inflammation in the periphery by central action of salicylates.

    PubMed Central

    Catania, A; Arnold, J; Macaluso, A; Hiltz, M E; Lipton, J M

    1991-01-01

    Understanding of the antiinflammatory actions of nonsteroidal drugs is incomplete, but these actions are believed to occur in the periphery, without any contribution from the central nervous system. Recent research on the antipyretic antiinflammatory neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone indicates that it can act centrally to inhibit peripheral inflammation; this raises the possibility that other agents, such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, may have similar activity. In the present research both lysine acetylsalicylate and sodium salicylate inhibited edema, induced in the mouse ear by topical application of picryl chloride, when injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle. This inhibitory activity on a measure of acute inflammation was not due to escape of the drugs into the periphery, because systemic injection of doses that were effective centrally did not affect inflammation. In contrast, central administration of a dose of indomethacin that was antiinflammatory when given intraperitoneally did not inhibit peripheral inflammation. Thus indomethacin apparently lacks the central antiinflammatory action of the salicylates. This observation, plus our inability to demonstrate either an antiinflammatory effect of intracerebroventricular dexamethasone, a prostaglandin inhibitor, or a pro-inflammatory influence of prostaglandin E2, suggests that prostaglandins are not important to central modulation of inflammation. The results indicate that, in addition to having central influences on fever and pain, salicylates can act within the brain to inhibit acute inflammation in the periphery. Images PMID:1924313

  20. Valenced action/inhibition learning in humans is modulated by a genetic variant linked to dopamine D2 receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anni; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Barman, Adriana; Libeau, Catherine; Behnisch, Gusalija; Czerney, Sophia; Schanze, Denny; Assmann, Anne; Klein, Marieke; Düzel, Emrah; Zenker, Martin; Seidenbecher, Constanze I.; Schott, Björn H.

    2014-01-01

    Motivational salience plays an important role in shaping human behavior, but recent studies demonstrate that human performance is not uniformly improved by motivation. Instead, action has been shown to dominate valence in motivated tasks, and it is particularly difficult for humans to learn the inhibition of an action to obtain a reward, but the neural mechanism behind this behavioral specificity is yet unclear. In all mammals, including humans, the monoamine neurotransmitter dopamine is particularly important in the neural manifestation of appetitively motivated behavior, and the human dopamine system is subject to considerable genetic variability. The well-studied TaqIA restriction fragment length polymorphism (rs1800497) has previously been shown to affect striatal dopamine metabolism. In this study we investigated a potential effect of this genetic variation on motivated action/inhibition learning. Two independent cohorts consisting of 87 and 95 healthy participants, respectively, were tested using the previously described valenced go/no-go learning paradigm in which participants learned the reward-associated no-go condition significantly worse than all other conditions. This effect was modulated by the TaqIA polymorphism, with carriers of the A1 allele showing a diminished learning-related performance enhancement in the rewarded no-go condition compared to the A2 homozygotes. This result highlights a modulatory role for genetic variability of the dopaminergic system in individual learning differences of action-valence interaction. PMID:25147510

  1. Enhanced tonic inhibition influences the hypnotic and amnestic actions of the intravenous anesthetics etomidate and propofol

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmannova, Karla; Hines, Rochelle M.; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tretter, Verena; Jurd, Rachel; Kelz, Max B.; Moss, Stephen J.; Davies, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous anesthetics exert a component of their actions via potentiating inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric type-A receptors (GABAARs). Phasic and tonic inhibition are mediated by distinct populations of GABAARs, with the majority of phasic inhibition by subtypes composed of α1-3βγ2 subunits, while tonic inhibition is dependent on subtypes assembled from α4-6βδ subunits. To explore the contribution that these distinct forms of inhibition play in mediating intravenous anesthesia we have used mice in which tyrosine residues 365/7 within the γ2 subunit are mutated to phenyalanines (Y365/7F). Here we demonstrate that this mutation leads to increased accumulation of the α4 subunit containing GABAARs in the thalamus and dentate gyrus of female Y365/7F but not male Y365/7F mice. Y365/7F mice exhibited a gender specific enhancement of tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus that was more sensitive to modulation by the anesthetic etomidate, together with a deficit in long-term potentiation. Consistent with this, female Y365/7F, but not male Y365/7F mice exhibited a dramatic increase in the duration of etomidate and propofol mediated hypnosis. Moreover, the amnestic actions of etomidate were selectively potentiated in female Y365/7F mice. Collectively these observations suggest potentiation of tonic inhibition mediated by α4 subunit containing GABAARs contributes to the hypnotic and amnestic actions of the intravenous anesthetics, etomidate and propofol. PMID:23616535

  2. Inhibition of hormone-stimulated lipolysis by clofibrate. A possible mechanism for its hypolipidemic action.

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, M A; Angel, A

    1975-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of the antilipolytic action of clofibrate (p-chlorophenoxyisobutyrate). Clofibrate, in the dose range of 10-80 mg/199 ml, inhibited the initial rate of norepinephrine-stimulated lipolysis 17-44 percent in isolated rat fat cells. At a dose corresponding to therapeutic levels in vivo (10 mg/100 ml) clofibrate also inhibited hormone-stimulated lipolysis by 20-30 percent in fragments of human subcutaneous fat. Inhibition of lipolysis by clofibrate occurred at all concentrations of norepinephrine and ACTH (0.02-0.1 mug/ml) but did not occur with equilipolytic concentrations of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, suggesting a proximal site of action on the lipolytic sequence. Clofibrate reduced by 60 percent (315plus or minus40 vs. 120plus or minus25 pmol/g lipid; meanplus or minusSEM) the norepinephrine-stimulated initial rise in cyclic AMP, measured 10 min after addition of hormone. Because the antilipolytic effect occurred in the presence of glucose and without altering cellular ATP levels, the reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels could not be attributed to uncoupling of oxidative metabolism or to secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the presence of procaine-HC1, which blocks hormone-stimulated lipolysis without inhibiting cyclic AMP accumulation, addition of clofibrate prevented the hormone-stimulated rise in cyclic AMP. Clofibrate did not affect the activity of the low-Km 3',5'-cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in norepinephrine-stimulated adipocytes. These data suggest that the antilipolytic effect of clofibrate is due to its suppression of cyclic AMP production by inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The drug's hypolipidemic action may in part be explained by its antilipolytic effect, which deprives the liver of free fatty acid substrate for lipoprotein synthesis. Images PMID:162783

  3. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27181061

  4. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  5. Somatosensory effects of action inhibition: a study with the stop-signal paradigm.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Eamonn; Haggard, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    When a weak shock is delivered to the finger immediately before a voluntary movement, or during a delay interval where subjects are prepared to make the movement, shock detection rates worsen progressively as the movement approaches. Further, we previously showed that shock detection improves again if a NoGo signal produces inhibition of a prepared response. Here, we used a somatosensory version of the stop-signal paradigm to investigate inhibitory processing during the 'horserace' period when motor excitation and inhibition processes may be simultaneously active. When subjects made a rapid keypress response to a go-signal, shock detection deteriorated in a time-dependent manner, replicating sensory suppression. However, when go-signals were followed by adaptively delayed stop-signals so that subjects could not inhibit the prepared movement, and made errors of commission, we found a paradoxical brief increase in shock detection performance just after the stop-signal, as if in a NoGo trial. During this brief window, the somatosensory system showed a pattern consistent with motor inhibition, even though the motor system itself was too far advanced in movement execution for action to be inhibited. Most models of stop-signal processing propose a two-horse race between excitation and inhibition, with a winner-takes-all solution. We show that there may be distinct motor and somatosensory races. Moreover, inhibitory processes may lead in the somatosensory race, at least briefly, even when excitatory processes win the motor race.

  6. Optimisation of driver actions in RWD race car including tyre thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniowski, Michal

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents an innovative method for a lap time minimisation by using genetic algorithms for a multi objective optimisation of a race driver-vehicle model. The decision variables consist of 16 parameters responsible for actions of a professional driver (e.g. time traces for brake, accelerator and steering wheel) on a race track part with RH corner. Purpose-built, high fidelity, multibody vehicle model (called 'miMa') is described by 30 generalised coordinates and 440 parameters, crucial in motorsport. Focus is put on modelling of the tyre tread thermodynamics and its influence on race vehicle dynamics. Numerical example considers a Rear Wheel Drive BMW E36 prepared for track day events. In order to improve the section lap time (by 5%) and corner exit velocity (by 4%) a few different driving strategies are found depending on thermal conditions of semi-slick tyres. The process of the race driver adaptation to initially cold or hot tyres is explained.

  7. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10(-6) cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10(-6) cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10(-6) cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10(-6) cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  8. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10(-6) cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10(-6) cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10(-6) cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10(-6) cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine.

  9. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10−6 cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10−6 cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10−6 cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10−6 cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  10. 24 CFR 968.315 - Comprehensive Plan (including five-year action plan).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... comprehensive plan including, but not limited to, the physical and management needs assessments, viability... CFR part 91) for project and neighborhood improvements where public housing units are located or...; (2) A copy of the summary of total preliminary estimated costs to address physical needs by...

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    2002-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted uranium

  12. Milnacipran inhibits oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia through spinal action in mice.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kitamura, Ryo; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, would have therapeutic effect on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg) induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection and almost completely subsided by day 20. Ten days post-oxaliplatin injection, the intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran (3-30 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the established mechanical allodynia. Intrathecal injections of milnacipran (2.1-21 µg/site) also significantly and dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia, but intracisternal and intracereboventricular injections at the same doses did not. The present results suggest that milnacipran is effective against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and that the antiallodynic effect is mainly mediated by actions on the spinal cord. PMID:25744472

  13. Opposing Actions of Sevoflurane on GABAergic and Glycinergic Synaptic Inhibition in the Spinal Ventral Horn

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, Veit-Simon; Hauser, Sabrina; Drexler, Berthold; Antkowiak, Bernd; Grasshoff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background The ventral horn is a major substrate in mediating the immobilizing properties of the volatile anesthetic sevoflurane in the spinal cord. In this neuronal network, action potential firing is controlled by GABAA and glycine receptors. Both types of ion channels are sensitive to volatile anesthetics, but their role in mediating anesthetic-induced inhibition of spinal locomotor networks is not fully understood. Methodology/Principal Findings To compare the effects of sevoflurane on GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from ventral horn interneurons were carried out in organotypic spinal cultures. At concentrations close to MAC (minimum alveolar concentration), decay times of both types of IPSCs were significantly prolonged. However, at 1.5 MAC equivalents, GABAergic IPSCs were decreased in amplitude and reduced in frequency. These effects counteracted the prolongation of the decay time, thereby decreasing the time-averaged GABAergic inhibition. In contrast, amplitudes and frequency of glycinergic IPSCs were not significantly altered by sevoflurane. Furthermore, selective GABAA and glycine receptor antagonists were tested for their potency to reverse sevoflurane-induced inhibition of spontaneous action potential firing in the ventral horn. These experiments confirmed a weak impact of GABAA receptors and a prominent role of glycine receptors at a high sevoflurane concentration. Conclusions At high concentrations, sevoflurane mediates neuronal inhibition in the spinal ventral horn primarily via glycine receptors, and less via GABAA receptors. Our results support the hypothesis that the impact of GABAA receptors in mediating the immobilizing properties of volatile anesthetics is less essential in comparison to glycine receptors. PMID:23565218

  14. Retinoids inhibit the actions of angiotensin II on vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Haxsen, V; Adam-Stitah, S; Ritz, E; Wagner, J

    2001-03-30

    Retinoids are derivatives of vitamin A and powerful inhibitors of cell proliferation and inflammation. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to vascular lesions by promoting cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we examined whether retinoids interfere with the proproliferative actions of Ang II in VSMCs via AT(1) receptor-dependent or activator protein-1 (AP-1)-dependent mechanisms. VSMCs express retinoid receptor proteins, ie, retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha and retinoid X receptor (RXR) alpha. Long-term exposure to 1 micromol/L all-trans retinoic acid (RA) dose-dependently inhibited Ang II-induced cell proliferation (P<0.005) as well as DNA and protein synthesis (P<0.001). All-trans RA blocked Ang II stimulation of transforming growth factor-beta(1) mRNA (P<0.005). All-trans RA inhibition of vascular VSMC growth was mediated both via RAR- and RXR-dependent pathways, as shown by receptor-specific synthetic retinoids. Transfection experiments revealed that inhibition of AP-1-dependent gene transcription is one mechanism by which all-trans RA inhibits Ang II action. RARalpha cotransfection enhanced the anti-AP-1 effects of all-trans RA dose-dependently. AP-1 activity was similarly inhibited by cotransfection with either RARalpha or RXRalpha. Ang II-induced gene expression of c-fos was abrogated by all-trans RA treatment (P<0.005). In VSMCs, all-trans RA downregulated AT(1) receptor mRNA (P<0.01) and reduced B(max) (P<0.001). All-trans RA repressed Ang II-stimulated AT(1) receptor promoter activity. The all-trans RA inhibitory effect was abolished when the AP-1 consensus site on the AT(1) receptor promoter was deleted. Our findings demonstrate that retinoids are potent inhibitors of the actions of Ang II on VSMCs. The findings support the notion that retinoids may interfere with proliferative vascular disease.

  15. Polyphenols Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Entry by a New Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Calland, Noémie; Sahuc, Marie-Emmanuelle; Belouzard, Sandrine; Pène, Véronique; Bonnafous, Pierre; Mesalam, Ahmed Atef; Deloison, Gaspard; Descamps, Véronique; Sahpaz, Sevser; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Lambert, Olivier; Brodin, Priscille; Duverlie, Gilles; Meuleman, Philip; Rosenberg, Arielle R.; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the validation of direct-acting antivirals for hepatitis C treatment, the discovery of new compounds with different modes of action may still be of importance for the treatment of special patient populations. We recently identified a natural molecule, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), as an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) targeting the viral particle. The aim of this work was to discover new natural compounds with higher anti-HCV activity than that of EGCG and determine their mode of action. Eight natural molecules with structure similarity to EGCG were selected. HCV JFH1 in cell culture and HCV pseudoparticle systems were used to determine the antiviral activity and mechanism of action of the compounds. We identified delphinidin, a polyphenol belonging to the anthocyanidin family, as a new inhibitor of HCV entry. Delphinidin inhibits HCV entry in a pangenotypic manner by acting directly on the viral particle and impairing its attachment to the cell surface. Importantly, it is also active against HCV in primary human hepatocytes, with no apparent cytotoxicity and in combination with interferon and boceprevir in cell culture. Different approaches showed that neither aggregation nor destruction of the particle occurred. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy observations of HCV pseudoparticles treated with delphinidin or EGCG showed a bulge on particles that was not observed under control conditions. In conclusion, EGCG and delphinidin inhibit HCV entry by a new mechanism, i.e., alteration of the viral particle structure that impairs its attachment to the cell surface. IMPORTANCE In this article, we identify a new inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, delphinidin, that prevents HCV entry. This natural compound, a plant pigment responsible for the blue-purple color of flowers and berries, belongs to the flavonoid family, like the catechin EGCG, the major component present in green tea extract, which is also an inhibitor of HCV entry. We

  16. Direct inhibition of arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons: a potential mechanism for the orexigenic actions of dynorphin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2013-01-01

    Dynorphin, an endogenous ligand of kappa (κ) opioid receptors, has multiple roles in the brain, and plays a positive role in energy balance and food intake. However, the mechanism for this is unclear. With immunocytochemistry, we find that axonal dynorphin immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus is strong, and that a large number of dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons terminate on or near anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cells. Here we provide evidence from whole-cell patch-clamp recording that dynorphin-A (Dyn-A) directly and dose-dependently inhibits arcuate nucleus POMC neurons. Dyn-A inhibition was eliminated by the κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-BNI, but not by the μ receptor antagonist CTAP. The inhibitory effect was mimicked by the κ2 receptor agonist GR89696, but not by the κ1 receptor agonist U69593. No presynaptic effect of κ2 agonists was found. These results suggest that Dyn-A inhibits POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor. In whole-cell voltage clamp, Dyn-A opened G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK)-like channels on POMC neurons. Dynorphin attenuated glutamate and GABA neurotransmission to POMC neurons. In contrast to the strong inhibition of POMC neurons by Dyn-A, we found a weaker direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons mediated by both κ1 and κ2 receptors. Taken together, these results indicate a direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor and GIRK channels. A number of orexigenic hypothalamic neurons release dynorphin along with other neuropeptides. The inhibition of anorexigenic POMC neurons may be one mechanism underlying the orexigenic actions of dynorphin. PMID:23318874

  17. Agonist self-inhibition at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor a nonspecific action

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Firestone, L.L.; Miller, K.W.

    1987-05-19

    Agonist concentration-response relationships at nicotinic postsynaptic receptors were established by measuring /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from acetylcholine receptor rich native Torpedo membrane vesicles under three different conditions: (1) integrated net ion efflux (in 10 s) from untreated vesicles, (2) integrated net efflux from vesicles in which most acetylcholine sites were irreversibly blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, and (3) initial rates of efflux (5-100 ms) from vesicles that were partially blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Exposure to acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, or (-)-nicotine over 10/sup 8/-fold concentration ranges results in bell-shaped ion flux response curves due to stimulation of acetylcholine receptor channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channel function at 60-2000 times higher concentrations. Concentrations of agonists that inhibit their own maximum /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux by 50% (K/sub B/ values) are 110, 211, 3.0, 39, and 8.9 mM, respectively, for the agonists listed above. For acetylcholine and carbamylcholine, K/sub B/ values determined from both 10-s and 15-ms efflux measurements are the same, indicating that the rate of agonist-induced desensitization increases to maximum at concentrations lower than those causing self-inhibition. For all partial and full agonists studied, Hill coefficients for self-inhibition are close to 1.0. Concentrations of agonists up to 8 times K/sub B/ did not change the order parameter reported by a spin-labeled fatty acid incorporated in Torpedo membranes. The authors conclude that agonist self-inhibition cannot be attributed to a general nonspecific membrane perturbation. Instead, these results are consistent with a saturable site of action either at the lipid-protein interface or on the acetylcholine receptor protein itself.

  18. Inhibition of the compound action potentials of frog sciatic nerves by aroma oil compounds having various chemical structures

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Matsushita, Akitomo; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived chemicals including aroma oil compounds have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction and modulate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although applying aroma oils to the skin produces a local anesthetic effect, this has not been yet examined throughly. The aim of the present study was to know how nerve conduction inhibitions by aroma oil compounds are related to their chemical structures and whether these activities are mediated by TRP activation. Compound action potentials (CAPs) were recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. Citral (aldehyde), which activates various types of TRP channels, attenuated the peak amplitude of CAP with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.46 mmol/L. Another aldehyde (citronellal), alcohol (citronellol, geraniol, (±)-linalool, (−)-linalool, (+)-borneol, (−)-borneol, α-terpineol), ester (geranyl acetate, linalyl acetate, bornyl acetate), and oxide (rose oxide) compounds also reduced CAP peak amplitudes (IC50: 0.50, 0.35, 0.53, 1.7, 2.0, 1.5, 2.3, 2.7, 0.51, 0.71, 0.44, and 2.6 mmol/L, respectively). On the other hand, the amplitudes were reduced by a small extent by hydrocarbons (myrcene and p-cymene) and ketone (camphor) at high concentrations (2–5 mmol/L). The activities of citral and other TRP agonists ((+)-borneol and camphor) were resistant to TRP antagonist ruthenium red. An efficacy sequence for the CAP inhibitions was generally aldehydes ≥ esters ≥ alcohols > oxides >> hydrocarbons. The CAP inhibition by the aroma oil compound was not related to its octanol–water partition coefficient. It is suggested that aroma oil compounds inhibit nerve conduction in a manner specific to their chemical structures without TRP activation. PMID:26038703

  19. Proteomic Signature of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibition Available for In Vivo Mechanism-of-Action Studies▿

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Patra, Malay; Albrecht, Dirk; Chen, David Y.-K.; Nicolaou, K. C.; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Bandow, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is a promising novel antibiotic target. Two inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis, platencin and platensimycin, were recently discovered and their molecular targets identified. Numerous structure-activity relationship studies for both platencin and platensimycin are currently being undertaken. We established a proteomic signature for fatty acid biosynthesis inhibition in Bacillus subtilis using platencin, platensimycin, cerulenin, and triclosan. The induced proteins, FabHA, FabHB, FabF, FabI, PlsX, and PanB, are enzymes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and thus linked directly to the target pathway. The proteomic signature can now be used to assess the in vivo mechanisms of action of compounds derived from structure-activity relationship programs, as demonstrated for the platensimycin-inspired chromium bioorganometallic PM47. It will further serve as a reference signature for structurally novel natural and synthetic antimicrobial compounds with unknown mechanisms of action. In summary, we described a proteomic signature in B. subtilis consisting of six upregulated proteins that is diagnostic of fatty acid biosynthesis inhibition and thus can be applied to advance antibacterial drug discovery programs. PMID:21383089

  20. Bithionol inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth In Vitro - studies on mechanism(s) of action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is a cause of ovarian cancer recurrence and low overall survival rates. There is a need for more effective treatment approaches because the development of new drug is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, the concept of ‘drug repurposing’ is promising. We focused on Bithionol (BT), a clinically approved anti-parasitic drug as an anti-ovarian cancer drug. BT has previously been shown to inhibit solid tumor growth in several preclinical cancer models. A better understanding of the anti-tumor effects and mechanism(s) of action of BT in ovarian cancer cells is essential for further exploring its therapeutic potential against ovarian cancer. Methods The cytotoxic effects of BT against a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines were determined by Presto Blue cell viability assay. Markers of apoptosis such as caspases 3/7, cPARP induction, nuclear condensation and mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization were assessed using microscopic, FACS and immunoblotting methods. Mechanism(s) of action of BT such as cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, autotaxin (ATX) inhibition and effects on MAPK and NF-kB signalling were determined by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and colorimetric methods. Results BT caused dose dependent cytotoxicity against all ovarian cancer cell lines tested with IC50 values ranging from 19 μM – 60 μM. Cisplatin-resistant variants of A2780 and IGROV-1 have shown almost similar IC50 values compared to their sensitive counterparts. Apoptotic cell death was shown by expression of caspases 3/7, cPARP, loss of mitochondrial potential, nuclear condensation, and up-regulation of p38 and reduced expression of pAkt, pNF-κB, pIκBα, XIAP, bcl-2 and bcl-xl. BT treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1/M phase and increased ROS generation. Treatment with ascorbic acid resulted in partial restoration of cell viability. In addition, dose and time dependent inhibition of ATX was observed. Conclusions BT

  1. Inhibition of collagen peptidase in HeLa cells and human tumours by compounds including drugs used in cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Boggust, W. A.; McGauley, H.

    1978-01-01

    Collagen-peptidase activity in extracts of HeLa cells and human tumours is inactivated by Razoxane (ICRF-159), cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, thiotepa, aprotinin, EDTA and phenanthroline. As this activity, in association with other enzymes, may contribute to tissue lysis in cancers, chemical intervention may reduce invasiveness and modify the processes of infiltration and metastasis. Accordingly, some drugs used in therapy or for the prevention of metastasis may produce their observed effects by a combination of factors including enzyme inhibition. PMID:212092

  2. Mode of Action of Primaquine: Preferential Inhibition of Protein Biosynthesis in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Olenick, John G.; Hahn, Fred E.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of a strain of Bacillus megaterium was prevented by a minimal inhibitory concentration of primaquine of 52 μg/ml or 2 × 10−4m. When exponentially growing cultures received the drug at 6 × 10−4m, the rate of growth was drastically reduced and no further growth occurred after 15 min of exposure. At this concentration, primaquine was bactericidal, causing a 50% reduction in the viable population after one doubling time of 45 min. Supplying primaquine to cultures 30 min after adding radioactive-labeled phenylalanine, thymidine, uracil, or diaminopimelic acid produced an immediate and complete inhibition of protein biosynthesis but no inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid biosynthesis for at least 15 min, and caused the formation of ribonucleic acid and cell wall polymer to proceed linearly at rates similar to those established prior to the addition of drug. This pattern of inhibition of macromolecular biosyntheses suggests that the major in vivo action of primaquine in B. megaterium is to block protein synthesis. PMID:4625625

  3. Compound K, a Ginsenoside Metabolite, Inhibits Colon Cancer Growth via Multiple Pathways Including p53-p21 Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Du, Guang-Jian; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Calway, Tyler; Li, Zejuan; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Bissonnette, Marc; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2013-01-01

    Compound K (20-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol, CK), an intestinal bacterial metabolite of ginseng protopanaxadiol saponins, has been shown to inhibit cell growth in a variety of cancers. However, the mechanisms are not completely understood, especially in colorectal cancer (CRC). A xenograft tumor model was used first to examine the anti-CRC effect of CK in vivo. Then, multiple in vitro assays were applied to investigate the anticancer effects of CK including antiproliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. In addition, a qPCR array and western blot analysis were executed to screen and validate the molecules and pathways involved. We observed that CK significantly inhibited the growth of HCT-116 tumors in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. CK significantly inhibited the proliferation of human CRC cell lines HCT-116, SW-480, and HT-29 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also observed that CK induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase in HCT-116 cells. The processes were related to the upregulation of p53/p21, FoxO3a-p27/p15 and Smad3, and downregulation of cdc25A, CDK4/6 and cyclin D1/3. The major regulated targets of CK were cyclin dependent inhibitors, including p21, p27, and p15. These results indicate that CK inhibits transcriptional activation of multiple tumor-promoting pathways in CRC, suggesting that CK could be an active compound in the prevention or treatment of CRC. PMID:23434653

  4. Targeting of androgen receptor in bone reveals a lack of androgen anabolic action and inhibition of osteogenesis: a model for compartment-specific androgen action in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Wiren, Kristine M; Semirale, Anthony A; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Woo, Adrian; Tommasini, Steven M; Price, Christopher; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Jepsen, Karl J

    2008-09-01

    Androgens are anabolic hormones that affect many tissues, including bone. However, an anabolic effect of androgen treatment on bone in eugonadal subjects has not been observed and clinical trials have been disappointing. The androgen receptor (AR) mediates biological responses to androgens. In bone tissue, both AR and the estrogen receptor (ER) are expressed. Since androgens can be converted into estrogen, the specific role of the AR in maintenance of skeletal homoeostasis remains controversial. The goal of this study was to use skeletally targeted overexpression of AR in differentiated osteoblasts as a means of elucidating the specific role(s) for AR transactivation in the mature bone compartment. Transgenic mice overexpressing AR under the control of the 2.3-kb alpha1(I)-collagen promoter fragment showed no difference in body composition, testosterone, or 17ss-estradiol levels. However, transgenic males have reduced serum osteocalcin, CTx and TRAPC5b levels, and a bone phenotype was observed. In cortical bone, high-resolution micro-computed tomography revealed no difference in periosteal perimeter but a significant reduction in cortical bone area due to an enlarged marrow cavity. Endocortical bone formation rate was also significantly inhibited. Biomechanical analyses showed decreased whole bone strength and quality, with significant reductions in all parameters tested. Trabecular morphology was altered, with increased bone volume comprised of more trabeculae that were closer together but not thicker. Expression of genes involved in bone formation and bone resorption was significantly reduced. The consequences of androgen action are compartment-specific; anabolic effects are exhibited exclusively at periosteal surfaces, but in mature osteoblasts androgens inhibited osteogenesis with detrimental effects on matrix quality, bone fragility and whole bone strength. Thus, the present data demonstrate that enhanced androgen signaling targeted to bone results in low bone

  5. COST Action “EuroTelepath”: digital pathology integration in electronic health record, including primary care centres

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Digital pathology includes the information technology that allows for the management of information, including data and images, generated in an anatomic pathology department. COST Action IC0604 The integration of digital slides in the electronic health record is one of the main objectives of COST Action IC0604 “Telepathology Network in Europe” (EURO-TELEPATH). Fostering use of medical informatics standards and adapting them to current needs is needed to manage efficiently extremely large medical images, like digital slide files. Digital slides in Pathology Digital slides can play a role in disease prevention, primary diagnosis, and second opinion. In all these tasks, automated image analysis can also be a most valuable tool. Interoperability in pathology information systems In order to achieve an efficient interoperability between pathology information systems with other clinical information systems, obtaining a seamless integration of pathology images (gross pictures and digital slides) with LIS-Pathology Information system in a web environment is an important task. Primary care information systems should also be included in the integration, since primary care centres play an essential role in the generation of clinical information and specimen collection. A common terminology, based in SNOMED CT is also needed. Conclusions Main barrier in the integration of digital slides in pathology workflow and eHealth record is the cost of current digital slide scanners. Pathology information system vendors should participate in standardization bodies. PMID:21489201

  6. Action and Inhibition of Endogenous Phospholipases during Isolation of Plant Membranes.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F; Morré, D J

    1978-12-01

    Endogenous phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities were demonstrated in membrane fractions isolated from soybean (Glycine max L.) hypocotyls. Phospholipase D activity was distributed widely among different membrane fractions while phosphatidic acid phosphatase was found predominantly in membranes equilibrating in lower sucrose densities. Phospholipase D action was unaffected by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium salt or ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid but was prevented by a mixture of 4% choline and 4% ethanolamine. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase was inhibited by 10 millimolar glycerol 1-phosphate or by homogenization media prepared with coconut milk as a solvent instead of water. Under fully protected conditions the phospholipid composition of soybean membrane fractions remained unchanged for at least 1 hour at 20 C. Membranes prepared under protected conditions had low phosphatidic acid contents and the phospholipid compositions closely resembled those of corresponding animal membranes.

  7. Antioxidant effects of coumarins include direct radical scavenging, metal chelation and inhibition of ROS-producing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Filipský, Tomáš; Říha, Michal; Macáková, Kateřina; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Karlíčková, Jana; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2015-01-01

    Coumarins represent a large group of 1,2-benzopyrone derivatives which have been identified in many natural sources and synthetized as well. Several studies have shown that their antioxidant capacity is not based only on direct scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) but other mechanisms are also involved. These include: a) the chelation of transient metals iron and copper, which are known to catalyse the Fenton reaction; and b) the inhibition of RONS-producing enzymes (e.g. xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase and lipoxygenase), suggesting that mechanism(s) involved on cellular level are complex and synergistic. Moreover, many factors must be taken into account when analysing structure-antioxidant capacity relationships of coumarins due to different in vitro/in vivo methodological approaches. The structural features necessary for the direct RONS scavenging and metal chelation are apparently similar and the ideal structures are 6,7-dihydroxy- or 7,8-dihydroxycoumarins. However, the clinical outcome is unknown, because these coumarins are able to reduce copper and iron, and may thus paradoxically potentiate the Fenton chemistry. The similar structural features appear to be associated with inhibition of lipoxygenase, probably due to interference with iron in its active site. Contrarily, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin seems to be the most active coumarin in the inhibition of xanthine oxidase while its derivative bearing the 4-methyl group or 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin are less active or inactive. In addition, coumarins may hinder the induction of inducible NO-synthase and cyclooxygenase- 2. Sparse data on inhibition of myeloperoxidase do not enable any clear conclusion, but some coumarins may block it.

  8. Rapid Inhibition Profiling in Bacillus subtilis to Identify the Mechanism of Action of New Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Lamsa, Anne; Lopez-Garrido, Javier; Quach, Diana; Riley, Eammon P; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit

    2016-08-19

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance has become a major public health crisis. New antimicrobials with novel mechanisms of action (MOA) are desperately needed. We previously developed a method, bacterial cytological profiling (BCP), which utilizes fluorescence microscopy to rapidly identify the MOA of antimicrobial compounds. BCP is based upon our discovery that cells treated with antibiotics affecting different metabolic pathways generate different cytological signatures, providing quantitative information that can be used to determine a compound's MOA. Here, we describe a system, rapid inhibition profiling (RIP), for creating cytological profiles of new antibiotic targets for which there are currently no chemical inhibitors. RIP consists of the fast, inducible degradation of a target protein followed by BCP. We demonstrate that degrading essential proteins in the major metabolic pathways for DNA replication, transcription, fatty acid biosynthesis, and peptidoglycan biogenesis in Bacillus subtilis rapidly produces cytological profiles closely matching that of antimicrobials targeting the same pathways. Additionally, RIP and antibiotics targeting different steps in fatty acid biosynthesis can be differentiated from each other. We utilize RIP and BCP to show that the antibacterial MOA of four nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory antibiotics differs from that proposed based on in vitro data. RIP is a versatile method that will extend our knowledge of phenotypes associated with inactivating essential bacterial enzymes and thereby allow for screening for molecules that inhibit novel essential targets. PMID:27193499

  9. Angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibition in heart failure: mechanistic action and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J; DeVore, Adam D; Velazquez, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly common syndrome associated with high mortality and economic burden, and there has been a paucity over the past decade of new pharmacotherapies that improve outcomes. However, recent data from a large randomized controlled trial compared the novel agent LCZ696, a dual-acting angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi), with the well established angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril and found significant reduction in mortality among the chronic reduced ejection fraction HF population. Preclinical and clinical data suggest that neprilysin inhibition provides beneficial outcomes in HF patients by preventing the degradation of natriuretic peptides and thereby promoting natriuresis and vasodilatation and counteracting the negative cardiorenal effects of the up-regulated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Agents such as omapatrilat combined neprilysin and ACE inhibition but had increased rates of angioedema. Goals of an improved safety profile provided the rationale for the development of the ARNi LCZ696. Along with significant reductions in mortality and hospitalizations, clinical trials suggest that LCZ696 may improve surrogate markers of HF severity. In this paper, we review the preclinical and clinical data that led to the development of LCZ696, the understanding of the underlying mechanistic action, and the robust clinical impact that LCZ696 may have in the near future.

  10. Neuronostatin inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via direct action on the pancreatic α-cell

    PubMed Central

    Salvatori, Alison S.; Elrick, Mollisa M.; Samson, Willis K.; Corbett, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronostatin is a recently described peptide hormone encoded by the somatostatin gene. We previously showed that intraperitoneal injection of neuronostatin into mice resulted in c-Jun accumulation in pancreatic islets in a pattern consistent with the activation of glucagon-producing α-cells. We therefore hypothesized that neuronostatin could influence glucose homeostasis via a direct effect on the α-cell. Neuronostatin enhanced low-glucose-induced glucagon release in isolated rat islets and in the immortalized α-cell line αTC1-9. Furthermore, incubation with neuronostatin led to an increase in transcription of glucagon mRNA, as determined by RT-PCR. Neuronostatin also inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated islets. However, neuronostatin did not alter insulin release from the β-cell line INS 832/13, indicating that the effect of neuronostatin on insulin secretion may be secondary to a direct action on the α-cell. In agreement with our in vitro data, intra-arterial infusion of neuronostatin in male rats delayed glucose disposal and inhibited insulin release during a glucose challenge. These studies suggest that neuronostatin participates in maintaining glucose homeostasis through cell-cell interactions between α-cells and β-cells in the endocrine pancreas, leading to attenuation in insulin secretion. PMID:24735892

  11. Enantioselective inhibition of the biotransformation and pharmacological actions of isoidide dinitrate by diphenyleneiodonium sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Ratz, Jodan D; McGuire, John J; Bennett, Brian M

    1999-01-01

    We have shown previously that the D- and L- enantiomers of isoidide dinitrate (D-IIDN and L-IIDN) exhibit a potency difference for relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in isolated rat aorta and that this is related to preferential biotransformation of the more potent enantiomer (D-IIDN). The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of the flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium sulphate (DPI), on the enantioselectivity of IIDN action.In isolated rat aortic strip preparations, exposure to 0.3 μM DPI resulted in a 3.6 fold increase in the EC50 value for D-IIDN-induced relaxation, but had no effect on L-IIDN-induced relaxation.Incubation of aortic strips with 2 μM D- or L-IIDN for 5 min resulted in significantly more D-isoidide mononitrate formed (5.0±1.5 pmol mg  protein−1) than L-isoidide mononitrate (2.1±0.7 pmol mg protein−1) and this difference was abolished by pretreatment of tissues with 0.3 μM DPI. DPI had no effect on glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity or GSH-dependent biotransformation of D- or L-IIDN in the 105,000×g supernatant fraction of rat aorta.Consistent with both the relaxation and biotransformation data, treatment of tissues with 0.3 μM DPI significantly inhibited D-IIDN-induced cyclic GMP accumulation, but had no effect on L-IIDN-induced cyclic GMP accumulation.In the intact animal, 2 mg kg−1 DPI significantly inhibited the pharmacokinetic and haemodynamic properties of D-IIDN, but had no effect L-IIDN.These data suggest that the basis for the potency difference for relaxation by the two enantiomers is preferential biotransformation of D-IIDN to NO, by an enzyme that is inhibited by DPI. Given that DPI binds to and inhibits NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, the data are consistent with a role for the cytochromes P450-NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase system in this enantioselective biotransformation process. PMID:10051121

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-02-26

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 529, Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 529 consists of one Corrective Action Site (25-23-17). For the purpose of this investigation, the Corrective Action Site has been divided into nine parcels based on the separate and distinct releases. A conceptual site model was developed for each parcel to address the translocation of contaminants from each release. The results of this investigation will be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  14. Autophagy inhibition uncovers the neurotoxic action of the antipsychotic drug olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Vucicevic, Ljubica; Misirkic-Marjanovic, Maja; Paunovic, Verica; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Martinovic, Tamara; Ciric, Darko; Maric, Nadja; Petricevic, Sasa; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of autophagy, a controlled cellular self-digestion process, in regulating survival of neurons exposed to atypical antipsychotic olanzapine. Olanzapine induced autophagy in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cell line, as confirmed by the increase in autophagic flux and presence of autophagic vesicles, fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, and increase in the expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes ATG4B, ATG5, and ATG7. The production of reactive oxygen species, but not modulation of the main autophagy repressor MTOR or its upstream regulators AMP-activated protein kinase and AKT1, was responsible for olanzapine-triggered autophagy. Olanzapine-mediated oxidative stress also induced mitochondrial depolarization and damage, and the autophagic clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria was confirmed by electron microscopy, colocalization of autophagosome-associated MAP1LC3B (LC3B henceforth) and mitochondria, and mitochondrial association with the autophagic cargo receptor SQSTM1/p62. While olanzapine-triggered mitochondrial damage was not overtly toxic to SH-SY5Y cells, their death was readily initiated upon the inhibition of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors, RNA interference knockdown of BECN1 and LC3B, or biological free radical nitric oxide. The treatment of mice with olanzapine for 14 d increased the brain levels of autophagosome-associated LC3B-II and mRNA encoding Atg4b, Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, Gabarap, and Becn1. The administration of the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine significantly increased the expression of proapoptotic genes (Trp53, Bax, Bak1, Pmaip1, Bcl2l11, Cdkn1a, and Cdkn1b) and DNA fragmentation in the frontal brain region of olanzapine-exposed animals. These data indicate that olanzapine-triggered autophagy protects neurons from otherwise fatal mitochondrial damage, and that inhibition of autophagy might unmask the neurotoxic action of the drug. PMID:25551567

  15. HMGB1 Inhibition During Zymosan-Induced Inflammation: The Potential Therapeutic Action of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Pocheć, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis, also known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is a life-threatening condition caused by a pathogenic agent and leading to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. One of the factors responsible for the excessive intensification of the inflammatory response in the course of inflammation is high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). HMG-1 is a nuclear protein which, after being released to the intercellular space, has a highly pro-inflammatory effect and acts as a late mediator of lethal damage. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the anti-inflammatory action of riboflavin is accompanied by inhibition of HMGB1 release during peritoneal inflammation and zymosan stimulation of macrophages. Peritonitis was induced in male BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice via intraperitoneal injection of zymosan (40 mg/kg). RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated with zymosan (250 µg/ml). Riboflavin (mice, 50 mg/kg; RAW 264.7, 25 µg/ml) was administered 30 min before zymosan, simultaneously with, or 2, 4, 6 h after zymosan. Additionally, mRNA expression of HMGB1 and its intracellular and serum levels were evaluated. The research showed that riboflavin significantly reduces both the expression and the release of HMGB1; however, the effect of riboflavin was time-dependent. The greatest efficacy was found when riboflavin was given 30 min prior to zymosan, and also 2 and 4 h (C57BL/6J; RAW 264.7) or 4 and 6 h (BALB/c) after zymosan. Research showed that riboflavin influences the level of HMGB1 released in the course of inflammation; however, further study is necessary to determine its mechanisms of action. PMID:26445809

  16. MMI-0100 inhibits cardiac fibrosis in myocardial infarction by direct actions on cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts via MK2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Yates, Cecelia C.; Lockyer, Pamela; Xie, Liang; Bevilacqua, Ariana; He, Jun; Lander, Cynthia; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte

    2014-01-01

    The cell-permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), MMI-0100, inhibits MK2 and downstream fibrosis and inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that MMI-0100 reduces intimal hyperplasia in a mouse vein graft model, pulmonary fibrosis in a murine bleomycin-induced model and development of adhesions in conjunction with abdominal surgery. MK2 is critical to the pathogenesis of ischemic heart injury as MK2 −/− mice are resistant to ischemic remodeling. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting MK2 with MMI-0100 would protect the heart after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in vivo. AMI was induced by placing a permanent LAD coronary ligation. When MMI-0100 peptide was given 30 minutes after permanent LAD coronary artery ligation, the resulting fibrosis was reduced/prevented ~50% at a 2 week time point, with a corresponding improvement in cardiac function and decrease in left ventricular dilation. In cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts, MMI-0100 inhibited MK2 to reduce cardiomyocyte caspase 3/7 activity, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast caspase 3/7 activity, which may explain MMI-0100’s salvage of cardiac function and anti-fibrotic effects in vivo. These findings suggest that therapeutic inhibition of MK2 after acute MI, using rationally-designed cell-permeant peptides, inhibits cardiac fibrosis and maintains cardiac function by mechanisms that involve inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast cell death. PMID:25257914

  17. The antinociceptive action of etorphine in the dorsal horn is due to a direct spinal action and not to activation of descending inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. L.; Ryall, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    1--Etorphine, microinjected into the brainstem or administered intravenously, inhibited the firing of dorsal horn neurones to noxious heat in spinal or non-spinal anaesthetized cats and in decerebrate, non-anaesthetized cats with intact spinal cords. 2--Small doses of etorphine sometimes caused facilitation, especially when the cord was intact, but this was invariably followed by inhibition at higher doses. 3--The ED50 for inhibition (mean 3.9 micrograms/kg) after microinjection into nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus reticularis magnocellularis or the lateral tegmental field was similar at all sites in anaesthetized, non-spinal cats. 4--The ED50 for microinjection was not increased by spinal transection in anaesthetized cats (mean ED50, 2.6 micrograms/kg) and was similar to the ED50 in decerebrate, non-anaesthetized cats. 5--Intravenous administration was 2 to 3 times more effective than microinjection and the time course of inhibition was faster after intravenous administration than after microinjection. 6--It is concluded that etorphine inhibits dorsal horn neurones after microinjection or intravenous administration by a direct action on the spinal cord and not by activating a descending inhibition. After microinjection it rapidly enters the general circulation and subsequently distributes into the spinal cord. 7--It is also concluded that naloxone readily gains entry to the circulation from the brain because microinjection antagonized the effects of systemic etorphine on dorsal horn neurones in spinal cats. PMID:6338986

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  19. CONSENSUS REPORT: Recognizing non-melanoma skin cancer, including actinic keratosis, as an occupational disease - A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    John, S M; Trakatelli, M; Gehring, R; Finlay, K; Fionda, C; Wittlich, M; Augustin, M; Hilpert, G; Barroso Dias, J M; Ulrich, C; Pellacani, G

    2016-04-01

    1. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most common cancer diagnosed in westernized countries, and one of the few almost preventable cancers if detected and treated early as up to 90% of NMSC may be attributed to excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation. 2. The incidence of NMSC is increasing: 2-3 million people are diagnosed worldwide annually, with an average yearly increase of 3-8% among white populations in Australia, Europe, the US and Canada over the last 30 years. 3. The link between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and certain forms of NMSC is clearly recognized. It is estimated that outdoor workers are exposed to an UV radiation dose 2-3 times higher than indoor workers, and there is a growing body of research linking UV radiation exposure in outdoor workers to NMSC: I. Occupationally UV-exposed workers are at least at a 43% higher risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and almost doubled risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared to the average population, with risk increasing with decreasing latitude. II. The risk for BCC, SCC and actinic keratosis (AK) among workers who have worked outdoors for more than 5 years is 3-fold higher than the risk among those with no years of working outdoors. 4. Primary prevention, early detection, treatment and regular follow-up of skin cancer (NMSC and melanoma) are shown to be beneficial from a health economic perspective. 5. Action is needed at international, European and national level to legislate for recognizing AK and NMSC as an occupational disease, which has the potential to improve access to compensation and drive preventative activities. 6. This report is a Call to Action for: I. The engagement of key stakeholders, including supranational institutions, national governments, trade organizations, employers, workers and patient organizations to drive change in prevention and protection of at-risk groups. II. Employers should be obliged to prevent outdoor worker's UV exposure from exceeding limit values

  20. CONSENSUS REPORT: Recognizing non-melanoma skin cancer, including actinic keratosis, as an occupational disease - A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    John, S M; Trakatelli, M; Gehring, R; Finlay, K; Fionda, C; Wittlich, M; Augustin, M; Hilpert, G; Barroso Dias, J M; Ulrich, C; Pellacani, G

    2016-04-01

    1. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most common cancer diagnosed in westernized countries, and one of the few almost preventable cancers if detected and treated early as up to 90% of NMSC may be attributed to excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation. 2. The incidence of NMSC is increasing: 2-3 million people are diagnosed worldwide annually, with an average yearly increase of 3-8% among white populations in Australia, Europe, the US and Canada over the last 30 years. 3. The link between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and certain forms of NMSC is clearly recognized. It is estimated that outdoor workers are exposed to an UV radiation dose 2-3 times higher than indoor workers, and there is a growing body of research linking UV radiation exposure in outdoor workers to NMSC: I. Occupationally UV-exposed workers are at least at a 43% higher risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and almost doubled risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared to the average population, with risk increasing with decreasing latitude. II. The risk for BCC, SCC and actinic keratosis (AK) among workers who have worked outdoors for more than 5 years is 3-fold higher than the risk among those with no years of working outdoors. 4. Primary prevention, early detection, treatment and regular follow-up of skin cancer (NMSC and melanoma) are shown to be beneficial from a health economic perspective. 5. Action is needed at international, European and national level to legislate for recognizing AK and NMSC as an occupational disease, which has the potential to improve access to compensation and drive preventative activities. 6. This report is a Call to Action for: I. The engagement of key stakeholders, including supranational institutions, national governments, trade organizations, employers, workers and patient organizations to drive change in prevention and protection of at-risk groups. II. Employers should be obliged to prevent outdoor worker's UV exposure from exceeding limit values

  1. Glitazones inhibit human monoamine oxidase but their anti-inflammatory actions are not mediated by VAP-1/semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Carpéné, Christian; Bizou, Mathilde; Tréguer, Karine; Hasnaoui, Mounia; Grès, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Glitazones are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists widely used as antidiabetic drugs also known as thiazolidinediones. Most of them exert other effects such as anti-inflammatory actions via mechanisms supposed to be independent from PPARγ activation (e.g., decreased plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels). Recently, pioglitazone has been shown to inhibit the B form of monoamine oxidase (MAO) in mouse, while rosiglitazone and troglitazone were described as non-covalent inhibitors of both human MAO A and MAO B. Since molecules interacting with MAO might also inhibit semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO), known as vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), and since VAP-1/SSAO inhibitors exhibit anti-inflammatory activity, our aim was to elucidate whether VAP-1/SSAO inhibition could be a mechanism involved in the anti-inflammatory behaviour of glitazones. To this aim, MAO and SSAO activities were measured in human subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies obtained from overweight women undergoing plastic surgery. The production of hydrogen peroxide, an end-product of amine oxidase activity, was determined in tissue homogenates using a fluorometric method. The oxidation of 1 mM tyramine was inhibited by pargyline and almost resistant to semicarbazide, therefore predominantly MAO-dependent. Rosiglitazone was more potent than pioglitazone in inhibiting tyramine oxidation. By contrast, benzylamine oxidation was only abolished by semicarbazide: hence SSAO-mediated. Pioglitazone hampered SSAO activity only when tested at 1 mM while rosiglitazone was inefficient. However, rosiglitazone exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in human adipocytes by limiting MCP-1 expression. Our observations rule out any involvement of VAP-1/SSAO inhibition and subsequent limitation of leukocyte extravasation in the anti-inflammatory action of glitazones.

  2. Dissociating action inhibition, conflict monitoring and sensory mismatch into independent components of event related potentials in GO/NOGO task.

    PubMed

    Kropotov, Juri D; Ponomarev, Valery A; Hollup, Stig; Mueller, Andreas

    2011-07-15

    The anterior N2 and P3 waves of event related potentials (ERPs) in the GO/NOGO paradigm in trials related to preparatory set violations in previous studies were inconsistently associated either with action inhibition or conflict monitoring operations. In the present study a paired stimulus GO/NOGO design was used in order to experimentally control the preparatory sets. Three variants of the same stimulus task manipulated sensory mismatch, action inhibition and conflict monitoring operations by varying stimulus-response associations. The anterior N2 and P3 waves were decomposed into components by means of independent component analysis (ICA). The ICA was performed on collection of 114 individual ERPs in the three experimental conditions. Three of the independent components were selectively affected by the task manipulations indicating association of these components with sensory mismatch, action inhibition and conflict monitoring operations. According to sLORETA the sensory mismatch component was generated in the left and right temporal areas, the action suppression component was generated in the supplementary motor cortex, and the conflict monitoring component was generated in the anterior cingulate cortex.

  3. How preparation changes the need for top-down control of the basal ganglia when inhibiting premature actions.

    PubMed

    Jahfari, Sara; Verbruggen, Frederick; Frank, Michael J; Waldorp, Lourens J; Colzato, Lorenza; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Forstmann, Birte U

    2012-08-01

    Goal-oriented signals from the prefrontal cortex gate the selection of appropriate actions in the basal ganglia. Key nodes within this fronto-basal ganglia action regulation network are increasingly engaged when one anticipates the need to inhibit and override planned actions. Here, we ask how the advance preparation of action plans modulates the need for fronto-subcortical control when a planned action needs to be withdrawn. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected while human participants performed a stop task with cues indicating the likelihood of a stop signal being sounded. Mathematical modeling of go trial responses suggested that participants attained a more cautious response strategy when the probability of a stop signal increased. Effective connectivity analysis indicated that, even in the absence of stop signals, the proactive engagement of the full control network is tailored to the likelihood of stop trial occurrence. Importantly, during actual stop trials, the strength of fronto-subcortical projections was stronger when stopping had to be engaged reactively compared with when it was proactively prepared in advance. These findings suggest that fronto-basal ganglia control is strongest in an unpredictable environment, where the prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the optimization of reactive control. Importantly, these results further indicate that the advance preparation of action plans reduces the need for reactive fronto-basal ganglia communication to gate voluntary actions. PMID:22875921

  4. Inhibition of aldose reductase and anti-cataract action of trans-anethole isolated from Foeniculum vulgare Mill. fruits.

    PubMed

    Dongare, Vandana; Kulkarni, Chaitanya; Kondawar, Manish; Magdum, Chandrakant; Haldavnekar, Vivek; Arvindekar, Akalpita

    2012-05-01

    Foeniculum vulgare fruits are routinely consumed for their carminative and mouth freshening effect. The plant was evaluated for aldose reductase inhibition and anti-diabetic action. Bioguided fractionation using silica gel column chromatography, HPLC, and GC-MS analysis revealed trans-anethole as the bioactive constituent possessing potent aldose reductase inhibitory action, with an IC50 value of 3.8μg/ml. Prolonged treatment with the pet ether fraction of the F. vulgare distillate demonstrated improvement in blood glucose, lipid profile, glycated haemoglobin and other parameters in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Trans-anethole could effectively show anti-cataract activity through the increase in soluble lens protein, reduced glutathione, catalase and SOD activity on in vitro incubation of the eye lens with 55mM glucose. Trans-anethole demonstrated noncompetitive to mixed type of inhibition of lens aldose reductase using Lineweaver Burk plot.

  5. Antinociceptive actions of R(-)-flurbiprofen--a non-cyclooxygenase inhibiting 2-arylpropionic acid--in rats.

    PubMed

    Geisslinger, G; Ferreira, S H; Menzel, S; Schlott, D; Brune, K

    1994-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of R(-)- and S(+)-flurbiprofen resulted in dose dependent antinociceptive behavior in the rat paw formalin test. S(+)-flurbiprofen was significantly more potent than the non-cyclooxygenase inhibiting R(-)-enantiomer with a potency ratio of about 3 to 1. Chiral inversion was very low and does not seem to account for the action of R(-)-flurbiprofen. In a modified Randall Selitto assay also both enantiomers were active in a dose dependent manner following systemic administration. Following local administration into the inflamed paw only S(+)-flurbiprofen showed significant dose related antinociceptive effects. R(-)-flurbiprofen was unable to block prostaglandin E2 induced hyperalgesia following local administration. Consequently, a central site of action independent of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition has to be discussed with respect to antinociceptive activity following systemic administration.

  6. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  7. Nobiletin and tangeretin ameliorate scratching behavior in mice by inhibiting the action of histamine and the activation of NF-κB, AP-1 and p38.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se-Eun; Ryu, Kwon-Ryeol; Park, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Suna; Teruya, Yuto; Han, Myung Joo; Woo, Je-Tae; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Nobiletin and tangeretin are polymethoxy flavonoids that are abundantly present in the pericarp of Citrus unshiu (family Rutaceae) and the fruit of Citrus depressa (family Rutaceae). They exhibit various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and anti-asthmatic effects. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of nobiletin and tangeretin, we measured their inhibitory effects in histamine- or compound 48/80-induced scratching behavioral mice. Nobiletin and tangeretin potently inhibited scratching behavior, as well as histamine-induced vascular permeability. Furthermore, they inhibited the expression of the allergic cytokines, IL-4 and TNF-α as well as the activation of their transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1 and p38 in histamine-stimulated skin tissues. They also inhibited the expression of IL-4 and TNF-α and the activation of NF-κB and c-jun in PMA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. Furthermore, nobiletin and tangeretin inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) activity and the IgE-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells. These agents showed potent anti-histamine effect through the Magnus test when guinea pig ileum was used. Based on these results, nobiletin and tangeretin may ameliorate scratching behavioral reactions by inhibiting the action of histamine as well as the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 via PKC.

  8. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  9. Multiple molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of lycopene in cancer inhibition.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Solís, Cristina; Pedraza-Chaverrí, Jose; Torres-Ramos, Mónica; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Cruz Salgado, Arturo; Serrano-García, Norma; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Sotelo, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  10. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Trejo-Solís, Cristina; Pedraza-Chaverrí, Jose; Torres-Ramos, Mónica; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Cruz Salgado, Arturo; Serrano-García, Norma; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Sotelo, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity. PMID:23970935

  11. Modes of Action of ADP-Ribosylated Elongation Factor 2 in Inhibiting the Polypeptide Elongation Cycle: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin C.; Xie, Honglin; Cai, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that ADP-ribosylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (EF2) leads to inhibition of protein synthesis, the mechanism by which ADP-ribosylated EF2 (ADPR•EF2) causes this inhibition remains controversial. Here, we applied modeling approaches to investigate the consequences of various modes of ADPR•EF2 inhibitory actions on the two coupled processes, the polypeptide chain elongation and ADP-ribosylation of EF2. Modeling of experimental data indicates that ADPR•EF2 fully blocks the late-phase translocation of tRNAs; but the impairment in the translocation upstream process, mainly the GTP-dependent factor binding with the pretranslocation ribosome and/or the guanine nucleotide exchange in EF2, is responsible for the overall inhibition kinetics. The reduced ADPR•EF2-ribosome association spares the ribosome to bind and shield native EF2 against toxin attack, thereby deferring the inhibition of protein synthesis inhibition and inactivation of EF2. Minimum association with the ribosome also keeps ADPR•EF2 in an accessible state for toxins to catalyze the reverse reaction when nicotinamide becomes available. Our work underscores the importance of unveiling the interactions between ADPR•EF2 and the ribosome, and argues against that toxins inhibit protein synthesis through converting native EF2 to a competitive inhibitor to actively disable the ribosome. PMID:23861744

  12. IL-4 inhibits osteoclast formation through a direct action on osteoclast precursors via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ1

    PubMed Central

    Bendixen, Amy C.; Shevde, Nirupama K.; Dienger, Krista M.; Willson, Timothy M.; Funk, Colin D.; Pike, J. Wesley

    2001-01-01

    IL-4 is a pleiotropic immune cytokine secreted by activated TH2 cells that inhibits bone resorption both in vitro and in vivo. The cellular targets of IL-4 action as well as its intracellular mechanism of action remain to be determined. We show here that IL-4 inhibits receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation through an action on osteoclast precursors that is independent of stromal cells. Interestingly, this inhibitory effect can be mimicked by both natural as well as synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ1 (PPARγ1) ligands and can be blocked by the irreversible PPARγ antagonist GW 9662. These findings suggest that the actions of IL-4 on osteoclast differentiation are mediated by PPARγ1, an interpretation strengthened by the observation that IL-4 can activate a PPARγ1-sensitive luciferase reporter gene in RAW264.7 cells. We also show that inhibitors of enzymes such as 12/15-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenases that produce known PPARγ1 ligands do not abrogate the IL-4 effect. These findings, together with the observation that bone marrow cells from 12/15-lipoxygenase-deficient mice retain sensitivity to IL-4, suggest that the cytokine may induce novel PPARγ1 ligands. Our results reveal that PPARγ1 plays an important role in the suppression of osteoclast formation by IL-4 and may explain the beneficial effects of the thiazolidinedione class of PPARγ1 ligands on bone loss in diabetic patients. PMID:11226258

  13. Aging pathways for organophosphate-inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase, including novel pathways for isomalathion, resolved by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Nachon, Florian; Froment, Marie-Thérèse; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2007-11-01

    Some organophosphorus compounds are toxic because they inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by phosphylation of the active site serine, forming a stable conjugate: Ser-O-P(O)-(Y)-(XR) (where X can be O, N, or S and Y can be methyl, OR, or SR). The inhibited enzyme can undergo an aging process, during which the X-R moiety is dealkylated by breaking either the P-X or the X-R bond depending on the specific compound, leading to a nonreactivatable enzyme. Aging mechanisms have been studied primarily using AChE. However, some recent studies have indicated that organophosphate-inhibited butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) may age through an alternative pathway. Our work utilized matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry to study the aging mechanism of human BChE inhibited by dichlorvos, echothiophate, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), isomalathion, soman, sarin, cyclohexyl sarin, VX, and VR. Inhibited BChE was aged in the presence of H2O18 to allow incorporation of (18)O, if cleavage was at the P-X bond. Tryptic-peptide organophosphate conjugates were identified through peptide mass mapping. Our results showed no aging of VX- and VR-treated BChE at 25 degrees C, pH 7.0. However, BChE inhibited by dichlorvos, echothiophate, DFP, soman, sarin, and cyclohexyl sarin aged exclusively through O-C bond cleavage, i.e., the classical X-R scission pathway. In contrast, isomalathion aged through both X-R and P-X pathways; the main aged product resulted from P-S bond cleavage and a minor product resulted from O-C and/or S-C bond cleavage. PMID:17698511

  14. [Inhibition of tumor cell growth by the action of high-energy sources].

    PubMed

    Rosell, D; Robles, J E; Abad, J I; Agúera, L G; De Castro, F; Zudaire, J J; Berián, J M

    1993-09-01

    In vitro comparison of the cytotoxic action of high-energy shockwave and megavoltage radiotherapy on tumoral cells. The inhibitory action these two therapeutic approaches have on cell viability is determined both singly and jointly, through life staining exclusion and nucleoside uptake tests. High energy shockwaves have a cytotoxic action significantly greater than low- and medium-energy levels of megavoltage radiation. The cytotoxic effect from megavoltage radiation is significantly greater than that resulting from high levels of high-energy shockwave as shown by the life staining exclusion tests. However, the nucleoside uptake test shows that cytotoxicity from either type of energy is no significantly different. When measuring the cumulative cytotoxic action of high energy shockwaves plus megavoltage radiation, the level of cytotoxicity is greater than the individual inhibitory actions on cell viability, but the degree of cytotoxicity induced cannot be comparable to that produced by higher energy levels from both sources separately.

  15. Inhibition of protein import into mitochondria by amphiphilic cations: potential targets and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, P F; Glaser, E

    1998-11-01

    In this paper we describe for the first time the inhibitory effect of three amphiphilic cations, trifluoperazine, propranolol and dibucaine on mitochondrial protein import. The amphiphilic cations did not affect binding of mitochondrial precursor proteins to mitochondria. Import into mitoplasts was affected in a similar manner to intact mitochondria, indicating that the protein import machinery of the inner membrane of mitochondria was responsible for the observed effect. At concentrations which completely inhibited protein import, the amphiphilic cations did not affect the membrane potential (DeltaPsi) across the inner membrane. The inhibitory potency of amphiphilic cations reflects their lipid/water partition coefficient and relatively high concentrations of the drugs were required for complete inhibition, hence we propose that the mechanism of protein import inhibition by amphiphilic cations is due to membrane perturbing effects. We discuss the implications of our findings in view of the possible connection between various inner mitochondrial membrane channels and the protein import pore.

  16. Action of ethanol on responses to nicotine from cerebellar Purkinje neurons: relationship to methyllycaconitine (MLA) inhibition of nicotine responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Criswell, H E; Breese, G R

    1999-08-01

    The effect of ethanol on responses to nicotine from rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons was investigated using extracellular single-unit recording. Systemic administration of ethanol initially enhanced the nicotine-induced inhibition from 50% of the Purkinje neurons. However, irrespective of whether there was an initial enhancement, systemic administration of ethanol antagonized the response to nicotine from the majority of Purkinje neurons. When varying ethanol concentrations were electro-osmotically applied to this neuronal cell type, the responses to nicotine (6/8) were enhanced when a low concentration of ethanol (40 mM) was in the pipette, whereas the majority of nicotine responses (10/11) were antagonized when a higher concentration of ethanol (160 mM) was applied to Purkinje neurons. Thus, the concentration of ethanol presented to the neuron seemed to explain the biphasic consequence of systemically administered ethanol on responses to nicotine. In order to determine whether ethanol affected a specific nACh receptor subtype containing the alpha-7 subunit, it was initially established that the nicotinic antagonists, alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) and methyllycaconitine (MLA), which are associated with this subunit, had identical actions on responses to nicotine from Purkinje neurons. When MLA was tested against responses to nicotine from this cell type, MLA antagonized the response to nicotine from 45% (9/20) of the neurons tested. In a direct comparison of the action of ethanol to inhibit responses to nicotine with the action of MLA on the same Purkinje neuron, ethanol inhibited responses to nicotine on all neurons sensitive to MLA. However, ethanol also affected nicotine-induced neural changes from some Purkinje neurons not sensitive to MLA antagonism of nicotine. These data support the supposition that ethanol affects a nACh receptor subtype which has an alpha-7 subunit as well as other nACh receptor subtypes without this specific subunit.

  17. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels as common mode of action for (mixtures of) distinct classes of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M L; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies.

  18. Completion Report for Well ER-12-4, Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain (includes Errata Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2006-05-01

    Well ER-12-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in May 2005, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit in the north-central portion of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located on Rainier/Aqueduct Mesa, northwest of Yucca Flat, within Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site. The well provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in U12t Tunnel, information on the pre-Tertiary rocks in the area, and depth to the regional water table.

  19. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states.

  20. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C.; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.; Damschroder, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  1. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  2. Ventral tegmental area neurons are either excited or inhibited by cocaine’s actions in the peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mejías-Aponte, Carlos A.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine’s multiple pharmacological substrates are ubiquitously present in the peripheral and central nervous system. Thus, upon its administration, cocaine acts in the periphery before directly acting in the brain. We determined whether cocaine alters ventral tegmental area (VTA) neuronal activity via peripheral actions, and whether this precedes its central actions. In urethane-anesthetized rats, we recorded VTA neurons responses to intravenous injections of two cocaine analogs: cocaine-hydrochloride (HCl, 0.25 mg/kg) that readily cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cocaine-methiodide (MI, 0.33 mg/kg) that does not cross the BBB. Both cocaine analogs produced sustained changes in discharge rates that began 5s after the initiation of a 10s drug infusion. Within the first 90s post-injection the magnitudes of neuronal responsive of both cocaine analogs were comparable, but later in time the effects of cocaine-HCl were stronger and persisted longer than those of cocaine-MI. The proportion of neurons responsive to cocaine-HCl was twice to that of cocaine-MI (74% and 35% respectively). Both analogs also differed in the response onsets. Cocaine-MI rarely evoked responses after 1 min whereas cocaine-HCl continued to evoke responses within 3 min post-injection. VTA neurons were either excited or inhibited by both cocaine analogs. Most units responsive to cocaine-MI, regardless of excitation or inhibition, had electrophysiological characteristics of putative DA neurons. Units inhibited by cocaine-HCl also had characteristic of DA neurons whereas excited neurons had widely varying action potential durations and discharge rates. Cocaine-MI and cocaine-HCl each produced changes in VTA neuron activity under full DA receptor blockade. However, the duration of inhibition was shortened, the number of excitations increased, and they occurred with an earlier onset during DA receptor blockade. These findings indicate that cocaine acts peripherally with a short latency and

  3. Corticospinal and reciprocal inhibition actions on human soleus motoneuron activity during standing and walking.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Boutros, Berthe; Sangari, Sina; Giboin, Louis-Solal; El Mendili, Mohamed-Mounir; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Knikou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal Ia inhibition constitutes a key segmental neuronal pathway for coordination of antagonist muscles. In this study, we investigated the soleus H-reflex and reciprocal inhibition exerted from flexor group Ia afferents on soleus motoneurons during standing and walking in 15 healthy subjects following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The effects of separate TMS or deep peroneal nerve (DPN) stimulation and the effects of combined (TMS + DPN) stimuli on the soleus H-reflex were assessed during standing and at mid- and late stance phases of walking. Subthreshold TMS induced short-latency facilitation on the soleus H-reflex that was present during standing and at midstance but not at late stance of walking. Reciprocal inhibition was increased during standing and at late stance but not at the midstance phase of walking. The effects of combined TMS and DPN stimuli on the soleus H-reflex significantly changed between tasks, resulting in an extra facilitation of the soleus H-reflex during standing and not during walking. Our findings indicate that corticospinal inputs and Ia inhibitory interneurons interact at the spinal level in a task-dependent manner, and that corticospinal modulation of reciprocal Ia inhibition is stronger during standing than during walking. PMID:25825912

  4. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  5. Anti-Proliferative Actions of T-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition in Thy1 Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Cove-Smith, Andrea; Mulgrew, Christopher J.; Rudyk, Olena; Dutt, Neelanjana; McLatchie, Linda M.; Shattock, Michael J.; Hendry, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant proliferation of mesangial cells (MCs) is a key finding in progressive glomerular disease. TH1177 is a small molecule that has been shown to inhibit low-voltage activated T-type Ca2+ channels (TCCs). The current study investigates the effect of TH1177 on MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Ca2+ channel inhibition on primary rat MC proliferation in vitro was studied using the microculture tetrazolium assay and by measuring bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. In vivo, rats with Thy1 nephritis were treated with TH1177 or vehicle. Glomerular injury and average glomerular cell number were determined in a blinded fashion. Immunostaining for Ki-67 and phosphorylated ERK were also performed. The expression of TCC isoforms in healthy and diseased tissue was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. TCC blockade caused a significant reduction in rat MC proliferation in vitro, whereas L-type inhibition had no effect. Treatment of Thy1 nephritis with TH1177 significantly reduced glomerular injury (P < 0.005) and caused a 49% reduction in glomerular cell number (P < 0.005) compared to the placebo. TH1177 also reduced Ki-67-positive and pERK-positive cells per glomerulus by 52% (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). These results demonstrate that TH1177 inhibits MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that TCC inhibition may be a useful strategy for studying and modifying MC proliferative responses to injury. PMID:23746655

  6. Anti-proliferative actions of T-type calcium channel inhibition in Thy1 nephritis.

    PubMed

    Cove-Smith, Andrea; Mulgrew, Christopher J; Rudyk, Olena; Dutt, Neelanjana; McLatchie, Linda M; Shattock, Michael J; Hendry, Bruce M

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant proliferation of mesangial cells (MCs) is a key finding in progressive glomerular disease. TH1177 is a small molecule that has been shown to inhibit low-voltage activated T-type Ca(2+) channels (TCCs). The current study investigates the effect of TH1177 on MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Ca(2+) channel inhibition on primary rat MC proliferation in vitro was studied using the microculture tetrazolium assay and by measuring bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. In vivo, rats with Thy1 nephritis were treated with TH1177 or vehicle. Glomerular injury and average glomerular cell number were determined in a blinded fashion. Immunostaining for Ki-67 and phosphorylated ERK were also performed. The expression of TCC isoforms in healthy and diseased tissue was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. TCC blockade caused a significant reduction in rat MC proliferation in vitro, whereas L-type inhibition had no effect. Treatment of Thy1 nephritis with TH1177 significantly reduced glomerular injury (P < 0.005) and caused a 49% reduction in glomerular cell number (P < 0.005) compared to the placebo. TH1177 also reduced Ki-67-positive and pERK-positive cells per glomerulus by 52% (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). These results demonstrate that TH1177 inhibits MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that TCC inhibition may be a useful strategy for studying and modifying MC proliferative responses to injury. PMID:23746655

  7. Under What Conditions Do Young Children Have Difficulty Inhibiting Manual Actions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andrew; Riggs, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding how responses become prepotent is essential for understanding when inhibitory control is needed in everyday behavior. The authors investigated the conditions under which manual actions became prepotent in a go/no-go task. Children had to open boxes that contained stickers on go trials and leave shut boxes that were empty on no-go…

  8. Action video gaming and cognitive control: playing first person shooter games is associated with improvement in working memory but not action inhibition.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Zmigrod, Sharon; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-03-01

    The interest in the influence of videogame experience in our daily life is constantly growing. "First Person Shooter" (FPS) games require players to develop a flexible mindset to rapidly react and monitor fast moving visual and auditory stimuli, and to inhibit erroneous actions. This study investigated whether and to which degree experience with such videogames generalizes to other cognitive control tasks. Experienced video game players (VGPs) and individuals with little to no videogame experience (NVGPs) performed on a N-back task and a stop-signal paradigm that provide a relatively well-established diagnostic measure of the monitoring and updating of working memory (WM) and response inhibition (an index of behavioral impulsivity), respectively. VGPs were faster and more accurate in the monitoring and updating of WM than NVGPs, which were faster in reacting to go signals, but showed comparable stopping performance. Our findings support the idea that playing FPS games is associated with enhanced flexible updating of task-relevant information without affecting impulsivity.

  9. Acquired Mitochondrial Abnormalities, Including Epigenetic Inhibition of Superoxide Dismutase 2, in Pulmonary Hypertension and Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    There is no cure for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Therapies lack efficacy and/or are toxic, reflecting a failure to target disease abnormalities that are distinct from processes vital to normal cells. NSCLC and PAH share reversible mitochondrial-metabolic abnormalities which may offer selective therapeutic targets. The following mutually reinforcing, mitochondrial abnormalities favor proliferation, impair apoptosis, and are relatively restricted to PAH and cancer cells: (1) Epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2) by methylation of CpG islands creates a pseudohypoxic redox environment that causes normoxic activation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α). (2) HIF-1α increases expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), which impairs oxidative metabolism and promotes a glycolytic metabolic state. (3) Mitochondrial fragmentation, partially due to mitofusin-2 downregulation, promotes proliferation. This review focuses on the recent discovery that decreased expression of SOD2, a putative tumor-suppressor gene and the major source of H2O2, results from hypermethylation of CpG islands. In cancer and PAH hypermethylation of a site in the enhancer region of intron 2 inhibits SOD2 transcription. In normal PASMC, SOD2 siRNA decreases H2O2 and activates HIF-1α. In PAH, reduced SOD2 expression decreases H2O2, reduces the cytosol and thereby activates HIF-1α. This causes a glycolytic shift in metabolism and increases the proliferation/apoptosis ratio by downregulating Kv1.5 channels, increasing cytosolic calcium, and inhibiting caspases. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, which restores SOD2 expression, corrects the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance in PAH and cancer cells. The specificity of PAH for lung vessels may relate to the selective upregulation of DNA methyltransferases that mediate CpG methylation in PASMC (DNA MT-1A and -3B). SOD2 augmentation inactivates HIF-1α in PAH

  10. Investigation of gender differences in the cardiovascular actions of direct and indirect sympathomimetic stimulants including cathinone in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Alsufyani, H A; Docherty, J R

    2016-01-01

    We have studied gender differences in the direct and indirect sympathomimetic cardiovascular effects of the stimulant cathinone (from Khat) (and for comparison methylenedioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) and the archetypal indirect sympathomimetic agent tyramine, employing male and female Wistar rats. Animals were sympathectomized by treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine or treated with vehicle. In male and female vehicle-treated pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats, all three agonists (0.001-1 mg/kg) produced significant tachycardia, tyramine produced large pressor, and in high doses small depressor responses, MDMA produced small pressor responses, and cathinone produced only minor pressor effects. In sympathectomized rats, pressor responses, even those to tyramine, were virtually abolished, and depressor responses to tyramine were abolished. In vehicle-treated rats, the tachycardia to tyramine, but not the tachycardia to cathinone or MDMA, was significantly greater in male than female rats. This may suggest that the mechanism of the tachycardia to tyramine differs from those of the stimulants cathinone and MDMA. Following sympathectomy, there were no differences between male and female rats in the tachycardia to any agent. Hence, there were gender differences in the tachycardia response for tyramine, but no gender differences in the cardiovascular responses to the widely used recreational stimulants cathinone and MDMA. Cardiac stimulant actions of cathinone and MDMA were similar in male and female rats. PMID:27534387

  11. Inhibition of carotenoid synthesis as a mechanism of action of amitrole, dichlormate, and pyriclor.

    PubMed

    Burns, E R; Buchanan, G A; Carter, M C

    1971-01-01

    Amitrole (3-amino-s-triazole), dichlormate (3,4-dichlorobenzyl methylcarbamate), and pyriclor (2,3,5-trichloro-4-pyridinol) inhibited normal carotenogenesis in etiolated wheat (Triticum aestivum L. var. Coker 65-20) seedlings. Carotenoid precursors accumulated in treated plants. In dichlormate-treated plants, zeta-carotene accumulated, whereas phytofluene, phytoene, and zeta-carotene accumulated in amitrole- and pyriclor-treated plants. None of the herbicides interfered with protochlorophyllide synthesis or its conversion to chlorophyllide when etiolated plants were illuminated. Chlorophyll accumulated in treated plants exposed to light at 60 foot candles, but was unstable and partially destroyed by illumination at 4000 foot candles. These data suggest that the phytotoxicity of amitrole, pyriclor, and dichlormate is due to inhibition of the synthesis of carotenoids and to the consequent photodestruction of chlorophyll and chloroplast disruption. PMID:16657570

  12. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Replication by α-Amanitin: Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mahy, B. W. J.; Hastie, N. D.; Armstrong, Sylvia J.

    1972-01-01

    The replication of influenza virus in chick embryo fibroblast cells is inhibited by α-amanitin added during the first 2 hr of infection at concentrations similar to those required to inhibit cellular DNA-dependent RNA polymerase form II in vivo. Of two periods of increased RNA synthesis observed in cells infected with influenza virus, only the first, occurring from 0 to 2 hr after infection, is sensitive to α-amanitin. During this early period, there is a stimulation of the activity of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II of nuclei isolated from infected cells. The data suggest that DNA transcription mediated by polymerase II is essential for influenza virus replication. PMID:4504353

  13. Dithiocarbamates strongly inhibit carbonic anhydrases and show antiglaucoma action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-02-23

    A series of dithiocarbamates were prepared by reaction of primary/secondary amines with carbon disulfide in the presence of bases. These compounds were tested for the inhibition of four human (h) isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase, CA (EC 4.2.1.1), hCA I, II, IX, and XII, involved in pathologies such as glaucoma (CA II and XII) or cancer (CA IX). Several low nanomolar inhibitors targeting these CAs were detected. The X-ray crystal structure of the hCA II adduct with morpholine dithiocarbamate evidenced the inhibition mechanism of these compounds, which coordinate to the metal ion through a sulfur atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding function. Some dithiocarbamates showed an effective intraocular pressure lowering activity in an animal model of glucoma. PMID:22276570

  14. Dithiocarbamates strongly inhibit carbonic anhydrases and show antiglaucoma action in vivo#

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2012-01-01

    A series of dithiocarbamates was prepared by reaction of primary/secondary amines with carbon disulfide in the presence of bases. These compounds were tested for the inhibition of 4 human (h) isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase, CA (EC 4.2.1.1), hCA I, II, IX and XII, involved in pathologies such as glaucoma (CA II and XII) or cancer (CA IX). Several low nanomolar inhibitors targeting these CAs were detected. X-ray crystal structure of hCA II adduct with morpholine dithiocarbamate evidenced the inhibition mechanism of these compounds, which coordinate to the metal ion through a sulfur atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding function. Some dithiocarbamates showed effective intraocular pressure lowering activity in an animal model of glucoma. PMID:22276570

  15. Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Transferrins: Selective Inhibition of H+-ATPase ▿

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Fierro, José F.

    2010-01-01

    Two bacterial species with different metabolic features, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactococcus lactis, were used as a comparative experimental model to investigate the antimicrobial target and mechanism of transferrins. In anaerobiosis, P. aeruginosa cells were not susceptible to lactoferrin (hLf) or transferrin (hTf). In aerobiosis, the cells were susceptible but O2 consumption was not modified, indicating that components of the electron transport chain (ETC) were not targeted. However, the respiratory chain inhibitor piericidin A significantly reduced the killing activity of both proteins. Moreover, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP), a reducing agent that accepts electrons from the ETC coupled to H+ extrusion, made P. aeruginosa susceptible to hLf and hTf in anaerobiosis. These results indicated that active cooperation of the cell was indispensable for the antimicrobial effect. For L. lactis cells lacking an ETC, the absence of a detectable transmembrane electrical potential in hLf-treated cells suggested a loss of H+-ATPase activity. Furthermore, the inhibition of ATPase activity and H+ translocation (inverted membrane vesicles) provided direct evidence of the ability of hLf to inhibit H+-ATPase in L. lactis. Based on these data, we propose that hLf and hTf also inhibit the H+-ATPase of respiring P. aeruginosa cells. Such inhibition thereby interferes with reentry of H+ from the periplasmic space to the cytoplasm, resulting in perturbation of intracellular pH and the transmembrane proton gradient. Consistent with this hypothesis, periplasmic H+ accumulation was prevented by anaerobiosis or by piericidin A or was induced by DCIP in anaerobiosis. Collectively, these results indicate that transferrins target H+-ATPase and interfere with H+ translocation, yielding a lethal effect in vitro. PMID:20625147

  16. Potentiation of acetylcholine action by huperzine-A and physostigmine on some vertebrate effectors, including human iris sphincter muscle.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Buerki, Robin A; Patil, Popat N

    2003-04-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to compare the acetylcholine potentiating action of huperzine-A with acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine on the frog rectus abdominus muscle, rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation, guinea pig ileum and human iris sphincter muscle. In vitro on the frog rectus abdominus muscle, microM of each alkaloid, incubated for 10 min, shifted the acetylcholine concentration response curve to the left. At EC(50) level, physostigmine potentiated acetylcholine response by 4-fold. The potentiation by huperzine-A was 40-fold. The acetylcholine maximum effect, relative to the control, increased to approximately 130% by each alkaloid. Neurally mediated twitch contraction of the rat diaphragm, a skeletal muscle at 1 microM was also potentiated more by huperzine-A than that by physostigmine. Neuromuscular block by (+)-tubocurarine was reversed more easily by huperzine-A than that by physostigmine. On guinea pig ileum, a 30 nM concentration of each alkaloid incubated for 5 min potentiated acetylcholine (10 nM) by 42%, and 33% for huperzine-A and physostigmine respectively. The difference in potentiation between the alkaloids was not significant. At 300 nM of each alkaloid, intrinsic indirect contractions were observed on the ileum, where the rate of contraction by huperzine-A was faster than that by physostigmine. On the iris sphincter, huperzine-A and physostigmine produced a concentration-dependent effect. Maximum effect after each alkaloid was achieved at 30 microM. Potentiation of acetylcholine response by 0.3 microM huperzine-A after a 10-min incubation was greater than that achieved by physostigmine at an equivalent concentration on the contralateral iris sphincter. In summary, huperzine-A exhibits greater acetylcholine potentiating activity on vertebrate muscles than that produced by physostigmine. The results are discussed in relation to the potential therapeutic value of huperzine-A.

  17. Control of Inhibition by the Direct Action of Cannabinoids on GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Golovko, Tatiana; Min, Rogier; Lozovaya, Natalia; Falconer, Caroline; Yatsenko, Natalia; Tsintsadze, Timur; Tsintsadze, Vera; Ledent, Catherine; Harvey, Robert J; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J; Rozov, Andrei; Burnashev, Nail

    2015-09-01

    Cannabinoids are known to regulate inhibitory synaptic transmission via activation of presynaptic G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). Additionally, recent studies suggest that cannabinoids can also directly interact with recombinant GABAA receptors (GABAARs), potentiating currents activated by micromolar concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the impact of this direct interaction on GABAergic inhibition in central nervous system is unknown. Here we report that currents mediated by recombinant GABAARs activated by high (synaptic) concentrations of GABA as well as GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) at neocortical fast spiking (FS) interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses are suppressed by exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids in a CB1R-independent manner. This IPSC suppression may account for disruption of inhibitory control of pyramidal neurons by FS interneurons. At FS interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses, endocannabinoids induce synaptic low-pass filtering of GABAAR-mediated currents evoked by high-frequency stimulation. The CB1R-independent suppression of inhibition is synapse specific. It does not occur in CB1R containing hippocampal cholecystokinin-positive interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses. Furthermore, in contrast to synaptic receptors, the activity of extrasynaptic GABAARs in neocortical pyramidal neurons is enhanced by cannabinoids in a CB1R-independent manner. Thus, cannabinoids directly interact differentially with synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAARs, providing a potent novel context-dependent mechanism for regulation of inhibition.

  18. Antidepressant action of ketamine via mTOR is mediated by inhibition of nitrergic Rheb degradation.

    PubMed

    Harraz, M M; Tyagi, R; Cortés, P; Snyder, S H

    2016-03-01

    As traditional antidepressants act only after weeks/months, the discovery that ketamine, an antagonist of glutamate/N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, elicits antidepressant actions in hours has been transformative. Its mechanism of action has been elusive, though enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is a major feature. We report a novel signaling pathway wherein NMDA receptor activation stimulates generation of nitric oxide (NO), which S-nitrosylates glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Nitrosylated GAPDH complexes with the ubiquitin-E3-ligase Siah1 and Rheb, a small G protein that activates mTOR. Siah1 degrades Rheb leading to reduced mTOR signaling, while ketamine, conversely, stabilizes Rheb that enhances mTOR signaling. Drugs selectively targeting components of this pathway may offer novel approaches to the treatment of depression. PMID:26782056

  19. Antidepressant action of ketamine via mTOR is mediated by inhibition of nitrergic Rheb degradation

    PubMed Central

    Harraz, Maged M.; Tyagi, Richa; Cortés, Pedro; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2016-01-01

    As traditional antidepressants act only after weeks/months, the discovery that ketamine, an antagonist of glutamate/NMDA receptors, elicits antidepressant actions in hours has been transformative. Its mechanism of action has been elusive, though enhanced mTOR signaling is a major feature. We report a novel signaling pathway wherein NMDA receptor activation stimulates generation of nitric oxide (NO), which S-nitrosylates glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Nitrosylated GAPDH complexes with the ubiquitin-E3-ligase Siah1 and Rheb, a small G protein that activates mTOR. Siah1 degrades Rheb leading to reduced mTOR signaling, while ketamine, conversely, stabilizes Rheb which enhances mTOR signaling. Drugs selectively targeting components of this pathway may offer novel approaches to the treatment of depression. PMID:26782056

  20. 78 FR 42805 - HarperCollins Publishers Distribution Operations Including On-Site Leased Workers From Action...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... of determination was published in the Federal Register on May 15, 2013 (Volume 78 FR Pages 28628... Employment and Training Administration HarperCollins Publishers Distribution Operations Including On- Site... to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance on April 19, 2013, applicable to workers of...

  1. 30 CFR 254.23 - What information must I include in the “Emergency response action plan” section?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Plans for Outer Continental Shelf... the oil spill reporting forms included in the Area Contingency Plan or an equivalent reporting...

  2. 30 CFR 254.23 - What information must I include in the “Emergency response action plan” section?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Plans for Outer Continental Shelf Facilities § 254.23 What information... for spill notification. The plan must provide for the use of the oil spill reporting forms included...

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (includes ROTC No. 1, date 01/25/1999)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    1999-07-29

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 254 was used between 1963 through 1973 for the decontamination of test-car hardware and tooling used in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program. The CAS is composed of a fenced area measuring approximately 119 feet by 158 feet that includes Building 3126, an associated aboveground storage tank, a potential underground storage area, two concrete decontamination pads, a generator, two sumps, and a storage yard. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that decontamination activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) onto building surfaces, down building drains to associated leachfields, and to soils associated with two concrete decontamination pads located outside the building. Therefore, the scope of the corrective action field investigation will involve soil sampling at biased and random locations in the yard using a direct-push method, scanning and static radiological surveys, and laboratory analyses of all soil/building samples. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that solvents and degreasers may have been used in the decontamination processes; therefore, potential COCs include volatile/semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, asbestos, gamma-emitting radionuclides, plutonium, uranium, and strontium-90. The results of this

  4. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David M.; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C.; Bunt, Joy C.; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = −0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism. PMID:18056794

  5. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mott, David M; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C; Bunt, Joy C; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = -0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism.

  6. Anti-inflammatory action of legume isoflavonoid sophoricoside through inhibition on cyclooxygenase-2 activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hak; Chung, Eun Yong; Min, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Min, Kyung Rak; Kim, Youngsoo

    2003-05-01

    Soy is a main source of isoflavonoids which are of high dietary intake for the oriental population. In this study, the anti-inflammatory action of sophoricoside, an isoflavone glycoside isolated from immature fruits of Sophora japonica L. (Leguminosae), has been demonstrated. When administered orally at > 100 mg/kg or injected intravenously at > 10 mg/kg, sophoricoside showed significant reduction of carrageenin-induced paw edema in mice. Sophoricoside has been identified as a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity with an IC50 value of 3.3 microM. PMID:12802736

  7. Inhibition of ACh release at an Aplysia synapse by neurotoxic phospholipases A2: specific receptors and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Fossier, P; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Baux, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Monochain (OS2) and multichain (taipoxin) neurotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), purified from taipan snake venom, both inhibited ACh release at a concentration of 20 nM (90% inhibition in 2 h) at an identified synapse from buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. The Na+ current was unchanged upon application of either OS2 or taipoxin. Conversely, presynaptic K+ currents (IA and IK) were increased by taipoxin but not by OS2. In addition, OS2 induced a significant decrease of the presynaptic Ca2+ current (30%) while taipoxin increased this latter current by 20-30%. 3. Bee venom PLA2, another monochain neurotoxic PLA2, also inhibited ACh release while non-toxic enzymatically active PLA2s like OS1 (also purified from taipan snake venom) or porcine pancreatic PLA2 elicited a much weaker inhibition of ACh release, suggesting a specific action of neurotoxic PLA2s versus non-toxic PLA2s on ACh release. 4. Using iodinated OS2, specific high affinity binding sites with molecular masses of 140 and 18 kDa have been identified on Aplysia ganglia. The maximal binding capacities were 55 and 300-400 fmol (mg protein)-1 for membrane preparations from whole and buccal ganglia, respectively. These binding sites are of high affinity for neurotoxic PLA2s (Kd values, 100-800 pM) and of very low affinity for non-toxic PLA2s (Kd values in the micromolar range), thus indicating that these binding sites are presumably involved in the blockade of ACh release by neurotoxic PLA2s. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8583413

  8. Computational modeling of inhibition of voltage-gated Ca channels: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wing-Chiu; Ghouri, Iffath; Taggart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs). Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models—of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC), cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN), and ventricular cells—to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents—the L-type (ICaL) and T-type (ICaT) Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10%) alone, or ICaT (40%) alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine specificity of action

  9. Insights in the mechanism of action and inhibition of N-acylethanolamine acid amidase by means of computational methods.

    PubMed

    Lodola, Alessio; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Computer-aided approaches are widely used in modern medicinal chemistry to improve the efficiency of the discovery phase. N-Acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA) is a cysteine amidase belonging to the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolases that primarily degrades anti-inflammatory and analgesic lipid amide palmitoylethanolamide. In this chapter, we review our contribution to (i) the determination of the reaction mechanism of amide hydrolysis catalyzed by cysteine Ntn-hydrolases and (ii) the discovery and optimization of active-site-directed inhibitors of NAAA characterized by a β-lactone warhead. The combination of different computational tools, ranging from homology modeling, docking, and mechanistic simulations based on hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potentials, contributed to the elucidation of the mechanism of action and inhibition of NAAA enzyme and to the design of more potent inhibitors.

  10. Cannabidiol protects liver from binge alcohol-induced steatosis by mechanisms including inhibition of oxidative stress and increase in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Wu, Defeng; Devi, Lakshmi A; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Cederbaum, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Acute alcohol drinking induces steatosis, and effective prevention of steatosis can protect liver from progressive damage caused by alcohol. Increased oxidative stress has been reported as one mechanism underlying alcohol-induced steatosis. We evaluated whether cannabidiol, which has been reported to function as an antioxidant, can protect the liver from alcohol-generated oxidative stress-induced steatosis. Cannabidiol can prevent acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis in mice, possibly by preventing the increase in oxidative stress and the activation of the JNK MAPK pathway. Cannabidiol per se can increase autophagy both in CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells and in mouse liver. Importantly, cannabidiol can prevent the decrease in autophagy induced by alcohol. In conclusion, these results show that cannabidiol protects mouse liver from acute alcohol-induced steatosis through multiple mechanisms including attenuation of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress, prevention of JNK MAPK activation, and increasing autophagy.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-05-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, CAU 214 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters; 11-22-03, Drum; 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage; 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials; 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-99-18, Storage Area; 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); and 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker). These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). The suspected contaminants and critical analyte s for CAU 214 include oil (total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics [TPH-DRO], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), pesticides (chlordane, heptachlor, 4,4-DDT), barium, cadmium, chronium, lubricants (TPH-DRO, TPH-gasoline-range organics [GRO]), and fly ash (arsenic). The land-use zones where CAU 214 CASs are located dictate that future land uses will be limited to nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the corrective action decision document.

  12. THE INHIBITION OF THE BACTERIOSTATIC ACTION OF SULFONAMIDE DRUGS BY SUBSTANCES OF ANIMAL AND BACTERIAL ORIGIN.

    PubMed

    Macleod, C M

    1940-08-31

    Sulfonamide inhibitor has been demonstrated in extracts of fresh normal muscle, pancreas, and spleen of certain animals. When autolysis of tissues takes place the amount of inhibitor is greatly increased. Fresh liver from beef, rabbit, and guinea pig is free of active inhibitor, although inhibitor is demonstrable in autolysates of this tissue. Fresh rabbit kidney is likewise free of active inhibitor. Following acid hydrolysis extracts of fresh rabbit liver and kidney cause sulfonamide inhibition. Normal human urine contains little or no active inhibitor. However, upon acid hydrolysis, inhibitor is uniformly present. Sulfonamide inhibitor is present in some, but not all, sterile serous effusions occurring during certain diseases. Inhibitor was found uniformly in pus. None was found in blood serum. In certain species of bacteria the inhibitor is found in the cells only and is not demonstrable in the culture medium, whereas in other species, the inhibitor is found in the culture supernatant, and the cells themselves are relatively free. The development of sulfapyridine fastness in a strain of Pneumococcus Type I is accompanied by a greatly increased production of sulfonamide inhibitor.

  13. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation. PMID:8115666

  14. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation.

  15. Supercritical fluid extract of Lycium chinense Miller root inhibition of melanin production and its potential mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mode of action of Lycium chinense Miller root extract in skin care has never been explored. In the present study, Lycium chinense Miller root was extracted by the supercritical fluid CO2 extraction method. Methods In the present study, the components of the root extract were analyzed by HPLC. The effects of the extract on tyrosinase activity and melanin content were determined spectrophotometrically; the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins was determined by Western blotting; the possible signaling pathways involved in the root extract-mediated depigmentation were also investigated using specific inhibitors. Results The results revealed that the SFE of Lycium chinense Miller root (2.37-7.11 mg/mL) effectively suppressed intracellular tyrosinase activity and decreased the melanin content in B16F10 cells. The root extract also effectively decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Furthermore, the root extract decreased the expression of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1) and then inhibited melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. The root extract also showed antioxidant capacities and depleted cellular ROS. Conclusions Our results indicate that the SFE of Lycium chinense Miller root inhibited melanogenesis in B16F10 cells by down-regulation of both mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathways or through its antioxidant properties. PMID:24972978

  16. Role of hydroxyl group in the inhibitive action of benzoic acid toward corrosion of aluminum in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P.N.S.; Singh, A.K.; Wadhwani, R.

    1999-10-01

    Corrosion inhibition action of benzoic acid, p-hydroxy benzoic acid, 2-4-dihydroxy benzoic acid, and 3-4-5-trihydroxy benzoic acid toward aluminum alloy 3003 (UNS A93003) in 20% (wt%) nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) using different concentrations of these compounds at 30 C, 40 C, and 50 C has been studied thoroughly. 3-4-5-trihydroxy benzoic acid (inhibition efficiency (IE): 30% and 72%) was the most effective inhibitor followed by 2-4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (IE: 22% to 62%) p-hydroxy benzoic acid (IE: 11% to 52%), and benzoic acid (IE: 2.5% to 15%). IE increased with concentration and its maximum value was observed at 0.5% concentration of all inhibitors used. The percentage of IE of the inhibitors decreased with an increase in temperature from 30 C to 50 C. Values of heat adsorption and activation energy were calculated from weight loss data, which came out in the range for the reaction occurring at the surface. The behavior of inhibitors studied deviated from the Langmuir isotherm. The IE of higher hydroxy species was improved when more hydroxy centers were added. Anodic and cathodic polarization curves were shifted toward lower current density regions in the presence of inhibitors. This revealed that they were mixed inhibitors.

  17. Histamine H1 receptor involvement in prepulse inhibition and memory function: Relevance for the antipsychotic actions of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    Roegge, Cindy S.; Perraut, Charles; Hao, Xin; Levin, Edward D.

    2009-01-01

    Histamine H1 blockade is one of the more prominent actions of the multi-receptor acting antipsychotic clozapine. It is currently not known how much this H1 antagonism of clozapine contributes to the therapeutic or adverse side effects of clozapine. The current studies with Sprague-Dawley rats were conducted to determine the participation of histaminergic H1 receptor subtype in sensorimotor plasticity and memory function affected by clozapine using tests of prepulse inhibition (PPI) and radial-arm maze choice accuracy. The PPI impairment caused by the glutamate antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) was significantly attenuated by clozapine. In the current project, we found that the selective H1 antagonist pyrilamine also reversed the dizocilpine-induced impairment in PPI of tactile startle with an auditory prepulse. In the radial-arm maze (RAM), pyrilamine, like clozapine, impaired working memory and caused a significant dose-related slowing of response. Pyrilamine, however, decreased the number of reference memory errors. We have previously shown that nicotine effectively attenuates the clozapine-induced working memory impairment, but in the current study, nicotine did not significantly alter the effects of pyrilamine on the RAM. In summary, the therapeutic effect of clozapine in reversing PPI impairment was mimicked by the H1 antagonist pyrilamine, while pyrilamine had a mixed effect on cognition. Pyrilamine impaired working memory but improved reference memory in rats. Thus, H1 antagonism seems to play a role in part of the beneficial actions of antipsychotics, such as clozapine. PMID:17382376

  18. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on glutamine action in a bacterial translocation model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rosana G C; Quirino, Iara E P; Viana, Mirelle L; Generoso, Simone V; Nicoli, Jacques R; Martins, Flaviano S; Nogueira-Machado, José A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2014-01-14

    Glutamine may be a precursor for NO synthesis, which may play a crucial role in bacterial translocation (BT). The goal of the present study was to investigate the potential effects of glutamine on BT and the immunological response in an experimental model of NO synthase inhibition by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Mice were randomly assigned to four groups: sham; intestinal obstruction (IO); IO+500 mg/kg per d glutamine (GLN); IO+GLN plus 10 mg/kg per d l-NAME (GLN/LN). The groups were pretreated for 7 d. BT was induced by ileal ligation and was assessed 18 h later by measuring the radioactivity of 99mTc-Escherichia coli in the blood and organs. Mucosal damage was determined using a histological analysis. Intestinal permeability (IP) was assessed by measuring the levels of 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in the blood at 4, 8 and 18 h after surgery. IgA and cytokine concentrations were determined by ELISA in the intestinal fluid and plasma, respectively. BT was increased in the GLN/LN and IO groups than in the GLN and sham groups. IP and intestinal mucosa structure of the sham, GLN and GLN/LN groups were similar. The GLN group had the highest levels of interferon-γ, while IL-10 and secretory IgA levels were higher than those of the IO group but similar to those of the GLN/LN group. The present results suggest that effects of the glutamine pathway on BT were mediated by NO. The latter also interferes with the pro-inflammatory systemic immunological response. On the other hand, IP integrity preserved by the use of glutamine is independent of NO.

  19. Serotonin spillover onto the axon initial segment of motoneurons induces central fatigue by inhibiting action potential initiation

    PubMed Central

    Cotel, Florence; Exley, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Motor fatigue induced by physical activity is an everyday experience characterized by a decreased capacity to generate motor force. Factors in both muscles and the central nervous system are involved. The central component of fatigue modulates the ability of motoneurons to activate muscle adequately independently of the muscle physiology. Indirect evidence indicates that central fatigue is caused by serotonin (5-HT), but the cellular mechanisms are unknown. In a slice preparation from the spinal cord of the adult turtle, we found that prolonged stimulation of the raphe-spinal pathway—as during motor exercise—activated 5-HT1A receptors that decreased motoneuronal excitability. Electrophysiological tests combined with pharmacology showed that focal activation of 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS), but not on other motoneuronal compartments, inhibited the action potential initiation by modulating a Na+ current. Immunohistochemical staining against 5-HT revealed a high-density innervation of 5-HT terminals on the somatodendritic membrane and a complete absence on the AIS. This observation raised the hypothesis that a 5-HT spillover activates receptors at this latter compartment. We tested it by measuring the level of extracellular 5-HT with cyclic voltammetry and found that prolonged stimulations of the raphe-spinal pathway increased the level of 5-HT to a concentration sufficient to activate 5-HT1A receptors. Together our results demonstrate that prolonged release of 5-HT during motor activity spills over from its release sites to the AIS of motoneurons. Here, activated 5-HT1A receptors inhibit firing and, thereby, muscle contraction. Hence, this is a cellular mechanism for central fatigue. PMID:23487756

  20. Inhibition of Nav1.7 channels by methyl eugenol as a mechanism underlying its antinociceptive and anesthetic actions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Jun; Tabakoff, Boris; Levinson, Simon R; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Methyl eugenol is a major active component extracted from the Chinese herb Asari Radix et Rhizoma, which has been used to treat toothache and other pain. Previous in vivo studies have shown that methyl eugenol has anesthetic and antinociceptive effects. The aim of this study was to determine the possible mechanism underlying its effect on nervous system disorders. Methods: The direct interaction of methyl eugenol with Na+ channels was explored and characterized using electrophysiological recordings from Nav1.7-transfected CHO cells. Results: In whole-cell patch clamp mode, methyl eugenol tonically inhibited peripheral nerve Nav1.7 currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 295 μmol/L at a −100 mV holding potential. Functionally, methyl eugenol preferentially bound to Nav1.7 channels in the inactivated and/or open state, with weaker binding to channels in the resting state. Thus, in the presence of methyl eugenol, Nav1.7 channels exhibited reduced availability for activation in a steady-state inactivation protocol, strong use-dependent inhibition, enhanced binding kinetics, and slow recovery from inactivation compared to untreated channels. An estimation of the affinity of methyl eugenol for the resting and inactivated states of the channel also demonstrated that methyl eugenol preferentially binds to inactivated channels, with a 6.4 times greater affinity compared to channels in the resting state. The failure of inactivated channels to completely recover to control levels at higher concentrations of methyl eugenol implies that the drug may drive more drug-bound, fast-inactivated channels into drug-bound, slow-inactivated channels. Conclusion: Methyl eugenol is a potential candidate as an effective local anesthetic and analgesic. The antinociceptive and anesthetic effects of methyl eugenol result from the inhibitory action of methyl eugenol on peripheral Na+ channels. PMID:26051112

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 9/17/2002)

    SciTech Connect

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

    2002-05-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 5 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 5 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 05-16-01, Landfill; 06-08-01, Landfill; 06-15-02, Sanitary Landfill; 06-15-03, Sanitary Landfill; 12-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 20-15-01, Landfill; 23-15-03, Disposal Site. Located between Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 5 consists of unlined landfills used in support of disposal operations between 1952 and 1992. Large volumes of solid waste were produced from the projects which used the CAU 5 landfills. Waste disposed in these landfills may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. During the 1992 to 1995 time frame, the NTS was used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. Instead of managing solid waste at one or two disposal sites, the practice on the NTS was to dispose of solid waste in the vicinity of the project. A review of historical documentation, process knowledge, personal interviews, and inferred activities associated with this CAU identified the following as potential contaminants of concern: volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range organics), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Metals, plus nickel and zinc. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2002-01-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the results of

  3. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  4. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection: inhibition by polysaccharide from Ginkgo biloba exocarp and mode of its action.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hee; Park, Jang-Soon; Lee, Seung-Woong; Hwang, Seock-Yeon; Young, Bae-Eun; Choi, Hwa-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is the predominant cause of severe entero-pathogenic diarrhea in swine. Until now there is no recorded clinically effective antiviral chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of diseases caused by PEDV. This study aimed to investigate in vitro anti-PEDV effect of polysaccharide from Ginkgo biloba exocarp and mode of its action. The polysaccharide exhibited potent antiviral activity against PEDV reducing the formation of a visible CPE [a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50)=1.7±1.3μg/mL], compared to positive control, ribavirin and it did not show cytotoxicity at 100μg/mL [a 50% cytotoxicity concentration (CC50)=100μg/mL]. Polysaccharide also showed effective inhibitory effects when added at the viral attachment and entry steps. Moreover, polysaccharide effectively inactivated PEDV infection in time-, dose- and temperature-dependent manners. Overall, this research revealed that polysaccharide could inhibit PEDV infection, and that polysaccharide may be involved in PEDV-Vero cell interactions, as the virus attachment and entry to the Vero cells was hindered by the polysaccharide. Therefore, polysaccharide possessing effective inhibitory effect on viral attachment and entry steps of PEDV life cycle is a good candidate for development of antivirals.

  5. Icaritin Inhibits Collagen Degradation-Related Factors and Facilitates Collagen Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions: A Potential Action for Plaque Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-Kang; Li, Jie; Yan, De-Xin; Leung, Wing-Nang; Zhang, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-28

    Most acute coronary syndromes result from rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The collagen content of plaques may critically affect plaque stability. This study tested whether Icaritin (ICT), an intestinal metabolite of Epimedium-derived flavonoids, could alter the collagen synthesis/degradation balance in atherosclerotic lesions. Rabbits were fed with an atherogenic diet for four months. Oral administration of ICT (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was started after two months of an atherogenic diet and lasted for two months. The collagen degradation-related parameters, including macrophages accumulation, content and activity of interstitial collagenase-1 (MMP-1), and the collagen synthesis-related parameters, including amount and distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and collagen mRNA/protein levels, were evaluated in the aorta. ICT reduced plasma lipid levels, inhibited macrophage accumulation, lowered MMP-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed proteolytic activity of pro-MMP-1 and MMP-1 in the aorta. ICT changed the distribution of the SMCs towards the fibrous cap of lesions without increasing the amount of SMCs. Higher collagen protein content in lesions and aorta homogenates was observed with ICT treatment compared with the atherogenic diet only, without altered collagen mRNA level. These results suggest that ICT could inhibit the collagen degradation-related factors and facilitate collagen accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions, indicating a new potential of ICT in atherosclerotic plaques.

  6. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    1998-12-18

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  7. Non-nucleosidic inhibition of Herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase: mechanistic insights into the anti-herpetic mode of action of herbal drug withaferin A

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 causes several infections in humans including cold sores and encephalitis. Previous antiviral studies on herpes viruses have focussed on developing nucleoside analogues that can inhibit viral polymerase and terminate the replicating viral DNA. However, these drugs bear an intrinsic non-specificity as they can also inhibit cellular polymerase apart from the viral one. The present study is an attempt to elucidate the action mechanism of naturally occurring withaferin A in inhibiting viral DNA polymerase, thus providing an evidence for its development as a novel anti-herpetic drug. Results Withaferin A was found to bind very similarly to that of the previously reported 4-oxo-DHQ inhibitor. Withaferin A was observed binding to the residues Gln 617, Gln 618, Asn 815 and Tyr 818, all of which are crucial to the proper functioning of the polymerase. A comparison of the conformation obtained from docking and the molecular dynamics simulations shows that substantial changes in the binding conformations have occurred. These results indicate that the initial receptor-ligand interaction observed after docking can be limited due to the receptor rigid docking algorithm and that the conformations and interactions observed after simulation runs are more energetically favoured. Conclusions We have performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies to elucidate the binding mechanism of prospective herbal drug withaferin A onto the structure of DNA polymerase of Herpes simplex virus. Our docking simulations results give high binding affinity of the ligand to the receptor. Long de novo MD simulations for 10 ns performed allowed us to evaluate the dynamic behaviour of the system studied and corroborate the docking results, as well as identify key residues in the enzyme-inhibitor interactions. The present MD simulations support the hypothesis that withaferin A is a potential ligand to target/inhibit DNA polymerase of the Herpes simplex

  8. A dose-finding study of methylene blue to inhibit nitric oxide actions in the hemodynamics of human septic shock.

    PubMed

    Juffermans, Nicole P; Vervloet, Marc G; Daemen-Gubbels, Catharina R G; Binnekade, Jan M; de Jong, Martin; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2010-05-15

    Methylene blue increases blood pressure and myocardial function in septic shock mainly by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) actions. However, a dose-dependency of methylene blue has not been established. Therefore, the compound is currently used as rescue treatment only. To evaluate dose-dependency, a prospective, randomized, double blind, single centre study was performed in 15 consecutive, mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock admitted to the intensive care unit, in whom methylene blue was infused at 1 mg/kg (n=4), 3 mg/kg (n=6) or 7 mg/kg (n=5) over 20 min. Hemodynamic parameters were measured before and after the infusion. Gastric tonometry was performed. Methylene blue treatment increased heart rate, cardiac index, mean arterial, pulmonary artery, pulmonary artery occlusion and central venous pressures, systemic vascular resistance, ventricular stroke work indices and O(2) delivery and uptake, and decreased lactate levels. Methylene blue had a dose-dependent effect on cardiac index, mean arterial, mean pulmonary artery and pulmonary artery occlusion pressures, left ventricular function, O(2) delivery and consumption and lactate levels. The drug dose-dependently increased the gastric-arterial blood PCO(2) gap. The data suggest that in human septic shock, methylene blue increases mean arterial blood pressure by an increase in cardiac index and systemic vascular resistance. The rise in cardiac index is caused by an increase in left ventricular filling and function, increasing tissue oxygenation, even at a dose of 1mg/kg. High doses of methylene blue may compromise splanchnic perfusion, even though further enhancing global hemodynamics, and should therefore, be avoided in future studies.

  9. Nitrous oxide directly inhibits action potential-dependent neurotransmission from single presynaptic boutons adhering to rat hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Kotani, Naoki; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Akaike, Norio

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of N2O on synaptic transmission using a preparation of mechanically dissociated rat hippocampal CA3 neurons that allowed assays of single bouton responses evoked from native functional nerve endings. We studied the effects of N2O on GABAA, glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents (IGABA, IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA) elicited by exogenous application of GABA, glutamate, (S)-AMPA, and NMDA and spontaneous, miniature, and evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (sIPSC, mIPSC, eIPSC, sEPSC, mEPSC and eEPSC) in mechanically dissociated CA3 neurons. eIPSC and eEPSC were evoked by focal electrical stimulation of a single bouton. Administration of 70% N2O altered neither IGABA nor the frequency and amplitude of both sIPSCs and mIPSCs. In contrast, N2O decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs, while increasing failure rates (Rf) and paired-pulse ratios (PPR) in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, N2O decreased IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA. Again N2O did not change the frequency and amplitude of either sEPSCs of mEPSCs. N2O also decreased amplitudes of eEPSCs with increased Rf and PPR. The decay phases of all synaptic responses were unchanged. The present results indicated that N2O inhibits the activation of AMPA/KA and NMDA receptors and also that N2O preferentially depress the action potential-dependent GABA and glutamate releases but had little effects on spontaneous and miniature releases. PMID:26343381

  10. Prepotency in action: does children's knowledge of an artifact affect their ability to inhibit acting on it?

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew; Carroll, Daniel J; Riggs, Kevin J

    2014-02-01

    Prepotent actions are actions that are strongly triggered by the environment and so tend to be carried out unless intentionally avoided. Understanding what makes an action prepotent is central to an understanding of inhibitory control. The current study investigated actions made on artifacts because in artifact-dense cultures much everyday behavior is focused on them. A total of 80 3-year-olds were tested on a Go/No-go task that required children to make an action on go trials and to withhold it on no-go trials. These actions were made on artifacts with which the actions were either associated (e.g., drawing with a crayon) or unassociated (e.g., drawing with a hammer). Failure to avoid the go action on no-go trials was taken as evidence that the action was prepotent. Results suggested that an action did not need to be associated with an artifact in order for it to be prepotent (so drawing with a hammer could be prepotent). However, associated actions were sometimes produced even when children had been instructed to make an unassociated action. Children sometimes drew with a crayon when told to hammer with it, but they never hammered when told to draw.

  11. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  13. Biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial action of lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by heavy metal tolerant strain Bacillus cereus NK1.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Muthu Irulappan; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Deepak, Venkataraman; Gracerosepat, Raja; Srisakthi, Kandasamy; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2011-07-01

    Biosurfactants are worthful microbial amphiphilic molecules with efficient surface-active and biological properties applicable to several industries and processes. Among them lipopeptides represent a class of microbial surfactants with increasing scientific, therapeutic and biotechnological interests. A heavy metal tolerant Bacillus strain has been isolated and the biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial activity of biosurfactant produced by the strain have been studied. Biosurfactant production was confirmed by the conventional screening methods including hemolytic activity, drop collapsing test, oil displacement test, emulsification and lipase production assays. The biosurfactant produced by this strain was a lipopeptide and exhibited strong surface activity. The biosurfactant has been characterized using FTIR, TLC and HPLC. The minimum active dose of this biosurfactant when compared with the other chemical surfactants was found as 0.150±0.06 μg. The critical micelle concentration was found to be 45 mg/l. The biosurfactant was found to be stable and active over a wide range of pH, temperature and NaCl concentration. It was also able to emulsify a wide range of hydrocarbons and oils thereby extending its application for the bioremediation of oil contaminated sites. The biosurfactant exhibited significant reduction in biofilm formation by pathogens and showed potent antimicrobial activity against various gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi. Agar diffusion assay for heavy metal resistance showed that the isolate was resistant to ferrous, lead and zinc. Considering the biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial property of biosurfactant, it can be utilized as a potential therapeutic molecule for numerous microbial infections. The heavy metal resistance of the strain can also be harnessed as an invaluable biological tool for in situ bioremediation.

  14. Inhibition of gastrointestinal release of acetylcholine by quercetin as a possible mode of action of Psidium guajava leaf extracts in the treatment of acute diarrhoeal disease.

    PubMed

    Lutterodt, G D

    1989-05-01

    The electrically stimulated guinea-pig ileum and spontaneously contracting guinea-pig ileum preparations were employed in studies on the effects of an alcoholic extract and two flavonoid compounds, quercetin and quercetin-3-arabinoside, extracted from the leaves of Psidium guajava. The extract showed a morphine-like inhibition of acetylcholine release in the coaxially stimulated ileum, together with an initial increase in muscular tone, followed by a gradual decrease. The morphine-like inhibition was found to be due to quercetin, starting at concentrations of 1.6 micrograms/ml. The glycoside did not show any such action at concentrations of up to 1.28 mg/ml. The extract inhibited spontaneous contractions in the unstimulated ileum with a concentration-response relationship.

  15. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of primary prostate epithelial cells following gamma irradiation or photodynamic therapy include senescence, necrosis, and autophagy, but not apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Frame, Fiona M; Savoie, Huguette; Bryden, Francesca; Giuntini, Francesca; Mann, Vincent M; Simms, Matthew S; Boyle, Ross W; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to more differentiated cells, prostate cancer stem-like cells are radioresistant, which could explain radio-recurrent prostate cancer. Improvement of radiotherapeutic efficacy may therefore require combination therapy. We have investigated the consequences of treating primary prostate epithelial cells with gamma irradiation and photodynamic therapy (PDT), both of which act through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Primary prostate epithelial cells were cultured from patient samples of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer prior to treatment with PDT or gamma irradiation. Cell viability was measured using MTT and alamar blue assay, and cell recovery by colony-forming assays. Immunofluorescence of gamma-H2AX foci was used to quantify DNA damage, and autophagy and apoptosis were assessed using Western blots. Necrosis and senescence were measured by propidium iodide staining and beta-galactosidase staining, respectively. Both PDT and gamma irradiation reduced the colony-forming ability of primary prostate epithelial cells. PDT reduced the viability of all types of cells in the cultures, including stem-like cells and more differentiated cells. PDT induced necrosis and autophagy, whereas gamma irradiation induced senescence, but neither treatment induced apoptosis. PDT and gamma irradiation therefore inhibit cell growth by different mechanisms. We suggest these treatments would be suitable for use in combination as sequential treatments against prostate cancer.

  16. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Inhibits the Translocation of Bacteria of Gut-Origin in Mice with Peritonitis: Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Shan-Wen; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Zi-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Guo-Wei; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), an enzyme produced endogenously at the brush edge of the intestinal mucosa, may mitigate the increase in aberrant intestinal permeability increased during sepsis. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the inhibitory effect of IAP on acute intestinal inflammation and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying IAP in ameliorating intestinal permeability. We used an in vivo imaging method to evaluate disease status and the curative effect of IAP. Two Escherichia coli (E.coli) B21 strains, carrying EGFP labeled enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and RFP labeled red fluorescent protein (RFP), were constructed as tracer bacteria and were administered orally to C57/B6N mice to generate an injection peritonitis (IP) model. The IP model was established by injecting inflammatory lavage fluid. C57/B6N mice bearing the tracer bacteria were subsequently treated with (IP+IAP group), or without IAP (IP group). IAP was administered to the mice via tail vein injections. The amount of tracer bacteria in the blood, liver, and lungs at 24 h post-injection was analyzed via flow cytometry (FCM), in vivo imaging, and Western blotting. Intestinal barrier function was measured using a flux assay with the macro-molecule fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, molecular weight 40kD, (FD40). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of IAP, we examined the levels of ERK phosphorylation, and the expression levels of proteins in the ERK-SP1-VEGF and ERK-Cdx-2-Claudin-2 pathways. We observed that IAP inhibited the expression of Claudin-2, a type of cation channel-forming protein, and VEGF, a cytokine that may increase intestinal permeability by reducing the levels of dephosphorylated ERK. In conclusion, exogenous IAP shows a therapeutic effect in an injection peritonitis model. This including inhibition of bacterial translocation. Moreover, we have established an imaging methodology for live-animals can

  17. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase inhibits the translocation of bacteria of gut-origin in mice with peritonitis: mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Shan-Wen; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Zi-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Guo-Wei; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), an enzyme produced endogenously at the brush edge of the intestinal mucosa, may mitigate the increase in aberrant intestinal permeability increased during sepsis. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the inhibitory effect of IAP on acute intestinal inflammation and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying IAP in ameliorating intestinal permeability. We used an in vivo imaging method to evaluate disease status and the curative effect of IAP. Two Escherichia coli (E.coli) B21 strains, carrying EGFP labeled enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and RFP labeled red fluorescent protein (RFP), were constructed as tracer bacteria and were administered orally to C57/B6N mice to generate an injection peritonitis (IP) model. The IP model was established by injecting inflammatory lavage fluid. C57/B6N mice bearing the tracer bacteria were subsequently treated with (IP+IAP group), or without IAP (IP group). IAP was administered to the mice via tail vein injections. The amount of tracer bacteria in the blood, liver, and lungs at 24 h post-injection was analyzed via flow cytometry (FCM), in vivo imaging, and Western blotting. Intestinal barrier function was measured using a flux assay with the macro-molecule fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, molecular weight 40kD, (FD40). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of IAP, we examined the levels of ERK phosphorylation, and the expression levels of proteins in the ERK-SP1-VEGF and ERK-Cdx-2-Claudin-2 pathways. We observed that IAP inhibited the expression of Claudin-2, a type of cation channel-forming protein, and VEGF, a cytokine that may increase intestinal permeability by reducing the levels of dephosphorylated ERK. In conclusion, exogenous IAP shows a therapeutic effect in an injection peritonitis model. This including inhibition of bacterial translocation. Moreover, we have established an imaging methodology for live-animals can

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  19. GABAA receptor α4 subunits mediate extrasynaptic inhibition in thalamus and dentate gyrus and the action of gaboxadol

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, D.; Jia, F.; Liang, J.; Peng, Z.; Suryanarayanan, A.; Werner, D. F.; Spigelman, I.; Houser, C. R.; Olsen, R. W.; Harrison, N. L.; Homanics, G. E.

    2006-01-01

    The neurotransmitter GABA mediates the majority of rapid inhibition in the CNS. Inhibition can occur via the conventional mechanism, the transient activation of subsynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAA-Rs), or via continuous activation of high-affinity receptors by low concentrations of ambient GABA, leading to “tonic” inhibition that can control levels of excitability and network activity. The GABAA-R α4 subunit is expressed at high levels in the dentate gyrus and thalamus and is suspected to contribute to extrasynaptic GABAA-R-mediated tonic inhibition. Mice were engineered to lack the α4 subunit by targeted disruption of the Gabra4 gene. α4 Subunit knockout mice are viable, breed normally, and are superficially indistinguishable from WT mice. In electrophysiological recordings, these mice show a lack of tonic inhibition in dentate granule cells and thalamic relay neurons. Behaviorally, knockout mice are insensitive to the ataxic, sedative, and analgesic effects of the novel hypnotic drug, gaboxadol. These data demonstrate that tonic inhibition in dentate granule cells and thalamic relay neurons is mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA-Rs containing the α4 subunit and that gaboxadol achieves its effects via the activation of this GABAA-R subtype. PMID:17005728

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1 (Including Records of Technical Change No.1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2002-12-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527, Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 527 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. The site is located in an abandoned mine site in Area 26 (which is the most arid part of the NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Historical documents may refer to this site as CAU 168, CWD-1, the Wingfield mine (or shaft), and the Wahmonie mine (or shaft). Historical documentation indicates that between 1959 and the 1970s, nonliquid classified material and unclassified waste was placed in the Horn Silver Mine's shaft. Some of the waste is known to be radioactive. Documentation indicates that the waste is present from 150 feet to the bottom of the mine (500 ft below ground surface). This CAU is being investigated because hazardous constituents migrating from materials and/or wastes disposed of in the Horn Silver Mine may pose a threat to human health and the environment as well as to assess the potential impacts associated with any potential releases from the waste. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  1. Non-local photo-polymerization kinetics including multiple termination mechanisms and dark reactions: Part III. Primary radical generation and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Michael R.; Liu Shui; Guo Jinxin; Sheridan, John T.

    2010-09-15

    Photopolymers are playing an ever more important role in diverse areas of research such as holographic data storage, hybrid photonic circuits, and solitary waves. In each of these applications, the production of primary radicals is the driving force of the polymerization processes. Therefore an understanding of the production, removal, and scavenging processes of free radicals in a photopolymer system is crucial in determining a material's response to a given exposure. One such scavenging process is inhibition. In this paper the non-local photo-polymerization driven diffusion model is extended to more accurately model the effects of (i) time varying primary radical production, (ii) the rate of removal of photosensitizer, and (iii) inhibition. The model is presented to specifically analyze the effects of inhibition, which occur most predominantly at the start of grating growth, and comparisons between theory and experiment are performed which quantify these effects.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-08-08

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of recommended corrective action alternatives (CAAs) to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU)168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 25 and 26 at the NTS in Nevada, CAU 168 is comprised of twelve Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Review of data collected during the corrective action investigation, as well as consideration of current and future operations in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS, led the way to the development of three CAAs for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; and Alternative 3 - Close in Place with Administrative Controls. As a result of this evaluation, a combination of all three CAAs is recommended for this CAU. Alternative 1 was the preferred CAA for three CASs, Alternative 2 was the preferred CAA for six CASs (and nearly all of one other CAS), and Alternative 3 was the preferred CAA for two CASs (and a portion of one other CAS) to complete the closure at the CAU 168 sites. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and elimination of potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at CAU 168.

  3. Mycelium of fungi isolated from mouldy foods inhibits Staphylococcus aureus including MRSA – A rationale for the re-introduction of mycotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Alnaimat, Sulaiman; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh H.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Al-Johny, Bassam O.; Wainwright, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal mycelium capable of producing antibacterial agents was isolated from samples of apple, beetroot, lemon and orange; the mycelium of all isolates produced penicillin, while the apple and beetroot samples also produced the antibacterial mycotoxin patulin. The known penicillin-producing fungi were shown to produce penicillin, but not patulin. The mycelial discs of all of fruit and vegetable isolates, as well as the two known penicillin producing fungi, inhibited Staphylococcus aureus, and mycelium of all isolates inhibited MRSA, in contrast, only one of the two known penicillin-producers did so. The results are discussed in relation to the possibility of using the mycelium of Penicillium species in mycotherapy. PMID:26288565

  4. Anion-selective channelrhodopsin expressed in neuronal cell culture and in vivo in murine brain: Light-induced inhibition of generation of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, D A; Malyshev, A Yu; Salozhin, S V; Nekrasova, O V; Petrovskaya, L E; Roshchin, M V; Borodinova, A A; Feldman, T B; Balaban, P M; Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovsky, M A

    2015-01-01

    Anionic channelrhodopsin slow ChloC was expressed in the culture of nerve cells and in vivo in mouse brain. We demonstrated ability of slow ChloC to suppress effectively the activity of the neuron in response to the illumination with the visible light. It has been shown for a first time that slow ChloC works equally efficiently in both neuronal culture and in the whole brain being expressed in vivo. Thus, slow ChloC could be considered as an effective optogenetic tool capable in response to light stimulation to inhibit the generation of action potentials in the neuron.

  5. Tonic Inhibition of Accumbal Spiny Neurons by Extrasynaptic α4βδ GABAA Receptors Modulates the Actions of Psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Edward P.; Macpherson, Tom; Swinny, Jerome D.; Dixon, Claire I.; Herd, Murray B.; Belelli, Delia; Stephens, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) mediate phasic inhibition of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and influence behavioral responses to cocaine. We demonstrate that both dopamine D1- and D2-receptor-expressing MSNs (D-MSNs) additionally harbor extrasynaptic GABAARs incorporating α4, β, and δ subunits that mediate tonic inhibition, thereby influencing neuronal excitability. Both the selective δ-GABAAR agonist THIP and DS2, a selective positive allosteric modulator, greatly increased the tonic current of all MSNs from wild-type (WT), but not from δ−/− or α4−/− mice. Coupling dopamine and tonic inhibition, the acute activation of D1 receptors (by a selective agonist or indirectly by amphetamine) greatly enhanced tonic inhibition in D1-MSNs but not D2-MSNs. In contrast, prolonged D2 receptor activation modestly reduced the tonic conductance of D2-MSNs. Behaviorally, WT and constitutive α4−/− mice did not differ in their expression of cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). Importantly, however, mice with the α4 deletion specific to D1-expressing neurons (α4D1−/−) showed increased CPP. Furthermore, THIP administered systemically or directly into the NAc of WT, but not α4−/− or α4D1−/− mice, blocked cocaine enhancement of CPP. In comparison, α4D2−/− mice exhibited normal CPP, but no cocaine enhancement. In conclusion, dopamine modulation of GABAergic tonic inhibition of D1- and D2-MSNs provides an intrinsic mechanism to differentially affect their excitability in response to psychostimulants and thereby influence their ability to potentiate conditioned reward. Therefore, α4βδ GABAARs may represent a viable target for the development of novel therapeutics to better understand and influence addictive behaviors. PMID:24431441

  6. Inhibition of the contractile action of bradykinin on isolated smooth muscle preparations by derivatives of low molecular weight peptides.

    PubMed

    Claeson, G; Fareed, J; Larsson, C; Kindel, G; Arielly, S; Simonsson, R; Messmore, H L; Balis, J U

    1979-01-01

    The carbonyl terminal tripeptide sequence of bradykinin (Pro-Phe-Arg) is molecularly manipulated to obtain agents with potent antagonistic activity towards the smooth muscle contractile activity of bradykinin. Screening of various peptide derivatives revealed that heptyl amides or esters of H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg, and H-D-Phe-Phe-Arg possessed relatively stronger antibradykinin activity on the isolated smooth muscle preparation. The parent tripeptides, H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg-OH, and H-D-Phe-Phe-Arg-OH, and their amino acid components, i.e. D-Proline, D-Phenylalanine, L-Phenylalanine and Arginine, did not possess any antibradykinin activity in concentrations of up to 10(-4) M. When the heptyl derivatives of these peptides were incubated with either heparinized or citrated whole blood or plasma, the antibradykinin activity was not lost. Incubation of these peptide derivatives with either carboxypeptidase A or B did not result in any loss of the pharmacological effect. However, pancreatic protease extract produced a significant loss of the anti-oxytocic action on the isolated rat uterus preparation. H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg-NH-lauryl derivative also blocked the action of bradykinin and this effect sustained for a longer period of time comparative to the blockade with H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg-NH-heptyl derivative. In concentrations of 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M and 1 min incubation, which blocked the contractile action of bradykinin (1 nmole) on the isolated guinea pig ileum, these peptide derivatives did not block the action of acetylcholine, histamine, and serotonin. However, in concentrations of about 10(-6) M and higher with 5 min. incubation histamin is also blocked. On the isolated rat uterus preparation the contractile action of acetylcholine, angiotensin, oxytocin and vasopressin was blocked at concentrations of 10(-6) M. These findings warrant a differential pharmacological evaluation and in vivo testing of these peptide derivatives to investigate their therapeutic potential.

  7. Anandamide inhibits endothelin-1 production by human cultured endothelial cells: a new vascular action of this endocannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Ana María; Llanos, Miguel; Tamayo, Daniela; Hirsch, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonist anandamide (AEA) exerts vascular effects such as vasodilatation and hypotension. In this study, we determined the effect of AEA on endothelin-1 production by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Anandamide (>or=5 micromol/l) significantly decreased endothelin-1 production in a dose-dependent manner, a response not affected by the specific CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR-141716A. Adenosine, via activation of adenosine receptors (also targets for SR-141716A), was not involved in these effects. Conversely, AEA increased nitric oxide (NO) production, an effect inhibited by SR-141716A, indicating the involvement of CB1 receptors. Therefore, we hypothesize that AEA effects on endothelial cells may lead to vasodilatation through independent concerted mechanisms, involving a non-CB1 receptor-dependent inhibition of endothelin-1 production and a CB1-mediated increase of NO.

  8. Comparison of the inhibition of biliary excretion produced by certain inducing agents including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E.F.; Schaus, P.; Fujimoto, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Rats were treated with chlordecone, mirex, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and respective solvent vehicle. Under urethane or pentobarbital anesthesia, the bile duct was cannulated and radioactive morphine, imipramine, or ouabain was given by segmented retrograde intrabiliary injection. The spectrum of inhibition of biliary excretion by chlordecone and mirex were similar in that morphine glucuronide and in part polar imipramine metabolite recoveries in bile were decreased; ouabain recovery was unaffected. TCDD was different in that it markedly decreased the recovery of ouabain. Thus, it appears that chlordecone, mirex, and TCDD inhibit the canalicular transport of the glucuronide metabolites of morphine and imipramine into bile, and TCDD affects in addition the canalicular transport of ouabain into bile.

  9. Synergistic action of auxin and ethylene on root elongation inhibition is caused by a reduction of epidermal cell length

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Salguero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene have been largely reported to reduce root elongation in maize primary root. However the effects of auxin are greater than those caused by ethylene. Although auxin stimulates ethylene biosynthesis through the specific increase of ACC synthase, the auxin inhibitory effect on root elongation is not mediated by the auxin-induced increase of ethylene production. Recently it has been demonstrated that root inhibition by the application of the synthetic auxin NAA (1-naphtalenacetic acid) is increased if combined with the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxilic acid) when both compounds are applied at very low concentrations. Root elongation is basically the result of two processes: a) cell divisions in the meristem where meristematic cells continuously generate new cells and b) subsequently polarized growth by elongation along the root axis as cells leave the meristem and enter the root elongation zone. Our results indicate that exogenous auxin reduced both root elongation and epidermal cell length. In a different way, ethylene at very low concentrations only inhibited root elongation without affecting significantly epidermal cell length. However, these concentrations of ethylene increased the inhibitory effect of auxin on root elongation and cell length. Consequently the results support the hypothesis that ethylene acts synergistically with auxin in the regulation of root elongation and that inhibition by both hormones is due, at least partially, to the reduction of cell length in the epidermal layer. PMID:24598313

  10. Synergistic action of auxin and ethylene on root elongation inhibition is caused by a reduction of epidermal cell length.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Salguero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene have been largely reported to reduce root elongation in maize primary root. However the effects of auxin are greater than those caused by ethylene. Although auxin stimulates ethylene biosynthesis through the specific increase of ACC synthase, the auxin inhibitory effect on root elongation is not mediated by the auxin-induced increase of ethylene production. Recently it has been demonstrated that root inhibition by the application of the synthetic auxin NAA (1-naphtalenacetic acid) is increased if combined with the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxilic acid) when both compounds are applied at very low concentrations.   Root elongation is basically the result of two processes: a) cell divisions in the meristem where meristematic cells continuously generate new cells and b) subsequently polarized growth by elongation along the root axis as cells leave the meristem and enter the root elongation zone. Our results indicate that exogenous auxin reduced both root elongation and epidermal cell length. In a different way, ethylene at very low concentrations only inhibited root elongation without affecting significantly epidermal cell length. However, these concentrations of ethylene increased the inhibitory effect of auxin on root elongation and cell length. Consequently the results support the hypothesis that ethylene acts synergistically with auxin in the regulation of root elongation and that inhibition by both hormones is due, at least partially, to the reduction of cell length in the epidermal layer.

  11. Action of silver nanoparticles towards biological systems: cytotoxicity evaluation using hen's egg test and inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Freire, Priscila L L; Stamford, Thayza C M; Albuquerque, Allan J R; Sampaio, Fabio C; Cavalcante, Horacinna M M; Macedo, Rui O; Galembeck, André; Flores, Miguel A P; Rosenblatt, Aronita

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of four silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloids and their ability to inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel. The cytotoxicity of AgNPs was evaluated based on signs of vascular change on the chorioallantoic membrane using the hen's egg test (HET-CAM). Bactericidal properties and inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation were determined using a parallel-flow cell system and a dichromatic fluorescent stain. The percentage of viable cells was calculated from regression data generated from a viability standard. AgNP colloids proved to be non-irritating, as they were unable to promote vasoconstriction, haemorrhage or coagulation. AgNP colloids inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel, and cell viability measured by fluorescence was 0% for samples S1, S2, S3 and S4 and 36.5% for the positive control (diluted 30% silver diamine fluoride). AgNPs are new products with a low production cost because they have a lower concentration of silver, with low toxicity and an effective bactericidal effect against a cariogenic oral bacterium. Moreover, they do not promote colour change in dental enamel, which is an aesthetic advantage compared with traditional silver products.

  12. Peripheral μ-opioid receptor mediated inhibition of calcium signaling and action potential-evoked calcium fluorescent transients in primary afferent CGRP nociceptive terminals.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Landon D; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Mulligan, Sean J

    2015-06-01

    While μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists remain the most powerful analgesics for the treatment of severe pain, serious adverse side effects that are secondary to their central nervous system actions pose substantial barriers to therapeutic use. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggest that peripheral MORs play an important role in opioid analgesia, particularly under inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms of peripheral MOR signaling in primary afferent pain fibres remain to be established. We have recently introduced a novel ex vivo optical imaging approach that, for the first time, allows the study of physiological functioning within individual peripheral nociceptive fibre free nerve endings in mice. In the present study, we found that MOR activation in selectively identified, primary afferent CGRP nociceptive terminals caused inhibition of N-type Ca(2+) channel signaling and suppression of action potential-evoked Ca(2+) fluorescent transients mediated by 'big conductance' Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa). In the live animal, we showed that the peripherally acting MOR agonist HS-731 produced analgesia and that BKCa channels were the major effectors of the peripheral MOR signaling. We have identified two key molecular transducers of MOR activation that mediate significant inhibition of nociceptive signaling in primary afferent terminals. Understanding the mechanisms of peripheral MOR signaling may promote the development of pathway selective μ-opioid drugs that offer improved therapeutic profiles for achieving potent analgesia while avoiding serious adverse central side effects. PMID:25721395

  13. Antihyperglycemic effect of Annona squamosa hexane extract in type 2 diabetes animal model: PTP1B inhibition, a possible mechanism of action?

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph Alex; Sharma, Suchitra; Mittra, Shivani; Sujatha, S.; Kanaujia, Anil; Shukla, Gyanesh; Katiyar, Chandrakant; Lakshmi, B.S.; Bansal, Vinay Sheel; Bhatnagar, Pradip Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The mechanism of action of Annona squamosa hexane extract in mediating antihyperglycemic and antitriglyceridimic effect were investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: The effects of extract on glucose uptake, insulin receptor-β (IR-β), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) phosphorylation and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3 kinase) mRNA expression were studied in L6 myotubes. The in vitro mechanism of action was tested in protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), G-protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) assays. The in vivo efficacy was characterized in ob/ob mice after an oral administration of the extract for 21 days. Results: The effect of extract promoted glucose uptake, IR-β and IRS-1 phosphorylation and GLUT4 and PI3 kinase mRNA upregulation in L6 myotubes. The extract inhibited PTP1B with an IC50 17.4 μg/ml and did not modulate GPR40, SIRT1 or DPP-IV activities. An oral administration of extract in ob/ob mice for 21 days improved random blood glucose, triglyceride and oral glucose tolerance. Further, the extract did not result in body weight gain before and after treatment (29.3 vs. 33.6 g) compared to rosiglitazone where significant body weight gain was observed (28.4 vs. 44.5 g; *P<0.05 after treatment compared to before treatment). Conclusion: The results suggest that Annona squamosa hexane extract exerts its action by modulating insulin signaling through inhibition of PTP1B. PMID:22701240

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Action of an Antimicrobial Model Peptide That Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Do-Wan; Heo, Kang-Hyuck; Kim, Young-Kyu; Sim, Eun-Jeong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Choi, Jae-Wan; Sim, Dae-Won; Cheong, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hong; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also called host defense peptides, particularly those with amphipathic helical structures, are emerging as target molecules for therapeutic development due to their immunomodulatory properties. Although the antimicrobial activity of AMPs is known to be exerted primarily by permeation of the bacterial membrane, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity remains to be elucidated. We report potent anti-inflammatory activity of WALK11.3, an antimicrobial model peptide with an amphipathic helical conformation, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This peptide inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, INF-β, and TNF-α. Although WALK11.3 did not exert a major effect on all downstream signaling in the MyD88-dependent pathway, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- mediated pro-inflammatory signals were markedly attenuated in the TRIF-dependent pathway due to inhibition of the phosphorylation of STAT1 by attenuation of IRF3 phosphorylation. WALK11.3 specifically inhibited the endocytosis of TLR4, which is essential for triggering TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophage cells. Hence, we suggest that specific interference with TLR4 endocytosis could be one of the major modes of the anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. Our designed WALK11 peptides, which possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, may be promising molecules for the development of therapies for infectious inflammation. PMID:26017270

  15. The mechanism of action of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. Inhibition by amino acid derivatives and amines; activation by aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Metrione, R M; MacGeorge, N L

    1975-12-01

    A variety of amino acid and peptide amides have been shown to be inhibitors of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. Among these compounds derivatives of strongly hydrophobic amino acids are the strongest inhibitors (Phe-NH2, Ki = 1.0 +/- 0.2 mM), while amides of basic amino acids were somewhat less effective (Lys-NH2, Ki = 36 +/- 3 mM). Short chain amino acid amides are notably weaker inhibitors (Gly-NH2, Ki = 293 +/- 50 mM). The interaction of the side chains of compounds with the enzyme appears to be at a site other than that at which the side chain of the amino-penultimate residue of the substrate interacts since the specificity of binding is different. Primary amines have been shown to inhibit, e.g., butylamine, Ki = 340 +/- 40 mM, and aromatic compounds have been shown to stimulate activity toward Gly-Gly-NH2 and Gly-Gly-OEt (phenol, 35% stimulation of activity at a 1:1 molar ratio with the substrate). The data suggest that inhibition involves binding at the site occupied by the free alpha-amino group and the N-terminal amino acid.

  16. Peripheral antagonistic action of trimebutine and kappa opioid substances on acoustic stress-induced gastric motor inhibition in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gué, M; Pascaud, X; Hondé, C; Junien, J L; Buéno, L

    1988-01-27

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.), intravenous (i.v.) and oral (p.o.) administration of trimebutine on the gastric motor inhibition induced by acoustic stress were investigated in fasted dogs fitted with strain-gauge transducers on the antrum and proximal jejunum. Started 40-50 min after the last migrating motor complex, a 1 h acoustic stress delayed by 111% the occurrence of the next gastric migrating motor complex without affecting the jejunal motor pattern. This inhibition of gastric migrating motor complex induced by acoustic stress was abolished by previous p.o. administration of trimebutine (1 mg/kg) but not by its i.v. (0.1 mg/kg) or i.c.v. (0.01 mg/kg) injection. The trimebutine blockade of gastric motor alterations induced by acoustic stress was suppressed after previous i.v. treatment with MR 2266 (0.3 mg/kg) but was unaffected by naloxone (0.3 mg/kg). Furthermore oral administration of U-50488H (10 micrograms/kg) and ethylketocyclazocine (10 micrograms/kg) respectively abolished and reduced the acoustic stress-induced delay of the occurrence of the gastric migrating motor complex. We concluded that trimebutine is able to antagonize the gastric motor disturbances induced in dogs by acoustic stress, probably by acting selectively on peripheral kappa receptors located in the wall of the proximal gut and directly stimulated from a mucosal site. PMID:2895010

  17. Ketanserin, an antidepressant, exerts its antileishmanial action via inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) enzyme of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushma; Dinesh, Neeradi; Kaur, Preet Kamal; Shamiulla, Baigadda

    2014-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major health problems existing globally. The current chemotherapy for leishmaniasis presents several drawbacks like toxicity and increased resistance to existing drugs, and hence, there is a necessity to look out for the novel drug targets and new chemical entities. Current trend in drug discovery arena is the "repurposing" of old drugs for the treatment of diseases. In the present study, an antidepressant, ketanserin, was found lethal to both Leishmania donovani promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes with no apparent toxicity to the cells. Ketanserin killed promastigotes and amastigotes with an IC50 value of 37 μM and 28 μM respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Ketanserin was found to inhibit L. donovani recombinant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) enzyme with an IC50 value of 43 μM. Ketanserin treated promastigotes were exogenously supplemented with sterols like ergosterol and cholesterol to rescue cell death. Ergosterol could recover the inhibition partially, whereas cholesterol supplementation completely failed to rescue the inhibited parasites. Further, HMGR-overexpressing parasites were generated by transfecting Leishmania promastigotes with an episomal pspα hygroα-HMGR construct. Wild-type and HMGR overexpressors of L. donovani were used to study the effect and mode of action of this inhibitor. The HMGR overexpressors showed twofold resistance to ketanserin. These observations suggest that the lethal effect of ketanserin is due to inhibition of HMGR, the rate-limiting enzyme of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Since targeting of the sterol biosynthetic pathway enzymes may be useful therapeutically, the present study may have implications in treatment of leishmaniasis.

  18. Teacher Fear of Litigation for Disciplinary Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holben, Diane M.; Zirkel, Perry A.; Caskie, Grace I. L.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined the extent to which teachers' fear of litigation limits their disciplinary actions, including any significant differences by period, demographic factors, and item type. Teachers' perceptions of limitations placed on their disciplinary actions do not substantiate the "paralyzing fear" of litigation that inhibits student…

  19. Bispecific anti-CD20/22 antibodies inhibit B-cell lymphoma proliferation by a unique mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhengxing; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Shi, Victoria; Hansen, Hans J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2008-01-01

    Combination immunotherapy with anti-CD20 and anti-CD22 mAbs shows promising activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Therefore, bispecific mAbs (bsAbs) were recombinantly constructed from veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20) and epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22) and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. While none of the parental mAbs alone or mixed had notable antiproliferative activity against Burkitt lymphoma cells when not cross-linked, the bsAbs [eg, anti-CD20 IgG-anti–CD22 (scFv)2] were inhibitory without cross-linking and synergistic with B-cell antigen (BCR)-mediated inhibition. The bsAbs demonstrated higher antibody-dependent cellulary cytoxicity (ADCC) activity than the parental mAbs, but not complement-dependent cytoxicity (CDC) of the parental CD20 mAb. Cross-linking both CD20 and CD22 with the bsAbs resulted in the prominent redistribution of not only CD20 but also CD22 and BCR into lipid rafts. Surprisingly, appreciable translocation of CD22 into lipid rafts was also observed after treatment with epratuzumab. Finally, the bsAbs inhibited Daudi lymphoma transplant growth, but showed a significant advantage over the parental anti-CD20 mAb only at the highest dose tested. These results suggest that recombinantly fused, complementary, bispecific, anti-CD20/22 antibodies exhibit functional features distinct from their parental antibodies, perhaps representing new candidate therapeutic molecules. PMID:18025153

  20. Potent and efficacious inhibition of CXCR2 signaling by biparatopic nanobodies combining two distinct modes of action.

    PubMed

    Bradley, M E; Dombrecht, B; Manini, J; Willis, J; Vlerick, D; De Taeye, S; Van den Heede, K; Roobrouck, A; Grot, E; Kent, T C; Laeremans, T; Steffensen, S; Van Heeke, G; Brown, Z; Charlton, S J; Cromie, K D

    2015-02-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are key modulators in inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Here, we describe the identification and pharmacologic characterization of nanobodies selectively blocking CXCR2, the most promiscuous of all chemokine receptors. Two classes of selective monovalent nanobodies were identified, and detailed epitope mapping showed that these bind to distinct, nonoverlapping epitopes on the CXCR2 receptor. The N-terminal-binding or class 1 monovalent nanobodies possessed potencies in the single-digit nanomolar range but lacked complete efficacy at high agonist concentrations. In contrast, the extracellular loop-binding or class 2 monovalent nanobodies were of lower potency but were more efficacious and competitively inhibited the CXCR2-mediated functional response in both recombinant and neutrophil in vitro assays. In addition to blocking CXCR2 signaling mediated by CXCL1 (growth-related oncogene α) and CXCL8 (interleukin-8), both classes of nanobodies displayed inverse agonist behavior. Bivalent and biparatopic nanobodies were generated, respectively combining nanobodies from the same or different classes via glycine/serine linkers. Interestingly, receptor mutation and competition studies demonstrated that the biparatopic nanobodies were able to avidly bind epitopes within one or across two CXCR2 receptor molecules. Most importantly, the biparatopic nanobodies were superior over their monovalent and bivalent counterparts in terms of potency and efficacy.

  1. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  2. Combination therapy including CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and entecavir induces early viral response and enhanced inhibition of viral replication in a woodchuck model of chronic hepadnaviral infection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhongji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhang, Ejuan; Kemper, Thekla; Vollmer, Jörg; Davis, Heather L; Glebe, Dieter; Gerlich, Wolfram; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) stimulate immune cells via TLR9 and are potentially useful immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic viral infections. In the present study, different classes of CpGs were tested for their capacities for innate immune activation and antiviral activities in the woodchuck model. A class P CpG ODN was found to stimulate interferon (IFN) production in woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro, and following subcutaneous administration in vivo, it was observed to induce IFN and MxA expression in woodchuck PBMCs. Combination treatment with CpG ODN and entecavir (ETV) led to effective suppression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) load in the woodchucks, with early viral responses and inhibition of replication. The woodchuck hepatitis surface antigen (WHsAg) serum concentrations were strongly decreased by CpG and ETV together but not by either agent alone, indicating synergistic effects. However, viral control post-treatment was still transient, similar to that observed with ETV alone. Significantly elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) but not of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in some of the woodchucks receiving CpG ODN were noted, but these increases were resolved before the completion of treatment and were not associated with an elevated serum bilirubin level or coagulation disorders, suggesting the absence of a significant safety concern. PMID:26585244

  3. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates.

  4. Dipeptidase-inactivated tACE action in vivo: selective inhibition of sperm-zona pellucida binding in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Eishi; Tani, Taeko; Watanabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Shuichi; Kondoh, Gen

    2007-11-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a crucial role in male fertilization and is a key regulator of blood pressure. Testicular ACE (tACE), the germinal specific isozyme expressed on different promoters, exclusively carries out the role of ACE in fertility, although the site and mode of action are not well known. To investigate the contribution of tACE in fertilization, we produced transgenic mouse lines carrying a dipeptidase-inactivated mutant. Although the transgenic mice showed normal blood pressure, kidney morphology, and fertility, reduced fertilization was observed after in vitro fertilization (IVF). The sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding was exclusively impaired in these lines in a manner similar to that observed in an Ace knockout mouse. The dipeptidase activity was reduced in epididymal ingredients but not in the testis. Furthermore, direct application of mutant protein did not suppress sperm-ZP binding of intact sperm during IVF, implying that the dipeptidase-inactivated mutant affects sperm modification in the epididymis for ZP binding. Our results indicate that the dipeptidase-inactivated tACE acts in vivo, suggesting that tACE contributes to fertilization as a dipeptidase at least in the epididymis.

  5. Vestitol Isolated from Brazilian Red Propolis Inhibits Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Elucidation of the Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Marcelo; Cólon, David F; Castanheira, Fernanda V S; da Cunha, Marcos G; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Alencar, Severino M; Cunha, Thiago M; Rosalen, Pedro L

    2016-04-22

    Vestitol is an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis with potential anti-inflammatory activity. This study investigated the mechanism of action of vestitol on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process. Pre-treatment with vestitol at 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg reduced LPS- or mBSA-induced neutrophil migration and the release of CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 in vivo. Likewise, pre-treatment with vestitol at 1, 3, or 10 μM reduced the levels of CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 in macrophage supernatants in vitro. Moreover, the administration of vestitol (10 mg/kg) reduced leukocyte rolling and adherence in the mesenteric microcirculation of mice. The pre-treatment with vestitol (10 mg/kg) in iNOS(-/-) mice did not block its activity concerning neutrophil migration. With regard to the activity of vestitol on neutrophils isolated from the bone marrow of mice, there was a reduction on the chemotaxis of CXCL2/MIP-2 or LTB4-induced neutrophils and on calcium influx after pre-treatment with the compound at 3 or 10 μM. There was no change in CXCR2 expression by neutrophils treated with vestitol at 10 μM. These findings demonstrate that vestitol is a promising novel anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:26938776

  6. Novel action and mechanism of auranofin in inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3-dependent lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Huang, Qunhua; Lu, Lin; Min, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Auranofin is a gold compound initially developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent data suggest that auranofin has promise in the treatment of other inflammatory and proliferative diseases. However, the mechanisms of action of auranofin have not been well defined. In the present study, we identify vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR3), an endothelial cell (EC) surface receptor essential for angiogiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, as a novel target of auranofin. In both primary EC and EC cell lines, auranofin induces downregulation of VEGFR3 in a dose-dependent manner. Auranofin at high doses (≥1 µM) decreases cellular survival protein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2), TrxR2-dependent Trx2 and transcription factor NF-κB whereas increases stress signaling p38MAPK, leading to EC apoptosis. However, auranofin at low doses (≤0.5 µM) specifically induces downregulation of VEGFR3 and VEGFR3-mediated EC proliferation and migration, two critical steps required for in vivo lymphangiogenesis. Mechanistically, we show that auranofin-induced VEGFR3 downregulation is blocked by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and lysosome inhibitor chloroquine, but is promoted by proteasomal inhibitor MG132. These results suggest that auranofin induces VEGFR3 degradation through a lysosome-dependent pathway. Auranofin may be a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of lymphangiogenesis-dependent diseases such as lymphedema and cancer metastasis. PMID:24913775

  7. Vestitol Isolated from Brazilian Red Propolis Inhibits Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Elucidation of the Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Marcelo; Cólon, David F; Castanheira, Fernanda V S; da Cunha, Marcos G; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Alencar, Severino M; Cunha, Thiago M; Rosalen, Pedro L

    2016-04-22

    Vestitol is an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis with potential anti-inflammatory activity. This study investigated the mechanism of action of vestitol on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process. Pre-treatment with vestitol at 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg reduced LPS- or mBSA-induced neutrophil migration and the release of CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 in vivo. Likewise, pre-treatment with vestitol at 1, 3, or 10 μM reduced the levels of CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 in macrophage supernatants in vitro. Moreover, the administration of vestitol (10 mg/kg) reduced leukocyte rolling and adherence in the mesenteric microcirculation of mice. The pre-treatment with vestitol (10 mg/kg) in iNOS(-/-) mice did not block its activity concerning neutrophil migration. With regard to the activity of vestitol on neutrophils isolated from the bone marrow of mice, there was a reduction on the chemotaxis of CXCL2/MIP-2 or LTB4-induced neutrophils and on calcium influx after pre-treatment with the compound at 3 or 10 μM. There was no change in CXCR2 expression by neutrophils treated with vestitol at 10 μM. These findings demonstrate that vestitol is a promising novel anti-inflammatory agent.

  8. Fomiroid A, a Novel Compound from the Mushroom Fomitopsis nigra, Inhibits NPC1L1-Mediated Cholesterol Uptake via a Mode of Action Distinct from That of Ezetimibe

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Tomohiro; Sakurada, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Rie; Yamaguchi, Kohji; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Kioka, Noriyuki; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Matsuo, Michinori; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the key risk factors for coronary heart disease, a major cause of death in developed countries. Suppression of NPC1L1-mediated dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption is predicted to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of hypercholesterolemia. In a screen for natural products that inhibit ezetimibe glucuronide binding to NPC1L1, we found a novel compound, fomiroid A, in extracts of the mushroom Fomitopsis nigra. Fomiroid A is a lanosterone derivative with molecular formula C30H48O3. Fomiroid A inhibited ezetimibe glucuronide binding to NPC1L1, and dose-dependently prevented NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake and formation of esterified cholesterol in NPC1L1-expressing Caco2 cells. Fomiroid A exhibited a pharmacological chaperone activity that corrected trafficking defects of the L1072T/L1168I mutant of NPC1L1. Because ezetimibe does not have such an activity, the binding site and mode of action of fomiroid A are likely to be distinct from those of ezetimibe. PMID:25551765

  9. Fomiroid A, a novel compound from the mushroom Fomitopsis nigra, inhibits NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake via a mode of action distinct from that of ezetimibe.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tomohiro; Sakurada, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Rie; Yamaguchi, Kohji; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Kioka, Noriyuki; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Matsuo, Michinori; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the key risk factors for coronary heart disease, a major cause of death in developed countries. Suppression of NPC1L1-mediated dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption is predicted to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of hypercholesterolemia. In a screen for natural products that inhibit ezetimibe glucuronide binding to NPC1L1, we found a novel compound, fomiroid A, in extracts of the mushroom Fomitopsis nigra. Fomiroid A is a lanosterone derivative with molecular formula C30H48O3. Fomiroid A inhibited ezetimibe glucuronide binding to NPC1L1, and dose-dependently prevented NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake and formation of esterified cholesterol in NPC1L1-expressing Caco2 cells. Fomiroid A exhibited a pharmacological chaperone activity that corrected trafficking defects of the L1072T/L1168I mutant of NPC1L1. Because ezetimibe does not have such an activity, the binding site and mode of action of fomiroid A are likely to be distinct from those of ezetimibe.

  10. Fir honeydew honey flavonoids inhibit TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression in human keratinocytes: a new action of honey in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj; Bohova, Jana; Garcia-Villalba, Rocio; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco A; Madakova, Zuzana; Majtan, Tomas; Majtan, Viktor; Klaudiny, Jaroslav

    2013-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) appears to be a major protease responsible for the degradation of matrix and growth-promoting agents in chronic wounds. Honey has been successfully used for treating non-healing wounds associated with infections. However, the mechanisms of its action at the cellular level have remained poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fir honeydew honey on TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression and secretion from human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and to identify the honey component(s) responsible for a discovered effect. A C18 solid-phase column was used for preparation of honey aqueous extract (HAE). Expression and production of MMP-9 by HaCaT cells were determined by reverse transcription-PCR, gelatine zymography and Western blot analysis using a polyclonal antibody against MMP-9. We found that HAE inhibited TNF-α-induced production of MMP-9 in keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Apigenin and kaempferol, identified flavonoids in HAE, markedly inhibited MMP-9 production from HaCaT and epidermal keratinocytes. Taken together, fir honeydew honey, which contains certain flavonoids, prevents TNF-α-induced proteolytic activity in cutaneous inflammation. Thus, our findings provide clear evidence that honey may serve as a natural treatment for dermatological problems associated with a persistent inflammation. PMID:23812412

  11. Large scale integration of drug-target information reveals poly-pharmacological drug action mechanisms in tumor cell line growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Richard A.; Gostev, Mikhail; Ilisavskii, Sergei; Willis, Anne E.; Melino, Gerry; Antonov, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding therapeutic mechanisms of drug anticancer cytotoxicity represents a key challenge in preclinical testing. Here we have performed a meta-analysis of publicly available tumor cell line growth inhibition assays (~ 70 assays from 6 independent experimental groups covering ~ 500 000 molecules) with the primary goal of understanding molecular therapeutic mechanisms of cancer cytotoxicity. To implement this we have collected currently available information on protein targets for molecules that were tested in the assays. We used a statistical methodology to identify protein targets overrepresented among molecules exhibiting cancer cytotoxicity with the particular focus of identifying overrepresented patterns consisting of several proteins (i.e. proteins “A” and “B” and “C”). Our analysis demonstrates that targeting individual proteins can result in a significant increase (up to 50-fold) of the observed odds for a molecule to be an efficient inhibitor of tumour cell line growth. However, further insight into potential molecular mechanisms reveals a multi-target mode of action: targeting a pattern of several proteins drastically increases the observed odds (up to 500-fold) for a molecule to be tumour cytotoxic. In contrast, molecules targeting only one protein but not targeting an additional set of proteins tend to be nontoxic. Our findings support a poly-pharmacology drug discovery paradigm, demonstrating that anticancer cytotoxicity is a product, in most cases, of multi-target mode of drug action PMID:24553133

  12. Multiple actions of Lucilia sericata larvae in hard-to-heal wounds: larval secretions contain molecules that accelerate wound healing, reduce chronic inflammation and inhibit bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Pritchard, David I; Nigam, Yamni; Jung, Willi; Nibbering, Peter H

    2013-12-01

    In Europe ≈15,000 patients receive larval therapy for wound treatment annually. Over the past few years, clinical studies have demonstrated the success of larvae of Lucilia sericata as debridement agents. This is based on a combination of physical and biochemical actions. Laboratory investigations have advanced our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of larval secretions, including removal of dead tissue, reduction of the bacterial burden, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the microbiological, immunological, and wound healing actions of larval therapy, and the molecules involved in these beneficial effects. Future studies will focus on the isolation, identification, and (pre)clinical testing of the effective molecules of L. sericata larvae. These molecules may be candidates for the development of new agents for the treatment of several infectious and inflammatory diseases, including chronic wounds.

  13. Actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists on CFTR antibody-inhibited β-adrenergic mucin secretion response

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, M M C; Lloyd Mills, C; Dormer, R L; McPherson, M A

    1998-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a chloride channel and is a key regulator of mucin secretion. The mechanism by which 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) corrects the defect in CFTR mediated β-adrenergic stimulation of mucin secretion has not been determined. The present study has investigated the actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists to determine whether ability to stimulate mucin secretion correlates with correction of CFTR antibody inhibited β-adrenergic response and whether excessive cyclic AMP rise is required.CFTR antibodies were introduced into living rat submandibular acini by hypotonic swelling. Following recovery, mucin secretion in response to isoproterenol was measured.The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, 8 cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) was a less potent stimulator of mucin secretion than was the A2 receptor antagonist dimethylpropargylxanthine (DMPX). A concentration of CPT close to the Ki for A1 receptor antagonism (10 nM) did not stimulate mucin secretion.DMPX, although a potent stimulator of mucin secretion, did not correct CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion.CPT corrected defective CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion at a high (1 mM) concentration, suggesting a mechanism other than adenosine receptor antagonism.DMPX potentiated the isoproterenol induced cyclic AMP rise, whereas CPT did not.Correction of the defective CFTR mucin secretion response did not correlate with ability to stimulate mucin secretion and did not require potentiation of β-adrenergic induced increases in cyclic AMP. This affords real promise for the development of a selective drug treatment for cystic fibrosis. PMID:9831904

  14. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  15. Inhibition of recombinant N-type and native high voltage-gated neuronal Ca{sup 2+} channels by AdGABA: Mechanism of action studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Sandoval, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Zoidis, Grigoris; Felix, Ricardo

    2011-02-01

    High-voltage activated Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub V}) channels play a key role in the regulation of numerous physiological events by causing transient changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. These channels consist of a pore-forming Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} protein and three auxiliary subunits (Ca{sub V}{beta}, Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and Ca{sub V}{gamma}). Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} is an important component of Ca{sub V} channels in many tissues and of great interest as a drug target. It is well known that anticonvulsant agent gabapentin (GBP) binds to Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and reduces Ca{sup 2+} currents by modulating the expression and/or function of the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} subunit. Recently, we showed that an adamantane derivative of GABA, AdGABA, has also inhibitory effects on Ca{sub V} channels. However, the importance of the interaction of AdGABA with the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} subunit has not been conclusively demonstrated and the mechanism of action of the drug has yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe studies on the mechanism of action of AdGABA. Using a combined approach of patch-clamp recordings and molecular biology we show that AdGABA inhibits Ca{sup 2+} currents acting on Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} only when applied chronically, both in a heterologous expression system and in dorsal root-ganglion neurons. AdGABA seems to require uptake and be acting intracellularly given that its effects are prevented by an inhibitor of the L-amino acid transport system. Interestingly, a mutation in the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} that abolishes GBP binding did not affect AdGABA actions, revealing that its mechanism of action is similar but not identical to that of GBP. These results indicate that AdGABA is an important Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} ligand that regulates Ca{sub V} channels.

  16. A study of Nigella sativa induced growth inhibition of MCF and HepG2 cell lines: An anti-neoplastic study along with its mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Y. Padmanabha; Chandrasekhar, K. B.; Sadiq, Mohammed Jaffar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anticancer potential of seeds of Nigella sativa using MCF and HepG2 cell lines along with its mechanism of action. Materials and Methods: (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide nuclear staining technique were selected to evaluate anticancer potential and mechanism of action of test extract. Results: Aqueous extract of N.sativa at a test dose of 180 mg and 300 mg was identified to be the best as anticancer agent against MCF and HepG2 cell lines among different solvent test extract where doxorubicin and cisplatin were employed as standard references. Discussion: Further study including separation and characterization of active principles in the aqueous extract shall prove beneficial. PMID:25829794

  17. Norzotepine, a major metabolite of zotepine, exerts atypical antipsychotic-like and antidepressant-like actions through its potent inhibition of norepinephrine reuptake.

    PubMed

    Shobo, M; Kondo, Y; Yamada, H; Mihara, T; Yamamoto, N; Katsuoka, M; Harada, K; Ni, K; Matsuoka, N

    2010-06-01

    The antipsychotic drug zotepine [ZTP; 2-[(8-chlorodibenzo[b,f]thiepin-10-yl)oxy]-N,N-dimethylethan-1-amine] is known to have not only atypical antipsychotic effects but also antidepressive effects in schizophrenia patients. Norzotepine [norZTP; N-desmethylzotepine, 2-[(8-chlorodibenzo[b,f]thiepin-10-yl)oxy]-N-methylethan-1-amine] has been postulated to be a major metabolite of ZTP in humans. Here, we characterized norZTP through several in vitro studies and in animal models of psychosis, depression, and extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and compared the pharmacological profiles with those of ZTP. Although both compounds showed similar overall neurotransmitter receptor binding profiles, norZTP showed 7- to 16-fold more potent norepinephrine reuptake inhibition than ZTP. In a pharmacokinetic study, both ZTP and norZTP showed good brain permeability when administered individually in mice, although norZTP was not detected in either plasma or brain after intraperitoneal injection of ZTP. In the methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion test in mice, norZTP and ZTP showed similar antipsychotic-like effects at doses above 1 mg/kg i.p. In contrast, unlike ZTP, norZTP did not induce catalepsy up to 10 mg/kg i.p. norZTP significantly antagonized the hypothermia induced by reserpine [(3beta,16beta,17alpha,18beta,20alpha)-11,17-dimethoxy-18-[(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)oxy]yohimban-16-carboxylic acid methyl ester], suggesting in vivo inhibition of the norepinephrine transporter. In the forced-swim test, norZTP exerted an antidepressant-like effect at the effective doses for its antipsychotic action, whereas ZTP neither antagonized reserpine-induced hypothermia nor showed antidepressant-like effect. These results collectively demonstrate that norZTP exerts more potent inhibitory action than ZTP on norepinephrine transporters both in vitro and in vivo, presumably accounting for its antidepressant-like effect and low EPS propensity. Given that norZTP is the major metabolite observed in

  18. A highly acid-resistant novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 has antibacterial activity, including that against Helicobacter pylori, and inhibits gastrin-mediated acid production in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Yuji; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was isolated from the gastric juice of a healthy Japanese male volunteer, and characterized for its effectiveness in the stomach environment. Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was found to have the strongest acid resistance among several lactobacilli examined (>10% of cells survived at pH 1.0 after 2 h), and such a high acid resistance property was a specific characteristic of this strain of L. johnsonii. When cultured with various virulent bacteria, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori,Escherichia coli O-157, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile, in which case its effectiveness was more potent than that of a type strain of L. johnsonii,JCM2012. In addition to its effect in vitro, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of H. pylori in human intestinal microbiota-associated mice in both its live and lyophilized forms. Moreover, L. johnsonii No. 1088 suppressed gastric acid secretion in mice via decreasing the number of gastrin-positive cells in the stomach. These results taken together suggest that L. johnsonii No. 1088 is a unique lactobacillus having properties beneficial for supporting H. pylori eradication by triple therapy including the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and also for prophylaxis of gastroesophageal reflux disease possibly caused after H. pylori eradication as a side effect of PPI. PMID:25771812

  19. A highly acid-resistant novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 has antibacterial activity, including that against Helicobacter pylori, and inhibits gastrin-mediated acid production in mice.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Yuji; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2015-06-01

    A novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was isolated from the gastric juice of a healthy Japanese male volunteer, and characterized for its effectiveness in the stomach environment. Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was found to have the strongest acid resistance among several lactobacilli examined (>10% of cells survived at pH 1.0 after 2 h), and such a high acid resistance property was a specific characteristic of this strain of L. johnsonii. When cultured with various virulent bacteria, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli O-157, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile, in which case its effectiveness was more potent than that of a type strain of L. johnsonii, JCM2012. In addition to its effect in vitro, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of H. pylori in human intestinal microbiota-associated mice in both its live and lyophilized forms. Moreover, L. johnsonii No. 1088 suppressed gastric acid secretion in mice via decreasing the number of gastrin-positive cells in the stomach. These results taken together suggest that L. johnsonii No. 1088 is a unique lactobacillus having properties beneficial for supporting H. pylori eradication by triple therapy including the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and also for prophylaxis of gastroesophageal reflux disease possibly caused after H. pylori eradication as a side effect of PPI.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 8/28/2002), Record of Technical Change No. 2 (dated 9/23/2002), and Record of Technical Change No. 3 (dated 6/2/2004)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

    2001-11-21

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 168 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 168 consists of a group of twelve relatively diverse Corrective Action Sites (CASs 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; 25-99-16, USW G3; 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2). These CASs vary in terms of the sources and nature of potential contamination. The CASs are located and/or associated wit h the following Nevada Test Site (NTS) facilities within three areas. The first eight CASs were in operation between 1958 to 1984 in Area 25 include the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Missile Experiment Salvage Yard; the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Radioactive Materials Storage Facility; and the Treatment Test Facility Building at Test Cell A. Secondly, the three CASs located in Area 26 include the Project Pluto testing area that operated from 1961 to 1964. Lastly, the Underground Southern Nevada Well (USW) G3 (CAS 25-99-16), a groundwater monitoring well located west of the NTS on the ridgeline of Yucca Mountain, was in operation during the 1980s. Based on site history and existing characterization data obtained to support the data quality objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for CAU 168 are primarily radionuclide; however, the COPCs for several CASs were not defined. To address COPC uncertainty

  1. Lehrerbelastungsforschung -- Erweiterung durch ein handlungpsychologisches Belastungskonzept (Research on Teacher's Ability To Cope with Stress -- A Broadening of the Approach by Including a Psychology of Action-Concept of Stress).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Reveals that most research on teacher stress relies on personal accounts. Presents a psychology of action-concept of stress and that has been transferred to teacher's instructional activities. Argues that this psychology of action concept of stress helps develop an understanding of teachers' work and what may lead to psychological stress. (CAJ)

  2. The IFITMs Inhibit Zika Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Savidis, George; Perreira, Jill M; Portmann, Jocelyn M; Meraner, Paul; Guo, Zhiru; Green, Sharone; Brass, Abraham L

    2016-06-14

    Zika virus has emerged as a severe health threat with a rapidly expanding range. The IFITM family of restriction factors inhibits the replication of a broad range of viruses, including the closely related flaviruses West Nile virus and dengue virus. Here, we show that IFITM1 and IFITM3 inhibit Zika virus infection early in the viral life cycle. Moreover, IFITM3 can prevent Zika-virus-induced cell death. These results suggest that strategies to boost the actions and/or levels of the IFITMs might be useful for inhibiting a broad range of emerging viruses.

  3. D-sorbose inhibits disaccharidase activity and demonstrates suppressive action on postprandial blood levels of glucose and insulin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Oku, Tsuneyuki; Murata-Takenoshita, Yoko; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shimura, Fumio; Nakamura, Sadako

    2014-11-01

    In an attempt to develop D-sorbose as a new sweetener that could help in preventing lifestyle-related diseases, we investigated the inhibitory effect of D-sorbose on disaccharidase activity, using the brush border membrane vesicles of rat small intestines. The inhibitory effect was compared with that of L-sorbose and other rare sugars, and the small intestinal disaccharidases in rats was compared with that of humans as well. In humans and the small intestines of rats, d-sorbose strongly inhibited sucrase activity and weakly inhibited maltase activity. Inhibition by D-sorbose of sucrase activity was similar to that of L-arabinose, and the K(i) of D-sorbose was 7.5 mM. Inhibition by D-sorbose was very strong in comparison with that of L-sorbose (K(i), 60.8 mM), whereas inhibition of d-tagatose was between that of D-sorbose and L-sorbose. The inhibitory mode of D-sorbose for sucrose and maltase was uncompetitive, and that of L-sorbose was competitive. To determine a suppressive effect on postprandial blood levels of glucose and insulin via inhibition of sucrase activity, sucrose solution with or without D-sorbose was administered to rats. Increments in the blood levels of glucose and insulin were suppressed significantly after administration of sucrose solution with D-sorbose to rats, in comparison to administration of sucrose solution without D-sorbose. In contrast, the suppressive effect of L-sorbose on postprandial blood levels of glucose and insulin was very weak. These results suggest that D-sorbose may have an inhibitory effect on disaccharidase activity and could be used as a sweetener to suppress the postprandial elevation of blood levels of glucose and insulin. The use of D-sorbose as a sweetener may contribute to the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Assessment of competitive and mechanism-based inhibition by clarithromycin: use of domperidone as a CYP3A probe-drug substrate and various enzymatic sources including a new cell-based assay with freshly isolated human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Veronique; Turgeon, Jacques

    2010-04-01

    Clarithromycin is involved in a large number of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. Discrepancies are observed between the magnitude of drug interactions predicted from in vitro competitive inhibition studies and changes observed clinically in the plasma levels of affected CYP3A substrates. The formation of metabolic-intermediate complexes has been proposed to explain these differences. The objectives of our study were: 1) to determine the competitive inhibition potency of clarithromycin on the metabolism of domperidone as a CYP3A probe drug using human recombinant CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 isoenzymes, human liver microsomes and cultured human hepatocytes; 2) to establish the modulatory role of cytochrome b5 on the competitive inhibition potency of clarithromycin; 3) to demonstrate the clarithromycin-induced formation of CYP450 metabolic-intermediate complexes in human liver microsomes; and 4) to determine the extent of CYP3A inhibition due to metabolic-intermediate complex formation using human liver microsomes and cultured human hepatocytes. At high concentrations (100 µM), clarithromycin had weak competitive inhibition potency towards CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. Inhibition potency was further decreased by the addition of cytochrome b5 (9-19%). Clarithromycin-induced metabolic-intermediate complexes were revealed by spectrophotometry analysis using human liver microsomes while time- and concentration-dependent mechanism-based inhibitions were quantified using isolated hepatocytes. These results indicate that mechanism-based but not competitive inhibition of CYP3As is the major underlying mechanism of drug-drug interactions observed clinically with clarithromycin. Drug interactions between clarithromycin and several CYP3A substrates are predicted to be insidious; the risk of severe adverse events should increase over time and persist for a few days after cessation of the drug.

  5. A novel action mechanism for MPT0G013, a derivative of arylsulfonamide, inhibits tumor angiogenesis through up-regulation of TIMP3 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Ya; Liou, Jing-Ping; Tsai, An-Chi; Lai, Mei-Jung; Liu, Yi-Min; Lee, Hsueh-Yun; Wang, Jing-Chi; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Teng, Che-Ming

    2014-10-30

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) were originally characterized as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), acting as potent antiangiogenic proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that the arylsulfonamide derivative MPT0G013 has potent antiangiogenic activities in vitro and in vivo viainducing TIMP3 expression. Treatments with MPT0G013 significantly inhibited endothelial cell functions, such as cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation, as well as induced p21 and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. Subsequent microarray analysis showed significant induction of TIMP3 gene expression by MPT0G013, and siRNA-mediated blockage of TIMP3 up-regulation abrogated the antiangiogenic activities of MPT0G013 and prevented inhibition of p-AKT and p-ERK proteins. Importantly, MPT0G013 exhibited antiangiogenic activities in in vivo Matrigel plug assays, inhibited tumor growth and up-regulated TIMP3 and p21 proteins in HCT116 mouse xenograft models. These data suggest potential therapeutic application of MPT0G013 for angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer.

  6. Inhibition of MAP kinase promotes the recruitment of corepressor SMRT by tamoxifen-bound estrogen receptor alpha and potentiates tamoxifen action in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wei; Chen, Linfeng; Li, Juan; Yao, Zhi

    2010-05-28

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}), a ligand controlled transcription factor, plays an important role in breast cancer growth and endocrine therapy. Tamoxifen (TAM) antagonizes ER{alpha} activity and has been applied in breast cancer treatment. TAM-bound ER{alpha} associates with nuclear receptor-corepressors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been elucidated to result in cross-talk between growth factor and ER{alpha} mediated signaling. We show that activated MAPK represses interaction of TAM-bound ER{alpha} with silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) and inhibits the recruitment of SMRT by ER{alpha} to certain estrogen target genes. Blockade of MAPK signaling cascade with MEK inhibitor U0126 promotes the interaction and subsequently inhibits ER{alpha} activity via enhanced recruitment of SMRT, leading to reduced expression of ER{alpha} target genes. The growth rate of MCF-7 cells was decelerated when treated with both TAM and U0126. Moreover, the growth of MCF-7 cells stably expressing SMRT showed a robust repression in the presence of TAM and U0126. These results suggest that activated MAPK signaling cascade attenuates antagonist-induced recruitment of SMRT to ER{alpha}, suggesting corepressor mediates inhibition of ER{alpha} transactivation and breast cancer cell growth by antagonist. Taken together, our finding indicates combination of antagonist and MAPK inhibitor could be a helpful approach for breast cancer therapy.

  7. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and Action Research in Context" (Cliff…

  8. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-25

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357, Mud Pits and Waste Dump, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All of the CASs are found within Yucca Flat except CAS 25-15-01 (Waste Dump). Corrective Action Site 25-15-01 is found in Area 25 in Jackass Flat. Of the 14 CASs in CAU 357, 11 are mud pits, suspected mud pits, or mud processing-related sites, which are by-products of drilling activities in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing done on the NTS. Of the remaining CASs, one CAS is a waste dump, one CAS contains scattered lead bricks, and one CAS has a building associated with Project 31.2. All 14 of the CASs are inactive and abandoned. Clean closure with no further action of CAU 357 will be completed if no contaminants are detected above preliminary action levels. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval upon completion of the field activities. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  9. Action potential in Chara cells intensifies spatial patterns of photosynthetic electron flow and non-photochemical quenching in parallel with inhibition of pH banding.

    PubMed

    Krupenina, Natalia A; Bulychev, Alexander A; Roelfsema, M Rob G; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2008-06-01

    Characean cells exposed to illumination arrange plasma-membrane H(+) fluxes and photosynthesis in coordinated spatial patterns. The limited availability of CO(2) in alkaline bands accounts for the lower effective quantum yield of photosystem II (DeltaF/F(m)') in chloroplasts of these bands compared to acidic zones. The effect of electrically triggered action potential on the spatial distribution of photosynthetic parameters (DeltaF/F(m)' and non-photochemical quenching, NPQ) and extracellular pH was studied with fluorescence imaging and pH microelectrodes. In the resting cell at a range of light intensities, the periodic profile of extracellular pH is parallel to the profile of NPQ and antiparallel to that of DeltaF/F(m)'. After triggering the action potential, the pH banding temporarily disappeared, but in contrast, the differences in effective quantum yield and NPQ patterns became more apparent. The transient changes in pH-banding, effective quantum yield and non-photochemical quenching are discussed in relation to alterations in intracellular Ca(2+) and H(+) concentrations during and after the action potential.

  10. OL3, a novel low-absorbed TGR5 agonist with reduced side effects, lowered blood glucose via dual actions on TGR5 activation and DPP-4 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shan-yao; Ning, Meng-meng; Zou, Qing-an; Feng, Ying; Ye, Yang-liang; Shen, Jian-hua; Leng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Aim: TGR5 agonists stimulate intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, but systemic exposure causes unwanted side effects, such as gallbladder filling. In the present study, linagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor with a large molecular weight and polarity, and MN6, a previously described TGR5 agonist, were linked to produce OL3, a novel low-absorbed TGR5 agonist with reduced side-effects and dual function in lowering blood glucose by activation of TGR5 and inhibition of DPP-4. Methods: TGR5 activation was assayed in HEK293 cells stably expressing human or mouse TGR5 and a CRE-driven luciferase gene. DPP-4 inhibition was assessed based on the rate of hydrolysis of a surrogate substrate. GLP-1 secretion was measured in human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. OL3 permeability was tested in Caco-2 cells. Acute glucose-lowering effects of OL3 were evaluated in ICR and diabetic ob/ob mice. Results: OL3 activated human and mouse TGR5 with an EC50 of 86.24 and 17.36 nmol/L, respectively, and stimulated GLP-1 secretion in human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells (3–30 μmol/L). OL3 inhibited human and mouse DPP-4 with IC50 values of 18.44 and 69.98 μmol/L, respectively. Low permeability of OL3 was observed in Caco-2 cells. In ICR mice treated orally with OL3 (150 mg/kg), the serum OL3 concentration was 101.10 ng/mL at 1 h, and decreased to 13.38 ng/mL at 5.5 h post dose, confirming the low absorption of OL3 in vivo. In ICR mice and ob/ob mice, oral administration of OL3 significantly lowered the blood glucose levels, which was a synergic effect of activating TGR5 that stimulated GLP-1 secretion in the intestine and inhibiting DPP-4 that cleaved GLP-1 in the plasma. In ICR mice, oral administration of OL3 did not cause gallbladder filling. Conclusion: OL3 is a low-absorbed TGR5 agonist that lowers blood glucose without inducing gallbladder filling. This study presents a new strategy in the development of potent TGR5 agonists in treating type 2 diabetes, which target to the

  11. Antibacterial compounds of Canadian honeys target bacterial cell wall inducing phenotype changes, growth inhibition and cell lysis that resemble action of β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active β-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential β-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001). E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (β-lactamase) remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, β-lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and survival, honey

  12. Antibacterial compounds of Canadian honeys target bacterial cell wall inducing phenotype changes, growth inhibition and cell lysis that resemble action of β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active β-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential β-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001). E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (β-lactamase) remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, β-lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and survival, honey

  13. Iminosugars Inhibit Dengue Virus Production via Inhibition of ER Alpha-Glucosidases—Not Glycolipid Processing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sayce, Andrew C.; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Killingbeck, Sarah S.; Tyrrell, Beatrice E.; Hill, Michelle L.; Caputo, Alessandro T.; Iwaki, Ren; Kinami, Kyoko; Ide, Daisuke; Kiappes, J. L.; Beatty, P. Robert; Kato, Atsushi; Harris, Eva; Dwek, Raymond A.; Miller, Joanna L.; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    It has long been thought that iminosugar antiviral activity is a function of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-resident α-glucosidases, and on this basis, many iminosugars have been investigated as therapeutic agents for treatment of infection by a diverse spectrum of viruses, including dengue virus (DENV). However, iminosugars are glycomimetics possessing a nitrogen atom in place of the endocyclic oxygen atom, and the ubiquity of glycans in host metabolism suggests that multiple pathways can be targeted via iminosugar treatment. Successful treatment of patients with glycolipid processing defects using iminosugars highlights the clinical exploitation of iminosugar inhibition of enzymes other than ER α-glucosidases. Evidence correlating antiviral activity with successful inhibition of ER glucosidases together with the exclusion of alternative mechanisms of action of iminosugars in the context of DENV infection is limited. Celgosivir, a bicyclic iminosugar evaluated in phase Ib clinical trials as a therapeutic for the treatment of DENV infection, was confirmed to be antiviral in a lethal mouse model of antibody-enhanced DENV infection. In this study we provide the first evidence of the antiviral activity of celgosivir in primary human macrophages in vitro, in which it inhibits DENV secretion with an EC50 of 5 μM. We further demonstrate that monocyclic glucose-mimicking iminosugars inhibit isolated glycoprotein and glycolipid processing enzymes and that this inhibition also occurs in primary cells treated with these drugs. By comparison to bicyclic glucose-mimicking iminosugars which inhibit glycoprotein processing but do not inhibit glycolipid processing and galactose-mimicking iminosugars which do not inhibit glycoprotein processing but do inhibit glycolipid processing, we demonstrate that inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-resident α-glucosidases, not glycolipid processing, is responsible for iminosugar antiviral activity against DENV. Our data suggest that

  14. Iminosugars Inhibit Dengue Virus Production via Inhibition of ER Alpha-Glucosidases--Not Glycolipid Processing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sayce, Andrew C; Alonzi, Dominic S; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Tyrrell, Beatrice E; Hill, Michelle L; Caputo, Alessandro T; Iwaki, Ren; Kinami, Kyoko; Ide, Daisuke; Kiappes, J L; Beatty, P Robert; Kato, Atsushi; Harris, Eva; Dwek, Raymond A; Miller, Joanna L; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    It has long been thought that iminosugar antiviral activity is a function of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-resident α-glucosidases, and on this basis, many iminosugars have been investigated as therapeutic agents for treatment of infection by a diverse spectrum of viruses, including dengue virus (DENV). However, iminosugars are glycomimetics possessing a nitrogen atom in place of the endocyclic oxygen atom, and the ubiquity of glycans in host metabolism suggests that multiple pathways can be targeted via iminosugar treatment. Successful treatment of patients with glycolipid processing defects using iminosugars highlights the clinical exploitation of iminosugar inhibition of enzymes other than ER α-glucosidases. Evidence correlating antiviral activity with successful inhibition of ER glucosidases together with the exclusion of alternative mechanisms of action of iminosugars in the context of DENV infection is limited. Celgosivir, a bicyclic iminosugar evaluated in phase Ib clinical trials as a therapeutic for the treatment of DENV infection, was confirmed to be antiviral in a lethal mouse model of antibody-enhanced DENV infection. In this study we provide the first evidence of the antiviral activity of celgosivir in primary human macrophages in vitro, in which it inhibits DENV secretion with an EC50 of 5 μM. We further demonstrate that monocyclic glucose-mimicking iminosugars inhibit isolated glycoprotein and glycolipid processing enzymes and that this inhibition also occurs in primary cells treated with these drugs. By comparison to bicyclic glucose-mimicking iminosugars which inhibit glycoprotein processing but do not inhibit glycolipid processing and galactose-mimicking iminosugars which do not inhibit glycoprotein processing but do inhibit glycolipid processing, we demonstrate that inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-resident α-glucosidases, not glycolipid processing, is responsible for iminosugar antiviral activity against DENV. Our data suggest that

  15. A Natural Variant of Obestatin, Q90L, Inhibits Ghrelin's Action on Food Intake and GH Secretion and Targets NPY and GHRH Neurons in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, Rim; Zizzari, Philippe; Viltart, Odile; Yang, Seung-Kwon; Gardette, Robert; Videau, Catherine; Badoer, Emilio; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    Background Ghrelin and obestatin are two gut-derived peptides originating from the same ghrelin/obestatin prepropeptide gene (GHRL). While ghrelin stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion and food intake and inhibits γ-aminobutyric-acid synaptic transmission onto GHRH (Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone) neurons, obestatin blocks these effects. In Humans, GHRL gene polymorphisms have been associated with pathologies linked to an unbalanced energy homeostasis. We hypothesized that one polymorphism located in the obestatin sequence (Q to L substitution in position 90 of the ghrelin/obestatin prepropeptide, rs4684677) may impact on the function of obestatin. In the present study, we tested the activity of native and Q90L obestatin to modulate ghrelin-induced food intake, GH secretion, cFos activity in GHRH and Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons and γ-aminobutyric-acid activity onto GHRH neurons. Methodology/Principal findings Food intake, GH secretion and electrophysiological recordings were assessed in C57BL/6 mice. cFos activity was measured in NPY-Renilla-GFP and GHRH-eGFP mice. Mice received saline, ghrelin or ghrelin combined to native or Q90L obestatin (30 nmol each) in the early light phase. Ghrelin stimulation of food intake and GH secretion varied considerably among individual mice with 59–77% eliciting a robust response. In these high-responders, ghrelin-induced food intake and GH secretion were reduced equally by native and Q90L obestatin. In contrast to in vivo observations, Q90L was slightly more efficient than native obestatin in inhibiting ghrelin-induced cFos activation within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and the nucleus tractus solitarius of the brainstem. After ghrelin injection, 26% of NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus expressed cFos protein and this number was significantly reduced by co-administration of Q90L obestatin. Q90L was also more potent that native obestatin in reducing ghrelin-induced inhibition of γ-aminobutyric-acid synaptic

  16. Cyanamide mode of action during inhibition of onion (Allium cepa L.) root growth involves disturbances in cell division and cytoskeleton formation.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata

    2011-09-01

    Cyanamide is an allelochemical produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.). Its phyotoxic effect on plant growth was examined on roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Water solution of cyanamide (2-10 mM) restricted growth of onion roots in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of onion roots with cyanamide resulted in a decrease in root growth rate accompanied by a decrease in accumulation of fresh and dry weight. The inhibitory effect of cyanamide was reversed by its removal from the environment, but full recovery was observed only for tissue treated with this chemical at low concentration (2-6 mM). Cytological observations of root tip cells suggest that disturbances in cell division may explain the strong cyanamide allelopathic activity. Moreover, in cyanamide-treated onion the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells and cell cycle, and modifications of cytoskeleton arrangement.

  17. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis KasA show mode of action within cell wall biosynthesis and its inhibition by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Luckner, Sylvia R; Machutta, Carl A; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2009-07-15

    Mycobacteria have a unique cell wall consisting of mycolic acids, very-long-chain lipids that provide protection and allow the bacteria to persist within human macrophages. Inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis is fatal for the organism and a starting point for the discovery and development of novel antibiotics. We determined the crystal structures of KasA, a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids, in its apo-form and bound to the natural product inhibitor thiolactomycin. Detailed insights into the interaction of the inhibitor with KasA and the identification of a polyethylene glycol molecule that mimics a fatty acid substrate of approximately 40 carbon atoms length, represent the first atomic view of a mycobacterial enzyme involved in the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids and provide a robust platform for the development of novel thiolactomycin analogs with high affinity for KasA. PMID:19604480

  18. Broad range of inhibiting action of novel camphor-based compound with anti-hemagglutinin activity against influenza viruses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zarubaev, V V; Garshinina, A V; Tretiak, T S; Fedorova, V A; Shtro, A A; Sokolova, A S; Yarovaya, O I; Salakhutdinov, N F

    2015-08-01

    Influenza virus continues to remain one of the leading human respiratory pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality around the globe. Due to short-term life cycle and high rate of mutations influenza virus is able to rapidly develop resistance to clinically available antivirals. This makes necessary the search and development of new drugs with different targets and mechanisms of activity. Here we report anti-influenza activity of camphor derivative 1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-ylidene-aminoethanol (camphecene). In in vitro experiments it inhibited influenza viruses A(H1, H1pdm09, H3 and H5 subtypes) and B with EC50's lying in micromolar range. Due to low cytotoxicity it resulted in high selectivity indices (74-661 depending on the virus). This effect did not depend on susceptibility or resistance of the viruses to adamantane derivatives amantadine and rimantadine. The compound appeared the most effective when added at the early stages of viral life cycle (0-2h p.i.). In direct hemagglutinin inhibition tests camphecene was shown to decrease the activity of HA's of influenza viruses A and B. The activity of camphecene was further confirmed in experiments with influenza virus-infected mice, in which, being used orally by therapeutic schedule (once a day, days 1-5 p.i.) it decreased specific mortality of animals infected with both influenza A and B viruses (highest indices of protection 66.7% and 88.9%, respectively). Taken together, these results are encouraging for further development of camphecene-based drug(s) and for exploration of camphor derivatives as highly prospective group of potential antivirals. PMID:26072310

  19. In vivo and in vitro inhibitory action of 17β-estradiol and environmental estrogen 4-nonylphenol on gonad-inhibiting hormone (GIH) expression in the eyestalks of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Li, G L; Chen, H P; Deng, S P; Ye, M; Jiang, S; Chan, S F; Zhu, C H

    2015-01-01

    The gonad-inhibiting hormone (GIH) belongs to a neuropeptide family synthesized and released in an X-organ sinus gland complex of crustacean eyestalks. GIH inhibits crustacean ovarian maturation by suppressing vitellogenin (Vtg) synthesis, whereas estrogen is responsible for the stimulation of vitellogenesis (not established). In this study, the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2, 10(-6) M), estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen (TAM, 10(-6), 10(-7), and 10(-8) M), and the environmental estrogen nonylphenol (NP, 1 μg/L and 100 μg/L) on LvGIH expression in the eyestalks of shrimp were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that LvGIH expression decreased significantly during the L. vannamei ovarian maturation cycle. E2 and NP significantly reduced LvGIH transcripts in vivo, but TAM neutralized the inhibitory action of E2 in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). In addition, the LvGIH expression levels decreased significantly in a time-dependent manner (P < 0.05) when ovary fragments were cultured in vitro with E2. The results of this study suggested that estrogen regulates GIH expression in L. vannamei eyestalks. E2 promoted ovarian development not only by directly upregulating vitellogenesis in the hepatopancreas, but it was also capable of downregulating LvGIH expression, which indirectly resulted in the stimulation of L. vannamei vitellogenesis.

  20. The acute renal actions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in the sodium-depleted conscious primate are mediated by inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Humke, U; Levens, N; Wood, J; Hofbauer, K

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the changes in renal function acutely produced by an inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the sodium-depleted conscious marmoset can be explained primarily by blockade of the renin-angiotensin system. Intravenous injection of a dose of the ACEI, enalaprilate (2 mg/kg), that produced a maximal lowering of blood pressure (BP), also decreased renal vascular resistance and increased renal blood flow. Glomerular filtration rate was unchanged by enalaprilat, leading to a fall in the filtration fraction. In comparison, a dose of the renin inhibitory monoclonal antibody, R-3-36-16 (0.1 mg/kg), that also produced a maximal fall in BP, produced similar changes in renal hemodynamics to those observed after administration of the ACEI. Combined administration of 2 mg/kg enalaprilat and 0.1 mg/kg R-3-36-16 produced changes in BP and renal hemodynamics similar to those produced by the same doses of either agent administered alone. Enalaprilat (2 mg/kg) significantly increased urine volume (UV) and urinary sodium excretion (UNaV). In contrast, these parameters were not significantly altered by 0.1 mg/kg R-3-36-16. However, when given at a 10-fold higher dose, the monoclonal antibody produced an increase in UNaV and UV identical to that produced by the ACEI alone. Enalaprilat did not increase UV and UNaV excretion to a greater extent than the high dose of the renin inhibitory antibody. These results demonstrate that acute administration of an ACEI affects BP and renal function in the sodium-depleted conscious primate primarily by inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system.

  1. Berberine Antifungal Activity in Fluconazole-Resistant Pathogenic Yeasts: Action Mechanism Evaluated by Flow Cytometry and Biofilm Growth Inhibition in Candida spp.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Anderson Ramos; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; da Silva, Cecília Rocha; Campos, Rosana de Sousa; Costa Silva, Rose Anny; Freitas, Daniel Domingues; do Nascimento, Francisca Bruna Stefany Aires; de Andrade, Larissa Nara Dantas; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Nobre Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of fungal infections and, in particular, the incidence of fungal antibiotic resistance, which is associated with biofilm formation, have significantly increased, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Thus, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. In this context, natural products have emerged as a major source of possible antifungal agents. Berberine is a protoberberine-type isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of natural herbs, such as Berberis aquifolium, Berberis vulgaris, Berberis aristata, and Hydrastis canadensis, and of Phellodendron amurense Berberine has been proven to have broad antibacterial and antifungal activity. In the present study, the potential antifungal effect of berberine against fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains, as well as against the biofilm form of Candida spp., was assessed. The antifungal effect of berberine was determined by a broth microdilution method (the M27-A3 method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) and flow cytometry techniques, in which the probable mechanism of action of the compound was also assessed. For biofilm assessment, a colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the susceptibility of sessile cells. The isolates used in the study belonged to the Laboratory of Bioprospection and Experiments in Yeast (LABEL) of the Federal University of Ceará. After 24 and 72 h, fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains showed berberine MICs equal to 8 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml, respectively. Cytometric analysis showed that treatment with berberine caused alterations to the integrity of the plasma and mitochondrial membranes and DNA damage, which led to cell death, probably by apoptosis. Assessment of biofilm-forming isolates after treatment showed statistically significant reductions in biofilm cell activity (P < 0.001). PMID:27021328

  2. Berberine Antifungal Activity in Fluconazole-Resistant Pathogenic Yeasts: Action Mechanism Evaluated by Flow Cytometry and Biofilm Growth Inhibition in Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anderson Ramos; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; da Silva, Cecília Rocha; Campos, Rosana de Sousa; Costa Silva, Rose Anny; Freitas, Daniel Domingues; do Nascimento, Francisca Bruna Stefany Aires; de Andrade, Larissa Nara Dantas; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fungal infections and, in particular, the incidence of fungal antibiotic resistance, which is associated with biofilm formation, have significantly increased, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Thus, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. In this context, natural products have emerged as a major source of possible antifungal agents. Berberine is a protoberberine-type isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of natural herbs, such as Berberis aquifolium, Berberis vulgaris, Berberis aristata, and Hydrastis canadensis, and of Phellodendron amurense. Berberine has been proven to have broad antibacterial and antifungal activity. In the present study, the potential antifungal effect of berberine against fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains, as well as against the biofilm form of Candida spp., was assessed. The antifungal effect of berberine was determined by a broth microdilution method (the M27-A3 method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) and flow cytometry techniques, in which the probable mechanism of action of the compound was also assessed. For biofilm assessment, a colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the susceptibility of sessile cells. The isolates used in the study belonged to the Laboratory of Bioprospection and Experiments in Yeast (LABEL) of the Federal University of Ceará. After 24 and 72 h, fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains showed berberine MICs equal to 8 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml, respectively. Cytometric analysis showed that treatment with berberine caused alterations to the integrity of the plasma and mitochondrial membranes and DNA damage, which led to cell death, probably by apoptosis. Assessment of biofilm-forming isolates after treatment showed statistically significant reductions in biofilm cell activity (P < 0.001). PMID:27021328

  3. Myorelaxant action of fluorine-containing pinacidil analog, flocalin, in bladder smooth muscle is mediated by inhibition of L-type calcium channels rather than activation of KATP channels.

    PubMed

    Philyppov, Igor B; Golub, Andriy А; Boldyriev, Oleksiy I; Shtefan, Natalia L; Totska, Khrystyna; Voitychuk, Oleg I; Shuba, Yaroslav M

    2016-06-01

    Flocalin (FLO) is a new ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel opener (KCO) derived from pinacidil (PIN) by adding fluorine group to the drug's structure. FLO acts as a potent cardioprotector against ischemia-reperfusion damage in isolated heart and whole animal models primarily via activating cardiac-specific Kir6.2/SUR2A KATP channels. Given that FLO also confers relaxation on several types of smooth muscles and can partially inhibit L-type Ca(2+) channels, in this study, we asked what is the mechanism of FLO action in bladder detrusor smooth muscle (DSM). The actions of FLO and PIN on contractility of rat and guinea pig DSM strips and membrane currents of isolated DSM cells were compared by tensiometry and patch clamp. Kir6 and SUR subunit expression in rat DSM was assayed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In contrast to PIN (10 μM), FLO (10 μM) did not produce glibenclamide-sensitive DSM strips' relaxation and inhibition of spontaneous and electrically evoked contractions. However, FLO, but not PIN, inhibited contractions evoked by high K(+) depolarization. FLO (40 μM) did not change the level of isolated DSM cell's background K(+) current, but suppressed by 20 % L-type Ca(2+) current. Determining various Kir6 and SUR messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions in rat DSM by RT-PCR indicated that dominant KATP channel in rat DSM is of vascular type involving association of Kir6.1 and SUR2B subunits. Myorelaxant effects of FLO in bladder DSM are explained by partial blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx rather than by hyperpolarization associated with increased K(+) permeability. Thus, insertion of fluorine group in PIN's structure made the drug more discriminative between Kir6.2/SUR2A cardiac- and Kir6.1/SUR2B vascular-type KATP channels and rendered it partial L-type Ca(2+) channel-blocking potency.

  4. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  5. [Neurophysiological and neurotransmitter mechanisms of behavior inhibition in normal and pathological conditions].

    PubMed

    Shul'gina, G I

    2010-01-01

    The data concerning neurophysiological and neurotransmitter mechanisms of two principal kinds of inhibition of behavior is carried out: the inborn genetically determined inhibition and that developed in the course of training. On the basis of the experiments performed by the author and the literature on general neurophysiology the conclusion is made that development of inhibition of behavior during training (i.e. internal inhibition, including "latent inhibition") is determined by the relative strengthening of inhibitory hyperpolarization processes either locally (in a conditioned stimulus analyzer) or globally in the brain cortex and other brain structures during intensification of the inhibitory state (profound inhibition of a reflex and sleep). The main neurotransmitter in development of internal inhibition is gamma-aminobutyric acid. Inhibition of behavior without preliminary training arises either during the action of superstrong stimuli, (exceeding the maximum value inhibition) or during interaction of two and more active systems. A stronger one of these two systems suppresses another one (external inhibition, dominant inhibition, "freezing", "prepulse inhibition", etc.). These kinds of inhibition develop on the background of EEG activation, which suggests participation in their realization of reticular structures and corresponding neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, noradrenalin, dopamine and serotonin). Behavior pathology causes a break of the balanced interaction between the excitation and inhibition in the central nervous system. This affects both genetically determined forms of behavior inhibition and the learned internal inhibition.

  6. The generalized anomeric effect in the 1,3-thiazolidines: Evidence for both sulphur and nitrogen as electron donors. Crystal structures of various N-acylthiazolidines including mercury(II) complexes. Possible relevance to penicillin action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Chopra, Deepak; Gopalaiah, Kovuru; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2007-06-01

    Evidence for the generalized anomeric effect (GAE) in the N-acyl-1,3-thiazolidines, an important structural motif in the penicillins, was sought in the crystal structures of N-(4-nitrobenzoyl)-1,3-thiazolidine and its (2:1) complex with mercuric chloride, N-acetyl-2-phenyl-1,3-thiazolidine, and the (2:1) complex of N-benzoyl-1,3-thiazolidine with mercuric bromide. An inverse relationship was generally observed between the C2- N and C2- S bond lengths of the thiazolidine ring, supporting the existence of the GAE. (Maximal bond length changes were ˜0.04 Å for C2- N3, S1- C2, and ˜0.08 Å for N3- C6.) Comparison with N-acylpyrrolidines and tetrahydrothiophenes indicates that both the nitrogen-to-sulphur and sulphur-to-nitrogen GAE's operate simultaneously in the 1,3-thiazolidines, the former being dominant. (This is analogous to the normal and exo-anomeric effects in pyranoses, and also leads to an interesting application of Baldwin's rules.) The nitrogen-to-sulphur GAE is generally enhanced in the mercury(II) complexes (presumably via coordination at the sulphur); a 'competition' between the GAE and the amide resonance of the N-acyl moiety is apparent. There is evidence for a 'push-pull' charge transfer between the thiazolidine moieties in the mercury(II) complexes, and for a 'back-donation' of charge from the bromine atoms to the thiazolidine moieties in the HgBr 2 complex. (The sulphur atom appears to be sp 2 hybridised in the mercury(II) complexes, possibly for stereoelectronic reasons.) These results are apparently relevant to the mode of action of the penicillins.

  7. Including Conflict in Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvin, Martin

    Conflict is the basis of all stories and thus should appear in some form in the first sentence. There are three kinds of conflict: people vs. people; people vs. nature; and people vs. themselves. Conflict must be repeated in all the various elements of the story's structure, including the plot, which is the plan of action telling what happens to…

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) targeting with monoclonal antibody cixutumumab (IMC-A12) inhibits IGF-I action in endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Attias-Geva, Zohar; Bentov, Itay; Ludwig, Dale L; Fishman, Ami; Bruchim, Ilan; Werner, Haim

    2011-07-01

    Specific insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) targeting emerged in recent years as a promising therapeutic strategy in cancer. Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in the Western world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of cixutumumab (IMC-A12, ImClone Systems), a fully human monoclonal antibody against the IGF-IR, to inhibit IGF-I-mediated biological actions and cell signalling events in four endometrial carcinoma-derived cell lines (ECC-1, Ishikawa, USPC-1 and USPC-2). Our results demonstrate that cixutumumab was able to block the IGF-I-induced autophosphorylation of the IGF-IR. In addition, the PI3K and MAPK downstream signalling pathways were also inactivated by cixutumumab in part of the cell lines. Prolonged (24h and 48h) exposures to cixutumumab reduced IGF-IR expression. Furthermore, confocal microscopy of GFP-tagged receptors shows that cixutumumab treatment led to IGF-IR redistribution from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Antiapoptotic effects were evaluated by cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP, and mitogenicity and transformation by proliferation and cell cycle assays. Results obtained showed that cixutumumab abrogated the IGF-I-stimulated increase in proliferation rate, and increased caspase-3 and PARP cleavage, two markers of apoptosis. Of importance, cixutumumab had no effect neither on insulin receptor (IR) expression nor on IGF-I activation of IR. In summary, in a cellular model of endometrial cancer cixutumumab was able to inhibit the IGF-I-induced activation of intracellular cascades, apoptosis and proliferation.

  9. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  10. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  11. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  12. Neural correlates of intentional and stimulus-driven inhibition: a comparison

    PubMed Central

    Schel, Margot A.; Kühn, Simone; Brass, Marcel; Haggard, Patrick; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Crone, Eveline A.

    2014-01-01

    People can inhibit an action because of an instruction by an external stimulus, or because of their own internal decision. The similarities and differences between these two forms of inhibition are not well understood. Therefore, in the present study the neural correlates of intentional and stimulus-driven inhibition were tested in the same subjects. Participants performed two inhibition tasks while lying in the scanner: the marble task in which they had to choose for themselves between intentionally acting on, or inhibiting a prepotent response to measure intentional inhibition, and the classical stop signal task in which an external signal triggered the inhibition process. Results showed that intentional inhibition decision processes rely on a neural network that has been documented extensively for stimulus-driven inhibition, including bilateral parietal and lateral prefrontal cortex and pre-supplementary motor area. We also found activation in dorsal frontomedian cortex and left inferior frontal gyrus during intentional inhibition that depended on the history of previous choices. Together, these results indicate that intentional inhibition and stimulus-driven inhibition engage a common inhibition network, but intentional inhibition is also characterized by additional context-dependent neural activation in medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:24550808

  13. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  14. A Variable Supervisory Strategy That Includes Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahlhut, Richard

    The educational "Reports" of the 1980's are demanding change in the schools and change in the way we prepare teachers. Perhaps a marriage between some industrial practices and some education strategies is now appropriate since both are in the informational age. For the first time in history, industry has many personnel who do not physically touch…

  15. Propolis inhibits osteoclast maturation.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Roberta; Antony, Kathryn; Johnson, Kristie; Zuo, Jian; Shannon Holliday, L

    2009-12-01

    Propolis, a natural product produced by the honey bee, has been successfully used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent. Traumatic injuries to the teeth, especially avulsion injuries, present a challenging situation for the clinician because of post-treatment complications, such as inflammatory and/or replacement resorption. Agents that reduce osteoclast numbers and activity may be useful in the treatment of traumatic injuries to the teeth. In this study, we evaluated propolis as an anti-resorptive agent. Calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures, which contain both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were exposed to the ethanol extracts of propolis or vehicle control and stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-activity to identify osteoclasts. A significant, dose-dependent reduction in multinuclear TRAP+ cells was demonstrated, although the propolis treatment accommodated cell growth and survival (P < 0.05). Propolis also reduced the formation of actin rings in pure cultures of RAW 264.7 osteoclast-like cells, suggesting that it exerts direct actions on osteoclast maturation. In summary, our data suggest that propolis inhibits late stages of osteoclast maturation including fusion of osteoclasts precursors to form giant cells and formation of actin rings. This supports the hypothesis that it may prove useful as a medicament to reduce resorption associated with traumatic injuries to the teeth. PMID:19843135

  16. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings from a study…

  17. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae Odorant Receptor Function by Mosquito Repellents*

    PubMed Central

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca2+-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  18. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae odorant receptor function by mosquito repellents.

    PubMed

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-03-20

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca(2+)-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  19. Adenosine analogs inhibit fighting in isolated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Palmour, R.M.; Lipowski, C.J.; Simon, C.K.; Ervin, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The potent adenosine analogs N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) and phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) inhibit fighting and associated agonistic behaviors in isolated male mice. These effects are reversed by methylxanthines; moderate doses of NECA which inhibit fighting have minimal effects on spontaneous locomotor activity. At very low doses, both NECA and PIA increase fighting in parallel with previously reported increases of motor activity. Brain levels of (/sup 3/H)-NECA and (/sup 3/H)-PIA achieved at behaviorally effective doses suggest an involvement of adenosine receptors. The biochemical mechanism of adenosine receptor action with respect to fighting is unknown, but may include neuromodulatory effects on the release of other, more classical neurotransmitters.

  20. Episodic Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racsmany, Mihaly; Conway, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    Six experiments examined the proposal that an item of long-term knowledge can be simultaneously inhibited and activated. In 2 directed forgetting experiments items to-be-forgotten were found to be inhibited in list-cued recall but activated in lexical decision tasks. In 3 retrieval practice experiments, unpracticed items from practiced categories…

  1. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  2. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  3. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  4. Developing an action concept inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on progress towards the development of an Action Concept Inventory (ACI), a test that measures student understanding of action principles in introductory mechanics and optics. The ACI also covers key concepts of many-paths quantum mechanics, from which classical action physics arises. We used a multistage iterative development cycle for incorporating expert and student feedback into successive revisions of the ACI. The student feedback, including think-aloud interviews, enabled us to identify their misconceptions about action physics.

  5. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  6. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  7. Neurobiological actions of cysteamine

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.; Fisher, L.; Mason, R.T.; Rivier, J.; Vale, W.

    1985-06-01

    Somatostatin (SS)-related peptides act within discrete brain regions to inhibit adrenal epinephrine (E) secretion, to prevent hypothermia, and to produce hyperthermia. Depletion of brain concentrations of these SS-related peptides using cysteamine (CSH) or central administration of an SS receptor antagonist increases adrenal E secretion and impairs thermoregulation. These actions of CSH and the SS receptor antagonist are reversed by administration of SS into the central nervous system. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous brain SS-related peptides are involved in the regulation of adrenal E secretion and thermoregulation.

  8. Unconsciously triggered response inhibition requires an executive setting.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Chin; Aron, Adam R

    2014-02-01

    Much research on response inhibition has focused on a consciously triggered variety (i.e., outright stopping of action). However, recent studies have shown that response inhibition can also be triggered unconsciously. For example, van Gaal, Ridderinkhof, Scholte, and Lamme (2010) showed that an unconscious no-go prime slowed down ongoing behavior, at least when outright stopping was sometimes required (i.e., in an executive setting). Here we replicated that result but also went further by including a condition with no executive setting. Then there was no slowing following a no-go prime. These results support the hypothesis that an executive setting is necessary for unconsciously triggered inhibition. We speculate that this arises from the fact that when the context includes outright stopping, the brain network for response inhibition is primed, and it can be triggered by the unconscious prime. The result has theoretical implications for the distinction between conscious and unconscious response inhibition and also clinical implications for how to train response inhibition so that it is instantiated automatically.

  9. Unconsciously triggered response inhibition requires an executive setting.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Chin; Aron, Adam R

    2014-02-01

    Much research on response inhibition has focused on a consciously triggered variety (i.e., outright stopping of action). However, recent studies have shown that response inhibition can also be triggered unconsciously. For example, van Gaal, Ridderinkhof, Scholte, and Lamme (2010) showed that an unconscious no-go prime slowed down ongoing behavior, at least when outright stopping was sometimes required (i.e., in an executive setting). Here we replicated that result but also went further by including a condition with no executive setting. Then there was no slowing following a no-go prime. These results support the hypothesis that an executive setting is necessary for unconsciously triggered inhibition. We speculate that this arises from the fact that when the context includes outright stopping, the brain network for response inhibition is primed, and it can be triggered by the unconscious prime. The result has theoretical implications for the distinction between conscious and unconscious response inhibition and also clinical implications for how to train response inhibition so that it is instantiated automatically. PMID:23317085

  10. Listening to Include

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  11. Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  12. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Elyssa B.; Fields, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  13. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Elyssa B; Fields, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  14. Inhibition of the MAP3 kinase Tpl2 protects rodent and human β-cells from apoptosis and dysfunction induced by cytokines and enhances anti-inflammatory actions of exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Varin, E M; Wojtusciszyn, A; Broca, C; Muller, D; Ravier, M A; Ceppo, F; Renard, E; Tanti, J-F; Dalle, S

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines exert cytotoxic effects on β-cells, and are involved in the pathogenesis of type I and type II diabetes and in the drastic loss of β-cells following islet transplantation. Cytokines induce apoptosis and alter the function of differentiated β-cells. Although the MAP3 kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) is known to integrate signals from inflammatory stimuli in macrophages, fibroblasts and adipocytes, its role in β-cells is unknown. We demonstrate that Tpl2 is expressed in INS-1E β-cells, mouse and human islets, is activated and upregulated by cytokines and mediates ERK1/2, JNK and p38 activation. Tpl2 inhibition protects β-cells, mouse and human islets from cytokine-induced apoptosis and preserves glucose-induced insulin secretion in mouse and human islets exposed to cytokines. Moreover, Tpl2 inhibition does not affect survival or positive effects of glucose (i.e., ERK1/2 phosphorylation and basal insulin secretion). The protection against cytokine-induced β-cell apoptosis is strengthened when Tpl2 inhibition is combined with the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog exendin-4 in INS-1E cells. Furthermore, when combined with exendin-4, Tpl2 inhibition prevents cytokine-induced death and dysfunction of human islets. This study proposes that Tpl2 inhibitors, used either alone or combined with a GLP-1 analog, represent potential novel and effective therapeutic strategies to protect diabetic β-cells. PMID:26794660

  15. Basic models for differential inhibition of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Mario; Moschini, Roberta; Balestri, Francesco; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2014-03-14

    The possible preferential action exerted by an inhibitor on the transformation of one of two agonist substrates catalyzed by the same enzyme has recently been reported in studies on aldose reductase inhibition. This event was defined as "intra-site differential inhibition" and the molecules able to exert this action as "differential inhibitors". This work presents some basic kinetic models describing differential inhibition. Using a simple analytic approach, the results show that differential inhibition can occur through either competitive or mixed type inhibition in which the inhibitor prevalently targets the free enzyme. The results may help in selecting molecules whose differential inhibitory action could be advantageous in controlling the activity of enzymes acting on more than one substrate.

  16. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  17. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  18. Design of dual action antibiotics as an approach to search for new promising drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevyashova, A. N.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to the latest achievements in the design of dual action antibiotics — heterodimeric (chimeric) structures based on antibacterial agents of different classes (fluoroquinolones, anthracyclines, oxazolidines, macrolides and so on). Covalent binding can make the pharmacokinetic characteristics of these molecules more predictable and improve the penetration of each component into the cell. Consequently, not only does the drug efficacy increase owing to inhibition of two targets but also the resistance to one or both antibiotics can be overcome. The theoretical grounds of elaboration, design principles and methods for the synthesis of dual action antibiotics are considered. The structures are classified according to the type of covalent spacer (cleavable or not) connecting the moieties of two agents. Dual action antibiotics with a spacer that can be cleaved in a living cell are considered as dual action prodrugs. Data on the biological action of heterodimeric compounds are presented and structure-activity relationships are analyzed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  19. Investigation of the inhibiting action of O-, S- and N-dithiocarbamato(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)cobalt(III) complexes on the corrosion of iron in HClO 4 acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić-Samardžija, K.; Khaled, K. F.; Hackerman, N.

    2005-02-01

    The inhibiting properties of four macrocyclic cobalt(III) complexes of the general formula [Co III(Rdtc)cyclam](ClO 4) 2, where cyclam and Rdtc- refer to 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and morpholine-, thiomorpholine-, piperazine-, N-methylpiperazine-dithiocarbamates, respectively, has been studied on the corrosion of iron in aerated 0.1 M HClO 4 solutions by potentiodynamic polarization (dc) technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ac). Inhibitor efficiency for the corrosion of iron is found to be better for cobalt complexes then for related amino-ligands. The impedance increases with inhibitor concentration. Polarization curves indicate that the inhibitors are predominantly mixed-type. Better protection by the complex inhibitors was obtained with longer immersion time. The best fit for inhibitors adsorption is obtained using the Langmuir isotherm model. Molecular modeling calculations were used to correlate structural properties of the complex species and their inhibition efficiency.

  20. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do. PMID:27667859

  1. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do.

  2. Antimetastatic effect of prodigiosin through inhibition of tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Yaling; Liu, Jianwen; Wei, Dongzhi

    2005-02-01

    Prodigiosin, a bacterial metabolite, was reported to have immunosuppressive and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated novel functions of prodigiosin about anti-metastasis and anti-invasion. Prodigiosin dose-dependently inhibited 95-D cells' migration and invasion according to wound healing assay and the Transwell assay. The inhibitive effect could reach about 50% when cells were treated with 5 microM prodigiosin for 12 h. In animal experiment, intraperitoneal administration of 5 mg kg(-1) prodigiosin decreased the number of metastatic nodules by 53% and elevated the survival rate of mice about one-fold comparing with control group. Results of cell aggregation and adhesion assay showed that prodigiosin could promote cell aggregation and simultaneously inhibit cell from adhering to extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, prodigiosin suppressed RhoA gene expression, hence, decreased protein level of RhoA in 95-D cells, according to RT-PCR assay and Western blot assay. Gel zymogram assay revealed that prodigiosin could suppress the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). These results demonstrate that prodigiosin effectively inhibit tumor metastasis in vitro and in vivo. The action mechanisms of prodigiosin are associated with the promotion of cell aggregation and the inhibition of various steps in cell invasive process, which include the inhibition of cell adhesion and mobility in a RhoA-dependent way and the suppression of MMP-2 ability.

  3. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  4. Action for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranly, Donald P.

    The origins, development, and effectiveness of Action for Children's Television (ACT) are examined in this pamphlet. The strategies used by ACT to obtain change at the congressional level and within television stations and networks include the following: a "tuneout" day when people are urged to turn off their television sets, a boycott of certain…

  5. Literacy Education Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clymer, Carol

    The Literacy Education Action (LEA) program was established in the fall of 1985 under the initiative of the president of the El Paso Community College (Texas). During 1985 and 1986, LEA concentrated on developing its own literacy tutoring program, including recruiting and training volunteers and community members with reading skills below the…

  6. Nutrition Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockut, Joanne; Stumpe, Stephanie

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these instructional materials integrate elementary school-level nutrition education into other disciplines--biology, sociology, physiology, mathematics, and art. Contents include four units consisting of twelve activities. Unit 1, Why You Need Food, is a self-examination of what is needed for growth, health,…

  7. Programs for Urban Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Board of Young Men's Christian Associations, New York, NY.

    This booklet contains descriptions of 150 urban action programs being conducted by Young Men's Christian Associations throughout the United States. Planning principles are included to assist those who wish to adapt the programs to local situations: involvement of people in planning; use of local indigenous leadership; planning in collaboration…

  8. Task Force Report on Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    Issues raised by affirmative action are explored and a legislative agenda for reform is offered. Part One of the report examines affirmative action in practice and includes discussions of the Bakke case and affirmative action in the federal government. Part Two considers the legal aspect of affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and Part…

  9. Action Research in Science Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Allan; Capobianco, Brenda

    This digest provides an introduction to action research in science education and includes examples of how action research has been used to improve teaching and learning, as well as suggested resources for those seeking to incorporate action research into their own teaching or research. Action research is defined and is examined in science…

  10. To require the Secretary of the Interior to assemble a team of technical, policy, and financial experts to address the energy needs of the insular areas of the United States and the Freely Associated States through the development of energy action plans aimed at promoting access to affordable, reliable energy, including increasing use of indigenous clean-energy resources, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Christensen, Donna M. [D-VI-At Large

    2014-12-08

    12/12/2014 Received in the Senate. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.83, which became Public Law 113-235 on 12/16/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  12. Willed action and its impairments.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, M

    1998-09-01

    Actions are goal-directed behaviours that usually involve movem ent. There is evidence that intentional self-generated actions (willed actions) are controlled differently from routine, stereotyped actions that are externally triggered by environmental stimuli. We review evidence from investigations using positron emission tomography (PET), recordings of movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and conclude that willed actions are controlled by a network of frontal cortical (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, anterior cingulate) and subcortical (thalamus and basal ganglia) areas. We also consider evidence suggesting that some of the cognitive and motor deficits of patients with frontal lesions, Parkinson's disease, or schizophrenia as well as apathy and abulia and rarer phenomena such as primary obsessional slowness can be considered as reflecting im pairment of willed actions. We propose that the concept of a willed action system based on the frontostriatal circuits provides a useful framework for integrating the cognitive, motor, and motivational deficits found in these disorders. Problems remaining to be resolved include: identification of the component processes of willed actions; the specific and differential role played by each of the frontal cortical and subcortical areas in the control of willed actions; the specific mechanisms of impairm ent of willed actions in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and frontal damage; and the precise role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the willed action system. PMID:22448836

  13. Infrared inhibition of embryonic hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yves T.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Infrared control is a new technique that uses pulsed infrared lasers to thermally alter electrical activity. Originally developed for nerves, we have applied this technology to embryonic hearts using a quail model, previously demonstrating infrared stimulation and, here, infrared inhibition. Infrared inhibition enables repeatable and reversible block, stopping cardiac contractions for several seconds. Normal beating resumes after the laser is turned off. The block can be spatially specific, affecting propagation on the ventricle or initiation on the atrium. Optical mapping showed that the block affects action potentials and not just calcium or contraction. Increased resting intracellular calcium was observed after a 30-s exposure to the inhibition laser, which likely resulted in reduced mechanical function. Further optimization of the laser illumination should reduce potential damage. Stopping cardiac contractions by disrupting electrical activity with infrared inhibition has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying the developing heart.

  14. Learning to take actions

    SciTech Connect

    Khardon, R.

    1996-12-31

    We formalize a model for supervised learning of action strategies in dynamic stochastic domains, and show that pac-learning results on Occam algorithms hold in this model as well. We then identify a particularly useful bias for action strategies based on production rule systems. We show that a subset of production rule systems, including rules in predicate calculus style, small hidden state, and unobserved support predicates, is properly learnable. The bias we introduce enables the learning algorithm to invent the recursive support predicates which are used in the action strategy, and to reconstruct the internal state of the strategy. It is also shown that hierarchical strategies are learnable if a helpful teacher is available, but that otherwise the problem is computationally hard.

  15. Inhibition of X-ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair by cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine) and enhancement of its action by 2'-deoxycoformycin in Chinese Hamster hai cells in the stationary phase in Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsugawa, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of growth phase and chemicals on PLD repair were studied in X-irradiated Chinese hamster hai cells. The change in capacity of cells in different growth phases to repair PLD was investigated. Starting from cells in the log phase, the magnitude of PLD repair during 10 hr of postirradiation incubation in Hanks' balanced salt solution increased for 2.5 to 18 as the cultures approached the stationary phase, which occurred on the 7th or 8th day. The effects of chemicals dissolved in Hanks' BSS on PLD repair were studied using 10th- or 12th-day cultures. Among the chemicals tested, caffeine and cordycepin were effective in inhibiting PLD repair. When 2'-deoxycoformycin, an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, was combined with cordycepin, the effect of cordycepin was enhanced. Due to this prevention of the deamination of cordycepin by 2'-deoxycoformycin, the inhibition of PLD repair was prolonged, indicating a possible clinical application of cordycepin as a radiosensitizer.

  16. Lipolytic effect of a polyphenolic citrus dry extract of red orange, grapefruit, orange (SINETROL) in human body fat adipocytes. Mechanism of action by inhibition of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE).

    PubMed

    Dallas, Constantin; Gerbi, Alain; Tenca, Guillaume; Juchaux, Franck; Bernard, François-Xavier

    2008-10-01

    The present study investigated the lipolytic (break of fat stored) effect of a citrus-based polyphenolic dietary supplement (SINETROL) at human adipocytes (ex vivo), body fat (clinical) and biochemical levels (inhibition of phosphodiesterase). Free fatty acids (FFA) release was used as indicator of human adipocyte lipolysis and SINETROL activity has been compared with known lipolytic products (isoproterenol, theopylline and caffeine). SINETROL stimulated significantly the lipolytic activity in a range of 6 fold greater than the control. Moreover, SINETROL has 2.1 greater activity than guarana 12% caffeine while its content in caffeine is 3 times lower. Clinically, two groups of 10 volunteers with BMI relevant of overweight were compared during 4 and 12 weeks with 1.4 g/day SINETROL and placebo supplementation. In the SINETROL Group the body fat (%) decreased with a significant difference of 5.53% and 15.6% after 4 and 12 weeks, respectively, while the body weight (kg) decreased with a significant difference of 2.2 and 5.2 kg after 4 and 12 weeks, respectively. These observed effects are linked to SINETROL polyphenolic composition and its resulting synergistic activity. SINETROL is a potent inhibitor of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) (97%) compared to other purified compounds (cyanidin-3 glycoside, narangin, caffeine). These results suggest that SINETROL has a strong lipolytic effect mediated by cAMP-PDE inhibition. SINETROL may serve to prevent obesity by decreasing BMI.

  17. Overview of herbicide mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Duke, S O

    1990-01-01

    Commercial herbicides exhibit many different mechanisms of action. Several enzymes involved in biosynthesis of amino acids are sites of action for herbicides. A large number of different herbicide classes inhibit photosynthesis by binding to the quinone-binding protein, D-1, to prevent photosynthetic electron transfer. Several different types of herbicides apparently cause accumulation of photodynamic porphyrins by inhibiting protoporphyrinogen oxidase. Bipyridyliums and heteropentalenes cause the production of superoxide radicals by energy diversion from photosystem I of photosynthesis. Lipid synthesis is the site of action of a broad array of herbicides used in controlling monocot weeds. Herbicides of several classes apparently act by inhibiting mitosis through direct interaction with tubulin. Several other molecular sites of herbicide action are known. Despite a growing body of knowledge, the exact molecular sites of action of many herbicides are unknown. Some herbicides are known to have more than one site of action. Virtually all knowledge of herbicide structure-activity relationships is semiempirical. In addition to site of action structure-activity relationships, herbicide structure and chemical properties also strongly influence absorption, translocation, bioactivation, and environmental stability. Considering how little is known about all the potential sites of herbicide action, it is unlikely that during the next decade more than a relatively small number of site-specific herbicide structure-activity relationships will be developed. PMID:1980104

  18. Where is the action? Action sentence processing in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Conant, Lisa L.; Binder, Jeffrey R.; Blindauer, Karen; Hiner, Bradley; Spangler, Katie; Desai, Rutvik H.

    2013-01-01

    According to an influential view of conceptual representation, action concepts are understood through motoric simulations, involving motor networks of the brain. A stronger version of this embodied account suggests that even figurative uses of action words (e.g., grasping the concept) are understood through motoric simulations. We investigated these claims by assessing whether Parkinson's disease (PD), a disorder affecting the motor system, is associated with selective deficits in comprehending action-related sentences. Twenty PD patients and 21 age-matched controls performed a sentence comprehension task, where sentences belonged to one of four conditions: literal action, non-idiomatic metaphoric action, idiomatic action, and abstract. The same verbs (referring to hand/arm actions) were used in the three action-related conditions. Patients, but not controls, were slower to respond to literal and idiomatic action than to abstract sentences. These results indicate that sensory-motor systems play a functional role in semantic processing, including processing of figurative action language. PMID:23624313

  19. Technology assessment and citizen action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mottur, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    Citizen participation in the nation's total social, political, economic decisionmaking processes was studied. Impediments are discussed which prevent citizens from taking effective assessment action; these include finance, organization and motivation, and information. The proposal for establishing citizens assessment associations is considered along with implications of citizen assessment action.

  20. Local actions of trimebutine on canine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Daniel, E E; Kostolanska, F; Fox, J E

    1987-01-01

    The local actions of trimebutine on the circular muscle of canine gastrointestinal tract were studied after close intraarterial injection. The effects resembled those of metenkephalin at all sites. In stomach, trimebutine had no excitatory effects, but inhibited responses mediated by cholinergic post-ganglionic nerves. In small intestine, trimebutine stimulated the quiet gut by probably both neural and direct smooth muscle mechanisms, and it inhibited the field-stimulated phasic contractions. In large intestine, trimebutine had no excitatory actions and only weak inhibitory actions on the field-stimulated gut. Excitatory actions most likely seem to use the mu or delta receptors while inhibitory actions may focus on kappa opiate receptors. PMID:3038657

  1. Fisetin inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammatory action and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT/Nrf-2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hee; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative skin damage and skin inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis of skin-related diseases. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid abundantly found in several vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been shown to exert various positive biological effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, neuroprotective and anti-oxidative effects. In this study, we investigate the skin protective effects and anti-inflammatory properties of fisetin in hydrogen peroxide- and TNF-α-challenged human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. When HaCaT cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of fisetin (1-20μM), heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, fisetin dose-dependently increased cell viability and reduced ROS production in hydrogen peroxide-treated HaCaT cells. Fisetin also inhibited the production of NO, PGE2 IL-1β, IL-6, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells treated with TNF-α. Fisetin induced Nrf2 translocation to the nuclei. HO-1 siRNA transient transfection reversed the effects of fisetin on cytoprotection, ROS reduction, NO, PGE2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α production, and NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Moreover, fisetin increased Akt phosphorylation and a PI3K pathway inhibitor (LY294002) abolished fisetin-induced cytoprotection and NO inhibition. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a beneficial role of fisetin in skin therapy. PMID:26590114

  2. Fisetin inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammatory action and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT/Nrf-2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hee; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative skin damage and skin inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis of skin-related diseases. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid abundantly found in several vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been shown to exert various positive biological effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, neuroprotective and anti-oxidative effects. In this study, we investigate the skin protective effects and anti-inflammatory properties of fisetin in hydrogen peroxide- and TNF-α-challenged human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. When HaCaT cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of fisetin (1-20μM), heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, fisetin dose-dependently increased cell viability and reduced ROS production in hydrogen peroxide-treated HaCaT cells. Fisetin also inhibited the production of NO, PGE2 IL-1β, IL-6, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells treated with TNF-α. Fisetin induced Nrf2 translocation to the nuclei. HO-1 siRNA transient transfection reversed the effects of fisetin on cytoprotection, ROS reduction, NO, PGE2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α production, and NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Moreover, fisetin increased Akt phosphorylation and a PI3K pathway inhibitor (LY294002) abolished fisetin-induced cytoprotection and NO inhibition. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a beneficial role of fisetin in skin therapy.

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This document summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period of January-June 1996. The report includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violations sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to the enforcement actions.

  4. Mechanisms of Non-Opioid Analgesics Beyond Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, May; Dionne, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    Non-opioid analgesics including both selective and non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors and acetaminophen are the most widely used treatments for pain. Inhibition of COX is thought to be largely responsible for both the therapeutic and adverse effects of this class of drugs. Accumulating evidence over the past two decades has demonstrated effects of non-opioids beyond the inhibition of COX and prostaglandin synthesis that might also explain their therapeutic and adverse effects. These include their interaction with endocannabinoids, nitric oxide, monoaminergic, and cholinergic systems. Moreover, the recent development of microarray technology that allows the study of human gene expression suggests multiple pathways that may be related to the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of non-opioids. The present review will discuss the multiple actions of non-opioids and their interactions with these systems during inflammation and pain, suggesting that COX inhibition is an incomplete explanation for the actions of non-opioids and proposes the involvement of multiple selective targets for their analgesic, as well as, their adverse effects. PMID:19779578

  5. Locomotor response to L-DOPA in reserpine-treated rats following central inhibition of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase: further evidence for non-dopaminergic actions of L-DOPA and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Alachkar, Amal; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Jones, Owen T

    2010-09-01

    L-DOPA is the most widely used treatment for Parkinson's disease. The anti-parkinsonian and pro-dyskinetic actions of L-DOPA are widely attributed to its conversion, by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), to dopamine. We investigated the hypothesis that exogenous L-DOPA can induce behavioural effects without being converted to dopamine in the reserpine-treated rat-model of Parkinson's disease. A parkinsonian state was induced with reserpine (3 mg/kg s.c.). Eighteen hours later, the rats were administered L-DOPA plus the peripherally acting AADC inhibitor benserazide (25 mg/kg), with or without the centrally acting AADC inhibitor NSD1015 (100 mg/kg). L-DOPA/benserazide alone reversed reserpine-induced akinesia (4158+/-1125 activity counts/6 h, cf vehicle 1327+/-227). Addition of NSD1015 elicited hyperactive behaviour that was approximately 7-fold higher than L-DOPA/benserazide (35755+/-5226, P<0.001). The hyperactivity induced by L-DOPA and NSD1015 was reduced by the alpha(2C) antagonist rauwolscine (1 mg/kg) and the 5-HT(2C) agonist MK212 (5 mg/kg), but not by the D2 dopamine receptor antagonist remoxipride (3 mg/kg) or the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1 mg/kg). These data suggest that L-DOPA, or metabolites produced via routes not involving AADC, might be responsible for the generation of at least some L-DOPA actions in reserpine-treated rats. PMID:20542064

  6. Immunoglobulin: production, mechanisms of action and formulations

    PubMed Central

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin (Ig) began to be applied in the clinical practice with the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. Quickly, applications of Ig increased, as its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions were elucidated. Currently, Ig is the most commonly used blood product. Ig is obtained by processing plasma; methods, in particular, techniques to reduce plasma viral loads have been evolving over the years and include: pasteurization, solvent/ detergent treatment, caprylic acid treatment and nanofiltration. These methods contribute to increased safety and quality of blood products. The mechanisms of action of Ig not only involve the blockade of Fc receptors of phagocytes, but also control complement pathways, idiotype-anti-idiotype dimer formation, blockage of superantigen binding to T cells, inhibition of dendritic cells and stimulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). There are several formulations of Ig available, each one with its own peculiar characteristics. In Brazil, there is stringent legislation regulating the quality of Ig. Only Ig products that completely fulfill the quality control criteria are released for use. These standards involve different tests from visual inspection to determination of anti-complementary activity. This paper will further review the history and current status of Ig, including its production and mechanisms of action. The formulations available in Brazil and also the criteria of quality control currently applied will be presented. PMID:23049343

  7. MOLECULAR TARGETS AND MECHANISMS FOR ETHANOL ACTION IN GLYCINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Daya I.; Trudell, James R.; Crawford, Daniel K.; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2010-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are recognized as the primary mediators of neuronal inhibition in the spinal cord, brain stem and higher brain regions known to be sensitive to ethanol. Building evidence supports the notion that ethanol acting on GlyRs causes at least a subset of its behavioral effects and may be involved in modulating ethanol intake. For over two decades, GlyRs have been studied at the molecular level as targets for ethanol action. Despite the advances in understanding the effects of ethanol in vivo and in vitro, the precise molecular sites and mechanisms of action for ethanol in ligand-gated ion channels in general, and in GlyRs specifically, are just now starting to become understood. The present review focuses on advances in our knowledge produced by using molecular biology, pressure antagonism, electrophysiology and molecular modeling strategies over the last two decades to probe, identify and model the initial molecular sites and mechanisms of ethanol action in GlyRs. The molecular targets on the GlyR are covered on a global perspective, which includes the intracellular, transmembrane and extracellular domains. The latter has received increasing attention in recent years. Recent molecular models of the sites of ethanol action in GlyRs and their implications to our understanding of possible mechanism of ethanol action and novel targets for drug development in GlyRs are discussed. PMID:20399807

  8. InterAction Database (IADB)

    Cancer.gov

    The InterAction Database includes demographic and prescription information for more than 500,000 patients in the northern and middle Netherlands and has been integrated with other systems to enhance data collection and analysis.

  9. Action-based flood forecasting for triggering humanitarian action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan de Perez, Erin; van den Hurk, Bart; van Aalst, Maarten K.; Amuron, Irene; Bamanya, Deus; Hauser, Tristan; Jongma, Brenden; Lopez, Ana; Mason, Simon; Mendler de Suarez, Janot; Pappenberger, Florian; Rueth, Alexandra; Stephens, Elisabeth; Suarez, Pablo; Wagemaker, Jurjen; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-09-01

    Too often, credible scientific early warning information of increased disaster risk does not result in humanitarian action. With financial resources tilted heavily towards response after a disaster, disaster managers have limited incentive and ability to process complex scientific data, including uncertainties. These incentives are beginning to change, with the advent of several new forecast-based financing systems that provide funding based on a forecast of an extreme event. Given the changing landscape, here we demonstrate a method to select and use appropriate forecasts for specific humanitarian disaster prevention actions, even in a data-scarce location. This action-based forecasting methodology takes into account the parameters of each action, such as action lifetime, when verifying a forecast. Forecasts are linked with action based on an understanding of (1) the magnitude of previous flooding events and (2) the willingness to act "in vain" for specific actions. This is applied in the context of the Uganda Red Cross Society forecast-based financing pilot project, with forecasts from the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS). Using this method, we define the "danger level" of flooding, and we select the probabilistic forecast triggers that are appropriate for specific actions. Results from this methodology can be applied globally across hazards and fed into a financing system that ensures that automatic, pre-funded early action will be triggered by forecasts.

  10. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Qingyi; Qing, Yong; Wu, Yang; Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  11. Pharmacological efficacy of CPU 86017 on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats: mediated by direct inhibition of calcium channels and antioxidant action, but indirect effects on the ET-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Tai; Cui, Bing; Dai, De-Zai; Tang, Xiao-Yun

    2005-12-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of a novel compound p-chlorobenzyltetrahydroberberine (CPU 86017) on endothelin-1 system of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. SD male rats were divided into control, untreated pulmonary hypertension, nifedipine (10 mg/kg p.o.), and CPU 86017 (80, 40, and 20 mg/kg p.o.) groups. The pulmonary hypertension was established by housing the rats in a hypoxic (10 +/- 0.5% oxygen) chamber 8 hours per day for 4 weeks. Hemodynamic and morphologic assessment exhibited a significant increase in the central vein pressure (CVP), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), and pulmonary arteriole remodeling in the pulmonary hypertensive rats, which were improved by CPU 86017 80 and 40 mg/kg administration (P < 0.01). The elevated pulmonary endothelin-1 level and the over-active preproET-1 and iNOS mRNA expression were also decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in CPU 86017 groups. The maladjustment of redox enzyme system in pulmonary hypertension rats was corrected after treatment. We concluded that CPU 86017 improves pulmonary hypertension mainly to suppress the endothelin-1 pathway at the upstream and downstream via calcium antagonism and antioxidative action, then, resulting in a relief in pathogenesis of the disease.

  12. Inhibition of the gravitropic bending response of flowering shoots by salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Haya; Meir, Shimon; Halevy, Abraham H; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia

    2003-10-01

    The upward gravitropic bending of cut snapdragon, lupinus and anemone flowering shoots was inhibited by salicylic acid (SA) applied at 0.5 mM and above. This effect was probably not due to acidification of the cytoplasm, since other weak acids did not inhibit bending of snapdragon shoots. In order to study its mode of inhibitory action, we have examined in cut snapdragon shoots the effect of SA on three processes of the gravity-signaling pathway, including: amyloplast sedimentation, formation of ethylene gradient across the stem, and differential growth response. The results show that 1 mM SA inhibited differential ethylene production rates across the horizontal stem and the gravity-induced growth, without significantly inhibiting vertical growth or amyloplast sedimentation following horizontal placement. However, 5 mM SA inhibited all three gravity-induced processes, as well as the growth of vertical shoots, while increasing flower wilting. It may, therefore, be concluded that SA inhibits bending of various cut flowering shoots in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, at a low concentration SA exerts its effect in snapdragon shoots by inhibiting processes operating downstream to stimulus sensing exerted by amyloplast sedimentation. At a higher concentration SA inhibits bending probably by exerting general negative effects on various cellular processes.

  13. Hypothesis: Musculin is a hormone secreted by skeletal muscle, the body's largest endocrine organ. Evidence for actions on the endocrine pancreas to restrain the beta-cell mass and to inhibit insulin secretion and on the hypothalamus to co-ordinate the neuroendocrine and appetite responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Engler, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that skeletal muscle may act as an endocrine organ by secreting interleukin-6 (IL-6) into the systemic circulation. From an analysis of the actions of IL-6 and of additional literature, we postulate that skeletal muscle also secretes an unidentified hormone, which we have named Musculin (Latin: musculus = muscle), which acts on the pancreatic beta-cell to restrain the size of the (beta-cell mass and to tonically inhibit insulin secretion and biosynthesis. It is suggested that the amount of Musculin secreted is determined by, and is positively correlated with, the prevailing insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle, thereby accounting for the hyperinsulinemia that occurs in insulin resistant disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and the polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition, it is postulated that Musculin acts on the hypothalamus (arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus) to co-ordinate the neuroendocrine and appetite responses to exercise. However, the possibilities that Musculin may act on additional central nervous system sites and that an additional hormone(s) may be responsible for these actions are not excluded. It is suggested that a search be made for Musculin, since analogues of such a substance may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of the current global diabetes and obesity epidemic.

  14. Azelaic Acid: Evidence-based Update on Mechanism of Action and Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Brian C; Wu, Wesley; Rosen, Ted

    2015-09-01

    Azelaic acid is a complex molecule with many diverse activities. The latter include anti-infective and anti-inflammatory action. The agent also inhibits follicular keratinization and epidermal melanogenesis. Due to the wide variety of biological activities, azelaic acid has been utilized as a management tool in a broad spectrum of disease states and cutaneous disorders. This paper reviews the clinical utility of azelaic acid, noting the quality of the evidence supporting each potential use. PMID:26355614

  15. Role of electrostatics at the catalytic metal binding site in xylose isomerase action: Ca(2+)-inhibition and metal competence in the double mutant D254E/D256E.

    PubMed

    Fuxreiter, M; Böcskei, Z; Szeibert, A; Szabó, E; Dallmann, G; Naray-Szabo, G; Asboth, B

    1997-06-01

    The catalytic metal binding site of xylose isomerase from Arthrobacter B3728 was modified by protein engineering to diminish the inhibitory effect of Ca2+ and to study the competence of metals on catalysis. To exclude Ca2+ from Site 2 a double mutant D254E/D256E was designed with reduced space available for binding. In order to elucidate structural consequences of the mutation the binary complex of the mutant with Mg2+ as well as ternary complexes with bivalent metal ions and the open-chain inhibitor xylitol were crystallized for x-ray studies. We determined the crystal structures of the ternary complexes containing Mg2+, Mn2+, and Ca2+ at 2.2 to 2.5 A resolutions, and refined them to R factors of 16.3, 16.6, and 19.1, respectively. We found that all metals are liganded by both engineered glutamates as well as by atoms O1 and O2 of the inhibitor. The similarity of the coordination of Ca2+ to that of the cofactors as well as results with Be2+ weaken the assumption that geometry differences should account for the catalytic noncompetence of this ion. Kinetic results of the D254E/D256E mutant enzyme showed that the significant decrease in Ca2+ inhibition was accompanied by a similar reduction in the enzymatic activity. Qualitative argumentation, based on the protein electrostatic potential, indicates that the proximity of the negative side chains to the substrate significantly reduces the electrostatic stabilization of the transition state. Furthermore, due to the smaller size of the catalytic metal site, no water molecule, coordinating the metal, could be observed in ternary complexes of the double mutant. Consequently, the proton shuttle step in the overall mechanism should differ from that in the wild type. These effects can account for the observed decrease in catalytic efficiency of the D254E/D256E mutant enzyme. PMID:9188736

  16. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    PubMed

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand.

  17. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    PubMed

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand. PMID:12319083

  18. A Model of Motor Inhibition for a Complex Skill: Baseball Batting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rob

    2009-01-01

    The ability to inhibit an ongoing action in response to a signal from the environment is important for many perceptual-motor actions. This paper examines a particular example of this behavior: attempting to inhibit or "check" a swing in baseball batting. A model of motor inhibition in batting is proposed. In the model there are three different…

  19. Benzonatate inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Evans, M Steven; Maglinger, G Benton; Fletcher, Anita M; Johnson, Stephen R

    2016-02-01

    Benzonatate was FDA-approved in 1958 as an antitussive. Its mechanism of action is thought to be anesthesia of vagal sensory nerve fibers that mediate cough. Vagal sensory neurons highly express the Nav1.7 subtype of voltage-gated sodium channels, and inhibition of this channel inhibits the cough reflex. Local anesthetics inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels, but there are no reports of whether benzonatate affects these channels. Our hypothesis is that benzonatate inhibits Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels. We used whole cell voltage clamp recording to test the effects of benzonatate on voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) currents in two murine cell lines, catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells, which express primarily Nav1.7, and N1E-115, which express primarily Nav1.3. We found that, like local anesthetics, benzonatate strongly and reversibly inhibits voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Benzonatate causes both tonic and phasic inhibition. It has greater effects on channel inactivation than on activation, and its potency is much greater at depolarized potentials, indicating inactivated-state-specific effects. Na(+) currents in CAD cells and N1E-115 cells are similarly affected, indicating that benzonatate is not Na(+) channel subtype-specific. Benzonatate is a mixture of polyethoxy esters of 4-(butylamino) benzoic acid having varying degrees of hydrophobicity. We found that Na(+) currents are inhibited most potently by a benzonatate fraction containing the 9-ethoxy component. Detectable effects of benzonatate occur at concentrations as low as 0.3 μM, which has been reported in humans. We conclude that benzonatate has local anesthetic-like effects on voltage-gated sodium channels, including Nav1.7, which is a possible mechanism for cough suppression by the drug.

  20. Benzonatate inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Evans, M Steven; Maglinger, G Benton; Fletcher, Anita M; Johnson, Stephen R

    2016-02-01

    Benzonatate was FDA-approved in 1958 as an antitussive. Its mechanism of action is thought to be anesthesia of vagal sensory nerve fibers that mediate cough. Vagal sensory neurons highly express the Nav1.7 subtype of voltage-gated sodium channels, and inhibition of this channel inhibits the cough reflex. Local anesthetics inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels, but there are no reports of whether benzonatate affects these channels. Our hypothesis is that benzonatate inhibits Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels. We used whole cell voltage clamp recording to test the effects of benzonatate on voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) currents in two murine cell lines, catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells, which express primarily Nav1.7, and N1E-115, which express primarily Nav1.3. We found that, like local anesthetics, benzonatate strongly and reversibly inhibits voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Benzonatate causes both tonic and phasic inhibition. It has greater effects on channel inactivation than on activation, and its potency is much greater at depolarized potentials, indicating inactivated-state-specific effects. Na(+) currents in CAD cells and N1E-115 cells are similarly affected, indicating that benzonatate is not Na(+) channel subtype-specific. Benzonatate is a mixture of polyethoxy esters of 4-(butylamino) benzoic acid having varying degrees of hydrophobicity. We found that Na(+) currents are inhibited most potently by a benzonatate fraction containing the 9-ethoxy component. Detectable effects of benzonatate occur at concentrations as low as 0.3 μM, which has been reported in humans. We conclude that benzonatate has local anesthetic-like effects on voltage-gated sodium channels, including Nav1.7, which is a possible mechanism for cough suppression by the drug. PMID:26386152

  1. Zinc Inhibits Hedgehog Autoprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Owen, Timothy; Xia, Ke; Singh, Ajay Vikram; Tou, Emiley; Li, Lingyun; Arduini, Brigitte; Li, Hongmin; Wan, Leo Q.; Callahan, Brian; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element with wide-ranging biological functions, whereas the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in both development and disease. Here we show that there is a mechanistic link between zinc and Hh signaling. The upstream activator of Hh signaling, the Hh ligand, originates from Hh autoprocessing, which converts the Hh precursor protein to the Hh ligand. In an in vitro Hh autoprocessing assay we show that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing with a Ki of 2 μm. We then demonstrate that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing in a cellular environment with experiments in primary rat astrocyte culture. Solution NMR reveals that zinc binds the active site residues of the Hh autoprocessing domain to inhibit autoprocessing, and isothermal titration calorimetry provided the thermodynamics of the binding. In normal physiology, zinc likely acts as a negative regulator of Hh autoprocessing and inhibits the generation of Hh ligand and Hh signaling. In many diseases, zinc deficiency and elevated level of Hh ligand co-exist, including prostate cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and autism. Our data suggest a causal relationship between zinc deficiency and the overproduction of Hh ligand. PMID:25787080

  2. Insulin action on the liver in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, A D; Moore, M C; Sindelar, D K; Edgerton, D S

    2007-11-01

    Insulin has a potent inhibitory effect on hepatic glucose production by direct action at hepatic receptors. The hormone also inhibits glucose production by suppressing both lipolysis in the fat cell and secretion of glucagon by the alpha-cell. Neural sensing of insulin levels appears to participate in control of hepatic glucose production in rodents, but a role for brain insulin sensing has not been documented in dogs or humans. The primary effect of insulin on the liver is its direct action.

  3. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  4. 10 CFR 850.23 - Action level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Action level. 850.23 Section 850.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.23 Action level. (a) The responsible employer must include in its CBDPP an action level that is no greater than 0.2...

  5. 10 CFR 850.23 - Action level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Action level. 850.23 Section 850.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.23 Action level. (a) The responsible employer must include in its CBDPP an action level that is no greater than 0.2...

  6. 10 CFR 850.23 - Action level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Action level. 850.23 Section 850.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.23 Action level. (a) The responsible employer must include in its CBDPP an action level that is no greater than 0.2...

  7. 10 CFR 850.23 - Action level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Action level. 850.23 Section 850.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.23 Action level. (a) The responsible employer must include in its CBDPP an action level that is no greater than 0.2...

  8. 10 CFR 850.23 - Action level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Action level. 850.23 Section 850.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.23 Action level. (a) The responsible employer must include in its CBDPP an action level that is no greater than 0.2...

  9. Action against Bullying: Drawing from Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Margaret; And Others

    This booklet discusses action against bullying and gives information and practical ideas for the teacher and the school. The introduction explains why bullying should be a concern and how the booklet is to be used. Other sections deal with what bullying is and with anti-bullying action. Also included are four Action on Policy papers that can be…

  10. Action Research and Academic Writing: A Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Richard; Badley, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Here is a conversation between two former colleagues about action research and academic writing. Richard Winter opens the discussion with a series of reflections on his work as an action researcher. These reflections include the key argument that action research is a noble cause because it is relevant to working life, has a practical impact and…

  11. 24 CFR 91.420 - Action plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to be undertaken to pursue its strategic plan. The consolidated plan must provide this description... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Action plan. 91.420 Section 91.420... Plan § 91.420 Action plan. (a) Form application. The action plan for the consortium must include...

  12. 24 CFR 91.420 - Action plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to be undertaken to pursue its strategic plan. The consolidated plan must provide this description... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Action plan. 91.420 Section 91.420... Plan § 91.420 Action plan. (a) Form application. The action plan for the consortium must include...

  13. 24 CFR 91.420 - Action plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to be undertaken to pursue its strategic plan. The consolidated plan must provide this description... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Action plan. 91.420 Section 91.420... Plan § 91.420 Action plan. (a) Form application. The action plan for the consortium must include...

  14. 24 CFR 91.420 - Action plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to be undertaken to pursue its strategic plan. The consolidated plan must provide this description... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Action plan. 91.420 Section 91.420... Plan § 91.420 Action plan. (a) Form application. The action plan for the consortium must include...

  15. Mechanisms of action of the 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Stewart J; Rapoport, Alan M; Sheftell, Fred D

    2002-07-01

    Recent studies of the pathophysiology of migraine provide evidence that the headache phase is associated with multiple physiologic actions. These actions include the release of vasoactive neuropeptides by the trigeminovascular system, vasodilation of intracranial extracerebral vessels, and increased nociceptive neurotransmission within the central trigeminocervical complex. The 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists, collectively known as triptans, are a major advance in the treatment of migraine. The beneficial effects of the triptans in patients with migraine are related to their multiple mechanisms of action at sites implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. These mechanisms are mediated by 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and include vasoconstriction of painfully dilated cerebral blood vessels, inhibition of the release of vasoactive neuropeptides by trigeminal nerves, and inhibition of nociceptive neurotransmission. The high affinity of the triptans for 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and their favorable pharmacologic properties contribute to the beneficial effects of these drugs, including rapid onset of action, effective relief of headache and associated symptoms, and low incidence of adverse effects. PMID:12117355

  16. Disentangling common and specific neural subprocesses of response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, A; Pohl, M F; Klöppel, S; Feige, B; Lange, T; Stahl, C; Voss, A; Klauer, K C; Lieb, K; Tüscher, O

    2013-01-01

    Response inhibition is disturbed in several disorders sharing impulse control deficits as a core symptom. Since response inhibition is a cognitively and neurally multifaceted function which has been shown to rely on differing neural subprocesses and neurotransmitter systems, further differentiation to define neurophysiological endophenotypes is essential. Response inhibition may involve at least three separable cognitive subcomponents, i.e. interference inhibition, action withholding, and action cancelation. Here, we introduce a novel paradigm - the Hybrid Response Inhibition task - to disentangle interference inhibition, action withholding and action cancelation and their neural subprocesses within one task setting during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To validate the novel task, results were compared to a battery of separate, standard response inhibition tasks independently capturing these subcomponents and subprocesses. Across all subcomponents, mutual activation was present in the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC), pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and parietal regions. Interference inhibition revealed stronger activation in pre-motor and parietal regions. Action cancelation resulted in stronger activation in fronto-striatal regions. Our results show that all subcomponents share a common neural network and thus all constitute different subprocesses of response inhibition. Subprocesses, however, differ to the degree of regional involvement: interference inhibition relies more pronouncedly on a fronto-parietal-pre-motor network suggesting its close relation to response selection processes. Action cancelation, in turn, is more strongly associated with the fronto-striatal pathway implicating it as a late subcomponent of response inhibition. The new paradigm reliably captures three putatively subsequent subprocesses of response inhibition and might be a promising tool to differentially assess disturbed neural networks in disorders showing

  17. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates.

    PubMed

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A; Clifton, Ian J; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W G; Schofield, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as 'transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  18. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as ‘transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  19. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  20. TACT: The Action Computation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jason L.; Binney, James

    2015-12-01

    The Action Computation Tool (TACT) tests methods for estimating actions, angles and frequencies of orbits in both axisymmetric and triaxial potentials, including general spherical potentials, analytic potentials (Isochrone and Harmonic oscillator), axisymmetric Stackel fudge, average generating function from orbit (AvGF), and others. It is written in C++; code is provided to compile the routines into a Python library. TM (ascl:1512.014) and LAPACK are required to access some features.

  1. The mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc in inflammatory skin disease.

    PubMed

    Fivenson, David P

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide (niacinamide), a physiologically active form of niacin (nicotinic acid), in combination with zinc is being assessed in clinical studies for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as acne vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. The basis for these investigations is the variety of potential mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc, including an anti-inflammatory effect via inhibition of leukocyte chemotaxis, lysosomal enzyme release, lymphocytic transformation, mast cell degranulation, bacteriostatic effect against Propionibacterium acnes, inhibition of vasoactive amines, preservation of intracellular coenzyme homeostasis, and decreased sebum production. Other possible mechanisms involve suppression of vascular permeability and inflammatory cell accumulation, as well as protection against DNA damage. The goal of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases and discuss the role, mechanisms of action, and safety of nicotinamide and zinc as therapeutic options for these disorders.

  2. Platform for Action: update.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Women's Global Leadership (CWGL) has collaborated in the preparation of amendments and strategies designed to withstand the challenges being posed to the Platform for Action of the Fourth World Conference on Women. Specific challenges include the inappropriate use of the word "universal" to modify "human rights." This implies that some human rights are less than universal. The strategy proposed is to accept the use of the word "universal" in this context only when it affirms principles of universality contained in the Vienna Programme of Action and not where its use would restrict the rights to which women are entitled. A second concern is over the use of the word "equity" rather than "equality" when referring to gender relations. The use of these terms will be carefully monitored to insure that "equity" not be used to undermine the principle of gender equality. The third concern is the efforts of some governments to hinder the integration of women's human rights throughout the UN system. Such efforts will be opposed. Fourth, the CWGL will seek the inclusion of language which recognizes the barriers that different groups of women face when trying to secure their rights. Finally, the CWGL will propose inclusion of language recognizing and protecting sexual orientation rights. The CWGL is also going to work to translate the abstract language of the Platform for Action into political organizing potential to insure that governments will follow through on their agreements.

  3. Action video game experience affects oculomotor performance.

    PubMed

    West, Greg L; Al-Aidroos, Naseem; Pratt, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Action video games have been show to affect a variety of visual and cognitive processes. There is, however, little evidence of whether playing video games can also affect motor action. To investigate the potential link between experience playing action video games and changes in oculomotor action, we tested habitual action video game players (VGPs) and non-video game players (NVGPs) in a saccadic trajectory deviation task. We demonstrate that spatial curvature of a saccadic trajectory towards or away from distractor is profoundly different between VGPs and NVGPs. In addition, task performance accuracy improved over time only in VGPs. Results are discussed in the context of the competing interplay between stimulus-driven motor programming and top-down inhibition during oculomotor execution.

  4. Inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by Urtica dioica leaves extracts.

    PubMed

    El Haouari, Mohammed; Bnouham, Mohamed; Bendahou, Mourad; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2006-07-01

    Platelet hyperactivity plays an important role in arterial thrombosis and atherosclerosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different extracts of Urtica dioica leaves on platelet aggregation. Rat platelets were prepared and incubated in vitro with different concentrations of the tested extracts and aggregation was induced by different agonists including thrombin (0.5 U/mL), ADP (10 microm), epinephrine (100 microm) and collagen (5 mg/mL). The crude aqueous extract inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. At 1 mg/mL, the percent inhibition was 17.1 +/- 4.2%. Soxhlet extraction of the plant leaves with different successive solvents showed that the ethyl acetate extract exhibited the most antiaggregant effect with an inhibition of 76.8 +/- 6.1% at 1 mg/mL. Flavonoids isolated from the plant leaves, produced a strong inhibitory effect on thrombin-induced platelet aggregation with an IC(50) of 0.25 +/- 0.05 and 0.40 +/- 0.04 mg/mL for genins and heterosidic flavonoids, respectively. Flavonoids also markedly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen and epinephrine. It is concluded that Urtica dioica has an antiplatelet action in which flavonoids are mainly implicated. These results support the traditional use of Urtica dioica in the treatment and/or prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:16619332

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individuals actions. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July - December 1996) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to-these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Semiannual progress report, January 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (January - June 1997) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  7. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  8. Gardimycin, a New Antibiotic Inhibiting Peptidoglycan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Somma, Sergio; Merati, Wilma; Parenti, Francesco

    1977-01-01

    Gardimycin, a new antibiotic, at 100 μg/ml, specifically inhibited cell wall synthesis and induced accumulation of uridine 5′-diphosphate-N-acetylmur-amylpentapeptide in whole cells of Bacillus subtilis. The antibiotic was active in a particulate enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus: 60 μg/ml caused 50%, and 200μg/ml caused 100%, inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis. Suppression of peptidoglycan synthesis was accompanied by parallel accumulation of the lipid intermediate. This mechanism of action is discussed in comparison with those of other antibiotics that are known to inhibit bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:404960

  9. Response inhibition signals and miscoding of direction in dorsomedial striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, Daniel W.; Burton, Amanda C.; Kashtelyan, Vadim; Barnett, Brian R.; Roesch, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to inhibit action is critical for everyday behavior and is affected by a variety of disorders. Behavioral control and response inhibition is thought to depend on a neural circuit that includes the dorsal striatum, yet the neural signals that lead to response inhibition and its failure are unclear. To address this issue, we recorded from neurons in rat dorsomedial striatum (mDS) in a novel task in which rats responded to a spatial cue that signaled that reward would be delivered either to the left or to the right. On 80% of trials rats were instructed to respond in the direction cued by the light (GO). On 20% of trials a second light illuminated instructing the rat to refrain from making the cued movement and move in the opposite direction (STOP). Many neurons in mDS encoded direction, firing more or less strongly for GO movements made ipsilateral or contralateral to the recording electrode. Neurons that fired more strongly for contralateral GO responses were more active when rats were faster, showed reduced activity on STOP trials, and miscoded direction on errors, suggesting that when these neurons were overly active, response inhibition failed. Neurons that decreased firing for contralateral movement were excited during trials in which the rat was required to stop the ipsilateral movement. For these neurons activity was reduced when errors were made and was negatively correlated with movement time suggesting that when these neurons were less active on STOP trials, response inhibition failed. Finally, the activity of a significant number of neurons represented a global inhibitory signal, firing more strongly during response inhibition regardless of response direction. Breakdown by cell type suggests that putative medium spiny neurons (MSNs) tended to fire more strongly under STOP trials, whereas putative interneurons exhibited both activity patterns. PMID:22973206

  10. Inhibition of TRPP3 channel by amiloride and analogs.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Qing; Ramji, Alkarim; Liu, Yan; Li, Qiang; Karpinski, Edward; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2007-12-01

    TRPP3, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, is a Ca2+-activated channel permeable to Ca2+, Na+, and K+. TRPP3 has been implicated in sour tasting in bipolar cells of tongue and in regulation of pH-sensitive action potential in spinal cord neurons. TRPP3 is also present in excitable and nonexcitable cells of other tissues, including retina, brain, heart, testis, and kidney, with unknown functions. In this study, we examined the functional modulation of TRPP3 channel by amiloride and its analogs, known to inhibit several ion channels and transporters and respond to all taste stimuli, using Xenopus laevis oocyte expression, electrophysiology, and radiotracer measurements. We found that amiloride and its analogs inhibit TRPP3 channel activities with different affinities. Radiolabeled (45)Ca2+ uptake showed that TRPP3-mediated Ca2+ transport was inhibited by amiloride, phenamil, benzamil, and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA). Two-microelectrode voltage clamp experiments revealed that TRPP3-mediated Ca2+-activated currents are substantially inhibited by amiloride analogs, in an order of potency of phenamil > benzamil > EIPA > amiloride, with IC50 values of 0.14, 1.1, 10.5, and 143 microM, respectively. The inhibition potency positively correlated with the size of inhibitors. Using cell-attached patch clamping, we showed that the amiloride analogs decrease the open probability and mean open time but have no effect on single-channel conductance. Study of inhibition by phenamil in the presence of previously reported inhibitor tetrapentylammonium indicates that amiloride and organic cation inhibitors compete for binding the same site on TRPP3. TRPP3 may contribute to previously reported in vivo amiloride-sensitive cation transport. PMID:17804601

  11. Antimicrobial action of sanguinarine.

    PubMed

    Godowski, K C

    1989-01-01

    Sanguinarine is a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived from rhizomes of Sanguinaria canadensis L. (bloodroot). It is a cationic molecule which converts from an iminium ion form at pH less than 6 to an alkanolamine form at pH greater than 7. Sanguinaria extract is composed of sanguinarine and five other closely related alkaloids. The safety profile of both sanguinarine and sanguinaria extract provide a broad margin for their safe use in oral health products. Sanguinarine has broad antimicrobial activity as well as antiinflammatory properties. In vitro studies indicate that the anti-plaque action of sanguinaria is due to its ability to inhibit bacterial adherence to newly formed pellicle, its retention in plaque being 10-100 times its saliva concentration, and due to its antimicrobic properties. The MIC of sanguinarine ranges from 1 to 32 micrograms/mL for most species of plaque bacteria. Long term use of sanguinaria-containing toothpaste and oral rinse products does not predispose users to detrimental shifts in oral flora. Electron microscopic studies of bacteria exposed to sanguinarine demonstrate that bacteria aggregate and become morphologically irregular. Sanguinarine-containing slow release polymer systems are currently being developed for use in periodontitis treatment applications.

  12. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Reszka, Alfred A; Rodan, Gideon A

    2004-09-01

    The current paradigm for drug discovery requires the identification of a target involved in the disease process (e.g. enzyme or receptor) and the development of an appropriate ligand (activator, inhibitor or selective modulator). Selection of ligands for clinical development is based on the therapeutic window between efficacy vs. safety and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) considerations. For bisphosphonates (BPs) the process has not followed that paradigm. BPs have very low absorption and are retained in bone, their target tissue. A few have been used on a limited basis for over 20 years in diseases of rapid bone destruction (e.g. post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease, bone metastases, etc.), without understanding their molecular mechanism of action. The nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs) are the latest and most potent addition to this family of compounds and have the widest use. They have high potency, are specifically targeted to the osteoclast on bone and are used at very low doses (5-10 mg clinically). Over the last four years, there was significant progress in elucidating the mechanism of action of BPs, both lacking and containing nitrogen. This review will focus on the mechanism of action of the N-BPs, specifically alendronate (ALN) and risedronate (RIS), the two agents most widely used. For these and all other N-BPs, the molecular target is the isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Although inhibition of this enzyme by N-BPs results in the suppression of sterol biosynthesis, it is actually disruption of a branch pathway, isoprenylation, that is responsible for N-BP pharmacological activity. Isoprenylation involves covalent linkage of the 15 or 20 carbon isoprene moiety farnesyl diphosphate or geranylgeranyl diphosphate, respectively, to the carboxy-terminus of regulatory proteins, including the small GTPases Ras, Rac, Rho and Cdc42. The latter three, as well as

  13. Action goals influence action-specific perception.

    PubMed

    Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen; van der Kamp, John

    2009-12-01

    We examined the processes that mediate the emergence of action-specific influences on perception that have recently been reported for baseball batting and golf putting (Witt, Linkenauger, Bakdash, & Proffitt, 2008; Witt & Proffitt, 2005). To this end, we used a Schokokusswurfmaschine: Children threw a ball at a target, which, if hit successfully, launched a ball that the children then had to catch. In two experiments, children performed either a throwing-and-catching task or a throwing-only task, in which no ball was launched. After each task, the size of the target or of the ball was estimated. Results indicate that action-specific influences on perceived size occur for objects that are related to the end goal of the action, but not for objects that are related to intermediate action goals. These results suggest that action-specific influences on perception are contingent upon the primary action goals to be achieved.

  14. Attention, biological motion, and action recognition.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James; Parasuraman, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Interacting with others in the environment requires that we perceive and recognize their movements and actions. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have indicated that a number of brain regions, particularly the superior temporal sulcus, are involved in a number of processes essential for action recognition, including the processing of biological motion and processing the intentions of actions. We review the behavioral and neuroimaging evidence suggesting that while some aspects of action recognition might be rapid and effective, they are not necessarily automatic. Attention is particularly important when visual information about actions is degraded or ambiguous, or if competing information is present. We present evidence indicating that neural responses associated with the processing of biological motion are strongly modulated by attention. In addition, behavioral and neuroimaging evidence shows that drawing inferences from the actions of others is attentionally demanding. The role of attention in action observation has implications for everyday social interactions and workplace applications that depend on observing, understanding and interpreting actions. PMID:21640836

  15. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  16. Carbendazim Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yenjerla, Mythili; Cox, Corey; Wilson, Leslie; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Carbendazim (methyl 2-benzimidazolecarbamate) is widely used as a systemic fungicide in human food production and appears to act on fungal tubulin. However, it also inhibits proliferation of human cancer cells, including drug- and multidrug-resistant and p53-deficient cell lines. Because of its promising preclinical anti-tumor activity, it has undergone phase I clinical trials and is under further clinical development. Although it weakly inhibits polymerization of brain microtubules and induces G2/M arrest in tumor cells, its mechanism of action in human cells has not been fully elucidated. We examined its mechanism of action in MCF7 human breast cancer cells and found that it inhibits proliferation (IC50, 10 μM) and half-maximally arrests mitosis at a similar concentration (8 μM), in concert with suppression of microtubule dynamic instability without appreciable microtubule depolymerization. It induces mitotic spindle abnormalities and reduces the metaphase intercentromere distance of sister chromatids, indicating reduction of tension on kinetochores, thus leading to metaphase arrest. With microtubules assembled in vitro from pure tubulin, carbendazim also suppresses dynamic instability, reducing the dynamicity by 50% at 10 μM, with only minimal (21%) reduction of polymer mass. Carbendazim binds to mammalian tubulin (Kd, 42.8 ± 4.0 μM). Unlike some benzimidazoles that bind to the colchicine site in tubulin, carbendazim neither competes with colchicine nor competes with vinblastine for binding to brain tubulin. Thus, carbendazim binds to an as yet unidentified site in tubulin and inhibits tumor cell proliferation by suppressing the growing and shortening phases of microtubule dynamic instability, thus inducing mitotic arrest. PMID:19001156

  17. Numerical Tests of the Improved Fermilab Action

    SciTech Connect

    Detar, C.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Oktay, M.B.

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the Fermilab heavy-quark action was extended to include dimension-six and -seven operators in order to reduce the discretization errors. In this talk, we present results of the first numerical simulations with this action (the OK action), where we study the masses of the quarkonium and heavy-light systems. We calculate combinations of masses designed to test improvement and compare results obtained with the OK action to their counterparts obtained with the clover action. Our preliminary results show a clear improvement.

  18. Inhibition of de novo Palmitate Synthesis by Fatty Acid Synthase Induces Apoptosis in Tumor Cells by Remodeling Cell Membranes, Inhibiting Signaling Pathways, and Reprogramming Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Waszczuk, Joanna; Wang, Zhaoti; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George; Heuer, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of de novo palmitate synthesis via fatty acid synthase (FASN) inhibition provides an unproven approach to cancer therapy with a strong biological rationale. FASN expression increases with tumor progression and associates with chemoresistance, tumor metastasis, and diminished patient survival in numerous tumor types. TVB-3166, an orally-available, reversible, potent, and selective FASN inhibitor induces apoptosis, inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth under lipid-rich conditions, and inhibits in-vivo xenograft tumor growth. Dose-dependent effects are observed between 20–200 nM TVB-3166, which agrees with the IC50 in biochemical FASN and cellular palmitate synthesis assays. Mechanistic studies show that FASN inhibition disrupts lipid raft architecture, inhibits biological pathways such as lipid biosynthesis, PI3K–AKT–mTOR and β-catenin signal transduction, and inhibits expression of oncogenic effectors such as c-Myc; effects that are tumor-cell specific. Our results demonstrate that FASN inhibition has anti-tumor activities in biologically diverse preclinical tumor models and provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers, including those expressing mutant K-Ras, ErbB2, c-Met, and PTEN. The reported findings inform ongoing studies to link mechanisms of action with defined tumor types and advance the discovery of biomarkers supporting development of FASN inhibitors as cancer therapeutics. Research in context Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a vital enzyme in tumor cell biology; the over-expression of FASN is associated with diminished patient prognosis and resistance to many cancer therapies. Our data demonstrate that selective and potent FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 leads to selective death of tumor cells, without significant effect on normal cells, and inhibits in vivo xenograft tumor growth at well-tolerated doses. Candidate biomarkers for

  19. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  20. [Neuroprotective actions of lithium].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Jeong, Mi Ra; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Christ, Lori; Leeds, Peter; Chuang, De-Maw; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has long been one of the primary drugs used to treat bipolar mood disorder. However, neither the etiology of this disease nor the therapeutic mechanism(s) of this drug is well understood. Several lines of clinical evidence suggest that lithium has neurotrophic actions. For example chronic lithium treatment increases the volume of gray matter and the content of N-acetyl-aspartate, a cell survival marker, in bipolar mood disorder patients (Moore et al., 2000). Moreover, treatment with this mood-stabilizer suppresses the decrease in the volume of the subgenual pre-frontal cortex found in bipolar patients (Drevets, 2001). To elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of lithium, we employed a preparation of cultured cortical neurons prepared form embryonic rats. We found that treatment with therapeutic doses (0.2-1.2 mM) of lithium robustly protects cortical neurons from multiple insults, notably glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. The neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity is time-dependent, requiring treatment for 5-6 days for maximal effect, and is associated with a reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx. The latter is correlated with a decrease in Tyrosine 1472 phosphorylation levels in the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors and a loss of Src kinase activity which is involved in NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation. Neither the activity of total tyrosine protein kinase nor that of tyrosine protein phosphatase is affected by this drug, indicating the selectivity of the modulation. Lithium neuroprotection against excitotoxicity is inhibited by a BDNF-neutralizing antibody and K252a, a Trk antagonist. Lithium treatment time-dependently increases the intracellular level of BDNF in cortical neurons and activates its receptor, TrkB. The neuroprotection can be completely blocked by either heterozygous or homozygous knockout of the BDNF gene. These results suggest a central role of BDNF and TrkB in mediating the

  1. Anti-Cancer Effect of Lambertianic Acid by Inhibiting the AR in LNCaP Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Seon-Ok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Eun-Ok; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Lambertianic acid (LA) is known to have anti-allergic and antibacterial effects. However, the anticancer activities and mechanism of action of LA have not been investigated. Therefore, the anticancer effects and mechanism of LA are investigated in this study. LA decreased not only AR protein levels, but also cellular and secretory levels of PSA. Furthermore, LA inhibited nuclear translocation of the AR induced by mibolerone. LA suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1 arrest, downregulating CDK4/6 and cyclin D1 and activating p53 and its downstream molecules, p21 and p27. LA induced apoptosis and the expression of related proteins, including cleaved caspase-9 and -3, c-PARP and BAX, and inhibited BCl-2. The role of AR in LA-induced apoptosis was assessed by using siRNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that LA exerts the anticancer effect by inhibiting AR and is a valuable therapeutic agent in prostate cancer treatment. PMID:27399684

  2. Betanin inhibits the myeloperoxidase/nitrite-induced oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Mario; Tesoriere, Luisa; Livrea, Maria A

    2007-03-01

    Production of nitrogen dioxide by the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the presence of nitrite is now considered a key step in the pathophysiology of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. This study shows that betanin, a phytochemical of the betalain class, inhibits the production of lipid hydroperoxides in human LDL submitted to a MPO/nitrite-induced oxidation. Kinetic measurements including time-course of particle oxidation and betanin consumption, either in the presence or in the absence of nitrite, suggest that the antioxidant effect is possibly the result of various actions. Betanin scavenges the initiator radical nitrogen dioxide and can also act as a lipoperoxyl radical-scavenger. In addition, unidentified oxidation product(s) of betanin by MPO/nitrite inhibit(s) the MPO/nitrite-induced LDL oxidation as effectively as the parent compound. In the light of betanin bioavailability and post-absorbtion distribution in humans, present findings may suggest favourable in vivo activity of this phytochemical.

  3. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Yeun; Yoon, Sei Mee; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Jinu

    2016-09-15

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. PMID:27487578

  4. Calcium antagonistic and antiarrhythmic actions of CPU-23, a substituted tetrahydroisoquinoline.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, H.; Sheng, J. Z.; Lee, C. M.; Wong, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of CPU-23 (1-(1-[(6-methoxyl)-naphth-2-yl])-propyl-2-(1-piperidine)-acetyl-6 ,7- dimethyoxy-1,2,3,4-tetra-hydroisoquinoline) were studied on mechanical and electrical activities, and intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) of isolated cardiac tissues in order to investigate its spectrum and mechanisms of action in the heart. Its antiarrhythmic and haemodynamic effects in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats subjected to coronary artery ligation were also evaluated. 2. CPU-23 at 10(-6)-10(-4) M markedly inhibited slow action potential characteristics in guinea-pig papillary muscles and pace-maker action potential of rabbit sinoatrial node. It affected fast action potential only at 10(-4) M. None of the effects of CPU-23 was reversed by washout for up to 2 h. 3. Like nifedipine and diltiazem, CPU-23 decreased the heart rate of the isolated perfused heart of the rat. However, in contrast to these two classical calcium antagonists which dose-dependently inhibited the force of contraction, CPU-23 inhibited and stimulated the force of contraction at 10(-7)-3 x 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M, respectively. 4. CPU-23 at 10(-6)-10(-5) M inhibited the KCl-induced [Ca2+]i increase in the Ca2+ medium, but did not affect the caffeine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in the Ca(2+)-free medium in isolated ventricular myocytes. 5. CPU-23 at 1-5 mg kg-1 reduced dose-dependently ventricular arrhythmias including ventricular ectopic beats, VT and VF as well as mortality during coronary artery ligation. At 2.5-5 mg kg-1 it even abolished VF, which was accompanied by 100% survival.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8495235

  5. Competing mechanisms for mapping action-related categorical knowledge and observed actions.

    PubMed

    Candidi, Matteo; Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Abreu, Ana Maria; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2010-12-01

    Responses to pictures of famous tennis and soccer athletes are slower when the responding effector is a hand or foot, respectively, indicating that visual recognition of individuals characterized by skilled motor behavior interferes with the motor reactivity of nonproficient observers. By contrast, directly viewing actions induces motor facilitation, suggesting that actions are mapped in the observers' motor system. Here, we used single-pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to determine 1) whether observing and recognizing the identity of famous tennis and soccer athletes selectively reduce the corticospinal excitability of arm and leg representations (categorization), 2) whether any athlete-related inhibition effect contrasts the facilitation associated with direct action observation (categorization + action), and 3) whether the classic action observation-related facilitation effect is found when viewing "in action" nonathlete models (action). In 3 experiments, we found that amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded from leg and arm muscles gradually shifted from reduction to facilitation, moving from the categorization to the action observation tasks. Thus, semantic derivation of motor skills is reflected in limb-specific reduction of MEP amplitude, indicating that even abstract action knowledge is embodied in the motor system and that mapping others' actions on the basis of categorization or of their direct observation relies on competing functional mechanisms.

  6. Mechanism of action of memantine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jon W; Kotermanski, Shawn E

    2006-02-01

    Memantine is a clinically useful drug in many neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. The principal mechanism of action of memantine is believed to be the blockade of current flow through channels of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors--a glutamate receptor subfamily broadly involved in brain function. Surprisingly, other drugs that block NMDA receptor channels, such as ketamine, exhibit serious deleterious effects. The unusual therapeutic utility of memantine probably results from inhibitory mechanisms shared with ketamine, combined with actions specific to memantine. These potentially important differences between memantine and ketamine include effects on gating of blocked channels and binding of memantine to two sites on NMDA receptors. Because modulation of NMDA receptor activity can increase or decrease excitability of neuronal circuits, subtle differences in the mechanisms of action of NMDA receptor antagonists can strongly impact on their clinical effects.

  7. Classification of Drugs Based on Properties of Sodium Channel Inhibition: A Comparative Automated Patch-Clamp Study

    PubMed Central

    Lenkey, Nora; Karoly, Robert; Lukacs, Peter; Vizi, E. Sylvester; Sunesen, Morten; Fodor, Laszlo; Mike, Arpad

    2010-01-01

    Background There is only one established drug binding site on sodium channels. However, drug binding of sodium channels shows extreme promiscuity: ∼25% of investigated drugs have been found to potently inhibit sodium channels. The structural diversity of these molecules suggests that they may not share the binding site, and/or the mode of action. Our goal was to attempt classification of sodium channel inhibitors by measuring multiple properties of inhibition in electrophysiology experiments. We also aimed to investigate if different properties of inhibition correlate with specific chemical properties of the compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings A comparative electrophysiological study of 35 compounds, including classic sodium channel inhibitors (anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics and local anesthetics), as well as antidepressants, antipsychotics and neuroprotective agents, was carried out using rNav1.2 expressing HEK-293 cells and the QPatch automatic patch-clamp instrument. In the multi-dimensional space defined by the eight properties of inhibition (resting and inactivated affinity, potency, reversibility, time constants of onset and offset, use-dependence and state-dependence), at least three distinct types of inhibition could be identified; these probably reflect distinct modes of action. The compounds were clustered similarly in the multi-dimensional space defined by relevant chemical properties, including measures of lipophilicity, aromaticity, molecular size, polarity and electric charge. Drugs of the same therapeutic indication typically belonged to the same type. We identified chemical properties, which were important in determining specific properties of inhibition. State-dependence correlated with lipophilicity, the ratio of the neutral form of molecules, and aromaticity: We noticed that the highly state dependent inhibitors had at least two aromatic rings, logP>4.0, and pKa<8.0. Conclusions/Significance The correlations of inhibition properties

  8. Understanding the mechanisms by which probiotics inhibit gastrointestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Corr, Sinead C; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of probiotic bacteria for the maintenance of general gastrointestinal health and the prevention or treatment of intestinal infections. Whilst probiotics are documented to reduce or prevent specific infectious diseases of the GI tract, the mechanistic basis of this effect remains unclear. It is likely that diverse modes-of-action contribute to inhibition of pathogens in the gut environment and proposed mechanisms include (i) direct antimicrobial activity through production of bacteriocins or inhibitors of virulence gene expression; (ii) competitive exclusion by competition for binding sites or stimulation of epithelial barrier function; (iii) stimulation of immune responses via increases of sIgA and anti-inflammatory cytokines and regulation of proinflammatory cytokines; and (iv) inhibition of virulence gene or protein expression in gastrointestinal pathogens. In this review, we discuss the modes of action by which probiotic bacteria may reduce gastrointestinal infections, and highlight some recent research which demonstrates the mechanistic basis of probiotic cause and effect. PMID:19389605

  9. Inhibition of cyclic diadenylate cyclase, DisA, by polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Opoku-Temeng, Clement; Sintim, Herman O.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP has emerged as an important signaling molecule that controls a myriad of functions, including cell wall homeostasis in different bacteria. Polyphenols display various biological activities and tea polyphenols in particular have been shown to possess among other properties antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Certain tea polyphenols, such as catechin and epigallocatechin gallate, have been used to augment the action of traditional antibiotics that target the cell wall. Considering the expanding role played by cyclic dinucleotides in bacteria, we investigated whether the action of polyphenols on bacteria could be due in part to modulation of c-di-AMP signaling. Out of 14 tested polyphenols, tannic acid (TA), theaflavin-3′-gallate (TF2B) and theaflavin-3,3′-digallate (TF3) exhibited inhibitory effects on B. subtilis c-di-AMP synthase, DisA. TF2B and TF3 specifically inhibited DisA but not YybT (a PDE) whilst TA was more promiscuous and inhibited both DisA and YybT. PMID:27150552

  10. Synaptic transmission: inhibition of neurotransmitter release by botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A, a protein long used in the successful treatment of various dystonias, has a complex mechanism of action that results in muscle relaxation. At the neuromuscular junction, the presynaptic nerve ending is packed with synaptic vesicles filled with acetylcholine, and clustered at the tip of the folds of the postsynaptic muscle membrane are the acetylcholine receptors. Synaptic vesicles fuse with the membrane in response to an elevation of intraneuronal calcium concentration and undergo release of their transmitter by exocytosis. Intracellular proteins that contribute to the fusion of the vesicles with the plasma membrane during exocytosis include synaptosomal protein with a molecular weight of 25 kDa (SNAP-25); vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), also known as synaptobrevin; and syntaxin. Through their proteolytic action on these proteins, botulinum toxins prevent exocytosis, thereby inhibiting the release of acetylcholine. There are 7 serotypes of this toxin-A, B, C1, D, E, F, and G-and each cleaves a different intracellular protein or the same target at distinct bonds. The separate cleavage sites in SNAP-25 for botulinum toxin types A and E contribute to their dissimilar durations of muscle relaxation. This report describes the molecular basis for the inhibition by botulinum toxins of neuroexocytosis and subsequent functional recovery at the neuromuscular junction.

  11. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document contains the planned actions to correct the deficiences identified in the Tiger Team Assessments of Sandia California (August 1990) and Sandia New Mexico (May 1991). Information is also included on the management structures, estimated costs, root causes, prioritization and schedules for the Action Plan. This Plan is an integration of the two individual Action Plans to provide a cost effective, integrated program for implementation by Sandia and monitoring by DOE. This volume (I) contains the findings and actions concerning the environment. Tables 4.2 and 4.7 summarize the annual costs estimated for completing the actions. The total costs for completion of all the actions are estimated to be $283 million over a 12 year period; the majority of the actions to be completed and costs incurred in the first five years. Resources are provided from DOE-ER/WM, the DOE/DP landlord funds (one time, physical fixes), and from the Sandia Indirect Budget.

  12. Anti-inflammatory Actions of Adjunctive Tetracyclines and Other Agents in Periodontitis and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tilakaratne, Aruni; Soory, Mena

    2014-01-01

    The non-antimicrobial properties of tetracyclines such as anti-inflammatory, proanabolic and anti-catabolic actions make them effective pharmaceuticals for the adjunctive management of chronic inflammatory diseases. An over-exuberant inflammatory response to an antigenic trigger in periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases could contribute to an autoimmune element in disease progression. Their adjunctive use in managing periodontitis could have beneficial effects in curbing excessive inflammatory loading from commonly associated comorbidities such as CHD, DM and arthritis. Actions of tetracyclines and their derivatives include interactions with MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs, growth factors and cytokines. They affect the sequence of inflammation with implications on immunomodulation, cell proliferation and angiogenesis; these actions enhance their scope, in treating a range of disease entities. Non-antimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) sustain their diverse actions in organ systems which include anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-proteolytic actions, inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. A spectrum of biological actions in dermatitis, periodontitis, atherosclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, malignancy and prevention of bone resorption is particularly relevant to minocycline. Experimental models of ischemia indicate their specific beneficial effects. Parallel molecules with similar functions, improved Zn binding and solubility have been developed for reducing excessive MMP activity. Curbing excessive MMP activity is particularly relevant to periodontitis, and comorbidities addressed here, where specificity is paramount. Unique actions of tetracyclines in a milieu of excessive inflammatory stimuli make them effective therapeutic adjuncts in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders. These beneficial actions of tetracyclines are relevant to the adjunctive management of periodontitis subjects

  13. Effect of Fuzheng Huayu formula and its actions against liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenghai; Hu, Yiyang; Xu, Lieming; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common histological process to develop into cirrhosis in various chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis and fatty liver. Therefore anti-liver fibrosis is very important strategy to treat chronic liver diseases. Fuzheng Huayu (FZHY), a preparation containing herbs such as Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae, Cordyceps, Semen Persicae, was formulated on the basis of Chinese medicine theory in treating liver fibrosis and was approved. Pharmacological studies and clinical trials demonstrate that FZHY has a significant effect against liver fibrosis and that many of the pharmacological actions are attributable to the effect. This article reviews the effects and actions of FZHY, in particular the effects observed from clinical trials in treating liver fibrosis caused by chronic hepatitis B and the actions on inhibition of hepatic stellate cell activation, protection of hepatocytes and inhibition of hepatic sinusoidal capillarization. This article also reviews the coordinated effects of the constituent herbs of FZHY and the actions of their active compounds such as salvianonic acid B (SA-B) on liver fibrosis. PMID:19558726

  14. State Governance Action Report, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the State Governance Action Report for 2007. Compiled in this report are state policy developments, including legislation, commissions, and studies, affecting the structure, responsibilities, and operations of public higher education governing boards and institutionally related foundations. Governance and governance-related…

  15. Ecology and Energy Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these elementary school-level instructional materials are for use as an introduction to existing units of study, supplements to a textbook, or a source of special projects for environmental education. Contents include these six units: Make Your Own Ecology Mini-spinner, Let's Look at a Food Chain, Drip the…

  16. Learning to Regulate Joint Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vila, Ignasi; Zanon, Javier

    Reported are implications of the genesis and development of joint action between Spanish adults and their infants for early first language acquisition. Focusing on the naturally occurring context of the "give and take" game format, this investigation discloses the role of the interaction pattern in the language acquisition process, including the…

  17. Outdoor Recreation Action. Report 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This report from the Department of Interior presents information concerning individual state actions and projects related to the broad topic of outdoor recreation. Included are data on the following topics: rights-of-way for recreation; federal financing of outdoor recreation; state and local financing of outdoor recreation; federal acquisition…

  18. Remote-Action Tube Crimper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, R. L.; Harrison, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Long-handled tube crimper stops leaks or reduces fluid flow in hard to reach and hazardous areas. Tool includes steel plunger, contained within pipe, and long cam-action handles that open and close crimping jaw. Movable jaw is wedge shaped and stationary jaw cylindrical.

  19. Benzophenanthridine alkaloid, piperonyl butoxide and (S)-methoprene action at the cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1-receptor) pathway of mouse brain: Interference with [(3)H]CP55940 and [(3)H]SR141716A binding and modification of WIN55212-2-dependent inhibition of synaptosomal l-glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Dhopeshwarkar, Amey Sadashiv; Nicholson, Russell Alfred

    2014-01-15

    Benzophenanthridine alkaloids (chelerythrine and sanguinarine) inhibited binding of [(3)H]SR141716A to mouse brain membranes (IC50s: <1µM). Piperonyl butoxide and (S)-methoprene were less potent (IC50s: 21 and 63µM respectively). Benzophenanthridines and piperonyl butoxide were more selective towards brain CB1 receptors versus spleen CB2 receptors. All compounds reduced Bmax of [(3)H]SR141716A binding to CB1 receptors, but only methoprene and piperonyl butoxide increased Kd (3-5-fold). Benzophenanthridines increased the Kd of [(3)H]CP55940 binding (6-fold), but did not alter Bmax. (S)-methoprene increased the Kd of [(3)H]CP55940 binding (by almost 4-fold) and reduced Bmax by 60%. Piperonyl butoxide lowered the Bmax of [(3)H]CP55940 binding by 50%, but did not influence Kd. All compounds reduced [(3)H]SR141716A and [(3)H]CP55940 association with CB1 receptors. Combined with a saturating concentration of SR141716A, only piperonyl butoxide and (S)-methoprene increased dissociation of [(3)H]SR141716A above that of SR141716A alone. Only piperonyl butoxide increased dissociation of [(3)H]CP55940 to a level greater than CP55940 alone. Binding results indicate predominantly allosteric components to the study compounds action. 4-Aminopyridine-(4-AP-) evoked release of l-glutamate from synaptosomes was partially inhibited by WIN55212-2, an effect completely neutralized by AM251, (S)-methoprene and piperonyl butoxide. With WIN55212-2 present, benzophenanthridines enhanced 4-AP-evoked l-glutamate release above 4-AP alone. Modulatory patterns of l-glutamate release (with WIN-55212-2 present) align with previous antagonist/inverse agonist profiling based on [(35)S]GTPγS binding. Although these compounds exhibit lower potencies compared to many classical CB1 receptor inhibitors, they may have potential to modify CB1-receptor-dependent behavioral/physiological outcomes in the whole animal.

  20. 48 CFR 501.404-70 - Contract action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Contract action. Contract action. A contract action, for the purpose of determining whether an individual... to Federal Procurement Data System—Next Generation (FPDS-NG). A contract action includes, but is not limited to, any of the following: (a) Initial letter contract. (b) Definitive contract superseding...

  1. 48 CFR 501.404-70 - Contract action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Contract action. Contract action. A contract action, for the purpose of determining whether an individual... to Federal Procurement Data System—Next Generation (FPDS-NG). A contract action includes, but is not limited to, any of the following: (a) Initial letter contract. (b) Definitive contract superseding...

  2. 48 CFR 501.404-70 - Contract action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Contract action. Contract action. A contract action, for the purpose of determining whether an individual... to Federal Procurement Data System—Next Generation (FPDS-NG). A contract action includes, but is not limited to, any of the following: (a) Initial letter contract. (b) Definitive contract superseding...

  3. 48 CFR 501.404-70 - Contract action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Contract action. Contract action. A contract action, for the purpose of determining whether an individual... to Federal Procurement Data System—Next Generation (FPDS-NG). A contract action includes, but is not limited to, any of the following: (a) Initial letter contract. (b) Definitive contract superseding...

  4. 48 CFR 501.404-70 - Contract action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Contract action. Contract action. A contract action, for the purpose of determining whether an individual... to Federal Procurement Data System—Next Generation (FPDS-NG). A contract action includes, but is not limited to, any of the following: (a) Initial letter contract. (b) Definitive contract superseding...

  5. Action Research: An Approach for the Teachers in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasmeen, G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Action Research is a formative study of progress commonly practiced by teachers in schools. Basically an action research is a spiral process that includes problem investigation, taking action & fact-finding about the result of action. It enables a teacher to adopt/craft most appropriate strategy within its own teaching…

  6. Action Research: An Approach for the Teachers in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasmeen, Ghazala

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Action Research is a formative study of progress commonly practiced by teachers in schools. Basically an action research is a spiral process that includes problem investigation, taking action & fact-finding about the result of action. It enables a teacher to adopt/craft most appropriate strategy within its own teaching environment.…

  7. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  8. Aspirin, cyclooxygenase inhibition and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sostres, Carlos; Gargallo, Carla Jerusalen; Lanas, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide. Screening measures are far from adequate and not widely available in resource-poor settings. Primary prevention strategies therefore remain necessary to reduce the risk of developing CRC. Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies, randomized clinical trials and basic science supports the effectiveness of aspirin, as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for chemoprevention of several types of cancer, including CRC. This includes the prevention of adenoma recurrence and reduction of CRC incidence and mortality. The detectable benefit of daily low-dose aspirin (at least 75 mg), as used to prevent cardiovascular disease events, strongly suggests that its antiplatelet action is central to explaining its antitumor efficacy. Daily low-dose aspirin achieves complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in platelets (in pre-systemic circulation) while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (about 20 minutes); nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize acetylated COX isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin have been suggested to explain its chemopreventive effects but this concept remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses. PMID:24605250

  9. Aspirin, cyclooxygenase inhibition and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sostres, Carlos; Gargallo, Carla Jerusalen; Lanas, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide. Screening measures are far from adequate and not widely available in resource-poor settings. Primary prevention strategies therefore remain necessary to reduce the risk of developing CRC. Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies, randomized clinical trials and basic science supports the effectiveness of aspirin, as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for chemoprevention of several types of cancer, including CRC. This includes the prevention of adenoma recurrence and reduction of CRC incidence and mortality. The detectable benefit of daily low-dose aspirin (at least 75 mg), as used to prevent cardiovascular disease events, strongly suggests that its antiplatelet action is central to explaining its antitumor efficacy. Daily low-dose aspirin achieves complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in platelets (in pre-systemic circulation) while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (about 20 minutes); nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize acetylated COX isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin have been suggested to explain its chemopreventive effects but this concept remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses.

  10. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  11. Action potential in charophytes.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary Jane

    2007-01-01

    The plant action potential (AP) has been studied for more than half a century. The experimental system was provided mainly by the large charophyte cells, which allowed insertion of early large electrodes, manipulation of cell compartments, and inside and outside media. These early experiments were inspired by the Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) work on the squid axon and its voltage clamp techniques. Later, the patch clamping technique provided information about the ion transporters underlying the excitation transient. The initial models were also influenced by the HH picture of the animal AP. At the turn of the century, the paradigm of the charophyte AP shifted to include several chemical reactions, second messenger-activated channel, and calcium ion liberation from internal stores. Many aspects of this new model await further clarification. The role of the AP in plant movements, wound signaling, and turgor regulation is now well documented. Involvement in invasion by pathogens, chilling injury, light, and gravity sensing are under investigation.

  12. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  13. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  14. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  15. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  16. Progesterone directly and rapidly inhibits GnRH neuronal activity via progesterone receptor membrane component 1.

    PubMed

    Bashour, Nicholas Michael; Wray, Susan

    2012-09-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, being an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Progesterone (P4), a steroid hormone, modulates reproductive behavior and is associated with rapid changes in GnRH secretion. However, a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons has not been previously described. Receptors in the progestin/adipoQ receptor family (PAQR), as well as progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PgRMC1) and its partner serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1), have been shown to mediate rapid progestin actions in various tissues, including the brain. This study shows that PgRMC1 and SERBP1, but not PAQR, are expressed in prenatal GnRH neurons. Expression of PgRMC1 and SERBP1 was verified in adult mouse GnRH neurons. To investigate the effect of P4 on GnRH neuronal activity, calcium imaging was used on primary GnRH neurons maintained in explants. Application of P4 significantly decreased the activity of GnRH neurons, independent of secretion of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic input, suggesting a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons. Inhibition was not blocked by RU486, an antagonist of the classic nuclear P4 receptor. Inhibition was also maintained after uncoupling of the inhibitory regulative G protein (G(i/o)), the signal transduction pathway used by PAQR. However, AG-205, a PgRMC1 ligand and inhibitor, blocked the rapid P4-mediated inhibition, and inhibition of protein kinase G, thought to be activated downstream of PgRMC1, also blocked the inhibitory activity of P4. These data show for the first time that P4 can act directly on GnRH neurons through PgRMC1 to inhibit neuronal activity.

  17. Progesterone action in breast, uterine, and ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Caroline H.; Daniel, Andrea R.; Mauro, Laura J.; Knutson, Todd P.; Lange, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Progesterone and progesterone receptors (PR) are essential for the development and cyclical regulation of hormone-responsive tissues including the breast and reproductive tract. Altered functions of PR isoforms contribute to the pathogenesis of tumors that arise in these tissues. In the breast, progesterone acts in concert with estrogen to promote proliferative and pro-survival gene programs. In sharp contrast, progesterone inhibits estrogen-driven growth in the uterus and protects the ovary from neoplastic transformation. Progesterone-dependent actions and associated biology in diverse tissues and tumors are mediated by two progesterone receptor isoforms, PR-A and PR-B. These isoforms are subject to altered transcriptional activity or expression levels, differential cross-talk with growth factor signaling pathways, and distinct post-translational modifications and cofactor binding partners. Herein, we summarize and discuss the recent literature focused on progesterone and PR isoform-specific actions in breast, uterine, and ovarian cancers. Understanding the complexity of context-dependent PR actions in these tissues is critical to developing new models that will allow us to advance our knowledge base with the goal of revealing novel and efficacious therapeutic regimens for these hormone-responsive diseases. PMID:25587053

  18. Propoxur: a novel mechanism for insecticidal action and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2012-01-01

    Propoxur is a carbamate insecticide that has recently attracted considerable attention as a possible treatment option for addressing the bedbug epidemic. The generally accepted mechanism of toxicity for propoxur involves the inhibition of ChE, as is the case for many agents in the category. Considerable research supports the concept that most physiologically active substances induce their effects through multi-faceted action. In this review, we provide evidence that ET--ROS--OS participate mechanistically in both the action and in human toxicity of pesticides, including propoxur. Propoxur is a catechol derivative that contains carbamate and isopropyl groups on the oxygens in its moiety. Metabolic studies with propoxur reveal hydrolysis of the carbamate and dealkylation of the isopropyl group to yield the parent catechol. In addition, nuclear hydroxylation produces a hydroquinone derivative. Both the catechol and this hydroquinone derivative are potentially able to undergo redox cycling with the corresponding quinone to produce ROS. It is primarily for these reasons that we believe propoxur may be similar to other classes of physiologically active compounds in producing effects through ET-ROS-OS. Generally, reactive ROS are generated by metabolic processes that yield ET entities, and this occurs with propoxur as well. Although ROS are commonly associated with toxicity, there is little recognition in the literature that they can also play a role in therapeutic action.

  19. Fraser River action plan: Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report reviews the Fraser River Action Plan, intended to foster a co-operative approach to restoring the environmental health of the Fraser watershed. Topics covered include the Plan`s ecosystem approach; the development of a new model of governance, with the goal of creating a body that would take responsibility for the well-being of the watershed; challenges and accomplishments of Plan programs; and future actions now that the Plan has ended. Completed and future programs are briefly reviewed in such areas as aquatic science, pollution, habitat, agriculture and the environment, and effects of forest practices.

  20. Family Living, Including Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlano, George

    This volume describes and evaluates 21 selected New York City Board of Education Umbrella Programs for the 1974-1975 school year. The programs include: (1) the parent resource center, (2) the teacher self-help program, (3) the East Harlem pre-kindergarten center, (4) the Brooklyn College volunteer tutoring program, (5) the parent education for…

  1. Botanical modulation of menopausal symptoms: mechanisms of action?

    PubMed

    Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dietz, Birgit M; Bolton, Judy L

    2013-05-01

    Menopausal women suffer from a variety of symptoms, including hot flashes and night sweats, which can affect quality of life. Although it has been the treatment of choice for relieving these symptoms, hormone therapy has been associated with increased breast cancer risk leading many women to search for natural, efficacious, and safe alternatives such as botanical supplements. Data from clinical trials suggesting that botanicals have efficacy for menopausal symptom relief have been controversial, and several mechanisms of action have been proposed including estrogenic, progestogenic, and serotonergic pathways. Plant extracts with potential estrogenic activities include soy, red clover, kudzu, hops, licorice, rhubarb, yam, and chasteberry. Botanicals with reported progestogenic activities are red clover, hops, yam, and chasteberry. Serotonergic mechanisms have also been proposed since women taking antidepressants often report a reduction in hot flashes and night sweats. Black cohosh, kudzu, kava, licorice, and dong quai all either have reported 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 7 ligands or inhibit serotonin reuptake, therefore have potential serotonergic activities. Understanding the mechanisms of action of these natural remedies used for women's health could lead to more efficacious formulations and to the isolation of active components which have the potential of becoming effective medications in the future. PMID:23408273

  2. Investigations of the Mode of Action and Resistance Development of Cadazolid, a New Antibiotic for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, Patrick; Bruyère, Thierry; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Knezevic, Andreja; Keck, Wolfgang; Ritz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic currently in clinical development for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Here, we report investigations on the mode of action and the propensity for spontaneous resistance development in C. difficile strains. Macromolecular labeling experiments indicated that cadazolid acts as a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis, while inhibition of DNA synthesis was also observed, albeit only at substantially higher concentrations of the drug. Strong inhibition of protein synthesis was also obtained in strains resistant to linezolid, in agreement with low MICs against such strains. Inhibition of protein synthesis was confirmed in coupled transcription/translation assays using extracts from different C. difficile strains, including strains resistant to linezolid, while inhibitory effects in DNA topoisomerase assays were weak or not detectable under the assay conditions. Spontaneous resistance frequencies of cadazolid were low in all strains tested (generally <10−10 at 2× to 4× the MIC), and in multiple-passage experiments (up to 13 passages) MICs did not significantly increase. Furthermore, no cross-resistance was observed, as cadazolid retained potent activity against strains resistant or nonsusceptible to linezolid, fluoroquinolones, and the new antibiotic fidaxomicin. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that cadazolid acts primarily by inhibition of protein synthesis, with weak inhibition of DNA synthesis as a potential second mode of action, and suggest a low potential for spontaneous resistance development. PMID:24277035

  3. Investigations of the mode of action and resistance development of cadazolid, a new antibiotic for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Locher, Hans H; Caspers, Patrick; Bruyère, Thierry; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Knezevic, Andreja; Keck, Wolfgang; Ritz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic currently in clinical development for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Here, we report investigations on the mode of action and the propensity for spontaneous resistance development in C. difficile strains. Macromolecular labeling experiments indicated that cadazolid acts as a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis, while inhibition of DNA synthesis was also observed, albeit only at substantially higher concentrations of the drug. Strong inhibition of protein synthesis was also obtained in strains resistant to linezolid, in agreement with low MICs against such strains. Inhibition of protein synthesis was confirmed in coupled transcription/translation assays using extracts from different C. difficile strains, including strains resistant to linezolid, while inhibitory effects in DNA topoisomerase assays were weak or not detectable under the assay conditions. Spontaneous resistance frequencies of cadazolid were low in all strains tested (generally <10(-10) at 2× to 4× the MIC), and in multiple-passage experiments (up to 13 passages) MICs did not significantly increase. Furthermore, no cross-resistance was observed, as cadazolid retained potent activity against strains resistant or nonsusceptible to linezolid, fluoroquinolones, and the new antibiotic fidaxomicin. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that cadazolid acts primarily by inhibition of protein synthesis, with weak inhibition of DNA synthesis as a potential second mode of action, and suggest a low potential for spontaneous resistance development.

  4. Understanding affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Faye J; Iyer, Aarti; Sincharoen, Sirinda

    2006-01-01

    Affirmative action is a controversial and often poorly understood policy. It is also a policy that has been widely studied by social scientists. In this review, we outline how affirmative action operates in employment and education settings and consider the major points of controversy. In addition, we detail the contributions of psychologists and other social scientists in helping to demonstrate why affirmative action is needed; how it can have unintended negative consequences; and how affirmative action programs can be most successful. We also review how psychologists have examined variations in people's attitudes toward affirmative action, in part as a means for testing different theories of social behavior. PMID:16318608

  5. Mini-review: Inhibition of biofouling by marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Dobretsov, Sergey; Abed, Raeid M M; Teplitski, Max

    2013-01-01

    Any natural or artificial substratum exposed to seawater is quickly fouled by marine microorganisms and later by macrofouling species. Microfouling organisms on the surface of a substratum form heterogenic biofilms, which are composed of multiple species of heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, protozoa and fungi. Biofilms on artificial structures create serious problems for industries worldwide, with effects including an increase in drag force and metal corrosion as well as a reduction in heat transfer efficiency. Additionally, microorganisms produce chemical compounds that may induce or inhibit settlement and growth of other fouling organisms. Since the last review by the first author on inhibition of biofouling by marine microbes in 2006, significant progress has been made in the field. Several antimicrobial, antialgal and antilarval compounds have been isolated from heterotrophic marine bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi. Some of these compounds have multiple bioactivities. Microorganisms are able to disrupt biofilms by inhibition of bacterial signalling and production of enzymes that degrade bacterial signals and polymers. Epibiotic microorganisms associated with marine algae and invertebrates have a high antifouling (AF) potential, which can be used to solve biofouling problems in industry. However, more information about the production of AF compounds by marine microorganisms in situ and their mechanisms of action needs to be obtained. This review focuses on the AF activity of marine heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi and covers publications from 2006 up to the end of 2012.

  6. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Toru; Higa, Shinji; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio . E-mail: ttanak@imed3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    Flavonoids including luteolin, apigenin, and fisetin are inhibitors of IL-4 synthesis and CD40 ligand expression by basophils. This study was done to search for compounds with greater inhibitory activity of IL-4 expression and to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which flavonoids inhibit their expression. Of the 37 flavonoids and related compounds examined, ayanin, luteolin, and apigenin were the strongest inhibitors of IL-4 production by purified basophils in response to anti-IgE antibody plus IL-3. Luteolin did not suppress Syk or Lyn phosphorylation in basophils, nor did suppress p54/46 SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK, and p44/42 MAPK activation by a basophilic cell line, KU812 cells, stimulated with A23187 and PMA. However, luteolin did inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1 in nuclear lysates from stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide a fundamental structure of flavonoids for IL-4 inhibition and demonstrate a novel action of flavonoids that suppresses the activation of AP-1.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy ameliorates diabetic nephropathy via the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors including exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Nagaishi, Kanna; Mizue, Yuka; Chikenji, Takako; Otani, Miho; Nakano, Masako; Konari, Naoto; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have contributed to the improvement of diabetic nephropathy (DN); however, the actual mediator of this effect and its role has not been characterized thoroughly. We investigated the effects of MSC therapy on DN, focusing on the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors, including exosomes secreted by MSCs. MSCs and MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) as renal trophic factors were administered in parallel to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetic mice and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced insulin-deficient diabetic mice. Both therapies showed approximately equivalent curative effects, as each inhibited the exacerbation of albuminuria. They also suppressed the excessive infiltration of BMDCs into the kidney by regulating the expression of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1. Proinflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., TNF-α) and fibrosis in tubular interstitium were inhibited. TGF-β1 expression was down-regulated and tight junction protein expression (e.g., ZO-1) was maintained, which sequentially suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tubular epithelial cells (TECs). Exosomes purified from MSC-CM exerted an anti-apoptotic effect and protected tight junction structure in TECs. The increase of glomerular mesangium substrate was inhibited in HFD-diabetic mice. MSC therapy is a promising tool to prevent DN via the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors including exosomes due to its multifactorial action. PMID:27721418

  8. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  9. Mechanisms of Action of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Mutwiri, George

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants are used in many vaccines, but their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Studies from the past decade on adjuvant mechanisms are slowly revealing the secrets of adjuvant activity. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of adjuvants. Adjuvants may act by a combination of various mechanisms including formation of depot, induction of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of immune cells, enhancement of antigen uptake and presentation, and promoting antigen transport to draining lymph nodes. It appears that adjuvants activate innate immune responses to create a local immuno-competent environment at the injection site. Depending on the type of innate responses activated, adjuvants can alter the quality and quantity of adaptive immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of action of adjuvants will provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity, help in rational design of vaccines against various diseases, and can inform on adjuvant safety. PMID:23720661

  10. Antifertility effect and some pharmacological actions of Butea frondosa seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Razdan, M K; Kapila, K; Bhide, N K

    1969-10-01

    The antifertility effects and pharmacological actions of Betea fronosa seed extracts are reported. An alcoholic extract, chloroform extract, and an aqueous extract were tested. Drugs were administered in 6 female mice 5 days after mating. Laparotomy was performed on the 10th day of pregnancy to observe the implants and delivery by Cesarean section was made at 20 days. Female rats were similarly treated. Female rats were studied as well for estreus cycle and mating behavior under the influence of the drug. Antiestrogenic activity was tested in mature mice and androgenic activity was tested in immature male mice at 6 different extract doses. Decidual cell reaction was tested in rats with pseudopregnancy given different doses of the extract daily. Abortifacient and teratogenic actions were studied. Pharmacological studies included antiinflammatory studies, isolated tissues, blood pressure and respiration, diuretic action, and acute toxicity. Results indicate only the alcohol extract to be active. It has a distinct antifertility effect in rats but without a clearcut dose-response relationship. There was an incomplete suppression of fertility at 100 mg/kg. Estreus cycle was uneffected by the extracts although there was delayed mating in half the animals and a significant reduction in offspring. There was some inhibition of ovulation produced by the extract. Differences between controls and treated groups were insignificant regarding antiestrogenic activity and androgenic activity. There was a partial blocking of the decidual cell reaction. Complete resorption of implants was seen in 4 out of 5 mice when the extract was given at 1 gm/kg. The only other pharmacological action noted was inhibition of the action of acetylcholine and histamine on the guinea pig ileum. Pharamcodynamic and toxic effects are probably unrelated to the antifertility action of the extract.

  11. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul J; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Lin, Hung-Yun; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  12. Arsenic speciation driving risk based corrective action.

    PubMed

    Marlborough, Sidney J; Wilson, Vincent L

    2015-07-01

    The toxicity of arsenic depends on a number of factors including its valence state. The more potent trivalent arsenic [arsenite (As3+)] inhibits a large number of cellular enzymatic pathways involved in energy production, while the less toxic pentavalent arsenic [arsenate (As5+)] interferes with phosphate metabolism, phosphoproteins and ATP formation (uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation). Environmental risk based corrective action for arsenic contamination utilizes data derived from arsenite studies of toxicity to be conservative. However, depending upon environmental conditions, the arsenate species may predominate substantially, especially in well aerated surface soils. Analyses of soil concentrations of arsenic species at two sites in northeastern Texas historically contaminated with arsenical pesticides yielded mean arsenate concentrations above 90% of total arsenic with the majority of the remainder being the trivalent arsenite species. Ecological risk assessments based on the concentration of the trivalent arsenite species will lead to restrictive remediation requirements that do not adequately reflect the level of risk associated with the predominate species of arsenic found in the soil. The greater concentration of the pentavalent arsenate species in soils would be the more appropriate species to monitor remediation at sites that contain high arsenate to arsenite ratios.

  13. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  14. Inhibition of angiogenesis by selective estrogen receptor modulators through blockade of cholesterol trafficking rather than estrogen receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong Sup; Li, Ruo-Jing; Lv, Junfang; Head, Sarah A; Yang, Eun Ju; Liu, Jun O

    2015-06-28

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) including tamoxifen are known to inhibit angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism, which is independent of their action on the estrogen receptor (ER), has remained largely unknown. In the present study, we found that tamoxifen and other SERM inhibited cholesterol trafficking in endothelial cells, causing a hyper-accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes. Inhibition of cholesterol trafficking by tamoxifen was accompanied by abnormal subcellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and inhibition of the terminal glycosylation of the receptor. Tamoxifen also caused perinuclear positioning of lysosomes, which in turn trapped the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the perinuclear region of endothelial cells. Abnormal distribution of VEGFR2 and mTOR and inhibition of VEGFR2 and mTOR activities by tamoxifen were significantly reversed by addition of cholesterol-cyclodextrin complex to the culture media of endothelial cells. Moreover, high concentrations of tamoxifen inhibited endothelial and breast cancer cell proliferation in a cholesterol-dependent, but ER-independent, manner. Together, these results unraveled a previously unrecognized mechanism of angiogenesis inhibition by tamoxifen and other SERM, implicating cholesterol trafficking as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  15. Outdoor Recreation Action. Report No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Actions taken in the area of outdoor recreation on Federal, State, local, and private levels are reported in the document. Financing actions are listed according to states, government agencies, and names of private financers. The organization and administration section includes new agencies, personnel, reorganizations, and significant resolutions…

  16. Gathering Strength: Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed to renew the relationship between the Canadian government and the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, this action plan contains a statement of reconciliation, a statement of renewal, and four key objectives for action. First, renewing partnerships includes community-based healing to address the negative effects of the residential schools…

  17. 16 CFR 1209.37 - Corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... taken. Corrective action includes changes to the manufacturing process as well as reworking the insulation product itself. Corrective action may consist of equipment adjustment, equipment repair, equipment replacement, change in chemical formulation, change in chemical quantity, change in cellulosic stock, or...

  18. Behavioral inhibition and childhood stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dahye; Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra A.; Lambert, Warren E.; Tumanova, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the relation of behavioral inhibition to stuttering and speech/language output in preschool-age children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS). Method Participants were preschool-age (ages 36 to 68 months), including 26 CWS (22 males) and 28 CWNS (13 males). Participants’ behavioral inhibition (BI) was assessed by measuring the latency to their sixth spontaneous comment during conversation with an unfamiliar experimenter, using methodology developed by Kagan, Reznick, and Gibbons (1989). In addition to these measures of BI, each participant’s stuttered and non-stuttered disfluencies and mean length of utterance (in morphemes) were assessed. Results Among the more salient findings, it was found that (1) there was no significant difference in BI between preschool-age CWS and CWNS as a group, (2) when extremely high versus low inhibited children were selected, there were more CWS with higher BI and fewer CWS with lower BI when compared to their CWNS peers, and (3) more behaviorally inhibited CWS, when compared to less behaviorally inhibited CWS, exhibited more stuttering. Conclusions Findings are taken to suggest that one aspect of temperament (i.e., behavioral inhibition) is exhibited by some preschool-age CWS and that these children stutter more than CWS with lower behavioral inhibition. The present results seem to support continued study of the association between young children’s temperamental characteristics and stuttering, the diagnostic entity (i.e., CWS versus CWNS), as well as stuttering, the behavior (e.g., frequency of stuttered disfluencies). PMID:23773669

  19. Inositol pyrophosphates inhibit synaptotagmin-dependent exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Sun; Lee, Joo-Young; Kyung, Jae Won; Yang, Yoosoo; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Seulgi; Pavlovic, Igor; Kong, Byoungjae; Jho, Yong Seok; Jessen, Henning J; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Kim, Sung Hyun; Yoon, Tae-Young; Kim, Seyun

    2016-07-19

    Inositol pyrophosphates such as 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-IP7) are highly energetic inositol metabolites containing phosphoanhydride bonds. Although inositol pyrophosphates are known to regulate various biological events, including growth, survival, and metabolism, the molecular sites of 5-IP7 action in vesicle trafficking have remained largely elusive. We report here that elevated 5-IP7 levels, caused by overexpression of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) kinase 1 (IP6K1), suppressed depolarization-induced neurotransmitter release from PC12 cells. Conversely, IP6K1 depletion decreased intracellular 5-IP7 concentrations, leading to increased neurotransmitter release. Consistently, knockdown of IP6K1 in cultured hippocampal neurons augmented action potential-driven synaptic vesicle exocytosis at synapses. Using a FRET-based in vitro vesicle fusion assay, we found that 5-IP7, but not 1-IP7, exhibited significantly higher inhibitory activity toward synaptic vesicle exocytosis than IP6 Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1), a Ca(2+) sensor essential for synaptic membrane fusion, was identified as a molecular target of 5-IP7 Notably, 5-IP7 showed a 45-fold higher binding affinity for Syt1 compared with IP6 In addition, 5-IP7-dependent inhibition of synaptic vesicle fusion was abolished by increasing Ca(2+) levels. Thus, 5-IP7 appears to act through Syt1 binding to interfere with the fusogenic activity of Ca(2+) These findings reveal a role of 5-IP7 as a potent inhibitor of Syt1 in controlling the synaptic exocytotic pathway and expand our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of inositol pyrophosphates. PMID:27364007

  20. Factors Impacting the Child with Behavioral Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornbuckle, Suzanne R.

    2010-01-01

    Various factors influence the developmental course of the behaviorally inhibited child. These factors include reciprocating, contextual factors, such as the child's own traits, the environment, the maternal characteristics, and the environment. Behaviorally inhibited children show physiological and behavioral signs of fear and anxiety when…

  1. Inhibition of human neutrophil activation by the allergic mediator release inhibitor, CI-922: differential inhibition of responses to a variety of stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wright, C D; Hoffman, M D; Thueson, D O; Conroy, M C

    1987-07-01

    The allergic mediator release inhibitor 3,7-dimethoxy-4-phenyl-N-1H-tetrazol-5-yl-4H-furo[3,2-b]indole-2- carboxamide, L-arginate (CI-922) is a potent inhibitor of human neutrophil functions in vitro. Over a concentration range from 1 to 100 mumol CI-922 inhibits the chemotactic response of neutrophils to the synthetic chemotaxin N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). CI-922 also inhibits respiratory and secretory responses of neutrophils in response to agents that stimulate phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis to generate the second messengers inositol 1,4,5, trisphosphate and 1,2 diacylglycerol, including: the plasma membrane receptor-specific ligands FMLP and C5a; serum-opsonized zymosan; concanavalin A; and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein-specific stimulus guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S). CI-922 also inhibits neutrophil functions stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast, CI-922 does not inhibit neutrophil responses to protein kinase C-specific stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or L-alpha-1,2 dioctanoylglycerol (DiC8). CI-922 also fails to inhibit the synergistic activation of the respiratory burst by suboptimal concentrations of PMA and calcium ionophore A23187. The observation that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil responses to a variety of soluble and particulate stimuli, excluding protein kinase C-specific stimuli, allows us to postulate the site of action of the compound. We propose that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil activation at a site distal to signal transduction through the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein required for second messenger generation but proximal to phosphorylation reactions mediated by protein kinase C and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases.

  2. Copper, aluminum, iron and calcium inhibit human acetylcholinesterase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important part of cholinergic nerves where it participates in termination of neurotransmission. AChE can be inhibited by e.g. some Alzheimer disease drugs, nerve agents, and secondary metabolites. In this work, metal salts aluminum chloride, calcium chloride, cupric chloride, ferric chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride and sodium chloride were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE. Standard Ellman assay based on human recombinant AChE was done and inhibition was measured using Dixon plot. No inhibition was proved for sodium, potassium and magnesium ions. However, aluminum, cupric, ferric and calcium ions were able to inhibit AChE via noncompetitive mechanism of inhibition. Though the inhibition is much weaker when compared to e.g. drugs with noncompetitive mechanism of action, biological relevance of the findings can be anticipated. PMID:24473150

  3. Antibiotic action of beta-ursolic acid.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Z; Kortus, M; Kedzia, W; Koniar, H

    1976-01-01

    The antimicrobial action of beta-ursolic acid (triterpenoid sapogenin from the ursan group) has been studied. At the concentration of 300 mug/ml, this substance inhibited growth of all strains of staphylococci investigated. MIC for Gram-positive bacteria ranged between 50 and 500 mug/ml, and 100 to 800 mug/ml for Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. Acquired resistance to beta-ursolic acid was transient.

  4. Effect of mixed micelle formulations including terpenes on the transdermal delivery of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Hendradi, Esti; Obata, Yasuko; Isowa, Koichi; Nagai, Tsuneji; Takayama, Kozo

    2003-12-01

    The significant inhibitory action of diclofenac formulated in mixed micelles of lecithin with cholate or deoxycholate was observed on the rat hind paw edema induced by carrageenan. In the primary stage, mixed micelle formulation of deoxycholate was more effective compared with that of cholate. However, in the final term, the inhibitory action was similar in both formulations. In a previous study, the flux of diclofenac was greater in the mixed micelle formulation of deoxycholate compared with that of cholate. It was suggested that the permeation rate of diclofenac through skin was proportional to the pharmacological activity. The hind paw edema was quickly inhibited when cyclic monoterpene such as d-limonene or l-menthol was included in the formulations. All the micelle formulations significantly decreased the value of AUC estimated the hind paw thickness-time profile. This suggests that the micelle formulation of cholate in addition to deoxycholate showed significant anti-inflammatory activity to hind paw edema of rats. Incorporation of d-limonene or l-menthol was more effective on the decrease of AUC. A pharmacological study revealed that micelle formulations were able to reduce the skin irritation of chemicals.

  5. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system for lowering coronary artery disease risk.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Richard J; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system when activated exerts proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions and thereby contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, including that occurring in the coronary arteries. It thus contributes as well to coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have examined effects of renin-angiotensin system inhibition for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. These include important trials such as HOPE, EUROPA and PEACE using angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, VALIANT, OPTIMAAL and TRANSCEND using angiotensin receptor blockers, and the ongoing TOPCAT study in patients with preserved ejection fraction heart failure, many of who also have coronary artery disease. Data are unavailable as yet of effects of either direct renin inhibitors or the new angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor agents. Today, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is standard-of-care therapy for lowering cardiovascular risk in secondary prevention in high cardiovascular risk subjects. PMID:23523606

  6. The neural substrates of action identification

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Megan N.; Wegner, Daniel M.; Reid, Marguerite E.; Yu, Henry H.; Blair, R. J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Mentalization is the process by which an observer views a target as possessing higher cognitive faculties such as goals, intentions and desires. Mentalization can be assessed using action identification paradigms, in which observers choose mentalistic (goals-focused) or mechanistic (action-focused) descriptions of targets’ actions. Neural structures that play key roles in inferring goals and intentions from others’ observed or imagined actions include temporo-parietal junction, ventral premotor cortex and extrastriate body area. We hypothesized that these regions play a role in action identification as well. Data collected using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed our predictions that activity in ventral premotor cortex and middle temporal gyrus near the extrastriate body area varies both as a function of the valence of the target and the extent to which actions are identified as goal-directed. In addition, the inferior parietal lobule is preferentially engaged when participants identify the actions of mentalized targets. Functional connectivity analyses suggest support from other regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala, during mentalization. We found correlations between action identification and Autism Quotient scores, suggesting that understanding the neural correlates of action identification may enhance our understanding of the underpinnings of essential social cognitive processes. PMID:20150343

  7. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  8. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde), tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8+ T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Methods Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Results Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Conclusion Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of

  9. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Pauwels, K; Rizzolatti, G; Orban, G A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors "stimulus type" (action, static control, and dynamic control), "stereopsis" (present, absent) and "viewpoint" (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  10. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  11. The action of the benzopyrones on an experimental model of lymphoedema: a contribution to their mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Piller, N. B.

    1976-01-01

    A number of preparations containing benzopyrones are used clinically as a therapy for lymphoedema; however, their exact mode of action is not well known. This work presents evidence which indicates that, as in the treatment of thermally induced oedemas, the benzopyrones work by enhancing the lysis of the accumulated proteins. This is evidenced by reduced levels of total protein in the extracellular compartment of the skin, while peptides and amino acids were increased in the serum at 6 and 12 h respectively after the drug's administration. Failure to observe very marked increases in peptides and amino acids at other times in the serum and skin was attributed to the rapid incorporation of these into the large number of maturing phagocytes which enter the lymphoedematous tissues. Likewise, protease activity levels were not elevated as expected. This possibly was the consequence of a number of factors including serum deactivation, inhibition of release and membrane stabilization. PMID:1009001

  12. ACTION OF CYCLOHEXIMIDE ON ZYGOSACCHAROMYCES SOJA

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, Yoji; Sugimori, Tsunetake; Imai, Kazutami; Katagiri, Hideo

    1962-01-01

    Tsukada, Yoji (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan), Tsunetake Sugimori, Kazutami Imai, and Hideo Katagiri. Action of cycloheximide on Zygosaccharomyces soja. J. Bacteriol. 83:70–75. 1962.—Cycloheximide is known to inhibit the growth of some species of Saccharomyces and other fungi. A new type of action of this antibiotic, with Zygosaccharomyces soja as the test organism, is described in this paper. Growth of Z. soja was completely inhibited under aerobic conditions by cycloheximide in concentrations of more than 5 μg per ml of culture solution. Continued shaking of the culture for more than 96 hr in the presence of an inhibitory amount of cycloheximide restored growth, accompanied by the excretion of riboflavin to the extent of 30 μg per ml of culture solution. In the cells recovering from cycloheximide inhibition, the type of glucose metabolism differed from that in the mother strain; a respiratory quotient of 4 with the mother strain fell to 1 in the progeny. Glucose metabolism (O2 uptake and CO2 evolution) by resting cells was investigated, and it was concluded that inhibition of glycolysis was not significant. This was verified by comparing various dehydrogenase activities in the cell-free extract. There were essentially no differences between riboflavin-forming and nonriboflavin-forming cells. The presence of the hexose monophosphate shunt was deduced from the fact that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was the strongest of the various dehydrogenase activities. PMID:13922890

  13. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  14. Overlapping dose responses of spermatogenic and extragonadal testosterone actions jeopardize the principle of hormonal male contraception.

    PubMed

    Oduwole, Olayiwola O; Vydra, Natalia; Wood, Nicholas E M; Samanta, Luna; Owen, Laura; Keevil, Brian; Donaldson, Mandy; Naresh, Kikkeri; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone (T), alone or in combination with progestin, provides a promising approach to hormonal male contraception. Its principle relies on enhanced negative feedback of exogenous T to suppress gonadotropins, thereby blocking the testicular T production needed for spermatogenesis, while simultaneously maintaining the extragonadal androgen actions, such as potency and libido, to avoid hypogonadism. A serious drawback of the treatment is that a significant proportion of men do not reach azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, commensurate with contraceptive efficacy. We tested here, using hypogonadal luteinizing hormone/choriongonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) knockout (LHR(-/-)) mice, the basic principle of the T-based male contraceptive method, that a specific T dose could maintain extragonadal androgen actions without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. LHR(-/-) mice were treated with increasing T doses, and the responses of their spermatogenesis and extragonadal androgen actions (including gonadotropin suppression and sexual behavior) were assessed. Conspicuously, all dose responses to T were practically superimposable, and no dose of T could be defined that would maintain sexual function and suppress gonadotropins without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. This finding, never addressed in clinical contraceptive trials, is not unexpected in light of the same androgen receptor mediating androgen actions in all organs. When extrapolated to humans, our findings may jeopardize the current approach to hormonal male contraception and call for more effective means of inhibiting intratesticular T production or action, to achieve consistent spermatogenic suppression.

  15. Corticospinal disinhibition during dual action.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young H; Kang, Suk Y; Hallett, Mark

    2005-03-01

    When attempting to perform two tasks simultaneously, the human motor as well as the cognitive system shows interference. Such interference often causes altered activation of the cortical area representing each task compared to the single task condition. We investigated changes in corticospinal inhibition during dual action by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Single-pulse TMS was applied to the left motor cortex, triggered by right leg movement (tibialis anterior muscle) while the right abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle was moderately activated (10-20% of the maximal voluntary contraction). The background electromyography (EMG) activity of ADM was measured before and during the leg movement. The silent period (SP) and amplitude of motor evoked potential (MEP) following magnetic stimulation in active ADM were compared for the conditions with and without leg movement. The mean area of the rectified EMG activity of ADM did not alter, while the SP was significantly shortened during leg movement compared to that without leg movement. MEP amplitude was comparable between the two conditions. These results suggest that corticospinal inhibition tested by the SP duration is reduced during the movement of another body part, presumably in order to help maintain muscle force by compensating interference-related alteration in motor cortical activation. PMID:15502976

  16. Coextracted dissolved organic carbon has a suppressive effect on the acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Neale, Peta A; Escher, Beate I

    2013-07-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay is frequently applied to detect organophosphates and carbamate pesticides in different water types, including dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-rich wastewater and surface water. The aim of the present study was to quantify the effect of coextracted DOC from different water samples on the commonly used enzyme-based AChE inhibition assay. Approximately 40% to 70% of DOC is typically recovered by solid-phase extraction, and this comprises not only organic micropollutants but also natural organic matter. The inhibition of the water extracts in the assay differed greatly from the expected mixture effects based on chemical analysis of organophosphates and carbamates. Binary mixture experiments with the known AChE inhibitor parathion and the water extracts showed reduced toxicity in comparison with predictions using the mixture models of concentration addition and independent action. In addition, the extracts and reference organic matter had a suppressive effect on a constant concentration of parathion. The present study thus indicated that concentrations of DOC as low as 2 mg carbon/L can impair the AChE inhibition assay and, consequently, that only samples with a final DOC concentration of less than 2 mgC /L are suitable for this assay. To check for potential suppression in environmental samples, standard addition experiments using an AChE-inhibiting reference compound are recommended. PMID:23424099

  17. Symbolic Action in India: Gandhi's Nonverbal Persuasion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Allen H.

    1975-01-01

    Examines symbolic action as a method of exerting public influence nonverbally through nonviolent behavior. Discusses Gandhi's persuasive tactics including fasting, propaganda tours, silence, clothing and adoption of symbols. (MH)

  18. 40 CFR 60.2770 - What information must I include in my annual report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cause of deviations (including unknown cause, if applicable), as applicable, and the corrective action... that are due to control equipment problems, process problems, other known causes, and other...

  19. Sordarin, an antifungal agent with a unique mode of action

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Summary The sordarin family of compounds, characterized by a unique tetracyclic diterpene core including a norbornene system, inhibits protein synthesis in fungi by stabilizing the ribosome/EF2 complex. This mode of action is in contrast to typical antifungals, which target the cell membrane. This unusual bioactivity makes sordarin a promising candidate for the development of new fungicidal agents, and provided the motivation for extensive research. Three total syntheses (by the Kato, Mander and Narasaka groups), modifications of the glycosyl unit, and changes to the diterpene core (Cuevas and Ciufolini models) will also be discussed in this review. PMID:18941619

  20. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  1. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25999427

  2. Serum chemotactic inhibitory activity: heat activation of chemotactic inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Epps, D E; Williams, R C

    1976-01-01

    Serum chemotactic inhibitory activity (CIA) was studied in 46 patients with various systemic diseases, using a system consisting of normal human leukocytes as indicator cells and 10% fresh normal serum as a control chemotactic attractant. It was shown, as previously reported, that an association exists between CIA and skin test anergy. Heat treatment of sera at 56 C for 30 min increased both the incidence and the degree of chemotactic inhibition observed in these patients. The effects of heat treatment of sera containing CIA on other chemotactic attractants (C3a, bacteria-derived chemotactic factor (BF), and casein) are shown. Before heat treatment, some sera suppressed chemotaxis mediated by BF in the absence of suppression of normal serum-mediated chemotaxis, indicating the possible involvement of more than one system of inhibition. Multiple systems were further supported by data indicating that room temperature incubation resulted in a loss of CIA as measured by normal serum-mediated chemotoxis with no apparent decrease in the inhibition of BF -mediated chemotaxis. Separation of sera containing CIA by Sephadex G-200 showed chemotactic inhibitory activity to be increased in both the void volume region. Experiments showed that heat treating before separation resulted in similar increases in both peaks, implying the presence of an antagonist to CIA. Experiments demonstrating that sera containing CIA do not suppress casein-mediated chemotaxis by means of an irreversible inactivation of chemotactic factor are included along with experiments demonstrating a cellular mode of action. The possible presence of two systems of chemotactic inhibition, one acting directly upon chemotactic factors and one interacting with the responding cell, are discussed. PMID:773824

  3. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  4. Ozone Inhibits Guard Cell K+ Channels Implicated in Stomatal Opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsethaugen, Gro; Pell, Eva J.; Assmann, Sarah M.

    1999-11-01

    Ozone (O3) deleteriously affects organisms ranging from humans to crop plants, yet little is understood regarding the underlying mechanisms. In plants, O3 decreases CO2 assimilation, but whether this could result from direct O3 action on guard cells remained unknown. Potassium flux causes osmotically driven changes in guard cell volume that regulate apertures of associated microscopic pores through which CO2 is supplied to the photosynthetic mesophyll tissue. We show in Vicia faba that O3 inhibits (i) guard cell K+ channels that mediate K+ uptake that drives stomatal opening; (ii) stomatal opening in isolated epidermes; and (iii) stomatal opening in leaves, such that CO2 assimilation is reduced without direct effects of O3 on photosynthetic capacity. Direct O3 effects on guard cells may have ecological and agronomic implications for plant productivity and for response to other environmental stressors including drought.

  5. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  6. Community-Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sarah; Mattern, Mark; Telin, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes an undergraduate course entitled Public Interest Research in which students learn research methods by conducting research on behalf of one or more community organizations. Students' work is conceived of as community action learning, a combination of participatory action research and service learning, emphasizing…

  7. Preferential Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Derrick A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophical rationale for preferential affirmative action presented by Daniel C. Maguire in "A New American Justice." Maintains that self-interest bars present society's acceptance of Maguire's theories of justice, as demonstrated in negative reactions to the Harvard Law Review's affirmative action plan. (MJL)

  8. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  9. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  10. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  11. Action Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman-Peck, Lorraine; Murray, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between action research and policy and the kind of confidence teachers, policy makers and other potential users may have in such research. Many published teacher action research accounts are criticised on the grounds that they do not fully meet the conventional standards for reporting social scientific…

  12. ACTION. Annual Report 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1974. After an introduction that notes accomplishments of the past year, a review of domestic operations discusses such programs as VISTA, University Year for ACTION, National Student Volunteer Program, Foster Grandparent Program, and others according…

  13. Human seminal plasma inhibition of complement.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B H; Lammel, C J; Stites, D P; Brooks, G F

    1980-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that human seminal plasma contains chemically and biologically distinct factors which inhibit lymphocyte functions and the serum bactericidal and opsonic activities associated with the killing of gram-negative organisms. Because of the direct association between complement action and serum bactericidal and opsonic activities, inhibition of complement may be one of the possible mechanisms of action of seminal plasma immunoinhibitory factors. Complement hemolytic activity was measured for C3 and C4 in serum Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Escherichia coli bactericidal reaction mixtures with and without addition of seminal plasma. In the presence of seminal plasma, where there was no bactericidal action, C3 and titers were reduced to approximately 50% of the titers in the reactions with complement donor serum. The C3 titers were lower than in the reaction mixtures with immune serum and complement donor serum, where N. gonorrhoeae bactericidal activity occurred. Individual human seminal plasma specimens depressed CH50 activity of pooled normal human sera up to 50% of normal levels. There were no differences in inhibition by seminal plasma specimens from normal or vasectomized men. Treatment with seminal plasma depressed the functional activity of complement components C1 and C3 by more than 50%. Seminal plasma also inhibited alternate pathway activity. Cleavage of factor B was demonstrated. The seminal plasma factor which inhibited complement was of low molecular weight. DPF blocked the seminal plasma complement-inhibitory factor. However, amidolytic activity for serine protease substrates could not be demonstrated. It is likely that the seminal plasma complement inhibitor is a protease inhibitor acting singly or in combination.

  14. Conscious Vision in Action.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Robert; Schwenkler, John

    2015-09-01

    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH), according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a "zombie" processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious (Clark, 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner, 1992, 2004a; Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006, 2008). In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to "recognizing objects, selecting targets for action, and determining what kinds of action, broadly speaking, to perform" (Clark, 2007, p. 570). Our aim in this study is to show that the available evidence not only fails to support this dichotomous view but actually reveals a significant role for conscious vision in motor programming, especially for actions that require deliberate attention. PMID:25845648

  15. Delayed anti-inflammatory action of nedocromil sodium in the rat paw is dependent on de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Raud, J; Konrad, D; Dahlén, S E

    1995-08-25

    Nedocromil sodium is commonly suggested to reduce allergic inflammation by inhibiting mediator release from mast cells. However, nedocromil also exhibits a wide range of additional anti-inflammatory activities, including inhibition of increased vascular permeability induced by individual mediators such as histamine. In the present study, we have further characterized the mode of action of nedocromil in a rat model for hind paw edema. Mast cell-dependent edema was induced with compound 48/80 (edema response mainly due to 5-hydroxytryptamine release), and direct mediator-induced plasma extravasation was evoked by exogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine (both agents injected locally). Local pretreatment with nedocromil for 20 min dose-dependently inhibited the edema evoked by compound 48/80 more effectively than that induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine. However, after 2 h pretreatment, both the 5-hydroxytryptamine-and compound 48/80-induced edema responses were inhibited to approximately the same extent by a range of concentrations of nedocromil, as well as by dexamethasone. Local inhibition of RNA/protein synthesis with actinomycin-D abolished the effects of both dexamethasone and nedocromil (2 h local pretreatment). We thus conclude that nedocromil can produce an 'anti-exudative' effect that is independent of inhibition of mast cell mediator release, is slow in onset, and requires de novo protein synthesis.

  16. Tachykinin-related peptide and GABA-mediated presynaptic inhibition of crayfish photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Glantz, R M; Miller, C S; Nässel, D R

    2000-03-01

    Off-axis illumination elicits lateral inhibition at the primary visual synapse in crustacea and insects. The evidence suggests that the inhibitory action is presynaptic (i.e., on the photoreceptor terminal) and that the amacrine neurons of the lamina ganglionaris (the first synaptic layer) may be part of the inhibitory pathway. The neurotransmitters and the synaptic mechanisms are unknown. We show by immunocytochemistry that GABA and a tachykinin-related peptide (TRP) are localized in the amacrine neurons of the crayfish lamina ganglionaris. Indirect evidence suggests that GABA and TRP may be colocalized in these neurons. The extensive processes of the amacrine neurons occupy lamina layers containing the terminals of photoreceptors. Application of exogenous GABA and TRP to photoreceptor terminals produces a short-latency, dose-dependent hyperpolarization with a decay time constant on the order of a few seconds. TRP also exhibits actions that evolve over several minutes. These include a reduction of the receptor potential (and the light-elicited current) by approximately 40% and potentiation of the action of GABA by approximately 100%. The mechanisms of TRP action in crayfish are not known, but a plausible pathway is a TRP-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) that reduces photoreceptor sensitivity in arthropods. Although the mechanisms are not established, the results indicate that in crayfish photoreceptors TRP displays actions on two time scales and can exert profound modulatory control over cell function.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits calcium channel activation, exocytosis, and endocytosis at a central nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2015-03-18

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions.

  18. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  19. The modulatory action of harmane on serotonergic neurotransmission in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Abu Ghazaleh, Haya; Lalies, Maggie D; Nutt, David J; Hudson, Alan L

    2015-02-01

    The naturally occurring β-carboline, harmane, has been implicated in various physiological and psychological conditions. Some of these effects are attributed to its interaction with monoaminergic systems. Previous literature indicates that certain β-carbolines including harmane modulate central monoamine levels partly through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. However, this is not always the case and thus additional mechanisms may be involved. This study set to assess the potential modulatory role of harmane on the basal or K(+) stimulated release of preloaded radiolabelled noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in rat brain cortex in vitro in the presence of the MAO inhibitor pargyline. Harmane displayed an overt elevation in K(+) -evoked [(3)H]5-HT release; whilst little and no effect was reported with [(3)H]DA and [(3)H]NA respectively. The effect of harmane on [(3)H]5-HT efflux was partially compensated in K(+)-free medium. Further analyses demonstrated that removal of Ca(2+) ions and addition of 1.2mM EGTA did not alter the action of harmane on [(3)H]5-HT release from rat brain cortex. The precise mechanism of action however remains unclear but is unlikely to reflect an involvement of MAO inhibition. The current finding aids our understanding on the modulatory action of harmane on monoamine levels and could potentially be of therapeutic use in psychiatric conditions such as depression and anxiety. PMID:25498864

  20. Following the Action in Action Learning: Towards Ethnomethodological Studies of (Critical) Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Action learning is a pedagogical practice that helps participants learn by talking about their workplace action with fellow participants ("comrades in adversity") in their action learning set. This paper raises questions about the action in action learning, such as: how do members of an action learning set learn from and through each other? How do…

  1. Inhibition of transcription by platinum antitumor compounds

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ryan C.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin are three FDA-approved members of the platinum anticancer drug family. These compounds induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming a variety of structural adducts and triggering cellular responses, one of which is the inhibition of transcription. In this report we present (i) a detailed review of the structural investigations of various Pt-DNA adducts and the effects of these lesions on global DNA geometry; (ii) research detailing inhibition of cellular transcription by Pt-DNA adducts; and (iii) a mechanistic analysis of how DNA structural distortions induced by platinum damage may inhibit RNA synthesis in vivo. A thorough understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of platinum antitumor agents will aid in the development of new compounds in the family. PMID:20046924

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved; Quarterly progress report, October--December 1993: Volume 12, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  4. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  5. Individual preparedness and mitigation actions for a predicted earthquake in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Tekeli-Yeşil, Sıdıka; Dedeoğlu, Necati; Tanner, Marcel; Braun-Fahrlaender, Charlotte; Obrist, Birgit

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the process of taking action to mitigate damage and prepare for an earthquake at the individual level. Its specific aim was to identify the factors that promote or inhibit individuals in this process. The study was conducted in Istanbul, Turkey--where an earthquake is expected soon--in May and June 2006 using qualitative methods. Within our conceptual framework, three different patterns emerged among the study subjects. Outcome expectancy, helplessness, a low socioeconomic level, a culture of negligence, a lack of trust, onset time/poor predictability, and normalisation bias inhibit individuals in this process, while location, direct personal experience, a higher education level, and social interaction promote them. Drawing on these findings, the paper details key points for better disaster communication, including whom to mobilise to reach target populations, such as individuals with direct earthquake experience and women.

  6. Soybean-derived Bowman-Birk Inhibitor (BBI) Inhibits HIV Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tong-Cui; Zhou, Run-Hong; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Sang, Ming; Zhou, Li; Zhuang, Ke; Hou, Wei; Guo, De-Yin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), a soybean-derived protease inhibitor, is known to have anti-inflammatory effect in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Macrophages play a key role in inflammation and immune activation, which is implicated in HIV disease progression. Here, we investigated the effect of BBI on HIV infection of peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. We demonstrated that BBI could potently inhibit HIV replication in macrophages without cytotoxicity. Investigation of the mechanism(s) of BBI action on HIV showed that BBI induced the expression of IFN-β and multiple IFN stimulated genes (ISGs), including Myxovirus resistance protein 2 (Mx2), 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS-1), Virus inhibitory protein (viperin), ISG15 and ISG56. BBI treatment of macrophages also increased the expression of several known HIV restriction factors, including APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G and tetherin. Furthermore, BBI enhanced the phosphorylation of IRF3, a key regulator of IFN-β. The inhibition of IFN-β pathway by the neutralization antibody to type I IFN receptor (Anti-IFNAR) abolished BBI-mediated induction of the anti-HIV factors and inhibition of HIV in macrophages. These findings that BBI could activate IFN-β-mediated signaling pathway, initialize the intracellular innate immunity in macrophages and potently inhibit HIV at multiple steps of viral replication cycle indicate the necessity to further investigate BBI as an alternative and cost-effective anti-HIV natural product. PMID:27734899

  7. Pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric damage: Importance of cyclooxygenase inhibition and gastric hypermotility

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenic mechanism of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage, focusing on the relation between cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and various functional events. NSAIDs, such as indomethacin, at a dose that inhibits prostaglandin (PG) production, enhance gastric motility, resulting in an increase in mucosal permeability, neutrophil infiltration and oxyradical production, and eventually producing gastric lesions. These lesions are prevented by pretreatment with PGE2 and antisecretory drugs, and also via an atropine-sensitive mechanism, not related to antisecretory action. Although neither rofecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) nor SC-560 (a selective COX-1 inhibitor) alone damages the stomach, the combined administration of these drugs provokes gastric lesions. SC-560, but not rofecoxib, decreases prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and causes gastric hypermotility and an increase in mucosal permeability. COX-2 mRNA is expressed in the stomach after administration of indomethacin and SC-560 but not rofecoxib. The up-regulation of indomethacin-induced COX-2 expression is prevented by atropine at a dose that inhibits gastric hypermotility. In addition, selective COX-2 inhibitors have deleterious influences on the stomach when COX-2 is overexpressed under various conditions, including adrenalectomy, arthritis, and Helicobacter pylori-infection. In summary, gastric hypermotility plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric damage, and the response, causally related with PG deficiency due to COX-1 inhibition, occurs prior to other pathogenic events such as increased mucosal permeability; and the ulcerogenic properties of NSAIDs require the inhibition of both COX-1 and COX-2, the inhibition of COX-1 upregulates COX-2 expression in association with gastric hypermotility, and PGs produced by COX-2 counteract the deleterious effect of COX-1 inhibition. PMID:22611307

  8. Selective effects of an octopus toxin on action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela; Gage, Peter W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A lethal, water soluble toxin (Maculotoxin, MTX) with a molecular weight less than 540, can be extracted from the salivary glands of an octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). 2. MTX blocks action potentials in sartorius muscle fibres of toads without affecting the membrane potential. Delayed rectification is not inhibited by the toxin. 3. At low concentrations (10-6-10-5 g/ml.) MTX blocks action potentials only after a certain number have been elicited. The number of action potentials, which can be defined accurately, depends on the concentration of MTX and the concentration of sodium ions in the extracellular solution. 4. The toxin has no post-synaptic effect at the neuromuscular junction and it is concluded that it blocks neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting action potentials in motor nerve terminals. PMID:4330930

  9. Action of tremorgenic mycotoxins on GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Gant, D B; Cole, R J; Valdes, J J; Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T

    1987-11-01

    The effects of four tremorgenic and one nontremorgenic mycotoxins were studied on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor binding and function in rat brain and on binding of a voltage-operated Cl- channel in Torpedo electric organ. None of the mycotoxins had significant effect on [3H]muscimol or [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the GABAA receptor. However, only the four tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibited GABA-induced 36Cl- influx and [35S] t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate [( 35S]TBPS) binding in rat brain membranes, while the nontremorgenic verruculotoxin had no effect. Inhibition of [35S]TBPS binding by paspalinine was non-competitive. This suggests that tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibit GABAA receptor function by binding close to the receptor's Cl- channel. On the voltage-operated Cl- channel, only high concentrations of verruculogen and verruculotoxin caused significant inhibition of the channel's binding of [35S]TBPS. The data suggest that the tremorgenic action of these mycotoxins may be due in part to their inhibition of GABAA receptor function. PMID:2444852

  10. Action of pinaverium bromide on calmodulin-regulated functions.

    PubMed

    Wuytack, F; De Schutter, G; Casteels, R

    1985-08-01

    Pinaverium bromide at concentrations below 10(-5) M did not inhibit calmodulin-dependent enzymes such as phosphodiesterase and the Ca transport ATPase of the plasma membrane. At higher concentrations the compound interacted with the stimulation of those enzymes by calmodulin and also inhibited the calmodulin-independent activity. A similar inhibitory action was observed for the NaK ATPase. It is concluded that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on smooth muscle concentration at concentrations below 10(-5) M was due to its interaction with the voltage-dependent Ca channels and not to its interference with the calmodulin-dependent activation of the contractile proteins. PMID:2995077

  11. Macromolecular synthesis and membrane perturbation assays for mechanisms of action studies of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Cotsonas King, Amy; Wu, Liping

    2009-12-01

    The definition and confirmation of the mechanism of action of an NCE is central to antimicrobial drug discovery. Most antibiotics currently in clinical use selectively target and block one or more bacterial macromolecular synthesis processes, e.g., DNA replication, RNA synthesis (transcription), protein synthesis (translation), cell wall (peptidoglycan) synthesis, and fatty acid (lipid) biosynthesis. This unit includes two protocols for determining the effect of test compounds on macromolecular synthesis, one in test tube format and the other in 96-well plate format. A membrane potential depolarization protocol is also provided. Disruption of cell membrane integrity may be a legitimate mechanism of action for antibacterials, but it also may be the result of nonspecific cell membrane activity, an effect that must be ruled out for mammalian cells. These assays provide useful means for verifying inhibition of an intended target pathway with investigational antimicrobial compounds. They can also be used as valuable secondary assays for lead optimization to eliminate inhibitors that display nonselective toxicity.

  12. 24 CFR 968.315 - Comprehensive Plan (including five-year action plan).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conservation and life-cycle cost effective performance standards, lead-based paint testing and abatement... capacity building strategies to ensure meaningful resident participation in CGP. Such technical assistance... CFR part 91) for project and neighborhood improvements where public housing units are located...

  13. A feedback model for leukemia including cell competition and the action of the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balea, S.; Halanay, A.; Neamtu, M.

    2014-12-01

    A mathematical model, coupling the dynamics of short-term stem-like cells and mature leukocytes in leukemia with that of the immune system, is investigated. The model is described by a system of nine delay differential equations with nine delays. Three equilibrium points E0, E1, E2 are highlighted. The stability and the existence of the Hopf bifurcation for the equilibrium points are investigated. In the analysis of the model, the rate of asymmetric division and the rate of symmetric division are very important.

  14. 24 CFR 248.233 - Approval of a plan of action that includes incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES PREPAYMENT OF LOW INCOME HOUSING MORTGAGES Prepayment and Plans of...— (1) The housing will be retained as housing affordable for very low income families, low-income... operating costs. (e) In cases where the owner agrees to maintain only a portion of the project as low...

  15. 24 CFR 248.233 - Approval of a plan of action that includes incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES PREPAYMENT OF LOW INCOME HOUSING MORTGAGES Prepayment and Plans of...— (1) The housing will be retained as housing affordable for very low income families, low-income... operating costs. (e) In cases where the owner agrees to maintain only a portion of the project as low...

  16. 24 CFR 968.315 - Comprehensive Plan (including five-year action plan).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... entities are set up to plan and implement the consolidated plans (under 24 CFR part 91), the PHA shall... “emergency work” as set forth in § 968.305. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control... Partnership Process to develop and implement the goals, needs, strategies and priorities identified in...

  17. 24 CFR 968.315 - Comprehensive Plan (including five-year action plan).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... entities are set up to plan and implement the consolidated plans (under 24 CFR part 91), the PHA shall... CFR part 91) for project and neighborhood improvements where public housing units are located or... improvements needed for a PHA and all of its developments, and that represent needs eligible for funding...

  18. Firing regulation of fast-spiking interneurons by autaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Wu, Shengdun; Xia, Chuan; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in the brain are self-innervated by powerful inhibitory GABAergic autaptic connections. By computational modelling, we investigate how autaptic inhibition regulates the firing response of such interneurons. Our results indicate that autaptic inhibition both boosts the current threshold for action potential generation and modulates the input-output gain of FS interneurons. The autaptic transmission delay is identified as a key parameter that controls the firing patterns and determines multistability regions of FS interneurons. Furthermore, we observe that neuronal noise influences the firing regulation of FS interneurons by autaptic inhibition and extends their dynamic range for encoding inputs. Importantly, autaptic inhibition modulates noise-induced irregular firing of FS interneurons, such that coherent firing appears at an optimal autaptic inhibition level. Our results reveal the functional roles of autaptic inhibition in taming the firing dynamics of FS interneurons.

  19. ProBDNF inhibits collective migration and chemotaxis of rat Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, You-Quan; Li, Xuan-Yang; Xia, Guan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Yi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Su, Bing-Yin; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cell migration, including collective migration and chemotaxis, is essential for the formation of coordinate interactions between Schwann cells and axons during peripheral nerve development and regeneration. Moreover, limited migration of Schwann cells imposed a serious obstacle on Schwann cell-astrocytes intermingling and spinal cord repair after Schwann cell transplantation into injured spinal cords. Recent studies have shown that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, inhibits Schwann cell migration. The precursor form of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, proBDNF, was expressed in the developing or degenerating peripheral nerves and the injured spinal cords. Since "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" has been established as a common sense, proBDNF would be expected to promote Schwann cell migration. However, we found, in the present study, that exogenous proBDNF also inhibited in vitro collective migration and chemotaxis of RSC 96 cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line. Moreover, proBDNF suppressed adhesion and spreading of those cells. At molecular level, proBDNF inhibits F-actin polymerization and focal adhesion dynamics in cultured RSC 96 cells. Therefore, our results suggested a special case against the classical opinion of "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" and implied that proBDNF might modulate peripheral nerve development or regeneration and spinal cord repair through perturbing native or transplanted Schwann cell migration.

  20. Beyond topoisomerase inhibition: antitumor 1,4-naphthoquinones as potential inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Coelho-Cerqueira, Eduardo; Netz, Paulo A; do Canto, Vanessa P; Pinto, Angelo C; Follmer, Cristian

    2014-04-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) action has been involved in the regulation of neurotransmitters levels, cell signaling, cellular growth, and differentiation as well as in the balance of the intracellular polyamine levels. Although so far obscure, MAO inhibitors are believed to have some effect on tumors progression. 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) has been pointed out as a potential pharmacophore for inhibition of both MAO and DNA topoisomerase activities, this latter associated with antitumor activity. Herein, we demonstrated that certain antitumor 1,4-NQs, including spermidine-1,4-NQ, lapachol, and nor-lapachol display inhibitory activity on human MAO-A and MAO-B. Kinetic studies indicated that these compounds are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors, being the enzyme selectivity greatly affected by substitutions on 1,4-NQ ring. Molecular docking studies suggested that the most potent MAO inhibitors are capable to bind to the MAO active site in close proximity of flavin moiety. Furthermore, ability to inhibit both MAO-A and MAO-B can be potentialized by the formation of hydrogen bonds between these compounds and FAD and/or the residues in the active site. Although spermidine-1,4-NQs exhibit antitumor action primarily by inhibiting topoisomerase via DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that their effect on MAO activity should be taken into account when their application in cancer therapy is considered.

  1. State-Dependent Inhibition of Sodium Channels by Local Anesthetics: A 40-Year Evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, G-K; Strichartz, G R

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge about the mechanism of impulse blockade by local anesthetics has evolved over the past four decades, from the realization that Na(+) channels were inhibited to affect the impulse blockade to an identification of the amino acid residues within the Na(+) channel that bind the local anesthetic molecule. Within this period appreciation has grown of the state-dependent nature of channel inhibition, with rapid binding and unbinding at relatively high affinity to the open state, and weaker binding to the closed resting state. Slow binding of high affinity for the inactivated state accounts for the salutary therapeutic as well as the toxic actions of diverse class I anti-arrhythmic agents, but may have little importance for impulse blockade, which requires concentrations high enough to block the resting state. At the molecular level, residues on the S6 transmembrane segments in three of the homologous domains of the channel appear to contribute to the binding of local anesthetics, with some contribution also from parts of the selectivity filter. Binding to the inactivated state, and perhaps the open state, involves some residues that are not identical to those that bind these drugs in the resting state, suggesting spatial flexibility in the "binding site". Questions remaining include the mechanism that links local anesthetic binding with the inhibition of gating charge movements, and the molecular nature of the theoretical "hydrophobic pathway" that may be critical for determining the recovery rates from blockade of closed channels, and thus account for both therapeutic and cardiotoxic actions. PMID:23710324

  2. Action-Based Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansky, Amy L.; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to domain representation and planning that is fundamentally different from traditional methods; an approach based strictly on actions and their interrelationships, rather than on state-based goals and preconditions. In particular, we focus on the action-based planner COLLAGE, describe its methods for plan-construction, and contrast them with more traditional approaches to planning. Experiences with COLLAGE in realistic domains have shown that the action-based approach is not only more natural to use, but can also be more cost-efficient than traditional planning methods.

  3. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  4. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression.

  5. Unexpected Events Induce Motor Slowing via a Brain Mechanism for Action-Stopping with Global Suppressive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Aron, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression. PMID:24259571

  6. Saccadic Inhibition in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reingold, Eyal M.; Stampe, Dave M.

    2004-01-01

    In 5 experiments, participants read text that was briefly replaced by a transient image for 33 ms at random intervals. A decrease in saccadic frequency, referred to as saccadic inhibition, occurred as early as 60-70 ms following the onset of abrupt changes in visual input. It was demonstrated that the saccadic inhibition was influenced by the…

  7. Research progress of ursolic acid's anti-tumor actions.

    PubMed

    Zang, Li-li; Wu, Bao-ning; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Fu, Lei; Tang, Ze-yao

    2014-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a sort of pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid purified from natural plant. UA has a series of biological effects such as sedative, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, antiulcer, etc. It is discovered that UA has a broad-spectrum anti-tumor effect in recent years, which has attracted more and more scholars' attention. This review explained anti-tumor actions of UA, including (1) the protection of cells' DNA from different damages; (2) the anti-tumor cell proliferation by the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor/mitogen-activated protein kinase signal or of FoxM1 transcription factors, respectively; (3) antiangiogenesis, (4) the immunological surveillance to tumors; (5) the inhibition of tumor cell migration and invasion; (6) the effect of UA on caspase, cytochromes C, nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or mammalian target of rapamycin signal to induce tumor cell apoptosis respectively, and etc. Moreover, UA has selective toxicity to tumor cells, basically no effect on normal cells. With further studies, UA would be one of the potential anti-tumor agents. PMID:24374755

  8. Simulation of Accident Sequences Including Emergency Operating Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Queral, Cesar; Exposito, Antonio; Hortal, Javier

    2004-07-01

    Operator actions play an important role in accident sequences. However, design analysis (Safety Analysis Report, SAR) seldom includes consideration of operator actions, although they are required by compulsory Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) to perform some checks and actions from the very beginning of the accident. The basic aim of the project is to develop a procedure validation system which consists of the combination of three elements: a plant transient simulation code TRETA (a C based modular program) developed by the CSN, a computerized procedure system COPMA-III (Java technology based program) developed by the OECD-Halden Reactor Project and adapted for simulation with the contribution of our group and a software interface that provides the communication between COPMA-III and TRETA. The new combined system is going to be applied in a pilot study in order to analyze sequences initiated by secondary side breaks in a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plant. (authors)

  9. 4-Methylumbelliferone Treatment and Hyaluronan Inhibition as a Therapeutic Strategy in Inflammation, Autoimmunity, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Nadine; Kuipers, Hedwich F.; Frymoyer, Adam R.; Ishak, Heather D.; Bollyky, Jennifer B.; Wight, Thomas N.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a prominent component of the extracellular matrix at many sites of chronic inflammation, including type 1 diabetes (T1D), multiple sclerosis, and numerous malignancies. Recent publications have demonstrated that when HA synthesis is inhibited using 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), beneficial effects are observed in several animal models of these diseases. Notably, 4-MU is an already approved drug in Europe and Asia called “hymecromone” where it is used to treat biliary spasm. However, there is uncertainty regarding how 4-MU treatment provides benefit in these animal models and the potential long-term consequences of HA inhibition. Here, we review what is known about how HA contributes to immune dysregulation and tumor progression. Then, we review what is known about 4-MU and hymecromone in terms of mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, and safety. Finally, we review recent studies detailing the use of 4-MU to treat animal models of cancer and autoimmunity. PMID:25852691

  10. The bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila inhibits phospholipases A2 from insect, prokaryote, and vertebrate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Youngjin; Kim, Yonggyun; Stanley, David

    The bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila, is a virulent insect pathogen. Part of its pathogenicity is due to impairing cellular immunity by blocking biosynthesis of eicosanoids, the major recognized signal transduction system in insect cellular immunity. X. nematophila inhibits the first step in eicosanoid biosynthesis, phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Here we report that the bacterium inhibits PLA2 from two insect immune tissues, hemocytes and fat body, as well as PLA2s selected to represent a wide range of organisms, including prokaryotes, insects, reptiles, and mammals. Our finding on a bacterial inhibitor of PLA2 activity contributes new insight into the chemical ecology of microbe-host interactions, which usually involve actions rather than inhibitors of PLA2s.

  11. Decision Making in Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The importance of decision-making to safety in complex, dynamic environments like mission control centers and offshore installations has been well established. NASA-ARC has a program of research dedicated to fostering safe and effective decision-making in the manned spaceflight environment. Because access to spaceflight is limited, environments with similar characteristics, including aviation and nuclear power plants, serve as analogs from which space-relevant data can be gathered and theories developed. Analyses of aviation accidents cite crew judgement and decision making as causes or contributing factors in over half of all accidents. A similar observation has been made in nuclear power plants. Yet laboratory research on decision making has not proven especially helpful in improving the quality of decisions in these kinds of environments. One reason is that the traditional, analytic decision models are inappropriate to multidimensional, high-risk environments, and do not accurately describe what expert human decision makers do when they make decisions that have consequences. A new model of dynamic, naturalistic decision making is offered that may prove useful for improving decision making in complex, isolated, confined and high-risk environments. Based on analyses of crew performance in full-mission simulators and accident reports, features that define effective decision strategies in abnormal or emergency situations have been identified. These include accurate situation assessment (including time and risk assessment), appreciation of the complexity of the problem, sensitivity to constraints on the decision, timeliness of the response, and use of adequate information. More effective crews also manage their workload to provide themselves with time and resources to make good decisions. In brief, good decisions are appropriate to the demands of the situation. Effective crew decision making and overall performance are mediated by crew communication. Communication

  12. Inhibition of sucrose phosphatase by sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. Partially purified sucrose phosphatase from immature stem tissue of sugarcane is inhibited by sucrose. The enzyme was also inhibited by maltose, melezitose and 6-kestose but not by eight other sugars, including glucose and fructose. 2. The relative effectiveness of sucrose, maltose and melezitose as inhibitors is different for sucrose phosphatase from different plants. 3. The inhibition of the sugar-cane enzyme by sucrose was shown to be partially competitive. The Ki for sucrose is about 10mm. 4. Melezitose is also a partially competitive inhibitor of the enzyme but the inhibition by maltose is probably mixed. 5. The possibility that sucrose controls both the rate of accumulation of sucrose in stems of sugar-cane and sucrose synthesis in leaves by inhibiting sucrose phosphatase is discussed. PMID:4291490

  13. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  14. Postpartum Depression Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Postpartum Depression | Postpartum Depression Action Plan Patient __________________________ Physician/NP/PA __________________ Clinic ____________________________ Phone Number ____________________ Choose one area and add other areas as you begin to ...

  15. The Action Lawyers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubenow, Gerald C.

    1972-01-01

    A description of the Serrano vs. Priest class action suit in California, challenging the system of financing education through property taxes; author touches upon the possibilities for the courts becoming change agents in the struggle for social reform. (SP)

  16. SST0001, a chemically modified heparin, inhibits myeloma growth and angiogenesis via disruption of the heparanase/syndecan-1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Joseph P.; Ramani, Vishnu C.; Ren, Yongsheng; Naggi, Annamaria; Torri, Giangiacomo; Casu, Benito; Penco, Sergio; Pisano, Claudio; Carminati, Paolo; Tortoreto, Monica; Zunino, Franco; Vlodavsky, Israel; Sanderson, Ralph D.; Yang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Heparanase promotes myeloma growth, dissemination and angiogenesis through modulation of the tumor microenvironment, thus highlighting the potential of therapeutically targeting this enzyme. SST0001, a non-anticoagulant heparin with anti-heparanase activity was examined for its inhibition of myeloma tumor growth in vivo and for its mechanism of action. Experimental Design The ability of SST0001 to inhibit growth of myeloma tumors was assessed using multiple animal models and a diverse panel of human and murine myeloma cell lines. To investigate the mechanism of action of SST0001, pharmacodynamic markers of angiogenesis, heparanase activity, and pathways downstream of heparanase were monitored. The potential use of SST0001 as part of a combination therapy was also evaluated in vivo. Results SST0001 effectively inhibited myeloma growth in vivo, even when confronted with an aggressively growing tumor within human bone. In addition, SST0001 treatment causes changes within tumors consistent with the compound’s ability to inhibit heparanase; including down regulation of HGF, VEGF and MMP-9 expression and suppressed angiogenesis. SST0001 also diminishes heparanase-induced shedding of syndecan-1, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan known to be a potent promoter of myeloma growth. SST0001 inhibited the heparanase-mediated degradation of syndecan-1 heparan sulfate chains thus confirming the anti-heparanase activity of this compound. In combination with dexamethasone, SST0001 blocked tumor growth in vivo presumably through dual targeting of the tumor and its microenvironment. Conclusions These results provide mechanistic insight into the anti-tumor action of SST0001 and validate its use as a novel therapeutic tool for treating multiple myeloma. PMID:21257720

  17. Action Learning as Invigoration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chivers, Terence S.

    2011-01-01

    The present account of action learning describes its adoption for pragmatic reasons by the University of the Third Age (U3A). The reason for the existence of this movement is the education of retired people. The account seeks to explain why the action learning method spread from one local U3A to another and across it to other local U3As. The case…

  18. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  19. Beneficial action of resveratrol: How and why?

    PubMed

    Diaz-Gerevini, Gustavo Tomas; Repossi, Gaston; Dain, Alejandro; Tarres, María Cristina; Das, Undurti Narasimha; Eynard, Aldo Renato

    2016-02-01

    Flavonoid resveratrol modulates the transcription factor NF-κB; inhibits the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP1 A1; suppresses the expression and activity of cyclooxygenase enzymes; and modulates Fas/Fas-ligand-mediated apoptosis, p53, mammalian target of rapamycin, and cyclins and various phosphodiesterases. This increases the cytosolic cAMP that activates Epac1/CaMKKβ/AMPK/SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway, which in turn facilitates increased oxidation of fatty acids, mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration, and gluconeogenesis. Resveratrol triggers apoptosis of activated T cells and suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α, interluekin-17 (IL-17), and other proinflammatory molecules, and thus is of benefit in autoimmune diseases. In addition, resveratrol inhibits expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor, explaining its effective action against cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that is involved in the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome is also altered in depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. We noted that BDNF protects against cytotoxic actions of alloxan, streptozotocin, and benzo(a)pyrene. Resveratrol prevents bisphenol A-induced autism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, suggesting that it may augment BDNF synthesis and action. We also observed that BDNF levels are low in type 2 diabetes mellitus and that BDNF enhances production of antiinflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, whose levels are low in diabetes mellitus. Thus, resveratrol may augment production of lipoxin A4. Resveratrol alters gut microbiota and influences stem cell proliferation and differentiation. These pleiotropic actions of resveratrol may explain the multitude of its actions and benefits. PMID:26706021

  20. Beneficial action of resveratrol: How and why?

    PubMed

    Diaz-Gerevini, Gustavo Tomas; Repossi, Gaston; Dain, Alejandro; Tarres, María Cristina; Das, Undurti Narasimha; Eynard, Aldo Renato

    2016-02-01

    Flavonoid resveratrol modulates the transcription factor NF-κB; inhibits the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP1 A1; suppresses the expression and activity of cyclooxygenase enzymes; and modulates Fas/Fas-ligand-mediated apoptosis, p53, mammalian target of rapamycin, and cyclins and various phosphodiesterases. This increases the cytosolic cAMP that activates Epac1/CaMKKβ/AMPK/SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway, which in turn facilitates increased oxidation of fatty acids, mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration, and gluconeogenesis. Resveratrol triggers apoptosis of activated T cells and suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α, interluekin-17 (IL-17), and other proinflammatory molecules, and thus is of benefit in autoimmune diseases. In addition, resveratrol inhibits expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor, explaining its effective action against cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that is involved in the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome is also altered in depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. We noted that BDNF protects against cytotoxic actions of alloxan, streptozotocin, and benzo(a)pyrene. Resveratrol prevents bisphenol A-induced autism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, suggesting that it may augment BDNF synthesis and action. We also observed that BDNF levels are low in type 2 diabetes mellitus and that BDNF enhances production of antiinflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, whose levels are low in diabetes mellitus. Thus, resveratrol may augment production of lipoxin A4. Resveratrol alters gut microbiota and influences stem cell proliferation and differentiation. These pleiotropic actions of resveratrol may explain the multitude of its actions and benefits.

  1. Towards a Reflection Repertoire: Using a Thinking Tool to Understand Tensions in an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aas, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Most action researchers agree that action research consists of cycles of planning, acting, reflecting, and taking further action. However, in action research literature, there is something missing. The nature of reflection in the action research process, including its relationship with the tensions that arise while discussing purposes, processes,…

  2. Phenolics from Garcinia mangostana Inhibit Advanced Glycation Endproducts Formation: Effect on Amadori Products, Cross-Linked Structures and Protein Thiols.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; El-Bassossy, Hany; Mohamed, Gamal A; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alshali, Khalid Z; Banjar, Zainy M

    2016-02-22

    Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) in body tissues plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Here, the inhibitory effect of bioactive metabolites isolated from fruit hulls of Garcinia mangostana on AGE formation was investigated through bio-guided approach using aminoguanidine (AG) as a positive control. Including G. mangostana total methanol extract (GMT) in the reaction mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose or ribose inhibited the fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner. The bioassay guided fractionation of GMT revealed isolation of four bioactive constituents from the bioactive fraction; which were identified as: garcimangosone D (1), aromadendrin-8-C-glucopyranoside (2), epicatechin (3), and 2,3',4,5',6-pentahydroxybenzophenone (4). All the tested compounds significantly inhibited fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner whereas compound 3 (epicatechin) was found to be the most potent. In search for the level of action, addition of GMT, and compounds 2-4 inhibited fructosamine (Amadori product) and protein aggregation formation in both glucose and ribose. To explore the mechanism of action, it was found that addition of GMT and only compound (3) to reaction mixture increased protein thiol in both glucose and ribose while compounds 1, 2 and 4 only increased thiol in case of ribose. In conclusion, phenolic compounds 1-4 inhibited AGEs formation at the levels of Amadori product and protein aggregation formation through saving protein thiol.

  3. Phenolics from Garcinia mangostana Inhibit Advanced Glycation Endproducts Formation: Effect on Amadori Products, Cross-Linked Structures and Protein Thiols.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; El-Bassossy, Hany; Mohamed, Gamal A; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alshali, Khalid Z; Banjar, Zainy M

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) in body tissues plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Here, the inhibitory effect of bioactive metabolites isolated from fruit hulls of Garcinia mangostana on AGE formation was investigated through bio-guided approach using aminoguanidine (AG) as a positive control. Including G. mangostana total methanol extract (GMT) in the reaction mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose or ribose inhibited the fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner. The bioassay guided fractionation of GMT revealed isolation of four bioactive constituents from the bioactive fraction; which were identified as: garcimangosone D (1), aromadendrin-8-C-glucopyranoside (2), epicatechin (3), and 2,3',4,5',6-pentahydroxybenzophenone (4). All the tested compounds significantly inhibited fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner whereas compound 3 (epicatechin) was found to be the most potent. In search for the level of action, addition of GMT, and compounds 2-4 inhibited fructosamine (Amadori product) and protein aggregation formation in both glucose and ribose. To explore the mechanism of action, it was found that addition of GMT and only compound (3) to reaction mixture increased protein thiol in both glucose and ribose while compounds 1, 2 and 4 only increased thiol in case of ribose. In conclusion, phenolic compounds 1-4 inhibited AGEs formation at the levels of Amadori product and protein aggregation formation through saving protein thiol. PMID:26907243

  4. 40 CFR 300.525 - State involvement in removal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES... accordance with § 300.415 on removal actions, and 40 CFR part 35, subpart O. (b) States are not required... removal (including remedial planning) and remedial action costs at the time of the remedial action....

  5. 28 CFR 61.4 - Major federal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.4 Major federal action. The NEPA regulations define “major federal action.” “Major federal action” does not include action taken by the Department of Justice within the framework...

  6. 28 CFR 61.4 - Major federal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.4 Major federal action. The NEPA regulations define “major federal action.” “Major federal action” does not include action taken by the Department of Justice within the framework...

  7. 28 CFR 61.4 - Major federal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.4 Major federal action. The NEPA regulations define “major federal action.” “Major federal action” does not include action taken by the Department of Justice within the framework...

  8. 28 CFR 61.4 - Major federal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.4 Major federal action. The NEPA regulations define “major federal action.” “Major federal action” does not include action taken by the Department of Justice within the framework...

  9. 28 CFR 61.4 - Major federal action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.4 Major federal action. The NEPA regulations define “major federal action.” “Major federal action” does not include action taken by the Department of Justice within the framework...

  10. Affirmative Action Training: A Tool for Staff Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Joaquin, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the San Diego Community College District's Affirmative Action Training Program, which trains all affirmative action representatives on selection committees in compliance, hiring procedures, and committee monitoring. Includes a checklist for assessing organizational commitment to affirmative action. Reviews training goals, content,…

  11. Action Research in EdD Programs in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterman, Karen; Furman, Gail; Sernak, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study gathered information about the use of action research within doctor of education programs in educational leadership and explored faculty understanding of and perspectives on action research. Survey data established that action research is used infrequently to meet dissertation requirements. Contributing factors include lack…

  12. Action, agency and responsibility.

    PubMed

    Frith, Chris D

    2014-03-01

    In a series of experiments Marc Jeannerod revealed that we have very little awareness of the details and causes of our actions. We are, however, vividly aware of being in control of our actions and this gives us a sense of responsibility. These feelings arise, first, from intentional binding which creates a perception of agency, linking an intentional action to its outcome and, second, from the counterfactual reasoning that we could have chosen some other action. These feelings of responsibility play a critical role in creating social cohesion since they allow people to be held to account for deliberate antisocial behaviour. Jeannerod's studies also showed that we are unaware of how little we know about our actions and so are happy to make up stories about the nature and causes of our behaviour. These stories often do not correspond with the underlying cognitive and neural processes, but they can be changed through instructions and through discussion with others. Our experience of responsibility for action emerges during our upbringing through exposure to our culture. This creates consensus about the causes of behaviour, but not necessarily accuracy. PMID:24036357

  13. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved. Volume 14, No. 2, Part 1: Individual actions. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1995) and includes copies of Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved -- individual actions. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1997; Volume 16, Number 2, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1997) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  16. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) inhibits Stat5 signaling associated with apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Williams, Ann; Vultur, Adina; List, Alan; Bhalla, Kapil; Smith, David; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2007-04-01

    Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a novel, oral, potent, multi-targeted kinase inhibitor of Bcr-Abl and Src family kinases (SFK) and is a promising cancer therapeutic agent. Preclinical data indicate that dasatinib is 325-fold more potent than imatinib against cells expressing wild-type Bcr-Abl, and that dasatinib is active against 18 of 19 Bcr-Abl mutations known to cause imatinib resistance. Phase I clinical data show that dasatinib is well tolerated and highly effective for the treatment of imatinib-resistant/imatinib-intolerant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the molecular mechanism of action of dasatinib is not fully understood. In this study, we confirm that dasatinib inhibits tyrosine phosphorylation of SFKs, including Src, Hck, and Lyn, in K562 human CML cells. Significantly, downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) signaling is also blocked by dasatinib as shown by decreases in levels of phosphorylated Stat5 and Stat5 DNA-binding activities. In addition, dasatinib down-regulates expression of Stat5 target genes, including Bcl-x, Mcl-1, and cyclin D1. Consistent with these results, blockade of Stat5 signaling by dasatinib is accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Surprisingly, Stat5 DNA-binding activities are enhanced with increasing cell density, which is associated with resistance to apoptosis by dasatinib. Our findings indicate that inhibition of Stat5 signaling downstream of Bcr-Abl/SFKs contributes to the action of dasatinib, and, conversely, that increasing cell density up-regulates Stat5 activation and confers resistance to dasatinib. Moreover, the level of phosphorylated Stat5 in CML cells represents a mechanistically relevant biomarker for monitoring inhibition of Bcr-Abl signaling by dasatinib in CML patients using convenient immunocytochemical assays.

  17. Inhibition of phospholipid methylation by a cytosolic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1984-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol contains a heat-stable factor which inhibits phospholipid methylation by rat liver microsomes. The effect of this factor on lipid methylation was dose- and pH-dependent. This factor has an Mr of approx. 3200 as estimated by gel filtration. It could not be extracted by chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v), and its action was inhibited by incubation with subtilisin. PMID:6712636

  18. BDMC33, A Curcumin Derivative Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Macrophage-Like Cellular System: Role of Inhibition in NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ka-Heng; Chow, Yuh-Lit; Sharmili, Vidyadaran; Abas, Faridah; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Shaari, Khozirah; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Lajis, Nordin Haji; Syahida, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Our preliminary screening has shown that curcumin derivative BDMC33 [2,6-bis(2,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)cyclohexanone] exerted promising nitric oxide inhibitory activity in activated macrophages. However, the molecular basis and mechanism for its pharmacological action is yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of BDMC33 and elucidate its underlying mechanism action in macrophage cells. Our current study demonstrated that BDMC33 inhibits the secretion of major pro-inflammatory mediators in stimulated macrophages, and includes NO, TNF-α and IL-1β through interference in both nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen activator protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in IFN-γ/LPS-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, BDMC33 also interrupted LPS signaling through inhibiting the surface expression of CD-14 accessory molecules. In addition, the inhibitory action of BDMC33 not only restricted the macrophages cell (RAW264.7), but also inhibited the secretion of NO and TNF-α in IFN-γ/LPS-challenged microglial cells (BV-2). The experimental data suggests the inflammatory action of BDMC33 on activated macrophage-like cellular systems, which could be used as a future therapeutic agent in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22489138

  19. Investigation of scaling and inhibition mechanisms and the influencing factors in static and dynamic inhibition tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, M.D.; Jamieson, E.; Hammonds, P.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents results of some recent laboratory study on barium sulfate scale inhibition in oilfield brines and investigation of several factors potentially effecting scale inhibition efficiency. In addition to well known mechanisms of scale nucleation inhibition and crystal growth retardation, dispersion/anti-conglomeration appears to be a significant inhibition mechanism associated with some scale inhibitors, which may play an important role in a dynamic flowing system. The contamination of a brine by an organic chelating agent such as EDTA or citric acid did not, in this study, show any significant effect on the barium sulfate inhibition efficiency of any of the three generically different scale inhibitors included. Experiments show that, in a properly enclosed system, the pH of an oilfield brine even with hydrogen bicarbonate presence can be sufficiently buffered with acetic acid. These new results are believed to be useful in evaluating/selecting scale inhibitors and improving barium sulfate scale inhibition test methods.

  20. There Is No Free Won’t: Antecedent Brain Activity Predicts Decisions to Inhibit

    PubMed Central

    Filevich, Elisa; Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of prepotent action is an important aspect of self-control, particularly in social contexts. Action inhibition and its neural bases have been extensively studied. However, the neural precursors of free decisions to inhibit have hardly been studied. We asked participants to freely choose to either make a rapid key press in response to a visual cue, or to transiently inhibit action, and briefly delay responding. The task required a behavioural response on each trial, so trials involving inhibition could be distinguished from those without inhibition as those showing slower reaction times. We used this criterion to classify free-choice trials as either rapid or inhibited/delayed. For 13 participants, we measured the mean amplitude of the ERP activity at electrode Cz in three subsequent 50 ms time windows prior to the onset of the signal that either instructed to respond or inhibit, or gave participants a free choice. In two of these 50 ms time windows (−150 to −100, and −100 to −50 ms relative to action onset), the amplitude of prestimulus ERP differed between trials where participants ”freely” chose whether to inhibit or to respond rapidly. Larger prestimulus ERP amplitudes were associated with trials in which participants decided to act rapidly as compared to trials in which they decided to delay their responses. Last-moment decisions to inhibit or delay may depend on unconscious preparatory neural activity. PMID:23418420