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Sample records for action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene

  1. EFFECT OF 1-METHYLCYCLOPROPENE ON THE QUALITY OF FRESH-CUT APPLE SLICES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this project was to treat fresh-cut apple slices with the ethylene-action inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), in order to retard ethylene-induced deterioration and senescence, and prolong the shelf life of such products. Intact Braeburn and Pacific Rose apples were treated, at...

  2. Metabolic changes in 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-treated ‘Empire’ apple fruit during storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Empire’ apple fruit are more susceptible to flesh browning at 3.3 oC if first treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an inhibitor of ethylene perception. To better understand the metabolic changes associated with this browning, untargeted metabolic profiling with partial least squares analysis...

  3. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene treatment on green asparagus quality during cold storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shaojin; Wu, Zhishuang

    2012-10-01

    Green asparagus was treated with 1-methylcyclopropene at three concentration levels at room temperature for 24 h after harvest to evaluate the postharvest quality during cold storage at 4°C. Comparing with the controls, the loss of vitamin C, decomposition of chlorophyll, and accumulation of the malonydiadehyde under treatments of 1-methylcyclopropene were reduced during storage. The enzyme activities in asparagus including peroxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase were inhibited by 1-methylcyclopropene treatments, while the activity of superoxide dismutase was enhanced. Based on non-significant difference of the treated samples with 6 ìl l-1, 1-methylcyclopropene treatments at 4 ìl l-1 could be selected to maintain postharvest quality of green asparagus and provide long storage life.

  4. The use of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Chris B

    2006-01-01

    The recent availability of the inhibitor of ethylene perception, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), has resulted in an explosion of research on its effects on fruits and vegetables, both as a tool to further investigate the role of ethylene in ripening and senescence, and as a commercial technology to improve maintenance of product quality. The commercialization of 1-MCP was followed by rapid adoption by many apple industries around the world, and strengths and weaknesses of the new technology have been identified. However, use of 1-MCP remains limited for other products, and therefore it is still necessary to speculate on its commercial potential for most fruits and vegetables. In this review, the effects of 1-MCP on fruits and vegetables are considered from two aspects. First, a selected number of fruit (apple, avocado, banana, pear, peaches and nectarines, plums and tomato) are used to illustrate the range of responses to 1-MCP, and indicate possible benefits and limitations for commercialization of 1-MCP-based technology. Second, an outline of general physiological and biochemical responses of fruits and vegetables to the chemical is provided to illustrate the potential for use of 1-MCP to better understand the role of ethylene in ripening and senescence processes. PMID:16530376

  5. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1220 Section 180.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances §...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1220 Section 180.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances §...

  7. Maintaining Quality of Edible Flowers with Controlled Release of 1-Methylcyclopropene and Modified Atmosphere Packaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment is used to counter ethylene activity and delay senescence in many fresh produce commodities. This study investigated the effect of 1-MCP treatment with modified atmosphere (MA) packaging on quality maintenance of edible flowers. Freshly harvested ca...

  8. Measuring consumer response to 'Gala' apples treated with 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Post-harvest apple treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) was previously found to inhibit fruit ripening but also to inhibit the production of volatile compounds that contribute to apple flavor. The first objective of this study was to determine if consumers could distinguish 1-MCP-treated and ...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1220 Section 180.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances §...

  10. Up-regulation of genes in diphenylamine- and 1-methylcyclopropene-treated apples during cold storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold storage reduces the rate of quality loss and extends availability of fresh apples in the marketplace, but several cultivars develop various postharvest browning disorders of the peel or flesh tissue such as superficial scald and external carbon dioxide injury. Postharvest 1-methylcyclopropene...

  11. Efficacy of 1-methylcyclopropene on the mitigation of storage disorders of "Rocha" pear under normal refrigerated and controlled atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Domingos Pf; Carvalho, Rita; Dupille, Eve

    2016-07-01

    Alternatives are needed for long-term preservation of European pears (Pyrus communis L.) after the ban on diphenylamine. "Rocha" pear fruit harvested at commercial maturity were treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-methylcyclopropene, SmartFresh™) and diphenylamine and stored at 0 ℃, 90-95% relative humidity, under normal atmosphere for up to six months or under controlled atmosphere (controlled atmosphere, 3 kPa O2 + 0.7 kPa CO2) for up to 9.4 months. At 312 nl l(-1), 1-methylcyclopropene reduced softening and yellowing, and increased soluble solids content during shelf life in comparison with fruit treated with diphenylamine. 1-Methylcyclopropene at 312 nl l(-1) was also more effective than diphenylamine in reducing superficial scald and internal browning disorders. 1-Methylcyclopropene at 150 nl l(-1) had little effect on ripening-related changes but was effective against physiological disorders of pears stored in regular atmosphere or under controlled atmosphere. Delayed controlled atmosphere slightly reduced internal browning disorders but increased superficial scald. 1-Methylcyclopropene at 312 nl l(-1) reduced physiological disorders in "Rocha" pear under refrigerated storage and delayed ripening-related softening and color changes during shelf life. At 150 nl l(-1), 1-methylcyclopropene is as effective as diphenylamine against storage disorders without ripening impairment. PMID:26437671

  12. Inhibiting ethylene perception with 1-methylcyclopropene triggers molecular responses aimed to cope with cell toxicity and increased respiration in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Establés-Ortiz, Beatriz; Romero, Paco; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; González-Candelas, Luis; Lafuente, María T

    2016-06-01

    The ethylene perception inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) has been critical in understanding the hormone's mode of action. However, 1-MCP may trigger other processes that could vary the interpretation of results related until now to ethylene, which we aim to understand by using transcriptomic analysis. Transcriptomic changes in ethylene and 1-MCP-treated 'Navelate' (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) oranges were studied in parallel with changes in ethylene production, respiration and peel damage. The effects of compounds modifying the levels of the ethylene co-product cyanide and nitric oxide (NO) on fruit physiology were also studied. Results suggested that: 1) The ethylene treatment caused sub-lethal stress since it induced stress-related responses and reduced peel damage; 2) 1-MCP induced ethylene-dependent and ethylene-independent responsive networks; 3) 1-MCP triggered ethylene overproduction, stress-related responses and metabolic shifts aimed to cope with cell toxicity, which mostly affected to the inner part of the peel (albedo); 4) 1-MCP increased respiration and drove metabolism reconfiguration for favoring energy conservation but up-regulated genes related to lipid and protein degradation and triggered the over-expression of genes associated with the plasma membrane cellular component; 5) Xenobiotics and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) might act as signals for defense responses in the ethylene-treated fruit, while their uncontrolled generation would induce processes mimicking cell death and damage in 1-MCP-treated fruit; 6) ROS, the ethylene co-product cyanide and NO may converge in the toxic effects of 1-MCP. PMID:26990405

  13. Combination of 1-Methylcyclopropene and ethoxyquin to control superficial scald of 'Anjou' pears

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 25 nL L-1 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) application at 20 °C for 24 hours on the day of harvest plus an ethoxyquin drench at 1000 µL L-1 after 1, 7, 30 and 60 days (d) of cold storage controlled superficial scald of ‘d’Anjou’ pears stored in air at -1 °C for 5 months. 1-MCP alone, or ethoxyquin alo...

  14. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene and modified atmosphere packaging on chilling injury, and antioxidative defensive mechanism of sweet pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) are chilling sensitive vegetable, and develop injury when stored at temperatures less than 7 C. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) (650 ppb) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on chilling injuries of sweet pepper...

  15. Differential protein profiles of postharvest Gynura bicolor D.C leaf treated by 1-methylcyclopropene and ethephon.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Kang, Ruoyi; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Juan; Yu, Zhifang

    2015-06-01

    Proteins were extracted from G. bicolor that had been treated with 1-methylcyclopropene and ethephon and then stored at room temperature for 1, 3 and 7days. More than 300 protein spots were detected by 2-DE and 38 differentially abundant spots (P<0.05) were excised and analysed by using MALDI-TOF/TOF. Thirty-three proteins were finally confidently identified. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins, the proteins identified were classified into those responsible for metabolism (75.8%), information storage and processing (9.1%) and cellular processes and signaling (12.1%). Compared with ethephon and control treatments, 1-methylcyclopropene specifically increased the abundances of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, carbonic anhydrase, nucleoside diphosphate kinases, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, RuBisCO and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase. 1-Methylcyclopropene protected leaf chloroplast and cells by enhancing stress response and defense, and delayed senescence by inhibiting substance and energy metabolisms. Therefore, 1-methylcyclopropene allowed better self-defense and delayed senescence of G. bicolor leaf. PMID:25624203

  16. Extending the shelf life of edible flowers with controlled release of 1-methylcyclopropene and modified atmosphere packaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible flowers have great sensory appeal, but their extremely short shelf life limits their commercial usage. Postharvest 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment is used to counter ethylene activity and delay senescence in fresh produce; however its potential application in edible flowers has not bee...

  17. The isomerization of 1-methylcyclopropene: A multichannel unimolecular reaction induced by overtone excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggott, J. E.; Law, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of products resulting from the isomerization of gas phase 1-methylcyclopropene (1) induced by C-H stretch overtone excitation has been studied in a search for mode specific effects. Quantum yields for the disappearance of 1 have been determined as a function of the total pressure of a mixture of 1 and methylenecyclopropane and of the added bath gases SF6 and Ar using a combination of intracavity dye laser photolysis and end product analysis by gas chromatography. These data, together with the ratios of the yields of the major isomerization products, are adequately reproduced by RRKM theory and a weak collisional energy transfer model: no evidence for mode specificity is obtained. The experimental data demonstrate the importance of inefficient collisional energy transfer but allow some conclusions to be drawn concerning the applicability of RRKM theory which are not strongly dependent upon the details of the energy transfer model.

  18. Combined effect of temperature and controlled atmosphere on storage and shelf-life of 'Rocha' pear treated with 1-methylcyclopropene.

    PubMed

    Gago, Custódia M L; Miguel, Maria G; Cavaco, Ana M; Almeida, Domingos P F; Antunes, Maria D C

    2015-03-01

    The combination of temperature and atmosphere composition for storage of Pyrus communis L. 'Rocha' treated with 1-methylcyclopropene was investigated. Fruits treated with 312 nl l(-1) 1-methylcyclopropene were stored at 0 ℃ and 2.5 ℃ in air and controlled atmosphere (CA) (3.04 kPa O2+ 0.91 kPa CO2). Fruits were removed from storage after 14, 26 and 35 weeks, transferred to shelf-life at approximately 22 ℃ and assessed for ripening and quality, symptoms of superficial scald and internal browning and the accumulation of biochemical compounds related to scald after 0, 1 and 2 weeks. Superficial scald occurred only in fruits stored for 35 weeks in air at 2.5 ℃. Levels of conjugated trienols and α-farnesene increased during the first 26 weeks in storage, remaining constant thereafter. During shelf-life, conjugated trienols were higher in fruits stored in air at 2.5 ℃. Internal browning developed in shelf-life after 26 weeks at 2.5 ℃. Pears in air at 2.5 ℃ were not able to stand a 2-week shelf-life after 35 weeks of storage, while fruits stored at 0 ℃ under CA ripened slowly after the same storage period. The retention of firmness during shelf-life of 1-methylcyclopropene-treated 'Rocha' pear can be overcome by elevating the storage temperature from 0 ℃ to 2.5 ℃, but CA is a required complement to avoid excessive softening after long-term storage. The ratio carotenoid/chlorophyll increased during storage and shelf-life, as plastids senesced. CA reduced the rate of chlorophyll loss during the first 14 weeks in storage, but its effect was reduced afterwards. 'Rocha' pear treated with 1-methylcyclopropene had a similar post-harvest behaviour during long-term storage at 0 ℃ in air or at 2.5 ℃ under CA. PMID:24216324

  19. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene and calcium chloride treatments on quality maintenance of 'Lingwu Long' Jujube fruit.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Ban, Zhaojun; Li, Xihong; Xue, Ting

    2014-04-01

    'Lingwu Long' jujube (Zizyphus jujuba cv. Mill) fruits were harvested at mature-green stages and then treated with 1.0 μL L(-1) 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), 1.0% CaCl2 or their combination. All treatments were stored at room temperature (22 ± 1 °C) and 80-90% relative humidity (RH) up for 15 days. Results indicated that 1.0 μL L(-1) 1-MCP, 1.0% CaCl2 or their combination were effective in terms of senescence inhibition, and the storage life was extended by 6, 4 and 9 days, respectively. 1-MCP and CaCl2 treatment had a synergic effect on the inhibition of ethylene production and microbial population of 'Lingwu Long' jujube fruit. The combination of 1-MCP and CaCl2 significantly reduced polygalacturonase (PG) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activities. It also maintained higher concentrations of titratable acid and ascorbic acid. PMID:24741163

  20. Application of 1-methylcyclopropene reduces wound responses and maintains quality in fresh-cut apple.

    PubMed

    Mao, Linchun; Lu, Fujun; Wang, Guoze

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment before cutting on respiration rate, ethylene production, electrolyte leakage, firmness, and color in fresh-cut apple fruit. Fresh-cut apple without 1-MCP treatment had a shelf life of 10 days at 2 degrees C and became browning and decay after pro-long storage. However, fresh-cut apple remained fresh-looking even after 14 days at 2 degrees C when fruit were exposed to 1-MCP before cutting. 1-MCP treatment significantly reduced wound-activated respiration rate and ethylene production, maintained firmness during storage. Visible changes in apple skin color do not occur, however, .L and whiteness index (WI) of flesh in intact and fresh-cut apple applied with 1-MCP were higher than those without 1-MCP treatment. Fresh-cut and intact fruit had little changes in electrolyte leakage after 2 days of storage when 1-MCP was pre-applied. The present study indicated that treatment with 1 microL/L 1-MCP for 10 h at 20 degrees C prior to cutting can significantly reduce wound-active responses in fresh-cut apple. PMID:17392087

  1. RE-INITIATING SOFTENING ABILITY OF 1-METHYLCYCLOPROPENE-TREATED 'BARLETT' AND 'D'ANJOU' PEARS AFTER REGULAR AIR OR CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE STORAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Bartlett’ and ‘d’Anjou’ pears treated with 300 nL L-1 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), did not soften to eating quality within 7 d, a desirable ripening period. In this research, a preconditioning method was evaluated as a means to regenerate ripening ability of pears prior to marketing. Fruit treat...

  2. ANALYTICAL QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF FRESH-CUT WATERMELON SLICES FROM NON-TREATED AND 1-METHYLCYCLOPROPENE- AND/OR ETHYLENE-TREATED WHOLE FRUIT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining the postharvest quality of fresh-cut fruit after processing and throughout distribution and marketing is a major challenge facing the fresh-cut fruit industry. Analytical quality characteristics of packaged fresh-cut watermelon slices from non-treated and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)- a...

  3. 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-induced alteration in leaf photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, respiration and membrane damage in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under high night temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High night temperature (HNT) can induce ethylene-triggered reactive oxygen species production, which can cause premature leaf senescence and membrane damage, thereby affecting production, consumption and transfer of photosynthates, and yield. The 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can competitively bind w...

  4. Shelf life extension and antioxidant activity of 'Hayward' kiwi fruit as a result of prestorage conditioning and 1-methylcyclopropene treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Seo; Im, Myeng He; Gorinstein, Shela

    2015-05-01

    Kiwi fruits (Actinidia deliciosa C.F. Liang et A.R. Ferguson) were treated by prestorage conditioning (20 °C for 2 days), 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP, 1 ppm for 16 h) and conditioning plus 1-MCP. After the treatment the fruits were immediately stored at 0 °C during 24 weeks. Flesh firmness gradually decreased with storage time and the rate of its loss was lower in 1-MCP and conditioning plus 1-MCP treatments than those of control or conditioning. However, SSC, acidity and pH did not change among treatments. Starch content decreased during the storage time regardless of treatments. Oppositely the amount of reducing sugars increased at the same duration of the treatments. Rate and incidence of fruit decay was the lowest in fruit treated with conditioning plus 1-MCP treatment. Fruit decay mainly caused pathogen Botrytis cinerea and its rate significantly decreased with conditioning plus 1-MCP treatment. Ethylene and respiration abruptly increased after 8 weeks of storage, but their contents were lower in 1-MCP and conditioning plus 1-MCP. Total soluble phenolics, flavonoids, and total antioxidant capacities were much higher than in other treatments. Kiwi fruits treated with conditioning plus 1-MCP extended the shelf life by reducing the rate of fruit decay and softening during the storage. The bioactive compounds and total antioxidant status of fruits increased during the treatment. PMID:25892768

  5. Inhibition of hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia aruguta) ripening by 1-methylcyclopropene during cold storage and anticancer properties of the fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sooyeon; Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jeongyun; Lee, Han Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Lee, Eun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hardy kiwifruits (Actinidia arguta) were treated with 20 μl/l 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) for 16 h at 10 °C and subsequently stored at 1 ± 0.5 °C. Anticancer properties of the fruit extracts were tested against five different human cancer cells. The hardy kiwifruits, without 1-MCP treatment, showed increases in both respiration and ethylene production rates during fruit storage. The 1-MCP treatment remarkably inhibited fruit ripening by reducing respiration and ethylene production. Fruits with the 1-MCP treatment could be stored for up to 5 weeks by maintaining higher fruit firmness, ascorbic acid and total phenolic contents compared to the control. The hardy kiwifruit extracts showed anti-proliferative effects to Hep3B and HeLa cells but not to HT29, HepG2 and LoVo cells. These results suggest that the application of 1-MCP at harvest effectively delayed the ripening process of the fruits, and the fruit extract had beneficial effects for the prevention of human cancer growth. PMID:26212954

  6. Influence of 1-methylcyclopropene and storage atmosphere on changes in volatile compounds and fruit quality of conference pears.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, Anna; Cambiaghi, Paola; Grassi, Maurizio; Zerbini, Paola Eccher

    2005-12-14

    Conference pears (Pyrus communis L.) were treated with 25 and 50 nL L(-1) 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) at -0.5 degrees C for 24 h, then stored for up to 22 weeks in air (NA) and controlled atmosphere (CA). After 7 and 14 weeks of storage, fruits were retreated with 1-MCP. After 7, 14, and 22 weeks of storage, fruits were kept for up to 7 days at 20 degrees C in air for poststorage ripening. The effects of 1-MCP treatment declined with duration of storage in both storage atmospheres, indicating that retreatments had little additional effects on subsequent ripening. Ethylene production was lower and firmness was higher in 50 nL L(-1) fruits, while the 25 nL L(-1) dose was not very different from the control. Development of superficial scald was not prevented by 1-MCP treatments, but the severity of the symptoms was influenced. The 1-MCP effects were perceivable on texture (juiciness) and flavor. Control fruit and 25 nL L(-1) fruit reached their best sensory quality after 14 weeks of storage, while 50 nL L(-1) fruit reached the same sensory quality later, keeping a fresh flavor when the quality of control fruit declined and became watery or grainy. The fresh flavor in 50 nL L(-1) fruit was probably due to the presence below the odor detection threshold concentrations of the volatile compounds responsible for the "ripe pear" aroma, mainly of butanol and ethyl butanoate. CA prolonged or enhanced the effects of 1-MCP; 1-MCP cannot substitute for CA but can reinforce the CA effects. PMID:16332131

  7. Effects of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on gene expression and activity profile of alpha-1,4-glucan-phosphorylase during banana ripening.

    PubMed

    Mainardi, Janaina Aparecida; Purgatto, Eduardo; Vieira, Adair; Bastos, Walter Arato; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; Oliveira do Nascimento, João Roberto; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2006-09-20

    Starch phosphorylases are enzymes that can use starch as substrate, and they are supposed to act in both in starch synthesis and degradation. This paper reports the effects of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on the degradation of starch and phosphorylase activity and gene expression. The results indicate that phosphorylase activity is induced during ripening and that it is associated with the onset of starch degradation. The regulation of banana phosphorylase activity is mainly dependent on gene expression, and the absence of ethylene perception by 1-MCP had a positive effect. However, this effect can be precluded by increased levels of ethylene, both autocatalytic and exogenous. PMID:16968096

  8. Impact of 1-methylcyclopropene and controlled atmosphere storage on polyamine and 4-aminobutyrate levels in “Empire” apple fruit

    PubMed Central

    Deyman, Kristen L.; Brikis, Carolyne J.; Bozzo, Gale G.; Shelp, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) delays ethylene-meditated ripening of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) fruit during controlled atmosphere (CA) storage. Here, we tested the hypothesis that 1-MCP and CA storage enhances the levels of polyamines (PAs) and 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in apple fruit. A 46-week experiment was conducted with “Empire” apple using a split-plot design with four treatment replicates and 3°C, 2.5 kPa O2, and 0.03 or 2.5 kPa CO2 with or without 1 μL L-1 1-MCP. Total PA levels were not elevated by the 1-MCP treatment. Examination of the individual PAs revealed that: (i) total putrescine levels tended to be lower with 1-MCP regardless of the CO2 level, and while this was mostly at the expense of free putrescine, large transient increases in soluble conjugated putrescine were also evident; (ii) total spermidine levels tended to be lower with 1-MCP, particularly at 2.5 kPa CO2, and this was mostly at the expense of soluble conjugated spermidine; (iii) total spermine levels at 2.5 kPa CO2 tended to be lower with 1-MCP, and this was mostly at the expense of both soluble and insoluble conjugated spermine; and (iv) total spermidine and spermine levels at 0.03 kPa were relatively unaffected, compared to 2.5 kPa CO2, but transient increases in free spermidine and spermine were evident. These findings might be due to changes in the conversion of putrescine into higher PAs and the interconversion of free and conjugated forms in apple fruit, rather than altered S-adenosylmethionine availability. Regardless of 1-MCP and CO2 treatments, the availability of glutamate showed a transient peak initially, probably due to protein degradation, and this was followed by a steady decline over the remainder of the storage period which coincided with linear accumulation of GABA. This pattern has been attributed to the stimulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity and inhibition of GABA catabolism, rather than a contribution of PAs to GABA production. PMID:24782882

  9. Impact of 1-methylcyclopropene and controlled atmosphere storage on polyamine and 4-aminobutyrate levels in "Empire" apple fruit.

    PubMed

    Deyman, Kristen L; Brikis, Carolyne J; Bozzo, Gale G; Shelp, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) delays ethylene-meditated ripening of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) fruit during controlled atmosphere (CA) storage. Here, we tested the hypothesis that 1-MCP and CA storage enhances the levels of polyamines (PAs) and 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in apple fruit. A 46-week experiment was conducted with "Empire" apple using a split-plot design with four treatment replicates and 3°C, 2.5 kPa O2, and 0.03 or 2.5 kPa CO2 with or without 1 μL L(-1) 1-MCP. Total PA levels were not elevated by the 1-MCP treatment. Examination of the individual PAs revealed that: (i) total putrescine levels tended to be lower with 1-MCP regardless of the CO2 level, and while this was mostly at the expense of free putrescine, large transient increases in soluble conjugated putrescine were also evident; (ii) total spermidine levels tended to be lower with 1-MCP, particularly at 2.5 kPa CO2, and this was mostly at the expense of soluble conjugated spermidine; (iii) total spermine levels at 2.5 kPa CO2 tended to be lower with 1-MCP, and this was mostly at the expense of both soluble and insoluble conjugated spermine; and (iv) total spermidine and spermine levels at 0.03 kPa were relatively unaffected, compared to 2.5 kPa CO2, but transient increases in free spermidine and spermine were evident. These findings might be due to changes in the conversion of putrescine into higher PAs and the interconversion of free and conjugated forms in apple fruit, rather than altered S-adenosylmethionine availability. Regardless of 1-MCP and CO2 treatments, the availability of glutamate showed a transient peak initially, probably due to protein degradation, and this was followed by a steady decline over the remainder of the storage period which coincided with linear accumulation of GABA. This pattern has been attributed to the stimulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity and inhibition of GABA catabolism, rather than a contribution of PAs to GABA production. PMID:24782882

  10. Action of anti-HIV drugs and resistance: reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2004-01-01

    Currently, 20 drugs have been approved for Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) clinical therapy. These drugs inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, or virus entry. Introduction of a combination therapy with reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors has resulted in a drastic decrease in HIV-1 related mortality. Although the combination therapy can suppress viral replication below detection levels in current available assays, low levels of on-going viral replication still persist in some patients. Long-term administration of the combination therapy may increase selective pressure against viruses, and subsequently induce emergence of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. Attempts have been made to design novel antiretroviral drugs that would be able to suppress replication of the resistant variants. At present, several investigational drugs are being tested in clinical trials. These drugs target not only the resistant variants, but also improvement in oral bioavilability or other viral proteins such as HIV-1 integrase, ribonuclease H, and HIV-1 entry (CD4 attachment inhibitors, chemokine receptors antagonists, and fusion inhibitors). Understanding mechanism(s) of action of the drugs and mechanisms of drug resistance is necessary for successful designs in the next generation of anti-HIV-1 drugs. In this review, the mechanisms of action of reverse transcriptase- and protease-inhibitors, and the mechanism of resistance to these inhibitors, are described. PMID:15579086

  11. Effect of the Application of 1-Methylcyclopropene and Wax Emulsions on Proximate Analysis and Some Antioxidants of Soursop (Annona muricata L.)

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Hernández, Cristina L.; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G.; García-Galindo, Hugo S.; Mata-Montes De Oca, Miguel; Montalvo-González, Efigenia

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the application of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and wax emulsions, alone or combined, on composition analysis, vitamin C, polyphenols, and antioxidant capacity of soursop was evaluated. Fruits were stored as follows: at 25°C (control), and at 16°C: fruits sprayed with candelilla or flava emulsions, fruits treated with 1500 nL/L of 1-MCP (20°C, 12 h), and fruits treated with 1-MCP and then sprayed with emulsions. Fruits were allowed to ripen and the edible part was used for analysis. Only fruits stored at 16°C without 1-MCP showed visible symptoms of chilling injury. Fruits treated with 1-MCP combined with flava emulsion maintained in greater extent their vitamin C content, dietary fiber, total phenolics content, and antioxidant activity. The combination of 1-MCP and emulsions can be utilized in postharvest handling of soursop because this combination can preserve its nutritional composition and antioxidant activity. PMID:24892105

  12. Effects of 1-Methylcyclopropene and Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the Antioxidant Capacity in Pepper “Kulai” during Low-Temperature Storage

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chung Keat; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Ismail, Ismanizan; Zainal, Zamri

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to simultaneously evaluate the effect of a postharvest treatment on the pepper's antioxidant content and its ability to retain its economical value during the postharvest period. The fruits were pretreated by modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with or without treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) before cold storage at 10°C. Changes in the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants, including the total phenolic, ascorbic acid levels and the total glutathione level, as well as enzymatic antioxidants, including ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT), were determined. Both treatments successfully extended the shelf life of the fruit for up to 25 days, and a high level of antioxidant capacity was maintained throughout the storage period. However, 1-MCP treatment maintained the high antioxidant capacity for a longer period of time. The 1-MCP-treated peppers maintained high levels of phenolic content, a high reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidised glutathione (GSSG) ratio, decreased levels of ascorbic acid and CAT activity, and increased levels of APX and GR compared with the peppers that were not treated with 1-MCP. The overall results suggested that a combination of 1-MCP and MAP was the most effective treatment for extending shelf life while retaining the nutritional benefits. PMID:22919322

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Initially regarded as “epigenetic modifiers” acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discuss synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer. PMID:24769080

  14. Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    McKimm‐Breschkin, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McKimm‐Breschkin (2012) Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: Antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 25–36. There are two major classes of antivirals available for the treatment and prevention of influenza, the M2 inhibitors and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). The M2 inhibitors are cheap, but they are only effective against influenza A viruses, and resistance arises rapidly. The current influenza A H3N2 and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are already resistant to the M2 inhibitors as are many H5N1 viruses. There are four NAIs licensed in some parts of the world, zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and a long‐acting NAI, laninamivir. This review focuses on resistance to the NAIs. Because of differences in their chemistry and subtle differences in NA structures, resistance can be both NAI‐ and subtype specific. This results in different drug resistance profiles, for example, the H274Y mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, but not to zanamivir, and only in N1 NAs. Mutations at E119, D198, I222, R292, and N294 can also reduce NAI sensitivity. In the winter of 2007–2008, an oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation emerged in the northern hemisphere and spread rapidly around the world. In contrast to earlier evidence of such resistant viruses being unfit, this mutant virus remained fully transmissible and pathogenic and became the major seasonal A(H1N1) virus globally within a year. This resistant A(H1N1) virus was displaced by the sensitive A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Approximately 0·5–1·0% of community A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates are currently resistant to oseltamivir. It is now apparent that variation in non‐active site amino acids can affect the fitness of the enzyme and compensate for mutations that confer high‐level oseltamivir resistance resulting in minimal impact on enzyme function. PMID:23279894

  15. Early Onset of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressant Action

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew J.; Freemantle, Nick; Geddes, John R.; Bhagwagar, Zubin

    2008-01-01

    Context: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are often described as having a delayed onset of effect in the treatment of depression. However, some trials have reported clinical improvement as early as the first week of treatment. Objective: To test the alternative hypotheses of delayed vs early onset of antidepressant action with SSRIs in patients with unipolar depression. Data Sources: Trials identified by searching CENTRAL, The Cochrane Collaboration database of controlled trials (2005), and the reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews. Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials of SSRIs vs placebo for the treatment of unipolar depression in adults that reported outcomes for at least 2 time points in the first 4 weeks of treatment (50 trials from >500 citations identified). Trials were excluded if limited to participants older than 65 years or specific comorbidities. Data Extraction: Data were extracted on trial design, participant characteristics, and outcomes by a single reviewer. Data Synthesis: Pooled estimates of treatment effect on depressive symptom rating scales were calculated for weeks 1 through 6 of treatment. In the primary analysis, the pattern of response seen was tested against alternative models of onset of response. The primary analysis incorporated data from 28 randomized controlled trials (n=5872). A model of early treatment response best fit the experimental data. Treatment with SSRIs rather than placebo was associated with clinical improvement by the end of the first week of use. A secondary analysis indicated an increased chance of achieving a 50% reduction in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores by 1 week (relative risk, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.25) with SSRI treatment compared with placebo. Conclusions: Treatment with SSRIs is associated with symptomatic improvement in depression by the end of the first week of use, and the improvement continues at a decreasing rate for at least 6

  16. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Rhoji; Murray, David B.; Metz, Thomas O.; Baynes, John

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation or glycoxidation end-products (AGE) increase in tissue proteins with age, and their rate of accumulation is increased in diabetes, nephropathy and inflammatory diseases. AGE inhibitors include a range of compounds that are proposed to act by trapping carbonyl and dicarbonyl intermediates in AGE formation. However, some among the newer generation of AGE inhibitors lack reactive functional groups that would trap reaction intermediates, indicating an alternative mechanism of action. We propose that AGE inhibitors function primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. The AGE-inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers is also consistent with their chelating activity. Finally, compounds described as AGE breakers, or their hydrolysis products, also have strong chelating activity, suggesting that these compounds also act through their chelating activity. We conclude that chelation is the common, and perhaps the primary, mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors and breakers, and that chronic, mild chelation therapy should prove useful in treatment of diabetes and age-related diseases characterized by oxidative stress, inflammation and increased chemical modification of tissue proteins by advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products.

  17. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  18. The naphthoquinone diospyrin is an inhibitor of DNA gyrase with a novel mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Karkare, Shantanu; Chung, Terence T H; Collin, Frederic; Mitchenall, Lesley A; McKay, Adam R; Greive, Sandra J; Meyer, Jacobus J M; Lall, Namrita; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-02-15

    Tuberculosis and other bacterial diseases represent a significant threat to human health. The DNA topoisomerases are excellent targets for chemotherapy, and DNA gyrase in particular is a well-validated target for antibacterial agents. Naphthoquinones (e.g. diospyrin and 7-methyljuglone) have been shown to have therapeutic potential, particularly against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have found that these compounds are inhibitors of the supercoiling reaction catalyzed by M. tuberculosis gyrase and other gyrases. Our evidence strongly suggests that the compounds bind to the N-terminal domain of GyrB, which contains the ATPase active site, but are not competitive inhibitors of the ATPase reaction. We propose that naphthoquinones bind to GyrB at a novel site close to the ATPase site. This novel mode of action could be exploited to develop new antibacterial agents. PMID:23275348

  19. The Naphthoquinone Diospyrin Is an Inhibitor of DNA Gyrase with a Novel Mechanism of Action*

    PubMed Central

    Karkare, Shantanu; Chung, Terence T. H.; Collin, Frederic; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; McKay, Adam R.; Greive, Sandra J.; Meyer, Jacobus J. M.; Lall, Namrita; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis and other bacterial diseases represent a significant threat to human health. The DNA topoisomerases are excellent targets for chemotherapy, and DNA gyrase in particular is a well-validated target for antibacterial agents. Naphthoquinones (e.g. diospyrin and 7-methyljuglone) have been shown to have therapeutic potential, particularly against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have found that these compounds are inhibitors of the supercoiling reaction catalyzed by M. tuberculosis gyrase and other gyrases. Our evidence strongly suggests that the compounds bind to the N-terminal domain of GyrB, which contains the ATPase active site, but are not competitive inhibitors of the ATPase reaction. We propose that naphthoquinones bind to GyrB at a novel site close to the ATPase site. This novel mode of action could be exploited to develop new antibacterial agents. PMID:23275348

  20. New Class of HIV-1 Integrase (IN) Inhibitors with a Dual Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kan, Elaine; Lansdon, Eric B.; Huang, Wayne; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Xu, Yili; Mitchell, Michael; Guo, Hongyan; Babaoglu, Kerim; Liu, Xiaohong; Geleziunas, Romas; Sakowicz, Roman

    2012-01-01

    tert-Butoxy-(4-phenyl-quinolin-3-yl)-acetic acids (tBPQA) are a new class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors that are structurally distinct from IN strand transfer inhibitors but analogous to LEDGINs. LEDGINs are a class of potent antiviral compounds that interacts with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding pocket on IN and were identified through competition binding against LEDGF. LEDGF tethers IN to the host chromatin and enables targeted integration of viral DNA. The prevailing understanding of the antiviral mechanism of LEDGINs is that they inhibit LEDGF binding to IN, which prevents targeted integration of HIV-1. We showed that in addition to the properties already known for LEDGINs, the binding of tBPQAs to the IN dimer interface inhibits IN enzymatic activity in a LEDGF-independent manner. Using the analysis of two long terminal repeat junctions in HIV-infected cells, we showed that the inhibition by tBPQAs occurs at or prior to the viral DNA 3′-processing step. Biochemical studies revealed that this inhibition operates by compound-induced conformational changes in the IN dimer that prevent proper assembly of IN onto viral DNA. For the first time, tBPQAs were demonstrated to be allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN displaying a dual mode of action: inhibition of IN-viral DNA assembly and inhibition of IN-LEDGF interaction. PMID:22535962

  1. New class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors with a dual mode of action.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kan, Elaine; Lansdon, Eric B; Huang, Wayne; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Xu, Yili; Mitchell, Michael; Guo, Hongyan; Babaoglu, Kerim; Liu, Xiaohong; Geleziunas, Romas; Sakowicz, Roman

    2012-06-15

    tert-Butoxy-(4-phenyl-quinolin-3-yl)-acetic acids (tBPQA) are a new class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors that are structurally distinct from IN strand transfer inhibitors but analogous to LEDGINs. LEDGINs are a class of potent antiviral compounds that interacts with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding pocket on IN and were identified through competition binding against LEDGF. LEDGF tethers IN to the host chromatin and enables targeted integration of viral DNA. The prevailing understanding of the antiviral mechanism of LEDGINs is that they inhibit LEDGF binding to IN, which prevents targeted integration of HIV-1. We showed that in addition to the properties already known for LEDGINs, the binding of tBPQAs to the IN dimer interface inhibits IN enzymatic activity in a LEDGF-independent manner. Using the analysis of two long terminal repeat junctions in HIV-infected cells, we showed that the inhibition by tBPQAs occurs at or prior to the viral DNA 3'-processing step. Biochemical studies revealed that this inhibition operates by compound-induced conformational changes in the IN dimer that prevent proper assembly of IN onto viral DNA. For the first time, tBPQAs were demonstrated to be allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN displaying a dual mode of action: inhibition of IN-viral DNA assembly and inhibition of IN-LEDGF interaction. PMID:22535962

  2. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M.; Ogilvie, Donald J.; Ward, Simon E.; Atack, John R.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5′-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a ‘humanized’ form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  3. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2.

    PubMed

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E; Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M; Ogilvie, Donald J; Ward, Simon E; Atack, John R; Pearl, Laurence H; Caldecott, Keith W; Oliver, Antony W

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a 'humanized' form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  4. Identification and Characterization of Novel Classes of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Inhibitors with Distinct Mechanisms of Action*

    PubMed Central

    Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; El-Turk, Farah; Fauvet, Bruno; Cho, Min-Kyu; Pinar Karpinar, Damla; Le Roy, Didier; Dewor, Manfred; Roger, Thierry; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Calandra, Thierry; Zweckstetter, Markus; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine, is considered an attractive therapeutic target in multiple inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. In addition to its known biologic activities, MIF can also function as a tautomerase. Several small molecules have been reported to be effective inhibitors of MIF tautomerase activity in vitro. Herein we employed a robust activity-based assay to identify different classes of novel inhibitors of the catalytic and biological activities of MIF. Several novel chemical classes of inhibitors of the catalytic activity of MIF with IC50 values in the range of 0.2–15.5 μm were identified and validated. The interaction site and mechanism of action of these inhibitors were defined using structure-activity studies and a battery of biochemical and biophysical methods. MIF inhibitors emerging from these studies could be divided into three categories based on their mechanism of action: 1) molecules that covalently modify the catalytic site at the N-terminal proline residue, Pro1; 2) a novel class of catalytic site inhibitors; and finally 3) molecules that disrupt the trimeric structure of MIF. Importantly, all inhibitors demonstrated total inhibition of MIF-mediated glucocorticoid overriding and AKT phosphorylation, whereas ebselen, a trimer-disrupting inhibitor, additionally acted as a potent hyperagonist in MIF-mediated chemotactic migration. The identification of biologically active compounds with known toxicity, pharmacokinetic properties, and biological activities in vivo should accelerate the development of clinically relevant MIF inhibitors. Furthermore, the diversity of chemical structures and mechanisms of action of our inhibitors makes them ideal mechanistic probes for elucidating the structure-function relationships of MIF and to further determine the role of the oligomerization state and catalytic activity of MIF in regulating the function(s) of MIF in health and disease. PMID:20516071

  5. [Mode of action, clinical profile and relevance of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in glaucoma therapy].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M

    2013-02-01

    Since their introduction the local carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAH) dorzolamide and brinzolamide have become well established in the drug therapy of glaucoma. They lower intraocular pressure (IOP) by blocking specifically carbonic anhydrase in the ciliary epithelium and thereby the secretion of aqueous humor. The IOP lowering effect is comparable with that of beta-blockers, but less than that of prostaglandin agonists. Because of their specific mode of action they produce an additive pressure lowering effect with any other glaucoma drug. Therefore they are ideal for being combined with other drugs. In addition, CAH may improve perfusion of the posterior eye. Preliminary results in glaucoma patients under dorzolamide therapy suggesting a reduction in the risk of progression due to enhanced blood flow need further confirmation. PMID:23430679

  6. Action of Protein Synthesis Inhibitors in Blocking Electrogenic H+ Efflux from Corn Roots 12

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Chris J.; Lafayette, Peter R.; Hanson, John B.

    1981-01-01

    The block in the electrogenic H+ efflux produced by protein synthesis inhibitors in corn root tissue can be released or by-passed by addition of fusicoccin or nigericin. The inhibition also lowers cell potential, and the release repolarizes. Associated with the inhibition of H+ efflux is inhibition of K+ influx and the growth of the root tip; fusicoccin partially relieves these inhibitions, but nigericin does not. The inhibition of H+ efflux which arises from blocking the proton channel of the ATPase by oligomycin or N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide can also be partially relieved by fusicoccin, but not by nigericin; the inhibition produced by diethylstilbestrol is not relieved by fusicoccin. The results are discussed in terms of the presumed mode of action of fusicoccin on the plasmalemma ATPase. Inhibition of protein synthesis appears to inactivate the proton channel of the ATPase, possibly as the indirect result of disrupted metabolism. Fusicoccin reactivates or bypasses the blocked channel. PMID:16661763

  7. Dipeptidyl Enoates As Potent Rhodesain Inhibitors That Display a Dual Mode of Action.

    PubMed

    Royo, Santiago; Rodríguez, Santiago; Schirmeister, Tanja; Kesselring, Jochen; Kaiser, Marcel; González, Florenci V

    2015-09-01

    Dipeptidyl enoates were prepared through a high-yielding two-step synthetic route. They have a dipeptidic structure with a 4-oxoenoate moiety as a warhead with multiple reactive sites. Dipeptidyl enoates were screened against rhodesain and human cathepsins B and L, and were found to be potent and selective inhibitors of rhodesain. Among them (S,E)-ethyl 5-((S)-2-{[(benzyloxy)carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamido)-7-methyl-4-oxooct-2-enoate (6) was the most potent, with an IC50 value of 16.4 nM and kinact /Ki =1.6×10(6)  M(-1)  s(-1) against rhodesain. These dipeptidyl enoates display a reversible mode of inhibition at very low concentrations and an irreversible mode at higher concentrations. Inhibition kinetics data, supported by docking studies, suggest a dual mode of action via attack of cysteine thiolate at two reactive positions. PMID:26179752

  8. Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase; Mode of Action and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Eltahla, Auda A; Luciani, Fabio; White, Peter A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A

    2015-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a pandemic human pathogen posing a substantial health and economic burden in both developing and developed countries. Controlling the spread of HCV through behavioural prevention strategies has met with limited success and vaccine development remains slow. The development of antiviral therapeutic agents has also been challenging, primarily due to the lack of efficient cell culture and animal models for all HCV genotypes, as well as the large genetic diversity between HCV strains. On the other hand, the use of interferon-α-based treatments in combination with the guanosine analogue, ribavirin, achieved limited success, and widespread use of these therapies has been hampered by prevalent side effects. For more than a decade, the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) has been targeted for antiviral development, and direct-acting antivirals (DAA) have been identified which bind to one of at least six RdRp inhibitor-binding sites, and are now becoming a mainstay of highly effective and well tolerated antiviral treatment for HCV infection. Here we review the different classes of RdRp inhibitors and their mode of action against HCV. Furthermore, the mechanism of antiviral resistance to each class is described, including naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in different viral strains and genotypes. Finally, we review the impact of these RAVs on treatment outcomes with the newly developed regimens. PMID:26426038

  9. Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase; Mode of Action and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Eltahla, Auda A.; Luciani, Fabio; White, Peter A.; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Bull, Rowena A.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a pandemic human pathogen posing a substantial health and economic burden in both developing and developed countries. Controlling the spread of HCV through behavioural prevention strategies has met with limited success and vaccine development remains slow. The development of antiviral therapeutic agents has also been challenging, primarily due to the lack of efficient cell culture and animal models for all HCV genotypes, as well as the large genetic diversity between HCV strains. On the other hand, the use of interferon-α-based treatments in combination with the guanosine analogue, ribavirin, achieved limited success, and widespread use of these therapies has been hampered by prevalent side effects. For more than a decade, the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) has been targeted for antiviral development. Direct acting antivirals (DAA) have been identified which bind to one of at least six RdRp inhibitor-binding sites, and are now becoming a mainstay of highly effective and well tolerated antiviral treatment for HCV infection. Here we review the different classes of RdRp inhibitors and their mode of action against HCV. Furthermore, the mechanism of antiviral resistance to each class is described, including naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in different viral strains and genotypes. Finally, we review the impact of these RAVs on treatment outcomes with the newly developed regimens. PMID:26426038

  10. Decoding the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Action of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors Using Epimastigotes as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Sangenito, Leandro S.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; d′Avila-Levy, Claudia M.; Branquinha, Marta H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspartic peptidase inhibitors have shown antimicrobial action against distinct microorganisms. Due to an increase in the occurrence of Chagas' disease/AIDS co-infection, we decided to explore the effects of HIV aspartic peptidase inhibitors (HIV-PIs) on Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Methodology and Principal Findings HIV-PIs presented an anti-proliferative action on epimastigotes of T. cruzi clone Dm28c, with IC50 values ranging from 0.6 to 14 µM. The most effective inhibitors, ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir, also had an anti-proliferative effect against different phylogenetic T. cruzi strains. The HIV-PIs induced some morphological alterations in clone Dm28c epimastigotes, as reduced cell size and swollen of the cellular body. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar membrane, mitochondrion and reservosomes are the main targets of HIV-PIs in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Curiously, an increase in the epimastigote-into-trypomastigote differentiation process of clone Dm28c was observed, with many of these parasites presenting morphological alterations including the detachment of flagellum from the cell body. The pre-treatment with the most effective HIV-PIs drastically reduced the interaction process between epimastigotes and the invertebrate vector Rhodnius prolixus. It was also noted that HIV-PIs induced an increase in the expression of gp63-like and calpain-related molecules, and decreased the cruzipain expression in epimastigotes as judged by flow cytometry and immunoblotting assays. The hydrolysis of a cathepsin D fluorogenic substrate was inhibited by all HIV-PIs in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the aspartic peptidase could be a possible target to these drugs. Additionally, we verified that ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir reduced drastically the viability of clone Dm28c trypomastigotes, causing many morphological damages. Conclusions and Significance The results contribute to understand

  11. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  12. Studies on the mechanism of action of benzamide riboside: a novel inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, Kamran; Grünberger, Werner; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2002-04-01

    Benzamide is a well known inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair. However, benzamide exhibited neuotoxicity in animals and hence, in the hope of overcoming this problem, benzamide riboside (BR) was synthesized. Our mechanism of action studies on BR suggested that the agent was being metabolized to its 5'-monophosphate and then to its NAD analogue (BAD, benzamide adenine dinucleotide) that inhibits Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme of the branched purine nucleotide synthetic pathway that provides guanylates including GTP and dGTP. There are two isoforms of IMPDH, type I that is constitutively present in all cells, and type II that is inducible and is present in highly proliferating cells such as cancer. Ongoing studies with BR analogues suggest that they are more selective in inhibiting IMPDH type II. Our studies have characterized the metabolites of BR, especially its NAD analogue, BAD, by synthesizing this active metabolite by enzymatic means, and identifying its structure by NMR and mass spectrometry. We have partially purified IMPDH from tumor cells and have examined the kinetics of inhibition of IMPDH by BAD. We have also compared biochemical and cytotoxic activities of BR with tiazofurin and selenazofurin, that share similar mechanisms of action with BR. Our studies demonstrated that 2-3-fold more BAD is formed compared to TAD and SAD, the active metabolites of tiazofurin and selenazofurin, respectively. BR has demonstrated potent cytotoxic activity in a diverse group of human tumor cells, specifically more active in sarcomas and CNS neoplasms compared to tiazofurin or selenazofurin. Future in vivo animal studies should set a stage for determining its effectiveness in clinical Phase I studies. PMID:11966437

  13. Molecular Simulations of Solved Co-crystallized X-Ray Structures Identify Action Mechanisms of PDEδ Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Mestanoglu, Mert; Yurtsever, Mine; Noskov, Sergei Y; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-09-15

    PDEδ is a small protein that binds and controls the trafficking of RAS subfamily proteins. Its inhibition protects initiation of RAS signaling, and it is one of the common targets considered for oncological drug development. In this study, we used solved x-ray structures of inhibitor-bound PDEδ targets to investigate mechanisms of action of six independent all-atom MD simulations. An analysis of atomic simulations combined with the molecular mechanic-Poisson-Boltzmann solvent accessible surface area/generalized Born solvent accessible surface area calculations led to the identification of action mechanisms for a panel of novel PDEδ inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this study is one of the first in silico investigations on co-crystallized PDEδ protein. A detailed atomic-scale understanding of the molecular mechanism of PDEδ inhibition may assist in the design of novel PDEδ inhibitors. One of the most common side effects for diverse small molecules/kinase inhibitors is their off-target interactions with cardiac ion channels and human-ether-a-go-go channel specifically. Thus, all of the studied PDEδ inhibitors are also screened in silico at the central cavities of hERG1 potassium channels. PMID:26340817

  14. The new horizons of pharmacotherapy. Unexpected pharmacological actions and a new therapeutic strategy of phosphodiesterase–5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Benign prostate hyperplasia and erectile dysfunction affect a significant subset of men. BPH and ED may have the same promoting conditions and are the strong predicting risk factors to each other. A significant number of these patients are bothered by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Direct correlation of age, sexual dysfunction and LUTS severity has been well documented. Many sexually dysfunctional patients with concomitant BPH receive alpha–adrenergic antagonists and any Phosphodiesterase–5 (PDE5) inhibitor simultaneously. PDE5 inhibitors relieve LUTS symptoms in the course of BPH and reduce independent detrusor contractions. This paper presents the results of clinical trials on the efficacy of PDE5 inhibitors on LUTS, new perspectives on its use and newly–identified side effects. Material and methods The review is based on an internet search of PubMed and Medscape databases. The search terms were as follows: LUTS and ED, BPH and phosphodiesterase–5 inhibitors, LUTS clinical trials, phosphodiesterase–5 inhibitors mechanisms. Results Clinical trials show an epidemiological and pathophysiological relationship between BPH, LUTS and ED. Numerous studies reveal the alleviating effect of phosphodiesterase–5 inhibitors on LUTS, expressed as the reduction of IPSS score, but not followed by a change in Qmax. Opponents raise a link of PDE5 inhibitors with increased risk of melanoma. New studies reveal that phosphodiesterase–5 inhibitors are effective in the treatment of neurological disorders. Conclusions Researches reveal the efficacy of phosphodiesterase–5 inhibitors in LUTS along with an improvement of erectile function. The molecular mechanism of action of such drugs suggests imminent novel applications. Potential benefits will be multidimensional. Unfortunately, interfering with particular molecular mechanisms may alleviate some diseases, but may lay groundwork for others – new and even more devastating. PMID:25247094

  15. TWISTED DWARF1 Mediates the Action of Auxin Transport Inhibitors on Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinsheng; Bailly, Aurelien; Zwiewka, Marta; Sovero, Valpuri; Di Donato, Martin; Ge, Pei; Oehri, Jacqueline; Aryal, Bibek; Hao, Pengchao; Linnert, Miriam; Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias; Michel, Max; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Pollmann, Stephan; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Ferro, Noel; Fukao, Yoichiro; Hoffmann, Céline; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Friml, Jiří; Thomas, Clément; Geisler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth and architecture is regulated by the polar distribution of the hormone auxin. Polarity and flexibility of this process is provided by constant cycling of auxin transporter vesicles along actin filaments, coordinated by a positive auxin-actin feedback loop. Both polar auxin transport and vesicle cycling are inhibited by synthetic auxin transport inhibitors, such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), counteracting the effect of auxin; however, underlying targets and mechanisms are unclear. Using NMR, we map the NPA binding surface on the Arabidopsis thaliana ABCB chaperone TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1). We identify ACTIN7 as a relevant, although likely indirect, TWD1 interactor, and show TWD1-dependent regulation of actin filament organization and dynamics and that TWD1 is required for NPA-mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The TWD1-ACTIN7 axis controls plasma membrane presence of efflux transporters, and as a consequence act7 and twd1 share developmental and physiological phenotypes indicative of defects in auxin transport. These can be phenocopied by NPA treatment or by chemical actin (de)stabilization. We provide evidence that TWD1 determines downstream locations of auxin efflux transporters by adjusting actin filament debundling and dynamizing processes and mediating NPA action on the latter. This function appears to be evolutionary conserved since TWD1 expression in budding yeast alters actin polarization and cell polarity and provides NPA sensitivity. PMID:27053424

  16. Identification and Mechanism of Action of a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Arenavirus Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Nhi; Cubitt, Beatrice; Iwasaki, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and represent important public health problems in the regions where these viruses are endemic. In addition, evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is an important neglected human pathogen. There are no licensed arenavirus vaccines and current antiarenavirus therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. Therefore, there is an unmet need for novel antiarenaviral therapeutics. Here, we report the generation of a novel recombinant LCM virus and its use to develop a cell-based high-throughput screen to rapidly identify inhibitors of LCMV multiplication. We used this novel assay to screen a library of 30,400 small molecules and identified compound F3406 (chemical name: N-[3,5-bis(fluoranyl)phenyl]-2-[5,7-bis(oxidanylidene)-6-propyl-2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-[1,3]thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidin-4-yl]ethanamide), which exhibited strong anti-LCMV activity in the absence of cell toxicity. Mechanism-of-action studies revealed that F3406 inhibited LCMV cell entry by specifically interfering with the pH-dependent fusion in the endosome compartment that is mediated by LCMV glycoprotein GP2 and required to release the virus ribonucleoprotein into the cell cytoplasm to initiate transcription and replication of the virus genome. We identified residue M437 within the transmembrane domain of GP2 as critical for virus susceptibility to F3406. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses (HFA) are important human pathogens that cause high morbidity and mortality in areas where these viruses are endemic. In addition, evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Concerns posed by arenavirus infections are aggravated by the lack of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-licensed arenavirus vaccines and current

  17. Mechanism of Action of 2-Aminobenzamide HDAC Inhibitors in Reversing Gene Silencing in Friedreich’s Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Soragni, Elisabetta; Chou, C. James; Rusche, James R.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic defect in Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is the hyperexpansion of a GAA•TTC triplet in the first intron of the FXN gene, encoding the essential mitochondrial protein frataxin. Histone post-translational modifications near the expanded repeats are consistent with heterochromatin formation and consequent FXN gene silencing. Using a newly developed human neuronal cell model, derived from patient-induced pluripotent stem cells, we find that 2-aminobenzamide histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase FXN mRNA levels and frataxin protein in FRDA neuronal cells. However, only compounds targeting the class I HDACs 1 and 3 are active in increasing FXN mRNA in these cells. Structural analogs of the active HDAC inhibitors that selectively target either HDAC1 or HDAC3 do not show similar increases in FXN mRNA levels. To understand the mechanism of action of these compounds, we probed the kinetic properties of the active and inactive inhibitors, and found that only compounds that target HDACs 1 and 3 exhibited a slow-on/slow-off mechanism of action for the HDAC enzymes. HDAC1- and HDAC3-selective compounds did not show this activity. Using siRNA methods in the FRDA neuronal cells, we show increases in FXN mRNA upon silencing of either HDACs 1 or 3, suggesting the possibility that inhibition of each of these class I HDACs is necessary for activation of FXN mRNA synthesis, as there appears to be redundancy in the silencing mechanism caused by the GAA•TTC repeats. Moreover, inhibitors must have a long residence time on their target enzymes for this activity. By interrogating microarray data from neuronal cells treated with inhibitors of different specificity, we selected two genes encoding histone macroH2A (H2AFY2) and Polycomb group ring finger 2 (PCGF2) that were specifically down-regulated by the inhibitors targeting HDACs1 and 3 versus the more selective inhibitors for further investigation. Both genes are involved in transcriptional repression and we

  18. Use of Network Inference to Unravel the Mechanisms of Action and Specificity of Aromatase Inhibitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled through various feedback mechanisms in order to maintain a dynamic homeostasis during changing environmental conditions, including exposure to chemical stressors. In this study, three aromatase inhibitors, fad...

  19. ATP Synthase and the Actions of Inhibitors Utilized To Study Its Roles in Human Health, Disease, and Other Scientific Areas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sangjin; Pedersen, Peter L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: ATP synthase, a double-motor enzyme, plays various roles in the cell, participating not only in ATP synthesis but in ATP hydrolysis-dependent processes and in the regulation of a proton gradient across some membrane-dependent systems. Recent studies of ATP synthase as a potential molecular target for the treatment of some human diseases have displayed promising results, and this enzyme is now emerging as an attractive molecular target for the development of new therapies for a variety of diseases. Significantly, ATP synthase, because of its complex structure, is inhibited by a number of different inhibitors and provides diverse possibilities in the development of new ATP synthase-directed agents. In this review, we classify over 250 natural and synthetic inhibitors of ATP synthase reported to date and present their inhibitory sites and their known or proposed modes of action. The rich source of ATP synthase inhibitors and their known or purported sites of action presented in this review should provide valuable insights into their applications as potential scaffolds for new therapeutics for human and animal diseases as well as for the discovery of new pesticides and herbicides to help protect the world's food supply. Finally, as ATP synthase is now known to consist of two unique nanomotors involved in making ATP from ADP and Pi, the information provided in this review may greatly assist those investigators entering the emerging field of nanotechnology. PMID:19052322

  20. Structure and mechanism of action of the hydroxy aryl aldehyde class of IRE1 endoribonuclease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Mario; Duffy, Nicole M.; Talukdar, Manisha; Thevakumaran, Nero; Chiovitti, David; Canny, Marella D.; Lee, Kenneth; Kurinov, Igor; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Poda, Gennadiy; Prakesch, Michael; Wilson, Brian; Tam, Victor; Schweitzer, Colleen; Toro, Andras; Lucas, Julie L.; Vuga, Danka; Lehmann, Lynn; Durocher, Daniel; Zeng, Qingping; Patterson, John B.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the unfolded protein response and its dysfunction is linked to multiple diseases. The stress transducer IRE1α is a transmembrane kinase endoribonuclease (RNase) that cleaves mRNA substrates to re-establish ER homeostasis. Aromatic ring systems containing hydroxy-aldehyde moieties, termed hydroxy aryl aldehydes (HAA), selectively inhibit IRE1α RNase and thus represent a novel chemical series for therapeutic development. We solved crystal structures of murine IRE1α in complex with three HAA inhibitors. HAA inhibitors engage a shallow pocket at the RNase active site through pi-stacking interactions with His910 and Phe889, an essential Schiff base with Lys907 and a H-bond with Tyr892. Structure activity studies and mutational analysis of contact residues define the optimal chemical space of inhibitors and validate the inhibitor binding site. These studies lay the foundation for understanding both the biochemical and cellular functions of IRE1α using small molecule inhibitors and suggest new avenues for inhibitor design. PMID:25164867

  1. Novel Bifunctional Quinolonyl Diketo Acid Derivatives as HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Activities and Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Roux, Alessandra; Artico, Marino; Lavecchia, Antonio; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Palmisano, Lucia; Andreotti, Mauro; Amici, Roberta; Galluzzo, Clementina Maria; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    The virally encoded integrase protein is an essential enzyme in the life cycle of the HIV-1 virus and represents an attractive and validated target in the development of therapeutics against HIV infection. Drugs that selectively inhibit this enzyme, when used in combination with inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease, are believed to be highly effective in suppressing the viral replication. Among the HIV-1 integrase inhibitors, the β-diketo acids (DKAs) represent a major lead for anti-HIV-1drug development. In this study, novel bifunctional quinolonyl diketo acid derivatives were designed, synthesized and tested for their inhibitory ability against HIV-1 integrase. The compounds are potent inhibitors of integrase activity. Particularly, derivative 8 is a potent IN inhibitor for both steps of the reaction (3′-processing and strand transfer) and exhibits both high antiviral activity against HIV-1 infected cells and low cytotoxicity. Molecular modeling studies provide a plausible mechanism of action, which is consistent with ligand SARs and enzyme photo-crosslinking experiments. PMID:16539381

  2. Structurally diverse c-Myc inhibitors share a common mechanism of action involving ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabo; Sharma, Lokendra; Lu, Jie; Finch, Paul; Fletcher, Steven; Prochownik, Edward V

    2015-06-30

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein is deregulated in a large proportion of diverse human cancers. Considerable effort has therefore been directed at identifying pharmacologic inhibitors as potential anti-neoplastic agents. Three such groups of small molecule inhibitors have been described. The first is comprised of so-called "direct" inhibitors, which perturb Myc's ability to form productive DNA-binding heterodimers in association with its partner, Max. The second group is comprised of indirect inhibitors, which largely function by targeting the BET-domain protein BRD4 to prevent the proper formation of transcriptional complexes that assemble in response to Myc-Max DNA binding. Thirdly, synthetic lethal inhibitors cause the selective apoptosis of Myc over-expressing either by promoting mitotic catastrophe or altering Myc protein stability. We report here a common mechanism by which all Myc inhibitors, irrespective of class, lead to eventual cellular demise. This involves the depletion of ATP stores due to mitochondrial dysfunction and the eventual down-regulation of Myc protein. The accompanying metabolic de-regulation causes neutral lipid accumulation, cell cycle arrest, and an attempt to rectify the ATP deficit by up-regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). These responses are ultimately futile due to the lack of functional Myc to support the requisite anabolic response. Finally, the effects of Myc depletion on ATP levels, cell cycle arrest, differentiation and AMPK activation can be mimicked by pharmacologic inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain without affecting Myc levels. Thus, all Myc inhibitors promote a global energy collapse that appears to underlie many of their phenotypic consequences. PMID:26036281

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor ameliorates early renal injury through its anti-inflammatory action in a rat model of type 1 diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kodera, Ryo; Shikata, Kenichi; Takatsuka, Tetsuharu; Oda, Kaori; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Kajitani, Nobuo; Hirota, Daisho; Ono, Tetsuichiro; Usui, Hitomi Kataoka; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •DPP-4 inhibitor decreased urinary albumin excretion in a rat of type 1 diabetes. •DPP-4 inhibitor ameliorated histlogical changes of diabetic nephropathy. •DPP-4 inhibitor has reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action. •DPP-4 inhibitor is beneficial on diabetic nephropathy besides lowering blood glucose. -- Abstract: Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are incretin-based drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes. In our previous study, we showed that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist has reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action. The mechanism of action of DPP-4 inhibitor is different from that of GLP-1 receptor agonists. It is not obvious whether DPP-4 inhibitor prevents the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy through anti-inflammatory effects besides lowering blood glucose or not. The purpose of this study is to clarify the reno-protective effects of DPP-4 inhibitor through anti-inflammatory actions in the early diabetic nephropathy. Materials and methods: Five-week-old male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups; non-diabetes, diabetes and diabetes treated with DPP-4 inhibitor (PKF275-055; 3 mg/kg/day). PKF275-055 was administered orally for 8 weeks. Results: PKF275-055 increased the serum active GLP-1 concentration and the production of urinary cyclic AMP. PKF275-055 decreased urinary albumin excretion and ameliorated histological change of diabetic nephropathy. Macrophage infiltration was inhibited, and inflammatory molecules were down-regulated by PKF275-055 in the glomeruli. In addition, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity was suppressed in the kidney. Conclusions: These results indicate that DPP-4 inhibitor, PKF275-055, have reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy. The endogenous biological active GLP-1 might be beneficial on diabetic nephropathy besides lowering blood glucose.

  4. P21Cip1 is a critical mediator of the cytotoxic action of thymidylate synthase inhibitors in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Geller, James I; Szekely-Szucs, Kinga; Petak, Istvan; Doyle, Belinda; Houghton, Janet A

    2004-09-01

    We have demonstrated previously that interferon (IFN)-gamma sensitizes human colon carcinoma cell lines to the cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil combined with leucovorin and to the thymidylate synthase inhibitor, ZD9331, dependent on thymineless stress-induced DNA damage, independent of p53. Here we demonstrate that the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21(Cip1) regulates thymineless stress-induced cytotoxicity in these cells. HCT116 wild-type (wt) and p53-/- cells underwent apoptosis and loss in clonogenic survival when exposed to ZD9331, whereas p21Cip1-/- cells were resistant. In contrast, IFN-gamma induced marked cytotoxicity in p21Cip1-/- cells only. ZD9331 induced p21Cip1 up-regulation in all of the cell lines examined, as did thymidine deprivation in thymidylate synthase-deficient (thymidylate synthase-) cells. Furthermore, selective induction of p21Cip1 in RKO was sufficient to induce apoptosis. P21Cip1, cdk1, cdk2, and cyclin E mRNA expression increased coincident with S-phase accumulation in HT29 cells treated with ZD9331 or 5fluorouracil/leucovorin, as demonstrated by cDNA microarray analyses. Cell cycle analyses revealed that HCT116 wt and p21Cip1 -/- cells accumulated in S phase within 24 h of ZD9331 exposure; however, wt cells exited S-phase more rapidly, where apoptosis occurred before mitosis, either in late S or G2. Finally, the CDK inhibitor roscovitine potentiated the cytotoxic activity of ZD9331 in both wt and p21Cip1-/- cells, strongly suggesting a role for p21Cip1-dependent CDK inhibition in cytotoxicity induced by thymidylate synthase inhibition. In summary, p21Cip1 positively regulates the cytotoxic action of thymidylate synthase inhibitors, negatively regulates the cytotoxic action of IFN-gamma, and enhances S-phase exit after thymineless stress, possibly via interaction with CDK-cyclin complexes. PMID:15342418

  5. Free energy calculation provides insight into the action mechanism of selective PARP-1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ran

    2016-04-01

    Selective poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 inhibitor represents promising therapy against cancers with a good balance between efficacy and safety. Owing to the conserved structure between PARP-1 and PARP-2, most of the clinical and experimental drugs show equivalent inhibition against both targets. Most recently, it's disclosed a highly selective PARP-1 inhibitor (NMS-P118) with promising pharmacokinetic properties. Herein, we combined molecular simulation with free energy calculation to gain insights into the selective mechanism of NMS-P118. Our results suggest the reduction of binding affinity for PARP-2 is attributed to the unfavorable conformational change of protein, which is accompanied by a significant energy penalty. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis study further reveals the important role for a tyrosine residue of donor loop (Tyr889(PARP-1) and Tyr455(PARP-2)) in contributing to the ligand selectivity. Retrospective structural analysis indicates the ligand-induced movement of Tyr455(PARP-2) disrupts the intra-molecule hydrogen bonding network, which partially accounts for the "high-energy" protein conformation in the presence of NMS-P118. Interestingly, such effect isn't observed in other non-selective PARP inhibitors including BMN673 and A861695, which validates the computational prediction. Our work provides energetic insight into the subtle variations in the crystal structures and could facilitate rational design of new selective PARP inhibitor. PMID:26969680

  6. Diphenylamine Metabolism in 'Braeburn' Apples Stored under Conditions Conducive to Development of Internal Browning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative metabolism and ethylene action were evaluated as factors influencing development of ‘Braeburn’ apple internal browning and cavitation during cold storage. Apples treated with the antioxidant diphenylamine (DPA) and/or the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene were held at 1 oC fo...

  7. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: a Comprehensive Review of the Pharmacology, Mechanism of Action, Substrate Specificity, and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.; Chen, Ying; Ellermann, Manuel; Nicolaou, Kyriacos C.; Juvonen, Risto O.; Petersen, Dennis; Deitrich, Richard A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) belong to a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in the metabolism of aldehydes of both endogenous and exogenous derivation. The human ALDH superfamily comprises 19 isozymes that possess important physiological and toxicological functions. The ALDH1A subfamily plays a pivotal role in embryogenesis and development by mediating retinoic acid signaling. ALDH2, as a key enzyme that oxidizes acetaldehyde, is crucial for alcohol metabolism. ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are lens and corneal crystallins, which are essential elements of the cellular defense mechanism against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage in ocular tissues. Many ALDH isozymes are important in oxidizing reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and thereby help maintain cellular homeostasis. Increased expression and activity of ALDH isozymes have been reported in various human cancers and are associated with cancer relapse. As a direct consequence of their significant physiological and toxicological roles, inhibitors of the ALDH enzymes have been developed to treat human diseases. This review summarizes known ALDH inhibitors, their mechanisms of action, isozyme selectivity, potency, and clinical uses. The purpose of this review is to 1) establish the current status of pharmacological inhibition of the ALDHs, 2) provide a rationale for the continued development of ALDH isozyme-selective inhibitors, and 3) identify the challenges and potential therapeutic rewards associated with the creation of such agents. PMID:22544865

  8. Meleagrin, a new FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chryosogenum with at least one additional mode of action.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chang Ji; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Won-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) is a promising novel antibacterial target. We isolated a new class of FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chrysogenum, which produces various antibiotics, the mechanisms of some of them are unknown. The isolated FabI inhibitor was determined to be meleagrin by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, and its more active and inactive derivatives were chemically prepared. Consistent with their selective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus FabI, meleagrin and its more active derivatives directly bound to S. aureus FabI in a fluorescence quenching assay, inhibited intracellular fatty acid biosynthesis and growth of S. aureus, and increased the minimum inhibitory concentration for fabI-overexpressing S. aureus. The compounds that were not effective against the FabK isoform, however, inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae that contained only the FabK isoform. Additionally no resistant mutant to the compounds was obtained. Importantly, fabK-overexpressing Escherichia coli was not resistant to these compounds, but was resistant to triclosan. These results demonstrate that the compounds inhibited another target in addition to FabI. Thus, meleagrin is a new class of FabI inhibitor with at least one additional mode of action that could have potential for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24312171

  9. Meleagrin, a New FabI Inhibitor from Penicillium chryosogenum with at Least One Additional Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chang Ji; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Won-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) is a promising novel antibacterial target. We isolated a new class of FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chrysogenum, which produces various antibiotics, the mechanisms of some of them are unknown. The isolated FabI inhibitor was determined to be meleagrin by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, and its more active and inactive derivatives were chemically prepared. Consistent with their selective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus FabI, meleagrin and its more active derivatives directly bound to S. aureus FabI in a fluorescence quenching assay, inhibited intracellular fatty acid biosynthesis and growth of S. aureus, and increased the minimum inhibitory concentration for fabI-overexpressing S. aureus. The compounds that were not effective against the FabK isoform, however, inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae that contained only the FabK isoform. Additionally no resistant mutant to the compounds was obtained. Importantly, fabK-overexpressing Escherichia coli was not resistant to these compounds, but was resistant to triclosan. These results demonstrate that the compounds inhibited another target in addition to FabI. Thus, meleagrin is a new class of FabI inhibitor with at least one additional mode of action that could have potential for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24312171

  10. Antiplasmodial Activity and Mechanism of Action of RSM-932A, a Promising Synergistic Inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tahl; Moneriz, Carlos; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José Manuel; Gómez del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of action of inhibition of the choline kinase of P. falciparum (p.f.-ChoK) by two inhibitors of the human ChoKα, MN58b and RSM-932A, which have previously been shown to be potent antitumoral agents. The efficacy of these inhibitors against p.f.-ChoK is investigated using enzymatic and in vitro assays. While MN58b may enter the choline/phosphocholine binding site, RSM-932A appears to have an altogether novel mechanism of inhibition and is synergistic with respect to both choline and ATP. A model of inhibition for RSM-932A in which this inhibitor traps p.f.-ChoK in a phosphorylated intermediate state blocking phosphate transfer to choline is presented. Importantly, MN58b and RSM-932A have in vitro inhibitory activity in the low nanomolar range and are equally effective against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains. RSM-932A and MN58b significantly reduced parasitemia and induced the accumulation of trophozoites and schizonts, blocking intraerythrocytic development and interfering with parasite egress or invasion, suggesting a delay of the parasite maturation stage. The present data provide two new potent structures for the development of antimalarial compounds and validate p.f.-ChoK as an accessible drug target against the parasite. PMID:24041883

  11. [The action of catecholamine-synthesis inhibitors and of spiperone on sea urchin and mouse embryos].

    PubMed

    Markova, L N; Sakharova, N Iu; Bezuglov, V V

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effects of three inhibitors of catecholamine synthesis on the development of sea urchins Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. These drugs affected the early embryogenesis, which was expressed in inhibition of the cleavage divisions, appearance of abnormal embryos, and developmental arrest. The addition of arachidonic acid amide and dopamine to the incubation medium weakened the effects of the inhibitors. Spiperone induced developmental defects in preimplantation mouse embryos and sea urchin embryos. Arachidonic acid amide with dopamine exerted a protective effect against spiperone when introduced to sea urchin embryos at the blastula or late gastrula stages, rather than after fertilization. In murine embryos, this amide induced developmental defects and arrest itself and its effect was reversible. Possible mechanisms underlying the effects of these drugs are discussed. PMID:10732361

  12. Potent inhibitory action of the gastric proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole against urease activity of Helicobacter pylori: unique action selective for H. pylori cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, K; Satoh, H; Iwahi, T; Shimoyama, T; Tamura, T

    1993-01-01

    The gastric proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole, its active analog AG-2000, and omeprazole dose dependently inhibited urease activity extracted with distilled water from Helicobacter pylori cells; the 50% inhibitory concentrations were between 3.6 and 9.5 microM, which were more potent than those of urease inhibitors, such as acetohydroxamic acid, hydroxyurea, and thiourea. These compounds also inhibited urease activity in intact cells of H. pylori and Helicobacter mustelae but did not inhibit ureases from other bacteria, such as Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, and Providencia rettgeri. The mechanism of urease inhibition was considered to be blockage of the SH groups of H. pylori urease, since SH residues in the enzyme decreased after preincubation with lansoprazole and glutathione or dithiothreitol completely abolished the inhibitory action. The SH-blocking reagents N-ethylmaleimide and idoacetamide were also examined for their inhibition of the urease activity; their 50% inhibitory concentrations were 100- to 1,000-fold higher than those of lansoprazole. These results suggest that lansoprazole and omeprazole can potently and selectively inhibit H. pylori urease and that inhibition may be related to earlier findings indicating that these compounds have selective activity against HP growth. PMID:8494373

  13. Potent inhibitory action of the gastric proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole against urease activity of Helicobacter pylori: unique action selective for H. pylori cells.

    PubMed

    Nagata, K; Satoh, H; Iwahi, T; Shimoyama, T; Tamura, T

    1993-04-01

    The gastric proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole, its active analog AG-2000, and omeprazole dose dependently inhibited urease activity extracted with distilled water from Helicobacter pylori cells; the 50% inhibitory concentrations were between 3.6 and 9.5 microM, which were more potent than those of urease inhibitors, such as acetohydroxamic acid, hydroxyurea, and thiourea. These compounds also inhibited urease activity in intact cells of H. pylori and Helicobacter mustelae but did not inhibit ureases from other bacteria, such as Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, and Providencia rettgeri. The mechanism of urease inhibition was considered to be blockage of the SH groups of H. pylori urease, since SH residues in the enzyme decreased after preincubation with lansoprazole and glutathione or dithiothreitol completely abolished the inhibitory action. The SH-blocking reagents N-ethylmaleimide and idoacetamide were also examined for their inhibition of the urease activity; their 50% inhibitory concentrations were 100- to 1,000-fold higher than those of lansoprazole. These results suggest that lansoprazole and omeprazole can potently and selectively inhibit H. pylori urease and that inhibition may be related to earlier findings indicating that these compounds have selective activity against HP growth. PMID:8494373

  14. Discovery, biosynthesis, and mechanism of action of the zaragozic acids: potent inhibitors of squalene synthase.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, J D; Dufresne, C; Bills, G F; Nallin-Omstead, M; Byrne, K

    1995-01-01

    The zaragozic acids (ZAs), a family of fungal metabolites containing a novel 4,6,7-trihydroxy-2,8-dioxobicyclo[3.2.1]octane-3,4,5-tricarboxylic acid core, were discovered independently by two separate groups screening natural product sources to discover inhibitors of squalene synthase. This family of compounds all contain the same core but differ in their 1-alkyl and their 6-acyl side chains. Production of the ZAs is distributed over an extensive taxonomic range of Ascomycotina or their anamorphic states. The zaragozic acids are very potent inhibitors of squalene synthase that inhibit cholesterol synthesis and lower plasma cholesterol levels in primates. They also inhibit fungal ergosterol synthesis and are potent fungicidal compounds. The biosynthesis of the zaragozic acids appears to proceed through alkyl citrate intermediates and new members of the family have been produced through directed biosynthesis. These potent natural product based inhibitors of squalene synthase have potential to be developed either as cholesterol lowering agents and/or as antifungal agents. PMID:8561474

  15. Molecular basis for the actions of Hsp90 inhibitors and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Motowo; Shimotohno, Kumiko W; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2011-09-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor downregulates c-Myc expression and upregulates the expression of tumor repressor proteins such as p53 and pRB, inhibiting the G1/S transition and causing G2/M arrest during cell cycle progression. The cycle progression is extensively controlled by the pRB/E2F signaling pathway. E2F is released from the pRB/E2F complex with the phosphorylation of pRB by cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes. The released E2F promotes the transcription of target genes involved in cell cycle progression. The pRB/E2F signaling pathway is controlled by DNA methyltransferase-1 (Dnmt-1). The elevated expression of Dnmt-1 has been reported in carcinomas of the colon, lung and prostate. A defect of pRB expression in Rb -/- cancer cells is caused by the aberrant methylation of CpG in the Rb promoter. The Hsp90 inhibitor disrupts the Dnmt-1/Hsp90 association and upregulates pRB expression. In this review, the Hsp90 inhibitors that show promise for cancer therapy are summarized. PMID:21811259

  16. The HCV non-nucleoside inhibitor Tegobuvir utilizes a novel mechanism of action to inhibit NS5B polymerase function.

    PubMed

    Hebner, Christy M; Han, Bin; Brendza, Katherine M; Nash, Michelle; Sulfab, Maisoun; Tian, Yang; Hung, Magdeleine; Fung, Wanchi; Vivian, Randall W; Trenkle, James; Taylor, James; Bjornson, Kyla; Bondy, Steven; Liu, Xiaohong; Link, John; Neyts, Johan; Sakowicz, Roman; Zhong, Weidong; Tang, Hengli; Schmitz, Uli

    2012-01-01

    Tegobuvir (TGV) is a novel non-nucleoside inhibitor (NNI) of HCV RNA replication with demonstrated antiviral activity in patients with genotype 1 chronic HCV infection. The mechanism of action of TGV has not been clearly defined despite the identification of resistance mutations mapping to the NS5B polymerase region. TGV does not inhibit NS5B enzymatic activity in biochemical assays in vitro, suggesting a more complex antiviral mechanism with cellular components. Here, we demonstrate that TGV exerts anti-HCV activity utilizing a unique chemical activation and subsequent direct interaction with the NS5B protein. Treatment of HCV subgenomic replicon cells with TGV results in a modified form of NS5B with a distinctly altered mobility on a SDS-PAGE gel. Further analysis reveals that the aberrantly migrating NS5B species contains the inhibitor molecule. Formation of this complex does not require the presence of any other HCV proteins. The intensity of the aberrantly migrating NS5B species is strongly dependent on cellular glutathione levels as well as CYP 1A activity. Furthermore analysis of NS5B protein purified from a heterologous expression system treated with TGV by mass spectrometry suggests that TGV undergoes a CYP- mediated intracellular activation step and the resulting metabolite, after forming a glutathione conjugate, directly and specifically interacts with NS5B. Taken together, these data demonstrate that upon metabolic activation TGV is a specific, covalent inhibitor of the HCV NS5B polymerase and is mechanistically distinct from other classes of the non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNI) of the viral polymerase. PMID:22720059

  17. Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors: Action on the Signaling Pathways of Neuroinflammation, Neurodegeneration, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nunes, Ana Karolina Santana; Garcia-Osta, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) have recently emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammatory, neurodegenerative, and memory loss diseases. Mechanistically, PDE5-Is produce an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotection effect by increasing expression of nitric oxide synthases and accumulation of cGMP and activating protein kinase G (PKG), the signaling pathway of which is thought to play an important role in the development of several neurodiseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this paper was to review present knowledge of the signaling pathways that underlie the use of PDE5-Is in neuroinflammation, neurogenesis, learning, and memory. PMID:26770022

  18. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a “de novo” initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a “closed” conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the “GDD” active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed “N pocket”). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1–2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  19. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Shi, Pei-Yong; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-08-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a "de novo" initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a "closed" conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the "GDD" active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed "N pocket"). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1-2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  20. Antitumor Action of a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, YF479, in Breast Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yihua; Li, Jingjie; Yang, Feifei; Wu, Haigang; Dai, Fujun; Hu, Meichun; Lu, Xiaoling; Peng, Yi; Liu, Mingyao; Zhao, Yongxiang; Yi, Zhengfang

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates important roles for histone deacetylase in tumorigenesis (HDACs), highlighting them as attractive targets for antitumor drug development. Histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACIs), which have shown favorable anti-tumor activity with low toxicity in clinical investigations, are a promising class of anticancer therapeutics. Here, we screened our compound library to explore small molecules that possess anti-HDAC activity and identified a novel HDACI, YF479. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), which was the first approved HDAC inhibitor for clinical treatment by the FDA, was as positive control in our experiments. We further demonstrated YF479 abated cell viability, suppressed colony formation and tumor cell motility in vitro. To investigate YF479 with superior pharmacodynamic properties, we developed spontaneous and experimental breast cancer animal models. Our results showed YF479 significantly inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Further study indicated YF479 suppressed both early and end stages of metastatic progression. Subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy animal experiment revealed the elimination of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and distant metastasis by YF479. More important, YF479 remarkably prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Intriguingly, YF479 displayed more potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with SAHA. Together, our results suggest that YF479, a novel HDACI, inhibits breast tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. In light of these results, YF479 may be an effective therapeutic option in clinical trials for patients burdened by breast cancer. PMID:25220594

  1. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors--Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  2. Cerebroprotective effects of RAS inhibitors: Beyond their cardio-renal actions.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Jaspreet; Prakash, Atish; Kumar, Puneet; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Work on the brain renin-angiotensin system has been explored by various researchers and has led to elucidation of its basic physiologies and behavior, including its role in reabsorption and uptake of body fluid, blood pressure maintenance with angiotensin II being its prominent effector. Currently, this system has been implicated for its newly established effects, which are far beyond its cardio-renal effects accounting for maintenance of cerebral blood flow and cerebroprotection, seizure, in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and bipolar disorder. In this review, we have discussed the distribution of angiotensin receptor subtypes in the central nervous system (CNS) together with enzymatic pathways leading to active angiotensin ligands and its interaction with angiotensin receptor 2 (AT2) and Mas receptors. Secondly, the use of angiotensin analogues (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and AT1 and/or AT2 receptor blockers) in the treatment and management of the CNS disorders mentioned above has been discussed. PMID:25944853

  3. EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (PD153035) Improves Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Action in High-Fat Diet–Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Patricia O.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Mourão, Rosa H.; de Souza, Claudio T.; Pauli, Jose R.; Cintra, Dennys E.; Schenka, André; Rocco, Silvana A.; Rittner, Roberto; Franchini, Kleber G.; Vassallo, José; Velloso, Lício A.; Carvalheira, José B.; Saad, Mario J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In obesity, an increased macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue occurs, contributing to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediates both chemotaxis and proliferation in monocytes and macrophages. However, the role of EGFR inhibitors in this subclinical inflammation has not yet been investigated. We investigated, herein, in vivo efficacy and associated molecular mechanisms by which PD153035, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved diabetes control and insulin action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effect of PD153035 was investigated on insulin sensitivity, insulin signaling, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity in tissues of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice and also on infiltration and the activation state of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in these mice. RESULTS PD153035 treatment for 1 day decreased the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 in the stroma vascular fraction, suggesting that this drug reduces the M1 proinflammatory state in ATMs, as an initial effect, in turn reducing the circulating levels of TNF-α and IL-6, and initiating an improvement in insulin signaling and sensitivity. After 14 days of drug administration, there was a marked improvement in glucose tolerance; a reduction in insulin resistance; a reduction in macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and in TNF-α, IL-6, and free fatty acids; accompanied by an improvement in insulin signaling in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue; and also a decrease in insulin receptor substrate-1 Ser307 phosphorylation in JNK and inhibitor of NF-κB kinase (IKKβ) activation in these tissues. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with PD153035 improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and signaling and reduces subclinical inflammation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:19696185

  4. Lymphocyte-suppressing action of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in coronary artery disease patients with normal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2011-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders partially results from its anti-inflammatory action. No previous study has investigated the effect of any ACE inhibitor on lymphocyte cytokine release. In this study, we compared the effects of serum- and tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on systemic inflammation and lymphocyte secretory function in normotensive patients with stable coronary artery disease. The study included 134 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized into one of three groups and treated with enalapril (20 mg/d, n = 47), perindopril (4 mg/d, n = 45) or placebo (n = 42), respectively. The control group included 40 age-, sex- and weight-matched healthy subjects. The plasma lipid profile, glucose metabolism markers, hsCRP and lymphocyte cytokine release were examined at the beginning of the study and after 30 and 90 days of treatment. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T cells released significantly more interleukin-2, interferon-γ and TNFα than the lymphocytes of control subjects. Neither enalapril nor perindopril treatment was associated with any significant changes in blood pressure. Perindopril treatment inhibited lymphocyte cytokine release and systemic inflammation, while the effect of enalapril was insignificant. Perindopril, and, to a lesser extent, enalapril, strongly reduced lymphocyte cytokine release in insulin-resistant but not insulin-sensitive subjects. Our results indicate that perindopril is superior to enalapril in producing lymphocyte-suppressing and systemic anti-inflammatory effects in normotensive coronary artery disease patients. These effects may contribute to a reduction in the vascular risk of this group of patients, particularly in those subjects who are resistant to insulin, when these patients are treated with tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22180357

  5. Thrombostatin FM compounds: direct thrombin inhibitors – mechanism of action in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, M. T.; Burke, F.; Warnock, M.; Zhou, Y.; Sweigart, J.; Chen, A.; Ricketts, D.; Lucchesi, B. R.; Chen, Z.; Di Cera, E.; Hilfinger, J.; Kim, J. S.; Mosberg, H. I.; Schmaier, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Novel pentapeptides called Thrombostatin FM compounds consisting mostly of D-isomers and unusual amino acids were prepared based upon the stable angiotensin converting enzyme breakdown product of bradykinin – RPPGF. Methods and Results These peptides are direct thrombin inhibitors prolonging the thrombin clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time at ≥0.78, 1.6, and 1.6 µm, respectively. They competitively inhibit α-thrombin-induced cleavage of a chromogenic substrate at 4.4–8.2 µm. They do not significantly inhibit plasma kallikrein, factor (F) XIIa, FXIa, FIXa, FVIIa-TF, FXa, plasmin or cathepsin G. One form, FM19 [rOicPaF(p-Me)], blocks α-thrombin-induced calcium flux in fibroblasts with an IC50 of 6.9 ± 1.2 µm. FM19 achieved 100% inhibition of threshold α- or γ-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation at 8.4 ± 4.7 µm and 16 ± 4 µm, respectively. The crystal structure of thrombin in complex with FM19 shows that the N-terminal D-Arg retrobinds into the S1 pocket, its second residue Oic interacts with His-57, Tyr-60a and Trp-60d, and its C-terminal p-methyl Phe engages thrombin_s aryl binding site composed of Ile-174, Trp-215, and Leu-99. When administered intraperitoneal, intraduodenal, or orally to mice, FM19 prolongs thrombin clotting times and delays carotid artery thrombosis. Conclusion FM19, a low affinity reversible direct thrombin inhibitor, might be useful as an add-on agent to address an unmet need in platelet inhibition in acute coronary syndromes in diabetics and others who with all current antiplatelet therapy still have reactive platelets. PMID:18315550

  6. Proresolving Actions of Synthetic and Natural Protease Inhibitors Are Mediated by Annexin A1.

    PubMed

    Vago, Juliana P; Tavares, Luciana P; Sugimoto, Michelle A; Lima, Graziele Letícia N; Galvão, Izabela; de Caux, Thais R; Lima, Kátia M; Ribeiro, Ana Luíza C; Carneiro, Fernanda S; Nunes, Fernanda Freire C; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-02-15

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated protein endowed with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties. Intact AnxA1 is a 37-kDa protein that may be cleaved in vivo at the N-terminal region by neutrophil proteases including elastase and proteinase-3, generating the 33-kDa isoform that is largely inactive. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of AnxA1 expression and the effects of synthetic (sivelestat [SIV]; Eglin) and natural (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor [SLPI]; Elafin) protease inhibitors on the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation. During the settings of LPS inflammation AnxA1 cleavage associated closely with the peak of neutrophil and elastase expression and activity. SLPI expression increased during resolving phase of the pleurisy. Therapeutic treatment of LPS-challenge mice with recombinant human SLPI or Elafin accelerated resolution, an effect associated with increased numbers of apoptotic neutrophils in the pleural exudates, inhibition of elastase, and modulation of the survival-controlling proteins NF-κB and Mcl-1. Similar effects were observed with SIV, which dose-dependently inhibited neutrophil elastase and shortened resolution intervals. Mechanistically, SIV-induced resolution was caspase-dependent, associated to increased levels of intact AnxA1 and decreased expression of NF-κB and Mcl-1. The proresolving effect of antiproteases was also observed in a model of monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation. SIV skewed macrophages toward resolving phenotypes and enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A neutralizing antiserum against AnxA1 and a nonselective antagonist of AnxA1 receptor abolished the accelerated resolution promoted by SIV. Collectively, these results show that elastase inhibition not only inhibits inflammation but actually promotes resolution, and this response is mediated by protection of endogenous intact AnxA1 with ensuing augmentation of neutrophil apoptosis. PMID:26800869

  7. Thrombostatin FM compounds: direct thrombin inhibitors - mechanism of action in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, M T; Burke, F; Warnock, M; Zhou, Y; Sweigart, J; Chen, A; Ricketts, D; Lucchesi, B R; Chen, Z; Cera, E Di; Hilfinger, J; Kim, J S; Mosberg, H I; Schmaier, A H

    2008-04-29

    Novel pentapeptides called Thrombostatin FM compounds consisting mostly of D-isomers and unusual amino acids were prepared based upon the stable angiotensin converting enzyme breakdown product of bradykinin - RPPGF. These peptides are direct thrombin inhibitors prolonging the thrombin clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time at ≥0.78, 1.6, and 1.6 μm, respectively. They competitively inhibit α-thrombin-induced cleavage of a chromogenic substrate at 4.4--8.2 μm. They do not significantly inhibit plasma kallikrein, factor (F) XIIa, FXIa, FIXa, FVIIa-TF, FXa, plasmin or cathepsin G. One form, FM19 [rOicPaF(p-Me)], blocks α-thrombin-induced calcium flux in fibroblasts with an IC50 of 6.9 ± 1.2 μm. FM19 achieved 100% inhibition of threshold α- or γ-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation at 8.4 ± 4.7 μm and 16 ± 4 μm, respectively. The crystal structure of thrombin in complex with FM19 shows that the N-terminal D-Arg retrobinds into the S1 pocket, its second residue Oic interacts with His-57, Tyr-60a and Trp-60d, and its C-terminal p-methyl Phe engages thrombin's aryl binding site composed of Ile-174, Trp-215, and Leu-99. When administered intraperitoneal, intraduodenal, or orally to mice, FM19 prolongs thrombin clotting times and delays carotid artery thrombosis. FM19, a low affinity reversible direct thrombin inhibitor, might be useful as an add-on agent to address an unmet need in platelet inhibition in acute coronary syndromes in diabetics and others who with all current antiplatelet therapy still have reactive platelets.

  8. Synergy in a medicinal plant: antimicrobial action of berberine potentiated by 5'-methoxyhydnocarpin, a multidrug pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Stermitz, F R; Lorenz, P; Tawara, J N; Zenewicz, L A; Lewis, K

    2000-02-15

    Multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs) protect microbial cells from both synthetic and natural antimicrobials. Amphipathic cations are preferred substrates of MDRs. Berberine alkaloids, which are cationic antimicrobials produced by a variety of plants, are readily extruded by MDRs. Several Berberis medicinal plants producing berberine were found also to synthesize an inhibitor of the NorA MDR pump of a human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitor was identified as 5'-methoxyhydnocarpin (5'-MHC), previously reported as a minor component of chaulmoogra oil, a traditional therapy for leprosy. 5'-MHC is an amphipathic weak acid and is distinctly different from the cationic substrates of NorA. 5'-MHC had no antimicrobial activity alone but strongly potentiated the action of berberine and other NorA substrates against S. aureus. MDR-dependent efflux of ethidium bromide and berberine from S. aureus cells was completely inhibited by 5'-MHC. The level of accumulation of berberine in the cells was increased strongly in the presence of 5'-MHC, indicating that this plant compound effectively disabled the bacterial resistance mechanism against the berberine antimicrobial. PMID:10677479

  9. Mitochondrial Genome-Knockout Cells Demonstrate a Dual Mechanism of Action for the Electron Transport Complex I Inhibitor Mycothiazole

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kirsten J.; Singh, A. Jonathan; Cameron, Alanna; Tan, An S.; Leahy, Dora C.; O’Sullivan, David; Joshi, Praneta; La Flamme, Anne C.; Northcote, Peter T.; Berridge, Michael V.; Miller, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Mycothiazole, a polyketide metabolite isolated from the marine sponge Cacospongia mycofijiensis, is a potent inhibitor of metabolic activity and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I in sensitive cells, but other cells are relatively insensitive to the drug. Sensitive cell lines (IC50 0.36–13.8 nM) include HeLa, P815, RAW 264.7, MDCK, HeLa S3, 143B, 4T1, B16, and CD4/CD8 T cells. Insensitive cell lines (IC50 12.2–26.5 μM) include HL-60, LN18, and Jurkat. Thus, there is a 34,000-fold difference in sensitivity between HeLa and HL-60 cells. Some sensitive cell lines show a biphasic response, suggesting more than one mechanism of action. Mitochondrial genome-knockout ρ0 cell lines are insensitive to mycothiazole, supporting a conditional mitochondrial site of action. Mycothiazole is cytostatic rather than cytotoxic in sensitive cells, has a long lag period of about 12 h, and unlike the complex I inhibitor, rotenone, does not cause G2/M cell cycle arrest. Mycothiazole decreases, rather than increases the levels of reactive oxygen species after 24 h. It is concluded that the cytostatic inhibitory effects of mycothiazole on mitochondrial electron transport function in sensitive cell lines may depend on a pre-activation step that is absent in insensitive cell lines with intact mitochondria, and that a second lower-affinity cytotoxic target may also be involved in the metabolic and growth inhibition of cells. PMID:22690150

  10. Integrated metabolomic and transcriptomic profiling illustrates successive phases of increasing gene expression associated with chilling-related apple peel cell death

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superficial scald is a chilling-related storage disorder of apple caused by the death of peel epidermal and hypodermal cells and associated discoloration. It is controlled using postharvest antioxidant (diphenylamine; DPA) and ethylene action inhibitor (1-methylcyclopropene; 1-MCP), and/or controlle...

  11. Mechanism of action of anticandidal dipeptides containing inhibitors of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Milewski, S; Andruszkiewicz, R; Kasprzak, L; Mazerski, J; Mignini, F; Borowski, E

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of anticandidal action of novel synthetic dipeptides containing N3-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid (FMDP) residues was shown to be consistent with the "warhead delivery" concept. FMDP dipeptides were shown to be transported into Candida albicans cells by the di-tripeptide permease and subsequently hydrolyzed by intracellular peptidases, especially aminopeptidase. The anticandidal activity of the particular FMDP dipeptide was influenced by the rate of its transport and, to a lower extent, by the intracellular cleavage rate. A high transport rate accompanied by a high cleavage rate resulted in the high anticandidal activity of L-norvalyl-FMDP. The strong growth-inhibitory effect of this compound was the consequence of inhibition of the enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase by the released FMDP. The action of L-norvalyl-FMDP on exponentially growing C. albicans cells resulted in a sharp decrease of incorporation of 14C label from [14C]glucose into chitin, mannoprotein, and glucan. This effect, as well as the growth-inhibitory effect, was fully reversed by exogenous N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase was proved to be the only essential target for FMDP dipeptides. Scanning electron microscopy of C. albicans cells treated with L-norvalyl-FMDP revealed highly distorted, wrinkled, and collapsed forms. Cells formed long, bulbous chains, and partial lysis occurred. Images PMID:1901701

  12. Mechanism of action of anticandidal dipeptides containing inhibitors of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Milewski, S; Andruszkiewicz, R; Kasprzak, L; Mazerski, J; Mignini, F; Borowski, E

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of anticandidal action of novel synthetic dipeptides containing N3-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid (FMDP) residues was shown to be consistent with the "warhead delivery" concept. FMDP dipeptides were shown to be transported into Candida albicans cells by the di-tripeptide permease and subsequently hydrolyzed by intracellular peptidases, especially aminopeptidase. The anticandidal activity of the particular FMDP dipeptide was influenced by the rate of its transport and, to a lower extent, by the intracellular cleavage rate. A high transport rate accompanied by a high cleavage rate resulted in the high anticandidal activity of L-norvalyl-FMDP. The strong growth-inhibitory effect of this compound was the consequence of inhibition of the enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase by the released FMDP. The action of L-norvalyl-FMDP on exponentially growing C. albicans cells resulted in a sharp decrease of incorporation of 14C label from [14C]glucose into chitin, mannoprotein, and glucan. This effect, as well as the growth-inhibitory effect, was fully reversed by exogenous N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase was proved to be the only essential target for FMDP dipeptides. Scanning electron microscopy of C. albicans cells treated with L-norvalyl-FMDP revealed highly distorted, wrinkled, and collapsed forms. Cells formed long, bulbous chains, and partial lysis occurred. PMID:1901701

  13. HER2 Dimerization Inhibitor Pertuzumab – Mode of Action and Clinical Data in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Nadia; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Rody, Achim; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Müller, Volkmar; Fehm, Tanja; Marschner, Norbert; Gluz, Oleg; Schrader, Iris; Heinrich, Georg; Untch, Michael; Jackisch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Summary The humanized monoclonal antibody pertuzumab prevents the dimerization of HER2 with other HER receptors, in particular the pairing of the most potent signaling heterodimer HER2/HER3, thus providing a potent strategy for dual HER2 inhibition. It binds to the extracellular domain of HER2 at a different epitope than trastuzumab. Pertuzumab and trastuzumab act in a complementary fashion and provide a more complete blockade of HER2-mediated signal transduction than either agent alone. Phase II studies demonstrated that pertuzumab was generally well tolerated as a single agent or in combination with trastuzumab and/or cytotoxic agents, and implied an improved clinical efficacy of the combination of pertuzumab and trastuzumab in early and advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Results of the pivotal phase III study CLEOPATRA in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer demonstrated that the addition of pertuzumab to first-line combination therapy with docetaxel and trastuzumab significantly prolonged progression-free and overall survival without increasing cardiac toxicity. Currently, the combination of both antibodies is being explored in the palliative setting as well as in the treatment of early HER2-positive breast cancer. Dual HER2 inhibition with the HER2 dimerization inhibitor pertuzumab and trastuzumab may change clinical practice in HER2-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer treatment. PMID:24715843

  14. HER2 Dimerization Inhibitor Pertuzumab - Mode of Action and Clinical Data in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Nadia; Beckmann, Matthias W; Rody, Achim; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Müller, Volkmar; Fehm, Tanja; Marschner, Norbert; Gluz, Oleg; Schrader, Iris; Heinrich, Georg; Untch, Michael; Jackisch, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The humanized monoclonal antibody pertuzumab prevents the dimerization of HER2 with other HER receptors, in particular the pairing of the most potent signaling heterodimer HER2/HER3, thus providing a potent strategy for dual HER2 inhibition. It binds to the extracellular domain of HER2 at a different epitope than trastuzumab. Pertuzumab and trastuzumab act in a complementary fashion and provide a more complete blockade of HER2-mediated signal transduction than either agent alone. Phase II studies demonstrated that pertuzumab was generally well tolerated as a single agent or in combination with trastuzumab and/or cytotoxic agents, and implied an improved clinical efficacy of the combination of pertuzumab and trastuzumab in early and advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Results of the pivotal phase III study CLEOPATRA in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer demonstrated that the addition of pertuzumab to first-line combination therapy with docetaxel and trastuzumab significantly prolonged progression-free and overall survival without increasing cardiac toxicity. Currently, the combination of both antibodies is being explored in the palliative setting as well as in the treatment of early HER2-positive breast cancer. Dual HER2 inhibition with the HER2 dimerization inhibitor pertuzumab and trastuzumab may change clinical practice in HER2-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer treatment. PMID:24715843

  15. Mode of Action, In Vitro Activity, and In Vivo Efficacy of AFN-1252, a Selective Antistaphylococcal FabI Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Monique; Awrey, Donald; Bardouniotis, Elias; Berman, Judd; Clarke, Teresa; Dorsey, Mandy; Hafkin, Barry; Ramnauth, Jaillal; Romanov, Vladimir; Schmid, Molly B.; Thalakada, Rosanne; Yethon, Jeremy; Pauls, Henry W.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of action of AFN-1252, a selective inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), which is involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, was confirmed by using biochemistry, macromolecular synthesis, genetics, and cocrystallization of an AFN-1252–FabI complex. AFN-1252 demonstrated a low propensity for spontaneous resistance development and a time-dependent reduction of the viability of both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, achieving a ≥2-log10 reduction in S. aureus counts over 24 h, and was extremely potent against clinical isolates of S. aureus (MIC90, 0.015 μg/ml) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (MIC90, 0.12 μg/ml), regardless of their drug resistance, hospital- or community-associated origin, or other clinical subgroup. AFN-1252 was orally available in mouse pharmacokinetic studies, and a single oral dose of 1 mg/kg AFN-1252 was efficacious in a mouse model of septicemia, providing 100% protection from an otherwise lethal peritoneal infection of S. aureus Smith. A median effective dose of 0.15 mg/kg indicated that AFN-1252 was 12 to 24 times more potent than linezolid in the model. These studies, demonstrating a selective mode of action, potent in vitro activity, and in vivo efficacy, support the continued investigation of AFN-1252 as a targeted therapeutic for staphylococcal infections. PMID:22948878

  16. Mechanism of Action and Initial, In Vitro SAR of an Inhibitor of the Shigella flexneri Virulence Regulator VirF

    PubMed Central

    Emanuele, Anthony A.; Garcia, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are among the main causative agents of acute diarrheal illness and claim more than 1 million lives per year worldwide. There are multiple bacterial genes that control the pathogenesis of Shigella, but the virF gene may be the most important. This gene, located on the primary pathogenicity island of Shigella, encodes VirF, an AraC-family transcriptional activator that is responsible for initiating the pathogenesis cycle in Shigella. We have previously shown that it is possible to attenuate the virulence of Shigella flexneri via small molecule inhibition of VirF. In this study, we probed the mechanism of action of our small molecule inhibitors of VirF. To enable these studies, we have developed a homologous and efficient expression and purification system for VirF and have optimized two different in vitro VirF-DNA binding assays. We have determined that one of our HTS hit compounds inhibits VirF binding to DNA with a calculated Ki similar to the effective doses seen in our transcriptional activation and virulence screens. This is consistent with inhibition of DNA binding as the mechanism of action of this hit compound. We have also screened 15 commercially sourced analogs of this compound and deduced an initial SAR from the approximately 100-fold range in activities. Our four other HTS hit compounds do not inhibit DNA binding and yet they do block VirF activity. This suggests that multiple agents with different molecular mechanisms of inhibition of VirF could be developed. Pursuing hits with different mechanisms of action could be a powerful approach to enhance activity and to circumvent resistance that could develop to any one of these agents. PMID:26352269

  17. Action of Inhibitors of RNA and Protein Synthesis on Cell Enlargement 1

    PubMed Central

    Noodén, Larry D.; Thimann, Kenneth V.

    1966-01-01

    Further studies with inhibitors of protein synthesis are presented to support the conclusion, drawn from work with chloramphenicol, that protein synthesis is a critical limiting factor in auxin-induced cell expansion. The indoleacetic acid-induced elongation of oat coleoptile sections was strongly inhibited by dl-p-fluorophenylalanine, and the inhibition is antagonized by phenylalanine. Puromycin at 10−4 m very strongly inhibited the indoleacetic acid-induced growth of oat coleoptile and artichoke tuber sections and exerted a less powerful effect on pea stem sections. As found earlier with chloramphenicol, concentrations of puromycin effective in inhibiting the growth of coleoptile sections had quantitatively similar effects on protein synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of C14-leucine into protein of the coleoptile tissue. Several analogues of RNA bases were also tested, but while 8-azaguanine very strongly inhibited growth of artichoke tuber disks, 6-azauracil was the only one of this group clearly inhibitory to growth in coleoptile or pea stem sections. Actinomycin D actively inhibited both elongation and the incorporation of C14-leucine into protein in oat coleoptile sections. Inhibition of the 2 processes went closely parallel. Actinomycin D also powerfully inhibited growth of artichoke tuber disks. All the compounds effective in inhibiting growth generally inhibited the uptake of leucine as well. The possibility that auxin causes cell enlargement in plants by inducing the synthesis of a messenger RNA and of one or more new but unstable enzymes, is discussed. Possible but less favored alternative explanations are: A) that auxin induces synthesis of a wall protein, or B) that the continued synthesis of some other unstable protein (by a process independent of auxin) may be a prerequisite for cell enlargement. PMID:5904588

  18. Mechanisms of Action of Novel Influenza A/M2 Viroporin Inhibitors Derived from Hexamethylene Amiloride.

    PubMed

    Jalily, Pouria H; Eldstrom, Jodene; Miller, Scott C; Kwan, Daniel C; Tai, Sheldon S-H; Chou, Doug; Niikura, Masahiro; Tietjen, Ian; Fedida, David

    2016-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of influenza viruses with resistance to approved antivirals highlights the need for new anti-influenza therapeutics. Here we describe the functional properties of hexamethylene amiloride (HMA)-derived compounds that inhibit the wild-type and adamantane-resistant forms of the influenza A M2 ion channel. For example, 6-(azepan-1-yl)-N-carbamimidoylnicotinamide ( 9: ) inhibits amantadine-sensitive M2 currents with 3- to 6-fold greater potency than amantadine or HMA (IC50 = 0.2 vs. 0.6 and 1.3 µM, respectively). Compound 9: competes with amantadine for M2 inhibition, and molecular docking simulations suggest that 9: binds at site(s) that overlap with amantadine binding. In addition, tert-butyl 4'-(carbamimidoylcarbamoyl)-2',3-dinitro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylate ( 27: ) acts both on adamantane-sensitive and a resistant M2 variant encoding a serine to asparagine 31 mutation (S31N) with improved efficacy over amantadine and HMA (IC50 = 0.6 µM and 4.4 µM, respectively). Whereas 9: inhibited in vitro replication of influenza virus encoding wild-type M2 (EC50 = 2.3 µM), both 27: and tert-butyl 4'-(carbamimidoylcarbamoyl)-2',3-dinitro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylate ( 26: ) preferentially inhibited viruses encoding M2(S31N) (respective EC50 = 18.0 and 1.5 µM). This finding indicates that HMA derivatives can be designed to inhibit viruses with resistance to amantadine. Our study highlights the potential of HMA derivatives as inhibitors of drug-resistant influenza M2 ion channels. PMID:27193582

  19. Action of Caffeine as an Amyloid Inhibitor in the Aggregation of Aβ16-22 Peptides.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused due to aggregation of Aβ peptides in the brain tissues. Recently, several studies on AD transgenic mice have shown the effect of caffeine in significantly reducing the Aβ amyloid level in their brains. However, the mechanism and mode of caffeine action on amyloid aggregation are not known. Therefore, in this study, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of five amyloid-forming Aβ16-22 peptides in pure water and in a regime of caffeine solutions, with different caffeine/peptide stoichiometric ratios. The secondary structure analyses of peptides in pure water show the formation of β-sheet conformations, whereas on addition of caffeine, these ordered conformations become negligible. The radial distribution function, contact map, nonbonding interaction energy, hydrogen bonding, potential of mean force, and hydration analyses show that there is less interpeptide interaction in the presence of caffeine, and the effect is greater with an increasing caffeine ratio. The interaction of aromatic phenylalanine residues of peptides with caffeine restricts the interpeptide interaction tendency. Upon increasing the number of caffeine molecules, interaction of caffeine with other hydrophobic residues also increases. Thus, the hydrophobic core-recognition motif of amyloid formation of peptides is physically blocked by caffeine, thereby abolishing the self-assembly formation. PMID:27487451

  20. Nitropropenyl Benzodioxole, An Anti-Infective Agent with Action as a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    White, Kylie S; Nicoletti, Gina; Borland, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report on the activities of a broad spectrum antimicrobial compound,nitropropenyl benzodioxole (NPBD) which are of relevance to its potential as an anti-infective drug. These investigations support the proposal that a major mechanism of NPBD is action as a tyrosine mimetic, competitively inhibiting bacterial and fungal protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). NPBD did not affect major anti-bacterial drug targets, namely, ATP production, cell wall or cell membrane integrity, or transcription and translation of RNA. NPBD inhibited bacterial YopH and human PTP1B and not human CD45 in enzyme assays. NPBD inhibited PTP-associated bacterial virulence factors, namely, endospore formation in Bacillus cereus, prodigiosin secretion in Serratia marcescens, motility in Proteus spp., and adherence and invasion of mammalian cells by Yersinia enterocolitica. NPBD acts intracellularly to inhibit the early development stages of the Chlamydia trachomatis infection cycle in mammalian cells known to involve sequestration of host cell PTPs. NPBD thus both kills pathogens and inhibits virulence factors relevant to early infection, making it a suitable candidate for development as an anti-infective agent, particularly for pathogens that enter through, or cause infections at, mucosal surfaces. Though much is yet to be understood about bacterial PTPs, they are proposed as suitable anti-infective targets and have been linked to agents similar to NPBD. The structural and functional diversity and heterogeneous distribution of PTPs across microbial species make them suitably selective targets for the development of both broadly active and pathogen-specific drugs. PMID:24976873

  1. Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor from Vigna unguiculata seeds enhances the action of bradykinin-related peptides.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Morales Álvares, Alice; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni; Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Trindade, Neidiane Rosa; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Silva, Luciano Paulino; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2014-01-01

    The hydrolysis of bradykinin (Bk) by different classes of proteases in plasma and tissues leads to a decrease in its half-life. Here, Bk actions on smooth muscle and in vivo cardiovascular assays in association with a protease inhibitor, Black eyed-pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) and also under the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin were evaluated. Two synthetic Bk-related peptides, Bk1 and Bk2, were used to investigate the importance of additional C-terminal amino acid residues on serine protease activity. BTCI forms complexes with Bk and analogues at pH 5.0, 7.4 and 9.0, presenting binding constants ranging from 103 to 104 M-1. Formation of BTCI-Bk complexes is probably driven by hydrophobic forces, coupled with slight conformational changes in BTCI. In vitro assays using guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) ileum showed that Bk retains the ability to induce smooth muscle contraction in the presence of BTCI. Moreover, no alteration in the inhibitory activity of BTCI in complex with Bk and analogous was observed. When the BTCI and BTCI-Bk complexes were tested in vivo, a decrease of vascular resistance and consequent hypotension and potentiating renal and aortic vasodilatation induced by Bk and Bk2 infusions was observed. These results indicate that BTCI-Bk complexes may be a reliable strategy to act as a carrier and protective approach for Bk-related peptides against plasma serine proteases cleavage, leading to an increase in their half-life. These findings also indicate that BTCI could remain stable in some tissues to inhibit chymotrypsin or trypsin-like enzymes that cleave and inactivate bradykinin in situ. PMID:25361421

  2. [Role of reactive oxygen species in the bactericidal action of quinolones--inhibitors of DNA gyrase].

    PubMed

    Kotova, V Iu; Mironov, A S; Zavigel'skiĭ, G B

    2014-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics inhibit DNA gyrase, but the induced degradation of chromosomal DNA is determined by a complex process of joint action quinolones and hydroxyl radical OH'. To quantify the level of stress responses and their time dependence in bacterial cells the induced specific lux-biosensors--the bacterium Escherichia coli, containing hybrid plasmids pColD'::lux; pSoxS'::lux; pKatG'::lux were used in this study. It is shown that quinolones (nalidixic acid, norfloxacin) induce SOS-response and oxidative stress with the formation of superoxide anion O2(-) in E. coli cells. The main parameters of SOS-response and oxidative stress, which depend on the quinolone concentration, are determined. Formation of superoxide anion O2(-) occurs almost simultaneously with the SOS-response. The mutant strain of E. coli sodA sodB, which do not contain active forms of superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, is characterized by an increased resistance to quinolones as compared to the wild type cells. At high concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid-->20 μg/mL; norfloxacin-->500 ng/mL) their bactericidal effect is partially caused by conversion of the superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide H2O2, conducted by superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, which is followed by the Fenton reaction and the formation of toxic hydroxyl radical OH'. At low concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid--<20 μg/mL; norfloxacin--<500 ng/mL), the role of active oxygen species in the antimicrobial effect is practically nonexistent. PMID:25845240

  3. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of novel natural cathepsin L inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of a cancerous cell takes place when it ceases to respond to growth-inhibiting signals and multiplies uncontrollably and can detach and move to other parts of the body; the process called as metastasis. A particular set of cysteine proteases are very active during cancer metastasis, Cathepsins being one of them. They are involved in tumor growth and malignancy and have also been reported to be overexpressed in tumor cell lines. In the present study, a combinatorial approach comprising three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR), ligand-based pharmacophore modelling and search followed by cathepsin L structure-based high throughput screening was carried out using an initial set of 28 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives as cathepsin L inhibitors. A 3D QSAR was derived using the alignment of a common thiosemicarbazone substructure. Essential structural features responsible for biological activity were taken into account for development of a pharmacophore model based on 29 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives. This model was used to carry out an exhaustive search on a large dataset of natural compounds. A further cathepsin L structure-based screen identified two top scoring compounds as potent anti-cancer leads. Results The generated 3D QSAR model showed statistically significant results with an r2 value of 0.8267, cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 of 0.7232, and a pred_r2 (r2 value for test set) of 0.7460. Apart from these, a high F test value of 30.2078 suggested low probability of the model's failure. The pharmacophoric hypothesis chosen for searching the natural compound libraries was identified as DDHRR, where two Ds denote 2 hydrogen donors, H represents a hydrophobic group and two Rs represent aromatic rings, all of which are essential for the biological activity. We report two potential drug leads ZINC08764437 (NFP) and ZINC03846634 (APQ) obtained after a combined approach of pharmacophore

  4. Gene expression signature-based approach identifies a pro-resolving mechanism of action for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, T; Dalli, J; Perretti, M

    2013-01-01

    Despite several therapies being currently available to treat inflammatory diseases, new drugs to treat chronic conditions with less side effects and lower production costs are still needed. An innovative approach to drug discovery, the Connectivity Map (CMap), shows how integrating genome-wide gene expression data of drugs and diseases can accelerate this process. Comparison of genome-wide gene expression data generated with annexin A1 (AnxA1) with the CMap revealed significant alignment with gene profiles elicited by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), what made us to hypothesize that AnxA1 might mediate the anti-inflammatory actions of HDACIs. Addition of HDACIs (valproic acid, sodium butyrate and thricostatin A) to mouse macrophages caused externalization of AnxA1 with concomitant inhibition of cytokine gene expression and release, events that occurred independently as this inhibition was retained in AnxA1 null macrophages. In contrast, novel AnxA1-mediated functions for HDACIs could be unveiled, including promotion of neutrophil apoptosis and macrophage phagocytosis, both steps crucial for effective resolution of inflammation. In a model of acute resolving inflammation, administration of valproic acid and sodium butyrate to mice at the peak of disease accelerated resolution processes in wild type, but much more modestly in AnxA1 null mice. Deeper analyses revealed a role for endogenous AnxA1 in the induction of neutrophil death in vivo by HDACIs. In summary, interrogation of the CMap revealed an unexpected association between HDACIs and AnxA1 that translated in mechanistic findings with particular impact on the processes that regulate the resolution of inflammation. We propose non-genomic modulation of AnxA1 in immune cells as a novel mechanism of action for HDACIs, which may underlie their reported efficacy in models of chronic inflammatory pathologies. PMID:23222458

  5. Regulation of the action of the novel cholecystokinin-releasing peptide diazepam binding inhibitor by inhibitory hormones and taurocholate.

    PubMed

    Herzig, K H; Wilgus, C; Schön, I; Tatemoto, K; Fölsch, U R

    1998-06-30

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI1-86) has recently been isolated in search for a cholecystokinin (CCK)-releasing peptide in the duodenum that is responsible for the feedback regulation of exocrine pancreatic secretion. Synthetic porcine DBI1-86 stimulates CCK release in vivo and in vitro from isolated intestinal mucosal cells. We postulated that DBI intraduodenally releases CCK in a paracrine fashion and might be the missing link in the feedback regulation of exocrine pancreatic secretion. Somatostatin, peptide YY (PYY) and taurocholate are known to inhibit feedback-stimulated CCK release in the rat. In this study, we investigated the effect of somatostatin, PYY and taurocholate on DBI-stimulated CCK secretion. Dispersed rat intestinal mucosal cells were prepared from the proximal small bowel and continuously perfused. The perfusate was collected and the release of CCK into the medium was measured. DBI1-86 dose-dependently stimulated CCK release, with a maximal effect at 10(-9) M. Somatostatin blocked the DBI-stimulated CCK release. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin fully reversed the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on DBI-stimulated CCK secretion, suggesting that somatostatin exerts its action by an inhibitory G-protein. In contrast, PYY (10(-6) M) and taurocholate (10(-6) M) did not affect DBI stimulated CCK levels, indicating that they act through different mechanisms to inhibit feedback-stimulated CCK release. PMID:9712181

  6. The mechanism of action of tofacitinib - an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Jennifer A; Kawabata, Thomas T; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Clark, James D; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Dowty, Martin E; Menon, Sujatha; Lamba, Manisha; Zwillich, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterised by infiltration of immune cells into the affected synovium, release of inflammatory cytokines and degradative mediators, and subsequent joint damage. Both innate and adaptive arms of the immune response play a role, with activation of immune cells leading to dysregulated expression of inflammatory cytokines. Cytokines work within a complex regulatory network in RA, signalling through different intracellular kinase pathways to modulate recruitment, activation and function of immune cells and other leukocytes. As our understanding of RA has advanced, intracellular signalling pathways such as Janus kinase (JAK) pathways have emerged as key hubs in the cytokine network and, therefore, important as therapeutic targets. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor for the treatment of RA. Tofacitinib is a targeted small molecule, and an innovative advance in RA therapy, which modulates cytokines critical to the progression of immune and inflammatory responses. Herein we describe the mechanism of action of tofacitinib and the impact of JAK inhibition on the immune and inflammatory responses in RA. PMID:26966791

  7. Evidence for a central mode of action for etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-08-01

    The COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib modulates the peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms in animals. This interaction has not been studied in patients with pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, 4-week treatment study investigated the pain mechanisms modulated by etoricoxib in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to group A (60 mg/d etoricoxib followed by placebo) or B (placebo followed by 60 mg/d etoricoxib). The quantitative, mechanistic pain biomarkers were pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation (TS), and conditioning pain modulation. Clinical readouts were Brief Pain Inventory, WOMAC, painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), and time and pain intensity during walking and stair climbing. Etoricoxib as compared with placebo significantly modulated the pressure pain thresholds (P = 0.012, localized sensitization) at the knee and leg (control site) (P = 0.025, spreading sensitization) and TS assessed from the knee (P = 0.038) and leg (P = 0.045). Conditioning pain modulation was not modulated. The Brief Pain Inventory (pain scores), PD-Q, WOMAC, and walking and stair climbing tests were all significantly improved by etoricoxib. Based on a minimum of 30% or 50% pain alleviation (day 0-day 28), responders and nonresponders were defined. The nonresponders showed a significant association between increased facilitation of TS and increased pain alleviation. None of the other parameters predicted the degree of pain alleviation. Generally, a responder to etoricoxib has the most facilitated TS. In conclusion, etoricoxib (1) modulated central pain modulatory mechanisms and (2) improved pain and function in painful osteoarthritis. Stronger facilitation of TS may indicate a better response to etoricoxib, supporting the central mode-of-action of the drug. PMID:27007068

  8. Separating the mechanism-based and off-target actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors with CETP gene polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background—Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive...

  9. Structure and mechanism of action of the hydroxy-aryl-aldehyde class of IRE1 endoribonuclease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sanches, Mario; Duffy, Nicole M.; Talukdar, Manisha; Thevakumaran, Nero; Chiovitti, David; Canny, Marella D.; Lee, Kenneth; Kurinov, Igor; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Poda, Gennadiy; Prakesch, Michael; Wilson, Brian; Tam, Victor; Schweitzer, Colleen; Toro, Andras; Lucas, Julie L.; Vuga, Danka; Lehmann, Lynn; Durocher, Daniel; Zeng, Qingping; Patterson, John B.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-10-24

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the unfolded protein response and its dysfunction is linked to multiple diseases. The stress transducer IRE1α is a transmembrane kinase endoribonuclease (RNase) that cleaves mRNA substrates to re-establish ER homeostasis. Aromatic ring systems containing hydroxy–aldehyde moieties, termed hydroxy–aryl–aldehydes (HAA), selectively inhibit IRE1α RNase and thus represent a novel chemical series for therapeutic development. We solved crystal structures of murine IRE1α in complex with three HAA inhibitors. HAA inhibitors engage a shallow pocket at the RNase-active site through pi-stacking interactions with His910 and Phe889, an essential Schiff base with Lys907 and a hydrogen bond with Tyr892. Structure–activity studies and mutational analysis of contact residues define the optimal chemical space of inhibitors and validate the inhibitor-binding site. These studies lay the foundation for understanding both the biochemical and cellular functions of IRE1α using small molecule inhibitors and suggest new avenues for inhibitor design.

  10. Preclinical evaluation of the antineoplastic action of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and different histone deacetylase inhibitors on human Ewing's sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurtubise, Annie; Bernstein, Mark L; Momparler, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    Background Most patients with advanced Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) respond poorly to conventional chemotherapy, indicating the need for new treatment approaches. Epigenetic events, such as promoter hypermethylation and chromatin histone deacetylation, silence the expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and play an important role in tumorigenesis. These epigenetic changes can be reversed by using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AZA-CdR), a potent inhibitor of DNA methylation, in combination with an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC). Results Here, we used a clonogenic assay to evaluate the in vitro antineoplastic activity of 5AZA-CdR in combination with different HDAC inhibitors on EWS cells. We observed that the HDAC inhibitors, MS-275, trichostatin-A, phenylbutyrate, LAQ824 and depsipeptide, enhanced the antineoplastic action of 5AZA-CdR on EWS cells. The combination of 5AZA-CdR and MS-275 showed marked synergy, and was correlated with significant reactivation of the expression of two TSGs, E-cadherin and tumor suppressor lung cancer-1 (TSLC1), in a EWS cell line. Conclusion These results suggest the value of future clinical studies investigating the combination of 5AZA-CdR and MS-275 in patients with advanced EWS. PMID:19014694

  11. Antithrombotic actions of the thrombin inhibitor, argatroban, in a canine model of coronary cyclic flow: comparison with heparin.

    PubMed Central

    Duval, N.; Lunven, C.; O'Brien, D. P.; Grosset, A.; O'Connor, S. E.; Berry, C. N.

    1996-01-01

    1. The antithrombotic action of argatroban, a synthetic thrombin inhibitor, was studied in a canine model of coronary cyclic flow having some of the characteristics of acute unstable angina. Heparin was studied as a reference anticoagulant. 2. Localized endothelial damage was induced in the circumflex coronary artery of anaesthetized open-chest foxhounds and a critical stenosis was applied by use of a Lexan constrictor placed around the artery at the site of endothelial damage. An electro-magnetic flow probe was placed distal to the lesion, and cyclic flow variations (CFVs) were observed, as thrombi formed at the site of the arterial lesion and were dislodged. Test compounds were administered by i.v. infusion commencing 1 h after the appearance of CFVs, and maintained for 1 h. On termination of the treatments, coronary flow was observed for a further 60 min. A series of blood samples were taken at predetermined times throughout each experiment in order to determine the coagulation parameters, thrombin time (TT) activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and for the determination of fibrinopeptide A (FpA) levels before, during and post-treatment. 3. Argatroban and heparin showed antithrombotic effects in this model. Argatroban dose-dependently increased the minimum coronary flow at the nadir of the CFVs from 5.4 +/- 1.7 to 9.1 +/- 2.1 ml min-1 (30 micrograms kg-1 min-1, P = 0.041) and from 2.9 +/- 0.9 to 16.3 +/- 4.5 ml min-1 (100 micrograms kg-1 min-1, P = 0.023, n = 8 dogs at each dose level). Heparin (5 and 15 iu kg-1 min-1) also increased minimum flow, but the increase was not statistically significant at the 5% level, although the P value in animals treated with 15 iu kg-1 min-1 (P = 0.0521, n = 6 dogs) fell just outside this limit. Although neither compound significantly decreased the overall CFV frequency, argatroban (100 micrograms kg-1 min-1) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the number of large amplitude CFVs (minimum coronary flow < 10 ml min-1) by 63

  12. Mechanism of action and biological profile of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors. A new therapeutic alternative.

    PubMed

    Slater, E E; MacDonald, J S

    1988-01-01

    Lovastatin (MK-803, mevinolin) and simvastatin (MK-733, synvinolin), 2 highly potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been heralded as breakthrough therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. This paper discusses the biochemical attributes of these HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, their structures and inhibitory properties in a variety of biological systems and presents the rationale for their therapeutic use. Not only do lovastatin and simvastatin potently inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis; they also can result in the induction of hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, thus increasing the catabolism of LDL-cholesterol. Lovastatin and simvastatin are the first HMG CoA reductase inhibitors to receive regulatory agency approval for marketed use. Their safety profiles are reviewed and 2 aspects of this evaluation are stressed. First, the objective in the clinical use of these inhibitors is to normalise plasma cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. This contrasts with the profound reductions in cholesterol obtained when normocholesterolaemic animals are treated by the high doses of these drugs required for toxicological assessment. Second, both lovastatin and simvastatin are administered as prodrugs in their lactone forms. As lactones, they readily undergo first-pass metabolism, hepatic sequestration and hydrolysis to the active form. Consequently, lovastatin and simvastatin achieve lower plasma drug levels than do other HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in clinical development. Low plasma levels have been established as an important determinant of safety in the use of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in both animal and human studies. PMID:3076125

  13. A Four-Point Screening Method for Assessing Molecular Mechanism of Action (MMOA) Identifies Tideglusib as a Time-Dependent Inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Swinney, Zachary T.; Haubrich, Brad A.; Xia, Shuangluo; Ramesha, Chakk; Gomez, Stephen R.; Guyett, Paul; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo; Swinney, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background New therapeutics are needed for neglected tropical diseases including Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a progressive and fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. There is a need for simple, efficient, cost effective methods to identify new molecules with unique molecular mechanisms of action (MMOAs). The mechanistic features of a binding mode, such as competition with endogenous substrates and time-dependence can affect the observed inhibitory IC50, and differentiate molecules and their therapeutic usefulness. Simple screening methods to determine time-dependence and competition can be used to differentiate compounds with different MMOAs in order to identify new therapeutic opportunities. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report a four point screening methodology to evaluate the time-dependence and competition for inhibition of GSK3β protein kinase isolated from T. brucei. Using this method, we identified tideglusib as a time-dependent inhibitor whose mechanism of action is time-dependent, ATP competitive upon initial binding, which transitions to ATP non-competitive with time. The enzyme activity was not recovered following 100-fold dilution of the buffer consistent with an irreversible mechanism of action. This is in contrast to the T. brucei GSK3β inhibitor GW8510, whose inhibition was competitive with ATP, not time-dependent at all measured time points and reversible in dilution experiments. The activity of tideglusib against T. brucei parasites was confirmed by inhibition of parasite proliferation (GI50 of 2.3 μM). Conclusions/Significance Altogether this work demonstrates a straightforward method for determining molecular mechanisms of action and its application for mechanistic differentiation of two potent TbGSK3β inhibitors. The four point MMOA method identified tideglusib as a mechanistically differentiated TbGSK3β inhibitor. Tideglusib was shown to inhibit parasite

  14. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anders; Pedersen, Søren W.; Dorr, Liam A.; Vallon, Gary; Ripoche, Isabelle; Ducki, Sylvie; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical and biophysical methods, such as fluorescence polarization (FP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and 1H-15N HSQC NMR. Our data show that under the applied in vitro conditions, ZL006 and IC87201 do not interact with the PDZ domains of nNOS or PSD-95, nor inhibit the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interface by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action. PMID:26177569

  15. The synthesis of inhibitors for processing proteinases and their action on the Kex2 proteinase of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Angliker, H; Wikstrom, P; Shaw, E; Brenner, C; Fuller, R S

    1993-01-01

    Peptidyl chloromethane and sulphonium salts containing multiple Arg and Lys residues were synthesized as potential inhibitors of prohormone and pro-protein processing proteinases. The potencies of these compounds were assayed by measuring the kinetics of inactivation of the yeast Kex2 proteinase, the prototype of a growing family of eukaryotic precursor processing proteinases. The most potent inhibitor, Pro-Nvl-Tyr-Lys-Arg-chloromethane, was based on cleavage sites in the natural Kex2 substrate pro-alpha-factor. This inhibitor exhibited a Ki of 3.7 nM and a second-order inactivation rate constant (k2/Ki) of 1.3 x 10(7) M-1.s-1 comparable with the value of kcat./Km obtained with Kex2 for the corresponding peptidyl methylcoumarinylamide substrate. The enzyme exhibited sensitivity to the other peptidyl chloromethanes over a range of concentrations, depending on peptide sequence and alpha-amino decanoylation, but was completely resistant to peptidyl sulphonium salts. Kinetics of inactivation by these new inhibitors of a set of 'control' proteinases, including members of both the trypsin and subtilisin families, underscored the apparent specificity of the compounds most active against Kex2 proteinase. PMID:8328974

  16. Promiscuous Actions of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Protein Kinase D-Class IIa HDAC Axis in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Douglas D.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Horn, Todd R.; Stratton, Matthew S.; Ferguson, Bradley S.; Wempe, Michael F.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    PKD-mediated phosphorylation of class IIa HDACs frees the MEF2 transcription factor to activate genes that govern muscle differentiation and growth. Studies of the regulation and function of this signaling axis have involved MC1568 and Gö-6976, which are small molecule inhibitors of class IIa HDAC and PKD catalytic activity, respectively. We describe unanticipated effects of these compounds. MC1568 failed to inhibit class IIa HDAC catalytic activity in vitro, and exerted divergent effects on skeletal muscle differentiation compared to a bona fide inhibitor of these HDACs. In cardiomyocytes, Gö-6976 triggered calcium signaling and activated stress-inducible kinases. Based on these findings, caution is warranted when employing MC1568 and Gö-6976 as pharmacological tool compounds to assess functions of class IIa HDACs and PKD. PMID:25816750

  17. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  18. Incretin therapies: highlighting common features and differences in the modes of action of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nauck, M

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, incretin-based therapies have emerged as important agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). These agents exert their effect via the incretin system, specifically targeting the receptor for the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is partly responsible for augmenting glucose-dependent insulin secretion in response to nutrient intake (the 'incretin effect'). In patients with T2D, pharmacological doses/concentrations of GLP-1 can compensate for the inability of diabetic β cells to respond to the main incretin hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, and this is therefore a suitable parent compound for incretin-based glucose-lowering medications. Two classes of incretin-based therapies are available: GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. GLP-1RAs promote GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signalling by providing GLP-1R stimulation through 'incretin mimetics' circulating at pharmacological concentrations, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors prevent the degradation of endogenously released GLP-1. Both agents produce reductions in plasma glucose and, as a result of their glucose-dependent mode of action, this is associated with low rates of hypoglycaemia; however, there are distinct modes of action resulting in differing efficacy and tolerability profiles. Furthermore, as their actions are not restricted to stimulating insulin secretion, these agents have also been associated with additional non-glycaemic benefits such as weight loss, improvements in β-cell function and cardiovascular risk markers. These attributes have made incretin therapies attractive treatments for the management of T2D and have presented physicians with an opportunity to tailor treatment plans. This review endeavours to outline the commonalities and differences among incretin-based therapies and to provide guidance regarding agents most suitable for treating T2D in individual patients. PMID:26489970

  19. Insulinotropic and β-cell protective action of cuminaldehyde, cuminol and an inhibitor isolated from Cuminum cyminum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Patil, Swapnil B; Takalikar, Shreehari S; Joglekar, Madhav M; Haldavnekar, Vivek S; Arvindekar, Akalpita U

    2013-10-01

    Cuminum cyminum, a commonly used spice, is known to have anti-diabetic action. The present study aims towards the isolation of bioactive components from C. cyminum and the evaluation of their insulin secretagogue potential with the probable mechanism and β-cell protective action. The anti-diabetic activity was detected in the petroleum ether (pet ether) fraction of the C. cyminum distillate and studied through in vivo and in vitro experiments. Bioactive components were identified through GC-MS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and NMR analysis. The isolated components were evaluated for their insulin secretagogue action using rat pancreatic islets. Further, the probable mechanism of stimulation of islets was evaluated through in vitro studies using diazoxide, nifedipine and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. β-Cell protection was evaluated using the (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan) (MTT) assay, the alkaline comet assay and nitrite production. The administration of the pet ether fraction for 45 d to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats revealed an improved lipid profile. Cuminaldehyde and cuminol were identified as potent insulinotrophic components. Cuminaldehyde and cuminol (25 μg/ml) showed 3·34- and 3·85-fold increased insulin secretion, respectively, than the 11·8 mm-glucose control. The insulinotrophic action of both components was glucose-dependent and due to the closure of the ATP-sensitive K (K⁺-ATP) channel and the increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration. An inhibitor of insulin secretion with potent β-cell protective action was also isolated from the same pet ether fraction. In conclusion, C. cyminum was able to lower blood glucose without causing hypoglycaemia or β-cell burn out. Hence, the commonly used spice, C. cyminum, has the potential to be used as a novel insulinotrophic therapy for prolonged treatment of diabetes. PMID:23507295

  20. Efficacy and mechanism of action of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, lapatinib and neratinib in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer: preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Segovia-Mendoza, Mariana; González-González, María E; Barrera, David; Díaz, Lorenza; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of tumors, including breast cancer, overexpress proteins of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. The interaction between family members activates signaling pathways that promote tumor progression and resistance to treatment. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type II (HER2) positive breast cancer represents a clinical challenge for current therapy. It has motivated the development of novel and more effective therapeutic EGFR family target drugs, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This review focuses on the effects of three TKIs mostly studied in HER2- positive breast cancer, lapatinib, gefitinib and neratinib. Herein, we discuss the mechanism of action, therapeutic advantages and clinical applications of these TKIs. To date, TKIs seem to be promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast tumors, either as monotherapy or combined with other pharmacological agents. PMID:26609467

  1. Intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action in lepidopteran insects: inhibition of sex pheromone production by compactin, an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, R; Matsumoto, S; Kim, G H; Uchiumi, K; Kurihara, M; Shono, T; Mitsui, T

    1995-06-27

    Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) regulates sex pheromone production in the pheromone glands of many species of female moths. In order to probe the biochemical steps as well as underlying mechanisms regulated by PBAN, we have tested the effect of chemicals on sex pheromone production by using an in vitro assay. Among the chemicals we tested here, compactin, a specific 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitor, clearly inhibited the pheromone biosynthesis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura. Since the activation of HMG CoA reductase occurs by dephosphorylation mediated by a specific phosphatase and the biochemical step regulated by PBAN in bombykol biosynthesis is similar to the one catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase in cholesterol biosynthesis, the present results support the idea that phosphoprotein phosphatase has a significant role to regulate bombykol production in the intracellular transduction of PBAN action in B. mori. PMID:7480881

  2. Antibacterial FabH Inhibitors with Mode of Action Validated in Haemophilus influenzae by in Vitro Resistance Mutation Mapping.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Eyermann, Charles J; Gu, Rong-Fang; Hu, Jun; Kazmirski, Steven L; Lahiri, Sushmita D; McKenzie, Andrew R; Shapiro, Adam B; Breault, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to bacterial growth in Gram-negative pathogens. Several small molecules identified through a combination of high-throughput and fragment screening were cocrystallized with FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III) from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Structure-based drug design was used to merge several scaffolds to provide a new class of inhibitors. After optimization for Gram-negative enzyme inhibitory potency, several compounds demonstrated antimicrobial activity against an efflux-negative strain of Haemophilus influenzae. Mutants resistant to these compounds had mutations in the FabH gene near the catalytic triad, validating FabH as a target for antimicrobial drug discovery. PMID:27626097

  3. Denosumab--a powerful RANKL inhibitor to stop lytic metastases and other bone loss actions by osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kopper, László

    2012-10-01

    Denosumab is a perfect example on the targeted anticancer therapy. The inhibition of RANKL activity suppressed the osteoclasts' resorptive function and so prevented skeletal related events. This effect is useful not only against bone metastases, but also in the treatment of other diseases caused by bone loss. In different solid tumors with bone metastasis the quality of life also improved, although the overall survival usually showed no change. On the market the main competitors for denosumab are still the bisphosphonates (questions of costs and reimbursement are not discussed) and some potential new agents e.g. Src kinases (as dasatinib, saracatinib, bosutinib), cathepsin K inhibitors, (e.g. odanacatib), and new selective estrogen receptor modulators (e.g. bazedoxifene, lasofoxifene). Nevertheless, today denosumab is one of the most powerful agents in bone-saving area. PMID:22588706

  4. Identification, mechanism of action, and antitumor activity of a small molecule inhibitor of hippo, TGF-β, and Wnt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dipanjan; Lettan, Robert; Damodaran, Krishnan; Strellec, Susan; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Rebbaa, Abdelhadi

    2014-06-01

    Embryonic signaling pathways, in particular those mediated by Wnt and TGF-β, are known to play key roles in tumor progression through the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Their simultaneous targeting could therefore represent a desirable anticancer strategy. On the basis of recent findings that both Wnt and TGF-β-associated pathways are regulated by Hippo signaling in mammalian cells, we reasoned that targeting the latter would be more effective in inhibiting EMT. In a search for such inhibitors, we identified a small molecule (C19) with remarkable inhibitory activity not only against Hippo, but also against Wnt and TGF-β pathways. C19 inhibited cancer cell migration, proliferation, and resistance to doxorubicin in vitro, and exerted strong antitumor activity in a mouse tumor model. Mechanistically, C19 induced GSK3-β-mediated degradation of the Hippo transducer TAZ, through activation of the Hippo kinases Mst/Lats and the tumor suppressor kinase AMPK upstream of the degradation complex. Overall, this study identified C19 as a multi-EMT pathway inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action. The findings that both AMPK and Mst/Lats mediate the antitumor activity of C19 shed light on a potential cross-talk between metabolic and organ size control pathways in regulating cancer progression. By simultaneously targeting these two pathways, C19 may represent a new type of agents to suppress cancer progression and/or its recurrence. PMID:24694946

  5. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein: at the heart of the action of lipid-modulating therapy with statins, fibrates, niacin, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. John; Le Goff, Wilfried; Guerin, Maryse; Kontush, Anatol

    2010-01-01

    Subnormal plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) constitute a major cardiovascular risk factor; raising low HDL-C levels may therefore reduce the residual cardiovascular risk that frequently presents in dyslipidaemic subjects despite statin therapy. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), a key modulator not only of the intravascular metabolism of HDL and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I but also of triglyceride (TG)-rich particles and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), mediates the transfer of cholesteryl esters from HDL to pro-atherogenic apoB-lipoproteins, with heterotransfer of TG mainly from very low-density lipoprotein to HDL. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity is elevated in the dyslipidaemias of metabolic disease involving insulin resistance and moderate to marked hypertriglyceridaemia, and is intimately associated with premature atherosclerosis and high cardiovascular risk. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition therefore presents a preferential target for elevation of HDL-C and reduction in atherosclerosis. This review appraises recent evidence for a central role of CETP in the action of current lipid-modulating agents with HDL-raising potential, i.e. statins, fibrates, and niacin, and compares their mechanisms of action with those of pharmacological agents under development which directly inhibit CETP. New CETP inhibitors, such as dalcetrapib and anacetrapib, are targeted to normalize HDL/apoA-I levels and anti-atherogenic activities of HDL particles. Further studies of these CETP inhibitors, in particular in long-term, large-scale outcome trials, will provide essential information on their safety and efficacy in reducing residual cardiovascular risk. PMID:19825813

  6. The Action Mechanism of the Myc Inhibitor Termed Omomyc May Give Clues on How to Target Myc for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Mauro; Annibali, Daniela; Carucci, Nicoletta; Favuzzi, Emilia; Cole, Michael D.; Evan, Gerard I.; Soucek, Laura; Nasi, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence points to Myc – a multifaceted bHLHZip transcription factor deregulated in the majority of human cancers – as a priority target for therapy. How to target Myc is less clear, given its involvement in a variety of key functions in healthy cells. Here we report on the action mechanism of the Myc interfering molecule termed Omomyc, which demonstrated astounding therapeutic efficacy in transgenic mouse cancer models in vivo. Omomyc action is different from the one that can be obtained by gene knockout or RNA interference, approaches designed to block all functions of a gene product. This molecule – instead – appears to cause an edge-specific perturbation that destroys some protein interactions of the Myc node and keeps others intact, with the result of reshaping the Myc transcriptome. Omomyc selectively targets Myc protein interactions: it binds c- and N-Myc, Max and Miz-1, but does not bind Mad or select HLH proteins. Specifically, it prevents Myc binding to promoter E-boxes and transactivation of target genes while retaining Miz-1 dependent binding to promoters and transrepression. This is accompanied by broad epigenetic changes such as decreased acetylation and increased methylation at H3 lysine 9. In the presence of Omomyc, the Myc interactome is channeled to repression and its activity appears to switch from a pro-oncogenic to a tumor suppressive one. Given the extraordinary therapeutic impact of Omomyc in animal models, these data suggest that successfully targeting Myc for cancer therapy might require a similar twofold action, in order to prevent Myc/Max binding to E-boxes and, at the same time, keep repressing genes that would be repressed by Myc. PMID:21811581

  7. Inhibitory actions of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 on the human Kv1.5 channel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Ding, W-G; Matsuura, H; Tsuji, K; Zang, W-J; Horie, M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Kv1.5 channels conduct the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (IKur), and in humans, Kv1.5 channels are highly expressed in cardiac atria but are scarce in ventricles. Pharmacological blockade of human Kv1.5 (hKv1.5) has been regarded as effective for prevention and treatment of re-entry-based atrial tachyarrhythmias. Here we examined blockade of hKv1.5 channels by LY294002, a well-known inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Experimental approach: hKv1.5 channels were heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Effects of LY294002 on wild-type and mutant (T462C, H463C, T480A, R487V, A501V, I502A, I508A, L510A and V516A) hKv1.5 channels were examined by using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Key results: LY294002 rapidly and reversibly inhibited hKv1.5 current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 7.9 µmol·L−1). In contrast, wortmannin, a structurally distinct inhibitor of PI3K, had little inhibitory effect on hKv1.5 current. LY294002 block of hKv1.5 current developed with time during depolarizing voltage-clamp steps, and this blockade was also voltage-dependent with a steep increase over the voltage range for channel openings. The apparent binding (k+1) and unbinding (k−1) rate constants were calculated to be 1.6 µmol·L−1−1·s−1 and 5.7 s−1 respectively. Inhibition by LY294002 was significantly reduced in several hKv1.5 mutant channels: T480A, R487V, I502A, I508A, L510A and V516A. Conclusions and implications: LY294002 acts directly on hKv1.5 currents as an open channel blocker, independently of its effects on PI3K activity. Amino acid residues located in the pore region (Thr480, Arg487) and the S6 segment (Ile502, Ile508, Leu510, Val516) appear to constitute potential binding sites for LY294002. PMID:19154427

  8. Effects of suppression of estrogen action by the p450 aromatase inhibitor letrozole on bone mineral density and bone turnover in pubertal boys.

    PubMed

    Wickman, Sanna; Kajantie, Eero; Dunkel, Leo

    2003-08-01

    The essential role of estrogen (E) in regulation of developing peak bone mass in males was confirmed when young adult men were described who cannot respond to or produce E because of defective E receptor alpha or P-450 aromatase enzyme, respectively. These men had significantly reduced bone mineral density (BMD) despite normal or supranormal androgen concentrations, and E administration improved BMD in the men with aromatase deficiency, whereas testosterone (T) was ineffective. Because new P450 aromatase inhibitors may prove to be potential drugs in various growth disorders, the effect of suppression of E action on developing peak bone mass has to be closely evaluated. In this study, we explored the effects of suppression of E synthesis on bone metabolism in pubertal boys. A total of 23 boys with constitutional delay of puberty were randomized to receive T and placebo or T and a specific and potent P450 aromatase inhibitor, letrozole. We determined BMD in the lumbar spine and the femoral neck. Bone resorption was studied by measuring the serum concentration of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen by two different methods (CTx and ICTP), and bone formation by determining the serum concentrations of carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. We demonstrated previously that, during treatment with T and placebo, the concentrations of androgens and E increased. During treatment with T and letrozole, the E concentrations remained at the pretreatment level, but the androgen concentrations increased; the increase in the T concentration was more than 5-fold higher than during treatment with T and placebo. We did not observe any significant differences in the changes in bone mineral content, BMD, or bone mineral apparent density, an estimate of true volumetric BMD, between the treated groups. Lumbar spine bone mineral apparent density increased in both treated groups; but in the T- plus letrozole

  9. Recombinant protein of heptad-repeat HR212, a stable fusion inhibitor with potent anti-HIV action in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Wei; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Liu Changmei; Tien Po Zheng Yongtang

    2008-07-20

    HR212, a recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli, has been previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 membrane fusion at low nanomolar level. Here we report that HR212 is effective in blocking laboratory strain HIV-1{sub IIIB} entry and replication with EC{sub 50} values of 3.92 {+-} 0.62 and 6.59 {+-} 1.74 nM, respectively, and inhibiting infection by clinic isolate HIV-1{sub KM018} with EC{sub 50} values of 44.44 {+-} 10.20 nM, as well as suppressing HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect with an EC{sub 50} value of 3.04 {+-} 1.20 nM. It also inhibited HIV-2{sub ROD} and HIV-2{sub CBL-20} entry and replication in the {mu}M range. Notably, HR212 was highly effective against T20-resistant strains with EC{sub 50} values ranging from 5.09 to 7.75 nM. Unlike T20, HR212 showed stability sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation in a time-of-addition assay, and was insensitive to proteinase K digestion. These results suggest that HR212 has great potential to be further developed as novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients, particularly for those infected by T20-resistant variants.

  10. Aurora B kinase inhibitor AZD1152: determinants of action and ability to enhance chemotherapeutics effectiveness in pancreatic and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, A; Bocci, G; Porcelli, L; Fioravanti, A; Sini, P; Simone, G M; Quatrale, A E; Chiarappa, P; Mangia, A; Sebastian, S; Del Bufalo, D; Del Tacca, M; Paradiso, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: AZD1152, the prodrug for AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (HQPA), is a selective inhibitor of Aurora B kinase activity. Preclinical evaluation of AZD1152 has been reported in several human cancer models. The potentiality of this compound in combination therapy warrants further investigation in solid tumours. Experimental design: This study explored the effects of AZD1152-HQPA in colon and pancreatic tumour cells. The antitumour properties of AZD1152, either as single agent or in combination with chemotherapeutics, were evaluated in each study model. The efficacy and the toxicity of AZD1152 alone and in combination with gemcitabine were validated in pancreatic tumour xenograft model. Results: AZD1152-HQPA treatment resulted in a dramatic increase of chromosome number, modification of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis. The most effective combination was that with chemotherapeutics given soon after AZD1152 in both tumour cell types. The effectiveness of the sequential schedule of AZD1152 with gemcitabine was confirmed in nude mice bearing MiaPaCa-2 tumours, showing inhibition of tumour volumes and delaying of tumour growth after the interruption of the treatments. Conclusion: Here we show that AZD1152-HQPA enhances oxaliplatin and gemcitabine effectiveness in colon and pancreatic cancer, respectively. First, we provide advances into administration schedules and dosing regimens for the combination treatment in in vivo pancreatic tumour. PMID:21304529

  11. Identification of Known Drugs that Act as Inhibitors of NF-κB Signaling and their Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Susanne C.; Huang, Ruili; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Shukla, Sunita J.; Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Shinn, Paul; Van Leer, Danielle; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P.; Xia, Menghang

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role across many cellular processes including embryonic and neuronal development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune responses to infection, and inflammation. Dysregulation of NF-κB signaling is associated with inflammatory diseases and certain cancers. Constitutive activation of NF-κB signaling has been found in some types of tumors including breast, colon, prostate, skin and lymphoid, hence therapeutic blockade of NF-κB signaling in cancer cells provides an attractive strategy for the development of anticancer drugs. To identify small molecule inhibitors of NF-κB signaling, we screened approximately 2,800 clinically approved drugs and bioactive compounds from the NIH Chemical Genomics Center Pharmaceutical Collection (NPC) in a NF-κB mediated β-lactamase reporter gene assay. Each compound was tested at fifteen different concentrations in a quantitative high throughput screening format. We identified nineteen drugs that inhibited NF-κB signaling, with potencies as low as 20 nM. Many of these drugs, including emetine, fluorosalan, sunitinib malate, bithionol, narasin, tribromsalan, and lestaurtinib, inhibited NF-κB signaling via inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation. Others, such as ectinascidin 743, chromomycin A3 and bortezomib utilized other mechanisms. Furthermore, many of these drugs induced caspase 3/7 activity and had an inhibitory effect on cervical cancer cell growth. Our results indicate that many currently approved pharmaceuticals have previously unappreciated effects on NF-κB signaling, which may contribute to anticancer therapeutic effects. Comprehensive profiling of approved drugs provides insight into their molecular mechanisms, thus providing a basis for drug repurposing. PMID:20067776

  12. Novel high-throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine [AZT (azidothymidine)] is associated with selection of the mutations M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in RT (reverse transcriptase). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT's ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-MP (AZT-monophosphate) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme's polymerase active site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleoside/nucleotide analogues, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. In the present study, we have developed a FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer)-based high-throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z' factor of 0.69. We screened three chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified APEX57219 {3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxybenzoic acid]} as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate. PMID:24969820

  13. Novel high throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine (AZT) is associated with selection of M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in reverse transcriptase (RT). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT’s ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-monophosphate (AZT-MP) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme’s polymerase activ e site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleosid(t)e analogs, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. Here, we developed a Förster resonance energy transfer based high throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal to noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z’ factor of 0.69. We screened 3 chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified 3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-lidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxy-benzoic acid] (APEX57219) as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate. PMID:24969820

  14. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Pedro M.; Freitas, Teresa; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. {yields} Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. {yields} This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  15. Beneficial metabolic actions of a stable GIP agonist following pre-treatment with a SGLT2 inhibitor in high fat fed diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Millar, P J B; Pathak, V; Moffett, R C; Pathak, N M; Bjourson, A J; O'Kane, M J; Flatt, P R; Gault, V A

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of the present study was to examine if a stable glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) agonist could exert beneficial metabolic control in diabetic mice which had been pre-treated with sodium-glucose-cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor dapagliflozin (DAPA). High fat fed mice administered low dose streptozotocin (STZ) received vehicle, DAPA once-daily over 28 days, or DAPA once-daily for 14 days followed by (DAla(2))GIP once-daily for 14 days. Energy intake, body weight, glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at regular intervals. Glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance test, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and pancreatic histology were examined. Once-daily administration of (DAla(2))GIP for 14 days in high fat fed diabetic mice pre-treated with DAPA demonstrated significant decrease in body weight, blood glucose and increased insulin concentrations which were independent of changes in energy intake. Similarly, glucose tolerance, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and HOMA-β were significantly enhanced in (DAla(2))GIP-treated mice. DEXA analysis revealed sustained percentage body fat loss with no changes in lean mass, bone mineral content and density. Pancreatic immunohistochemical analysis revealed decreased islet number and increases in islet area, beta cell area and pancreatic insulin content. The DAPA-induced increase in alpha cell area was also reversed. Additional acute in vitro and in vivo experiments confirmed that the impaired action of (DAla(2))GIP under hyperglycaemic-induced conditions was significantly reversed by DAPA treatment. These data demonstrate that (DAla(2))GIP can exert beneficial metabolic control in high fat fed diabetic mice pre-treated with DAPA. The results highlight possibility of a targeted and personalized approach using a GIP agonist and SGLT2 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26607806

  16. Identification of chebulinic acid as potent natural inhibitor of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase and molecular insights into its binding mode of action.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kunal; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Wahi, Divya; Jain, Ritu; Bharadvaja, Navneeta; Grover, Abhinav

    2015-12-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis has threatened all the advances that have been made in TB control at the global stage in the last few decades. DNA gyrase enzymes are an excellent target for antibacterial drug discovery as they are involved in essential functions like DNA replication. Here we report, a successful application of high throughput virtual screening (HTVS) to identify an inhibitor of Mycobacterium DNA gyrase targeting the wild type and the most prevalent three double mutants of quinolone resistant DNA gyrase namely A90V+D94G, A74S+D94G and A90V+S91P. HTVS of 179.299 compounds gave five compounds with significant binding affinity. Extra presicion (XP) docking and MD simulations gave a clear view of their interaction pattern. Among them, chebulinic acid (CA), a phytocompound obtained from Terminalia chebula was the most potent inhibitor with significantly high XP docking score, -14.63, -16.46, -15.94 and -15.11 against wild type and three variants respectively. Simulation studies for a period of 16 ns indicated stable DNA gyrA-CA complex formation. This stable binding would result in inhibition of the enzyme by two mechanisms. Firstly, binding of CA causes displacement of catalytic Tyr129 away from its target DNA-phosphate molecule from 1.6 Å to 3.8-7.3 Å and secondly, by causing steric hindrance to the binding of DNA strand at DNA binding site of enzyme. The combined effect would result in loss of cleavage and religation activity of enzyme leading to bactericidal effect on tuberculosis. This phytocompound displays desirable quality for carrying forward as a lead compound for anti-tuberculosis drug development. The results presented here are solely based on computations and need to be validated experimentally in order to assert the proposed mechanism of action. PMID:26410242

  17. High-throughput screening using the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay identifies ebselen as an inhibitor of diguanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Ori J; Orr, Mona W; Wang, Yan; Lee, Vincent T

    2014-01-17

    The rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has motivated recent efforts to identify new drug candidates that target virulence factors or their regulatory pathways. One such antivirulence target is the cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP) signaling pathway, which regulates biofilm formation, motility, and pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that utilizes cdiGMP-regulated polysaccharides, including alginate and pellicle polysaccharide (PEL), to mediate virulence and antibiotic resistance. CdiGMP activates PEL and alginate biosynthesis by binding to specific receptors including PelD and Alg44. Mutations that abrogate cdiGMP binding to these receptors prevent polysaccharide production. Identification of small molecules that can inhibit cdiGMP binding to the allosteric sites on these proteins could mimic binding defective mutants and potentially reduce biofilm formation or alginate secretion. Here, we report the development of a rapid and quantitative high-throughput screen for inhibitors of protein-cdiGMP interactions based on the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA). Using this approach, we identified ebselen as an inhibitor of cdiGMP binding to receptors containing an RxxD domain including PelD and diguanylate cyclases (DGC). Ebselen reduces diguanylate cyclase activity by covalently modifying cysteine residues. Ebselen oxide, the selenone analogue of ebselen, also inhibits cdiGMP binding through the same covalent mechanism. Ebselen and ebselen oxide inhibit cdiGMP regulation of biofilm formation and flagella-mediated motility in P. aeruginosa through inhibition of diguanylate cyclases. The identification of ebselen provides a proof-of-principle that a DRaCALA high-throughput screening approach can be used to identify bioactive agents that reverse regulation of cdiGMP signaling by targeting cdiGMP-binding domains. PMID:24134695

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Action and Therapeutic Uses of Pharmacological Inhibitors of HIF–Prolyl 4-Hydroxylases for Treatment of Ischemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraju, Vaithinathan; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Adluri, Ram Sudheer; Goldman, Joshua W.; Hussain, Naveed; Sanchez, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: In this review, we have discussed the efficacy and effect of small molecules that act as prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibitors (PHDIs). The use of these compounds causes upregulation of the pro-angiogenic factors and hypoxia inducible factor-1α and -2α (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) to enhance angiogenic, glycolytic, erythropoietic, and anti-apoptotic pathways in the treatment of various ischemic diseases responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Recent Advances: Sprouting of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and surgical intervention, such as coronary bypass and stent insertion, have been shown to be effective in attenuating ischemia. However, the initial reentry of oxygen leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress and result in ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. This apparent “oxygen paradox” must be resolved to combat IR injury. During hypoxia, decreased activity of PHDs initiates the accumulation and activation of HIF-1α, wherein the modulation of both PHD and HIF-1α appears as promising therapeutic targets for the pharmacological treatment of ischemic diseases. Critical Issues: Research on PHDs and HIFs has shown that these molecules can serve as therapeutic targets for ischemic diseases by modulating glycolysis, erythropoiesis, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Efforts are underway to identify and synthesize safer small-molecule inhibitors of PHDs that can be administered in vivo as therapy against ischemic diseases. Future Directions: This review presents a comprehensive and current account of the existing small-molecule PHDIs and their use in the treatment of ischemic diseases with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action in animal models. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2631–2665. PMID:23992027

  19. High-throughput screening using the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay identifies ebselen as an inhibitor of diguanylate cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Ori J.; Orr, Mona W.; Wang, Yan; Lee, Vincent T.

    2013-01-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has motivated recent efforts to identify new drug candidates that target virulence factors or their regulatory pathways. One such antivirulence target is the cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP) signaling pathway, which regulates biofilm formation, motility, and pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that utilizes cdiGMP-regulated polysaccharides, including alginate and pellicle polysaccharide (PEL), to mediate virulence and antibiotic resistance. CdiGMP activates PEL and alginate biosynthesis by binding to specific receptors including PelD and Alg44. Mutations that abrogate cdiGMP binding to these receptors prevent polysaccharide production. Identification of small molecules that can inhibit cdiGMP binding to the allosteric sites on these proteins could mimic binding defective mutants and potentially reduce biofilm formation or alginate secretion. Here, we report the development of a rapid and quantitative high-throughput screen for inhibitors of protein-cdiGMP interactions based on the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA). Using this approach, we identified ebselen as an inhibitor of cdiGMP binding to receptors containing an RxxD domain including PelD and diguanylate cyclases (DGC). Ebselen reduces diguanylate cyclase activity by covalently modifying cysteine residues. Ebselen oxide, the selenone analogue of ebselen, also inhibits cdiGMP binding through the same covalent mechanism. Ebselen and ebselen oxide inhibit cdiGMP regulation of biofilm formation and flagella-mediated motility in P. aeruginosa through inhibition of diguanylate cyclases. The identification of ebselen provides a proof-of-principle that a DRaCALA high-throughput screening approach can be used to identify bioactive agents that reverse regulation of cdiGMP signaling by targeting cdiGMP-binding domains. PMID:24134695

  20. Combination of a Proteomics Approach and Reengineering of Meso Scale Network Models for Prediction of Mode-of-Action for Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balabanov, Stefan; Wilhelm, Thomas; Venz, Simone; Keller, Gunhild; Scharf, Christian; Pospisil, Heike; Braig, Melanie; Barett, Christine; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Walther, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    In drug discovery, the characterisation of the precise modes of action (MoA) and of unwanted off-target effects of novel molecularly targeted compounds is of highest relevance. Recent approaches for identification of MoA have employed various techniques for modeling of well defined signaling pathways including structural information, changes in phenotypic behavior of cells and gene expression patterns after drug treatment. However, efficient approaches focusing on proteome wide data for the identification of MoA including interference with mutations are underrepresented. As mutations are key drivers of drug resistance in molecularly targeted tumor therapies, efficient analysis and modeling of downstream effects of mutations on drug MoA is a key to efficient development of improved targeted anti-cancer drugs. Here we present a combination of a global proteome analysis, reengineering of network models and integration of apoptosis data used to infer the mode-of-action of various tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines expressing wild type as well as TKI resistance conferring mutants of BCR-ABL. The inferred network models provide a tool to predict the main MoA of drugs as well as to grouping of drugs with known similar kinase inhibitory activity patterns in comparison to drugs with an additional MoA. We believe that our direct network reconstruction approach, demonstrated on proteomics data, can provide a complementary method to the established network reconstruction approaches for the preclinical modeling of the MoA of various types of targeted drugs in cancer treatment. Hence it may contribute to the more precise prediction of clinically relevant on- and off-target effects of TKIs. PMID:23326482

  1. Mechanism of action of hypoglycemic effects of an intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Shohei; Katsumi, Sohei; Mera, Yasuko; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Nashida, Reiko; Kakutani, Makoto; Ohta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Diminished insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissues and failure of pancreatic beta cells to secrete insulin are known major determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus. JTT-130, an intestine-specific microsomal transfer protein inhibitor, has been shown to suppress high fat-induced obesity and ameliorate impaired glucose tolerance while enhancing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. We investigated the effects of JTT-130 on glucose metabolism and elucidated the mechanism of action, direct effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in a high fat diet-induced obesity rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet were treated with a single administration of JTT-130. Glucose tolerance, hyperglycemic clamp and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic testing were performed to assess effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, respectively. Plasma GLP-1 and tissue triglyceride content were also determined under the same conditions. A single administration of JTT-130 suppressed plasma glucose elevations after oral glucose loading and increased the disposition index while elevating GLP-1. JTT-130 also enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in hyperglycemic clamp tests, whereas increased insulin sensitivity was observed in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests. Single-dose administration of JTT-130 decreased lipid content in the liver and skeletal muscle. JTT-130 demonstrated acute and direct hypoglycemic effects by enhancing insulin secretion and/or insulin sensitivity. PMID:25704025

  2. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  3. Functional characterization and anti-cancer action of the clinical phase II cardiac Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor istaroxime: in vitro and in vivo properties and cross talk with the membrane androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Alevizopoulos, Konstantinos; Dimas, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Tsapara, Anna; Alkahtani, Saad; Honisch, Sabina; Prousis, Kyriakos C; Alarifi, Saud; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Lang, Florian; Stournaras, Christos

    2016-04-26

    Sodium potassium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase) is a validated pharmacological target for the treatment of various cardiac conditions. Recent published data with Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors suggest a potent anti-cancer action of these agents in multiple indications. In the present study, we focus on istaroxime, a Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor that has shown favorable safety and efficacy properties in cardiac phase II clinical trials. Our experiments in 22 cancer cell lines and in prostate tumors in vivo proved the strong anti-cancer action of this compound. Istaroxime induced apoptosis, affected the key proliferative and apoptotic mediators c-Myc and caspase-3 and modified actin cystoskeleton dynamics and RhoA activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, istaroxime was capable of binding to mAR, a membrane receptor mediating rapid, non-genomic actions of steroids in prostate and other cells. These results support a multi-level action of Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors in cancer cells and collectively validate istaroxime as a strong re-purposing candidate for further cancer drug development. PMID:27027435

  4. Cloning and tissue-specific functional characterization of the promoter of the rat diazepam binding inhibitor, a peptide with multiple biological actions.

    PubMed Central

    Kolmer, M; Alho, H; Costa, E; Pani, L

    1993-01-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) is a 10-kDa polypeptide that regulates mitochondrial steroidogenesis, glucose-induced insulin secretion, metabolism of acyl-CoA esters, and the action of gamma-aminobutyrate on GABAA receptors. To investigate the regulation of DBI gene expression, three positive clones were isolated from a rat genomic library. One of them contained a DBI genomic DNA fragment encompassing 4 kb of the 5' untranslated region, the first two exons, and part of the second intron of the DBI gene. Two other overlapping clones contained a processed DBI pseudogene. Several transcription initiation sites were detected by RNase protection and primer extension assays. Different tissues exhibited clear differences in the efficiencies of transcription startpoint usage. Transient expression experiments using DNA fragments of different length from the 5' untranslated region of the DBI gene showed that basal promoter activity required 146 bp of the proximal DBI sequence, whereas full activation was achieved with 423 bp of the 5' untranslated region. DNase I protection experiments with liver nuclear proteins demonstrated three protected regions at nt -387 to -333, -295 to -271, and -176 to -139 relative to the ATG initiation codon; in other tissues the pattern of protection was different. In gel shift assays the most proximal region (-176 to -139) was found to bind several general transcription factors as well as cell type-restricted nuclear proteins which may be related to specific regulatory patterns in different tissues. Thus, the DBI gene possesses some features of a housekeeping gene but also includes a variable regulation which appears to change with the function that it subserves in different cell types. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7690962

  5. Antiproliferative Mechanisms of Action of the Flavin Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Diphenylene Iodonium and Di-2-thienyliodonium Based on Molecular Profiling of the NCI-60 Human Tumor Cell Panel

    PubMed Central

    Doroshow, James H.; Juhasz, Agnes; Ge, Yun; Holbeck, Susan; Lu, Jiamo; Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Jiang, Guojian; Roy, Krishnendu

    2012-01-01

    Flavoprotein-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in cytokine-mediated signal transduction in normal tissues and tumor cells. The flavoenzyme inhibitors diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and di-2-thienyliodonium (DTI) have been used to inhibit membrane-bound, flavoprotein-containing NADPH oxidases, including epithelial and leukocyte NADPH oxidases (Nox1-5 and Duox 1 and 2). Recent evidence suggests that DPI can decrease tumor cell proliferation; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. To explore the mechanisms underlying DPI- and DTI-related tumor cell growth delay, we examined growth inhibition patterns produced by both agents in the NCI-60 tumor panel, and determined expression levels of Nox gene family members across these cell lines. Possible molecular targets were predicted using the COMPARE program. DPI was more potent than DTI (GI50: 10 nM versus 10 μM); DPI and DTI exposure produced unique patterns of growth inhibition when evaluated against the small molecule anticancer database of the National Cancer Institute. Growth inhibition profiling of DPI revealed a modest positive correlation with Nox1 levels; novel mechanisms of DPI and DTI action, including alterations in Stat, Erk1/2, and Akt pathways, were inferred by correlation with NCI-60 Affymetrix® array data. Exposure of HT-29 colon cancer cells, which express Nox1, to DPI and DTI confirmed their inhibitory effects on steady state ROS levels, and demonstrated decreased Stat, Erk1/2, and Akt signaling mediated by IL-4, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-22, possibly due to a concomitant increase in tumor cell phosphatase activity. These findings suggest that DPI and DTI may act therapeutically by altering ROS-related signal transduction. PMID:22305747

  6. Salt-sparing diuretic action of a water-soluble urea analog inhibitor of urea transporters UT-A and UT-B in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cil, Onur; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Tas, Sadik Taskin; Su, Tao; Lee, Sujin; Anderson, Marc O.; Ertunc, Mert; Verkman, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of kidney urea transporter (UT) proteins have potential use as salt-sparing diuretics (‘urearetics’) with a different mechanism of action than diuretics that target salt transporters. To study UT inhibition in rats, we screened about 10,000 drugs, natural products and urea analogs for inhibition of rat UT-A1. Drug and natural product screening found nicotine, sanguinarine and an indolcarbonylchromenone with IC50 of 10–20 μM. Urea analog screening found methylacetamide and dimethylthiourea (DMTU). DMTU fully and reversibly inhibited rat UT-A1 and UT-B by a noncompetitive mechanism with IC50 of 2–3 mM. Homology modeling and docking computations suggested DMTU binding sites on rat UT-A1. Following a single intraperitoneal injection of 500 mg/kg DMTU, peak plasma concentration was 9 mM with t1/2 of about 10 hours, and a urine concentration of 20–40 mM. Rats chronically treated with DMTU had a sustained, reversible reduction in urine osmolality from 1800 to 600 mOsm, a 3-fold increase in urine output, and mild hypokalemia. DMTU did not impair urinary concentrating function in rats on a low protein diet. Compared to furosemide-treated rats, the DMTU-treated rats had greater diuresis and reduced urinary salt loss. In a model of Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone secretion, DMTU treatment prevented hyponatremia and water retention produced by water-loading in dDAVP-treated rats. Thus, our results establish a rat model of UT inhibition and demonstrate the diuretic efficacy of UT inhibition. PMID:25993324

  7. The drug 5-aminosalicylic acid rescues alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from the neutrophil oxidative inactivation. A possible contribution to its therapeutic action in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Vitale, E; Dallegri, F

    1992-01-01

    The glycoprotein alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor is the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, a major tissue-damaging protease. When incubated with activated neutrophils, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor lost its pancreatic porcine elastase inhibitory capacity and became incapable of forming a sodium dodecyl sulphate-stable complex with pancreatic porcine elastase. Inhibitors and scavengers of neutrophil-derived reactive oxygen species outlined the crucial role of hypochlorous acid in the alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor inactivation. Moreover, the drug 5-aminosalicylic acid prevented the inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, when the capacity of 5-aminosalicylic acid to rescue alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from the neutrophil-derived attack was plotted as a function of the 5-aminosalicylic acid ability to scavenge neutrophil-derived hypochlorous acid, a positive linear relationship was found. Thus, our results provide a direct evidence that 5-aminosalicylic acid is able to prevent the oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by neutrophils. Therefore, we suggest that the drug has the potential to limit the elastase-mediated damage of colonic connective tissue by creating a microenvironment of active alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor around the neutrophils. PMID:1521714

  8. Concerted actions of ameliorated colitis, aberrant crypt foci inhibition and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase induction by sonic hedgehog inhibitor led to prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-03-15

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been known to contribute to carcinogenesis in organ, where hedgehog exerted organogenesis and in cancers, which are developed based on mutagenic inflammation. Therefore, colitis-associated cancer (CAC) can be a good model to prove whether Shh inhibitors can be applied to prevent, as the efforts to discover potent anti-inflammatory agent are active to prevent CAC. Here, under the hypothesis that Shh inhibitors can prevent CAC, mouse model was generated to develop CAC by azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted carcinogenesis. Shh inhibitors, cerulenin and itraconazole were treated by oral gavage and the mice were sacrificed at early phase of 3 weeks and late phase of 16 weeks. Compared to control group, the number of aberrant crypt foci at 3 weeks and tumor incidence at 16 weeks were all significantly decreased with Shh inhibitor. Significant attenuations of macrophage infiltration accompanied with significant decreases of IL-6, COX-2, STAT3 and NF-κB as well as significant ameliorations of β-catenin nuclear translocation, cyclin D1 and CDK4 were imposed with Shh inhibitors. Especially, CAC was accompanied with significant cancellation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), but their levels were significantly preserved with Shh inhibitors. Among inflammatory mediators, significantly decreased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, regulated with repressed NF-κb and STAT3, were prominent with Shh inhibitor, whereas significant inductions of apoptosis were noted with Shh inhibitors. In conclusion, Shh inhibitors significantly prevented CAC covering either ameliorating oncogenic inflammation or suppressing tumor proliferation, especially supported with significant inhibition of IL-6 and STAT3 signaling, 15-PGDH preservation and apoptosis induction. PMID:26476372

  9. In Vitro Mode of Action and Anti-thrombotic Activity of Boophilin, a Multifunctional Kunitz Protease Inhibitor from the Midgut of a Tick Vector of Babesiosis, Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Teresa C.; Ma, Dongying; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Kotsyfakis, Michail; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hematophagous mosquitos and ticks avoid host hemostatic system through expression of enzyme inhibitors targeting proteolytic reactions of the coagulation and complement cascades. While most inhibitors characterized to date were found in the salivary glands, relatively few others have been identified in the midgut. Among those, Boophilin is a 2-Kunitz multifunctional inhibitor targeting thrombin, elastase, and kallikrein. However, the kinetics of Boophilin interaction with these enzymes, how it modulates platelet function, and whether it inhibits thrombosis in vivo have not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings Boophilin was expressed in HEK293 cells and purified to homogeneity. Using amidolytic assays and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we have demonstrated that Boophilin behaves as a classical, non-competitive inhibitor of thrombin with respect to small chromogenic substrates by a mechanism dependent on both exosite-1 and catalytic site. Inhibition is accompanied by blockade of platelet aggregation, fibrin formation, and clot-bound thrombin in vitro. Notably, we also identified Boophilin as a non-competitive inhibitor of FXIa, preventing FIX activation. In addition, Boophilin inhibits kallikrein activity and the reciprocal activation, indicating that it targets the contact pathway. Furthermore, Boophilin abrogates cathepsin G- and plasmin-induced platelet aggregation and partially affects elastase-mediated cleavage of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI). Finally, Boophilin inhibits carotid artery occlusion in vivo triggered by FeCl3, and promotes bleeding according to the mice tail transection method. Conclusion/Significance Through inhibition of several enzymes involved in proteolytic cascades and cell activation, Boophilin plays a major role in keeping the midgut microenvironment at low hemostatic and inflammatory tonus. This response allows ticks to successfully digest a blood meal which is critical for metabolism and egg

  10. Study of the Activity and Possible Mechanism of Action of a Reversible Inhibitor of Recombinant Human KAT-2: A Promising Lead in Neurodegenerative and Cognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Jayawickrama, Gayan S; Hanrahan, Jane R; Church, W Bret

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA) in the human brain are believed to be connected to several central nervous system (CNS) diseases, therefore compounds which affect the production of this crucial metabolite are of interest in CNS drug development. The majority of KYNA production is accounted for by kynurenine aminotransferase-2 (KAT-2) in the mammalian brain; hence this enzyme is one of the most interesting targets with which to modulate KYNA levels. Recently developed human KAT-2 inhibitors with high potencies are known to irreversibly bind to the enzyme cofactor, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), which may lead to severe side effects due to the abundance of PLP-dependent enzymes. In this study, we report a reversible and competitive inhibitor of KAT-2. Its inhibitory activities were examined using HPLC and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and compare favorably with other recently reported KAT-2 inhibitors. Our inhibitor, NS-1502, demonstrates suitable inhibitory activity, almost 10 times more potent than the known reversible KAT-2, (S)-ESBA. PMID:27367665

  11. Mode of Action of cGMP-dependent Protein Kinase-specific Inhibitors Probed by Photoaffinity Cross-linking Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitor peptide DT-2 (YGRKKRRQRRRPPLRKKKKKH) is the most potent and selective inhibitor of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) known today. DT-2 is a construct of a PKG tight binding sequence (W45, LRKKKKKH, KI = 0.8 μm) and a membrane translocating sequence (DT-6, YGRKKRRQRRRPP, KI = 1.1 μm), that combined strongly inhibits PKG catalyzed phosphorylation (KI = 12.5 nm) with ∼1000-fold selectivity toward PKG over protein kinase A, the closest relative of PKG. However, the molecular mechanism behind this inhibition is not entirely understood. Using a combination of photoaffinity labeling, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry, we have located the binding sites of PKG-specific substrate and inhibitor peptides. Covalent linkage of a PKG-specific substrate analogue was localized in the catalytic core on residues 356–372, also known as the glycine-rich loop, essential for ATP binding. By analogy, the individual inhibitor peptides W45 and DT-6 were also found to cross-link near the glycine-rich loop, suggesting these are both substrate competitive inhibitors. A bifunctional photoreactive analogue of DT-2 was found to generate dimers of PKG. This cross-linking induced covalent PKG dimerization was not observed for an N-terminal deletion mutant of PKG, which lacks the dimerization domain. In addition, non-covalent mass spectrometry was used to determine binding stoichiometry and binding order of the inhibitor peptides. Dimeric PKG binds two W45 and DT-6 peptides, whereas only one DT-2 molecule was observed to bind to the dimeric PKG. Taken together, these findings imply that (i) the two individual components making up DT-2 are both targeted against the substrate-binding site and (ii) binding of a single DT-2 molecule inactivates both PKG monomers simultaneously, which is an indication that (iii) in cGMP-activated PKG the catalytic centers of both subunits may be in each other's proximity. PMID:19369251

  12. Exploration of 4,4-disubstituted pyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamides as potent, orally active Factor Xa inhibitors with extended duration of action.

    PubMed

    Van Huis, Chad A; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Bigge, Christopher F; Cody, Wayne L; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Heemstra, Ronald J; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Leadley, Robert J; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S; McClanahan, Thomas; Mochalkin, Igor; Pamment, Michael; Peterson, J Thomas; Sahasrabudhe, Vaishali; Schaum, Robert P; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2009-03-15

    Aiming to improve upon previously disclosed Factor Xa inhibitors, a series of 4,4-disubstituted pyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamides were explored with the intent of increasing the projected human half-life versus 5 (projected human t(1/2)=6 h). A stereospecific route to compounds containing a 4-aryl-4-hydroxypyrrolidine scaffold was developed, resulting in several compounds that demonstrated an increase in the half-life as well as an increase in the in vitro potency compared to 5. Reported herein is the discovery of 26, containing a (2R,4S)-4-hydroxy-4-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine scaffold, which is a selective, orally bioavailable, efficacious Factor Xa inhibitor that appears suitable for a once-daily dosing (projected human t(1/2)=23 h). PMID:19231206

  13. Inhibiting NFAT1 for breast cancer therapy: New insights into the mechanism of action of MDM2 inhibitor JapA

    PubMed Central

    Voruganti, Sukesh; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor NFAT1 has been recently identified as a new regulator of the MDM2 oncogene. Targeting the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway represents a novel approach to cancer therapy. We have recently identified a natural product MDM2 inhibitor, termed JapA. As a specific and potent MDM2 inhibitor, JapA inhibits MDM2 at transcriptional and post-translational levels. However, the molecular mechanism remains to be fully elucidated for its inhibitory effects on MDM2 transcription. Herein, we reported that JapA inhibited NFAT1 and NFAT1-mediated MDM2 transcription, which contributed to the anticancer activity of JapA. Its effects on the expression and activity of NFAT1 were examined in various breast cancer cell lines in vitro and in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors in vivo. The specificity of JapA in targeting NFAT1 and NFAT1-MDM2 pathway and the importance of NFAT1 inhibition in JapA's anticancer activity were demonstrated using NFAT1 overexpression and knockdown cell lines and the pharmacological activators and inhibitors of NFAT1 signaling. Our results indicated that JapA inhibited NFAT1 signaling in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which plays a pivotal role in its anticancer activity. JapA inhibited the nuclear localization of NFAT1, disrupted the NFAT1-MDM2 P2 promoter complex, and induced NFAT1 proteasomal degradation, resulting in the repression of MDM2 transcription. In conclusion, JapA is a novel NFAT1 inhibitor and the NFAT1 inhibition is responsible for the JapA-induced repression of MDM2 transcription, contributing to its anticancer activity. The results may pave an avenue for validating the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:26461225

  14. Two different mitotic checkpoint inhibitors of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome antagonize the action of the activator Cdc20

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Braunstein, Ilana; Ganoth, Dvora; Teichner, Adar; Hittle, James C.; Yen, Tim J.; Hershko, Avram

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint system ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation by preventing the completion of mitosis in the presence of any misaligned chromosome. When activated, it blocks the initiation of anaphase by inhibiting the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Little is known about the biochemical mechanisms by which this system inhibits APC/C, except for the existence of a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibitor of APC/C composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 associated with the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3. We have been studying the mechanisms of the mitotic checkpoint system in extracts that reproduce its downstream events. We found that inhibitory factors are associated with APC/C in the checkpoint-arrested state, which can be recovered from immunoprecipitates. Only a part of the inhibitory activity was caused by MCC [Braunstein I, Miniowitz S, Moshe Y, Hershko A (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:4870–4875]. Here, we show that during exit from checkpoint, rapid disassembly of MCC takes place while APC/C is still inactive. This observation suggested the possible involvement of multiple factors in the regulation of APC/C by the mitotic checkpoint. We have separated a previously unknown inhibitor of APC/C from MCC. This inhibitor, called mitotic checkpoint factor 2 (MCF2), is associated with APC/C only in the checkpoint-arrested state. The inhibition of APC/C by both MCF2 and MCC was decreased at high concentrations of Cdc20. We propose that both MCF2 and MCC inhibit APC/C by antagonizing Cdc20, possibly by interaction with the Cdc20-binding site of APC/C. PMID:18591651

  15. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. PMID:26800261

  16. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  17. Screening of telomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kleideiter, Elke; Piotrowska, Kamilla; Klotz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Shortening of telomeres prevents cells from uncontrolled proliferation. Progressive telomere shortening occurs at each cell division until a critical telomeric length is reached. Telomerase expression is switched off after embryonic differentiation in most normal cells, but it is expressed in a very high percentage of tumors of different origin. Thus, telomerase is regarded as the best tumor marker and a promising novel molecular target for cancer treatment. Therefore, different strategies to inhibit telomerase have been developed. However, systematic screening of telomerase inhibitors has not been performed to compare their therapeutic potential. We propose a suitable strategy for estimation of the therapeutic potential of telomerase inhibitors, which is based on a systematic screening of different inhibitors in the same cell system. From the long list of compounds discussed in the literature, we have selected four telomerase inhibitors of different structure and mode of action: BRACO19 (G-quadruplex-interactive compound), BIBR1532 (non-nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitor), 2'-O-methyl RNA, and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs; hTR antisense oligonucleotides). To determine minimal effective concentrations for telomerase inhibition, telomerase activity was measured using the cell-free telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. We also tested inhibitors in long-term cell-culture experiments by exposing A-549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentrations of inhibitors for a period of 99 days. Subsequently, telomerase activity of A-549 cells was investigated using the TRAP assay, and telomere length of samples was assessed by telomere restriction fragment (TRF) Southern blot analysis. PMID:18369824

  18. The Novel Cyclophilin Inhibitor CPI-431-32 Concurrently Blocks HCV and HIV-1 Infections via a Similar Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Philippe A.; Bobardt, Michael D.; Chatterji, Udayan; Trepanier, Daniel J.; Ure, Daren; Ordonez, Cosme; Foster, Robert

    2015-01-01

    HCV-related liver disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients. Despite the recent advent of anti-HCV direct acting antivirals (DAAs), the treatment of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients remains a challenge, as these patients are refractory to most therapies and develop liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer more often than HCV mono-infected patients. Until the present study, there was no suitable in vitro assay to test the inhibitory activity of drugs on HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. Here we developed a novel in vitro “co-infection” model where HCV and HIV-1 concurrently replicate in their respective main host target cells—human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Using this co-culture model, we demonstrate that cyclophilin inhibitors (CypI), including a novel cyclosporin A (CsA) analog, CPI-431-32, simultaneously inhibits replication of both HCV and HIV-1 when added pre- and post-infection. In contrast, the HIV-1 protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the HCV NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir only blocks the replication of a single virus in the “co-infection” system. CPI-431-32 efficiently inhibits HCV and HIV-1 variants, which are normally resistant to DAAs. CPI-431-32 is slightly, but consistently more efficacious than the most advanced clinically tested CypI—alisporivir (ALV)—at interrupting an established HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. The superior antiviral efficacy of CPI-431-32 over ALV correlates with its higher potency inhibition of cyclophilin A (CypA) isomerase activity and at preventing HCV NS5A-CypA and HIV-1 capsid-CypA interactions known to be vital for replication of the respective viruses. Moreover, we obtained evidence that CPI-431-32 prevents the cloaking of both the HIV-1 and HCV genomes from cellular sensors. Based on these results, CPI-431-32 has the potential, as a single agent or in combination with DAAs, to inhibit both HCV and HIV-1 infections. PMID:26263487

  19. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei—Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha Rao, Krishnamurthy; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  20. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei--Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishnamurthy Narasimha; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-05-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  1. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  2. Protective actions of PJ34, a poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor, on the blood-brain barrier after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, X; Chen, X; Hao, S; Hou, Z; Lu, T; Sun, M; Liu, B

    2015-04-16

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is activated by oxidative stress and plays an important role in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The objective of this study was to investigate whether PARP activation participated in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and edema formation in a mouse model of controlled cortical impact (CCI). N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide (PJ34) (10 mg/kg), a selective PARP inhibitor, was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min and 8 h after experimental CCI. After 6 h and 24 h of CCI, the permeability of the cortical BBB was determined after Evans Blue administration. The water content of the brain was also measured. Treatment with PJ34 markedly attenuated the permeability of the BBB and decreased the brain edema at 6 h and 24 h after CCI. Our data showed the up-regulation of nuclear factor-κB in cytosolic fractions and nuclear fractions in the injured cortex, and these changes were reversed by PJ34. Moreover, PJ34 significantly lessened the activities of myeloperoxidase and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9, enhanced the levels of occludin, laminin, collagen IV and integrin β1, reduced neurological deficits, decreased the contusion volume, and attenuated the necrotic and apoptotic neuronal cell death. These data suggest the protective effects of PJ34 on BBB integrity and cell death during acute TBI. PMID:25668593

  3. Regulation of the Action of Early Mitotic Inhibitor 1 on the Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome by Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Moshe, Yakir; Bar-On, Ortal; Ganoth, Dvora; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is characterized by alternating activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). During S-phase APC/C is inhibited by early mitotic inhibitor 1 (Emi1) to allow the accumulation of cyclins A and B and to prevent re-replication. Emi1 is degraded at prophase by a Plk1-dependent pathway. Recent studies in which the degradation pathway of Emi1 was disrupted have shown that APC/C is activated at mitotic entry despite stabilization of Emi1. These results suggested the possibility of additional mechanisms other than degradation of Emi1, which release APC/C from inhibition by Emi1 upon entry into mitosis. In this study we report one such mechanism, by which the ability of Emi1 to inhibit APC/C is negatively regulated by CDKs. We show that in Plk1-inhibited cells Emi1 is stabilized and phosphorylated, that Emi1 is phosphorylated by CDKs in mitotic but not S-phase cell extracts, and that Emi1 phosphorylation by mitotic cell extracts or purified CDKs markedly reduces the ability of Emi1 to bind and to inhibit APC/C. Finally, we show that the addition of extracts from S-phase cells to extracts from mitotic cells protects Emi1 from CDK-mediated inactivation. PMID:21454540

  4. Limiting production rates in C-steel pipes. Removal of inhibitors/corrosion products by fatigue/yield action of liquid or gas/liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Soentvedt, T.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this paper has been to form a link between the limiting production rates and the strength of the corrosion product formed on carbon steel. This paper has studied the available experimental data related to the failure of corrosion products with and without strengthening by inhibitors. Corrosion products in smooth pipes, bends and weldlike obstacles have been investigated. A model has been developed based on these observations which connects the strength of the corrosion product with the wall shear stress in both liquid and multiphase flow. Given the chemistry, temperature and metallurgy of the material the model allows the transformation from simple liquid tests to different flow conditions in the field. Thus limiting production rates in a field can be determined based on simple model tests. Relationships for the wall shear stress amplitudes, frequencies and mean values for various flow regimes have been developed. These relations are required in the model simulating the strength of the corrosion product. The paper shows why bends and weldlike obstacles constitute exposed areas. This study is the first of its kind. Thus the models developed lack detailed experimental verifications. The paper therefore briefly describes further work which has been initiated in order to verify the hypothesis formed.

  5. Mechanism of Action of Bortezomib and the New Proteasome Inhibitors on Myeloma Cells and the Bone Microenvironment: Impact on Myeloma-Induced Alterations of Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Fabrizio; Toscani, Denise; Bolzoni, Marina; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a high capacity to induce alterations in the bone remodeling process. The increase in osteoclastogenesis and the suppression of osteoblast formation are both involved in the pathophysiology of the bone lesions in MM. The proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib is the first drug designed and approved for the treatment of MM patients by targeting the proteasome. However, recently novel PIs have been developed to overcome bortezomib resistance. Interestingly, several preclinical data indicate that the proteasome complex is involved in both osteoclast and osteoblast formation. It is also evident that bortezomib either inhibits osteoclast differentiation induced by the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) or stimulates the osteoblast differentiation. Similarly, the new PIs including carfilzomib and ixazomib can inhibit bone resorption and stimulate the osteoblast differentiation. In a clinical setting, PIs restore the abnormal bone remodeling by normalizing the levels of bone turnover markers. In addition, a bone anabolic effect was described in responding MM patients treated with PIs, as demonstrated by the increase in the osteoblast number. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical evidence on the effects of bortezomib and other new PIs on myeloma bone disease. PMID:26579531

  6. [Effects of thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor, DP-1904 on the action of vasoactive substances in guinea pig trachea and lung tissue strips].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Kobayashi, J; Iwanaga, T; Kuratomi, Y; Kitamura, S

    1989-03-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TxA2) is a potent platelet aggregator and vascular or bronchial constrictor. DP-1904, a newly synthesized imidazol TxA2 synthetase inhibitor, is a potent and long-acting agent. The present investigation was conducted to explore the effect of DP-1904 on the contractile or relaxing responses in guinea pig trachea and lung tissue strips induced by various vasoactive substances. Fourteen guinea pigs, weighing 300-350 g, were sacrificed. Trachea and lungs were removed, cut spirally, set up in bioassay glass jackets and superfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C, saturated with oxygen and carbon dioxide. Contraction of tissues was detected by an isotonic transducer and displayed on a polyrecorder. Arachidonic acid-induced relaxing responses in guinea pig trachea strips were attenuated significantly by the continuous infusion of DP-1904 in a dose-dependent fashion. Arachidonic acid-induced contractile responses in guinea pig lung strips were attenuated significantly by the continuous infusion of DP-1904, dose-dependently. Acetylcholine-, histamine- and prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced contractile responses in guinea pig lung and trachea strips were attenuated significantly by the continuous infusion of DP-1904, dose-dependently. The above results suggest that DP-1904 might be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of chronic obstructive lung diseases. PMID:2615088

  7. Mechanism of Action of Bortezomib and the New Proteasome Inhibitors on Myeloma Cells and the Bone Microenvironment: Impact on Myeloma-Induced Alterations of Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Fabrizio; Toscani, Denise; Bolzoni, Marina; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a high capacity to induce alterations in the bone remodeling process. The increase in osteoclastogenesis and the suppression of osteoblast formation are both involved in the pathophysiology of the bone lesions in MM. The proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib is the first drug designed and approved for the treatment of MM patients by targeting the proteasome. However, recently novel PIs have been developed to overcome bortezomib resistance. Interestingly, several preclinical data indicate that the proteasome complex is involved in both osteoclast and osteoblast formation. It is also evident that bortezomib either inhibits osteoclast differentiation induced by the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) or stimulates the osteoblast differentiation. Similarly, the new PIs including carfilzomib and ixazomib can inhibit bone resorption and stimulate the osteoblast differentiation. In a clinical setting, PIs restore the abnormal bone remodeling by normalizing the levels of bone turnover markers. In addition, a bone anabolic effect was described in responding MM patients treated with PIs, as demonstrated by the increase in the osteoblast number. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical evidence on the effects of bortezomib and other new PIs on myeloma bone disease. PMID:26579531

  8. [Effectiveness and tolerance of the C3 convertase inhibitor, N-acetyl-aspartyl-magnesium glutamate with anti-allergic action. Results of a double-blind study].

    PubMed

    Gastpar, H; Kiehn, R; Sieger, C; Weibel, M A

    1989-02-01

    N-Acetyl-aspartyl magnesium glutamate (Rhinaaxia, NAAGA) is a topically active antiallergic dipeptide. The compound acts in two different ways. On the one hand NAAGA inhibits the mast cell-degranulation, on the other hand this compound blocks the activation of the C3-convertase, subsequently followed by a blocked cleavage of the fragments C3a and C5a, respectively. 20 patients suffering from pollinosis were treated for 2 weeks according to a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Besides subjective complaints nasal obstruction was objectively documented via rhinomanometria. 9 out of 10 patients under placebo had to use the rescue drug tritoqualine, a histidine decarboxylase inhibitor, compared to none in the verum group (p less than 0.01). After 14 days of treatment with NAAGA the nasal peak flow rate increased by 21.5 l/min and 21.8 l/min in the tritoqualine/placebo group, respectively (not significant). Nasal obstruction improved statistically significantly after 7 and 14 days of treatment in both groups. Tolerance was reported to be good in either group. PMID:2659002

  9. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  10. Purification, cloning, expression, and mechanism of action of a novel platelet aggregation inhibitor from the salivary gland of the blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Francischetti, I M; Ribeiro, J M; Champagne, D; Andersen, J

    2000-04-28

    Rhodnius prolixus aggregation inhibitor 1 (RPAI-1), a 19-kDa protein isolated from the salivary gland of R. prolixus, was purified by strong cation exchange and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographies. Based on 49 amino-terminal amino acid sequences of RPAI-1, primers were produced to generate probes to screen an R. prolixus salivary gland cDNA library. A phage containing the full-length clone of RPAI-1 codes for a mature protein of 155 amino acids. RPAI-1 shows sequence homology to triabin and pallidipin, lipocalins from Triatoma pallidipennis. The cDNA sequence was cloned in Pet17B Escherichia coli expression vector, producing an active peptide. RPAI-1 inhibits human platelet-rich plasma aggregation triggered by low concentrations of ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid, thromboxane A(2) mimetics (U46619), and very low doses of thrombin and convulxin. Here we show that ADP is the target of RPAI-1 since (i) RPAI-1 inhibits ADP-dependent large aggregation formation and secretion triggered by U46619, without affecting Ca(2+) increase and shape change; (ii) ADP restored the inhibition of U46619-induced platelet aggregation by RPAI-1, (iii) PGE(1)-induced increase of cAMP (which is antagonized by U46619 in an ADP-dependent manner) was restored by RPAI-1, (iv) RPAI-1 inhibits low concentrations of ADP-mediated responses of indomethacin-treated platelets, and (v) RPAI-1 binds to ADP, as assessed by large zone chromatography. RPAI-1 affects neither integrin alpha(2)beta(1)- nor glycoprotein VI-mediated platelet responses. We conclude that RPAI-1 is the first lipocalin described that inhibits platelet aggregation by a novel mechanism, binding to ADP. PMID:10777556

  11. An inhibitor of DNA binding and uptake events dictates the proficiency of genetic transformation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: mechanism of action and links to Type IV pilus expression.

    PubMed

    Aas, Finn Erik; Løvold, Cecilia; Koomey, Michael

    2002-12-01

    Although natural genetic transformation is a widely disseminated form of genetic exchange in prokaryotic species, the proficiencies with which DNA recognition, uptake and processing occur in nature vary greatly. However, the molecular factors and interactions underlying intra- and interspecies diversity in levels of competence for natural genetic transformation are poorly understood. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the Gram-negative aetiologic agent of gonorrhoea, DNA binding and uptake involve components required for Type IV pilus (Tfp) biogenesis as well as those which are structurally related to Tfp biogenesis components but dispensable for organelle expression. We demonstrate here that the gonococcal PilV protein, structurally related to Tfp pilin subunits, is an intrinsic inhibitor of natural genetic transformation which acts ultimately by reducing the levels of sequence-specific DNA uptake into the cell. Specifically, we show that DNA uptake is enhanced in strains bearing pilV mutations and reduced in strains overexpressing PilV. Furthermore, we show that PilV exerts its effect by acting as an antagonist of ComP, a positive effector of sequence-specific DNA binding. As it prevents the accumulation of ComP at a site where it can be purified by shear extraction of intact cells, the data are most consistent with PilV either obstructing ComP trafficking or altering ComP stability. In addition, we report that ComP and PilV play overlapping and partially redundant roles in Tfp biogenesis and document other genetic interactions between comP and pilV together with the pilE and pilT genes required for the expression of retractile Tfp. Together, the results reveal a novel mechanism by which the levels of competence are governed in prokaryotic species and suggest unique ways by which competence might be modulated. PMID:12453228

  12. [Effects of thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor, DP-1904 on the action of vasoactive substances in rabbit blood vessel smooth muscle preparations].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Kobayashi, J; Iwanaga, T; Kuratomi, Y; Kitamura, S

    1989-05-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TxA2) is a potent platelet aggregator as well as a vascular and bronchial constrictor. DP-1904, a newly synthesized imidazol TxA2 synthetase inhibitor, is a potent and long-acting agent. The present investigation was conducted to explore the effect of DP-1904 on the contractile responses in rabbit pulmonary artery and descending aorta strips induced by various vasoactive substances. Fourteen Japanese albino rabbits, weighing about 3 kg, were sacrificed. Rabbit pulmonary artery and descending aorta were removed, cut spirally, set up in bioassay glass jackets and superfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C, saturated with oxygen and carbon dioxide. Contraction of tissues was detected by an isotonic transducer and displayed on a polyrecorder. Arachidonic acid-induced contractile responses in rabbit pulmonary artery and descending aorta strips were attenuated significantly by the continuous infusion of DP-1904 in a dose-dependent fashion. Prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced contractile responses in rabbit pulmonary artery and descending aorta strips were attenuated significantly by the continuous infusion of DP-1904, dose-dependently. Angiotensin II-induced contractile responses in rabbit pulmonary artery and descending aorta strips were attenuated significantly by the continuous infusion of DP-1904, dose-dependently. Norepinephrine-induced contractile responses in rabbit pulmonary artery and descending aorta strips were attenuated significantly by the continuous infusion of DP-1904, dose-dependently. The above results suggest that DP-1904 might be a useful therapeutic agent for treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic obstructive lung diseases. PMID:2615099

  13. Combined action of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and whole-brain radiotherapy on EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunyun; Fan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer to spread to the brain (brain metastasis [BM]). This study assessed the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in combination with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with BM. Patients and methods Thirty-nine patients, who had receieved different EGFR TKIs plus 30 Gy WBRT until disease progression, were retrospectively analyzed between 2010 and 2014. Treatment response was evaluated and survival data were collected and analyzed. Results Among the 39 patients, 18 had an EGFR exon 19 deletion and 21 had an EGFR exon 21 point mutation. After therapy, 19 (48.7%) patients had complete remission, 12 (30.8%) had partial remission, and eight (20.5%) had stable disease in the intracranial lesions. Besides, there was no single case of complete remission, 21 (53.8%) had partial remission, and 18 (46.2%) had stable disease of the extracranial lesions. The median progression-free survival (PFS) of intracranial lesions and extracranial lesions was 18 and 12 months, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) was 26 months. The univariate analysis showed that graded prognostic assessment (P=0.006) and Karnofsky Performance Scale (P=0.045) were associated with intracranial progression-free survival (iPFS), while recursive partitioning analysis (P=0.049) was associated with OS of patients. Conclusion EGFR TKIs plus concomitant WBRT controlled intracranial lesions of lung cancer metastasis and significantly improved OS of patients. Further studies will be needed to confirm whether this combination treatment could be used as a standard therapy for EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with BM. PMID:27022274

  14. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  15. Antioxidant metabolism of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treated ‘Empire’ apples during controlled atmosphere storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Empire’ apples [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.] are susceptible to development of firm flesh browning during controlled atmosphere storage. The browning is thought to be a chilling injury and therefore fruit are typically stored at 2-3 degrees C to avoid fruit damage. How...

  16. 1-Methylcyclopropene effects on temporal changes of aroma volatiles and phytochemicals of fresh-cut cantaloupe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange fleshed cantaloupe melons have intense aroma and flavor, but are very perishable. Changes in quality traits were characterized during storage-life of fresh-cut cantaloupe (Cucumis melo var. cantalupensis "Fiesta") cubes treated with 1.0 µL L-1 4 of 1-methylcyclopene for 24 h at 5 ºC, packaged...

  17. Manipulation of fruit ripening in "Hass" avocado using 1-Methylcyclopropene(1-MCP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The state of Michoacán is the principal producer of ‘Hass’ avocado in Mexico with production of over 1 million tons annually. Hass avocado has excellent fruit characteristics and shelf-life. However, fruits harvested from January to May have a high dry matter content (>30%) and exhibit skin blackeni...

  18. Managing ‘Bartlett’ pear fruit ripening with 1-methylcyclopropene reapplication during cold storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repeated low-dose 1-MCP-applications were evaluated during cold storage of ‘Bartlett’ pear fruit to overcome long-term ripening inhibition of a high dose 1-MCP treatment at harvest. Fruit were exposed to 1-MCP at 0, 0.42, 4.2 or 42 umol m-3 at harvest in year one, and to 0, 0.42 or 42 umol m-3 in y...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Methylcyclopropene in or on fruits and vegetables when: (a) Used as a post harvest plant growth regulator, i.e., for the purpose of inhibiting the effects of ethylene. (b) Applied or used outdoors for...

  20. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are a unique class of anti-diabetic drugs. Derived from bacteria, these oral drugs are enzyme inhibitors which do not have a pancreato -centred mechanism of action. Working to delay carbohydrate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, they control postprandial hyperglycaemia and provide unquestioned cardiovascular benefit. Specially suited for a traditional Pakistani carbohydrate-rich diet, AGIs have been termed the 'untapped diamonds' of diabetology. The use of these oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) that target pathophysiology in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, notably to reduce postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia will inevitably increase with time. This review describes the history of their development, mechanism of action, basic and clinical pharmacology, and suggests practical, evidence-based guidance for their optimal use. PMID:24864650

  1. Mode of action of human pharmaceuticals in fish: the effects of the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride, on reproduction as a case study.

    PubMed

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Hannah, Robert E; Sumpter, John P

    2013-03-15

    In recent years, a growing number of human pharmaceuticals have been detected in the aquatic environment, generally at low concentrations (sub-ng/L-low μg/L). In most cases, these compounds are characterised by highly specific modes of action, and the evolutionary conservation of drug targets in wildlife species suggests the possibility that pharmaceuticals present in the environment may cause toxicological effects by acting through the same targets as they do in humans. Our research addressed the question of whether or not dutasteride, a pharmaceutical used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, may cause adverse effects in a teleost fish, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), by inhibiting the activity of both isoforms of 5α-reductase (5αR), the enzyme that converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Mammalian pharmacological and toxicological information were used to guide the experimental design and the selection of relevant endpoints, according to the so-called "read-across approach", suggesting that dutasteride may affect male fertility and steroid hormone dynamics. Therefore, a 21-day reproduction study was conducted to determine the effects of dutasteride (10, 32 and 100 μg/L) on fish reproduction. Exposure to dutasteride significantly reduced fecundity of fish and affected several aspects of reproductive endocrine functions in both males and females. However, none of the observed adverse effects occurred at concentrations of exposure lower than 32 μg/L; this, together with the low volume of drug prescribed every year (10.34 kg in the UK in 2011), and the extremely low predicted environmental concentration (0.03 ng/L), suggest that, at present, the potential presence of dutasteride in the environment does not represent a threat to wild fish populations. PMID:23280489

  2. The mode of vasorelaxant action of 2-aminoisoquinoline, 1.3 (2H.4H)-dione, a novel 'intracellular calcium inhibitor'.

    PubMed Central

    Hester, R. K.; Satake, N.; Shibata, S.; Ueda, S.; Yamahara, J.

    1986-01-01

    In rabbit aorta, pretreatment with 2-aminoisoquinoline, 1.3 (2H.4H)-dione (AQ, 10(-5) M and 10(-4) M) shifted the concentration-response relationship to noradrenaline (NA, 10(-9) M to 10(-4) M) in a parallel manner whereas the agent (10(-4) M) failed to affect the response to potassium and only slightly depressed Ca2+-induced contractions in a Ca2+-free medium in the presence of K+ (40 mM). Ca2+-entry blockers such as nifedipine and diltiazem (10(-6) M and 10(-5) M) had very weak or no apparent effects on the response to NA but markedly attenuated or abolished the K+- and Ca2+-induced contractions. Following incubation of tissues for 15 min in a Ca2+-free medium with low EGTA (0.01 mM) and methoxyverapamil (D600, 10(-5) M), NA (3 X 10(-7) M) caused a phasic (transient) contraction and the subsequent application of Ca2+ (2mM) resulted in a tonic contraction. This NA-induced, Ca2+-dependent, D600-insensitive contraction was inhibited by AQ (10(-5) M and 10(-4) M) in a concentration-dependent manner. This suggests that the inhibitory action of AQ may be related to Ca2+ entry through specific receptor activated pathways. Following incubation of tissues for 30 min in a Ca2+-free medium with high EGTA (2.0 mM), NA (10(-5) M) caused a contraction of rabbit aorta which is dependent upon release of intracellular Ca2+, but the response was 50% to 60% less than that in a normal medium. This contraction was inhibited by AQ (10(-5) M and 10(-4) M) and nitroglycerin (10(-5) M) but not by nifedipine or diltiazem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3082401

  3. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  4. A mega-analysis of fixed-dose trials reveals dose-dependency and a rapid onset of action for the antidepressant effect of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hieronymus, F; Nilsson, S; Eriksson, E

    2016-01-01

    The possible dose-dependency for the antidepressant effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remains controversial. We believe we have conducted the first comprehensive patient-level mega-analysis exploring this issue, one incentive being to address the possibility that inclusion of low-dose arms in previous meta-analyses may have caused an underestimation of the efficacy of these drugs. All company-sponsored, acute-phase, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose trials using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and conducted to evaluate the effect of citalopram, paroxetine or sertraline in adult major depression were included (11 trials, n=2859 patients). The single-item depressed mood, which has proven a more sensitive measure to detect an antidepressant signal than the sum score of all HDRS items, was designated the primary effect parameter. Doses below or at the lower end of the usually recommended dose range (citalopram: 10–20 mg, paroxetine: 10 mg; sertraline: 50 mg) were superior to placebo but inferior to higher doses, hence confirming a dose-dependency to be at hand. In contrast, among doses above these, there was no indication of a dose–response relationship. The effect size (ES) after exclusion of suboptimal doses was of a more respectable magnitude (0.5) than that usually attributed to the antidepressant effect of the SSRIs. In conclusion, the observation that low doses are less effective than higher ones challenges the oft-cited view that the effect of the SSRIs is not dose-dependent and hence not caused by a specific, pharmacological antidepressant action. Moreover, we suggest that inclusion of suboptimal doses in previous meta-analyses has led to an underestimation of the efficacy of these drugs. PMID:27271860

  5. Targeting HER2 aberrations as actionable drivers in lung cancers: phase II trial of the pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kris, M. G.; Camidge, D. R.; Giaccone, G.; Hida, T.; Li, B. T.; O'Connell, J.; Taylor, I.; Zhang, H.; Arcila, M. E.; Goldberg, Z.; Jänne, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HER2 mutations and amplifications have been identified as oncogenic drivers in lung cancers. Dacomitinib, an irreversible inhibitor of HER2, EGFR (HER1), and HER4 tyrosine kinases, has demonstrated activity in cell-line models with HER2 exon 20 insertions or amplifications. Here, we studied dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified lung cancers. Patients and methods As a prespecified cohort of a phase II study, we included patients with stage IIIB/IV lung cancers with HER2 mutations or amplification. We gave oral dacomitinib at 30–45 mg daily in 28-day cycles. End points included partial response rate, overall survival, and toxicity. Results We enrolled 30 patients with HER2-mutant (n = 26, all in exon 20 including 25 insertions and 1 missense mutation) or HER2-amplified lung cancers (n = 4). Three of 26 patients with tumors harboring HER2 exon 20 mutations [12%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2% to 30%] had partial responses lasting 3+, 11, and 14 months. No partial responses occurred in four patients with tumors with HER2 amplifications. The median overall survival was 9 months from the start of dacomitinib (95% CI 7–21 months) for patients with HER2 mutations and ranged from 5 to 22 months with amplifications. Treatment-related toxicities included diarrhea (90%; grade 3/4: 20%/3%), dermatitis (73%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%), and fatigue (57%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%). One patient died on study likely due to an interaction of dacomitinib with mirtazapine. Conclusions Dacomitinib produced objective responses in patients with lung cancers with specific HER2 exon 20 insertions. This observation validates HER2 exon 20 insertions as actionable targets and justifies further study of HER2-targeted agents in specific HER2-driven lung cancers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00818441. PMID:25899785

  6. A mega-analysis of fixed-dose trials reveals dose-dependency and a rapid onset of action for the antidepressant effect of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hieronymus, F; Nilsson, S; Eriksson, E

    2016-01-01

    The possible dose-dependency for the antidepressant effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remains controversial. We believe we have conducted the first comprehensive patient-level mega-analysis exploring this issue, one incentive being to address the possibility that inclusion of low-dose arms in previous meta-analyses may have caused an underestimation of the efficacy of these drugs. All company-sponsored, acute-phase, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose trials using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and conducted to evaluate the effect of citalopram, paroxetine or sertraline in adult major depression were included (11 trials, n=2859 patients). The single-item depressed mood, which has proven a more sensitive measure to detect an antidepressant signal than the sum score of all HDRS items, was designated the primary effect parameter. Doses below or at the lower end of the usually recommended dose range (citalopram: 10-20 mg, paroxetine: 10 mg; sertraline: 50 mg) were superior to placebo but inferior to higher doses, hence confirming a dose-dependency to be at hand. In contrast, among doses above these, there was no indication of a dose-response relationship. The effect size (ES) after exclusion of suboptimal doses was of a more respectable magnitude (0.5) than that usually attributed to the antidepressant effect of the SSRIs. In conclusion, the observation that low doses are less effective than higher ones challenges the oft-cited view that the effect of the SSRIs is not dose-dependent and hence not caused by a specific, pharmacological antidepressant action. Moreover, we suggest that inclusion of suboptimal doses in previous meta-analyses has led to an underestimation of the efficacy of these drugs. PMID:27271860

  7. Pharmacology of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J D; Francis, S H

    2002-01-01

    The clinical properties (efficacy and safety profile) of a medicine are related not only to its mode of action, but also to its selectivity for its target (usually a receptor or enzyme) and are also influenced by its pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination). The growing number of phosphodiesterase inhibitors that are selective for phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) represent a promising new class of compounds that are useful for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and perhaps other disorders. Some of the basic pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters that describe drug action are discussed with regard to the new PDE5 inhibitors. Central topics reviewed are the concentration that produces a given in vitro response, or potency (IC50), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (Tmax), half-life (t 1/2), area under the curve (AUC), bioavailability, onset and duration of action, and the balance to achieve optimum safety and efficacy. To illustrate these concepts, a group of inhibitors with varying selectivities and potencies for PDE5 (theophylline, IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil) are discussed. Each drug has its own set of unique pharmacological characteristics based on its specific molecular structure, enzyme inhibition profile and pharmacokinetic properties. Each PDE5 inhibitor has a distinct selectivity that contributes to its safety profile. As with all new drugs, and especially those in a new class, careful evaluation will be necessary to ensure the optimal use of the PDE5 inhibitors. PMID:12166544

  8. Benzoylurea Chitin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ranfeng; Liu, Chunjuan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-08-12

    Benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors are widely used in integrated pest management (IPM) and insecticide resistance management (IRM) programs due to their low toxicity to mammals and predatory insects. In the past decades, a large number of benzoylurea derivatives have been synthesized, and 15 benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors have been commercialized. This review focuses on the history of commercial benzolyphenylureas (BPUs), synthetic methods, structure-activity relationships (SAR), action mechanism research, environmental behaviors, and ecotoxicology. Furthermore, their disadvantages of high risk to aquatic invertebrates and crustaceans are pointed out. Finally, we propose that the para-substituents at anilide of benzoylphenylureas should be the functional groups, and bipartite model BPU analogues are discussed in an attempt to provide new insight for future development of BPUs. PMID:26168369

  9. Heterocyclics as corrosion inhibitors for acid media

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Khan, M.A.W.; Ahmad, S.; Quraishi, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    The available literature on the use of heterocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors in acid media has been reviewed. It has been noted that the workers in this field have either used sulfur or nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds for studying inhibition action. The authors have synthesized compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen both in the same ring and studied their inhibition action in acid media. These compounds were found to be better inhibitors than those containing either atoms alone.

  10. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  11. HIV Entry Inhibitors and Their Potential in HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses recent progress in the development of anti-HIV agents targeting the viral entry process. The three main classes (attachment inhibitors, co-receptor binding inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors) are further broken down by specific mechanism of action and structure. Many of these inhibitors are in advanced clinical trials, including the HIV maturation inhibitor bevirimat, from the authors’ laboratories. In addition, the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has recently been FDA-approved. Possible roles for these agents in anti-HIV therapy, including treatment of virus resistant to current drugs, are also discussed. PMID:18720513

  12. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26658914

  13. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  14. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  15. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  16. Thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, P V; Malli, H; Swenson, S

    1999-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a critical enzyme for DNA replication and cell growth because it is the only de novo source of thymine nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. TS is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has been used for cancer treatment for more than 40 years. However, dissatisfaction with the overall activity of 5-FU against the major cancers, and the recognition that TS still remains an attractive target for anticancer drugs because of its central position in the pathway of DNA synthesis, led to a search for new inhibitors of TS structurally analogous to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the second substrate of TS. TS inhibitory antifolates developed to date that are in various stages of clinical evaluation are ZD 1694 and ZD9331 (Astra-Zeneca, London, UK), (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), LY231514 (BW1843U89 (Glaxo-Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC), and AG337 and AG331 (Agouron, La Jolla, CA). Although each of these compounds has TS as its major intracellular site of action, they differ in propensity for polyglutamylation and for transport by the reduced folate carrier. LY231514 also has secondary target enzymes. As a result, each compound is likely to have a different spectrum of antitumor activity and toxicity. This review will summarize the development and properties of this new class of TS inhibitors. PMID:10606255

  17. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  1. [Recent development of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) are clinically effective against the inflammatory symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent attention has been focused on selective cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 inhibitors, a type of NSAID that inhibits a subtype of COX. Because of the different actions of COX-1 and COX-2, selective COX-2 inhibitors were expected to reduce adverse reactions such as gastrointestinal disorders. Various clinical studies have confirmed that the efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors for RA is similar to that of conventional NSAIDs, but they cause fewer severe gastrointestinal disorders. The incidence of complications related to renal dysfunction, such as edema and hypertension, is not different. Patients using selective COX-2 inhibitors have recently been reported to show an increase in thrombotic complications such as myocardial infarction. Therefore, more data on adverse events should be collected in the future from large-scale clinical studies to further clarify the actual value of selective COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:12510364

  2. Environmental Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Jesse; Allen, Rodney F.

    This booklet, a general guide to citizen eco-action, discusses a plan of action on community environmental problems. It offers factors to be considered in any community eco-action situation, but it is not a rigid set of rules. An overview identifies seven key ideas of environmental issues, including the universal participation of all humans in the…

  3. PTEN negatively regulates mTORC2 formation and signaling in grade IV glioma via Rictor hyperphosphorylation at Thr1135 and direct the mode of action of an mTORC1/2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, K; Maiti, S; Mandal, C

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) in mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we found higher activation of mTORC2 in PTEN(mu) cells, as evidenced by enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2481), AKT (Ser473) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) (Ser9) as compared with PTEN(wt) cells. In addition, PTEN(wt) cells upon PTEN depletion showed mTORC2 activation. The reduced mTORC2 signaling in PTEN(wt) cells was related to higher Rictor phosphorylation at Thr1135 residue. Phosphorylation of Rictor at Thr1135 inhibited its association with mTORC and thus there was a reduction in mTORC2 complex formation. In addition, PTEN(wt) cells expressing mutated Rictor in which Thr1135 was substituted with alanine, showed enhanced mTORC2 formation and signaling. This enhanced mTORC2 signaling promoted inactivation of GSK3β. Thus, we established the reciprocal activation of mTORC2 and GSK3β in GBM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing role of PTEN in mTORC2 formation by promoting Rictor phosphorylation (Thr1135) in GBM. Furthermore, the drug sensitivity of mTORC2 was evaluated. A newly identified carbazole alkaloid, mahanine, showed cytotoxicity in both PTEN(mu) and PTEN(wt) cells. It inhibited both mTORC1/2 and AKT completely in PTEN(mu) cells, whereas it inhibited only mTORC1 in PTEN(wt) cells. Cytotoxity and AKT-inhibitory activity of the mTORC1/2 inhibitor was increased either by depleting PTEN or in combination with phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase inhibitors in PTEN(wt) cells. In contrast, depletion of Rictor decreased the cytotoxicity of the mTORC1/2 inhibitor in PTEN(mu) cells. Thus, PTEN has an important role in mTORC2 formation and also influences the effectiveness of an mTORC1/2 inhibitor in GBM. PMID:27239959

  4. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  5. Effect of 1-Methylcyclopropene coupled with controlled atmosphere storage on the ripening and quality of ‘Cavendish’ bananas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh-fruit banana is well known to have a short-life after harvest. A short pre-pilot study was carried out to test the effect of atmospheric condition exposure to 1-MCP on the quality, limited to cosmetic and peel appearance, and shelf life of fresh-fruit bananas. Low level of O2 (3 kPa) and high ...

  6. Heart failure: SGLT2 inhibitors and heart failure -- clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-04-01

    The latest findings from the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial show a 34% reduction in hospitalization for heart failure or cardiovascular death in patients receiving empagliflozin, a sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, compared with placebo. These outstanding results call for discussion of the clinical implications, and in-depth studies of the mechanisms of action of SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:26961066

  7. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  8. CUDC-101, a Novel Inhibitor of Full-Length Androgen Receptor (flAR) and Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Activity: Mechanism of Action and In Vivo Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huiying; Mediwala, Sanjay N; Szafran, Adam T; Mancini, Michael A; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent disease expected to cause the death of more than 27,000 Americans in 2015. There are only a few available treatments for CRPC, making the discovery of new drugs an urgent need. We report that CUDC-101 (an inhibitor od HER2/NEU, EGFR and HDAC) inhibits both the full length AR (flAR) and the AR variant AR-V7. This observation prompted experiments to discover which of the known activities of CUDC-101 is responsible for the inhibition of flAR/AR-V7 signaling. We used pharmacologic and genetic approaches, and found that the effect of CUDC-101 on flAR and AR-V7 was duplicated only by other HDAC inhibitors, or by silencing the HDAC isoforms HDAC5 and HDAC10. We observed that CUDC-101 treatment or AR-V7 silencing by RNAi equally reduced transcription of the AR-V7 target gene, PSA, without affecting viability of 22Rv1 cells. However, when cellular proliferation was used as an end point, CUDC-101 was more effective than AR-V7 silencing, raising the prospect that CUDC-101 has additional targets beside AR-V7. In support of this, we found that CUDC-101 increased the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and decreased that of the oncogene HER2/NEU. To determine if CUDC-101 reduces growth in a xenograft model of prostate cancer, this drug was given for 14 days to castrated male SCID mice inoculated with 22Rv1 cells. Compared to vehicle, CUDC-101 reduced xenograft growth in a statistically significant way, and without macroscopic side effects. These studies demonstrate that CUDC-101 inhibits wtAR and AR-V7 activity and growth of 22Rv1 cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects result from the ability of CUDC-101 to target not only HDAC signaling, which was associated with decreased flAR and AR-V7 activity, but multiple additional oncogenic pathways. These observations raise the possibility that treatment of CRPC may be achieved by using similarly multi-targeted approaches. PMID

  9. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors. PMID:26641933

  10. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors. PMID:26641933

  11. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings from a study…

  12. NIH study uncovers new mechanism of action for class of chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NIH researchers have discovered a significant new mechanism of action for a class of chemotherapy drugs known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, or PARP inhibitors. They have also identified differences in the toxic capabilities of three drugs in

  13. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  14. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  15. Oral nano-delivery of anticancer ginsenoside 25-OCH3-PPD, a natural inhibitor of the MDM2 oncogene: Nanoparticle preparation, characterization, in vitro and in vivo anti-prostate cancer activity, and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sushanta; Nag, Subhasree; Walbi, Ismail A.; Wang, Shu; Zhao, Yuqing; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Double Minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene plays a critical role in cancer development and progression through p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Both natural and synthetic MDM2 inhibitors have been shown anticancer activity against several human cancers. We have recently identified a novel ginsenoside, 25-OCH3-PPD (GS25), one of the most active anticancer ginsenosides discovered thus far, and have demonstrated its MDM2 inhibition and anticancer activity in various human cancer models, including prostate cancer. However, the oral bioavailability of GS25 is limited, which hampers its further development as an oral anticancer agent. The present study was designed to develop a novel nanoparticle formulation for oral delivery of GS25. After GS25 was successfully encapsulated into PEG-PLGA nanoparticles (GS25NP) and its physicochemical properties were characterized, the efficiency of MDM2 targeting, anticancer efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and safety were evaluated in in vitro and in vivo models of human prostate cancer. Our results indicated that, compared with the unencapsulated GS25, GS25NP demonstrated better MDM2 inhibition, improved oral bioavailability and enhanced in vitro and in vivo activities. In conclusion, the validated nano-formulation for GS25 oral delivery improves its molecular targeting, oral bioavailability and anticancer efficacy, providing a basis for further development of GS25 as a novel agent for cancer therapy and prevention. PMID:26041888

  16. Solderability preservation through the use of organic inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Hosking, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Organic inhibitors can be used to prevent corrosion of metals and have application in the electronics industry as solderability preservatives. We have developed a model to describe the action of two inhibitors (benzotriazole and imidazole) during the environmental aging and soldering process. The inhibitors bond with the metal surface and form a barrier that prevents or retards oxidation. At soldering temperatures, the metal-organic complex breaks down leaving an oxide-free metal surface that allows excellent wetting by molten solder. The presence of the inhibitor retards the wetting rate relative to clean copper, but provides a vast improvement relative to oxidized copper.

  17. Behaviour of tetramine inhibitors during pickling of hot rolled steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornu, Marie-José; Koltsov, Alexey; Nicolas, Sabrina; Colom, Lydia; Dossot, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    To avoid the dissolution of steel in industrial pickling process, tetramine inhibitors are added to the pickling bath. This study is devoted to the understanding of the action mechanism of these inhibitors in hydrochloric and sulphuric baths on non-alloyed and alloyed steels. Pickling experiments and characterization with XPS, Raman and infrared spectroscopies have shown that inhibitors work only in acid media and leached out from the steel surfaces during the rinsing operation just after pickling. The effectiveness of inhibitors depends on the acid media and the temperature. Experimental data are consistent with a surface mechanism, i.e., the so-called "outer-sphere" adsorption.

  18. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  19. The presence and inactivation of trypsin inhibitors, tannins, lectins and amylase inhibitors in legume seeds during germination. A review.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; van der Poel, A F; Tamminga, S

    1992-01-01

    During the germination of legume seeds, enzymes become active in order to degrade starch, storage-protein and proteinaceous antinutritional factors. The degradation of storage-protein is necessary to make peptides and amino acids available in order to stimulate seed growth and early plant growth. Proteinaceous antinutritional factors such as amylase inhibitors, lectins and trypsin inhibitors are present in legume seeds and protect them against predators. However, during germination, they degrade to a lower level by the action of several enzymes. The effect of germination on the content and activity of amylase inhibitors, lectins, tannins and trypsin inhibitors is discussed. PMID:1372122

  20. FERRITIN H INDUCTION BY HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Di, Xiumin; Torti, Suzy V.; Torti, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Because both iron deficiency and iron excess are deleterious to normal cell function, the intracellular level of iron must be tightly controlled. Ferritin, an iron binding protein, regulates iron balance by storing iron in a bioavailable but non-toxic form. Ferritin protein comprises two subunits: ferritin H, which contains ferroxidase activity, and ferritin L. Here we demonstrate that ferritin H mRNA and protein are induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC inhibitors), a promising class of anti-cancer drugs, in cultured human cancer cells. Deletion analysis and EMSA assays reveal that the induction of ferritin H occurs at a transcriptional level via Sp1 and NF-Y binding sites near the transcriptional start site of the human ferritin H promoter. Classically, HDAC inhibitors modulate gene expression by increasing histone acetylation. However, ChIP assays demonstrate that HDAC inhibitors induce ferritin H transcription by increasing NF-Y binding to the ferritin H promoter without changes in histone acetylation. These results identify ferritin H as a new target of HDAC inhibitors, and recruitment of NF-Y as a novel mechanism of action of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20385107

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of the lentil trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor LCI-1.7 and a discussion of atypical binding sites of Bowman-Birk inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Weder, Jürgen K P; Hinkers, Sabine C

    2004-06-30

    The complete primary structure of the lentil (Lens culinaris) trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor LCI-1.7 was determined by conventional methods in order to find relationships between partial sequences and the difference in action against human and bovine chymotrypsin. As other Bowman-Birk type inhibitors, LCI-1.7 contained 68 amino acid residues, seven disulfide bridges, and two reactive sites, Arg16-Ser17 for trypsin and Tyr42-Ser43 for chymotrypsin. Evaluation of sequence homologies showed that it belonged to the group III Bowman-Birk inhibitors. The atypical additional binding site of LCI-1.7 for human chymotrypsin was discussed and compared with such binding sites of two other Bowman-Birk inhibitors, the Bowman-Birk soybean proteinase inhibitor BBI, and the lima bean proteinase inhibitor LBI I, for human and bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin. A concept to reduce the action of these inhibitors against human enzymes by genetic engineering was proposed. PMID:15212472

  2. Action, human.

    PubMed

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term "human action" designates the intentional and deliberate movement that is proper and exclusive to mankind. Human action is a unified structure: knowledge, intention or volition, deliberation, decision or choice of means and execution. The integration between these dimensions appears as a task that demands strength of will to achieve the synthesis of self-possession and self-control that enables full personal realisation. Recently, the debate about the dynamism of human action has been enriched by the contribution of neurosciences. Thanks to techniques of neuroimaging, neurosciences have expanded the field of investigation to the nature of volition, to the role of the brain in decision-making processes and to the notion of freedom and responsibility. PMID:20393686

  3. Reduction of energy usage in postharvest horticulture through management of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Wills, Ron B H; Golding, John B

    2015-05-01

    Cool chain management is the preferred technology to extend the postharvest life of horticultural produce, but with rising energy costs and community pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, there is a need to use less energy-intensive technologies. Minimising the level of ethylene around horticultural produce inhibits ripening and senescence and therefore has the potential to reduce the use of refrigeration. The long-distance transport of bananas within Australia and from Central America to Europe is used as a case study to show that the need for refrigeration could be reduced if the appropriate concentrations of ethylene were maintained around fruit during transit. Data are also presented to show a similar benefit of ethylene control with green beans, as well as another study showing that apples treated with the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene could be stored at a higher temperature without loss of quality to the consumer. The range of technologies available to manage ethylene levels is discussed. PMID:25257862

  4. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  5. Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors and their therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y

    2001-04-01

    A number of endogenous inhibitors targeting the tumor vasculature have recently been identified using in vitro and in vivo antiangiogenesis models. While many of these angiogenesis inhibitors display a broad spectrum of biological actions on several systems in the body, several inhibitors including angiostatin, endostatin, and serpin antithrombin seem to act specifically on the proliferating endothelial cell compartment of the newly formed blood vessels. The discovery of these specific endothelial inhibitors not only increases our understanding of the functions of these molecules in the regulation of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, but may also provide an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis dependent diseases, including diabetic retinopathy and chronic inflammations. Systemic administration of these angiogenesis inhibitors in animals significantly suppresses the growth of a variety of tumors and their metastases. However, their production as functional recombinant proteins has been proven to be difficult. In addition, high dosages of these inhibitors are required to suppress tumor growth in animal studies. Other disadvantages of the antiangiogenic protein therapy include repeated injections, prolonged treatment, transmission of toxins and infectious particles, and high cost for manufacturing large amounts of protein molecules. Thus, alternative strategies need to be developed in order to improve the clinical settings of antiangiogenic therapy. Developments of these strategies are ongoing and they include identification of more potent inhibitors, antiangiogenic gene therapy, improvement of protein/compound half-lives in the circulation, increase of their concentrations at the disease location, and combinatorial therapies with approaches including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. Despite the above-mentioned disadvantages, a few inhibitors have entered into the early stages of clinical trials and

  6. Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  7. Therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-19

    Marijuana and aspirin have been used for millennia to treat a wide range of maladies including pain and inflammation. Both cannabinoids, like marijuana, that exert anti-inflammatory action through stimulating cannabinoid receptors, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, like aspirin, that suppress pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production have shown beneficial outcomes in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Both cannabinoids and COX inhibitors, however, have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including cognitive deficits and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered that the serine hydrolase monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) links the endocannabinoid and eicosanoid systems together through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to provide the major arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pools for pro-inflammatory eicosanoid synthesis in specific tissues. Studies in recent years have shown that MAGL inhibitors elicit anti-nociceptive, anxiolytic, and anti-emetic responses and attenuate precipitated withdrawal symptoms in addiction paradigms through enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. MAGL inhibitors have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory action in the brain and protect against neurodegeneration through lowering eicosanoid production. In cancer, MAGL inhibitors have been shown to have anti-cancer properties not only through modulating the endocannabinoid-eicosanoid network, but also by controlling fatty acid release for the synthesis of protumorigenic signaling lipids. Thus, MAGL serves as a critical node in simultaneously coordinating multiple lipid signaling pathways in both physiological and disease contexts. This review will discuss the diverse (patho)physiological roles of MAGL and the therapeutic potential of MAGL inhibitors in treating a vast array of complex human diseases. PMID:23142242

  8. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  9. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  10. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  11. Androgen action.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ralf; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2014-01-01

    Androgens are important for male sex development and physiology. Their actions are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor. The activity of the AR is controlled at multiple stages due to ligand binding and induced structural changes assisted by the foldosome, compartmentalization, recruitment of coregulators, posttranslational modifications and chromatin remodeling, leading to subsequent transcription of androgen-responsive target genes. Beside these short-term androgen actions, there is phenomenological and experimental evidence of long-term androgen programming in mammals and in the human during sensitive programming time windows, both pre- and postnatally. At the molecular level, research into androgen insensitivity syndrome has unmasked androgen programming at the transcriptome level, in genital fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and at the epigenome level. Androgens are crucial for male sex development and physiology during embryogenesis, at puberty and in adult life. Testosterone and its more potent metabolite, dihydrotestosterone, which is converted from testosterone within the target cell by 5α-reductase II, are the main androgens involved in male sex differentiation. Androgen action is mediated by a single AR. The AR belongs to the nuclear receptor 3 group C, composed of the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2), progesterone receptor (NR3C3) and AR (NR3C4), and acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. PMID:25247642

  12. Assessing the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, A; Savoie, C; Stamatiou, P B; Lachance, N; Jolicoeur, P; Rasori, R; Chan, C C

    2002-01-01

    1. Type 4 phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors mimic the pharmacological actions of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonists. This has been postulated as the mechanism by which PDE4 inhibitors induce emesis and was also demonstrated by their ability to reverse xylazine/ketamine-induced anaesthesia. We further characterized this latter effect since it appears to reflect the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors. 2. Selective inhibitors of PDE 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were studied in rats, on the duration of anaesthesia induced by the combination of xylazine (10 mg kg(-1), i.m.) and ketamine (10 mg kg(-1), i.m.). PMNPQ (i.e. 6-(4-pyridylmethyl)-8-(3-nitrophenyl)quinoline) - PDE4 inhibitor: 0.01 - 3 mg kg(-1)), like MK-912 (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist: 0.01 - 3 mg kg(-1)), dose-dependently reduced the duration of anaesthesia. In contrast, vinpocetine (PDE1 inhibitor), EHNA (PDE2 inhibitor), milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor) and zaprinast (PDE5 inhibitor) had no significant effect at the doses tested (1 - 10 mg kg(-1)). Analysis of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of treated animals confirmed the absorption and distribution to the brain of the inactive inhibitors. 3. Neither MK-912 (3 mg kg(-1)) nor PMNPQ (0.1 - 1 mg kg(-1)) altered the duration of anaesthesia induced via a non-alpha(2)-adrenoceptor pathway (sodium pentobarbitone 50 mg kg(-1), i.p.). 4. Central NK(1) receptors are involved in PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. Consistently, [sar(9), Met(O(2))(11)]-substance P (NK(1) receptor agonist, 6 microg i.c.v.) reduced the duration of anaesthesia induced by xylazine/ketamine. 5. In summary, this model is functionally coupled to PDE4, specific to alpha(2)-adrenoceptors and relevant to PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. It therefore provides a novel way of evaluating the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats. PMID:11786486

  13. Guanine deaminase inhibitor from rat liver. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ali, S; Sitaramayya, A; Kumar, K S; Krishnan, P S

    1974-01-01

    1. An inhibitor of cytoplasmic guanine deaminase of rat liver was isolated from liver ;heavy mitochondrial' fraction after freezing and thawing and treatment with Triton X-100. 2. Submitochondrial fractionation revealed that the inhibitor was localized in the outer-membrane fraction. 3. The method of purification of inhibitor, involving precipitation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, its precipitability by trichloroacetic acid and the pattern of absorption in the u.v. indicated that the inhibitor was a protein. In confirmation, tryptic digestion of the isolated material resulted in destruction of the inhibitor activity. The inhibitor was stable to acid, but labile to heat. 4. The isolated inhibitor required phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) for activity. Phosphatidylcholine also partially protected the inhibitor against heat inactivation. 5. When detergent treatment was omitted, the inhibitor activity of frozen mitochondria was precipitated by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) in a fully active form without supplementation with phosphatidylcholine, indicating that Triton X-100 ruptured the linkage between inhibitor and lipid. 6. A reconstituted sample of inhibitor-phosphatidylcholine complex was precipitated in a fully active form by dialysis against 2-mercaptoethanol, but treatment of the precipitate with NaCl yielded an extract which was inactive unless supplemented with fresh phosphatidylcholine. 7. We interpret the results as evidence that the inhibitor was present in vivo as a lipoprotein and that once the complex was dissociated by the action of detergent and the protein precipitated, there was an absolute need for exogenous phosphatidylcholine for its activity. The manner in which inhibitor associated with the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria might regulate the activity of the enzyme in the supernatant has been suggested. PMID:4821397

  14. SGLT2 Inhibitors and the Diabetic Kidney.

    PubMed

    Fioretto, Paola; Zambon, Alberto; Rossato, Marco; Busetto, Luca; Vettor, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Blood glucose and blood pressure control reduce the risk of developing this complication; however, once DN is established, it is only possible to slow progression. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, the most recent glucose-lowering oral agents, may have the potential to exert nephroprotection not only through improving glycemic control but also through glucose-independent effects, such as blood pressure-lowering and direct renal effects. It is important to consider, however, that in patients with impaired renal function, given their mode of action, SGLT2 inhibitors are less effective in lowering blood glucose. In patients with high cardiovascular risk, the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin lowered the rate of cardiovascular events, especially cardiovascular death, and substantially reduced important renal outcomes. Such benefits on DN could derive from effects beyond glycemia. Glomerular hyperfiltration is a potential risk factor for DN. In addition to the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renal tubular factors, including SGLT2, contribute to glomerular hyperfiltration in diabetes. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule, causing, through tubuloglomerular feedback, afferent arteriole vasoconstriction and reduction in hyperfiltration. Experimental studies showed that SGLT2 inhibitors reduced hyperfiltration and decreased inflammatory and fibrotic responses of proximal tubular cells. SGLT2 inhibitors reduced glomerular hyperfiltration in patients with type 1 diabetes, and in patients with type 2 diabetes, they caused transient acute reductions in glomerular filtration rate, followed by a progressive recovery and stabilization of renal function. Interestingly, recent studies consistently demonstrated a reduction in albuminuria. Although these data are promising, only dedicated renal outcome trials will clarify whether

  15. Three Decades of β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Sarah M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the introduction of penicillin, β-lactam antibiotics have been the antimicrobial agents of choice. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these life-saving antibiotics is significantly threatened by bacterial β-lactamases. β-Lactamases are now responsible for resistance to penicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems. In order to overcome β-lactamase-mediated resistance, β-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam) were introduced into clinical practice. These inhibitors greatly enhance the efficacy of their partner β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious Enterobacteriaceae and penicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. However, selective pressure from excess antibiotic use accelerated the emergence of resistance to β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. Furthermore, the prevalence of clinically relevant β-lactamases from other classes that are resistant to inhibition is rapidly increasing. There is an urgent need for effective inhibitors that can restore the activity of β-lactams. Here, we review the catalytic mechanisms of each β-lactamase class. We then discuss approaches for circumventing β-lactamase-mediated resistance, including properties and characteristics of mechanism-based inactivators. We next highlight the mechanisms of action and salient clinical and microbiological features of β-lactamase inhibitors. We also emphasize their therapeutic applications. We close by focusing on novel compounds and the chemical features of these agents that may contribute to a “second generation” of inhibitors. The goal for the next 3 decades will be to design inhibitors that will be effective for more than a single class of β-lactamases. PMID:20065329

  16. Tools for Characterizing Bacterial Protein Synthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Skylar; Kaushal, Bindiya; Almutairi, Mashal M.; Liu, Haipeng; Ochabowicz, Anna; Quan, Selwyn; Pham, Van Cuong; Squires, Catherine L.; Murphy, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many antibiotics inhibit the growth of sensitive bacteria by interfering with ribosome function. However, discovery of new protein synthesis inhibitors is curbed by the lack of facile techniques capable of readily identifying antibiotic target sites and modes of action. Furthermore, the frequent rediscovery of known antibiotic scaffolds, especially in natural product extracts, is time-consuming and expensive and diverts resources that could be used toward the isolation of novel lead molecules. In order to avoid these pitfalls and improve the process of dereplication of chemically complex extracts, we designed a two-pronged approach for the characterization of inhibitors of protein synthesis (ChIPS) that is suitable for the rapid identification of the site and mode of action on the bacterial ribosome. First, we engineered antibiotic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strains that contain only one rRNA operon. These strains are used for the rapid isolation of resistance mutants in which rRNA mutations identify the site of the antibiotic action. Second, we show that patterns of drug-induced ribosome stalling on mRNA, monitored by primer extension, can be used to elucidate the mode of antibiotic action. These analyses can be performed within a few days and provide a rapid and efficient approach for identifying the site and mode of action of translation inhibitors targeting the bacterial ribosome. Both techniques were validated using a bacterial strain whose culture extract, composed of unknown metabolites, exhibited protein synthesis inhibitory activity; we were able to rapidly detect the presence of the antibiotic chloramphenicol. PMID:24041905

  17. Effects of 1-MCP Applied Postharvest on Epicuticular Wax of Apples Malus domestica (Borkj.) during Storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain apple cultivars develop a greasy feel when overripe. Treating fruit with the ripening inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP, SmartFresh™, AgroFresh, Inc., Spring House, PA) reduces fruit greasiness. This study examines the nature of this phenomenon. ‘Royal Gala’ apples were treated with 1-M...

  18. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  19. Inhibitors from Carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.)

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Mary Ritzel

    1970-01-01

    Two inhibitory fractions (B1 and C) from extracts of immature fruit of carob were tested for their ability to inhibit the action of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in three bioassays. There was no reduction of IAA-induced reactions in the Avena curvature test, abscission of debladed coleus petioles, or growth of cucumber hypocotyls. The highest ratio of inhibitor to IAA was 10,000 times greater than the ratio necessary to inhibit by 50% the growth caused by an equivalent amount of gibberellin A3 in pea seedlings. At the highest concentration used, fraction C alone caused curvature of Avena coleoptiles. The inhibitory fractions appeared to enhance the effect of IAA in the cucumber test. Concentrated whole extract and fractions B1 and C were tested for reduction of growth caused by gibberellins A1, A4, A5, A7, and a neutral gibberellin-like substance from beans in the dwarf-5 maize bioassay. Each gibberellin was inhibited and required the same amount of inhibitor for a 50% reduction of the induced growth. The inhibiting effect could be completely overcome by increasing the amount of gibberellin while maintaining the same concentration of inhibitor. Fractions B1 and C were also tested with gibberellins A2 and A4 in the cucumber hypocotyl test. Both inhibitory fractions reduced growth but were more effective against gibberellin A3 than gibberellin A4 in the assay. The ability to reduce gibberellin-induced growth and not reduce IAA-induced growth indicates that the inhibitors from carob have a greater specificity of action than that previously reported for any inhibitor. PMID:16657500

  20. [STAT3 inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Clinical efficacies of various molecular-targeted drugs have been recently demonstrated. Most of these drugs are kinase inhibitors. A most successful drug Glivec is an inhibitor of Bcr-Abl fusion kinase, derived from a well-known causative chromosome translocation of chronic myeloid leukemia(CML). Although other kinase inhibitors have also proved to be useful in the therapy of malignant diseases including an ALK inhibitor for lung carcinomas, a general problem of kinase inhibitors is their lowspecificities. Therefore, the complication of these drugs must be overcome. Recently, trials to develop moleculartargeted therapy whose targets are molecules other than kinases have also been promising. Among molecular targets, STAT3 has attracted a great deal of researchers' attention because it is constitutively activated in most malignant tumors and plays important roles in carcinogenesis. This article summarizes the current situation and problems to be solved with STAT3 inhibitors as well as our recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of STAT3 activation. PMID:21368456

  1. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A; Gray, Nathanael S

    2014-11-11

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a "DFG-out" covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  2. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  3. Aromatase and its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brodie, A; Lu, Q; Long, B

    1999-01-01

    Inhibitors of aromatase (estrogen synthetase) have been developed as treatment for postmenopausal breast cancer. Both steroidal substrate analogs, type I inhibitors, which inactivate the enzyme and non-steroidal competitive reversible, type II inhibitors, are now available. 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4-OHA), the first selective aromatase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce serum estrogen concentrations and cause complete and partial responses in approximately 25% of patients with hormone responsive disease who have relapsed from previous endocrine treatment. Letrozole (CGS 20, 269) and anastrozole (ZN 1033) have been recently approved for treatment. Both suppress serum estrogen levels to the limit of assay detection. Letrozole has been shown to be significantly superior to megace in overall response rates and time to treatment failure, whereas anastrozole was found to improve survival in comparison to megace. Both were better tolerated than the latter. The potential of aromatase within the breast as a significant source of estrogen mediating tumor proliferation and which might determine the outcome of inhibitor treatment was explored. Using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, aromatase and mRNAarom was detected mainly in the epithelial cells of the terminal ductal lobular units (TDLU) of the normal breast and also in breast tumor epithelial cells as well as some stromal cells. Increase in proliferation, measured by increased thymidine incorporation into DNA and by PCNA immunostaining in response to testosterone was observed in histocultures of breast cancer samples. This effect could be inhibited by 4-OHA and implies that intratumoral aromatase has functional significance. An intratumoral aromatase model in the ovariectomized nude mouse was developed which simulated the hormone responsive postmenopausal breast cancer patient. This model also allows evaluation of the efficacy of aromatase inhibitors and antiestrogens in tumors of estrogen receptor positive

  4. Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor: partnering alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor to combat pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Bingle, L.; Tetley, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) is a low molecular weight serine proteinase inhibitor, notably of neutrophil elastase (NE), which is synthesised and secreted by the pulmonary epithelium. SLPI plays an important role in limiting NE-induced pulmonary inflammation and, significantly, it also possesses anti-HIV activity. SLPI is a significant component of the anti-NE shield in the lung which has different reactivity from, and is therefore complementary to, the anti-NE action of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI). Inhaled recombinant SLPI (rSLPI) could prove beneficial in partnership with alpha 1-PI in the treatment of a number of inflammatory lung disorders including emphysema, chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:8994529

  5. [Main results of experimental studies on the toxicology of inhibitors of atmospheric corrosion of metals].

    PubMed

    Paustovskaia, V V

    1990-01-01

    Basing on experimental toxicity research it was established that, out of 50 atmosphere metal corrosion inhibitors, some 14 per cent were found extremely hazardous, 42 per cent--of high level hazardous, 33 percent--of moderate and 11 per cent--of low hazardous. Relationships were identified between the structure of polymethylene amine salts, azole compounds and carbonic acid, and the way they influence human organism. It was also found that inhibitors exercise a polytropic action in man, the toxicity action being concentrated on oxidation processes, and the inhibitors specifically influence protein, carbohydrate and phosphoric metabolisms, as well as the red blood system. This causes functional and structural disorders of CNS and in the parenchymal organs. Inhibitors are characterized by local and skin-resorption actions, their degree and specific features depending on their chemical structures. 22 MACs of working zone inhibitors are proposed, along with early diagnostic tests and preventive measures. PMID:2351297

  6. New-onset toxicity with programmed death-1 inhibitor rechallenge.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Steven P; Andrews, Stephanie; Pasikhova, Yanina; Hill, Eboné

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy has become a mainstay in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors and programmed death-1 (PD-1) inhibitors, which have been added more recently, represent two of the main classes of immunomodulating agents. PD-1 inhibitors are well tolerated and are known to have a decreased rate of occurrence of adverse effects compared with CTLA-4 inhibitors. However, the risk remains for serious immune-mediated adverse reactions. Given their long half and extended efficacy, treatment with a CTLA-4 inhibitor before use of a PD-1 inhibitor may increase the risk of adverse effects. In addition, caution should be exercised when rechallenging grade 3 or 4 adverse effects with the same agent or a different agent of the same class. The re-emergence of a previous toxicity may occur or, as found in this case, a new severe effect may arise. This article will present a case of fatal immune-related hepatoxicity in a patient treated with a CTLA-4 inhibitor, followed by treatment with a PD-1 inhibitor. The mechanisms of action and safety profiles for both classes of drugs will also be reviewed. PMID:26983078

  7. Cardiovascular effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, M; Tziomalos, K

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are effective glucose-lowering agents that do not increase body weight and are associated with a low risk for hypoglycemia. Also, they appear to exert beneficial effects on other established cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia and hypertension. Moreover, DPP-4 inhibitors exert antiinflammatory and antioxidant actions, improve endothelial function and reduce urinary albumin excretion. In contrast to these favorable cardiovascular effects, three recent large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and established cardiovascular disease or multiple cardiovascular risk factors showed that DPP-4 inhibitors do not affect the risk of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke and might increase the risk of heart failure. The findings of the former randomized studies highlight the limitations of surrogate markers and show that beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors do not necessarily translate into reductions in hard clinical endpoints. Ongoing trials will shed more light on the safety profile of DPP-4 inhibitors and will clarify whether they will improve the cardiovascular outcomes of patients with T2DM. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 195-199. PMID:27418775

  8. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  9. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  10. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs. PMID:23502698

  11. Marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs. PMID:23502698

  12. Protein protease inhibitors in insects and comparison with mammalian inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Studies on insect protein protease inhibitors are summarized. Biochemical, genetic and physiological investigations of the silkworm are performed. 2. In addition, the properties and characteristics of fungal protease inhibitors from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) are described and their importance as defensive functions is emphasized. 3. This review also concerns comparative and evolutionary studies of protease inhibitors from various sources. 4. The biological significance of inhibitors is discussed in view of the extensive experimental results. PMID:8365101

  13. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Korsinczky, Michael L J; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Craik, David J

    2004-10-01

    SFTI-1 is a bicyclic 14 amino acid peptide that was originally isolated from the seeds of the sunflower Helianthus annuus. It is a potent inhibitor of trypsin, with a sub-nanomolar K(i) value and is homologous to the active site region of the well-known family of serine protease inhibitors known as the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitors. It has a cyclic backbone that is cross-braced by a single disulfide bridge and a network of hydrogen bonds that result in a well-defined structure. SFTI-1 is amenable to chemical synthesis, allowing for the creation of synthetic variants. Alterations to the structure such as linearising the backbone or removing the disulfide bridge do not reduce the potency of SFTI-1 significantly, and minimising the peptide to as few as nine residues results in only a small decrease in reactivity. The creation of linear variants of SFTI-1 also provides a tool for investigating putative linear precursor peptides. The mechanism of biosynthesis of SFTI-1 is not yet known but it seems likely that it is a gene-coded product that has arisen from a precursor protein that may be evolutionarily related to classic Bowman-Birk inhibitors. PMID:15544530

  14. Inhibitors of rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eliane V; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2016-03-01

    Rhomboid proteases form one of the most widespread families of intramembrane proteases. They utilize a catalytic serine-histidine dyad located several Å below the surface of the membrane for substrate hydrolysis. Multiple studies have implicated rhomboid proteases in biologically and medically relevant processes. Several assays have been developed that are able to monitor rhomboid activity. With the aid of these assays, different types of inhibitors have been found, all based on electrophiles that covalently react with the active site machinery. Although the currently available inhibitors have limited selectivity and moderate potency, they can function as research tools and as starting point for the development of activity-based probes, which are reagents that can specifically detect active rhomboid species. Structural studies on complexes of inhibitors with the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG have provided insight into how substrate recognition may occur. Future synthetic efforts, aided by high-throughput screening or structure-based design, may lead to more potent and selective inhibitors for this interesting family of proteases. PMID:26166068

  15. Improving cancer immunotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad H; Wang, Lei; Goldberg, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit to melanoma, lung, and kidney cancer patients. Challengingly, most other solid tumors, including ovarian carcinoma, are not particularly responsive to immunotherapy, so combination with a complementary therapy may be beneficial. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic modifying drugs can prime antitumor immunity by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens, chemokines, and activating ligands by cancer cells as well as cytokines by immune cells. This review, drawing from both preclinical and clinical data, describes some of the mechanisms of action that enable DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to facilitate the establishment of antitumor immunity. PMID:26646852

  16. Ethylene Biosynthesis in Detached Young Persimmon Fruit Is Initiated in Calyx and Modulated by Water Loss from the Fruit1

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Ryohei; Ogura, Emi; Kubo, Yasutaka; Inaba, Akitsugu

    2003-01-01

    Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) fruit are usually classified as climacteric fruit; however, unlike typical climacteric fruits, persimmon fruit exhibit a unique characteristic in that the younger the stage of fruit detached, the greater the level of ethylene produced. To investigate ethylene induction mechanisms in detached young persimmon fruit, we cloned three cDNAs encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (DK-ACS1, 2, and -3) and two encoding ACC oxidase (DK-ACO1 and -2) genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis, and we analyzed their expression in various fruit tissues. Ethylene production was induced within a few days of detachment in all fruit tissues tested, accompanied by temporally and spatially coordinated expression of all the DK-ACS and DK-ACO genes. In all tissues except the calyx, treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene, an inhibitor of ethylene action, suppressed ethylene production and ethylene biosynthesis-related gene expression. In the calyx, one ACC synthase gene (DK-ACS2) exhibited increased mRNA accumulation accompanied by a large quantity of ethylene production, and treatment of the fruit with 1-methylcyclopropene did not prevent either the accumulation of DK-ACS2 transcripts or ethylene induction. Furthermore, the alleviation of water loss from the fruit significantly delayed the onset of ethylene production and the expression of DK-ACS2 in the calyx. These results indicate that ethylene biosynthesis in detached young persimmon fruit is initially induced in calyx and is modulated by water loss through transcriptional activation of DK-ACS2. The ethylene produced in the calyx subsequently diffuses to other fruit tissues and acts as a secondary signal that stimulates autocatalytic ethylene biosynthesis in these tissues, leading to a burst of ethylene production. PMID:12529535

  17. Strategies for discovering and derisking covalent, irreversible enzyme inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas S; Weerapana, Eranthie; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-01-01

    This article presents several covalent inhibitors, including examples of successful drugs, as well as highly selective, irreversible inhibitors of emerging therapeutic targets, such as fatty acid amide hydolase. Covalent inhibitors have many desirable features, including increased biochemical efficiency of target disruption, less sensitivity toward pharmacokinetic parameters and increased duration of action that outlasts the pharmacokinetics of the compound. Safety concerns that must be mitigated include lack of specificity and the potential immunogenicity of protein–inhibitor adduct(s). Particular attention will be given to recent technologies, such as activity-based protein profiling, which allow one to define the proteome-wide selectivity patterns for covalent inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. For instance, any covalent inhibitor can, in principle, be modified with a ‘clickable’ tag to generate an activity probe that is almost indistinguishable from the original agent. These probes can be applied to any living system across a broad dose range to fully inventory their on and off targets. The substantial number of drugs on the market today that act by a covalent mechanism belies historical prejudices against the development of irreversibly acting therapeutic small molecules. Emerging proteomic technologies offer a means to systematically discriminate safe (selective) versus deleterious (nonselective) covalent inhibitors and thus should inspire their future design and development. PMID:20640225

  18. CaMKII inhibitors: from research tools to therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Pellicena, Patricia; Schulman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac field has benefited from the availability of several CaMKII inhibitors serving as research tools to test putative CaMKII pathways associated with cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. Successful demonstrations of its critical pathophysiological roles have elevated CaMKII as a key target in heart failure, arrhythmia, and other forms of heart disease. This has caught the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which is now racing to develop CaMKII inhibitors as safe and effective therapeutic agents. While the first generation of CaMKII inhibitor development is focused on blocking its activity based on ATP binding to its catalytic site, future inhibitors can also target sites affecting its regulation by Ca2+/CaM or translocation to some of its protein substrates. The recent availability of crystal structures of the kinase in the autoinhibited and activated state, and of the dodecameric holoenzyme, provides insights into the mechanism of action of existing inhibitors. It is also accelerating the design and development of better pharmacological inhibitors. This review examines the structure of the kinase and suggests possible sites for its inhibition. It also analyzes the uses and limitations of current research tools. Development of new inhibitors will enable preclinical proof of concept tests and clinical development of successful lead compounds, as well as improved research tools to more accurately examine and extend knowledge of the role of CaMKII in cardiac health and disease. PMID:24600394

  19. Recent advances for FLAP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Daniel; Davidsson, Öjvind; Whatling, Carl

    2015-07-01

    A number of FLAP inhibitors have been progressed to clinical trials for respiratory and other inflammatory indications but so far no drug has reached the market. With this Digest we assess the opportunity to develop FLAP inhibitors for indications beyond respiratory disease, and in particular for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We also show how recently disclosed FLAP inhibitors have structurally evolved from the first generation FLAP inhibitors paving the way for new compound classes. PMID:26004579

  20. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of camptothecin topoisomerase I inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Herben, V M; Ten Bokkel Huinink, W W; Schellens, J H; Beijnen, J H

    1998-08-01

    In this review the clinical pharmacokinetics of camptothecin topoisomerase I inhibitors, an important new class of anticancer drugs, is discussed. Two prototypes, topotecan and irinotecan, are currently marketed in many European countries and the USA for the treatment of patients with ovarian and colorectal cancer, respectively. Other camptothecin derivatives, including lurtotecan, 9-aminocamptothecin (9-AC) and 9-nitrocamptothecin (9-NC), are at different stages of clinical development. The common property of camptothecin analogues is their action against DNA topoisomerase I, but beyond this similarity the compounds differ widely in terms of antitumour efficacy, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and metabolism. We review chemistry, mechanism of action, stability and bioanalysis of the camptothecins. Dosage and administration, status of clinical application, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and drug interactions are discussed. PMID:9762728

  2. Interaction of Chloroplasts with Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Stuart M.

    1983-01-01

    Several effects on pea (Pisum sativum L. var Onwards) chloroplasts of a new diphenylether herbicide, fomesafen (5-[2-chloro-4-trifluoromethyl-phenoxy]-N-methanesulfonyl-2 -nitrobenzamide) have been compared with those of a herbicide of related structure, nitrofluorfen (2-chloro-1-[4-nitrophenoxy]-4-[trifluoromethyl]benzene). Although both compounds produce the same light-dependent symptoms of desiccation and chlorosis indicative of a common primary mechanism of action, this study is concerned with a more broadly based investigation of different effects on the electron transport system. Comparisons have also been made with other compounds interacting with the chloroplast. Unlike nitrofluorfen, fomesafen has little effect as an inhibitor of electron flow or energy transfer. Both compounds have the ability to stimulate superoxide production through a functional electron transport system, and this involves specifically the p-nitro substituent. The stimulation, which is not likely to be an essential part of the primary herbicidal effect, is diminished under conditions that remove the coupling factor. Evidence suggests that both diphenylethers may be able to bind to the coupling factor, and kinetic studies reveal this for dibromothymoquinone as well. Such a binding site might be an important feature in allowing the primary effect of the diphenylether herbicides to be expressed. PMID:16663025

  3. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  4. PARP inhibitors and more.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chinmoy K; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  5. PARP inhibitors and more

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  6. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Toroian, Damon; Lim, Joo Eun

    2009-01-01

    One of our goals is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recently determined the size exclusion characteristics of the fibril. This study revealed that apatite crystals up to 12 unit cells in size can access the water within the fibril, whereas molecules larger than a 40-kDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization: that macromolecular inhibitors of apatite growth favor fibril mineralization by selectively inhibiting crystal growth in the solution outside of the fibril. To test this mechanism, we developed a system in which crystal formation is driven by homogeneous nucleation at high calcium phosphate concentration and the only macromolecule in solution is fetuin, a 48-kDa inhibitor of apatite growth. Our experiments with this system demonstrated that fetuin determines the location of mineral growth; in the presence of fetuin mineral grows exclusively within the fibril, whereas in its absence mineral grows in solution outside the fibril. Additional experiments showed that fetuin is also able to localize calcification to the interior of synthetic matrices that have size exclusion characteristics similar to those of collagen and that it does so by selectively inhibiting mineral growth outside of these matrices. We termed this new calcification mechanism “mineralization by inhibitor exclusion,” the selective mineralization of a matrix using a macromolecular inhibitor of mineral growth that is excluded from that matrix. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the possible role of this mechanism in bone mineralization. PMID:19414589

  7. PARP Inhibitors for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: Current Treatment Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J.; Braicu, E. I.; Chekerov, R.

    2016-01-01

    More than simply a promising management option, PARP inhibitors can be regarded as a milestone in the development of personalised treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Their mechanism of action, known as “synthetic lethality”, is dependent on functional differences of the DNA repair mechanisms of healthy cells and tumour cells; cells that repair DNA damage less efficiently are particularly sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Olaparib, licensed for use this year, is the best-studied PARP inhibitor used for treatment of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC). The efficacy of PARP inhibitors appears to be increased when used in combination with other treatments. PMID:26941449

  8. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  9. Development of scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    During the last fifty years, scale inhibition has gone from an art to a science. Scale inhibition has changed from simple pH adjustment to the use of optimized dose of designer polymers from multiple monomers. The water-treatment industry faces many challenges due to the need to conserve water, availability of only low quality water, increasing environmental regulations of the water discharge, and concern for human safety when using acid. Natural materials such as starch, lignin, tannin, etc., have been replaced with hydrolytically stable organic phosphates and synthetic polymers. Most progress in scale inhibition has come from the use of synergistic mixtures and copolymerizing different functionalities to achieve specific goals. Development of scale inhibitors requires an understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and its inhibition. This paper discusses the historic perspective of scale inhibition and the development of new inhibitors based on the understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and the use of powerful tools like molecular modeling to visualize crystal-inhibitor interactions.

  10. Molecular mechanisms that could contribute to prolonged effectiveness of PDE5 inhibitors to improve erectile function.

    PubMed

    Francis, S H; Morris, G Z; Corbin, J D

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in penile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) plays a key role in promoting penile erection. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) in VSMC breaks down cGMP to counter this effect. Sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) and tadalafil (Cialis), treatments for erectile dysfunction, inhibit PDE5 action. Many men with erectile dysfunction have improved erectile function after plasma inhibitor concentration falls below therapeutic levels. Maximum effect plus onset and duration of action of inhibitor determines its efficacy. The rate and extent of cellular drug accumulation and efflux of drug from smooth muscle cells plus persistence of drug effects in these cell impact these parameters. We propose possible molecular mechanisms that could account for prolonged action of PDE5 inhibitors including (1) persistence of biochemical effects after inhibitor is cleared from cells, and (2) retention of drug in VSMC beyond plasma clearance. PMID:18418391

  11. CYP17 inhibitors for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vasaitis, Tadas S; Bruno, Robert D; Njar, Vincent C O

    2011-05-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is now the second most prevalent cause of death in men in the USA and Europe. At present, the major treatment options include surgical or medical castration. These strategies cause ablation of the production of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and related androgens by the testes. However, because these procedures do not affect adrenal, prostate and other tissues' androgen production, they are often combined with androgen receptor antagonists to block their action. Indeed, recent studies have unequivocally established that in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) many androgen-regulated genes become re-expressed and tissue androgen levels increase despite low serum levels. Clearly, inhibition of the key enzyme which catalyzes the biosynthesis of androgens from pregnane precursors, 17α-hydroxy/17,20-lyase (hereafter referred to as CYP17) could prevent androgen production from all sources. Thus, total ablation of androgen production by potent CYP17 inhibitors may provide effective treatment of prostate cancer patients. This review highlights the role of androgen biosynthesis in the progression of prostate cancer and the impact of CYP17 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, abiraterone acetate, VN/124-1 (TOK-001) and TAK-700 in the clinic and in clinical development. Article from the special issue on Targeted Inhibitors. PMID:21092758

  12. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results. PMID:16839248

  13. Functional Analysis of Hsp70 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Heike; Wegener, Ansgar; Sirrenberg, Christian; Musil, Djordje; Bomke, Joerg; Eggenweiler, Hans-Michael; Mayer, Matthias P.; Bukau, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family have been recognized as targets for anti-cancer therapy. Since several paralogs of Hsp70 proteins exist in cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, we investigated which isoform needs to be down-regulated for reducing viability of cancer cells. For two recently identified small molecule inhibitors, VER-155008 and 2-phenylethynesulfonamide (PES), which are proposed to target different sites in Hsp70s, we analyzed the molecular mode of action in vitro. We found that for significant reduction of viability of cancer cells simultaneous knockdown of heat-inducible Hsp70 (HSPA1) and constitutive Hsc70 (HSPA8) is necessary. The compound VER-155008, which binds to the nucleotide binding site of Hsp70, arrests the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) in a half-open conformation and thereby acts as ATP-competitive inhibitor that prevents allosteric control between NBD and substrate binding domain (SBD). Compound PES interacts with the SBD of Hsp70 in an unspecific, detergent-like fashion, under the conditions tested. None of the two inhibitors investigated was isoform-specific. PMID:24265689

  14. Antineoplastic effects of mammalian target of rapamycine inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio

    2012-10-24

    Cancer after transplantation is the third cause of death and one of the more relevant comorbidities. Aim of this review is to verify the role of different pathogenetic mechanisms in cancer development in transplant patients and in general population as well. In particular has been outlined the different role exerted by two different families of drug as calcineurin inhibitor and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. The role of mTOR pathways in cell homeostasis is complex but enough clear. As a consequence the mTOR pathway deregulation is involved in the genesis of several cancers. Hence the relevant role of mTOR inhibitors. The authors review the complex mechanism of action of mTOR inhibitors, not only for what concerns the immune system but also other cells as endothelial, smooth muscle and epithelial cells. The mechanism of action is still now not completely defined and understood. It implies the inhibition of mTOR pathway at different levels, but mainly at level of the phosphorylation of several intracellular kinases that contribute to activate mTOR complex. Many prospective and retrospective studies in transplant patients document the antineoplastic role of mTOR inhibition. More recently mTOR inhibitors proven to be effective in the treatment of some cancers also in general population. Kidney cancers, neuroendocrine tumors and liver cancers seem to be the most sensitive to these drugs. Best results are obtained with a combination treatment, targeting the mTOR pathway at different levels. PMID:24175199

  15. Assessing the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Robichaud, A; Savoie, C; Stamatiou, P B; Lachance, N; Jolicoeur, P; Rasori, R; Chan, C C

    2002-01-01

    Type 4 phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors mimic the pharmacological actions of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists. This has been postulated as the mechanism by which PDE4 inhibitors induce emesis and was also demonstrated by their ability to reverse xylazine/ketamine-induced anaesthesia. We further characterized this latter effect since it appears to reflect the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors.Selective inhibitors of PDE 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were studied in rats, on the duration of anaesthesia induced by the combination of xylazine (10 mg kg−1, i.m.) and ketamine (10 mg kg−1, i.m.) PMNPQ (i.e. 6-(4-pyridylmethyl)-8-(3-nitrophenyl)quinoline)  –  PDE4 inhibitor: 0.01 – 3 mg kg−1), like MK-912 (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist: 0.01 – 3 mg kg−1), dose-dependently reduced the duration of anaesthesia. In contrast, vinpocetine (PDE1 inhibitor), EHNA (PDE2 inhibitor), milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor) and zaprinast (PDE5 inhibitor) had no significant effect at the doses tested (1 – 10 mg kg−1). Analysis of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of treated animals confirmed the absorption and distribution to the brain of the inactive inhibitors.Neither MK-912 (3 mg kg−1) nor PMNPQ (0.1 – 1 mg kg−1) altered the duration of anaesthesia induced via a non-alpha2-adrenoceptor pathway (sodium pentobarbitone 50 mg kg−1, i.p.)Central NK1 receptors are involved in PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. Consistently, [sar9, Met(O2)11]-substance P (NK1 receptor agonist, 6 μg i.c.v.) reduced the duration of anaesthesia induced by xylazine/ketamine.In summary, this model is functionally coupled to PDE4, specific to alpha2-adrenoceptors and relevant to PDE4 inhibitor-induced emesis. It therefore provides a novel way of evaluating the emetic potential of PDE4 inhibitors in rats. PMID:11786486

  16. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors confer anti-invasive and antimetastatic effects on lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Katrin; Ramer, Robert; Dithmer, Sophie; Ivanov, Igor; Merkord, Jutta; Hinz, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation has been suggested as tool for activation of endogenous tumor defense. One of these strategies lies in blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA], N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]). This study addressed the impact of two FAAH inhibitors (arachidonoyl serotonin [AA-5HT], URB597) on A549 lung cancer cell metastasis and invasion. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of FAAH substrates (AEA, 2-AG, OEA, PEA) in cells incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. In athymic nude mice FAAH inhibitors were shown to elicit a dose-dependent antimetastatic action yielding a 67% and 62% inhibition of metastatic lung nodules following repeated administration of 15 mg/kg AA-5HT and 5 mg/kg URB597, respectively. In vitro, a concentration-dependent anti-invasive action of either FAAH inhibitor was demonstrated, accompanied with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Using siRNA approaches, a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of FAAH inhibitors was confirmed. Moreover, knockdown of FAAH by siRNA was shown to confer decreased cancer cell invasiveness and increased TIMP-1 expression. Inhibitor experiments point toward a role of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in conferring anti-invasive effects of FAAH inhibitors and FAAH siRNA. Finally, antimetastatic and anti-invasive effects were confirmed for all FAAH substrates with AEA and OEA causing a TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive action. Collectively, the present study provides first-time proof for an antimetastatic action of FAAH inhibitors. As mechanism of its anti-invasive properties an upregulation of TIMP-1 was identified. PMID:26930716

  17. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and Action Research in Context" (Cliff…

  18. Action Research Facilitator's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro-Bruce, Cathy

    This handbook is a roadmap for action research facilitators to help groups as they work through the research process. It offers quotations, handouts, strategies, resources, and insights from actual experiences. The sections of the handbook follow the action research cycle, focusing on: "What is Action Research?"; "What is the Action Research…

  19. PSEUDOPEROXIDASE INVESTIGATIONS OF HYDROPEROXIDES AND INHIBITORS WITH HUMAN LIPOXYGENASES

    PubMed Central

    Hoobler, Eric K.; Holz, Charles; Holman, Theodore R.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mode of action for lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitors is critical to determining their efficacy in the cell. The pseudoperoxidase assay is an important tool for establishing if a LOX inhibitor is reductive in nature, however, there have been difficulties identifying the proper conditions for each of the many human LOX isozymes. In the current paper, both the 234 nm decomposition (UV) and iron-xylenol orange (XO) assays are shown to be effective methods of detecting pseudoperoxidase activity for 5-LOX, 12-LOX, 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2, but only if 13-(S)-HPODE is used as the hydroperoxide substrate. The AA products, 12-(S)-HPETE and 15-(S)-HPETE, are not consistent hydroperoxide substrates since they undergo a competing transformation to the di-HETE products. Utilizing the above conditions, the selective 12-LOX and 15-LOX-1 inhibitors, probes for diabetes, stroke and asthma, are characterized for their inhibitory nature. Interestingly, ascorbic acid also supports the pseudoperoxidase assay, suggesting that it may have a role in maintaining the inactive ferrous form of LOX in the cell. In addition, it is observed that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a known reductive LOX inhibitor, appears to generate radical species during the pseudoperoxidase assay, which are potent inhibitors against the human LOX isozymes, producing a negative pseudoperoxidase result. Therefore, inhibitors that do not support the pseudoperoxidase assay with the human LOX isozymes, should also be investigated for rapid inactivation, to clarify the negative pseudoperoxidase result. PMID:23669189

  20. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  1. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  2. [Kinase inhibitors and their resistance].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-08-01

    Kinase cascades are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis through modulation of transformation and differentiation, cell-cycle progression, and motility. Advances in molecular targeted drug development allow the design and synthesis of inhibitors targeting cancer-associated signal transduction pathways. Potent selective inhibitors with low toxicity can benefit patients especially with several malignancies harboring an oncogenic driver addictive signal. This article evaluates information on solid tumor-related kinase signals and inhibitors, including receptor tyrosine kinase or serine/threonine kinase signals that lead to successful application in clinical settings. In addition, the resistant mechanisms to the inhibitors is summarized. PMID:26281685

  3. Ethylene and a-farnesene metabolism in green and red skin of three apple cultivars in response to 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relationships among alpha-farnesene synthesis and oxidation, ethylene production and perception, antioxidative enzyme activities, and superficial scald development in fruit of three commercial apple cultivars were investigated at the biochemical and gene transcriptional levels. Scald-susceptible Cor...

  4. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins: new targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Perveen, Nadia; Ahmad, Bashir; Saleem, Uzma; Irshad, Tehseen; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) can play an important role in inhibiting apoptosis by exerting their negative action on caspases (apoptotic proteins). There are eight proteins in this family: NAIP/BIRC1/NLRB, cellular IAP1 (cIAP1)/human IAP2/BIRC2, cellular IAP2 (cIAP2)/human IAP1/BIRC3, X-linked IAP (XIAP)/BIRC4, survivin/BIRC5, baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme/apollon/BIRC6, livin/melanoma-IAP (ML-IAP)/BIRC7/KIAP, and testis-specific IAP (Ts-IAP)/hILP-2/BIRC8. Deregulation of these inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may push cell toward cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may provide new target for anticancer therapy. Drugs may be developed that are inhibiting these IAPs to induce apoptosis in cancerous cells. PMID:23790005

  5. Current topics on inhibitors of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masatoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2016-07-01

    There are a variety of chemicals which regulate the functions of bacterial and mitochondrial complex I. Some of them, such as rotenone and piericidin A, have been indispensable molecular tools in mechanistic studies on complex I. A large amount of experimental data characterizing the actions of complex I inhibitors has been accumulated so far. Recent X-ray crystallographic structural models of entire complex I may be helpful to carefully interpret this data. We herein focused on recent hot topics on complex I inhibitors and the subjects closely connected to these inhibitors, which may provide useful information not only on the structural and functional aspects of complex I, but also on drug design targeting this enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26625959

  6. Mode of action of etoxazole.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Smagghe, Guy

    2006-05-01

    The mode of action of the 2,4-diphenyl-1,3-oxazoline acaricide/insecticide etoxazole has been argued to be moulting inhibition, but experimental results supporting this hypothesis are lacking. This study investigated the effect of etoxazole on chitin biosynthesis in the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Etoxazole induced moulting defects in fall armyworm larvae similar, if not identical, to those caused by benzoylphenylureas, a well-known class of insecticidal chitin biosynthesis inhibitors. Furthermore, in contrast to untreated larvae, the chitin content in the integuments of larvae several days after treatment did not differ from that in freshly ecdysed individuals, thus suggesting strong chitin biosynthesis inhibition in vivo. A more detailed investigation of the inhibitory potential by incubating cultured integument pieces from larvae of S. frugiperda with [14C]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, a radiolabelled chitin precursor, revealed I50 values of 2.95 and 0.071 microM for etoxazole and triflumuron respectively. The incorporation of radiolabel into potassium hydroxide-resistant material was inhibited by etoxazole in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these results, it is concluded that the acaricidal and insecticidal mode of action of etoxazole is chitin biosynthesis inhibition. PMID:16555232

  7. Repositioning of DHFR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lele, Arundhati Chandrashekhar; Mishra, Deepak Amarnath; Kamil, Tengku Karmila; Bhakta, Sanjib; Degani, Mariam Sohel

    2016-01-01

    Development of new drugs is a time-consuming, hugely expensive and an uncertain endeavor. The pharmaceutical industry is looking for cost-effective alternatives with reduced risks of drug failure. Validated target machinery along with established inhibitors indicates usefulness in drug design, discovery and further development. Folate metabolism, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, represents an essential druggable target for chemotherapy. Numerous enzymes in the cell replication cycle use folate either as a cofactor or as a substrate. DHFR, an enzyme of the folate biosynthesis pathway is an established chemotherapeutic target, initially explored for anti-cancer drug discovery. Diaminopteridines e.g. methotrexate and aminopterin, primarily used as anti-cancer agents, are folic acid analogues, first reported in late 1940's, used to produce temporary remission of acute leukaemia in children. However, due to the toxicity of these drugs, they could not be used for other therapeutic implications such as in the treatment of infectious diseases. Development of newer diaminopteridine derivatives has helped in repositioning their therapeutic usefulness. These analogues have now been proven as anti-parasitic, immuno-suppressants, anti-bacterial agents, to enlist a few therapeutic applications. Likewise, diaminopyrimidine, diaminoquinazoline and diaminodihydrotriazines are being explored for structural modifications by which they can be repurposed from their originally developed medicinal applicability and exploited for various other infectious disease conditions. In this review, we encompass the study of DHFR inhibitors potentially to be repurposed for different infectious disease case scenario and also highlight the novel anti-infective drug discovery benefits therein. PMID:26881719

  8. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  9. Comparative toxicity of 20 herbicides to 5 periphytic algae and the relationship with mode of action.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Taya, Kiyoshi; Yoda, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    The authors used 5 species of periphytic algae to conduct toxicity assays of 20 herbicides. The 5 tested species represent riverine primary producers most likely to be affected by herbicides. A fluorescence microplate toxicity assay was used as an efficient and economical high-throughput assay. Toxicity characteristics were analyzed, focusing on their relationship to herbicide mode of action. The relative differences between 50% and 10% effect concentrations depended on herbicide mode of action, rather than tested species. Moreover, a clear relationship between sensitive species and herbicide mode of action was also observed. Green alga was most sensitive to herbicides of 2 mode of action groups: inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. Diatoms were most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: 4-hydroxyphenyl-pyruvate-dioxygenase inhibitors. Cyanobacterium was most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: inhibitors of acetolactate synthase. The species sensitivity distribution based on obtained data was also analyzed. The slopes of the species sensitivity distribution significantly differed among modes of action, suggesting that difference in species sensitivity is specific to the mode of action. In particular, differences in species sensitivity were markedly large for inhibitors of acetolactate synthase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase, and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. The results clearly showed that a single algal species cannot represent the sensitivity of an algal assemblage. Therefore, multispecies algal toxicity data are essential for substances with specific modes of action. PMID:26174500

  10. Structure-based drug discovery of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-12-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of anti-glaucoma, anti-convulsant and anti-cancer agents. But recently, it has also emerged that these enzymes have the potential for designing anti-infective drugs (anti-fungal and anti-bacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. Sulphonamides and their isosteres (sulphamates/sulphamides) constitute the main class of CA inhibitors (CAIs), which bind to the metal ion from the enzyme active site. Recently, the dithiocarbamates (DTCs), possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. These types of CAIs will be discussed in detail in this review. Novel drug design strategies have been reported ultimately based on the tail approach for obtaining sulphonamides/DTCs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Most of the promising data have been obtained by combining x-ray crystallography of enzyme-inhibitor adducts with novel synthetic approaches for generating chemical diversity. Whereas sulphonamide - NO donating hybrid drugs were reported as effective anti-glaucoma agents, most of the interesting new inhibitors were designed for inhibiting specifically the tumour-associated isoforms CA IX and XII, validated targets for imaging and treatment of hypoxic tumours. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the DTC and carboxylate types, will be also reviewed. PMID:22468747

  11. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  12. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  13. Toxic action/toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    Some six or so physiological systems, essential to normal mammalian life, are involved in poisoning; an intoxication that causes severe injury to any one of them could be life threatening. Reversible chemical reactions showing Scatchard-type binding are exemplified by CO, CN- and cyclodiene neurotoxin insecticide intoxications, and by antigen-antibody complex formation. Haemoglobin (Hb) molecular biology accounts for the allosteric co-operativity and other characteristics of CO poisoning, CN- acts as a powerful cytochrome oxidase inhibitor, and antigen binding in a deep antibody cleft between two domains equipped with epitopes for antigen-binding groups explains hapten-specific immune reactions. Covalent chemical reactions with second-order (SN2) kinetics characterize Hg and Cd poisonings, the reactions of organophosphates and phosphonates with acetylcholinesterase and neurotoxic esterase and the reaction sequence whereby Paraquat accepts electrons and generates superoxide under aerobic conditions. Indirect carcinogens require cytochrome P450 activation to form DNA adducts in target-organ DNA and cause cancer, but a battery of detoxifying enzymes clustered with the P450 system must be overcome. Thus, S-metabolism competes ineffectively with target DNA for reactive vinyl chloride (VC) metabolites, epoxide hydrolase is important to the metabolism and carcinogenicity of alfatoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, etc.), and the non-toxic 2-naphthylhydroxylamine N-glucuronide acts as a transport form in 2-naphthylamine bladder cancer. VC liver-cancer pathogenesis is explicable in terms of the presence of the glutathione S-transferase detoxifying system in hepatocytes and its absence from the fibroblastic elements, and of the VC concentrations reaching the liver by different administrative routes. In VC carcinogenicity, chemical reactions give imidazo-cyclization products with nucleoside residues of target DNA, and in benzene leukaemia, Z

  14. Systemic and spinal administration of FAAH, MAGL inhibitors and dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors produce antipruritic effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Cayirli, Mutlu; Sakin, Yusuf Serdar; Seyrek, Melik; Akar, Ahmet; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    The increase of endocannabinoid tonus by inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) represents a promising therapeutic approach in a variety of disease to overcome serious central side effects of exocannabinoids. Recent studies reported that systemic administration of FAAH and MAGL inhibitors produce antipruritic action. Dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors have also been described to get enhanced endocannabinoid therapeutic effect. In this study, we examined and compared dose-related antipruritic effects of systemic (intraperitoneal; ip) or intrathecal (it) administration of selective FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.; 1, 5, and 10 µg, i.t.), MAGL inhibitor JZL184 (4, 20, and 40 mg/kg, i.p.; 1, 5, and 10 µg, i.t.) and dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 (2, 5, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.; 1, 5, and 10 µg, i.t.) on serotonin (5-HT)-induced scratching model. Serotonin (25 μg) was injected intradermally in a volume of 50 μl into the rostral part of skin on the back of male Balb-C mice. Both systemic or intrathecal administration of PF-3845, JZL184 or JZL195 produced similar dose-dependent antipruritic effects. Our results suggest that endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes FAAH and MAGL are involved in pruritic process at spinal level. FAAH, MAGL or dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors have promising antipruritic effects, at least, in part through spinal site of action. PMID:27126057

  15. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  16. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  17. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  18. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  19. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  20. Dapagliflozin: glucuretic action and beyond.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sundram, Karupiah; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam A

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a greatly challenging disease of the 21 century, and the mortality rate due to this insidious disease is increasing worldwide in spite of availability of effective oral hypoglycemic agents. Satisfactory management of glycemic control in patients afflicted with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains a major clinical challenge. Identification of potential pharmacological target sites is therefore continuing as an integral part of the diabetic research. The sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) expressed in the renal proximal tubule plays an essential role in glucose reabsorption. Pharmacological blockade of SGLT2 prevents glucose reabsorption and subsequently induces the elimination of filtered glucose via urine, the process is known as 'glucuresis'. Dapagliflozin is a selective inhibitor of SGLT2. The US FDA approved dapagliflozin in January 2014 to improve glycemic control along with diet and exercise in adult patients afflicted with T2DM. It has a potential to decrease glycated hemoglobin and to promote weight loss. Although the mechanism of action of dapagliflozin is not directly linked with insulin or insulin sensitivity, reduction of plasma glucose by dapagliflozin via induction of glucosuria could improve muscle insulin sensitivity. Moreover, dapagliflozin could cause diuresis and subsequently fall in blood pressure. In addition to general discussion on the pharmacology of dapagliflozin, we propose in this review the possibilities of dual antidiabetic effect of dapagliflozin and its possible additional beneficial actions in hypertensive-obese-T2DM patients through its indirect blood pressure-lowering action and reduction of body calories and weight. Long-term clinical studies are however needed to clarify this contention. PMID:24705156

  1. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  2. The modern pharmacology of paracetamol: therapeutic actions, mechanism of action, metabolism, toxicity and recent pharmacological findings.

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Davies, Michael J; Day, Richard O; Mohamudally, Anthoulla; Scott, Kieran F

    2013-06-01

    Paracetamol is used worldwide for its analgesic and antipyretic actions. It has a spectrum of action similar to that of NSAIDs and resembles particularly the COX-2 selective inhibitors. Paracetamol is, on average, a weaker analgesic than NSAIDs or COX-2 selective inhibitors but is often preferred because of its better tolerance. Despite the similarities to NSAIDs, the mode of action of paracetamol has been uncertain, but it is now generally accepted that it inhibits COX-1 and COX-2 through metabolism by the peroxidase function of these isoenzymes. This results in inhibition of phenoxyl radical formation from a critical tyrosine residue essential for the cyclooxygenase activity of COX-1 and COX-2 and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. Paracetamol shows selectivity for inhibition of the synthesis of PGs and related factors when low levels of arachidonic acid and peroxides are available but conversely, it has little activity at substantial levels of arachidonic acid and peroxides. The result is that paracetamol does not suppress the severe inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis and acute gout but does inhibit the lesser inflammation resulting from extraction of teeth and is also active in a variety of inflammatory tests in experimental animals. Paracetamol often appears to have COX-2 selectivity. The apparent COX-2 selectivity of action of paracetamol is shown by its poor anti-platelet activity and good gastrointestinal tolerance. Unlike both non-selective NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors, paracetamol inhibits other peroxidase enzymes including myeloperoxidase. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase involves paracetamol oxidation and concomitant decreased formation of halogenating oxidants (e.g. hypochlorous acid, hypobromous acid) that may be associated with multiple inflammatory pathologies including atherosclerosis and rheumatic diseases. Paracetamol may, therefore, slow the development of these diseases. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors all have central and

  3. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  4. Characterization of Potent Fusion Inhibitors of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Michael; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Xian, Tongmei; Khawaja, Sarah; Yamauchi, Yohei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Guoxin; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    New inhibitors of influenza viruses are needed to combat the potential emergence of novel human influenza viruses. We have identified a class of small molecules that inhibit replication of influenza virus at picomolar concentrations in plaque reduction assays. The compound also inhibits replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Time of addition and dilution experiments with influenza virus indicated that an early time point of infection was blocked and that inhibitor 136 tightly bound to virions. Using fluorescently labeled influenza virus, inhibition of viral fusion to cellular membranes by blocked lipid mixing was established as the mechanism of action for this class of inhibitors. Stabilization of the neutral pH form of hemagglutinin (HA) was ruled out by trypsin digestion studies in vitro and with conformation specific HA antibodies within cells. Direct visualization of 136 treated influenza virions at pH 7.5 or acidified to pH 5.0 showed that virions remain intact and that glycoproteins become disorganized as expected when HA undergoes a conformational change. This suggests that exposure of the fusion peptide at low pH is not inhibited but lipid mixing is inhibited, a different mechanism than previously reported fusion inhibitors. We hypothesize that this new class of inhibitors intercalate into the virus envelope altering the structure of the viral envelope required for fusion to cellular membranes. PMID:25803288

  5. Characterization of potent fusion inhibitors of influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Rowse, Michael; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Xian, Tongmei; Khawaja, Sarah; Yamauchi, Yohei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Guoxin; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    New inhibitors of influenza viruses are needed to combat the potential emergence of novel human influenza viruses. We have identified a class of small molecules that inhibit replication of influenza virus at picomolar concentrations in plaque reduction assays. The compound also inhibits replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Time of addition and dilution experiments with influenza virus indicated that an early time point of infection was blocked and that inhibitor 136 tightly bound to virions. Using fluorescently labeled influenza virus, inhibition of viral fusion to cellular membranes by blocked lipid mixing was established as the mechanism of action for this class of inhibitors. Stabilization of the neutral pH form of hemagglutinin (HA) was ruled out by trypsin digestion studies in vitro and with conformation specific HA antibodies within cells. Direct visualization of 136 treated influenza virions at pH 7.5 or acidified to pH 5.0 showed that virions remain intact and that glycoproteins become disorganized as expected when HA undergoes a conformational change. This suggests that exposure of the fusion peptide at low pH is not inhibited but lipid mixing is inhibited, a different mechanism than previously reported fusion inhibitors. We hypothesize that this new class of inhibitors intercalate into the virus envelope altering the structure of the viral envelope required for fusion to cellular membranes. PMID:25803288

  6. Bowman-Birk inhibitors from legumes as colorectal chemopreventive agents

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant functioning of serine proteases in inflammatory and carcinogenic processes within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has prompted scientists to investigate the potential of serine protease inhibitors, both natural and synthetic, as modulators of their proteolytic activities. Protease inhibitors of the Bowman-Birk type, a major protease inhibitor family in legume seeds, which inhibit potently and specifically trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteases, are currently being investigated as colorectal chemopreventive agents. Physiologically relevant amounts of Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) can reach the large intestine in active form due to their extraordinary resistance to extreme conditions within the GIT. Studies in animal models have proven that dietary BBI from several legume sources, including soybean, pea, lentil and chickpea, can prevent or suppress carcinogenic and inflammatory processes within the GIT. Although the therapeutic targets and the action mechanism of BBI have not yet been elucidated, the emerging evidence suggests that BBI exert their preventive properties via protease inhibition; in this sense, serine proteases should be considered as primary targets in early stages of carcinogenesis. The validation of candidate serine proteases as therapeutic targets together with the identification, within the wide array of natural BBI variants, of the most potent and specific protease inhibitors, are necessary to better understand the potential of this protein family as colorectal chemopreventive agents. PMID:25132747

  7. New orally active proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Alessandro; Alonci, Andrea; Gerace, Demetrio; Russo, Sabina; Innao, Vanessa; Calabrò, Laura; Musolino, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved for the therapy of multiple myeloma (MM). Although Bortezomib has renovated the treatment of MM, a considerable proportion of subjects fail to respond to Bortezomib treatment and almost all patients relapse from this drug either alone or when used in combination therapies. However, the good clinical outcome of Bortezomib treatment in MM patients gave impulsion for the development of second generation proteasome inhibitors with the ambition of improving efficacy of proteasome inhibition, enhancing antitumor activity, and decreasing toxicity, as well as providing flexible dosing schedules and patient convenience. This review provides an overview of the role of oral proteasome inhibitors including Marizomib, Oprozomib, Delanzomib, chemical proteasome inhibitors, and cinnabaramides, in the therapy of MM, focusing on developments over the past five years. These emerging drugs with different mechanisms of action have exhibited promising antitumor activity in patients with relapsed/refractory MM, and they are creating chances to target multiple pathways, overcome resistance, and improve clinical outcomes, mainly for those subjects who are refractory to approved agents. Future steps in the clinical development of oral inhibitors include the optimization of the schedule and the definition of their antitumor activity in MM. PMID:24239172

  8. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  9. New inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase as potential antidiabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Somsák, L; Czifrák, K; Tóth, M; Bokor, E; Chrysina, E D; Alexacou, K-M; Hayes, J M; Tiraidis, C; Lazoura, E; Leonidas, D D; Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G

    2008-01-01

    The protein glycogen phosphorylase has been linked to type 2 diabetes, indicating the importance of this target to human health. Hence, the search for potent and selective inhibitors of this enzyme, which may lead to antihyperglycaemic drugs, has received particular attention. Glycogen phosphorylase is a typical allosteric protein with five different ligand binding sites, thus offering multiple opportunities for modulation of enzyme activity. The present survey is focused on recent new molecules, potential inhibitors of the enzyme. The biological activity can be modified by these molecules through direct binding, allosteric effects or other structural changes. Progress in our understanding of the mechanism of action of these inhibitors has been made by the determination of high-resolution enzyme inhibitor structures (both muscle and liver). The knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of protein-ligand complexes allows analysis of how the ligands interact with the target and has the potential to facilitate structure-based drug design. In this review, the synthesis, structure determination and computational studies of the most recent inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase at the different binding sites are presented and analyzed. PMID:19075645

  10. [Biological actions of acetaldehyde].

    PubMed

    Ijiri, I

    1999-11-01

    Acetaldehyde (AcH), the first metabolite of ethanol (EtOH), is a chemically reactive and pharmacologically active compound. The author has been engaged in the study of AcH in cooperation with many researchers for three decades. We have found many biological actions of AcH which cause cardiovascular symptoms after drinking and also inhibited EtOH absorption via the canine and rat intestinal tract. This report covers the following five points. 1. The subjects were classified into a non-flushing group and a flushing group, according to the degree of facial flushing after drinking 200 ml of Sake (Japanese rice wire) at a rate of 100 ml per 5 min. Blood EtOH profile was much the same in both groups, yet peak blood AcH concentration in the flushing group was significantly higher than that in the non-flushing group. All subjects in the flushing group showed marked flushing and an increase in pulse rate after drinking, but these symptoms were not apparent in the non-flushing group. These results suggested that cardiovascular symptoms were caused by AcH itself. 2. Urinary excretions of both norepinephrine and epinephrine increased in the flushing cases after drinking Sake in comparison with those who drank the same volume of water. However, these catecholamines did not change in the non-flushing group. These results suggested that it is catecholamines released from the sympathetic nerve end or the adrenal medulla by AcH which caused an increase in pulse rate. 3. Bradykinin is released from high molecular kininogen by activated kallikrein and acts to dilate distal blood vessels and raise permeability in tissues. On the other hand, kallidin is released from low molecular kininogen by activated glandular kallikrein and its action is weaker than that of bradykinin. Blood low molecular kininogen levels in the flushing group decreased gradually after drinking and were mutually related to the blood AcH concentrations. But levels in the non-flushing group showed no difference

  11. New Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mona; Adem, Abdu; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) remains a highly viable target for the symptomatic improvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD) because cholinergic deficit is a consistent and early finding in AD. The treatment approach of inhibiting peripheral AchE for myasthenia gravis had effectively proven that AchE inhibition was a reachable therapeutic target. Subsequently tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine were developed and approved for the symptomatic treatment of AD. Since then, multiple cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) continue to be developed. These include newer ChEIs, naturally derived ChEIs, hybrids, and synthetic analogues. In this paper, we summarize the different types of ChEIs in development and their respective mechanisms of actions. This pharmacological approach continues to be active with many promising compounds. PMID:22216416

  12. Pyrophosphate: a key inhibitor of mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Arnett, Timothy R; Russell, R Graham G

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic pyrophosphate has long been known as a by-product of many intracellular biosynthetic reactions, and was first identified as a key endogenous inhibitor of biomineralisation in the 1960s. The major source of pyrophosphate appears to be extracellular ATP, which is released from cells in a controlled manner. Once released, ATP can be rapidly hydrolysed by ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterases to produce pyrophosphate. The main action of pyrophosphate is to directly inhibit hydroxyapatite formation thereby acting as a physiological 'water-softener'. Evidence suggests pyrophosphate may also act as a signalling molecule to influence gene expression and regulate its own production and breakdown. This review will summarise our current understanding of pyrophosphate metabolism and how it regulates bone mineralisation and prevents harmful soft tissue calcification. PMID:27061894

  13. Designing Irreversible Inhibitors--Worth the Effort?

    PubMed

    González-Bello, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Despite the unquestionable success of numerous irreversible drugs that are currently in clinical use, such as acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) and penicillin, the number of such approved drugs is much lower than that of noncovalent drugs. Over the years, the potential off-target effects of these types of compounds have been the primary concern that has hampered their development. However, their remarkable advantages over noncovalent drugs and a better analysis of the risks have decreased the widespread skepticism surrounding them. The design of irreversible inhibitors is a challenge, particularly considering that in some cases their efficacy is due to complex and unexpected mechanisms of action. In this review the main advantages of irreversible inhibition are summarized, and the complexity of certain covalent modification mechanisms is highlighted with selected examples. PMID:26593241

  14. Understanding affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Faye J; Iyer, Aarti; Sincharoen, Sirinda

    2006-01-01

    Affirmative action is a controversial and often poorly understood policy. It is also a policy that has been widely studied by social scientists. In this review, we outline how affirmative action operates in employment and education settings and consider the major points of controversy. In addition, we detail the contributions of psychologists and other social scientists in helping to demonstrate why affirmative action is needed; how it can have unintended negative consequences; and how affirmative action programs can be most successful. We also review how psychologists have examined variations in people's attitudes toward affirmative action, in part as a means for testing different theories of social behavior. PMID:16318608

  15. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  16. CYP17 inhibitors for prostate cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vasaitis, Tadas S.; Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is now the second most prevalent cause of death in men in the USA and Europe. At present, the major treatment options include surgical or medical castration. These strategies cause ablation of the production of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and related androgens by the testes. However, because these procedures do not affect adrenal, prostate and other tissues androgen production, they are often combined with androgen receptor antagonists to block their action. Indeed, recent studies have unequivocally established that in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) many androgen-regulated genes become re-expressed and tissue androgen levels increase despite low serum levels. Clearly, inhibition of the key enzyme which catalyzes the biosynthesis of androgens from pregnane precursors, 17α-hydroxy/17,20-lyase (hereafter referred to as CYP17) could prevent androgen production from all sources. Thus, total ablation of androgen production by potent CYP17 inhibitors may provide effective treatment of prostate cancer patients. This review highlights the role of androgen biosynthesis in the progression of prostate cancer and the impact of CYP17 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, abiraterone acetate, VN/124-1 (TOK-001) and TAK-700 in the clinic and in clinical development. PMID:21092758

  17. Anti-platelet therapy: phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gresele, Paolo; Momi, Stefania; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of platelet aggregation can be achieved either by the blockade of membrane receptors or by interaction with intracellular signalling pathways. Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) are two critical intracellular second messengers provided with strong inhibitory activity on fundamental platelet functions. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs), by catalysing the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, limit the intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotides, thus regulating platelet function. The inhibition of PDEs may therefore exert a strong platelet inhibitory effect. Platelets possess three PDE isoforms (PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5), with different selectivity for cAMP and cGMP. Several nonselective or isoenzyme-selective PDE inhibitors have been developed, and some of them have entered clinical use as antiplatelet agents. This review focuses on the effect of PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5 inhibitors on platelet function and on the evidence for an antithrombotic action of some of them, and in particular of dipyridamole and cilostazol. PMID:21649691

  18. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-11-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  19. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  20. Chemistry and biology of chromatin remodeling agents: state of art and future perspectives of HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodriquez, Manuela; Aquino, Maurizio; Bruno, Ines; De Martino, Giovanni; Taddei, Maurizio; Gomez-Paloma, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling is a fundamental phenomenon in the life of eukaryotic cells, bearing implications to numerous physiological and pathological phenomena. This review outlines the chemistry of natural and synthetic agents endowed with the ability to interfere with such biological function, with a particular emphasis on histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Other aspects covered in this article comprise structure activity relationships (SAR) and modes of action at molecular level, including the description of crystal structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes. PMID:16719774

  1. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  2. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  3. Sodium-glucose linked transporter-2 inhibitors in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoli, L; Granata, A; Lentini, P; Rastelli, S; Fatuzzo, P; Rapisarda, F; Castellino, P

    2015-01-01

    SGLT2 inhibitors are new antihyperglycaemic agents whose ability to lower glucose is directly proportional to GFR. Therefore, in chronic kidney disease (CKD) the blood glucose lowering effect is reduced. Unlike many current therapies, the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors is independent of insulin action or beta-cell function. In addition, the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors is complementary and not alternative to other antidiabetic agents. SGLT2 inhibitors could be potentially effective in attenuating renal hyperfiltration and, consequently, the progression of CKD. Moreover, the reductions in intraglomerular pressure, systemic blood pressure, and uric acid levels induced by SGLT inhibition may potentially be of benefit in CKD subjects without diabetes. However, at present, only few clinical studies were designed to evaluate the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in CKD. Consequently, safety and potential efficacy beyond blood glucose lowering should be better clarified in CKD. In this paper we provide an updated review of the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in clinical practice, with particular attention on subjects with CKD. PMID:25785281

  4. Pharmacological inhibitors of exocytosis and endocytosis: novel bullets for old targets.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Andrei I

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibitors of vesicle trafficking possess great promise as valuable analytical tools for the study of a variety of biological processes and as potential therapeutic agents to fight microbial infections and cancer. However, many commonly used trafficking inhibitors are characterized by poor selectivity that diminishes their use in solving basic problems of cell biology or drug development. Recent high-throughput chemical screens intensified the search for novel modulators of vesicle trafficking, and successfully identified a number of small molecules that inhibit exocytosis and endocytosis in different types of mammalian cells. This chapter provides a systematic overview of recently discovered inhibitors of vesicle trafficking. It describes cellular effects and mechanisms of action of novel inhibitors of exocytosis and endocytosis. Furthermore, it pays special attention to the selectivity and possible off-target effects of these inhibitors. PMID:24947371

  5. Three ileus cases associated with the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kanasaki, Keizo; Konishi, Kazunori; Hayashi, Ranji; Shiroeda, Hisakazu; Nomura, Tomoe; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nagai, Takako; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Ito, Hiroki; Tsuda, Shin-Ichi; Kitada, Munehiro; Fujii, Mizue; Kanasaki, Megumi; Nishizawa, Makoto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yasuto; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-11-27

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic drugs that increase incretin hormone levels to enhance blood sugar level-dependent insulinotropic effects, suppress glucagon action, and reduce bowel motility. These incretin effects are ideal for blood sugar control. However, the safety profile of DPP-4 inhibitors is not yet established. Herein, we present three cases of ileus, considered to be closely related to the use of DPP-4 inhibitors, in diabetic patients. Each of the three patients exhibited some risk of a deficiency in bowel movement; the onset of ileus was within 40 days after strengthened inhibition of DPP-4. The use of a DPP-4 inhibitor could be safe, although the cases presented herein enable us to inform the scientific community to some of the potential adverse effects of the use of DPP-4 inhibitors in select populations. PMID:24843724

  6. Amphipathic Benzenes Are Designed Inhibitors of the Estrogen Receptor α/Steroid Receptor Coactivator Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Moore, Terry W.; Collins, Margaret L.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2008-01-01

    We report here on the design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between a steroid receptor coactivator and estrogen receptor α. These inhibitors are based upon an amphipathic benzene scaffold whose hydrophobic face mimics the leucine-rich α-helical consensus sequence on the steroid receptor coactivators that interacts with a shallow groove on estrogen receptor α. Several of these molecules are among the most potent inhibitors of this interaction described to date, and they are active at low micromolar concentrations in both in vitro models of estrogen receptor action and in cell-based assays of estrogen receptor-mediated coactivator interaction and transcription. PMID:18484708

  7. The mutation process in a chlorella population under the combined action of radionuclides and chemical mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyna, S.N.; Sergeeva, S.A.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Shvobene, R.Y.

    1985-09-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of the mutation process under the combined chronic action of radionuclides (/sup 144/Ce, /sup 90/Sr) and inhibitors of repair, acriflavine and caffeine, as well as under the joint action of ethyleneimine and acriflavine, in a Chlorella population. It is shown that the modifying effect of acriflavine is more pronounced under the action of /sup 144/Ce, which is evidently due to its stronger genetic effect, in comparison with /sup 90/Sr. Experiments with inhibitors confirm the participation of the repair systems in the establishment of the visible picture of the mutation process induced by radionuclides and by ethyleneimine (EI).

  8. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  9. Targeting cancer with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Stefan; Rahal, Rami; Stransky, Nicolas; Lengauer, Christoph; Hoeflich, Klaus P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors have played an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Currently, more than 25 oncology drugs that target kinases have been approved, and numerous additional therapeutics are in various stages of clinical evaluation. In this Review, we provide an in-depth analysis of activation mechanisms for kinases in cancer, highlight recent successes in drug discovery, and demonstrate the clinical impact of selective kinase inhibitors. We also describe the substantial progress that has been made in designing next-generation inhibitors to circumvent on-target resistance mechanisms, as well as ongoing strategies for combining kinase inhibitors in the clinic. Last, there are numerous prospects for the discovery of novel kinase targets, and we explore cancer immunotherapy as a new and promising research area for studying kinase biology. PMID:25932675

  10. Aromatase inhibitors for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-12-01

    Some men with severely defective sperm production commonly have excess aromatase activity, reflected by low serum testosterone and relatively elevated estradiol levels. Aromatase inhibitors can increase endogenous testosterone production and serum testosterone levels. Treatment of infertile males with the aromatase inhibitors testolactone, anastrazole, and letrozole has been associated with increased sperm production and return of sperm to the ejaculate in men with non-obstructive azoospermia. Use of the aromatase inhibitors anastrazole (1 mg/day) and letrozole (2.5 mg/day) represent off-label use of these agents for impaired spermatogenesis in men with excess aromatase activity (abnormal testosterone/estradiol [T/E] ratios). Side effects have rarely been reported. Randomized controlled trials are needed to define the magnitude of benefit of aromatase inhibitor treatment for infertile men. PMID:23103016

  11. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  12. [Cancer therapy by PARP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases(PARP) synthesize the ADP-ribose polymers onto proteins and play a role in DNA repair. PARP inhibitors block the repair of single-strand breaks, which in turn gives rise to double-strand breaks during DNA replication. Thus, PARP inhibitors elicit synthetic lethality in cancer with BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations that hamper homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks. Olaparib, the first-in-class PARP inhibitor, was approved for treatment of BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer in Europe and the United States in 2014. Other PARP inhibitors under clinical trials include rucaparib, niraparib, veliparib, and the "PARP-trapping" BMN-673. BRCA1/2 sequencing is an FDA-approved companion diagnostics, which predicts the cancer vulnerability to PARP inhibition. Together, synthetic lethal PARP inhibition is a novel promising strategy for cancer intervention even in cases without prominent driver oncogenes. PMID:26281686

  13. Alternative Agents in Type 1 Diabetes in Addition to Insulin Therapy: Metformin, Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors, Pioglitazone, GLP-1 Agonists, DPP-IV Inhibitors, and SGLT-2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeGeeter, Michelle; Williamson, Bobbie

    2016-04-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of current treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Due to increasing insulin resistance, insulin doses are often continually increased, which may result in weight gain for patients. Medications currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes offer varying mechanisms of action that can help to reduce insulin resistance and prevent or deter weight gain. A MEDLINE search was conducted to review literature evaluating the use of metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, pioglitazone, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase, and sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, in patients with T1DM. Varying results were found with some benefits including reductions in hemoglobin A1c, decreased insulin doses, and favorable effects on weight. Of significance, a common fear of utilizing multiple therapies for diabetes treatment is the risk of hypoglycemia, and this review displayed limited evidence of hypoglycemia with multiple agents. PMID:25312263

  14. Small molecule phagocytosis inhibitors for immune cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Neschadim, Anton; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Branch, Donald R

    2016-08-01

    Immune cytopenias are conditions characterized by low blood cell counts, such as platelets in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and red blood cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Chronic ITP affects approximately 4 in 100,000 adults annually while AIHA is much less common. Extravascular phagocytosis and massive destruction of autoantibody-opsonized blood cells by macrophages in the spleen and liver are the hallmark of these conditions. Current treatment modalities for ITP and AIHA include the first-line use of corticosteroids; whereas, IVIg shows efficacy in ITP but not AIHA. One main mechanism of action by which IVIg treatment leads to the reduction in platelet destruction rates in ITP is thought to involve Fcγ receptor (FcγR) blockade, ultimately leading to the inhibition of extravascular platelet phagocytosis. IVIg, which is manufactured from the human plasma of thousands of donors, is a limited resource, and alternative treatments, particularly those based on bioavailable small molecules, are needed. In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of ITP, the role of Fcγ receptors, and the mechanisms of action of IVIg in treating ITP, and outline the efforts and progress towards developing novel, first-in-class inhibitors of phagocytosis as synthetic, small molecule substitutes for IVIg in ITP and other conditions where the pathobiology of the disease involves phagocytosis. PMID:27296447

  15. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  16. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Pauwels, K; Rizzolatti, G; Orban, G A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors "stimulus type" (action, static control, and dynamic control), "stereopsis" (present, absent) and "viewpoint" (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  17. Corrosion inhibitor selection for wet pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.

    1995-12-31

    Selection of corrosion inhibitors for wet pipelines is based on laboratory testing and field confirmation. Both the use and selection of corrosion inhibitors are driven by economics. Economics of alternative corrosion protection methods is not treated in this paper, but the economics of proper inhibitor selection are. The key to successful inhibitor selection is careful analysis of pipeline flow conditions and experimental emulation of its corrosive environment. Transportation of inhibitor to the corroding interface must be explicitly considered in the emulation. Standard corrosion rate measurement methods are used to evaluate inhibitors. Inhibitor properties tabulated during evaluation form a core database for continuing quality control.

  18. [The synthesis of specific enzyme inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, G M

    1987-04-01

    The review deals with directed synthesis of specific enzyme inhibitors. They are classified within the framework of the mechanistic approach, namely, stable analogues of substrates, which form enzyme complexes mimicking the Michaelis complex or those which influence the chemical stages of enzyme catalysis; conformational inhibitors; substrate analogues participating in enzyme reactions and producing modified products; suicide inhibitors; stage inhibitors (inhibitors influencing certain stages of enzyme reaction); transition state analogues; multisubstrate analogues and collected substrates. Types of chemical modification used in synthesis of the specific inhibitors are discussed. Some possibilities of the quantity structure-activity relationship methods, computer modelling and molecular graphics in designing the optimal structure of inhibitors are mentioned. PMID:3300658

  19. Natural and synthetic inhibitors of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs).

    PubMed

    Goettig, Peter; Magdolen, Viktor; Brandstetter, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Including the true tissue kallikrein KLK1, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent a family of fifteen mammalian serine proteases. While the physiological roles of several KLKs have been at least partially elucidated, their activation and regulation remain largely unclear. This obscurity may be related to the fact that a given KLK fulfills many different tasks in diverse fetal and adult tissues, and consequently, the timescale of some of their physiological actions varies significantly. To date, a variety of endogenous inhibitors that target distinct KLKs have been identified. Among them are the attenuating Zn(2+) ions, active site-directed proteinaceous inhibitors, such as serpins and the Kazal-type inhibitors, or the huge, unspecific compartment forming α(2)-macroglobulin. Failure of these inhibitory systems can lead to certain pathophysiological conditions. One of the most prominent examples is the Netherton syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctional domains of the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 which fail to appropriately regulate KLKs in the skin. Small synthetic inhibitory compounds and natural polypeptidic exogenous inhibitors have been widely employed to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of KLKs and to further investigate their structures and biophysical properties. Overall, this knowledge leads not only to a better understanding of the physiological tasks of KLKs, but is also a strong fundament for the synthesis of small compound drugs and engineered biomolecules for pharmaceutical approaches. In several types of cancer, KLKs have been found to be overexpressed, which makes them clinically relevant biomarkers for prognosis and monitoring. Thus, down regulation of excessive KLK activity in cancer and in skin diseases by small inhibitor compounds may represent attractive therapeutical approaches. PMID:20615447

  20. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  1. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  2. Affirmative Action in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Natan

    This paper examines issues of equality, discrimination, affirmative action, and preferential treatment in Israel. An introduction provides a broad outline of topics addressed in the paper: the status of the Jewish sector, with treatment of Jewish immigrants to serve as an example of affirmative action; the policies of the state in relation to the…

  3. Community-Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sarah; Mattern, Mark; Telin, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes an undergraduate course entitled Public Interest Research in which students learn research methods by conducting research on behalf of one or more community organizations. Students' work is conceived of as community action learning, a combination of participatory action research and service learning, emphasizing…

  4. Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores intersections among art, action, and community. It describes sociopolitical aspects of the author's art therapy work with survivors of repressive regimes living in Brazil, China, and Denmark and considers ways that unique historical and social processes influenced her conceptualization and practice of social action art therapy.

  5. Training for Nonviolent Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Theodore W.; Shivers, Lynne

    The theory and practice of nonviolent action training as it exists to date are reviewed in this pamphlet. A response to a renewal of interest in alternative forms of social action, the pamphlet results specifically from an international seminar of experienced organizers and trainers held at Preston Patrick, Westmorland, England, June 27 - July 2,…

  6. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  7. Action Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman-Peck, Lorraine; Murray, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between action research and policy and the kind of confidence teachers, policy makers and other potential users may have in such research. Many published teacher action research accounts are criticised on the grounds that they do not fully meet the conventional standards for reporting social scientific…

  8. Affirmative Action Report, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada Univ. and Community Coll. System, Reno. Office of the Chancellor.

    All campuses and units of the University and Community College System of Nevada annually submit data to the Chancellor's Office on affirmative action. This report provides tables of affirmative action data for students enrolled during fall 1992 and professional and classified staff employed during 1992. First, student data is provided on gender…

  9. Action spectrum for photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, F R

    1995-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the carcinogenicity of ultraviolet (UV) radiation needs to be known in order to assess the carcinogenic risks of various UV sources, most notably the different solar UV spectra at ground level under depleting stratospheric ozone. This wavelength dependence cannot be extracted from human data (e.g., from epidemiology); it can, however, be directly obtained from animal experiments. Precise information on the wavelength dependence, the so-called action spectrum, was not available until recently: erythemal or mutagenic action spectra have been used as substitutes. However, experimental data on skin tumors induced in hairless mice (Skh:HR1) with various polychromatic sources have been building up. Our group has found that none of the substitute action spectra yield a statistically acceptable description of our data, and we have, therefore, derived a new action spectrum, dubbed the SCUP action spectrum (SCUP stands for Skin Cancer Utrecht-Philadelphia, because the action spectrum also fits experimental data from the former Skin and Cancer Hospital in Philadelphia). The SCUP action spectrum has a maximum at 293 nm, and in the UVA region above 340 nm the relative carcinogenicity per J/m2 drops to about 10(-4) of this maximum. The effects of an ozone depletion on solar UV doses weighted with these different action spectra are compared: the erythemal and SCUP weighted dose come out as least sensitive with a 1.3% and 1.4% increase, respectively, for every 1% decrease in ozone. PMID:7597292

  10. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  11. ACTION. Annual Report 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1974. After an introduction that notes accomplishments of the past year, a review of domestic operations discusses such programs as VISTA, University Year for ACTION, National Student Volunteer Program, Foster Grandparent Program, and others according…

  12. Entry inhibitors and future treatment of hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Fofana, Isabel; Jilg, Nikolaus; Chung, Raymond T; Baumert, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, HCV-induced liver disease is the leading indication for liver transplantation. The recent introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized HCV treatment by making possible the cure of the majority of patients. However, their efficacy and safety in difficult-to-treat patients such as patients receiving immunosuppression, those with advanced liver disease, co-morbidity and HIV/HCV-co-infection remain to be determined. Furthermore, prevention of liver graft infection remains a pressing issue. HCV entry inhibitors target the very first step of the HCV life cycle and efficiently inhibit cell-cell transmission - a key prerequisite for viral spread. Because of their unique mechanism of action on cell-cell transmission they may provide a promising and simple perspective for prevention of liver graft infection. A high genetic barrier to resistance and complementary mechanism of action compared to DAAs makes entry inhibitors attractive as a new strategy for treatment of multi-resistant or difficult-to-treat patients. Clinical studies are needed to determine the future role of entry inhibitors in the arsenal of antivirals to combat HCV infection. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Hepatitis C: next steps toward global eradication." PMID:24525381

  13. Protein synthesis inhibitors prevent both spontaneous and hormone-dependent maturation of isolated mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, S.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein synthesis in mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. In the first part of this study, the effects of cycloheximide (CX) were tested on spontaneous meiotic maturation when oocytes were cultured in inhibitor-free medium. CX reversibly suppressed maturation of oocytes as long as maturation was either initially prevented by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), or delayed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). In the second part of this study, the actions of protein synthesis inhibitors were tested on hormone-induced maturation. CEO were maintained in meiotic arrest for 21-22 h with hypoxanthine, and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) was induced with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Three different protein synthesis inhibitors (CX, emetine (EM), and puromycin (PUR)) each prevented the stimulatory action of FSH on GVB in a dose-dependent fashion. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent suppression of 3H-leucine incorporation by oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. The action of these inhibitors on FSH- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced GVB was next compared. All three drugs lowered the frequency of GVB in the FSH-treated groups, below even that of the controls (drug + hypoxanthine); the drugs maintained meiotic arrest at the control frequencies in the EGF-treated groups. Puromycin aminonucleoside, an analog of PUR with no inhibitory action on protein synthesis, had no effect. The three inhibitors also suppressed the stimulatory action of FSH on oocyte maturation when meiotic arrest was maintained with the cAMP analog, dbcAMP.

  14. Conscious Vision in Action.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Robert; Schwenkler, John

    2015-09-01

    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH), according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a "zombie" processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious (Clark, 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner, 1992, 2004a; Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006, 2008). In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to "recognizing objects, selecting targets for action, and determining what kinds of action, broadly speaking, to perform" (Clark, 2007, p. 570). Our aim in this study is to show that the available evidence not only fails to support this dichotomous view but actually reveals a significant role for conscious vision in motor programming, especially for actions that require deliberate attention. PMID:25845648

  15. Synthetic small molecule furin inhibitors derived from 2,5-dideoxystreptamine

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Cregar, Lynne; Wang, Jinzhi; Millis, Sherri Z.; Tang, Cho; O'Malley, Sean; Johnson, Alan T.; Sareth, Sina; Larson, Jason; Thomas, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Furin plays a crucial role in embryogenesis and homeostasis and in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and viral and bacterial infections. Thus, inhibition of furin may provide a feasible and promising approach for therapeutic intervention of furin-mediated disease mechanisms. Here, we report on a class of small molecule furin inhibitors based on 2,5-dideoxystreptamine. Derivatization of 2,5-dideoxystreptamine by the addition of guanidinylated aryl groups yielded a set of furin inhibitors with nanomolar range potency against furin when assayed in a biochemical cleavage assay. Moreover, a subset of these furin inhibitors protected RAW 264.7 macrophage cells from toxicity caused by furin-dependent processing of anthrax protective antigen. These inhibitors were found to behave as competitive inhibitors of furin and to be relatively specific for furin. Molecular modeling revealed that these inhibitors may target the active site of furin as they showed site occupancy similar to the alkylating inhibitor decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-CH2Cl. The compounds presented here are bona fide synthetic small molecule furin inhibitors that exhibit potency in the nanomolar range, suggesting that they may serve as valuable tools for studying furin action and potential therapeutics agents for furin-dependent diseases. PMID:17179036

  16. Resynthesis of reactive site peptide bond and temporary inhibition of Streptomyces metalloproteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Seeram, S S; Hiraga, K; Oda, K

    1997-10-01

    Streptomyces metalloproteinase inhibitor (SMPI) is a small proteinaceous inhibitor which inhibits metalloproteinases such as thermolysin (Ki =1.14 x 10(-10) M). When incubated with the enzyme, it is gradually hydrolyzed at the Cys64-Val65 peptide bond, which was identified as the reactive site by mutational analysis. To achieve a further understanding of the inhibition mechanism, we attempted to resynthesize the cleaved reactive site by using the enzyme catalytic action. The native inhibitor was resynthesized from the modified inhibitor (Ki =2.18 x 10(-8) M) by incubation with a catalytic amount of thermolysin under the same conditions as used for hydrolysis (pH 7.5, 25 degrees C), suggesting that SMPI follows the standard mechanism of inhibition of serine proteinase inhibitors. Temporary inhibition was observed when the native inhibitor and thermolysin were incubated at a 1:100 (mol/mol) enzyme-inhibitor ratio at 37 degrees C. SMPI showed temporary inhibition towards all the enzymes it inhibited. The inhibitory spectrum of SMPI was analyzed with various metalloproteinases based on the Ki values and limited proteolysis patterns. Pseudomonas elastase and Streptomyces griseus metalloproteinase II formed more stable complexes and showed much lower Ki values (approximately 2 pM) than thermolysin. In the limited proteolysis experiments weak inhibitors were degraded by the enzymes. SMPI did not inhibit almelysin, Streptomyces caespitosus neutral proteinase or matrix metalloproteinases. SMPI specifically inhibits metalloproteinases which are sensitive to phosphoramidon. PMID:9399583

  17. Antioxidant action of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, A; Montesinos, C; Payá, M; Terencio, C; Alcaraz, M J

    1993-01-01

    The antioxidant action of a series of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been investigated. Laudanosoline, protopapaverine, anonaine, apomorphine, glaucine, boldine, bulbocapnine, tetrahydroberberine and stepholidine produced a dose-dependent inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation induced by Fe2+/ascorbate, CCl4/NADPH or by Fe3+ ADP/NADPH. Apomorphine exerted the highest inhibitory effects in the three systems of induction used, with a potency higher than propyl gallate. Laudanosoline was particularly effective in the first system, while bulbocapnine and anonaine were more potent when CCl4/NADPH or Fe3(+)-ADP/NADPH were used as inducers. Laudanosoline, protopapaverine, apomorphine, tetrahydroberberine and stepholidine were also potent inhibitors of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction. The presence of a free hydroxyl group or preferably of a catechol group is a feature relevant for inhibition of lipid peroxidation and NBT reduction, nevertheless the antioxidant activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids cannot be only ascribed to the formation of phenoxy radicals and other free radical species may be formed during aporphine and tetrahydroprotoberberine oxidation. The influence of this series of compounds on the time course of lipid peroxidation suggests that some of them, like apomorphine and boldine act as chain-breaking antioxidants. PMID:8319926

  18. Following the Action in Action Learning: Towards Ethnomethodological Studies of (Critical) Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Action learning is a pedagogical practice that helps participants learn by talking about their workplace action with fellow participants ("comrades in adversity") in their action learning set. This paper raises questions about the action in action learning, such as: how do members of an action learning set learn from and through each other? How do…

  19. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  20. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  1. Converting maslinic acid into an effective inhibitor of acylcholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan; Loesche, Anne; Lucas, Susana Dias; Sommerwerk, Sven; Serbian, Immo; Siewert, Bianka; Pianowski, Elke; Csuk, René

    2015-10-20

    During the last decade, maslinic acid has been evaluated for many biological properties, e.g. as an anti-tumor or an anti-viral agent but also as a nutraceutical. The potential of maslinic acid and related derivatives to act as inhibitors of acetyl- or butyryl-cholinesterase was examined in this communication in more detail. Cholinesterases do still represent an interesting group of target enzymes with respect to the investigation and treatment of the Alzheimer's disease and other dementia illnesses as well. Although other triterpenoic acids have successfully been tested for their ability to act as inhibitors of cholinesterases, up to now maslinic acid has not been part of such studies. For this reason, three series of maslinic acid derivatives possessing modifications at different centers were synthesized and subjected to Ellman's assay to determine their inhibitory strength and type of inhibitory action. While parent compound maslinic acid was no inhibitor in these assays, some of the compounds exhibited an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in the single-digit micro-molar range. Two compounds were identified as inhibitors of butyrylcholinesterase showing inhibition constants comparable to those of galantamine, a drug often used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, additional selectivity as well as cytotoxicity studies were performed underlining the potential of several derivatives and qualifying them for further investigations. Docking studies revealed that the different kinetic behavior within the same compound series may be explained by the ability of the compounds to enter the active site gorge of AChE. PMID:26383128

  2. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) and DUB inhibitors: a patent review

    PubMed Central

    Nwankwo, Joseph O.; Arkwright, Richard T.; Cvek, Boris; Liu, Jinbao; Dou, Q. Ping

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deubiquitinating-enzymes (DUBs) are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS). The fundamental role of DUBs is specific removal of ubiquitin from substrates. DUBs contribute to activation/deactivation, recycling and localization of numerous regulatory-proteins, thus playing major roles in diverse cellular-processes. Altered DUB activity is associated with multitudes of pathologies including cancer. Therefore, DUBs represent novel candidates for target-directed drug development. Areas covered The article is a thorough review/accounting of patented compounds targeting DUBs stratifying/classifying the patented compounds based on: chemical-structures, nucleic-acid compositions, modes-of-action and targeting-sites. The review provides a brief background on the UPS and DUBs involvement. Furthermore, methods for assessing efficacy and potential pharmacological utility of DUB inhibitor (DUBi) are discussed. Expert opinion The FDA’s approval of the 20S proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib and carfilzomib for treatment of hematological malignancies established the UPS as an anti-cancer target. Unfortunately, many patients are inherently resistant or develop resistance to proteasome inhibitors (PIs). One potential strategy to combat PI resistance is targeting upstream components of the UPS such as DUBs. DUBs represent a promising potential therapeutic target due to their critical roles in various cellular processes including protein-turnover, localization and cellular homeostasis. While considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop DUB modulators, significant advancement is necessary move DUB inhibitors into the clinic. PMID:26077642

  3. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  4. PCSK9 Inhibitors: An Innovative Approach to Treating Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Sible, Alexandra M; Nawarskas, James J; Anderson, Joe R

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors are novel agents indicated for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Inhibition of PCSK9 produces an increase in surface low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors and increases removal of LDL from the circulation. Alirocumab (Praluent; Sanofi/Regeneron, Bridgewater, NJ) and evolocumab (Repatha; Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA) are currently available and approved for use in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, and clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Bococizumab (RN316; Pfizer, New York, NY) is currently being studied in similar indications, with an estimated approval date in late 2016. The pharmacodynamic effects of PCSK9 inhibitors have been extensively studied in various patient populations. They have been shown to produce significant reductions in LDL and are well tolerated in clinical studies, but they are very costly when compared with statins, the current mainstay of hyperlipidemia treatment. Clinical outcome studies are underway, but not yet available; however, meta-analyses have pointed to a reduction in cardiovascular death and cardiovascular events with the use of PCSK9 inhibitors. This review will discuss the novel mechanism of action of PCSK9 inhibitors, the results of clinical studies, and the clinical considerations of these agents in current therapy. PMID:26886466

  5. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  6. A fluorescein-labeled AmpC β-lactamase allows rapid characterization of β-lactamase inhibitors by real-time fluorescence monitoring of the β-lactamase-inhibitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Man-Wah; Chan, Pak-Ho; Liu, Sze-Yan; Wong, Kwok-Yin; Leung, Yun-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Rapid emergence of class C β-lactamases has urged an immediate need for developing class C β-lactamase specific inhibitors for effective clinical treatment. To facilitate the development of effective class C β-lactamase inhibitors, we propose a new approach for a rapid analysis of the interaction of AmpC β-lactamase and its inhibitors using our recently developed V211Cf fluorescent β-lactamase biosensor during drug screening. Since the fluorescein of V211Cf can report the local environment change in the active site of AmpC β-lactamase, fluorescence responses of V211Cf toward its substrates/inhibitors can provide real-time traces of the dynamic change of the interaction of the β-lactamase with its substrates/inhibitors. In this study, we found that V211Cf displayed distinct fluorescence signal patterns toward different kinds of inhibitors (including clavulanic acid, sulbactam, tazobactam and 2-thiopheneboronic acid) due to the differences in their interactions with β-lactamase. V211Cf not only enables a high throughput screening for inhibitors but can also provide a rapid preliminary indication on the inhibitor's potency and stability to β-lactamase's hydrolytic action as well as how the inhibitors interact with the target enzyme, thereby speeding up the drug discovery and development cycle of class C β-lactamase inhibitors. PMID:26250526

  7. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  8. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  9. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  10. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%. PMID:22561212

  11. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  12. Monoglyceride lipase: Structure and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scalvini, Laura; Piomelli, Daniele; Mor, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL), the main enzyme responsible for the hydrolytic deactivation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), is an intracellular serine hydrolase that plays critical roles in many physiological and pathological processes, such as pain, inflammation, neuroprotection and cancer. The crystal structures of MGL that are currently available provide valuable information about how this enzyme might function and interact with site-directed small-molecule inhibitors. On the other hand, its conformational equilibria and the contribution of regulatory cysteine residues present within the substrate-binding pocket or on protein surface remain open issues. Several classes of MGL inhibitors have been developed, from early reversible ones, such as URB602 and pristimerin, to carbamoylating agents that react with the catalytic serine, such as JZL184 and more recent O-hexafluoroisopropyl carbamates. Other inhibitors that modulate MGL activity by interacting with conserved regulatory cysteines act through mechanisms that deserve to be more thoroughly investigated. PMID:26216043

  13. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  14. Corrective Action Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The glossary of technical terms was prepared to facilitate the use of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) issued by OSWER on November 14, 1986. The CAP presents model scopes of work for all phases of a corrective action program, including the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI), Corrective Measures Study (CMS), Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI), and interim measures. The Corrective Action Glossary includes brief definitions of the technical terms used in the CAP and explains how they are used. In addition, expected ranges (where applicable) are provided. Parameters or terms not discussed in the CAP, but commonly associated with site investigations or remediations are also included.

  15. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, José A; Pompeu, Dávia G; Smolka, Marcus B; Gozzo, Fabio C; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N; Granjeiro, Paulo A; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  16. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Silva, José A.; Pompeu, Dávia G.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  17. Fluorescent techniques for discovery and characterization of phosphopantetheinyl transferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kosa, Nicolas M.; Foley, Timothy L.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferase (E.C. 2.7.8.-) activates biosynthetic pathways that synthesize both primary and secondary metabolites in bacteria. Inhibitors of these enzymes have the potential to serve as antibiotic compounds that function through a unique mode of action and possess clinical utility. Here we report a direct and continuous assay for this enzyme class based upon monitoring polarization of a fluorescent phosphopantetheine analog as it is transferred from a low molecular weight coenzyme A substrate to higher molecular weight protein acceptor. We demonstrate the utility of this method for the biochemical characterization of phosphopantetheinyl transferase Sfp, a canonical representative from this class. We also establish the portability of this technique to other homologs by adapting the assay to function with the human phosphopantetheinyl transferase, a target for which a microplate detection method does not currently exist. Comparison of these targets provides a basis to predict therapeutic index of inhibitor candidates and offers a valuable characterization of enzyme activity. PMID:24192555

  18. A novel proteasome inhibitor NPI-0052 as an anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, D; Hideshima, T; Anderson, K C

    2006-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib/Velcade has emerged as an effective anticancer therapy for the treatment of relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma (MM), but prolonged treatment can be associated with toxicity and development of drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the recent discovery of a novel proteasome inhibitor, NPI-0052, that is distinct from Bortezomib in its chemical structure, mechanisms of action, and effects on proteasomal activities; most importantly, it overcomes resistance to conventional and Bortezomib therapies. In vivo studies using human MM xenografts shows that NPI-0052 is well tolerated, prolongs survival, and reduces tumour recurrence. These preclinical studies provided the basis for Phase-I clinical trial of NPI-0052 in relapsed/refractory MM patients. PMID:17047643

  19. Endocrine side effects of broad-acting kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya B.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted therapy in oncology consists of drugs that specifically interfere with abnormal signaling pathways that are dysregulated in cancer cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) take advantage of unique oncogenes that are activated in certain types of cancer, and also target common mechanisms of growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. However, many kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy are somewhat nonselective, and most have additional mechanisms of action at the cellular level which are not completely understood. The use of these agents has increased our knowledge of important side effects, of which the practicing clinician must be aware. Recently proposed endocrine-related side effects of these agents include alterations in thyroid function, bone metabolism, linear growth, gonadal function, fetal development, and glucose metabolism, and adrenal function. This review summarizes the most recent data on the endocrine side effects of TKIs. PMID:20603395

  20. STAT inhibitors for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins are a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors consisting of 7 members, STAT1 to STAT6, including STAT5a and STAT5b. STAT proteins are thought to be ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy since cancer cells are more dependent on the STAT activity than their normal counterparts. Inhibitors targeting STAT3 and STAT5 have been developed. These included peptidomimetics, small molecule inhibitors and oligonucleotides. This review summarized advances in preclinical and clinical development of these compounds. PMID:24308725

  1. SGLT2 inhibitors: new reports.

    PubMed

    2015-10-12

    A significant decrease in cardiovascular mortality has been reported with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin (Jardiance) to treat patients with type 2 diabetes who have established cardiovascular disease. The mechanism of this reduction is unclear, and these results may not apply to patients with type 2 diabetes and less advanced cardiovascular disease. Whether the increase in fractures reported with canagliflozin (Invokana) could also occur with empagliflozin remains to be established. All SGLT2 inhibitors are only modestly effective for treatment of diabetes. PMID:26445203

  2. Effect of the enzymatic inhibitor of Kunitz on the gastric lesions from reserpine, from phenylbutazone, from pyloric ligation and by restraint in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrin, F.; Demaille, A.; Merveille, P.; Bel, C.

    1980-01-01

    The protective effects of certain polypeptides on gastric ulcerations caused from reserpine and phenylbutazone in the rate were studied. It was found that the Kunitz enzymatic inhibitor exerts a protective action in regard to gastric lesions. However, the inhibitor did not change the development of Shay ulcers and stress ulcers from restraint.

  3. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  4. Potentiation of Growth Inhibitory Responses of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus by Dual mTORC1/2 Inhibitors in Cultured Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Euphemia Y.; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Finlay, Graeme J.; Rewcastle, Gordon W.; Baguley, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a vital component of signaling pathways involving PI3K/AKT, is an attractive therapeutic target in breast cancer. Everolimus, an allosteric mTOR inhibitor that inhibits the mTOR functional complex mTORC1, is approved for treatment of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Other mTOR inhibitors show interesting differences in target specificities: BEZ235 and GSK2126458 are ATP competitive mTOR inhibitors targeting both PI3K and mTORC1/2; AZD8055, AZD2014 and KU-0063794 are ATP competitive mTOR inhibitors targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2; and GDC-0941 is a pan-PI3K inhibitor. We have addressed the question of whether mTOR inhibitors may be more effective in combination than singly in inhibiting the proliferation of breast cancer cells. We selected a panel of 30 human breast cancer cell lines that included ER and PR positive, HER2 over-expressing, and “triple negative” variants, and determined whether signaling pathway utilization was related to drug-induced inhibition of proliferation. A significant correlation (p = 0.005) was found between everolimus IC50 values and p70S6K phosphorylation, but not with AKT or ERK phosphorylation, consistent with the mTOR pathway being a principal target. We then carried out combination studies with four everolimus resistant triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, and found an unexpectedly high degree of synergy between everolimus and the other inhibitors tested. The level of potentiation of everolimus inhibitory activity (measured by IC50 values) was found to be cell line-specific for all the kinase inhibitors tested. The results suggest that judicious combination of mTOR inhibitors with different modes of action could have beneficial effects in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26148118

  5. Current role of neprilysin inhibitors in hypertension and heart failure.

    PubMed

    von Lueder, Thomas G; Atar, Dan; Krum, Henry

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) continue to represent the major cause of death, morbidity and healthcare expenditure worldwide. Current medical therapy fails to effectively halt disease progression and to reduce adverse clinical outcomes, reflecting incomplete understanding of pathomechanisms as well as the need to expand current pharmacotherapeutic strategies. Hypertension and heart failure, the most important CVD entities, are associated with imbalance in neurohormonal systems activity such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelin system. Blockade of the RAAS constitutes the most successful pharmacotherapeutic concept in hypertension and heart failure to date. The RAAS-opposing natriuretic peptide system constitutes the body's own BP-lowering system, and mediates a multitude of beneficial actions within cardiovascular tissues. The metallopeptidase neprilysin (NEP) hydrolyzes natriuretic peptides. Conceptually, NEP inhibition would increase salutary natriuretic peptide actions in CVD. However, stand-alone NEP inhibitors (NEPi) lacked efficacy beyond standard pharmacotherapy. Combined blockers of NEP and the endothelin system demonstrated efficacy in preclinical studies but have not been evaluated in clinical trials. A decade ago, omapatrilat and other dual-acting NEPi-ACEi (vasopeptidase-inhibitors) were promising agents for hypertension and heart failure. Despite greater efficacy, development of vasopeptidase-inhibitors was halted due to significant off-target effects in some cohorts, most notably increased frequency of angioedema in hypertensive subjects. Novel angiotensin-receptor-neprilysin-inhibitors (ARNi) seek to fully exploit clinical efficacy of combined RAAS-blockade and NEPi-mediated natriuretic peptide augmentation, and hopefully do so with improved clinical safety. We herein review current knowledge of NEPi as stand-alone and combined pharmacotherapeutic agents in hypertension and heart

  6. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  7. Delving into Egocentric Actions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Ye, Zhefan; Rehg, James M.

    2016-01-01

    We address the challenging problem of recognizing the camera wearer's actions from videos captured by an egocentric camera. Egocentric videos encode a rich set of signals regarding the camera wearer, including head movement, hand pose and gaze information. We propose to utilize these mid-level egocentric cues for egocentric action recognition. We present a novel set of egocentric features and show how they can be combined with motion and object features. The result is a compact representation with superior performance. In addition, we provide the first systematic evaluation of motion, object and egocentric cues in egocentric action recognition. Our benchmark leads to several surprising findings. These findings uncover the best practices for egocentric actions, with a significant performance boost over all previous state-of-the-art methods on three publicly available datasets. PMID:26973427

  8. Caregiver Action Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Caregiver Action Network Toggle navigation Toolbox Forum Volunteers Donate About Us Join National Family Caregivers ... for caring for a loved one Family Caregiver Forum Share and talk with other caregivers Rare Disease ...

  9. Postpartum Depression Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Postpartum Depression | Postpartum Depression Action Plan Patient __________________________ Physician/NP/PA __________________ Clinic ____________________________ Phone Number ____________________ Choose one area and add other areas as you begin to ...

  10. Affirmative Action's Contradictory Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Madeline E.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses affirmative action's success at creating a more equal workplace. Explores some potential psychological costs of this policy--costs that paradoxically may undermine its objectives--and their implications for achieving the goal of workplace equality. (GR)

  11. Low-carbohydrate diet combined with SGLT2 inhibitor for refractory hyperglycemia caused by insulin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Riyoko; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Abiru, Norio; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A low-carbohydrate diet is effective to improve hyperglycemia via insulin-independent actions. We report here that a low-carbohydrate diet combined with an SGLT2 inhibitor was effective and safe to treat refractory hyperglycemia in the perioperative period in a type 2 diabetes patient complicated with a high titer of insulin antibodies. PMID:27321315

  12. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    PubMed

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand. PMID:12319083

  13. Galileons from Lovelock actions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Acoleyen, Karel; Van Doorsselaere, Jos

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate how, for an arbitrary number of dimensions, the Galileon actions and their covariant generalizations can be obtained through a standard Kaluza-Klein compactification of higher-dimensional Lovelock gravity. In this setup, the dilaton takes on the role of the Galileon. In addition, such compactifications uncover other more general Galilean actions, producing purely second-order equations in the weak-field limit, now both for the Galileon and the metric perturbations.

  14. Action Learning as Invigoration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chivers, Terence S.

    2011-01-01

    The present account of action learning describes its adoption for pragmatic reasons by the University of the Third Age (U3A). The reason for the existence of this movement is the education of retired people. The account seeks to explain why the action learning method spread from one local U3A to another and across it to other local U3As. The case…

  15. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  16. [Addictions and action systems].

    PubMed

    Loonis, E; Apter, M J

    2000-01-01

    Generalizing from some previous analyses of addiction, and introducing the concept of an action system which governs all actions which are focussed on what Brown (1988) calls "hedonic management", we argue that addictions of every kind involve an action system that displays high salience, low variety and low vicariance. Addictions also involve what Apter (1982) calls the "paratelic state". A study was carried out comparing 31 drug addicts with 29 control subjects in terms of action system variables. To measure these variables, we constructed a new instrument, the Activity-System Drawing Test, and also used the Telic Dominance Scale to measure frequency of paratelic states. Dysphoria was measured by means of the BATE (anxiety), IDA-13 (depression), SEI (self-esteem), and TAS-20 (alexithymia) instruments. Strongly significant differences were found between groups for both action system variables and dysphoria, and there were also strong correlations between both groups of variables. This supports the idea that addictions emerge from systemic properties of the action system. PMID:10858918

  17. Chlorophyll a Fluorescence as a Tool in Evaluating the Effects of ABA Content and Ethylene Inhibitors on Quality of Flowering Potted Bougainvillea

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Antonio; Trivellini, Alice; Borghesi, Eva; Vernieri, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Flowering potted plants during the postproduction stage are usually stored in inadequate environmental conditions. We evaluated the effect of the most common storage conditions and treatments on two Bougainvillea cultivars after harvest and during recovery. Flowering potted Bougainvillea plants were treated with 100 mL 2 mM amino-oxyacetic acid (AOA) or 500 ppb 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) prior storage in dark at 14°C for simulating transport or storage conditions and, subsequently, transferred to growth chambers at 20°C in the light for one week for evaluating the recovery ability. The plant stress during the experiments was assessed by ethylene, ABA, and chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements. Ethylene production was affected by temperature rather than treatments. ABA concentration declined in leaves and flowers during storage and was not affected by treatments. Fluorescence parameters appear to be very useful for screening Bougainvillea cultivars resistant to prolonged storage periods. PMID:22272178

  18. Discovery of Dual-Stage Malaria Inhibitors with New Targets.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria J; Gamo-Benito, Francisco Javier; Clardy, Jon; Derbyshire, Emily R

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health problem, with more than half of the world population at risk of contracting the disease and nearly a million deaths each year. Here, we report the discovery of inhibitors that target multiple stages of malaria parasite growth. To identify these inhibitors, we took advantage of the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Compound Set (TCAMS) small-molecule library, which is comprised of diverse and potent chemical scaffolds with activities against the blood stage of the malaria parasite, and investigated their effects against the elusive liver stage of the malaria parasite using a forward chemical screen. From a screen of nearly 14,000 compounds, we identified and confirmed 103 compounds as dual-stage malaria inhibitors. Interestingly, these compounds show preferential inhibition of parasite growth in liver- versus blood-stage malaria parasite assays, highlighting the drug susceptibility of this parasite form. Mode-of-action studies were completed using genetically modified and drug-resistant Plasmodium parasite strains. While we identified some compound targets as classical antimalarial pathways, such as the mitochondrial electron transport chain through cytochrome bc1 complex inhibition or the folate biosynthesis pathway, most compounds induced parasite death through as yet unknown mechanisms of action. Importantly, the identification of new chemotypes with different modes of action in killing Plasmodium parasites represents a promising opportunity for probing essential and novel molecular processes that remain to be discovered. The chemical scaffolds identified with activity against drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites represent starting points for dual-stage antimalarial development to surmount the threat of malaria parasite drug resistance. PMID:26666931

  19. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  20. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  1. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  2. COX-2 inhibitors: a novel strategy in the management of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Regulski, Miłosz; Regulska, Katarzyna; Prukała, Wiesław; Piotrowska, Hanna; Stanisz, Beata; Murias, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are common anti-inflammatory drugs with pleiotropic, endogenous actions that could be useful in the management of breast cancer. Here, we provide a complete understanding of the biochemistry of COX-2 and discuss the various molecular mechanisms behind its increased expression in breast cancer. We also analyze the possible mechanisms responsible for the anticancer effect of COX-2 inhibitors and provide an overview of the available preclinical and clinical data on the use of COX-2 inhibitors in breast cancer. Finally, we describe a mathematical model of the relation between the structure and biological potency of promising new COX-2 inhibitors (trans-stilbenes) using a 2D quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) technique. PMID:26723915

  3. Discovery of a novel class of covalent inhibitor for aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, Mary; Chen, Che-Hong; Kimble-Hill, Ann; Parajuli, Bibek; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Kim, Jeewon; Dria, Karl; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-10-23

    Human aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) comprise a family of 17 homologous enzymes that metabolize different biogenic and exogenic aldehydes. To date, there are relatively few general ALDH inhibitors that can be used to probe the contribution of this class of enzymes to particular metabolic pathways. Here, we report the discovery of a general class of ALDH inhibitors with a common mechanism of action. The combined data from kinetic studies, mass spectrometric measurements, and crystallographic analyses demonstrate that these inhibitors undergo an enzyme-mediated {beta}-elimination reaction generating a vinyl ketone intermediate that covalently modifies the active site cysteine residue present in these enzymes. The studies described here can provide the basis for rational approach to design ALDH isoenzyme-specific inhibitors as research tools and perhaps as drugs, to address diseases such as cancer where increased ALDH activity is associated with a cellular phenotype.

  4. A Cell-Permeable Inhibitor to Trap Gαq Proteins in the Empty Pocket Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M.; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H. Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T. Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be “frozen” pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

  5. Synthesis and Evaluation of Indatraline-Based Inhibitors for Trypanothione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Jeffrey G A; Jones, Deuan C; Kiuru, Paula; Durie, Alastair J; Westwood, Nicholas J; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2011-01-01

    The search for novel compounds of relevance to the treatment of diseases caused by trypanosomatid protozoan parasites continues. Screening of a large library of known bioactive compounds has led to several drug-like starting points for further optimisation. In this study, novel analogues of the monoamine uptake inhibitor indatraline were prepared and assessed both as inhibitors of trypanothione reductase (TryR) and against the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Although it proved difficult to significantly increase the potency of the original compound as an inhibitor of TryR, some insight into the preferred substituent on the amine group and in the two aromatic rings of the parent indatraline was deduced. In addition, detailed mode of action studies indicated that two of the inhibitors exhibit a mixed mode of inhibition. PMID:21275055

  6. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors: Recent Advances and Future Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Clare L.; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promising activity in epithelial ovarian cancers, especially relapsed platinum-sensitive high-grade serous disease. Consistent with preclinical studies, ovarian cancers and a number of other solid tumor types occurring in patients with deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 seem to be particularly sensitive. However, it is also becoming clear that germline BRCA1/2 mutations are neither necessary nor sufficient for patients to derive benefit from PARP inhibitors. We provide an update on PARP inhibitor clinical development, describe recent advances in our understanding of PARP inhibitor mechanism of action, and discuss current issues in the development of these agents. PMID:25779564

  7. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Brozic, P; Lanisnik Risner, T; Gobec, S

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis of hormone-related cancers involves hormone-stimulated cell proliferation, which increases the number of cell divisions and the opportunity for random genetic errors. In target tissues, steroid hormones are interconverted between their potent, high affinity forms for their respective receptors and their inactive, low affinity forms. One group of enzymes responsible for these interconversions are the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, which regulate ligand access to steroid receptors and thus act at a pre-receptor level. As part of this group, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze either oxidation of hydroxyl groups or reduction of keto groups at steroid position C17. The thoroughly characterized 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activates the less active estrone to estradiol, a potent ligand for estrogen receptors. This isoform is expressed in gonads, where it affects circulating levels of estradiol, and in peripheral tissue, where it regulates ligand occupancy of estrogen receptors. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 are thus highly interesting potential therapeutic agents for the control of estrogen-dependent diseases such as endometriosis, as well as breast and ovarian cancers. Here, we present the review on the recent development of inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 published and patented since the previous review of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors of Poirier (Curr. Med. Chem., 2003, 10, 453). These inhibitors are divided into two separate groups according to their chemical structures: steroidal and non-steroidal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors. Their estrogenic/ proliferative activities and selectivities over other 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that are involved in local regulation of estrogen action (types 2, 7 and 12) are also presented. PMID:18220769

  8. Polyoxometalates--potent and selective ecto-nucleotidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yong; Fiene, Amelie; Li, Wenjin; Hanck, Theodor; Brylev, Konstantin A; Fedorov, Vladimir E; Lecka, Joanna; Haider, Ali; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Zimmermann, Herbert; Sévigny, Jean; Kortz, Ulrich; Stephan, Holger; Müller, Christa E

    2015-01-15

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic cluster metal complexes that possess versatile biological activities, including antibacterial, anticancer, antidiabetic, and antiviral effects. Their mechanisms of action at the molecular level are largely unknown. However, it has been suggested that the inhibition of several enzyme families (e.g., phosphatases, protein kinases or ecto-nucleotidases) by POMs may contribute to their pharmacological properties. Ecto-nucleotidases are cell membrane-bound or secreted glycoproteins involved in the hydrolysis of extracellular nucleotides thereby regulating purinergic (and pyrimidinergic) signaling. They comprise four distinct families: ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases), ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatases/phosphodiesterases (NPPs), alkaline phosphatases (APs) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN). In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory potency of a series of polyoxometalates as well as chalcogenide hexarhenium cluster complexes at a broad range of ecto-nucleotidases. [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2](10-) (5, PSB-POM142) was discovered to be the most potent inhibitor of human NTPDase1 described so far (Ki: 3.88 nM). Other investigated POMs selectively inhibited human NPP1, [TiW11CoO40](8-) (4, PSB-POM141, Ki: 1.46 nM) and [NaSb9W21O86](18-) (6, PSB-POM143, Ki: 4.98 nM) representing the most potent and selective human NPP1 inhibitors described to date. [NaP5W30O110](14-) (8, PSB-POM144) strongly inhibited NTPDase1-3 and NPP1 and may therefore be used as a pan-inhibitor to block ATP hydrolysis. The polyoxoanionic compounds displayed a non-competitive mechanism of inhibition of NPPs and eN, but appeared to be competitive inhibitors of TNAP. Future in vivo studies with selected inhibitors identified in the current study are warranted. PMID:25449596

  9. Lipocarbazole, an efficient lipid peroxidation inhibitor anchored in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Gabin; Hänchen, Anne; Calliste, Claude-Alain; Berka, Karel; Banala, Srinivas; Otyepka, Michal; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Trouillas, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major deleterious effect caused by oxidative stress. It is involved in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases. In order to inhibit lipid peroxidation, antioxidants must efficiently scavenge free radicals and penetrate inside biological membranes. Lipocarbazole has recently been shown to be a powerful antioxidant in solution. Here, we show its powerful capacity as lipid peroxidation inhibitor. Its mechanism of action is rationalized based on molecular dynamics simulations on a biomembrane model, quantum calculations and experimental evaluation. The role of the lipocarbazole side chain is particularly highlighted as a critical chemical feature responsible for its antioxidant activity. PMID:26068016

  10. Schistosome serine protease inhibitors: parasite defense or homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Quezada, Landys A.; McKerrow, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Serpins are a structurally conserved family of macromolecular inhibitors found in numerous biological systems. The completion and annotation of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum has enabled the identification by phylogenetic analysis of two major serpin clades. S. mansoni shows a greater multiplicity of serpin genes, perhaps reflecting adaptation to infection of a human host. Putative targets of schistosome serpins can be predicted from the sequence of the reactive center loop (RCL). Schistosome serpins may play important roles in both post-translational regulation of schistosome-derived proteases, as well as parasite defense mechanisms against the action of host proteases. PMID:21670886

  11. Clinical pharmacology of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wu; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Yin-Xue; Duan, Wei; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a class of oral antidiabetic drugs that improve glycaemic control without causing weight gain or increasing hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The eight available DPP-4 inhibitors, including alogliptin, anagliptin, gemigliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin, teneligliptin, and vildagliptin, are small molecules used orally with identical mechanism of action and similar safety profiles in patients with T2DM. DPP-4 inhibitors may be used as monotherapy or in double or triple combination with other oral glucose-lowering agents such as metformin, thiazolidinediones, or sulfonylureas. Although DPP-4 inhibitors have the same mode of action, they differ by some important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that may be clinically relevant in some patients. The main differences between the eight gliptins include: potency, target selectivity, oral bioavailability, elimination half-life, binding to plasma proteins, metabolic pathways, formation of active metabolite(s), main excretion routes, dosage adjustment for renal and liver insufficiency, and potential drug-drug interactions. The off-target inhibition of selective DPP-4 inhibitors is responsible for multiorgan toxicities such as immune dysfunction, impaired healing, and skin reactions. As a drug class, the DPP-4 inhibitors have become accepted in clinical practice due to their excellent tolerability profile, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, a neutral effect on body weight, and once-daily dosing. It is unknown if DPP-4 inhibitors can prevent disease progression. More clinical studies are needed to validate the optimal regimens of DPP-4 inhibitors for the management of T2DM when their potential toxicities are closely monitored. PMID:26173919

  12. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor-induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  13. Trapping of PARP1 and PARP2 by Clinical PARP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Murai, Junko; Huang, Shar-yin N; Das, Benu Brata; Renaud, Amelie; Zhang, Yiping; Doroshow, James H; Ji, Jiuping; Takeda, Shunichi; Pommier, Yves

    2012-11-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of PARP are thought to mediate their antitumor effects as catalytic inhibitors that block repair of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB). However, the mechanism of action of PARP inhibitors with regard to their effects in cancer cells is not fully understood. In this study, we show that PARP inhibitors trap the PARP1 and PARP2 enzymes at damaged DNA. Trapped PARP-DNA complexes were more cytotoxic than unrepaired SSBs caused by PARP inactivation, arguing that PARP inhibitors act in part as poisons that trap PARP enzyme on DNA. Moreover, the potency in trapping PARP differed markedly among inhibitors with niraparib (MK-4827) > olaparib (AZD-2281) > veliparib (ABT-888), a pattern not correlated with the catalytic inhibitory properties for each drug. We also analyzed repair pathways for PARP-DNA complexes using 30 genetically altered avian DT40 cell lines with preestablished deletions in specific DNA repair genes. This analysis revealed that, in addition to homologous recombination, postreplication repair, the Fanconi anemia pathway, polymerase β, and FEN1 are critical for repairing trapped PARP-DNA complexes. In summary, our study provides a new mechanistic foundation for the rational application of PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:23118055

  14. Inhibition of Growth by Combined Treatment with Inhibitors of Lactate Dehydrogenase and either Phenformin or Inhibitors of 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase/Fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Guzman, Yolanda; Desbordes, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells presents a target for chemotherapy. Previous studies have indicated that proliferation of cancer cells can be inhibited by treatment with phenformin and with an inhibitor of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB) namely 3-(3-pyridinyl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (3PO). In the present work, the action of two inhibitors that are effective at lower concentrations than 3PO, namely 1-(3-pyridinyl)-3-(2-quinolinyl)-2-propen-1-one (PQP) and 1-(4-pyridinyl)-3-(2-quinolinyl)-2-propen-1-one (PFK15) were investigated. The inhibitors of lactate dehydrogenase (LDHA) studied in order of half-maximal inhibitory concentrations were methyl 1-hydroxy-6-phenyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxylate (NHI-2) < isosafrole < oxamate. In colonic and bladder cancer cells, additive growth inhibitory effects were seen with the LDHA inhibitors, of which NHI-2 was effective at the lowest concentrations. Growth inhibition was generally greater with PFK15 than with PQP. The increased acidification of the culture medium and glucose uptake caused by phenformin was blocked by combined treatment with PFKFB3 or LDHA inhibitors. The results suggest that combined treatment with phenformin and inhibitors of glycolysis can cause additive inhibition of cell proliferation and may mitigate lactic acidosis caused by phenformin when used as a single agent. PMID:27069123

  15. Antagonism screen for inhibitors of bacterial cell wall biogenesis uncovers an inhibitor of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Maya A.; Czarny, Tomasz L.; Myers, Cullen L.; Worrall, Liam J.; French, Shawn; Conrady, Deborah G.; Wang, Yang; Oldfield, Eric; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Brown, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug combinations are valuable tools for studying biological systems. Although much attention has been given to synergistic interactions in revealing connections between cellular processes, antagonistic interactions can also have tremendous value in elucidating genetic networks and mechanisms of drug action. Here, we exploit the power of antagonism in a high-throughput screen for molecules that suppress the activity of targocil, an inhibitor of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) flippase in Staphylococcus aureus. Well-characterized antagonism within the WTA biosynthetic pathway indicated that early steps would be sensitive to this screen; however, broader interactions with cell wall biogenesis components suggested that it might capture additional targets. A chemical screening effort using this approach identified clomiphene, a widely used fertility drug, as one such compound. Mechanistic characterization revealed the target was the undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of a polyisoprenoid essential for both peptidoglycan and WTA synthesis. The work sheds light on mechanisms contributing to the observed suppressive interactions of clomiphene and in turn reveals aspects of the biology that underlie cell wall synthesis in S. aureus. Further, this effort highlights the utility of antagonistic interactions both in high-throughput screening and in compound mode of action studies. Importantly, clomiphene represents a lead for antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:26283394

  16. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  17. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  18. Pharmacodynamics of TNF-α inhibitors in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Vergou, Theognosia; Moustou, Aikaterini-Evangelia; Sfikakis, Petros P; Antoniou, Christina; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2011-07-01

    Over the last two decades, research developments have revolutionized our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis and of the contribution of several cytokines in the manifestation of the disease. The key role of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been extensively studied and its therapeutic action, initially observed in experimental models, has been clinically translated into therapeutic agents with remarkable efficacy in the treatment of the disease. There are currently two classes of marketed biologic drugs that reduce TNF-α bioavailability and are used clinically in psoriasis: the soluble TNF-α receptor-Fc fusion protein (etanercept) and the anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibodies (adalimumab and infliximab). The present article reviews the pharmacodynamic properties of the three TNF-α inhibitors and discusses possible differences in their mode of action, clinical efficacy and safety profile. PMID:22114860

  19. Effects of sulphydryl inhibitors on frog sartorius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, E. B.; Kuperman, A. S.

    1970-01-01

    1. The characteristic action of the -SH inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), is muscle rigour. The dose-response curve indicates a biphasic effect with maximum rigour tension produced by 1·0 mM NEM; beyond 1·0 mM there was an inverse relationship between dose and response. 2. NEM produces a membrane depolarization unrelated to rigour development. 3. NEM causes a sustained increase in 45Ca efflux from whole muscle. Pretreatment of a muscle with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA, 5 mM) to remove membrane calcium does not alter the NEM induced 45Ca efflux. 4. It is suggested that the primary site of NEM action is inhibition of calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum thereby producing rigour. At concentrations above 1·0 mM, NEM may affect the myofilaments. PMID:4992958

  20. γ-Secretase inhibitors and modulators.

    PubMed

    Golde, Todd E; Koo, Edward H; Felsenstein, Kevin M; Osborne, Barbara A; Miele, Lucio

    2013-12-01

    γ-Secretase is a fascinating, multi-subunit, intramembrane cleaving protease that is now being considered as a therapeutic target for a number of diseases. Potent, orally bioavailable γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) have been developed and tested in humans with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Preclinical studies also suggest the therapeutic potential for GSIs in other disease conditions. However, due to inherent mechanism based-toxicity of non-selective inhibition of γ-secretase, clinical development of GSIs will require empirical testing with careful evaluation of benefit versus risk. In addition to GSIs, compounds referred to as γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) remain in development as AD therapeutics. GSMs do not inhibit γ-secretase, but modulate γ-secretase processivity and thereby shift the profile of the secreted amyloid β peptides (Aβ) peptides produced. Although GSMs are thought to have an inherently safe mechanism of action, their effects on substrates other than the amyloid β protein precursor (APP) have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we will review the current state of development of GSIs and GSMs and explore pertinent biological and pharmacological questions pertaining to the use of these agents for select indications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. PMID:23791707

  1. Probing translation using small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The translational apparatus of the bacterial cell remains one of the principal targets of antibiotics for the clinical treatment of infection worldwide. Since the introduction of specific translation inhibitors into clinical practise in the late 1940’s, intense efforts have been made to understand their precise mechanisms of action. Such research has often revealed significant and sometimes unexpected insights into many fundamental aspects of the translation mechanism. Central to progress in this area, high-resolution crystal structures of the bacterial ribosome identifying the sites of antibiotic binding are now available, which, together with recent developments in single-molecule and fast-kinetic approaches, provide an integrated view of the dynamic translation process. Assays employing these approaches and focusing on specific steps of the overall translation process are amenable for drug-screening. Such assays, coupled with structural studies, have the potential not only to accelerate the discovery of novel and effective antimicrobial agents, but also to refine our understanding of the translation mechanism, since antibiotics often stabilize specific functional states of the ribosome and allow distinct translation steps to be dissected in molecular detail. PMID:20609413

  2. Ceruloplasmin Is an Endogenous Inhibitor of Myeloperoxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Anna L. P.; Mocatta, Tessa J.; Shiva, Sruti; Seidel, Antonia; Chen, Brian; Khalilova, Irada; Paumann-Page, Martina E.; Jameson, Guy N. L.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Kettle, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that promotes oxidative stress in numerous inflammatory pathologies. It uses hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the production of strong oxidants including chlorine bleach and free radicals. A physiological defense against the inappropriate action of this enzyme has yet to be identified. We found that myeloperoxidase oxidized 75% of the ascorbate in plasma from ceruloplasmin knock-out mice, but there was no significant loss in plasma from wild type animals. When myeloperoxidase was added to human plasma it became bound to other proteins and was reversibly inhibited. Ceruloplasmin was the predominant protein associated with myeloperoxidase. When the purified proteins were mixed, they became strongly but reversibly associated. Ceruloplasmin was a potent inhibitor of purified myeloperoxidase, inhibiting production of hypochlorous acid by 50% at 25 nm. Ceruloplasmin rapidly reduced Compound I, the FeV redox intermediate of myeloperoxidase, to Compound II, which has FeIV in its heme prosthetic groups. It also prevented the fast reduction of Compound II by tyrosine. In the presence of chloride and hydrogen peroxide, ceruloplasmin converted myeloperoxidase to Compound II and slowed its conversion back to the ferric enzyme. Collectively, our results indicate that ceruloplasmin inhibits myeloperoxidase by reducing Compound I and then trapping the enzyme as inactive Compound II. We propose that ceruloplasmin should provide a protective shield against inadvertent oxidant production by myeloperoxidase during inflammation. PMID:23306200

  3. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  4. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  5. Learning to take actions

    SciTech Connect

    Khardon, R.

    1996-12-31

    We formalize a model for supervised learning of action strategies in dynamic stochastic domains, and show that pac-learning results on Occam algorithms hold in this model as well. We then identify a particularly useful bias for action strategies based on production rule systems. We show that a subset of production rule systems, including rules in predicate calculus style, small hidden state, and unobserved support predicates, is properly learnable. The bias we introduce enables the learning algorithm to invent the recursive support predicates which are used in the action strategy, and to reconstruct the internal state of the strategy. It is also shown that hierarchical strategies are learnable if a helpful teacher is available, but that otherwise the problem is computationally hard.

  6. Improving Learning and Teaching through Action Learning and Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skeriit, Ortrun

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical framework for action learning and action research is presented, as a basis for better understanding college instruction and learning. Action research is viewed as a philosophy, theory of learning, research methodology, and teaching technique. It is argued that action research both increases knowledge and improves teaching.…

  7. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro, Joycellane Alline; Serquiz, Alexandre Coellho; dos Santos Silva, Priscila Fabíola; Barbosa, Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros; Sampaio, Tarcísio Bruno Montenegro; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; Machado, Richele Janaina Araújo; Maciel, Bruna Leal Lima; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; dos Santos, Elizeu Antunes; de Araújo Morais, Ana Heloneida

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30–60%) following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated. PMID:25789523

  8. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  9. Patient preference and satisfaction in erectile dysfunction therapy: a comparison of the three phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Amr Abdel; Kell, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a problem that may affect up to 52% of men between the ages of 40 and 70. It can be distressing because of its negative effect on self-esteem, quality of life, and interpersonal relationships. Oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5 inhibitors) are now the first choice of treatment in ED. The availability of three (sildenafil citrate, tadalafil, and vardenafil) well tolerated and effective oral PDE5 inhibitors gives treatment options for men with ED. Although the mechanism of action is the same for the three drugs, they differ in their pharmacokinetics. Several preference studies were conducted between the three PDE5 inhibitors but they were not free from bias. Because of the lack of overwhelming reliable data showing that one PDE5 inhibitor is superior to another, current opinion is that the individual patient should have the opportunity to test all three drugs and then select the one that best suits him and his partner. PMID:19936151

  10. Interpreting the behavior of concentration-response curves of hyaluronidase inhibitors under DMSO-perturbed assay conditions.

    PubMed

    Tomohara, Keisuke; Ito, Tomohiro; Onikata, Saika; Furusawa, Kota; Kato, Atsushi; Adachi, Isao

    2016-07-01

    Hyaluronan-degrading enzyme (hyaluronidase) is involved in tumor growth and inflammation, and as such, hyaluronidase inhibitors have received recent attention as potential therapeutics. The previous studies have successfully discovered a wide range of inhibitors, but unfortunately most of them are dissimilar to original ligand hyaluronan and the mode of action is poorly understood. The present study mechanistically characterized these structurally unrelated inhibitors by interpreting the behavior of concentration-response curves under several in vitro assay conditions. Detergent-addition conditions definitely identified aggregation-based inhibitors. Subsequently, DMSO-perturbed conditions, though preliminary, highlighted the inhibitors that might bind to enzyme non-specifically. Here, an intriguing implication of the latter description is that DMSO-perturbed conditions would generate non-productive but not-denatured enzyme that is an assembly of effective species to capture non-specific binding molecules, and thereby would attenuate their inhibitory activities. PMID:27165854

  11. Drug development from the bench to the pharmacy: with special reference to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor development.

    PubMed

    Carr, R D

    2016-06-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor concept is an example of prospective drug design and development based upon a distinct endocrine hypothesis. The design of enzyme inhibitors is a pragmatic approach to drug design; being compatible with the identification and optimization of small molecules that have properties commensurate with oral administration, as well as acceptable drug metabolism, distribution and elimination characteristics. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a hormone with a spectrum of favourable metabolic actions, including glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin and inhibition of glucagon secretion, provided the endocrine basis from which the idea of using DPP-4 inhibitors as anti-diabetic agents was developed. The origin of the DPP-4 inhibitor concept was inspired by the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor approach, which succeeded in establishing a class of extensively used therapeutic agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26773271

  12. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  13. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  14. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  15. Antiviral Activity of Broad-Spectrum and Enterovirus-Specific Inhibitors against Clinical Isolates of Enterovirus D68.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Meijer, Adam; Froeyen, Mathy; Zhang, Linlin; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Baggen, Jim; George, Shyla; Vernachio, John; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Leyssen, Pieter; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the susceptibility of 10 enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) isolates (belonging to clusters A, B, and C) to (entero)virus inhibitors with different mechanisms of action. The 3C-protease inhibitors proved to be more efficient than enviroxime and pleconaril, which in turn were more effective than vapendavir and pirodavir. Favipiravir proved to be a weak inhibitor. Resistance to pleconaril maps to V69A in the VP1 protein, and resistance to rupintrivir maps to V104I in the 3C protease. A structural explanation of why both substitutions may cause resistance is provided. PMID:26369972

  16. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  17. Bromodomains and their pharmacological inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gallenkamp, Daniel; Gelato, Kathy A; Haendler, Bernard; Weinmann, Hilmar

    2014-03-01

    Over 60 bromodomains belonging to proteins with very different functions have been identified in humans. Several of them interact with acetylated lysine residues, leading to the recruitment and stabilization of protein complexes. The bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) proteins contain tandem bromodomains which bind to acetylated histones and are thereby implicated in a number of DNA-centered processes, including the regulation of gene expression. The recent identification of inhibitors of BET and non-BET bromodomains is one of the few examples in which effective blockade of a protein-protein interaction can be achieved with a small molecule. This has led to major strides in the understanding of the function of bromodomain-containing proteins and their involvement in diseases such as cancer and inflammation. Indeed, BET bromodomain inhibitors are now being clinically evaluated for the treatment of hematological tumors and have also been tested in clinical trials for the relatively rare BRD-NUT midline carcinoma. This review gives an overview of the newest developments in the field, with a focus on the biology of selected bromodomain proteins on the one hand, and on reported pharmacological inhibitors on the other, including recent examples from the patent literature. PMID:24497428

  18. Jump into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Cohen, Ann; Meyer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Jump Into Action (JIA) is a school-based team-taught program to help fifth-grade students make healthy food choices and be more active. The JIA team (physical education teacher, classroom teacher, school nurse, and parent) work together to provide a supportive environment as students set goals to improve food choices and increase activity.…

  19. Conclusions and Federal actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Findings regarding fluorocarbon production, the roles of ozone and fluorocarbons in atmospheric chemistry, the depletion of stratospheric ozone by fluorocarbons, and various effects of this depletion are outlined. Research into these areas is described and recommendations are given for governmental action to reduce the release of fluorocarbons to the environment.

  20. The Constitution in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the experiences middle school students on a field trip to the new Constitution in Action Learning Lab in the Boeing Learning Center at the National Archives can expect. There, middle school students take on the roles of archivists and researchers collecting and analyzing primary sources from the holdings of…

  1. Cognitive framing in action.

    PubMed

    Huhn, John M; Potts, Cory Adam; Rosenbaum, David A

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive framing effects have been widely reported in higher-level decision-making and have been ascribed to rules of thumb for quick thinking. No such demonstrations have been reported for physical action, as far as we know, but they would be expected if cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. To test for such effects, we asked participants to reach for a horizontally-oriented pipe to move it from one height to another while turning the pipe 180° to bring one end (the "business end") to a target on the left or right. From a physical perspective, participants could have always rotated the pipe in the same angular direction no matter which end was the business end; a given participant could have always turned the pipe clockwise or counter-clockwise. Instead, our participants turned the business end counter-clockwise for left targets and clockwise for right targets. Thus, the way the identical physical task was framed altered the way it was performed. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. A tantalizing possibility is that higher-level decision heuristics have roots in the control of physical action, a hypothesis that accords with embodied views of cognition. PMID:26970853

  2. Nutrition Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockut, Joanne; Stumpe, Stephanie

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these instructional materials integrate elementary school-level nutrition education into other disciplines--biology, sociology, physiology, mathematics, and art. Contents include four units consisting of twelve activities. Unit 1, Why You Need Food, is a self-examination of what is needed for growth, health,…

  3. SYRACUSE ACTION FOR YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADDINGTON, HAROLD E.; AND OTHERS

    A PROPOSAL WAS MADE TO PREVENT AND CONTROL JUVENILE DELINQUENCY BY OPENING OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPING COMPETENCE AMONG DISADVANTAGED YOUTH. THE TOTAL COMMUNITY WAS MOBILIZED TO DEVELOP A PROGRAM TO ATTACK THE PROBLEM AT ALL LEVELS THEY WORKED FOR 18 MONTHS TO PLAN A SERIES OF CREATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND COMMUNITY…

  4. Affirmative Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    In order to develop an affirmative action plan at Triton College, the college President appointed a committee made up of nine representatives from the various college constituencies, the majority of which were women and minorities, to determine the objectives to be achieved and how to implement them, and to establish appropriate review procedures.…

  5. Justifying Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helskog, Guro Hansen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I use a general philosophy of science perspective in looking at the problem of justifying action research. First I try to clarify the concept of justification, by contrasting it with the concept of validity, which seems to be used almost as a synonym in some parts of the literature. I discuss the need for taking a stand in relation…

  6. Hope for Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischer, Barbara J.; DeMoor, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Environmental consciousness-raising programs tend to emphasize the magnitude of imminent ecological disasters, if humans continue on their current trajectory. While these environmental literacy programs also call for action to avoid cataclysmic ecological changes, psychological research on "learned helplessness" suggests that information…

  7. Community Action Curriculum Compendium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Karen

    This compendium contains descriptions of 59 community action projects that receive academic credit from 48 colleges and universities. Brief descriptions are given of the diverse institutions offering such field work for credit, including information on enrollment and type (i.e., public, private, etc.). Although the characteristics of the programs…

  8. School Reform in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, A. Christine

    This study describes and analyzes the impact on student learning and the learning environment of 55 schools in Broward, Palm Beach, and Miami-Dade school districts as they implemented the schoolwide action-research framework for school improvement. Interviews, observations, document review during site visits, school framework reports, surveys,…

  9. Action Learning Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on adult learning issues and human resource development (HRD). "Creating a Systemic Framework for the Transfer of Learning from an Action Learning Experience" (Suzanne D. Butterfield, Kitty Gold, Verna J. Willis) discusses a study of the organizational elements that affect learning and transfer…

  10. Early Childhood Action Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Nina Sazer

    In response to requests for information from people and organizations all over the United States on how to contribute to the healthy development of young children, the Families and Work Institute has gathered concrete suggestions from leaders in diverse fields into this booklet of action tips. This effort was undertaken to support the "I Am Your…

  11. Quick action clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calco, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A quick release toggle clamp that utilizes a spring that requires a deliberate positive action for disengagement is presented. The clamp has a sliding bolt that provides a latching mechanism. The bolt is moved by a handle that tends to remain in an engaged position while under tension.

  12. Court Action for Migrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewald, Thomas R.

    Aiding attorneys who represent migrant farmworkers and their families when affirmative civil action is required, this book helps to raise the level of migrants' legal protection to a minimum standard of adequacy. The text is based on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, a national set of rules. The book is divided into 3 sections: the…

  13. From Awareness to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklos, John, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    What inspires young people to become activists? Events such as wars or regime changes obviously raise high emotions. But some choose to get involved because they saw a need and felt compelled to take action. Young Americans have a long track record as activists. Among other things, they played a key role in the civil rights movement of the 1950s…

  14. ACTION. Annual Report 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1978. The introduction notes a continued growth in programs and comments on new developments. Older American Volunteer Programs are discussed in the next section, specifically the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, Foster Grandparent Program, and…

  15. The Shape of Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, Bridgette Martin; Recchia, Gabriel; Tversky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How do people understand the everyday, yet intricate, behaviors that unfold around them? In the present research, we explored this by presenting viewers with self-paced slideshows of everyday activities and recording looking times, subjective segmentation (breakpoints) into action units, and slide-to-slide physical change. A detailed comparison of…

  16. Affirmative Action for Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malveaux, Julianne

    2005-01-01

    If colleges are willing to consider "social engineering" and affirmative action to ensure the inclusion of White men, are they willing to do so for African Americans and other people of color? Will the Center for Individual Rights ride to the rescue of the White women who may be unfairly nudged out of positions for which they are "qualified" in…

  17. Instructional Rounds in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, John E.

    2012-01-01

    "Instructional Rounds in Action" is an invaluable guide for those involved in implementing instructional rounds as the foundation and framework for systemic improvement in schools. Over the past few years, districts across the United States, Canada, and Australia have begun implementing "instructional rounds," a set of ideas and practices for…

  18. Action for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranly, Donald P.

    The origins, development, and effectiveness of Action for Children's Television (ACT) are examined in this pamphlet. The strategies used by ACT to obtain change at the congressional level and within television stations and networks include the following: a "tuneout" day when people are urged to turn off their television sets, a boycott of certain…

  19. From Intuition to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of principals intuitively believe that the arts belong in schools and in every child's life. Now is the time to take action on your intuition--and become an instructional leader for the arts, just as you are for every core subject. Arts-engaged principals share strategies for becoming instructional leaders for the arts.

  20. Action Research in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Action research places a powerful tool for school improvement in the hands of teachers. By highlighting the outcomes that are possible and presenting clear steps in the research process, this book is one to encourage anyone who is seeking to implement evidence-based school improvement. Eileen Piggot-Irvine uses her Problem Resolving Action…

  1. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  2. College Comedy and Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rosanna

    1977-01-01

    A few materials such as yarn and scraps of paper and cloth can provide the media for recording limitless ideas from the imaginations of students. With a little encouragement and a few suggestions of actions, emotions, exaggerations and activities students will produce a vast array of amusing characters. (Author)

  3. Promoting Environmental Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowyer, John

    1994-01-01

    Outlines a lesson on the extinction process allowing students to better understand why and how species become endangered before they attempt to take action on this problem. Provides background information and describes several suggested methodologies, evaluation and enrichment ideas, six resources, and two references. (LZ)

  4. Literacy Education Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clymer, Carol

    The Literacy Education Action (LEA) program was established in the fall of 1985 under the initiative of the president of the El Paso Community College (Texas). During 1985 and 1986, LEA concentrated on developing its own literacy tutoring program, including recruiting and training volunteers and community members with reading skills below the…

  5. Angels in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of the placement of action lines to show the direction of movement. The author shows some visuals of angels and discusses in details the texture of the wings, the hair and the clothing.

  6. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  7. Sustainability as Moral Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Merrily S.; Hart-Steffes, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    When one considers sustainability as a moral action, there are equally complex realities at hand--climate change, resource depletion, water and land rights. One author describes this broad sense of sustainability as "the connection of specific social and environmental problems to the functioning of human and ecological systems" (Jenkins, 2011).…

  8. Affirmative Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    As mandated by law, this 1983 revision describes the Oklahoma State Department of Education's Affirmative Action Plan and analyzes the employment patterns of the department's work force for that year in light of equal employment opportunity goals. Following a brief policy statement, the development, dissemination, and implementation of the plan…

  9. Conjugate flow action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  10. Enhancing CHK1 inhibitor lethality in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine whether inhibitors of MEK1/2 or SRC signaling, respectively, enhance CHK1 inhibitor lethality in primary human glioblastoma cells. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (CI-1040 (PD184352); AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01, AZD7762) to kill multiple primary human glioma cell isolates that have a diverse set of genetic alterations typically found in the disease. Inhibition of SRC family proteins also enhanced CHK1 inhibitor lethality. Combined treatment of glioma cells with (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitors enhanced radiosensitivity. Combined (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitor treatment led to dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6 ribosomal protein, whereas the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased. MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated cell death was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspases 3 and 7 as well as the caspase substrate (PARP). We also observed activation of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector proteins BAK and BAX and reduced levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family protein BCL-XL. Overexpression of BCL-XL alleviated but did not completely abolish MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor cytotoxicity in GBM cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-MEK pathway have the potential to interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill glioma cells. PMID:22313687

  11. The burden of inhibitors in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Auerswald, Guenter; Grancha, Salvador

    2016-08-31

    The burden of disease in haemophilia patients has wide ranging implications for the family and to society. There is evidence that having a current inhibitor increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Morbidity is increased by the inability to treat adequately and its consequent disabilities, which then equates to a poor quality of life compared with non-inhibitor patients. The societal cost of care, or `burden of inhibitors', increases with the ongoing presence of an inhibitor. Therefore, it is clear that successful eradication of inhibitors by immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the single most important milestone one can achieve in an inhibitor patient. The type of factor VIII (FVIII) product used in ITI regimens varies worldwide. Despite ongoing debate, there is in vitro and retrospective clinical evidence to support the use of plasma-derived VWF-containing FVIII concentrates in ITI regimens in order to achieve early and high inhibitor eradication success rates. PMID:27528280

  12. NF-κB Inhibitors from Eurycoma longifolia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The roots of Eurycoma longifolia have been used in many countries of Southeast Asia to alleviate various diseases including malaria, dysentery, sexual insufficiency, and rheumatism. Although numerous studies have reported the pharmacological properties of E. longifolia, the mode of action of the anti-inflammatory activity has not been elucidated. Bioguided isolation of NF-κB inhibitors using an NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter gene assay led to the identification of a new quassinoid, eurycomalide C (1), together with 27 known compounds including 11 quassinoids (2–12), six alkaloids (13–18), two coumarins (19, 20), a squalene derivative (21), a triterpenoid (22), and six phenolic compounds (23–28) from the extract of E. longifolia. Evaluation of the biological activity revealed that C19-type and C20-type quassinoids, β-carboline, and canthin-6-one alkaloids are potent NF-κB inhibitors, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range, while C18-type quassinoids, phenolic compounds, coumarins, the squalene derivative, and the triterpenoid turned out to be inactive when tested at a concentration of 30 μM. Eurycomalactone (2), 14,15β-dihydroklaieanone (7), and 13,21-dehydroeurycomanone (10) were identified as potent NF-κB inhibitors with IC50 values of less than 1 μM. PMID:24467387

  13. Immunomodulatory activity of a chymotrypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Alex Yuen-Kam; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2006-09-01

    Serine protease inhibitors are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Many of them have been purified and characterized from different species. While the physicochemical properties of these protease inhibitors have been extensively investigated, their biological effects, e.g. immunomodulatory effect, remain relatively unexplored. Recently, we isolated a chymotrypsin-specific inhibitor (MCoCI) from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour) Spreng (Family Cucurbitaceae), the traditional Chinese medicine known as Mubiezhi, which has been used as an antiinflammatory agent. In the present study, the effects of MCoCI on different types of cells of the immune system, including splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes, neutrophils, bone marrow cells and macrophages, were investigated. MCoCI was shown to possess immuno-enhancing and antiinflammatory effects. MCoCI could stimulate the proliferation of different cells of the immune system, e.g. splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes and bone marrow cells, in a manner comparable to that of Concanavalin A. Moreover, MCoCI could also suppress the formation of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils and macrophages. These immunomodulatory effects may explain some of the therapeutic actions of Mubiezhi. PMID:16733830

  14. Discovery of novel inhibitors for the treatment of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cholkar, Kishore; Trinh, Hoang M.; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease with heterogeneous causes that result in retinal ganglionic cell death (RGC). The discovery of ocular anti-hypertensives has shifted glaucoma therapy, largely, from surgery to medical intervention. Indeed, several intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering drugs, with different mechanisms of action and RGC protective property, have been developed. Areas covered In this review, the authors discuss the main new class of kinase inhibitors used as glaucoma treatments, which lower IOP by enhancing drainage and/or lowering production of aqueous humor. The authors include novel inhibitors under preclinical evaluation and investigation for their anti-glaucoma treatment. Additionally, the authors look at treatments that are in clinics now and which may be available in the near future. Expert opinion Treatment of glaucoma remains challenging because the exact cause is yet to be delineated. Neuroprotection to the optic nerve head is undisputable. The novel ROCK inhibitors have the capacity to lower IOP and provide optic nerve and RGC protection. In particular, the S-isomer of roscovitine has the capacity to lower IOP and provide neuroprotection. Combinations of selected drugs, which can provide maximal and sustained IOP lowering effects as well as neuroprotection, are paramount to the prevention of glaucoma progression. In the near future, microRNA intervention may be considered as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25575654

  15. SGLT2 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Monica Reddy, R P; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-08-01

    The glucose-lowering pharmacopeia continues to grow for patients with type 2 diabetes. The latest drug category, the SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin concentrations by increasing urinary excretion of glucose. They are used mainly in combination with metformin and other antihyperglycemic agents, including insulin. Their glucose-lowering potency is modest. Advantages include lack of hypoglycemia as a side effect, and mild reduction in blood pressure and body weight. Side effects include increased urinary frequency, owing to their mild diuretic action, symptoms of hypovolemia, genitourinary infections. There are also recent reports of rare cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occurring in insulin-treated patients. Recently, a large cardiovascular outcome trial reported that a specific SGLT2 inhibitor, empagliflozin, led to a reduction in the primary endpoint of major cardiovascular events. This effect was mainly the result of a surprising 38 % reduction in cardiovascular death, and the drug was also associated with nearly as large a reduction in heart failure hospitalization. These findings were notable because most drugs used in type 2 diabetes have not been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, there is growing interest in empagliflozin and the entire SGLT2 inhibitor class as drugs that could potentially change the manner in which we approach the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27270407

  16. Acridone alkaloids as potent inhibitors of cathepsin V.

    PubMed

    Severino, Richele P; Guido, Rafael V C; Marques, Emerson F; Brömme, Dieter; da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Fernandes, João B; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Vieira, Paulo C

    2011-02-15

    Cathepsin V is a lysosomal cysteine peptidase highly expressed in thymus, testis and corneal epithelium. Eleven acridone alkaloids were isolated from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr. (Rutaceae), with eight of them being identified as potent and reversible inhibitors of cathepsin V (IC(50) values ranging from 1.2 to 3.9 μM). Detailed mechanistic characterization of the effects of these compounds on the cathepsin V-catalyzed reaction showed clear competitive inhibition with respect to substrate, with dissociation constants (K(i)) in the low micromolar range (2, K(i)=1.2 μM; 6, K(i)=1.0 μM; 7, K(i)=0.2 μM; and 11, K(i)=1.7 μM). Molecular modeling studies provided important insight into the structural basis for binding affinity and enzyme inhibition. Experimental and computational approaches, including biological evaluation, mode of action assessment and modeling studies were successfully employed in the discovery of a small series of acridone alkaloid derivatives as competitive inhibitors of catV. The most potent inhibitor (7) has a K(i) value of 200 nM. PMID:21277783

  17. EFFECT OF ANTIBIOTICS AND INHIBITORS ON M PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Thomas D.

    1963-01-01

    Brock, Thomas D. (Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio). Effect of antibiotics and inhibitors on M protein synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 85:527–531. 1963.—This work extends the observations of Fox and Krampitz on M protein synthesis in nongrowing cells of streptococci. A survey of a large number of antibiotics and other potential inhibitors was made. Some substances bring about inhibition of fermentation and inhibit M protein synthesis because they deprive the cell of the energy needed for this process. A second group of substances inhibit growth at concentrations tenfold or more lower than they inhibit M protein synthesis. These are the antibiotics which inhibit synthesis of cell wall or other structures in growing cells, but do not affect protein synthesis. A third group of substances inhibit growth and M protein synthesis at the same concentration. These substances probably inhibit growth because they inhibit general protein synthesis, and are therefore specific inhibitors of protein synthesis. In this class are chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and the tetracyclines. Several other antibiotics of previously unknown mode of action are in this class. A fourth group of substances had no effect on M protein synthesis. No substances were found which inhibited M protein synthesis at a lower concentration than that which inhibited growth. M protein synthesis in nongrowing cells may be a useful model system for obtaining a detailed understanding of protein synthesis. PMID:14042928

  18. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively. PMID:26047999

  19. Some effects of uncouplers and inhibitors on growth and electron transport in rumen bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, K A; Preziosi, M C; Caldwell, D R

    1979-01-01

    Uncouplers and inhibitors of electron transport affected growth and electron transport of rumen bacteria in various ways. Selenomonas ruminantium was not affected by inhibitor and uncoupler concentrations which affected growth and electron transport of Bacteroides ruminicola, B. succinogenes, and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. Inhibitors, when active, led to accumulation of reduced electron carriers before the site of action, but differences were found among organisms in the site of action of these inhibitors. Uncouplers reduced the glucose molar growth yields (Ygluc) of B. ruminicola, B. succinogenes, and B. fibrisolvens compared with those obtained without uncouplers. The extent of Ygluc reduction accompanying inhibitor exposure reflected electron transport chain structure. S. ruminantium appeared to obtain its adenosine 5'-triphosphate from substrate-level processes only. The other organisms studied appeared to obtain adenosine 5'-triphosphate both from substrate-level processes and from electron transport but differed in the amount of adenosine 5'-triphosphate obtained from glucose catabolism and in the proportions of adenosine 5'-triphosphate obtained from substrate-level reactions and electron transport. PMID:457609

  20. Molecular orbital studies on the structure-activity relationships of catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Y

    1992-02-01

    Quantum chemical studies were applied to analyze the activities of catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors. Molecular orbital calculations of inhibitor molecules were made by semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations, CNDO/2 (complete neglect of differential overlap) methods. Regression analysis among theoretical reaction indices based on the frontier electron theory and COMT inhibitory activities were carried out. The COMT inhibitory actions of two series of inhibitors, a series of 1,5-substituted 3,4-dihydroxy benzenes and a series of substituted 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy benzenes, were investigated. The resulting regression equations contain two common reaction indices as regression variables: the electron density on the oxygen atom of the hydroxyl group and the super-delocalizability on the 5th carbon atom of the benzene ring. These two atomic positions are considered to play an important role in the interaction of these inhibitors with COMT. The hydroxyl of atomic position 3 is probably indispensable to the COMT inhibitory action by these inhibitors. PMID:1507526

  1. Dopamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease: A Review of Nonhuman Primate Studies and Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    Striatal dopamine deficiency is the core feature of the pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD), and dopamine replacement with l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) is the mainstay of PD treatment. Unfortunately, chronic l-DOPA administration is marred by the emergence of dyskinesia and wearing-off. Alternatives to l-DOPA for alleviation of parkinsonism are of interest, although none can match the efficacy of l-DOPA to date. Catechol-O-methyltransferase and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are currently used to alleviate wearing-off, but they do not increase "on-time" without exacerbating dyskinesia. Alternate approaches to dopamine replacement in parkinsonism generally (and to wearing-off and dyskinesia, specifically) are therefore urgently needed. Inasmuch as they increase synaptic dopamine levels, dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitors, whether they are selective or have actions on noradrenaline or serotonin transporters, theoretically represent an attractive way to alleviate parkinsonism per se and potentially enhance l-DOPA antiparkinsonian action (provided that sufficient dopamine terminals remain within the striatum). Several nonhuman primate studies and clinical trials have been performed to evaluate the potential of DAT inhibitors for PD. In this article, we review nonhuman primate studies and clinical trials, we summarize the current knowledge of DAT inhibitors in PD, and we propose a hypothesis as to how tailoring the selectivity of DAT inhibitors might maximize the benefits of DAT inhibition in PD. PMID:27190169

  2. Isoflavonoids and chronic disease: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S; Boersma, B; Patel, R; Kirk, M; Darley-Usmar, V M; Kim, H; Xu, J

    2000-01-01

    Soy and its isoflavones are associated with a reduced risk of chronic disease. The mechanisms of action of isoflavones include their roles as weak estrogens, inhibitors of tyrosine kinase-dependent signal transduction processes and as cellular antioxidants. Although estrogen receptor beta binds genistein with an affinity close to that of 17beta-estradiol, it remains to be determined whether it is a mediator of genistein's activity in vivo. Genistein's inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases is not limited to direct effect on these kinases, but may result from alteration in kinase expression. Genistein is not a particularly good scavanger of cellular oxidants; however, it reacts vigorously with the prooxidant hypochlorous acid, produced by neutrophils as part of the inflammatory response. The chlorinated isoflavones may have altered biochemical and biological effects compared to their parent compounds and may provide increased protection against inflammatory disease. PMID:11216488

  3. Prokaryote-derived protein inhibitors of peptidases: a sketchy occurrence and mostly unknown function

    PubMed Central

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Rawlings, Neil D.; Potempa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In metazoan organisms protein inhibitors of peptidases are important factors essential for regulation of proteolytic activity. In vertebrates genes encoding peptidase inhibitors constitute up to 1% of genes reflecting a need for tight and specific control of proteolysis especially in extracellular body fluids. In stark contrast unicellular organisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic consistently contain only few, if any, genes coding for putative peptidase inhibitors. This may seem perplexing in the light of the fact that these organisms produce large numbers of proteases of different catalytic classes with the genes constituting up to 6% of the total gene count with the average being about 3%. Apparently, however, a unicellular life-style is fully compatible with other mechanisms of regulation of proteolysis and does not require protein inhibitors to control their intracellular and extracellular proteolytic activity. So in prokaryotes occurrence of genes encoding different types of peptidase inhibitors is infrequent and often scattered among phylogenetically distinct orders or even phyla of microbiota. Genes encoding proteins homologous to alpha-2-macroglobulin (family I39), serine carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor (family I51), alpha-1-peptidase inhibitor (family I4) and ecotin (family I11) are the most frequently represented in Bacteria. Although several of these gene products were shown to possess inhibitory activity, with an exception of ecotin and staphostatins, the biological function of microbial inhibitors is unclear. In this review we present distribution of protein inhibitors from different families among prokaryotes, describe their mode of action and hypothesize on their role in microbial physiology and interactions with hosts and environment. PMID:20558234

  4. Growth hormone action in hypothyroid infant rats.

    PubMed

    Humbert, J T; Bergad, P L; Masha, O; Stolz, A M; Kaul, S; Berry, S A

    2000-02-01

    In neonatal rats, expression of serine protease inhibitors 2.1 and 2.3 mRNA peaks on d 2 of life and declines shortly thereafter, coinciding with levels of circulating GH. To evaluate the role of GH in this increase and to test the hypothesis that GH is active in perinatal life, we studied GH action in a model of GH deficiency. Maternal/neonatal hypothyroidism with consequent GH deficiency was induced by methimazole administration to pregnant dams. The resultant hypothyroid neonates were treated at d 2 or 7 of age with GH or saline for 1 h before exsanguination. In d-7 neonates, but not at d 2, GH administration resulted in significant serine protease inhibitors 2.1 and 2.3 mRNA induction. This treatment did not result in increased production of either GH receptor or IGF-I mRNA at either age. There was a slight GH-independent increase in GH receptor and IGF-I mRNA expression by d 7. Electromobility shift assays using hepatic nuclear extracts from these neonates and the GH response element from the serine protease inhibitor 2.1 promoter showed signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) binding in response to GH in extracts from d-7 rats only. Immunoblots of these extracts showed twice as much Stat5 in the nuclei of d-7 treated neonates compared with d-2 treated neonates. We conclude that there is apparent insensitivity to GH treatment in d-2 neonates that remits by d 7 and that this remission correlates with increased abundance of GH receptor and Stat5. PMID:10674355

  5. Holography in action

    SciTech Connect

    Kolekar, Sanved; Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-07-15

    The Einstein-Hilbert action and its natural generalizations to higher dimensions (like the Lanczos-Lovelock action) have certain peculiar features. All of them can be separated into a bulk and a surface term, with a specific (''holographic'') relationship between the two, so that either term can be used to extract information about the other. Further, the surface term leads to entropy of the horizons on shell. It has been argued in the past that these features are impossible to understand in the conventional approach but find a natural explanation if we consider gravity as an emergent phenomenon. We provide further support for this point of view in this paper. We describe an alternative decomposition of the Einstein-Hilbert action and the Lanczos-Lovelock action into a new pair of surface and bulk terms, such that the surface term becomes the Wald entropy on a horizon and the bulk term is the energy density (which is the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian density for Einstein gravity). We show that this new pair also obeys a holographic relationship, and we give a thermodynamic interpretation of this relation in this context. Since the bulk and surface terms, in this decomposition, are related to the energy and entropy, the holographic condition can be thought of as analogous to inverting the expression for entropy given as a function of energy S=S(E,V) to obtain the energy E=E(S,V) in terms of the entropy in a normal thermodynamic system. Thus the holographic nature of the action allows us to relate the descriptions of the same system in terms of two different thermodynamic potentials. Some further possible generalizations and implications are discussed.

  6. Protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation blocks juvenile hormone action.

    PubMed

    Kethidi, Damu R; Li, Yiping; Palli, Subba R

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate a wide variety of developmental and physiological processes in insects. Although the biological actions of JH are well documented, the molecular mechanisms underlying JH action are poorly understood. We studied the molecular basis of JH action using a JH response element (JHRE) identified in the promoter region of JH esterase gene cloned from Choristoneura fumiferana, which is responsive to JH and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). In Drosophila melanogaster L57 cells, the JHRE-regulated reporter gene was induced by JH I, JH III, methoprene, and hydroprene. Nuclear proteins isolated from L57 cells bound to the JHRE and exposure of these proteins to ATP resulted in a reduction in their DNA binding. Either JH III or calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) was able to restore the binding of nuclear proteins to the DNA. In addition, protein kinase C inhibitors increased and protein kinase C activators reduced the binding of nuclear proteins to the JHRE. In transactivation assays, protein kinase C inhibitors induced the luciferase gene placed under the control of a minimal promoter and the JHRE. These data suggest that protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation prevents binding of nuclear proteins to juvenile hormone responsive promoters resulting in suppression of JH action. PMID:16448742

  7. Development of the pan-DAC inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589): successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Atadja, Peter

    2009-08-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging as a highly useful class of anticancer agents that inhibit the enzyme HDAC involved in the deacetylation of histone and non-histone cellular proteins. The HDAC inhibitor, panobinostat (LBH589, Novartis Pharmaceuticals), achieves potent inhibition of all HDAC enzymes implicated in cancer and has demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity in preclinical models and promising clinical efficacy in cancer patients. In this review we discuss the successes and challenges surrounding the development of panobinostat, focusing on its proposed mechanism of action, preclinical anti-tumor activity, and early clinical efficacy in hematologic and solid tumors. PMID:19344997

  8. Xylanase inhibitors bind to nonstarch polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fierens, Ellen; Gebruers, Kurt; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2008-01-23

    This study is an in-depth investigation of the interaction between polysaccharides and the proteinaceous xylanase inhibitors, Triticum aestivum xylanase inhibitor (TAXI), xylanase inhibitor protein (XIP), and thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TLXI). The binding affinities of all three known types of xylanase inhibitors from wheat are studied by measuring the residual xylanase inhibition activity after incubation of the inhibitors in the presence of different polysaccharides, such as beta-glucans and (arabino)xylans. The binding affinities of all three xylanase inhibitors for (arabino)xylans increased with a decreasing arabinose/xylose ratio (A/X ratio). This phenomenon was observed both with water-extractable and water-unextractable (arabino)xylans. The inhibitors also interacted with different soluble and insoluble beta-glucans. None of the inhibitors tested had the ability to hydrolyze the polysaccharides investigated. The present findings contribute to the unraveling of the function of xylanase inhibitors in nature and to the prediction of the effect of added xylanases in cereal-based biotechnological processes, such as bread making and gluten-starch separation. PMID:18092758

  9. Anticancer Inhibitors of Hsp90 Function: Beyond the Usual Suspects.

    PubMed

    Garg, Gaurav; Khandelwal, Anuj; Blagg, Brian S J

    2016-01-01

    The 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone responsible for the stability and function of a wide variety of client proteins that are critical for cell growth and survival. Many of these client proteins are frequently mutated and/or overexpressed in cancer cells and are therefore being actively pursued as individual therapeutic targets. Consequently, Hsp90 inhibition offers a promising strategy for simultaneous degradation of several anticancer targets. Currently, most Hsp90 inhibitors under clinical evaluation act by blocking the binding of ATP to the Hsp90 N-terminal domain and thereby, induce the degradation of many Hsp90-dependent oncoproteins. Although, they have shown some promising initial results, clinical challenges such as induction of the heat-shock response, retinopathy, and gastrointestinal tract toxicity are emerging from human trials, which constantly raise concerns about the future development of these inhibitors. Novobiocin derivatives, which do not bind the chaperone's N-terminal ATPase pocket, have emerged over the past decade as an alternative strategy to inhibit Hsp90, but to date, no derivative has been investigated in the clinical setting. In recent years, a number of natural or synthetic compounds have been identified that modulate Hsp90 function via various mechanisms. These compounds not only offer new chemotypes for the development of future Hsp90 inhibitors but can also serve as chemical probes to unravel the biology of Hsp90. This chapter presents a synopsis of inhibitors that directly, allosterically, or even indirectly alters Hsp90 function, and highlights their proposed mechanisms of action. PMID:26916001

  10. A Metadata Action Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  11. Finding minimal action sequences with a simple evaluation of actions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashvin; Gurney, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Animals are able to discover the minimal number of actions that achieves an outcome (the minimal action sequence). In most accounts of this, actions are associated with a measure of behavior that is higher for actions that lead to the outcome with a shorter action sequence, and learning mechanisms find the actions associated with the highest measure. In this sense, previous accounts focus on more than the simple binary signal of “was the outcome achieved?”; they focus on “how well was the outcome achieved?” However, such mechanisms may not govern all types of behavioral development. In particular, in the process of action discovery (Redgrave and Gurney, 2006), actions are reinforced if they simply lead to a salient outcome because biological reinforcement signals occur too quickly to evaluate the consequences of an action beyond an indication of the outcome's occurrence. Thus, action discovery mechanisms focus on the simple evaluation of “was the outcome achieved?” and not “how well was the outcome achieved?” Notwithstanding this impoverishment of information, can the process of action discovery find the minimal action sequence? We address this question by implementing computational mechanisms, referred to in this paper as no-cost learning rules, in which each action that leads to the outcome is associated with the same measure of behavior. No-cost rules focus on “was the outcome achieved?” and are consistent with action discovery. No-cost rules discover the minimal action sequence in simulated tasks and execute it for a substantial amount of time. Extensive training, however, results in extraneous actions, suggesting that a separate process (which has been proposed in action discovery) must attenuate learning if no-cost rules participate in behavioral development. We describe how no-cost rules develop behavior, what happens when attenuation is disrupted, and relate the new mechanisms to wider computational and biological context. PMID:25506326

  12. Multiple resistance of acetolactate synthase and protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors in Euphorbia heterophylla biotypes.

    PubMed

    Trezzi, Michelangelo M; Felippi, C L; Mattei, D; Silva, H L; Nunes, A L; Debastiani, C; Vidal, R A; Marques, A

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides in Brazil has been documented for six species. The probability to select biotypes of Euphorbia heterophylla (EPPHL) with multiple resistance increases in the same order of magnitude as the use of other herbicides belonging to only one mechanism of action. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the distribution of resistant populations (R) in the states of the Parana and Santa Catarina; to determine the existence of populations of EPHHL with multiple resistance to ALS and PROTOX inhibitors, and to confirm the occurrence of cross resistance to compounds of these mechanisms of action. Seeds of EPHHL of areas with suspected resistance had been sampled in 97 places during 2003. In the greenhouse experiment samples of each population were sprayed with imazethapyr or fomesafen, at only one rate. To identify the resistant ones they were sprayed with different levels of the herbicides imazethapyr and fomesafen. Later they were sprayed with diverse herbicides of the same mechanisms of action to confirm the multiple/cross resistance. There is widespread distribution in the region of populations with resistance to ALS inhibitors. Some biotypes demonstrated resistance to herbicides from the two mechanisms of action. The resistance factor (FR), or the relation of resistance between R and susceptible biotypes, confirms the existence of two biotypes of EPHHL with cross resistance to several herbicides inhibitors of ALS and PROTOX. PMID:15656167

  13. DPP-4 inhibitors in diabetic complications: role of DPP-4 beyond glucose control.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-08-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) are an emerging class of antidiabetic drugs that constitutes approximately fifty percent of the market share of the oral hypoglycemic drugs. Its mechanism of action for lowering blood glucose is essentially via inhibition of the rapid degradation of incretin hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), thus the plasma concentration of GLP-1 increases, which promotes insulin secretion from the pancreatic β cells and suppresses glucagon secretion from the α cells. In addition to the direct actions on the pancreas, GLP-1 exhibits diverse actions on different tissues through its action on GLP-1 receptor, which is expressed ubiquitously. Moreover, DPP-4 has multiple substrates besides GLP-1 and GIP, including cytokines, chemokines, neuropeptides, and growth factors, which are involved in many pathophysiological conditions. Recently, it was suggested that DPP-4 is a new adipokine secreted from the adipose tissue, which plays an important role in the regulation of the endocrine function in obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. Consequently, DPP-4 inhibitors have been reported to exhibit cytoprotective functions against various diabetic complications affecting the liver, heart, kidneys, retina, and neurons. This review outlines the current understanding of the effect of DPP-4 inhibitors on the complications associated with type 2 diabetes, such as liver steatosis and inflammation, dysfunction of the adipose tissue and pancreas, cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, and neuropathy in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:27502601

  14. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  15. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor–induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  16. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    PubMed

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  17. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  18. High-Throughput Screen of Natural Product Libraries for Hsp90 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Jason; Balch, Maurie; Galam, Lakshmi; Girgis, Antwan; Hall, Jessica; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Matts, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 has become the target of intensive investigation, as inhibition of its function has the ability to simultaneously incapacitate proteins that function in pathways that represent the six hallmarks of cancer. While a number of Hsp90 inhibitors have made it into clinical trials, a number of short-comings have been noted, such that the search continues for novel Hsp90 inhibitors with superior pharmacological properties. To identify new potential Hsp90 inhibitors, we have utilized a high-throughput assay based on measuring Hsp90-dependent refolding of thermally denatured luciferase to screen natural compound libraries. Over 4,000 compounds were screen with over 100 hits. Data mining of the literature indicated that 51 compounds had physiological effects that Hsp90 inhibitors also exhibit, and/or the ability to downregulate the expression levels of Hsp90-dependent proteins. Of these 51 compounds, seven were previously characterized as Hsp90 inhibitors. Four compounds, anthothecol, garcinol, piplartine, and rottlerin, were further characterized, and the ability of these compounds to inhibit the refolding of luciferase, and reduce the rate of growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells, correlated with their ability to suppress the Hsp90-dependent maturation of the heme-regulated eIF2α kinase, and deplete cultured cells of Hsp90-dependent client proteins. Thus, this screen has identified an additional 44 compounds with known beneficial pharmacological properties, but with unknown mechanisms of action as possible new inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone machine. PMID:24833337

  19. Dietary HDAC inhibitors: time to rethink weak ligands in cancer chemoprevention?

    PubMed Central

    H.Dashwood, Roderick; C.Myzak, Melinda; Ho, Emily

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in the various mechanisms that regulate chromatin remodeling, including modulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities. Competitive HDAC inhibitors disrupt the cell cycle and/or induce apoptosis via de-repression of genes such as P21 and BAX, and cancer cells appear to be more sensitive than non-transformed cells to trichostatin A and related HDAC inhibitory compounds. This apparent selectivity of action in cancer cells makes HDAC inhibitors an attractive avenue for drug development. However, in the search for potent HDAC inhibitors with cancer therapeutic potential there has been a tendency to overlook or dismiss weak ligands that could prove effective in cancer prevention, including agents present in the human diet. Recent reports have described butyrate, diallyl disulfide and sulforaphane as HDAC inhibitors, and many other dietary agents will be probably discovered to attenuate HDAC activity. Here we discuss ‘pharmacologic’ agents that potently de-repress gene expression (e.g. during therapeutic intervention) versus dietary HDAC inhibitors that, as weak ligands, might subtly regulate the expression of genes involved in cell growth and apoptosis. An important question is the extent to which dietary HDAC inhibitors, and other dietary agents that affect gene expression via chromatin remodeling, modulate the expression of genes such as P21 and BAX so that cells can respond most effectively to external stimuli and toxic insults. PMID:16267097

  20. Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Review of Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Arfaei, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme which mediates the bioconversion of arachidonic acid to inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Their use is associated with the side effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs is produced by the inhibition of COX-2, while the undesired side effects arise from inhibition of COX-1 activity. Thus, it was though that more selective COX-2 inhibitors would have reduced side effects. Based upon a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib, valdecoxibetc.) were developed as safer NSAIDs with improved gastric safety profile. However, the recent market removal of some COXIBs such as rofecoxib due to its adverse cardiovascular side effects clearly encourages the researchers to explore and evaluate alternative templates with COX-2 inhibitory activity. Recognition of new avenues for selective COX-2 inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy and neurological diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases still continues to attract investigations on the development of COX-2 inhibitors. This review highlights the various structural classes of selective COX-2 inhibitors with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24250402