Science.gov

Sample records for action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene

  1. Encapsulation of the ethylene inhibitor 1-Methylcyclopropene by cucurbit[6]uril.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Zhen, Zeng; Jiang, Hong; Li, Xue-Gang; Liu, Jun-An

    2011-10-12

    1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) is an excellent safe and commercially available ethylene antagonist for the preservation of horticultural products. However 1-MCP has to be stored in absorbents due to its gaseous and unstable characteristics. In this paper cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) was used as the absorbent to encapsulate 1-MCP, and the resultant inclusion complex was characterized by IR, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and fluorescent spectra. The effects of encapsulation conditions on the formation of inclusion complex were also investigated. The amount of 1-MCP encapsulated by CB[6] was about 4.5% by weight when the initial concentration of 1-MCP, encapsulation temperature, CB[6] concentration, and encapsulation time were set at 75 mL/L, 20 °C, 30 mM, and 8 h, respectively. Furthermore, the release of 1-MCP from the complex can be realized with different solutions such as sodium bicarbonate, benzoic acid, and distilled water. CB[6] can be used as an excellent absorbent for encapsulation of 1-MCP.

  2. Effect of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene on the postharvest behavior of cape gooseberry fruits (Physalis peruviana L.).

    PubMed

    Balaguera-López, Helber E; Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Herrera, Aníbal O

    2017-01-01

    Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.) fruits are highly perishable berries that exhibit a climacteric respiratory behavior. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethylene and the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene on the postharvest behavior of cape gooseberry fruits (ecotype Colombia). Fruits were treated with ethylene, in an ethephon application (1000 µL L(-1)), and pretreated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1 µL L(-1)), 1-methylcyclopropene+ethylene, and results compared with a control without application. Subsequently, the fruits were maintained at room temperature (20 ℃, 75% RH) for up to 11 days. The pretreatment of the cape gooseberry fruits with 1-methylcyclopropene delayed most of the ripening-associated parameters, with a reduction in the respiration rate and ethylene production, skin color development, total soluble solids, total carotenoid content, loss of firmness, loss of total titratable acidity and emission of volatile compounds such as ethyl octanoate, ethyl butanoate, ethyl decanoate, and hexyl decanoate. Conversely, application of ethephon accelerated most of these physiological changes and also overcame most of the effects prevented by the ethylene action inhibitor. Altogether, the results supported the idea of a climacteric-like behavior for cape gooseberry fruits and pointing out that the pretreatment with 1-methylcyclopropene may be a promising and efficient postharvest treatment to delay maturity and extend the postharvest period.

  3. Antifungal activity of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) in postharvest mango fruit and its possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangbin; Lei, Huanhuan; Ma, Xiuyan; Lai, Tongfei; Song, Hongmiao; Shi, Xuequn; Li, Jiangkuo

    2017-01-16

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is one of the most important postharvest diseases in mango fruit, often causing huge economic losses. In this study, the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose in postharvest mango fruit and the mechanisms involved were investigated. 1-MCP induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, damaged the mitochondria and destroyed the integrity of plasma membrane of spores of C. gloeosporioides, significantly suppressing spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. 1-MCP also decreased the decay incidence and lesion expansion of mango fruit caused by C. gloeosporioides. For the first time this study demonstrated that 1-MCP suppressed anthracnose of postharvest mango fruit by directly inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides, thus providing a promising strategy for disease control.

  4. Metabolic changes in 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-treated ‘Empire’ apple fruit during storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Empire’ apple fruit are more susceptible to flesh browning at 3.3 oC if first treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an inhibitor of ethylene perception. To better understand the metabolic changes associated with this browning, untargeted metabolic profiling with partial least squares analysis...

  5. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene treatment on green asparagus quality during cold storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shaojin; Wu, Zhishuang

    2012-10-01

    Green asparagus was treated with 1-methylcyclopropene at three concentration levels at room temperature for 24 h after harvest to evaluate the postharvest quality during cold storage at 4°C. Comparing with the controls, the loss of vitamin C, decomposition of chlorophyll, and accumulation of the malonydiadehyde under treatments of 1-methylcyclopropene were reduced during storage. The enzyme activities in asparagus including peroxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase were inhibited by 1-methylcyclopropene treatments, while the activity of superoxide dismutase was enhanced. Based on non-significant difference of the treated samples with 6 ìl l-1, 1-methylcyclopropene treatments at 4 ìl l-1 could be selected to maintain postharvest quality of green asparagus and provide long storage life.

  6. Ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene differentially regulate gene expression during onion sprout suppression.

    PubMed

    Cools, Katherine; Chope, Gemma A; Hammond, John P; Thompson, Andrew J; Terry, Leon A

    2011-07-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is regarded as a nonclimacteric vegetable. In onions, however, ethylene can suppress sprouting while the ethylene-binding inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can also suppress sprout growth; yet, it is unknown how ethylene and 1-MCP elicit the same response. In this study, onions were treated with 10 μL L(-1) ethylene or 1 μL L(-1) 1-MCP individually or in combination for 24 h at 20°C before or after curing (6 weeks) at 20°C or 28°C and then stored at 1°C. Following curing, a subset of these same onions was stored separately under continuous air or ethylene (10 μL L(-1)) at 1°C. Onions treated with ethylene and 1-MCP in combination after curing for 24 h had reduced sprout growth as compared with the control 25 weeks after harvest. Sprout growth following storage beyond 25 weeks was only reduced through continuous ethylene treatment. This observation was supported by a higher proportion of down-regulated genes characterized as being involved in photosynthesis, measured using a newly developed onion microarray. Physiological and biochemical data suggested that ethylene was being perceived in the presence of 1-MCP, since sprout growth was reduced in onions treated with 1-MCP and ethylene applied in combination but not when applied individually. A cluster of probes representing transcripts up-regulated by 1-MCP alone but down-regulated by ethylene alone or in the presence of 1-MCP support this suggestion. Ethylene and 1-MCP both down-regulated a probe tentatively annotated as an ethylene receptor as well as ethylene-insensitive 3, suggesting that both treatments down-regulate the perception and signaling events of ethylene.

  7. Up-regulation of genes in diphenylamine- and 1-methylcyclopropene-treated apples during cold storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold storage reduces the rate of quality loss and extends availability of fresh apples in the marketplace, but several cultivars develop various postharvest browning disorders of the peel or flesh tissue such as superficial scald and external carbon dioxide injury. Postharvest 1-methylcyclopropene...

  8. Inhibiting ethylene perception with 1-methylcyclopropene triggers molecular responses aimed to cope with cell toxicity and increased respiration in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Establés-Ortiz, Beatriz; Romero, Paco; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; González-Candelas, Luis; Lafuente, María T

    2016-06-01

    The ethylene perception inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) has been critical in understanding the hormone's mode of action. However, 1-MCP may trigger other processes that could vary the interpretation of results related until now to ethylene, which we aim to understand by using transcriptomic analysis. Transcriptomic changes in ethylene and 1-MCP-treated 'Navelate' (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) oranges were studied in parallel with changes in ethylene production, respiration and peel damage. The effects of compounds modifying the levels of the ethylene co-product cyanide and nitric oxide (NO) on fruit physiology were also studied. Results suggested that: 1) The ethylene treatment caused sub-lethal stress since it induced stress-related responses and reduced peel damage; 2) 1-MCP induced ethylene-dependent and ethylene-independent responsive networks; 3) 1-MCP triggered ethylene overproduction, stress-related responses and metabolic shifts aimed to cope with cell toxicity, which mostly affected to the inner part of the peel (albedo); 4) 1-MCP increased respiration and drove metabolism reconfiguration for favoring energy conservation but up-regulated genes related to lipid and protein degradation and triggered the over-expression of genes associated with the plasma membrane cellular component; 5) Xenobiotics and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) might act as signals for defense responses in the ethylene-treated fruit, while their uncontrolled generation would induce processes mimicking cell death and damage in 1-MCP-treated fruit; 6) ROS, the ethylene co-product cyanide and NO may converge in the toxic effects of 1-MCP.

  9. Kinetics of molecular encapsulation of 1-methylcyclopropene into alpha-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Neoh, Tze Loon; Yamauchi, Kousuke; Yoshii, Hidefumi; Furuta, Takeshi

    2007-12-26

    1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an ethylene inhibiting regulator, is commercially available in the form of an inclusion complex with alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CD). In this study, molecular encapsulation of gaseous 1-MCP into aqueous alpha-CD was investigated in a closed, agitated vessel with a flat gas-liquid interface. Molecular encapsulation of gaseous 1-MCP by alpha-CD is a simultaneous two-step reaction which involves the aqueous dissolution of gaseous 1-MCP and the encapsulation of the dissolved molecules by alpha-CD. The kinetics and mechanism of molecular encapsulation were analyzed based on the depletion rate of 1-MCP in the headspace of the vessel. The encapsulation rates could be explained quantitatively by the gas absorption theory with a pseudo-first-order reaction between 1-MCP and alpha-CD. The negative value of the calculated apparent activation energy of encapsulation (-24.4 kJ/mol) implied the significant effect of exothermic aqueous dissolution of 1-MCP. An encapsulation temperature of 15 degrees C was optimal; at this temperature, the highest 1-MCP yield and best inclusion ratio of inclusion complex were obtained. Changes in the X-ray diffraction pattern suggested that the crystal lattice structure of alpha-CD was altered upon inclusion of 1-MCP.

  10. Effects of 1-methylcyclopropene and hot water quarantine treatment on quality of "Keitt" mangos.

    PubMed

    Ngamchuachit, Panita; Barrett, Diane M; Mitcham, Elizabeth J

    2014-04-01

    The optimal 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment to slow ripening of whole "Keitt" mangos, either alone or in combination with hot water treatment (HWT) (prior to or post 1-MCP) was identified. USDA-APHIS mandates that HWT can be used for control of fruit flies, but this may affect fruit response to 1-MCP. Mangos were evaluated by repeated measurement of nondestructive firmness, peel color, and ethylene production on the same mango fruits during 2 wk of ripening at 20 °C after treatment. The magnitude of ethylene production increased as a result of both 1-MCP and HWT. With softer mangos (65 N), treatment with 1-MCP alone delayed fruit softening and extended the number of days to full-ripeness (25 N) from 5 d in untreated fruit to 11 d. For these riper fruit, application of 1-MCP prior to HWT extended the days to full-ripeness to 9 d compared with 7 d when 1-MCP was applied after HWT. With firmer mangos (80 N), 1-MCP treatments alone prolonged the days to full-ripeness to 13 d as compared to 11 d for the untreated fruit. There was no significant concentration effect on firmness retention among 1-MCP treatments (0.5, 1.0, or 10.0 μL/L). HWT resulted in a faster rate of fruit softening, taking only 7 d to reach full-ripeness. Combining 1-MCP with HWT reduced the rate of softening compared to HWT alone, resulting in 9 to 11 d to full-ripeness. Application of 1-MCP before HWT showed a greater ability to reduce the rate of fruit softening compared with 1-MCP treatment after HWT.

  11. Identification of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase genes (XTHs) and their expression in persimmon fruit as influenced by 1-methylcyclopropene and gibberellic acid during storage at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qinggang; Zhang, Zhengke; Rao, Jingping; Huber, Donald J; Lv, Jingyi; Hou, Yali; Song, Kanghua

    2013-05-01

    Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) is thought to contribute to fruit softening by degrading xyloglucan that is a predominant hemicellulose in the cell wall. In this study, two full-length XTH genes (DKXTH1 and DKXTH2) were identified from 'Fupingjianshi' persimmon fruit, and the expression level of both XTH genes was investigated during softening for 18-24 d using RT-qPCR. Sequence analysis showed that DKXTH1 and DKXTH2 contained a putative open reading frame of 861 and 876 bp encoding polypeptides of 287 and 292 amino acid residues, respectively, which contained the conserved DEIDFEFLG motif of XTH, a potential N-linked glycosylation signal site. RT-qPCR analysis showed that DKXTH1 and DKXTH2 in untreated fruit had different expression patterns during fruit softening, in which maximum expression occurred on days 3 and 12 of ripening, respectively. 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) treatments delayed the softening and ethylene peak of persimmon fruit, as well as suppressed the expression of both XTH genes, especially DKXTH1. These results indicated that the expression of both XTH genes might be ethylene dependent action, and closely related to softening of persimmon in the early (DKXTH1) and later (DKXTH2) ripening stages.

  12. Effects of cold storage and 1-methylcyclopropene treatments on ripening and cell wall degrading in rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) fruit.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jia; Shi, Zhengjun; Li, Xianzhong; Liu, Huimin

    2014-06-01

    The effect of postharvest 1-methylcyclopropene and/or cold storage application on texture quality parameters during storage was determined. The changes in fruit quality (including weight loss, firmness, total soluble solids content, and ethylene production), cell wall material (including water-soluble fraction, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-soluble fraction, Na2CO3-soluble fraction, 4% KOH-soluble fraction, and 14% KOH-soluble fraction), and cell wall hydrolase activities (including polygalacturonase, endo-1,4-beta-D-glucanase, pectinesterase, alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase, and beta-galactosidase) were periodically measured up to 25 days after postharvest treatments. The application of cold storage reduced weight loss, ethylene production, and delayed ripening of blueberry fruit. The inhibition of senescence was associated with suppressed increase in cell wall hydrolase activities and retarded solubilization of pectins and hemicelluloses. Furthermore, no obvious differences in firmness, weight loss, ethylene production, and cell wall hydrolase activities between fruits with or without 1-methylcyclopropene application were observed, while significant lower levels of the detected parameters were found in cold storage fruit compared with fruit stored in room temperature. Thus, cold storage can be viewed as an effective means to extend the shelf life of blueberry fruit.

  13. 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-induced alteration in leaf photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, respiration and membrane damage in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under high night temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High night temperature (HNT) can induce ethylene-triggered reactive oxygen species production, which can cause premature leaf senescence and membrane damage, thereby affecting production, consumption and transfer of photosynthates, and yield. The 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can competitively bind w...

  14. Methyl jasmonate and 1-methylcyclopropene treatment effects on quinone reductase inducing activity and post-harvest quality of broccoli.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang Mo; Choi, Jeong Hee; Kim, Hyoung Seok; Kushad, Mosbah M; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2013-01-01

    Effect of pre-harvest methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and post-harvest 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatments on broccoli floret glucosinolate (GS) concentrations and quinone reductase (QR, an in vitro anti-cancer biomarker) inducing activity were evaluated two days prior to harvest, at harvest and at 10, 20, and 30 days of post-harvest storage at 4 °C. MeJA treatments four days prior to harvest of broccoli heads was observed to significantly increase floret ethylene biosynthesis resulting in chlorophyll catabolism during post-harvest storage and reduced product quality. Post-harvest treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), which competitively binds to protein ethylene receptors, maintained post-harvest floret chlorophyll concentrations and product visual quality in both control and MeJA-treated broccoli. Transcript abundance of BoPPH, a gene which is responsible for the synthesis of pheophytinase, the primary enzyme associated with chlorophyll catabolism in broccoli, was reduced by 1-MCP treatment and showed a significant, negative correlation with floret chlorophyll concentrations. The GS, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin were significantly increased by MeJA treatments. The products of some of the GS from endogenous myrosinase hydrolysis [sulforaphane (SF), neoascorbigen (NeoASG), N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C), and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC)] were also quantified and found to be significantly correlated with QR. Sulforaphane, the isothiocyanate hydrolysis product of the GS glucoraphanin, was found to be the most potent QR induction agent. Increased sulforaphane formation from the hydrolysis of glucoraphanin was associated with up-regulated gene expression of myrosinase (BoMyo) and the myrosinase enzyme co-factor gene, epithiospecifier modifier1 (BoESM1). This study demonstrates the combined treatment of MeJA and 1-MCP increased QR activity without post-harvest quality loss.

  15. Effects of 1-methylcyclopropene and modified atmosphere packaging on the antioxidant capacity in pepper "Kulai" during low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chung Keat; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Ismail, Ismanizan; Zainal, Zamri

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to simultaneously evaluate the effect of a postharvest treatment on the pepper's antioxidant content and its ability to retain its economical value during the postharvest period. The fruits were pretreated by modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with or without treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) before cold storage at 10°C. Changes in the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants, including the total phenolic, ascorbic acid levels and the total glutathione level, as well as enzymatic antioxidants, including ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT), were determined. Both treatments successfully extended the shelf life of the fruit for up to 25 days, and a high level of antioxidant capacity was maintained throughout the storage period. However, 1-MCP treatment maintained the high antioxidant capacity for a longer period of time. The 1-MCP-treated peppers maintained high levels of phenolic content, a high reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidised glutathione (GSSG) ratio, decreased levels of ascorbic acid and CAT activity, and increased levels of APX and GR compared with the peppers that were not treated with 1-MCP. The overall results suggested that a combination of 1-MCP and MAP was the most effective treatment for extending shelf life while retaining the nutritional benefits.

  16. Shelf life extension and antioxidant activity of 'Hayward' kiwi fruit as a result of prestorage conditioning and 1-methylcyclopropene treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Seo; Im, Myeng He; Gorinstein, Shela

    2015-05-01

    Kiwi fruits (Actinidia deliciosa C.F. Liang et A.R. Ferguson) were treated by prestorage conditioning (20 °C for 2 days), 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP, 1 ppm for 16 h) and conditioning plus 1-MCP. After the treatment the fruits were immediately stored at 0 °C during 24 weeks. Flesh firmness gradually decreased with storage time and the rate of its loss was lower in 1-MCP and conditioning plus 1-MCP treatments than those of control or conditioning. However, SSC, acidity and pH did not change among treatments. Starch content decreased during the storage time regardless of treatments. Oppositely the amount of reducing sugars increased at the same duration of the treatments. Rate and incidence of fruit decay was the lowest in fruit treated with conditioning plus 1-MCP treatment. Fruit decay mainly caused pathogen Botrytis cinerea and its rate significantly decreased with conditioning plus 1-MCP treatment. Ethylene and respiration abruptly increased after 8 weeks of storage, but their contents were lower in 1-MCP and conditioning plus 1-MCP. Total soluble phenolics, flavonoids, and total antioxidant capacities were much higher than in other treatments. Kiwi fruits treated with conditioning plus 1-MCP extended the shelf life by reducing the rate of fruit decay and softening during the storage. The bioactive compounds and total antioxidant status of fruits increased during the treatment.

  17. Inhibition of hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia aruguta) ripening by 1-methylcyclopropene during cold storage and anticancer properties of the fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sooyeon; Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jeongyun; Lee, Han Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Lee, Eun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hardy kiwifruits (Actinidia arguta) were treated with 20 μl/l 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) for 16 h at 10 °C and subsequently stored at 1 ± 0.5 °C. Anticancer properties of the fruit extracts were tested against five different human cancer cells. The hardy kiwifruits, without 1-MCP treatment, showed increases in both respiration and ethylene production rates during fruit storage. The 1-MCP treatment remarkably inhibited fruit ripening by reducing respiration and ethylene production. Fruits with the 1-MCP treatment could be stored for up to 5 weeks by maintaining higher fruit firmness, ascorbic acid and total phenolic contents compared to the control. The hardy kiwifruit extracts showed anti-proliferative effects to Hep3B and HeLa cells but not to HT29, HepG2 and LoVo cells. These results suggest that the application of 1-MCP at harvest effectively delayed the ripening process of the fruits, and the fruit extract had beneficial effects for the prevention of human cancer growth.

  18. [The effect of 1-methylcyclopropene on the components of pro- and antioxidant systems of wheat and the development of protective reactions in fungal pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Veselova, S V; Nuzhnaia, T V; Maksimov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), which inhibits the reception of ethylene, on the following has been studied: hydrogen peroxide generation, oxalate oxidase activity, peroxidase activity, catalase activity, and lignin accumulation in infected leaves of soft spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeds that differ in their resistance to the causative agent of leaf blotch Septoria nodorum Berk. A decrease in the development of leaf blotch in wheat leaves under the influence of 1-MCP was, on one hand, followed by an inhibition of catalase activity; on the other hand, it was accompanied by an increase in oxalate oxidase and peroxidase activity, as well as an accumulation of H2O2 in tissues and lignin in the infected zone. The role of the ethylene reception system in the plants' protective response to infection with a hemibiotrophic pathogen, the causative agent of leaf blotch, is discussed.

  19. Effect of the application of 1-methylcyclopropene and wax emulsions on proximate analysis and some antioxidants of soursop (Annona muricata L.).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Hernández, Cristina L; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G; García-Galindo, Hugo S; Mata-Montes De Oca, Miguel; Montalvo-González, Efigenia

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the application of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and wax emulsions, alone or combined, on composition analysis, vitamin C, polyphenols, and antioxidant capacity of soursop was evaluated. Fruits were stored as follows: at 25 °C (control), and at 16 °C: fruits sprayed with candelilla or flava emulsions, fruits treated with 1500 nL/L of 1-MCP (20 °C, 12 h), and fruits treated with 1-MCP and then sprayed with emulsions. Fruits were allowed to ripen and the edible part was used for analysis. Only fruits stored at 16 °C without 1-MCP showed visible symptoms of chilling injury. Fruits treated with 1-MCP combined with flava emulsion maintained in greater extent their vitamin C content, dietary fiber, total phenolics content, and antioxidant activity. The combination of 1-MCP and emulsions can be utilized in postharvest handling of soursop because this combination can preserve its nutritional composition and antioxidant activity.

  20. Structure and mechanism of action of tau aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cisek, Katryna; Cooper, Grace L.; Huseby, Carol J.; Kuret, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of phenothiazines as tau protein aggregation inhibitors, many additional small molecule inhibitors of diverse chemotype have been discovered and characterized in biological model systems. Although direct inhibition of tau aggregation has shown promise as a potential treatment strategy for depressing neurofibrillary lesion formation in Alzheimer’s disease, the mechanism of action of these compounds has been unclear. However, recent studies have found that tau aggregation antagonists exert their effects through both covalent and non-covalent means, and have identified associated potency and selectivity driving features. Here we review small-molecule tau aggregation inhibitors with a focus on compound structure and inhibitory mechanism. The elucidation of inhibitory mechanism has implications for maximizing on-target efficacy while minimizing off-target side effects. PMID:25387336

  1. Effect of dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient and 1-methylcyclopropene on the metabolism and quality of 'Galaxy' apple harvested at three maturity stages.

    PubMed

    Thewes, Fabio Rodrigo; Brackmann, Auri; Anese, Rogerio de Oliveira; Ludwig, Vagner; Schultz, Erani Eliseu; Dos Santos, Luana Ferreira; Wendt, Lucas Mallmann

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction between controlled atmosphere (CA), CA+1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient (DCA-RQ) with three fruit maturity stages at harvest (early harvest date, optimal harvest date and late harvest date) on 'Galaxy' apple metabolism and quality after harvest and 9months storage plus 7days of shelf life at 20°C. Fruit stored under dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient 1.3 (DCA-RQ 1.3) showed lower ethylene production, respiration rate, mealiness and higher flesh firmness in comparison to CA stored fruit, but did not differ from those treated with 1-MCP. The dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient 1.5 (DCA-RQ 1.5) increased the acetaldehyde, ethanol and ethyl acetate concentration, regardless of the fruit maturity at harvest. The storage of 'Galaxy' apple under DCA-RQ 1.3 is efficient in keeping quality regardless of the maturity stage at harvest.

  2. Effect of the Application of 1-Methylcyclopropene and Wax Emulsions on Proximate Analysis and Some Antioxidants of Soursop (Annona muricata L.)

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Hernández, Cristina L.; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G.; García-Galindo, Hugo S.; Mata-Montes De Oca, Miguel; Montalvo-González, Efigenia

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the application of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and wax emulsions, alone or combined, on composition analysis, vitamin C, polyphenols, and antioxidant capacity of soursop was evaluated. Fruits were stored as follows: at 25°C (control), and at 16°C: fruits sprayed with candelilla or flava emulsions, fruits treated with 1500 nL/L of 1-MCP (20°C, 12 h), and fruits treated with 1-MCP and then sprayed with emulsions. Fruits were allowed to ripen and the edible part was used for analysis. Only fruits stored at 16°C without 1-MCP showed visible symptoms of chilling injury. Fruits treated with 1-MCP combined with flava emulsion maintained in greater extent their vitamin C content, dietary fiber, total phenolics content, and antioxidant activity. The combination of 1-MCP and emulsions can be utilized in postharvest handling of soursop because this combination can preserve its nutritional composition and antioxidant activity. PMID:24892105

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights.

    PubMed

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Initially regarded as "epigenetic modifiers" acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discusses synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer.

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Initially regarded as “epigenetic modifiers” acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discuss synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer. PMID:24769080

  5. An Integrated Model of RAF Inhibitor Action Predicts Inhibitor Activity against Oncogenic BRAF Signaling.

    PubMed

    Karoulia, Zoi; Wu, Yang; Ahmed, Tamer A; Xin, Qisheng; Bollard, Julien; Krepler, Clemens; Wu, Xuewei; Zhang, Chao; Bollag, Gideon; Herlyn, Meenhard; Fagin, James A; Lujambio, Amaia; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Poulikakos, Poulikos I

    2016-09-12

    The complex biochemical effects of RAF inhibitors account for both the effectiveness and mechanisms of resistance to these drugs, but a unified mechanistic model has been lacking. Here we show that RAF inhibitors exert their effects via two distinct allosteric mechanisms. Drug resistance due to dimerization is determined by the position of the αC helix stabilized by inhibitor, whereas inhibitor-induced RAF priming and dimerization are the result of inhibitor-induced formation of the RAF/RAS-GTP complex. The biochemical effect of RAF inhibitor in cells is the combined outcome of the two mechanisms. Therapeutic strategies including αC-helix-IN inhibitors are more effective in multiple mutant BRAF-driven tumor models, including colorectal and thyroid BRAF(V600E) cancers, in which first-generation RAF inhibitors have been ineffective.

  6. Impact of suppression of ethylene action or biosynthesis on flavor metabolites in apple (Malus domestica Borkh) fruits.

    PubMed

    Defilippi, Bruno G; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Kader, Adel A

    2004-09-08

    To understand the role of ethylene in regulating the overall flavor of apple fruits, ethylene production or action was reduced using transgenic apple trees suppressed for ACC-synthase or ACC-oxidase enzyme activity or by the addition of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an ethylene action inhibitor. Flavor components were differentially regulated in response to the suppression of both ethylene biosynthesis and action. Headspace analysis of aroma production, an ethylene-associated event, showed a reduction in ester and alcohol production in the ethylene-suppressed lines and in the apples treated with 1 microL L(-1) 1-MCP for 20 h at 20 degrees C. However, no major differences were observed in the concentrations of aldehyde volatiles. Other flavor metabolites that showed an ethylene-dependent pattern were organic acids and sugars. Malic acid degradation was significantly reduced under ethylene-suppressed conditions, showing a recovery after the fruit was exposed to ethylene. Sucrose and fructose concentrations were influenced by suppression or enhancement of ethylene. Total phenolics as well as individual phenolic compounds showed an ethylene-dependent regulation only in response to the suppression of ethylene biosynthesis, but not when ethylene action was inhibited.

  7. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.

  8. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Rhoji; Murray, David B.; Metz, Thomas O.; Baynes, John

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation or glycoxidation end-products (AGE) increase in tissue proteins with age, and their rate of accumulation is increased in diabetes, nephropathy and inflammatory diseases. AGE inhibitors include a range of compounds that are proposed to act by trapping carbonyl and dicarbonyl intermediates in AGE formation. However, some among the newer generation of AGE inhibitors lack reactive functional groups that would trap reaction intermediates, indicating an alternative mechanism of action. We propose that AGE inhibitors function primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. The AGE-inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers is also consistent with their chelating activity. Finally, compounds described as AGE breakers, or their hydrolysis products, also have strong chelating activity, suggesting that these compounds also act through their chelating activity. We conclude that chelation is the common, and perhaps the primary, mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors and breakers, and that chronic, mild chelation therapy should prove useful in treatment of diabetes and age-related diseases characterized by oxidative stress, inflammation and increased chemical modification of tissue proteins by advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products.

  9. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  10. Acute inhibition of corticosteroidogenesis by inhibitors of calmodulin action.

    PubMed

    Carsia, R V; Moyle, W R; Wolff, D J; Malamed, S

    1982-11-01

    To identify the possible role of calmodulin in ACTH function, we tested the ability of chlorpromazine (CP) and other calmodulin antagonists to inhibit steroidogenesis of isolated adrenocortical cells of the rat. CP reversibly inhibited maximal ACTH-induced corticosterone (B) production. The presence of the drug did not alter the ED50 of ACTH stimulation (3.2 X 10(3) pg/ml), suggesting that it inhibited ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in a noncompetitive manner. The CP concentration required for half-maximal inhibition was 8.2 microM, a value close to the dissociation constant of the CP-calmodulin complex (5.3 microM). Concentrations greater than 40 microM resulted in complete inhibition. Similar concentrations of CP inhibited ACTH-induced cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating an effect of the drug on early events in ACTH action. In addition, CP also apparently acted at a site distal to the point of cAMP formation, as shown by the finding that it inhibited cAMP-induced B production. CP inhibition of ACTH-induced B production was independent of the Ca2+ concentration, suggesting that the drug did not compete with Ca2+ directly. Concentrations of CP greater than 20 microM inhibited protein synthesis as measured by leucine incorporation into cellular proteins. Thus, although the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of CP on steroidogenesis might be explained by an effect on protein synthesis, the inhibition seen at 10 microM appeared to be independent of protein synthesis. Other antagonists of calmodulin action inhibited maximal ACTH-induced B production with the following relative potencies: trifluoperazine greater than CP greater than haloperidol greater than chlordiazepoxide. This order is similar to that reported for inhibition of calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase and for binding to calmodulin. These findings suggest that calmodulin may modulate the effect of ACTH on steroidogenesis at multiple sites.

  11. Steroid inhibitors of androgen-potentiated actions on skin.

    PubMed

    Ebling, F J; Randall, V A

    1983-07-01

    Antiandrogens, such as cyproterone acetate, and oestrogens both inhibit sebaceous secretion in rats and have a potentiality for the treatment of hirsutism and acne in the human female. However, they act at different points. In castrated rats treated with testosterone, 3 micrograms/day oestradiol produced a greater decrease in sebum secretion than a dose of cyproterone acetate over 1000 times larger; moreover the antiandrogen reduced the incidence of sebaceous mitoses whereas the oestradiol did not. In hirsute women, oral administration of 100 mg of cyproterone acetate daily caused a 40% reduction in sebum secretion within 10 days; a further 20% was subsequently produced by combined therapy with cyproterone acetate and ethinyloestradiol. Significant decreases in the diameter and rate of growth of thigh hairs were not established until around the fourth monthly cycle of treatment. The actions were believed to be mainly peripheral, though contributory factors could also have been the small but significant reductions in plasma androgens produced by the antiandrogen, and the marked rise in sex hormone binding globulin produced by the oestrogen. That it is theoretically possible for cyproterone acetate or oestradiol to act locally follows from an unequivocal demonstration that either compound produced a local depression of sebum secretion when applied topically to rats.

  12. SGLT2 inhibitor/DPP-4 inhibitor combination therapy - complementary mechanisms of action for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jayant

    2017-04-03

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a progressive disease with multiple underlying pathophysiologic defects. Monotherapy alone cannot maintain glycemic control and leads to treatment failure. Ideally, a combination of glucose-lowering agents should have complementary mechanisms of action that address multiple pathophysiologic pathways, can be used at all stages of the disease, and be generally well tolerated with no increased risk of hypoglycemia, cardiovascular events, or weight gain. The combination should also provide conveniences for patients, such as oral dosing, single-pill formulations, and once-daily administration, potentially translating to improved adherence. Two classes of glucose-lowering agents that meet these criteria are the sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. This article reviews the rationale for combination therapy with these agents, and evidence from clinical trials with empagliflozin and linagliptin or dapagliflozin and saxagliptin in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Both combinations have been approved as single-pill formulations.

  13. Laying a trap to kill cancer cells: PARP inhibitors and their mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; O'Connor, Mark J; de Bono, Johann

    2016-10-26

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are the first DNA damage response targeted agents approved for cancer therapy. Here, we focus on their molecular mechanism of action by PARP "trapping" and what this means for both clinical monotherapy and combination with chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. Allosteric Inhibitors Have Distinct Effects, but Also Common Modes of Action, in the HCV Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brittny C.; Brown, Jodian A.; Thorpe, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from the Hepatitis C Virus (gene product NS5B) is a validated drug target because of its critical role in genome replication. There are at least four distinct allosteric sites on the polymerase to which several small molecule inhibitors bind. In addition, numerous crystal structures have been solved with different allosteric inhibitors bound to the polymerase. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these small molecules inhibit the enzyme have not been fully elucidated. There is evidence that allosteric inhibitors alter the intrinsic motions and distribution of conformations sampled by the enzyme. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to understand the structural and dynamic changes that result when inhibitors are bound at three different allosteric binding sites on the enzyme. We observe that ligand binding at each site alters the structure and dynamics of NS5B in a distinct manner. Nonetheless, our studies also highlight commonalities in the mechanisms of action of the different inhibitors. Each inhibitor alters the conformational states sampled by the enzyme, either by rigidifying the enzyme and preventing transitions between functional conformational states or by destabilizing the enzyme and preventing functionally relevant conformations from being adequately sampled. By illuminating the molecular mechanisms of allosteric inhibition, these studies delineate the intrinsic functional properties of the enzyme and pave the way for designing novel and more effective polymerase inhibitors. This information may also be important to understand how allosteric regulation occurs in related viral polymerases and other enzymes. PMID:25863069

  15. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  16. Overlapping and Divergent Actions of Structurally Distinct Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Katherine B; Stratton, Matthew S; Blakeslee, Weston W; Wempe, Michael F; Wagner, Florence F; Holson, Edward B; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Andrews, Andrew J; Gilbert, Tonya M; Hooker, Jacob M; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Inhibitors of zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) profoundly affect cellular function by altering gene expression via changes in nucleosomal histone tail acetylation. Historically, investigators have employed pan-HDAC inhibitors, such as the hydroxamate trichostatin A (TSA), which simultaneously targets members of each of the three zinc-dependent HDAC classes (classes I, II, and IV). More recently, class- and isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors have been developed, providing invaluable chemical biology probes for dissecting the roles of distinct HDACs in the control of various physiologic and pathophysiological processes. For example, the benzamide class I HDAC-selective inhibitor, MGCD0103 [N-(2-aminophenyl)-4-[[(4-pyridin-3-ylpyrimidin-2-yl)amino]methyl] benzamide], was shown to block cardiac fibrosis, a process involving excess extracellular matrix deposition, which often results in heart dysfunction. Here, we compare the mechanisms of action of structurally distinct HDAC inhibitors in isolated primary cardiac fibroblasts, which are the major extracellular matrix-producing cells of the heart. TSA, MGCD0103, and the cyclic peptide class I HDAC inhibitor, apicidin, exhibited a common ability to enhance histone acetylation, and all potently blocked cardiac fibroblast cell cycle progression. In contrast, MGCD0103, but not TSA or apicidin, paradoxically increased expression of a subset of fibrosis-associated genes. Using the cellular thermal shift assay, we provide evidence that the divergent effects of HDAC inhibitors on cardiac fibroblast gene expression relate to differential engagement of HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes. These findings illustrate the importance of employing multiple compounds when pharmacologically assessing HDAC function in a cellular context and during HDAC inhibitor drug development.

  17. Mechanism of Action of 2-Aminobenzamide HDAC Inhibitors in Reversing Gene Silencing in Friedreich's Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Soragni, Elisabetta; Chou, C James; Rusche, James R; Gottesfeld, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    The genetic defect in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the hyperexpansion of a GAA•TTC triplet in the first intron of the FXN gene, encoding the essential mitochondrial protein frataxin. Histone post-translational modifications near the expanded repeats are consistent with heterochromatin formation and consequent FXN gene silencing. Using a newly developed human neuronal cell model, derived from patient-induced pluripotent stem cells, we find that 2-aminobenzamide histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase FXN mRNA levels and frataxin protein in FRDA neuronal cells. However, only compounds targeting the class I HDACs 1 and 3 are active in increasing FXN mRNA in these cells. Structural analogs of the active HDAC inhibitors that selectively target either HDAC1 or HDAC3 do not show similar increases in FXN mRNA levels. To understand the mechanism of action of these compounds, we probed the kinetic properties of the active and inactive inhibitors, and found that only compounds that target HDACs 1 and 3 exhibited a slow-on/slow-off mechanism of action for the HDAC enzymes. HDAC1- and HDAC3-selective compounds did not show this activity. Using siRNA methods in the FRDA neuronal cells, we show increases in FXN mRNA upon silencing of either HDACs 1 or 3, suggesting the possibility that inhibition of each of these class I HDACs is necessary for activation of FXN mRNA synthesis, as there appears to be redundancy in the silencing mechanism caused by the GAA•TTC repeats. Moreover, inhibitors must have a long residence time on their target enzymes for this activity. By interrogating microarray data from neuronal cells treated with inhibitors of different specificity, we selected two genes encoding histone macroH2A (H2AFY2) and Polycomb group ring finger 2 (PCGF2) that were specifically down-regulated by the inhibitors targeting HDACs1 and 3 versus the more selective inhibitors for further investigation. Both genes are involved in transcriptional repression and we speculate

  18. PARP inhibitors: review of mechanisms of action and BRCA1/2 mutation targeting

    PubMed Central

    Gąsiorowska, Emilia; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Jankowska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases have shown true promise in early clinical studies due to reported activity in BRCA-associated cancers. PARP inhibitors may represent a potentially important new class of chemotherapeutic agents directed at targeting cancers with defective DNA-damage repair. In order to widen the prospective patient population that would benefit from PARP inhibitors, predictive biomarkers based on a clear understanding of the mechanism of action are required. In addition, a more sophisticated understanding of the toxicity profile is required if PARP inhibitors are to be employed in the curative, rather than the palliative, setting. PARP inhibitors have successfully moved into clinical practice in the past few years, with approval granted from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) within the past two years. The United States FDA approval of olaparib applies to fourth-line treatment in germline BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer, and European EMA approval of olaparib for maintenance therapy in both germline and somatic BRCA-mutant platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. This review covers the current understanding of PARP, its inhibition, and the basis of the excitement surrounding these new agents. It also evaluates future approaches and directions required to achieve full understanding of the intricate interplay of these agents at the cellular level. PMID:28250726

  19. Dual-Action Inhibitors of HIF Prolyl Hydroxylases That Induce Binding of a Second Iron Ion

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, Armin; Demetriades, Marina; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Tian, Ya-Min; Stolze, Ineke; McNeill, Luke A.; Lee, Myung Kyu; Woon, Esther C. Y.; Mackeen, Mukram M.; Kawamura, Akane; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Mecinović, Jasmin; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD or EGLN enzymes) is of interest for the treatment of anemia and ischemia-related diseases. Most PHD inhibitors work by binding to the single ferrous ion and competing with 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) co-substrate for binding at the PHD active site. Non-specific iron chelators also inhibit the PHDs, both in vitro and in cells. We report the identification of dual action PHD inhibitors, which bind to the active site iron and also induce the binding of a second iron ion at the active site. Following analysis of small-molecule iron complexes and application of non-denaturing protein mass spectrometry to assess PHD2·iron·inhibitor stoichimetry, selected diacylhydrazines were identified as PHD2 inhibitors that induce the binding of a second iron ion. Some compounds were shown to inhibit the HIF hydroxylases in human hepatoma and renal carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23151668

  20. Ripening, storage temperature, ethylene action, and oxidative stress alter apple peel phytosterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rudell, David R; Buchanan, David A; Leisso, Rachel S; Whitaker, Bruce D; Mattheis, James P; Zhu, Yanmin; Varanasi, Vijay

    2011-08-01

    The chilling conditions of apple cold storage can provoke an economically significant necrotic peel disorder called superficial scald (scald) in susceptible cultivars. Disorder development can be reduced by inhibiting ethylene action or oxidative stress as well as intermittent warming. It was previously demonstrated that scald is preceded by a metabolomic shift that results in altered levels of various classes of triterpenoids, including metabolites with mass spectral features similar to β-sitosterol. In this study, a key class of phytosterol metabolites was identified. Changes in peel tissue levels of conjugates of β-sitosterol and campesterol, including acylated steryl glycosides (ASG), steryl glycosides (SG) and steryl esters (SE), as well as free sterols (FS), were determined during the period of scald development. Responses to pre-storage treatment with the ethylene action inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene, or an antioxidant (diphenylamine), rapid temperature elevation, and cold acclimation using intermittent warming treatments were evaluated. Diphenylamine, 1-MCP, and intermittent warming all reduced or prevented scald development. ASG levels increased and SE levels decreased in untreated control fruit during storage. Removing fruit from cold storage to ambient temperature induced rapid shifts in ASG and SE fatty acyl moieties from unsaturated to saturated. FS and SG levels remained relatively stable during storage but SG levels increased following a temperature increase after storage. ASG, SE, and SG levels did not increase during 6 months cold storage in fruit subjected to intermittent warming treatment. Overall, the results show that apple peel phytosteryl conjugate metabolism is influenced by storage duration, oxidative stress, ethylene action/ripening, and storage temperature.

  1. Microtubule inhibitors: Differentiating tubulin-inhibiting agents based on mechanisms of action, clinical activity, and resistance.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith A

    2009-08-01

    Microtubules are important cellular targets for anticancer therapy because of their key role in mitosis. Microtubule inhibitors (MTI) such as taxanes, vinca alkaloids, and epothilones stabilize or destabilize microtubules, thereby suppressing microtubule dynamics required for proper mitotic function, effectively blocking cell cycle progression and resulting in apoptosis. In spite of their antitumor activity, innate or acquired drug resistance to MTIs such as the taxanes is common, limiting their overall clinical efficacy. Further insight into the mechanisms of action of microtubule-targeting drugs has lead to the discovery of novel agents that may provide higher efficacy with limited toxicity and help overcome resistance to conventional MTIs. This review will focus on the different mechanisms of action of MTIs, potential factors related to resistance and tolerability, and will discuss the recent approval as well as the development of new antineoplastic agents.

  2. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M.; Ogilvie, Donald J.; Ward, Simon E.; Atack, John R.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5′-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a ‘humanized’ form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  3. Contrasting actions of selective inhibitors of angiopoietin-1 and angiopoietin-2 on the normalization of tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Beverly L; Hashizume, Hiroya; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Chou, Jeyling; Bready, James V; Coxon, Angela; Oliner, Jonathan D; McDonald, Donald M

    2009-11-01

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) have complex actions in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling due to their effects on Tie2 receptor signaling. Ang2 blocks Ang1-mediated activation of Tie2 in endothelial cells under certain conditions but is a Tie2 receptor agonist in others. We examined the effects of selective inhibitors of Ang1 (mL4-3) or Ang2 (L1-7[N]), alone or in combination, on the vasculature of human Colo205 tumors in mice. The Ang2 inhibitor decreased the overall abundance of tumor blood vessels by reducing tumor growth and keeping vascular density constant. After inhibition of Ang2, tumor vessels had many features of normal blood vessels (normalization), as evidenced by junctional accumulation of vascular endothelial-cadherin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in endothelial cells, increased pericyte coverage, reduced endothelial sprouting, and remodeling into smaller, more uniform vessels. The Ang1 inhibitor by itself had little noticeable effect on the tumor vasculature. However, when administered with the Ang2 inhibitor, the Ang1 inhibitor prevented tumor vessel normalization, but not the reduction in tumor vascularity produced by the Ang2 inhibitor. These findings are consistent with a model whereby inhibition of Ang2 leads to normalization of tumor blood vessels by permitting the unopposed action of Ang1, but decreases tumor vascularity primarily by blocking Ang2 actions.

  4. Contrasting Actions of Selective Inhibitors of Angiopoietin-1 and Angiopoietin-2 on the Normalization of Tumor Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Falcón, Beverly L.; Hashizume, Hiroya; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Chou, Jeyling; Bready, James V.; Coxon, Angela; Oliner, Jonathan D.; McDonald, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) have complex actions in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling due to their effects on Tie2 receptor signaling. Ang2 blocks Ang1-mediated activation of Tie2 in endothelial cells under certain conditions but is a Tie2 receptor agonist in others. We examined the effects of selective inhibitors of Ang1 (mL4-3) or Ang2 (L1-7[N]), alone or in combination, on the vasculature of human Colo205 tumors in mice. The Ang2 inhibitor decreased the overall abundance of tumor blood vessels by reducing tumor growth and keeping vascular density constant. After inhibition of Ang2, tumor vessels had many features of normal blood vessels (normalization), as evidenced by junctional accumulation of vascular endothelial-cadherin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in endothelial cells, increased pericyte coverage, reduced endothelial sprouting, and remodeling into smaller, more uniform vessels. The Ang1 inhibitor by itself had little noticeable effect on the tumor vasculature. However, when administered with the Ang2 inhibitor, the Ang1 inhibitor prevented tumor vessel normalization, but not the reduction in tumor vascularity produced by the Ang2 inhibitor. These findings are consistent with a model whereby inhibition of Ang2 leads to normalization of tumor blood vessels by permitting the unopposed action of Ang1, but decreases tumor vascularity primarily by blocking Ang2 actions. PMID:19815705

  5. Aromatase inhibitors: mechanism of action and role in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, William R

    2003-08-01

    The natural history of breast cancer is closely linked with estrogens. These hormones influence both risk to the disease and growth of many established tumors. Consequently, measures that either inhibit the synthesis or block the mechanism of action of estrogens are attractive strategies for therapeutic intervention. This is particularly true in postmenopausal women in whom hormone responsiveness is common and estrogen synthesis is primarily sited peripherally in adipose tissue, muscle and breast tissue, rather than in the ovaries as in premenopausal women. In terms of inhibiting production, the most specific effects are best achieved by blocking the last step in biosynthesis, the conversion of androgens to estrogens by the heme-containing enzyme, aromatase. Two major classes of aromatase inhibitors have been developed and are currently in clinical use. Type I steroidal drugs include formestane and exemestane; they are androgen substrate analogues that bind competitively but irreversibly to the enzyme and have been marketed as "inactivators." Type II nonsteroidal inhibitors such as anastrozole and letrozole are triazoles; they bind reversibly to the enzyme and fit into the substrate binding site, such that azole nitrogens interact with the heme prosthetic group. This type of association provides exquisite potency for and specificity against the aromatase enzyme. These agents represent several generations of development, with each step in the evolution producing an increase in both potency and specificity. The latest aromatase inhibitors are drugs of immense potential that will undoubtedly play a major role in the management of postmenopausal women with hormone-dependent breast cancer. They also represent tools by which to elucidate the roles of both aromatase and estrogen in the development and growth of breast cancer.

  6. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Inhibit Insulin Secretion and Action in Pancreatic β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Roi; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Gurevitch, Diana; Shainskaya, Alla; Levkovitz, Yechiel; Zick, Yehiel

    2013-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are antidepressants used for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. Here, we demonstrate that incubation (2 h) of murine islets or Min6 β cell line with the SSRIs paroxetine, fluoxetine, or sertraline inhibited insulin-induced Tyr phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 protein and the activation of its downstream targets Akt and the ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1). Inhibition was dose-dependent with half-maximal effects at ∼15–20 μm. It correlated with a rapid dephosphorylation and activation of the IRS kinase GSK3β. Introduction of GSK3β siRNAs eliminated the inhibitory effects of the SSRIs. Inhibition of IRS-2 action by 30 μm SSRI was associated with a marked inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from murine and human pancreatic islets. Secretion induced by basic secretagogues (KCl and Arg) was not affected by these drugs. Prolonged treatment (16 h) of Min6 cells with sertraline resulted in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase; activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the initiation of the unfolded protein response, manifested by enhanced transcription of ATF4 and C/EBP homologous protein. This triggered an apoptotic process, manifested by enhanced caspase 3/7 activity, which resulted in β cell death. These findings implicate SSRIs as inhibitors of IRS protein function and insulin action through the activation of GSK3β. They further suggest that SSRIs inhibit insulin secretion; induce the unfolded protein response; activate an apoptotic process, and trigger β cell death. Given that SSRIs promote insulin resistance while inhibiting insulin secretion, these drugs might accelerate the transition from an insulin-resistant state to overt diabetes. PMID:23275337

  7. Chelation: a fundamental mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors, AGE breakers, and other inhibitors of diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ryoji; Murray, David B; Metz, Thomas O; Baynes, John W

    2012-03-01

    This article outlines evidence that advanced glycation end product (AGE) inhibitors and breakers act primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions that catalyze AGE formation. We then present evidence that chelation is the most likely mechanism by which ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldose reductase inhibitors inhibit AGE formation in diabetes. Finally, we note several recent studies demonstrating therapeutic benefits of chelators for diabetic cardiovascular and renal disease. We conclude that chronic, low-dose chelation therapy deserves serious consideration as a clinical tool for prevention and treatment of diabetes complications.

  8. Decoding the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Action of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors Using Epimastigotes as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Sangenito, Leandro S.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; d′Avila-Levy, Claudia M.; Branquinha, Marta H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspartic peptidase inhibitors have shown antimicrobial action against distinct microorganisms. Due to an increase in the occurrence of Chagas' disease/AIDS co-infection, we decided to explore the effects of HIV aspartic peptidase inhibitors (HIV-PIs) on Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Methodology and Principal Findings HIV-PIs presented an anti-proliferative action on epimastigotes of T. cruzi clone Dm28c, with IC50 values ranging from 0.6 to 14 µM. The most effective inhibitors, ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir, also had an anti-proliferative effect against different phylogenetic T. cruzi strains. The HIV-PIs induced some morphological alterations in clone Dm28c epimastigotes, as reduced cell size and swollen of the cellular body. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar membrane, mitochondrion and reservosomes are the main targets of HIV-PIs in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Curiously, an increase in the epimastigote-into-trypomastigote differentiation process of clone Dm28c was observed, with many of these parasites presenting morphological alterations including the detachment of flagellum from the cell body. The pre-treatment with the most effective HIV-PIs drastically reduced the interaction process between epimastigotes and the invertebrate vector Rhodnius prolixus. It was also noted that HIV-PIs induced an increase in the expression of gp63-like and calpain-related molecules, and decreased the cruzipain expression in epimastigotes as judged by flow cytometry and immunoblotting assays. The hydrolysis of a cathepsin D fluorogenic substrate was inhibited by all HIV-PIs in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the aspartic peptidase could be a possible target to these drugs. Additionally, we verified that ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir reduced drastically the viability of clone Dm28c trypomastigotes, causing many morphological damages. Conclusions and Significance The results contribute to understand

  9. Modeling the Mechanism of Action of a DGAT1 Inhibitor Using a Causal Reasoning Platform

    PubMed Central

    Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Ziemek, Daniel; Leininger, Michael T.; Randhawa, Ranjit; Yang, Jianxin; Manion, Tara B.; Mather, Dawn E.; Zavadoski, William J.; Kuhn, Max; Treadway, Judith L.; des Etages, Shelly Ann G.; Gibbs, E. Michael; Greene, Nigel; Steppan, Claire M.

    2011-01-01

    Triglyceride accumulation is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Genetic disruption of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), which catalyzes the final reaction of triglyceride synthesis, confers dramatic resistance to high-fat diet induced obesity. Hence, DGAT1 is considered a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and related metabolic disorders. However, the molecular events shaping the mechanism of action of DGAT1 pharmacological inhibition have not been fully explored yet. Here, we investigate the metabolic molecular mechanisms induced in response to pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 using a recently developed computational systems biology approach, the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). The CRE algorithm utilizes microarray transcriptomic data and causal statements derived from the biomedical literature to infer upstream molecular events driving these transcriptional changes. The inferred upstream events (also called hypotheses) are aggregated into biological models using a set of analytical tools that allow for evaluation and integration of the hypotheses in context of their supporting evidence. In comparison to gene ontology enrichment analysis which pointed to high-level changes in metabolic processes, the CRE results provide detailed molecular hypotheses to explain the measured transcriptional changes. CRE analysis of gene expression changes in high fat habituated rats treated with a potent and selective DGAT1 inhibitor demonstrate that the majority of transcriptomic changes support a metabolic network indicative of reversal of high fat diet effects that includes a number of molecular hypotheses such as PPARG, HNF4A and SREBPs. Finally, the CRE-generated molecular hypotheses from DGAT1 inhibitor treated rats were found to capture the major molecular characteristics of DGAT1 deficient mice, supporting a phenotype of decreased lipid and increased insulin sensitivity. PMID:22073239

  10. Zinc ions as cytochrome C oxidase inhibitors: two sites of action.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, S S; Azarkina, N V; Vygodina, T V; Siletsky, S A; Konstantinov, A A

    2005-02-01

    Zinc ions are shown to be an efficient inhibitor of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity, both in the solubilized and the liposome-reconstituted enzyme. The effect of zinc is biphasic. First there occurs rapid interaction of zinc with the enzyme at a site exposed to the aqueous phase corresponding to the mitochondrial matrix. This interaction is fully reversed by EDTA and results in a partial inhibition of the enzyme activity (50-90%, depending on preparation) with an effective K(i) of approximately 10 microM. The rapid effect of zinc is observed with the solubilized enzyme, it vanishes upon incorporation of cytochrome oxidase in liposomes, and it re-appears when proteoliposomes are supplied with alamethicin that makes the membrane permeable to low molecular weight substances. Zinc presumably blocks the entrance of the D-protonic channel opening into the inner aqueous phase. Second, zinc interacts slowly (tens of minutes, hours) with a site of cytochrome oxidase accessible from the outer aqueous phase bringing about complete inhibition of the enzymatic activity. The slow phase is characterized by high affinity of the inhibitor for the enzyme: full inhibition can be achieved upon incubation of the solubilized oxidase for 24 h with zinc concentration as low as 2 microM. The rate of zinc inhibitory action in the slow phase is proportional to Zn(2+) concentration. The slow interaction of zinc with the outer surface of liposome-reconstituted cytochrome oxidase is observed only with the enzyme turning over or in the presence of weak reductants, whereas incubation of zinc with the fully oxidized proteoliposomes does not induce the inhibition. It is shown that zinc ions added to cytochrome oxidase proteoliposomes from the outside inhibit specifically the slow electrogenic phase of proton transfer, coupled to a transition of cytochrome oxidase from the oxo-ferryl to the oxidized state (the F --> O step corresponding to transfer of the 4th electron in the catalytic

  11. ENMD-2076 is an orally active kinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Graham C; Brokx, Richard D; Denny, Trisha A; Hembrough, Todd A; Plum, Stacy M; Fogler, William E; Sidor, Carolyn F; Bray, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    ENMD-2076 is a novel orally active, small molecule kinase inhibitor with a mechanism of action involving several pathways key to tumor growth and survival: angiogenesis, proliferation, and the cell cycle. ENMD-2076 has selective activity against the mitotic kinase Aurora A, as well as kinases involved in angiogenesis (VEGFRs, FGFRs). ENMD-2076 inhibited the growth in vitro of a wide range of human solid tumor and hematopoietic cancer cell lines with IC(50) values ranging from 0.025 to 0.7 μmol/L. ENMD-2076 was also shown to induce regression or complete inhibition of tumor growth in vivo at well-tolerated doses in tumor xenograft models derived from breast, colon, melanoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma cell lines. Pharmacodynamic experiments in vivo showed that in addition to inhibiting Aurora A, single doses of ENMD-2076 had sustained inhibitory effects on the activation of Flt3 as well as the angiogenic tyrosine kinases, VEGFR2/KDR and FGFR1 and 2. ENMD-2076 was shown to prevent the formation of new blood vessels and regress formed vessels in vivo at doses equivalent to those that gave substantial activity in tumor xenograft models. These results indicate that ENMD-2076 is a well-tolerated, orally active multitarget kinase inhibitor with a unique antiangiogenic/antiproliferative profile and provides strong preclinical support for use as a therapeutic for human cancers. Several phase 1 studies involving ENMD-2076 have been recently completed, and the compound is currently being evaluated in a phase 2 clinical trial in patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

  12. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Still Remains a New Drug Target: Structure, Function, Classical Inhibitors, and New Inhibitors with Innovative Mechanisms of Actions

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesca; Corona, Angela; Tramontano, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    During the retrotranscription process, characteristic of all retroviruses, the viral ssRNA genome is converted into integration-competent dsDNA. This process is accomplished by the virus-coded reverse transcriptase (RT) protein, which is a primary target in the current treatments for HIV-1 infection. In particular, in the approved therapeutic regimens two classes of drugs target RT, namely, nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). Both classes inhibit the RT-associated polymerase activity: the NRTIs compete with the natural dNTP substrate and act as chain terminators, while the NNRTIs bind to an allosteric pocket and inhibit polymerization noncompetitively. In addition to these two classes, other RT inhibitors (RTIs) that target RT by distinct mechanisms have been identified and are currently under development. These include translocation-defective RTIs, delayed chain terminators RTIs, lethal mutagenesis RTIs, dinucleotide tetraphosphates, nucleotide-competing RTIs, pyrophosphate analogs, RT-associated RNase H function inhibitors, and dual activities inhibitors. This paper describes the HIV-1 RT function and molecular structure, illustrates the currently approved RTIs, and focuses on the mechanisms of action of the newer classes of RTIs. PMID:22778958

  13. Toxicity and Physiological Actions of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors to Aedes aegypti and Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Sheena A. M.; Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Gross, Aaron D.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The physiological role of carbonic anhydrases in pH and ion regulation is crucial to insect survival. We examined the toxic and neurophysiological effects of five carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) against Aedes aegypti. The 24 h larvicidal toxicities followed this rank order of potency: dichlorphenamide > methazolamide > acetazolamide = brinzolamide = dorzolamide. Larvicidal activity increased modestly in longer exposures, and affected larvae showed attenuated responses to probing without overt tremors, hyperexcitation, or convulsions. Acetazolamide and dichlorphenamide were toxic to adults when applied topically, but were of low potency and had an incomplete effect (<50% at 300 ng/mosquito) even after injection. Dichlorphenamide was also the most toxic compound when fed to adult mosquitoes, and they displayed loss of posture and occasionally prolonged fluttering of the wings. Co-exposure with 500 ng of the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) increased the toxicity of dichlorphenamide ca. two-fold in feeding assays, indicating that low toxicity was not related to oxidative metabolism. Dichlorphenamide showed mild depolarizing and nerve discharge actions on insect neuromuscular and central nervous systems, respectively. These effects were increased in low buffer salines, indicating they were apparently related to loss of pH control in these tissues. Overall, sulfonamides displayed weak insecticidal properties on Aedes aegypti and are weak lead compounds. PMID:28025488

  14. ErbB inhibitors ameliorate behavioral impairments of an animal model for schizophrenia: implication of their dopamine-modulatory actions

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, M; Sotoyama, H; Namba, H; Shibuya, M; Eda, T; Wang, R; Okubo, T; Nagata, K; Iwakura, Y; Nawa, H

    2013-01-01

    Ligands for ErbB receptors, including epidermal growth factor (EGF) and neuregulin-1, have a neurotrophic activity on midbrain dopaminergic neurons and are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Although ErbB kinase inhibitors ameliorate behavioral deficits of the schizophrenia model that was established by hippocampal lesioning of rat pups, the antipsychotic action of ErbB kinase inhibitors and its general applicability to other models are not fully characterized. Using a different animal model, here, we examined whether and how ErbB kinase inhibitors ameliorate the behavioral endophenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. The animal model for schizophrenia was prepared by exposing neonatal rats to the cytokine EGF. Intraventricular infusion of the ErbB1 inhibitors ZD1839 and PD153035 in these animals ameliorated the deficits in startle response and prepulse inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. The deficits of latent inhibition of fear learning were also alleviated by ZD1839 with its limited effects on body weight gain or locomotor activity. ZD1839 infusion also decreased the busting activity of nigral dopamine (DA) neurons and reduced pallidal DA metabolism, a result that mimics the anti-dopaminergic profile of risperidone and haloperidol in this brain region. ErbB inhibitors appear to have anti-dopaminergic actions to alleviate some of the behavioral deficits common to animal models for schizophrenia. PMID:23632456

  15. Identification and Mechanism of Action of a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Arenavirus Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Nhi; Cubitt, Beatrice; Iwasaki, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and represent important public health problems in the regions where these viruses are endemic. In addition, evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is an important neglected human pathogen. There are no licensed arenavirus vaccines and current antiarenavirus therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. Therefore, there is an unmet need for novel antiarenaviral therapeutics. Here, we report the generation of a novel recombinant LCM virus and its use to develop a cell-based high-throughput screen to rapidly identify inhibitors of LCMV multiplication. We used this novel assay to screen a library of 30,400 small molecules and identified compound F3406 (chemical name: N-[3,5-bis(fluoranyl)phenyl]-2-[5,7-bis(oxidanylidene)-6-propyl-2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-[1,3]thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidin-4-yl]ethanamide), which exhibited strong anti-LCMV activity in the absence of cell toxicity. Mechanism-of-action studies revealed that F3406 inhibited LCMV cell entry by specifically interfering with the pH-dependent fusion in the endosome compartment that is mediated by LCMV glycoprotein GP2 and required to release the virus ribonucleoprotein into the cell cytoplasm to initiate transcription and replication of the virus genome. We identified residue M437 within the transmembrane domain of GP2 as critical for virus susceptibility to F3406. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses (HFA) are important human pathogens that cause high morbidity and mortality in areas where these viruses are endemic. In addition, evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Concerns posed by arenavirus infections are aggravated by the lack of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-licensed arenavirus vaccines and current

  16. Divergent actions by inhibitors of DP IV and APN family enzymes on CD4+ Teff cell motility and functions.

    PubMed

    Biton, Aliza; Ansorge, Siegfried; Bank, Ute; Täger, Michael; Reinhold, Dirk; Brocke, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV)/CD26 and aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 family enzymes control T cell functions. We have previously defined these peptidases as targets to treat autoimmune disease, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we determined the effect of enzymatic inhibitors on chemotaxis by CD4+ effector T (Teff) cells. Exposure of Teff cells to the inhibitor of DP IV activity, Lys[Z(NO2)]-pyrrolidide (LZNP) and the inhibitor of APN activity, actinonin has no effect on chemotaxis or unstimulated cell migration, even at high inhibitor concentrations. LZNP and actinonin also fail to suppress migration of unfractionated lymph node cells, excluding paracrine action through other leukocyte subsets. In contrast, inhibition of DP IV and APN activities selectively suppresses lymphocyte functions including proliferation and production of the T helper type (Th)1 cytokine IFN-γ, the Th17 cytokine IL-17, as well as TNF-α, and ameliorates autoimmunity in vivo. The present results combined with previous studies suggest that LZNP and actinonin do not prevent migration of pathogenic Teff cells into target tissues, but rather suppress disease through inhibitor induced release of TGF-β by T cells at the site of inflammation.

  17. Indoxacarb, Metaflumizone, and Other Sodium Channel Inhibitor Insecticides: Mechanism and Site of Action on Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    von Stein, Richard T; Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2013-07-01

    Sodium channel inhibitor (SCI) insecticides were discovered almost four decades ago but have only recently yielded important commercial products (eg., indoxacarb and metaflumizone). SCI insecticides inhibit sodium channel function by binding selectively to slow-inactivated (non-conducting) sodium channel states. Characterization of the action of SCI insecticides on mammalian sodium channels using both biochemical and electrophysiological approaches demonstrates that they bind at or near a drug receptor site, the "local anesthetic (LA) receptor." This mechanism and site of action on sodium channels differentiates SCI insecticides from other insecticidal agents that act on sodium channels. However, SCI insecticides share a common mode of action with drugs currently under investigation as anticonvulsants and treatments for neuropathic pain. In this paper we summarize the development of the SCI insecticide class and the evidence that this structurally diverse group of compounds have a common mode of action on sodium channels. We then review research that has used site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression of cloned mammalian sodium channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes to further elucidate the site and mechanism of action of SCI insecticides. The results of these studies provide new insight into the mechanism of action of SCI insecticides on voltage-gated sodium channels, the location of the SCI insecticide receptor, and its relationship to the LA receptor that binds therapeutic SCI agents.

  18. Use of Network Inference to Unravel the Mechanisms of Action and Specificity of Aromatase Inhibitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled through various feedback mechanisms in order to maintain a dynamic homeostasis during changing environmental conditions, including exposure to chemical stressors. In this study, three aromatase inhibitors, fad...

  19. Binding kinetics and duration of in vivo action of novel prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Jarkko I; Garcia-Horsman, J Arturo; Forsberg, Markus M; Jalkanen, Aaro; Wallén, Erik A A; Jarho, Elina M; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Gynther, Jukka; Männistö, Pekka T

    2006-02-28

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine protease that specifically hydrolyses small peptides at the carboxyl end of the proline residue. POP has gained pharmaceutical interest, since its inhibitors have been shown to have antiamnesic properties in rat. We examined the effect of the 2(S)-substituents CN and COCH(2)OH at the P1 site of the parent inhibitors isophthalic acid 2(S)-(cyclopentanecarbonyl)pyrrolidine-l-prolyl-pyrrolidine amide and 4-phenylbutanoyl-l-prolyl-pyrrolidine and bulky 5-t-butyl group at the P2 site l-prolyl residue of the parent inhibitor 4-phenylbutanoyl-l-prolyl-pyrrolidine on the binding kinetics to the enzyme. In addition, we studied the duration of POP inhibition in the rat tissues in vivo after i.p. administration. CN and COCH(2)OH substituents at the P1 site pyrrolidine group were found to greatly increase the affinity of the inhibitor and the enzyme-inhibitor complex half-life. In addition, 5-t-butyl group at the P2 site l-prolyl residue increased the dissociation half-life of the enzyme-inhibitor complex, without much affecting the inhibitory potency. The duration of the inhibition in the rat tissues followed the inhibition kinetic properties in that the compounds with fast dissociation produced shorter inhibition in the rat tissues than the compounds with slow dissociation. The duration of POP inhibition of compounds was evidently not governed by their serum clearance. The fact that the in vivo pharmacodynamic behaviour of POP inhibitors can be predicted by their in vitro-properties may be of importance when designing therapeutically useful POP inhibitors.

  20. Structure and mechanism of action of the hydroxy aryl aldehyde class of IRE1 endoribonuclease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Mario; Duffy, Nicole M.; Talukdar, Manisha; Thevakumaran, Nero; Chiovitti, David; Canny, Marella D.; Lee, Kenneth; Kurinov, Igor; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Poda, Gennadiy; Prakesch, Michael; Wilson, Brian; Tam, Victor; Schweitzer, Colleen; Toro, Andras; Lucas, Julie L.; Vuga, Danka; Lehmann, Lynn; Durocher, Daniel; Zeng, Qingping; Patterson, John B.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the unfolded protein response and its dysfunction is linked to multiple diseases. The stress transducer IRE1α is a transmembrane kinase endoribonuclease (RNase) that cleaves mRNA substrates to re-establish ER homeostasis. Aromatic ring systems containing hydroxy-aldehyde moieties, termed hydroxy aryl aldehydes (HAA), selectively inhibit IRE1α RNase and thus represent a novel chemical series for therapeutic development. We solved crystal structures of murine IRE1α in complex with three HAA inhibitors. HAA inhibitors engage a shallow pocket at the RNase active site through pi-stacking interactions with His910 and Phe889, an essential Schiff base with Lys907 and a H-bond with Tyr892. Structure activity studies and mutational analysis of contact residues define the optimal chemical space of inhibitors and validate the inhibitor binding site. These studies lay the foundation for understanding both the biochemical and cellular functions of IRE1α using small molecule inhibitors and suggest new avenues for inhibitor design. PMID:25164867

  1. Deconvolution of Buparlisib's mechanism of action defines specific PI3K and tubulin inhibitors for therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bohnacker, Thomas; Prota, Andrea E.; Beaufils, Florent; Burke, John E.; Melone, Anna; Inglis, Alison J.; Rageot, Denise; Sele, Alexander M.; Cmiljanovic, Vladimir; Cmiljanovic, Natasa; Bargsten, Katja; Aher, Amol; Akhmanova, Anna; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fabbro, Doriano; Zvelebil, Marketa; Williams, Roger L.; Steinmetz, Michel O.; Wymann, Matthias P.

    2017-01-01

    BKM120 (Buparlisib) is one of the most advanced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors for the treatment of cancer, but it interferes as an off-target effect with microtubule polymerization. Here, we developed two chemical derivatives that differ from BKM120 by only one atom. We show that these minute changes separate the dual activity of BKM120 into discrete PI3K and tubulin inhibitors. Analysis of the compounds cellular growth arrest phenotypes and microtubule dynamics suggest that the antiproliferative activity of BKM120 is mainly due to microtubule-dependent cytotoxicity rather than through inhibition of PI3K. Crystal structures of BKM120 and derivatives in complex with tubulin and PI3K provide insights into the selective mode of action of this class of drugs. Our results raise concerns over BKM120's generally accepted mode of action, and provide a unique mechanistic basis for next-generation PI3K inhibitors with improved safety profiles and flexibility for use in combination therapies. PMID:28276440

  2. ATP Synthase and the Actions of Inhibitors Utilized To Study Its Roles in Human Health, Disease, and Other Scientific Areas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sangjin; Pedersen, Peter L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: ATP synthase, a double-motor enzyme, plays various roles in the cell, participating not only in ATP synthesis but in ATP hydrolysis-dependent processes and in the regulation of a proton gradient across some membrane-dependent systems. Recent studies of ATP synthase as a potential molecular target for the treatment of some human diseases have displayed promising results, and this enzyme is now emerging as an attractive molecular target for the development of new therapies for a variety of diseases. Significantly, ATP synthase, because of its complex structure, is inhibited by a number of different inhibitors and provides diverse possibilities in the development of new ATP synthase-directed agents. In this review, we classify over 250 natural and synthetic inhibitors of ATP synthase reported to date and present their inhibitory sites and their known or proposed modes of action. The rich source of ATP synthase inhibitors and their known or purported sites of action presented in this review should provide valuable insights into their applications as potential scaffolds for new therapeutics for human and animal diseases as well as for the discovery of new pesticides and herbicides to help protect the world's food supply. Finally, as ATP synthase is now known to consist of two unique nanomotors involved in making ATP from ADP and Pi, the information provided in this review may greatly assist those investigators entering the emerging field of nanotechnology. PMID:19052322

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor ameliorates early renal injury through its anti-inflammatory action in a rat model of type 1 diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kodera, Ryo; Shikata, Kenichi; Takatsuka, Tetsuharu; Oda, Kaori; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Kajitani, Nobuo; Hirota, Daisho; Ono, Tetsuichiro; Usui, Hitomi Kataoka; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •DPP-4 inhibitor decreased urinary albumin excretion in a rat of type 1 diabetes. •DPP-4 inhibitor ameliorated histlogical changes of diabetic nephropathy. •DPP-4 inhibitor has reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action. •DPP-4 inhibitor is beneficial on diabetic nephropathy besides lowering blood glucose. -- Abstract: Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are incretin-based drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes. In our previous study, we showed that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist has reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action. The mechanism of action of DPP-4 inhibitor is different from that of GLP-1 receptor agonists. It is not obvious whether DPP-4 inhibitor prevents the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy through anti-inflammatory effects besides lowering blood glucose or not. The purpose of this study is to clarify the reno-protective effects of DPP-4 inhibitor through anti-inflammatory actions in the early diabetic nephropathy. Materials and methods: Five-week-old male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups; non-diabetes, diabetes and diabetes treated with DPP-4 inhibitor (PKF275-055; 3 mg/kg/day). PKF275-055 was administered orally for 8 weeks. Results: PKF275-055 increased the serum active GLP-1 concentration and the production of urinary cyclic AMP. PKF275-055 decreased urinary albumin excretion and ameliorated histological change of diabetic nephropathy. Macrophage infiltration was inhibited, and inflammatory molecules were down-regulated by PKF275-055 in the glomeruli. In addition, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity was suppressed in the kidney. Conclusions: These results indicate that DPP-4 inhibitor, PKF275-055, have reno-protective effects through anti-inflammatory action in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy. The endogenous biological active GLP-1 might be beneficial on diabetic nephropathy besides lowering blood glucose.

  4. Cyclobutane-containing peptides: evaluation as novel metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and modelling of their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Daniel; Torres, Elisabeth; Avilés, Francesc X; Ortuño, Rosa M; Vendrell, Josep

    2009-06-01

    Different types of cyclobutane-containing peptides (CBPs) were screened for the first time as ligands of metallocarboxypeptidases (MCPs). CBPs are conformationally constrained, low molecular-weight compounds which showed moderate yet selective inhibitory activity against mammalian MCPs. The most potent compound was a carboxypeptidase B inhibitor. Docked protein-ligand complexes indicated that CBPs may bind to the target proteases via electrostatic interactions and aromatic stacking to catalytically crucial residues and that the placement of functional groups seems to be assisted by the rigid CBP backbone. The easily obtainable CBPs may offer a valuable alternative in the design of novel inhibitors to disease-linked metallocarboxypeptidases like human plasma carboxypeptidase B.

  5. P450 inhibitors of use in medical treatment: focus on mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bossche, H; Koymans, L; Moereels, H

    1995-01-01

    A number of cytochrome P450s are targets for compounds that are clinically used or under clinical evaluation for treatment of patients with mycotic infections, such as dermatophytosis, superficial and systemic candidiasis, cryptococcosis and aspergillosis, with skin diseases, such as psoriasis or ichthyosis, and other retinoid-sensitive malignancies, e.g., neuro-ectodermal glioma. Some of the P450 inhibitors are candidates for the treatment of hirsutism or prostate cancer, others are potent inhibitors of the P450 isomerase involved in the synthesis of thromboxane A2, a potent platelet aggregation inducer and vasoconstrictor.

  6. Free energy calculation provides insight into the action mechanism of selective PARP-1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ran

    2016-04-01

    Selective poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 inhibitor represents promising therapy against cancers with a good balance between efficacy and safety. Owing to the conserved structure between PARP-1 and PARP-2, most of the clinical and experimental drugs show equivalent inhibition against both targets. Most recently, it's disclosed a highly selective PARP-1 inhibitor (NMS-P118) with promising pharmacokinetic properties. Herein, we combined molecular simulation with free energy calculation to gain insights into the selective mechanism of NMS-P118. Our results suggest the reduction of binding affinity for PARP-2 is attributed to the unfavorable conformational change of protein, which is accompanied by a significant energy penalty. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis study further reveals the important role for a tyrosine residue of donor loop (Tyr889(PARP-1) and Tyr455(PARP-2)) in contributing to the ligand selectivity. Retrospective structural analysis indicates the ligand-induced movement of Tyr455(PARP-2) disrupts the intra-molecule hydrogen bonding network, which partially accounts for the "high-energy" protein conformation in the presence of NMS-P118. Interestingly, such effect isn't observed in other non-selective PARP inhibitors including BMN673 and A861695, which validates the computational prediction. Our work provides energetic insight into the subtle variations in the crystal structures and could facilitate rational design of new selective PARP inhibitor.

  7. Diphenylamine Metabolism in 'Braeburn' Apples Stored under Conditions Conducive to Development of Internal Browning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative metabolism and ethylene action were evaluated as factors influencing development of ‘Braeburn’ apple internal browning and cavitation during cold storage. Apples treated with the antioxidant diphenylamine (DPA) and/or the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene were held at 1 oC fo...

  8. Actions of the dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 in a murine neuropathic pain model

    PubMed Central

    Adamson Barnes, Nicholas S.; Mitchell, Vanessa A.; Kazantzis, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose While cannabinoids have been proposed as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain, they have limitations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists have good efficacy in animal models of neuropathic pain; they have a poor therapeutic window. Conversely, selective fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors that enhance the endocannabinoid system have a better therapeutic window, but lesser efficacy. We examined whether JZL195, a dual inhibitor of FAAH and monacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), could overcome these limitations. Experimental Approach C57BL/6 mice underwent the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. Mechanical and cold allodynia, plus cannabinoid side effects, were assessed in response to systemic drug application. Key Results JZL195 and the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212 produced dose‐dependent reductions in CCI‐induced mechanical and cold allodynia, plus side effects including motor incoordination, catalepsy and sedation. JZL195 reduced allodynia with an ED50 at least four times less than that at which it produced side effects. By contrast, WIN55212 reduced allodynia and produce side effects with similar ED50s. The maximal anti‐allodynic effect of JZL195 was greater than that produced by selective FAAH, or MAGL inhibitors. The JZL195‐induced anti‐allodynia was maintained during repeated treatment. Conclusions and Implications These findings suggest that JZL195 has greater anti‐allodynic efficacy than selective FAAH, or MAGL inhibitors, plus a greater therapeutic window than a cannabinoid receptor agonist. Thus, dual FAAH/MAGL inhibition may have greater potential in alleviating neuropathic pain, compared with selective FAAH and MAGL inhibitors, or cannabinoid receptor agonists. PMID:26398331

  9. Cardiovascular pleiotropic actions of DPP-4 inhibitors: a step at the cutting edge in understanding their additional therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam A

    2013-09-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) is a serine protease enzyme expressed widely in many tissues, including the cardiovascular system. The incretin hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are released from the small intestine into the vasculature during a meal, and these incretins have a potential to release insulin from pancreatic beta cells of islets of Langerhans, affording a glucose-lowering action. However, both incretins are hurriedly degraded by the DPP-4. Inhibitors of DPP-4, therefore, enhance the bioavailability of GLP-1 and GIP, and thus have been approved for better glycemic management in patients afflicted with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Five different DPP-4 inhibitors, often called as 'gliptins', namely sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin and alogliptin have been approved hitherto for clinical use. These drugs are used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in diabetic subjects. T2DM is intricately related with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Growing body of evidence suggests that gliptins, in addition to their persuasive anti-diabetic action, have a beneficial pleiotropic action on the heart and vessels. In view of the fact of cardiovascular disease susceptibility of patients afflicted with T2DM, gliptins might offer additional therapeutic benefits in treating diabetic cardiovascular complications. Exploring further the cardiovascular pleiotropic potentials of gliptins might open a panorama in impeccably employing these agents for the dual management of T2DM and T2DM-associated perilous cardiovascular complications. This review will shed lights on the newly identified beneficial pleiotropic actions of gliptins on the cardiovascular system.

  10. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: a Comprehensive Review of the Pharmacology, Mechanism of Action, Substrate Specificity, and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.; Chen, Ying; Ellermann, Manuel; Nicolaou, Kyriacos C.; Juvonen, Risto O.; Petersen, Dennis; Deitrich, Richard A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) belong to a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in the metabolism of aldehydes of both endogenous and exogenous derivation. The human ALDH superfamily comprises 19 isozymes that possess important physiological and toxicological functions. The ALDH1A subfamily plays a pivotal role in embryogenesis and development by mediating retinoic acid signaling. ALDH2, as a key enzyme that oxidizes acetaldehyde, is crucial for alcohol metabolism. ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are lens and corneal crystallins, which are essential elements of the cellular defense mechanism against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage in ocular tissues. Many ALDH isozymes are important in oxidizing reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and thereby help maintain cellular homeostasis. Increased expression and activity of ALDH isozymes have been reported in various human cancers and are associated with cancer relapse. As a direct consequence of their significant physiological and toxicological roles, inhibitors of the ALDH enzymes have been developed to treat human diseases. This review summarizes known ALDH inhibitors, their mechanisms of action, isozyme selectivity, potency, and clinical uses. The purpose of this review is to 1) establish the current status of pharmacological inhibition of the ALDHs, 2) provide a rationale for the continued development of ALDH isozyme-selective inhibitors, and 3) identify the challenges and potential therapeutic rewards associated with the creation of such agents. PMID:22544865

  11. Functional imaging of pharmacological action of SGLT2 inhibitor ipragliflozin via PET imaging using (11)C-MDG.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, Keisuke; Hayashizaki, Yuka; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Takasu, Toshiyuki; Yokono, Masanori; Umeda, Nobuhiro; Takakura, Shoji; Noda, Akihiro; Miyoshi, Sosuke

    2016-08-01

    Sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is a pharmacological target of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to noninvasively visualize the pharmacological action of a selective SGLT2 inhibitor ipragliflozin in the kidney using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methyl-d-glucoside ((11)C-MDG), an SGLT-specific radio-labeled substrate. PET imaging with (11)C-MDG in vehicle-treated rats demonstrated that intravenously injected (11)C-MDG substantially accumulated in the renal cortex, reflecting that the compound was reabsorbed by SGLTs. In contrast, ipragliflozin-treated rats showed significantly lower uptake of (11)C-MDG in renal cortex in a dose-related manner, suggesting that ipragliflozin inhibited the renal reabsorption of (11)C-MDG. This method of visualizing the mode of action of an SGLT2 inhibitor in vivo has demonstrated the drug's mechanism in reducing renal glucose reabsorption in kidney in living animals.

  12. Ethynylphenyl carbonates and carbamates as dual-action acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Jaya; Meloni, David; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Heindel, Ned D; Young, Sherri C

    2015-12-01

    Novel ethynylphenyl carbonates and carbamates containing carbon- and silicon-based choline mimics were synthesized from their respective phenol and aniline precursors and screened for anticholinesterase and anti-inflammatory activities. All molecules were micromolar inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with IC50s of 28-86 μM; the carbamates were two-fold more potent than the carbonates. Two of the most potent AChE inhibitors suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation by 40%. Furthermore, these molecules have physicochemical properties in the range of other CNS drugs. These molecules have the potential to treat inflammation; they could also dually target Alzheimer's disease through restoration of cholinergic balance and inflammation suppression.

  13. Exploring Oxidovanadium(IV) Complexes as YopH Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Modeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Martins, Priscila G A; Mori, Mattia; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise D; Menegatti, Angela C O; Mascarello, Alessandra; Botta, Bruno; Benítez, Julio; Gambino, Dinorah; Terenzi, Hernán

    2015-10-08

    YopH tyrosine phosphatase, a virulence factor produced by pathogenic species of Yersinia, is an attractive drug target. In this work, three oxidovanadium(IV) complexes were assayed against recombinant YopH and showed strong inhibition of the enzyme in the nanomolar range. Molecular modeling indicated that their binding is reinforced by H-bond, cation-π, and π-π interactions conferring specificity toward YopH. These complexes are thus interesting lead molecules for phosphatase inhibitor drug discovery.

  14. Actions of the dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 in a murine inflammatory pain model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wayne B; Gould, Michael J; Torres, Romeo D; Mitchell, Vanessa A; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2014-06-01

    The analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in chronic pain models is limited by side-effects. It has been proposed that this might be overcome by using agents which indirectly activate the endocannabinoid system. We examined the analgesic and side-effect profile of the dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 in an inflammatory pain model. The effect of systemic injections of a range of doses of JZL195 and the pan-cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212 were performed 1 day following intraplantar injection of CFA in C57BL/6 mice. JZL195 and WIN55212 both reduced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, and produced catalepsy and sedation in a dose dependent manner. Unlike WIN55212, JZL195 reduced allodynia at doses below those at which side-effects were observed. The effects of JZL195 and WIN55212 were abolished by co-application with the CB1 antagonist AM251. The CB2 antagonist also reduced the JZL195 anti-allodynia, and reversed the WIN55212 anti-allodynia. The reduction in allodynia produced by JZL195 was greater than that produced individually by the FAAH and MAGL inhibitors, URB597 and JZL184. These findings suggest that JZL195 reduces inflammation induced allodynia at doses below those which produce side-effects, and displays greater efficacy that FAAH or MAGL inhibitors. Thus, dual FAAH/MAGL inhibition has the potential to alleviate inflammatory pain with reduced cannabinoid-like side-effects.

  15. Filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z inhibitors from Glycyrrhiza glabra and their inhibitory mode of action.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takashi; Lallo, Subehan; Nisa, Khoirun; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-15

    FtsZ is an essential protein for bacterial cell division, and an attractive and underexploited novel antibacterial target protein. Screening of Indonesian plants revealed the inhibitory activity of the methanol extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra on the Bacillus subtilis FtsZ (BsFtsZ) GTPase, and further bioassay-guided fractionation of the active methanol extract led to the isolation of seven known polyketides (1-7). Among them, gancaonin I (1), glycyrin (3), and isolicoflavanol (5) exhibited anti-BsFtsZ GTPase activities, at levels comparable to that of the synthetic FtsZ inhibitor, Zantrin Z3. Enzymatic assays using a BsFtsZ Val307R mutant protein and in silico simulations suggested that 1, 3, and 5 bind to the cleft on BsFtsZ, as in the case of the previously reported uncompetitive FtsZ inhibitor, PC190723, and thereby display their significant anti-BsFtsZ inhibitory activities. Furthermore, 1 also showed significant inhibitory activity against B. subtilis, with a MIC value of 5μM. The present study provides new insights into the naturally occurring B. subtilis growth inhibitors.

  16. Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors: Action on the Signaling Pathways of Neuroinflammation, Neurodegeneration, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nunes, Ana Karolina Santana; Garcia-Osta, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) have recently emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammatory, neurodegenerative, and memory loss diseases. Mechanistically, PDE5-Is produce an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotection effect by increasing expression of nitric oxide synthases and accumulation of cGMP and activating protein kinase G (PKG), the signaling pathway of which is thought to play an important role in the development of several neurodiseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this paper was to review present knowledge of the signaling pathways that underlie the use of PDE5-Is in neuroinflammation, neurogenesis, learning, and memory. PMID:26770022

  17. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a “de novo” initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a “closed” conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the “GDD” active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed “N pocket”). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1–2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  18. Exploring Oxidovanadium(IV) Complexes as YopH Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Modeling Studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    YopH tyrosine phosphatase, a virulence factor produced by pathogenic species of Yersinia, is an attractive drug target. In this work, three oxidovanadium(IV) complexes were assayed against recombinant YopH and showed strong inhibition of the enzyme in the nanomolar range. Molecular modeling indicated that their binding is reinforced by H-bond, cation−π, and π–π interactions conferring specificity toward YopH. These complexes are thus interesting lead molecules for phosphatase inhibitor drug discovery. PMID:26617957

  19. Antitumor Action of a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, YF479, in Breast Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yihua; Li, Jingjie; Yang, Feifei; Wu, Haigang; Dai, Fujun; Hu, Meichun; Lu, Xiaoling; Peng, Yi; Liu, Mingyao; Zhao, Yongxiang; Yi, Zhengfang

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates important roles for histone deacetylase in tumorigenesis (HDACs), highlighting them as attractive targets for antitumor drug development. Histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACIs), which have shown favorable anti-tumor activity with low toxicity in clinical investigations, are a promising class of anticancer therapeutics. Here, we screened our compound library to explore small molecules that possess anti-HDAC activity and identified a novel HDACI, YF479. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), which was the first approved HDAC inhibitor for clinical treatment by the FDA, was as positive control in our experiments. We further demonstrated YF479 abated cell viability, suppressed colony formation and tumor cell motility in vitro. To investigate YF479 with superior pharmacodynamic properties, we developed spontaneous and experimental breast cancer animal models. Our results showed YF479 significantly inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Further study indicated YF479 suppressed both early and end stages of metastatic progression. Subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy animal experiment revealed the elimination of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and distant metastasis by YF479. More important, YF479 remarkably prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Intriguingly, YF479 displayed more potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with SAHA. Together, our results suggest that YF479, a novel HDACI, inhibits breast tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. In light of these results, YF479 may be an effective therapeutic option in clinical trials for patients burdened by breast cancer. PMID:25220594

  20. Benzoxazolamines and benzothiazolamines: potent, enantioselective inhibitors of leukotriene biosynthesis with a novel mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Lazer, E S; Miao, C K; Wong, H C; Sorcek, R; Spero, D M; Gilman, A; Pal, K; Behnke, M; Graham, A G; Watrous, J M

    1994-04-01

    A series of benzoxazolamine and benzothiazolamine analogs that inhibit leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis are described. The initial lead, (S)-N-(benzothiazol-2- yl)phenylalanine ethyl ester (5a), was discovered in a screening program for inhibition of Ca-ionophore-A23187-induced LTB4 release in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (IC50 0.23 microM). Through structural modification, it was determined that hydrophobic substituents in the 5-position and replacement of the phenyl ring of phenylalanine with a cyclohexyl group greatly enhance potency. Several ester bioisosteres that retain potency and enantiomeric selectivity are described. Lead optimization culminated in (S)-N-[2-cyclohexyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)ethyl]-5-methyl-2-benzoxazolamine+ ++ (43b), IC50 0.001 microM. The compounds described are not inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase but, rather, act at the level of arachidonic acid release.

  1. Thrombostatin FM compounds: direct thrombin inhibitors - mechanism of action in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, M T; Burke, F; Warnock, M; Zhou, Y; Sweigart, J; Chen, A; Ricketts, D; Lucchesi, B R; Chen, Z; Cera, E Di; Hilfinger, J; Kim, J S; Mosberg, H I; Schmaier, A H

    2008-04-29

    Novel pentapeptides called Thrombostatin FM compounds consisting mostly of D-isomers and unusual amino acids were prepared based upon the stable angiotensin converting enzyme breakdown product of bradykinin - RPPGF. These peptides are direct thrombin inhibitors prolonging the thrombin clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time at ≥0.78, 1.6, and 1.6 μm, respectively. They competitively inhibit α-thrombin-induced cleavage of a chromogenic substrate at 4.4--8.2 μm. They do not significantly inhibit plasma kallikrein, factor (F) XIIa, FXIa, FIXa, FVIIa-TF, FXa, plasmin or cathepsin G. One form, FM19 [rOicPaF(p-Me)], blocks α-thrombin-induced calcium flux in fibroblasts with an IC50 of 6.9 ± 1.2 μm. FM19 achieved 100% inhibition of threshold α- or γ-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation at 8.4 ± 4.7 μm and 16 ± 4 μm, respectively. The crystal structure of thrombin in complex with FM19 shows that the N-terminal D-Arg retrobinds into the S1 pocket, its second residue Oic interacts with His-57, Tyr-60a and Trp-60d, and its C-terminal p-methyl Phe engages thrombin's aryl binding site composed of Ile-174, Trp-215, and Leu-99. When administered intraperitoneal, intraduodenal, or orally to mice, FM19 prolongs thrombin clotting times and delays carotid artery thrombosis. FM19, a low affinity reversible direct thrombin inhibitor, might be useful as an add-on agent to address an unmet need in platelet inhibition in acute coronary syndromes in diabetics and others who with all current antiplatelet therapy still have reactive platelets.

  2. Synergistic antileukemic action of a combination of inhibitors of DNA methylation and histone methylation.

    PubMed

    Momparler, Richard L; Idaghdour, Youssef; Marquez, Victor E; Momparler, Louise F

    2012-08-01

    DNA methylation and histone methylation are both involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and their dysregulation can play an important role in leukemogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation has been reported to silence the expression of tumor suppressor genes in leukemia. Overexpression of the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, a subunit of the polycomb group repressive complex 2 (PRC2), was observed to promote oncogenesis. This is due to aberrant gene silencing by the trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) by EZH2. Since both these epigenetic silencing events are reversible, they are interesting targets for chemotherapeutic intervention by using an inhibitor of DNA methylation, such as 5-aza-2'-deoxcytidine (5-AZA-CdR), and 3-deazaneplanocin-A (DZNep), an inhibitor of the EZH2. Human HL-60 and murine L1210 leukemic cells exposed in vitro to 5-AZA-CdR and DZNep in combination showed a synergistic loss of clonogenicity in a colony assay as compared to each agent alone. This positive chemotherapeutic interaction was also observed in mice with L1210 leukemia. Quantitative PCR showed that the combination also produced a remarkable synergistic activation of the tumor suppressor genes, CDKN1A and FBXO32. Microarray analysis showed that 5-AZA-CdR plus DZNep produced a synergistic activation of >150 genes. Our results indicate that 5-AZA-CdR plus DZNep can reactivate target genes that are silenced by two distinct epigenetic mechanisms leading to a loss of the proliferative potential of leukemic cells.

  3. Proresolving Actions of Synthetic and Natural Protease Inhibitors Are Mediated by Annexin A1.

    PubMed

    Vago, Juliana P; Tavares, Luciana P; Sugimoto, Michelle A; Lima, Graziele Letícia N; Galvão, Izabela; de Caux, Thais R; Lima, Kátia M; Ribeiro, Ana Luíza C; Carneiro, Fernanda S; Nunes, Fernanda Freire C; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-02-15

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated protein endowed with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties. Intact AnxA1 is a 37-kDa protein that may be cleaved in vivo at the N-terminal region by neutrophil proteases including elastase and proteinase-3, generating the 33-kDa isoform that is largely inactive. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of AnxA1 expression and the effects of synthetic (sivelestat [SIV]; Eglin) and natural (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor [SLPI]; Elafin) protease inhibitors on the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation. During the settings of LPS inflammation AnxA1 cleavage associated closely with the peak of neutrophil and elastase expression and activity. SLPI expression increased during resolving phase of the pleurisy. Therapeutic treatment of LPS-challenge mice with recombinant human SLPI or Elafin accelerated resolution, an effect associated with increased numbers of apoptotic neutrophils in the pleural exudates, inhibition of elastase, and modulation of the survival-controlling proteins NF-κB and Mcl-1. Similar effects were observed with SIV, which dose-dependently inhibited neutrophil elastase and shortened resolution intervals. Mechanistically, SIV-induced resolution was caspase-dependent, associated to increased levels of intact AnxA1 and decreased expression of NF-κB and Mcl-1. The proresolving effect of antiproteases was also observed in a model of monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation. SIV skewed macrophages toward resolving phenotypes and enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A neutralizing antiserum against AnxA1 and a nonselective antagonist of AnxA1 receptor abolished the accelerated resolution promoted by SIV. Collectively, these results show that elastase inhibition not only inhibits inflammation but actually promotes resolution, and this response is mediated by protection of endogenous intact AnxA1 with ensuing augmentation of neutrophil apoptosis.

  4. Profile of anti-herpetic action of ASP2151 (amenamevir) as a helicase-primase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Misako; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takemoto, Masaya; Daikoku, Tohru; Yoshida, Yoshihiro; Long, Tan; Okuda, Tomoko; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2017-03-01

    The antiherpetic drugs acyclovir (ACV, valaciclovir) and penciclovir (famciclovir) are phosphorylated by viral thymidine kinase and terminate DNA synthesis. ASP2151 (amenamevir) and foscavir (PFA) directly inhibit viral helicase-primase and DNA polymerase, respectively, and inhibit replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus. ACV, ASP2151, and PFA all inhibit HSV with a different mechanism of action and as a consequence, the kinetics of viral DNA accumulation and progeny virus production differ. This study focused on how viral DNA synthesis and its related events in the replication cycle would influence anti-HSV action of ACV, ASP2151, and PFA. ASP2151 suppressed HSV replication more efficiently than ACV at 10 × 50% effective concentration of plaque formation (EC50), when treatments were started 0-24 h after infection. ASP2151 and PFA were more potent than ACV in suppressing viral DNA synthesis and infectious virus production when they were added up to 3 h following infection. The virus replicated in the presence of ACV was compared for the ratios of HSV DNA copy number to infectivity with that without ACV and infectivity of ACV-treated virus was less efficient than that without ACV-treatment. The EC50 of infected cells in the time course after infection was preserved in PFA, limited in ASP2151, and much increased for ACV, indicating that viral DNA synthesis had little effect on antiviral action of PFA and ASP2151 but reduced the susceptibility of ACV. ASP2151 showed a preferable profile as an anti-herpetic agent with a better pharmacokinetic profile than ACV.

  5. Integrated metabolomic and transcriptomic profiling illustrates successive phases of increasing gene expression associated with chilling-related apple peel cell death

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superficial scald is a chilling-related storage disorder of apple caused by the death of peel epidermal and hypodermal cells and associated discoloration. It is controlled using postharvest antioxidant (diphenylamine; DPA) and ethylene action inhibitor (1-methylcyclopropene; 1-MCP), and/or controlle...

  6. HER2 Dimerization Inhibitor Pertuzumab - Mode of Action and Clinical Data in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Nadia; Beckmann, Matthias W; Rody, Achim; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Müller, Volkmar; Fehm, Tanja; Marschner, Norbert; Gluz, Oleg; Schrader, Iris; Heinrich, Georg; Untch, Michael; Jackisch, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The humanized monoclonal antibody pertuzumab prevents the dimerization of HER2 with other HER receptors, in particular the pairing of the most potent signaling heterodimer HER2/HER3, thus providing a potent strategy for dual HER2 inhibition. It binds to the extracellular domain of HER2 at a different epitope than trastuzumab. Pertuzumab and trastuzumab act in a complementary fashion and provide a more complete blockade of HER2-mediated signal transduction than either agent alone. Phase II studies demonstrated that pertuzumab was generally well tolerated as a single agent or in combination with trastuzumab and/or cytotoxic agents, and implied an improved clinical efficacy of the combination of pertuzumab and trastuzumab in early and advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Results of the pivotal phase III study CLEOPATRA in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer demonstrated that the addition of pertuzumab to first-line combination therapy with docetaxel and trastuzumab significantly prolonged progression-free and overall survival without increasing cardiac toxicity. Currently, the combination of both antibodies is being explored in the palliative setting as well as in the treatment of early HER2-positive breast cancer. Dual HER2 inhibition with the HER2 dimerization inhibitor pertuzumab and trastuzumab may change clinical practice in HER2-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer treatment.

  7. Mechanisms of action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruno; Piña, Benjamín; Barata C, Carlos

    2012-03-06

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are known to increase offspring production in Daphnia magna. This study tested the hypothesis that the increase of serotonin postsynaptic activity by SSRI changes the perception of the food environment and switches life-history responses toward higher food level: females reproduced earlier, producing more but smaller offspring. D. magna reproduction tests, respiration, feeding, and survival-starvation assays and studies of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrate levels of unexposed and exposed females to the SSRI fluoxetine and fluvoxamine and the 5-HT serotonin receptor antagonist cyproheptadine were conducted. Factorial life-history experiments and reproductive assays showed that exposure to SSRI increased juvenile development rate, clutch size, and decrease offspring size at low and intermediate levels of food rations. These effects were reversed by the presence of cyproheptadine, indicating that 5-HT function was essential to the SSRI effects on Daphnia and linking them to the pharmacological effects of SSRI in humans. Respirometry and survival assays and biochemical analyses of lipids, proteins and carbohydrate levels showed that exposure to SSRI increased oxygen consumption rates and decreased carbohydrate levels in adult females. These changes did not affect survival under starving conditions, but they significantly affected the capacity of the exposed animals to survive under anoxic conditions. These results suggest that SSRI increased aerobic catabolism in D. magna making exposed individuals apparently more able to exploit food resources under normoxic conditions, but at the cost of being more sensitive to low oxygen levels, a common situation in natural environments.

  8. Action of the Src family kinase inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Kim, Donghwa; Cheng, Jin Q; Zhang, Shumin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Buettner, Ralf; Mirosevich, Janni; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2005-10-15

    Src family kinases (SFK) are currently being investigated as targets for treatment strategies in various cancers. The novel SFK/Abl inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), is a promising therapeutic agent with oral bioavailability. Dasatinib has been shown to inhibit growth of Bcr-Abl-dependent chronic myeloid leukemia xenografts in nude mice. Dasatinib also has been shown to have activity against cultured human prostate and breast cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which dasatinib acts on epithelial tumor cells remains unknown. In this study, we show that dasatinib blocks the kinase activities of the SFKs, Lyn, and Src, in human prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated substrate (p130(CAS)) signaling downstream of SFKs are also inhibited at similar concentrations of dasatinib. Consistent with inhibition of these signaling pathways, dasatinib suppresses cell adhesion, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Therefore, dasatinib has potential as a therapeutic agent for metastatic prostate cancers harboring activated SFK and focal adhesion kinase signaling.

  9. Mode of action of anti-Candida drugs: focus on terconazole and other ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bossche, H; Marichal, P

    1991-10-01

    A large proportion of the presently available antifungal agents are claimed to derive their activity from interaction with the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the key sterol in most pathogenic fungi. An important target for the allylamines, naftifine and terbinafine, is the squalene epoxidase. Interaction with the epoxidation step results in a decreased availability of ergosterol and an accumulation of squalene. Although the squalene epoxidase is clearly the primary target for this class of antifungals, it still remains an open question whether the fungistatic or fungicidal effects originate from a decrease in ergosterol or squalene accumulation. Indeed, preliminary evidence suggests that squalene does not change the physicochemical properties of membranes. Much more is known about the primary and secondary effects of the azole antifungals, such as miconazole, ketoconazole, terconazole, and itraconazole. Most of the imidazole and triazole derivatives are highly potent and selective inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450-dependent 14 alpha-demethylation of lanosterol (P-45014DM). Their potency and selectivity are determined by the nitrogen heterocycle and to a much greater extent by the hydrophobic N-1 substituent. The triazole antifungals, terconazole and itraconazole, combine a high affinity for Candida P-45014DM with an exceptionally low effect on mammalian cytochrome P-450.

  10. Bradykinin-mediated cardiovascular protective actions of ACE inhibitors. A new dimension in anti-ischaemic therapy?

    PubMed

    Remme, W J

    1997-01-01

    In addition to being accepted therapy in hypertension and heart failure, ACE inhibitors may well offer a new dimension in anti-ischaemic therapy. Currently, anti-ischaemic properties have been demonstrated by ACE inhibitors in selected patient groups, including patients with left ventricular dysfunction with or without a direct temporal relationship with myocardial infarction. Anti-ischaemic effects of ACE inhibitors become apparent late after initiation of treatment and suggest a structural rather than a functional effect. Underlying mechanisms may include a reduction in ventricular dilatation and (abnormal) cardiac hypertrophy, leading to less myocardial oxygen demand and, possibly, improved subendocardial blood supply, and vasculoprotective effects, i.e. anti-atherosclerotic and antiremodelling properties, a beneficial effect on the fibrinolytic system and an improvement in abnormal endothelial vasodilator function. The latter aspect is most probably the pivotal mode of action where the anti-ischaemic profile of ACE inhibition is concerned. An improvement in endothelial dysfunction has been shown in patients with mild to moderate coronary artery disease [Trial on Reversing ENdothelial Dysfunction (TREND)]. It is of importance that, in both clinical experiments and human studies, the role of bradykinin appears central in the structural and functional cardiovascular effects of ACE inhibition. This is particularly true for the improvement of impaired endothelial function. Myocardial ischaemia evokes vasoconstrictor neurohormonal activation, which may lead to coronary vasoconstriction in diseased coronary segments. The subsequent abnormal endothelial function leads to diminished coronary flow and also increases systemic vasotone and afterload, thus unfavourably altering the myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio. Under laboratory conditions, acute ACE inhibition counteracts this activation in humans. However, it is speculated that this anti-ischaemic mechanism may

  11. Mode of Action, In Vitro Activity, and In Vivo Efficacy of AFN-1252, a Selective Antistaphylococcal FabI Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Monique; Awrey, Donald; Bardouniotis, Elias; Berman, Judd; Clarke, Teresa; Dorsey, Mandy; Hafkin, Barry; Ramnauth, Jaillal; Romanov, Vladimir; Schmid, Molly B.; Thalakada, Rosanne; Yethon, Jeremy; Pauls, Henry W.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of action of AFN-1252, a selective inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), which is involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, was confirmed by using biochemistry, macromolecular synthesis, genetics, and cocrystallization of an AFN-1252–FabI complex. AFN-1252 demonstrated a low propensity for spontaneous resistance development and a time-dependent reduction of the viability of both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, achieving a ≥2-log10 reduction in S. aureus counts over 24 h, and was extremely potent against clinical isolates of S. aureus (MIC90, 0.015 μg/ml) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (MIC90, 0.12 μg/ml), regardless of their drug resistance, hospital- or community-associated origin, or other clinical subgroup. AFN-1252 was orally available in mouse pharmacokinetic studies, and a single oral dose of 1 mg/kg AFN-1252 was efficacious in a mouse model of septicemia, providing 100% protection from an otherwise lethal peritoneal infection of S. aureus Smith. A median effective dose of 0.15 mg/kg indicated that AFN-1252 was 12 to 24 times more potent than linezolid in the model. These studies, demonstrating a selective mode of action, potent in vitro activity, and in vivo efficacy, support the continued investigation of AFN-1252 as a targeted therapeutic for staphylococcal infections. PMID:22948878

  12. Biochemical mechanism of action of certain glucoside and nucleoside dialdehyde inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbag, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    The periodate-oxidation products of 4-methyl umbelliferyl 7-..beta..-D-glucoside (MUGox), n-dodecyl ..beta..-D-glucoside (DGox), n-amyl-..beta..-D-glucoside (AGox), 6,7 dihydroxy 6-..beta..-D-glucoside (esculinox), 4-hydroxy phenyl ..beta..-D-glucoside (arbutinox), salicylaldehyde-..beta..-D-glucoside (helicinox), indoxyl-..beta..-D0-D-glucoside (IGox) and ..beta..-Naphthyl ..cap alpha..-D-glucoside (N..cap alpha..Gox) were synthesized and screened for activity against L1210 leukemia in-vitro. MUGox, DGox, Arbutinox, and Helicinox were the most active, having IC/sub 50/ values of 40, 48, 44, and 47 ..mu..M, respectively. MUGox was found to inhibit DNA, RNA and protein synthesis significantly in L1210 cells. Its effects on the in-vitro activity of 2-cycle purified bovine brain tubulin were examined. MUGOx inhibited tubulin assembly only minimally at 100 ..mu..M but stabilized assembled microtubules from depolymerization at the same concentration. MUGox was a noncompetitive inhibitor of wheat germ RNA polymerase II and E. coli RNA polymerase with respect to (/sup 3/H)UMP incorporation into RNA. MUGox bound one essential lysine in the wheat germ enzyme and two essential lysines in the E. coli enzyme. DGox and AGox produced mixed inhibition of wheat germ RNA polymerase II. The purine nucleoside analog 6-S-(acetylaminoethyl-1-naphthylamino-5-sulfonyl) thioinosine dicarboxaldehyde (AMPR-OP) noncompetitively blocked 0X174 DNA binding to E. coli RNA polymerase. It is tentatively concluded that AMPR-OP bound two lysine residues in the template binding subsite in addition to one lysine in the initiation subsite.

  13. [Role of reactive oxygen species in the bactericidal action of quinolones--inhibitors of DNA gyrase].

    PubMed

    Kotova, V Iu; Mironov, A S; Zavigel'skiĭ, G B

    2014-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics inhibit DNA gyrase, but the induced degradation of chromosomal DNA is determined by a complex process of joint action quinolones and hydroxyl radical OH'. To quantify the level of stress responses and their time dependence in bacterial cells the induced specific lux-biosensors--the bacterium Escherichia coli, containing hybrid plasmids pColD'::lux; pSoxS'::lux; pKatG'::lux were used in this study. It is shown that quinolones (nalidixic acid, norfloxacin) induce SOS-response and oxidative stress with the formation of superoxide anion O2(-) in E. coli cells. The main parameters of SOS-response and oxidative stress, which depend on the quinolone concentration, are determined. Formation of superoxide anion O2(-) occurs almost simultaneously with the SOS-response. The mutant strain of E. coli sodA sodB, which do not contain active forms of superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, is characterized by an increased resistance to quinolones as compared to the wild type cells. At high concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid-->20 μg/mL; norfloxacin-->500 ng/mL) their bactericidal effect is partially caused by conversion of the superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide H2O2, conducted by superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, which is followed by the Fenton reaction and the formation of toxic hydroxyl radical OH'. At low concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid--<20 μg/mL; norfloxacin--<500 ng/mL), the role of active oxygen species in the antimicrobial effect is practically nonexistent.

  14. Leucaena leucocephala serine proteinase inhibitor: primary structure and action on blood coagulation, kinin release and rat paw edema.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M L; Souza-Pinto, J C; Batista, I F; Araujo, M S; Silveira, V F; Auerswald, E A; Mentele, R; Eckerskorn, C; Sampaio, M U; Sampaio, C A

    2000-03-07

    A serine proteinase inhibitor isolated from Leucaena leucocephala seeds (LlTI) was purified to homogeneity by acetone fractionation, ion exchange chromatography, gel filtration and reverse phase chromatography (HPLC). SDS-PAGE indicated a protein with M(r) 20000 and two polypeptide chains (alpha-chain, M(r) 15000, and beta-chain, M(r) 5000), the sequence being determined by automatic Edman degradation and by mass spectroscopy. LlTI is a 174 amino acid residue protein which shows high homology to plant Kunitz inhibitors, especially those double chain proteins purified from the Mimosoideae subfamily. LlTI inhibits plasmin (K(i) 3.2 x 10(-10) M), human plasma kallikrein (K(i) 6.3 x 10(-9) M), trypsin (K(i) 2.5 x 10(-8) M) and chymotrypsin (K(i) 1.4 x 10(-8) M). Factor XIIa activity is inhibited but K(i) was not determined, and factor Xa, tissue kallikrein and thrombin are not inhibited by LlTI. The action of LlTI on enzymes that participate in the blood clotting extrinsic pathway is confirmed by the prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, used as clotting time assay. The inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity of plasmin was confirmed on the hydrolysis of fibrin plates. LlTI inhibits kinin release from high molecular weight kininogen by human plasma kallikrein in vitro and, administered intravenously, causes a decrease in paw edema induced by carrageenin or heat in male Wistar rats. In addition, lower concentrations of bradykinin were found in limb perfusion fluids of LlTI-treated rats.

  15. Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor from Vigna unguiculata seeds enhances the action of bradykinin-related peptides.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Morales Álvares, Alice; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni; Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Trindade, Neidiane Rosa; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Silva, Luciano Paulino; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2014-10-30

    The hydrolysis of bradykinin (Bk) by different classes of proteases in plasma and tissues leads to a decrease in its half-life. Here, Bk actions on smooth muscle and in vivo cardiovascular assays in association with a protease inhibitor, Black eyed-pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) and also under the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin were evaluated. Two synthetic Bk-related peptides, Bk1 and Bk2, were used to investigate the importance of additional C-terminal amino acid residues on serine protease activity. BTCI forms complexes with Bk and analogues at pH 5.0, 7.4 and 9.0, presenting binding constants ranging from 103 to 104 M-1. Formation of BTCI-Bk complexes is probably driven by hydrophobic forces, coupled with slight conformational changes in BTCI. In vitro assays using guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) ileum showed that Bk retains the ability to induce smooth muscle contraction in the presence of BTCI. Moreover, no alteration in the inhibitory activity of BTCI in complex with Bk and analogous was observed. When the BTCI and BTCI-Bk complexes were tested in vivo, a decrease of vascular resistance and consequent hypotension and potentiating renal and aortic vasodilatation induced by Bk and Bk2 infusions was observed. These results indicate that BTCI-Bk complexes may be a reliable strategy to act as a carrier and protective approach for Bk-related peptides against plasma serine proteases cleavage, leading to an increase in their half-life. These findings also indicate that BTCI could remain stable in some tissues to inhibit chymotrypsin or trypsin-like enzymes that cleave and inactivate bradykinin in situ.

  16. Specificity and mechanism of action of EHT 1864, a novel small molecule inhibitor of Rac family small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Shutes, Adam; Onesto, Cercina; Picard, Virginie; Leblond, Bertrand; Schweighoffer, Fabien; Der, Channing J

    2007-12-07

    There is now considerable experimental evidence that aberrant activation of Rho family small GTPases promotes the uncontrolled proliferation, invasion, and metastatic properties of human cancer cells. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the development of small molecule inhibitors of Rho GTPase function. However, to date, most efforts have focused on inhibitors that indirectly block Rho GTPase function, by targeting either enzymes involved in post-translational processing or downstream protein kinase effectors. We recently determined that the EHT 1864 small molecule can inhibit Rac function in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the biological and biochemical specificities and biochemical mechanism of action of EHT 1864. We determined that EHT 1864 specifically inhibited Rac1-dependent platelet-derived growth factor-induced lamellipodia formation. Furthermore, our biochemical analyses with recombinant Rac proteins found that EHT 1864 possesses high affinity binding to Rac1, as well as the related Rac1b, Rac2, and Rac3 isoforms, and this association promoted the loss of bound nucleotide, inhibiting both guanine nucleotide association and Tiam1 Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor-stimulated exchange factor activity in vitro. EHT 1864 therefore places Rac in an inert and inactive state, preventing its engagement with downstream effectors. Finally, we evaluated the ability of EHT 1864 to block Rac-dependent growth transformation, and we determined that EHT 1864 potently blocked transformation caused by constitutively activated Rac1, as well as Rac-dependent transformation caused by Tiam1 or Ras. Taken together, our results suggest that EHT 1864 selectively inhibits Rac downstream signaling and transformation by a novel mechanism involving guanine nucleotide displacement.

  17. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of novel natural cathepsin L inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of a cancerous cell takes place when it ceases to respond to growth-inhibiting signals and multiplies uncontrollably and can detach and move to other parts of the body; the process called as metastasis. A particular set of cysteine proteases are very active during cancer metastasis, Cathepsins being one of them. They are involved in tumor growth and malignancy and have also been reported to be overexpressed in tumor cell lines. In the present study, a combinatorial approach comprising three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR), ligand-based pharmacophore modelling and search followed by cathepsin L structure-based high throughput screening was carried out using an initial set of 28 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives as cathepsin L inhibitors. A 3D QSAR was derived using the alignment of a common thiosemicarbazone substructure. Essential structural features responsible for biological activity were taken into account for development of a pharmacophore model based on 29 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives. This model was used to carry out an exhaustive search on a large dataset of natural compounds. A further cathepsin L structure-based screen identified two top scoring compounds as potent anti-cancer leads. Results The generated 3D QSAR model showed statistically significant results with an r2 value of 0.8267, cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 of 0.7232, and a pred_r2 (r2 value for test set) of 0.7460. Apart from these, a high F test value of 30.2078 suggested low probability of the model's failure. The pharmacophoric hypothesis chosen for searching the natural compound libraries was identified as DDHRR, where two Ds denote 2 hydrogen donors, H represents a hydrophobic group and two Rs represent aromatic rings, all of which are essential for the biological activity. We report two potential drug leads ZINC08764437 (NFP) and ZINC03846634 (APQ) obtained after a combined approach of pharmacophore

  18. Tumor Selective Cytotoxic Action of a Thiomorpholin Hydroxamate Inhibitor (TMI-1) in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mezil, Lynda; Berruyer-Pouyet, Carole; Cabaud, Olivier; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Combes, Sébastien; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Viens, Patrice; Collette, Yves; Birnbaum, Daniel; Lopez, Marc

    2012-01-01

    cytotoxic action of a thiomorpholin hydroxamate compound. TMI-1 is a novel repositionable drug not only for the treatment of adverse prognosis breast cancers but also for other neoplasms. PMID:23028451

  19. Regulatory substances produced by lymphocytes. VI. Cell cycle specificity of inhibitor of DNA synthesis action in L cells.

    PubMed

    Wagshal, A B; Jegasothy, B V; Waksman, B H

    1978-01-01

    IDS inhibits DNA synthesis and mitosis of L cells only when present during the late G1 phase of the cell cycle, as shown with L cells synchronized by a variety of methods. This corresponds well with earlier findings that IDS inhibits DNA synthesis in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes when present between 16 and 24 h after adding mitogen. In both cell types, the inhibition produced by IDS appears to be totally the result of elevation of cAMP level. Thus, inhibitors of cAMP phosphodiesterase work synergistically with IDS, and activators of cAMP phosphodiesterase overcome the inhibition by IDS. This paper shows that IDS raises cAMP levels in L cells only within a narrow interval of the cell cycle, around 6-8 h after mitosis. This cell cycle specificity, which may be related to appearance of receptors for IDS only at discrete times, may be important in limiting IDS action to suppression, as elevated cAMP levels have a variety of other effects during other phases of the cell cycle.

  20. Anti-metastatic action of FAK inhibitor OXA-11 in combination with VEGFR-2 signaling blockade in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Ingrid; Gebre, Matthew; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Chen, Debbie; Epstein, David

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to determine the anti-tumor effects of OXA-11, a potent, novel small-molecule amino pyrimidine inhibitor (1.2 pM biochemical IC50) of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). In studies of cancer cell lines, OXA-11 inhibited FAK phosphorylation at phospho-tyrosine 397 with a mechanistic IC50 of 1 nM in TOV21G tumor cells, which translated into functional suppression of proliferation in 3-dimensional culture with an EC50 of 9 nM. Studies of OXA-11 activity in TOV21G tumor-cell xenografts in mice revealed a pharmacodynamic EC50 of 1.8 nM, indicative of mechanistic inhibition of pFAK [Y397] in these tumors. OXA-11 inhibited TOV21G tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner and also potentiated effects of cisplatin on tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro and on tumor growth in mice. Studies of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice revealed OXA-11 suppression of pFAK [Y397] and pFAK [Y861] in tumors and liver. OXA-11 given daily from age 14 to 17 weeks reduced tumor vascularity, invasion, and when given together with the anti-VEGFR-2 antibody DC101 reduced the incidence, abundance, and size of liver metastases. Liver micrometastases were found in 100 % of mice treated with vehicle, 84 % of mice treated with OXA-11, and 79 % of mice treated with DC101 (19–24 mice per group). In contrast, liver micrometastases were found in only 52 % of 21 mice treated with OXA-11 plus DC101, and those present were significantly smaller and less numerous. Together, these findings indicate that OXA-11 is a potent and selective inhibitor of FAK phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. OXA-11 slows tumor growth, potentiates the anti-tumor actions of cisplatin and—when combined with VEGFR-2 blockade—reduces metastasis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in RIP-Tag2 mice. PMID:26445848

  1. Evidence for a central mode of action for etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-08-01

    The COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib modulates the peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms in animals. This interaction has not been studied in patients with pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, 4-week treatment study investigated the pain mechanisms modulated by etoricoxib in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to group A (60 mg/d etoricoxib followed by placebo) or B (placebo followed by 60 mg/d etoricoxib). The quantitative, mechanistic pain biomarkers were pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation (TS), and conditioning pain modulation. Clinical readouts were Brief Pain Inventory, WOMAC, painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), and time and pain intensity during walking and stair climbing. Etoricoxib as compared with placebo significantly modulated the pressure pain thresholds (P = 0.012, localized sensitization) at the knee and leg (control site) (P = 0.025, spreading sensitization) and TS assessed from the knee (P = 0.038) and leg (P = 0.045). Conditioning pain modulation was not modulated. The Brief Pain Inventory (pain scores), PD-Q, WOMAC, and walking and stair climbing tests were all significantly improved by etoricoxib. Based on a minimum of 30% or 50% pain alleviation (day 0-day 28), responders and nonresponders were defined. The nonresponders showed a significant association between increased facilitation of TS and increased pain alleviation. None of the other parameters predicted the degree of pain alleviation. Generally, a responder to etoricoxib has the most facilitated TS. In conclusion, etoricoxib (1) modulated central pain modulatory mechanisms and (2) improved pain and function in painful osteoarthritis. Stronger facilitation of TS may indicate a better response to etoricoxib, supporting the central mode-of-action of the drug.

  2. Possible involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility action of bupropion, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-08-01

    Sigma receptors particularly, sigma-1 subtype is known to modulate the release of catecholamines in the brain and may participate in the mechanism of action of various antidepressants. The present study investigated the possible involvement of sigma receptors in modulating the anti-immobility-like effect of bupropion (a dopamine reuptake inhibitor) using the forced swim test (FST) in mice. Bupropion produced dose-dependent (10-40 mg/kg, i.p.) reduction in immobility period and the ED(50) value was found to be 18.5 (7.34-46.6) mg/kg, i.p. (+)-Pentazocine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a high-affinity sigma-1 receptor agonist, produced synergistic response when it was co-administered with a subeffective dose of bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.). On the contrary, pretreatment with progesterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a sigma-1 receptor antagonist neurosteroid, rimcazole (5 mg/kg, i.p.), another sigma-1 receptor antagonist, or BD 1047 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a novel sigma-1 receptor antagonist, reversed the anti-immobility effects of bupropion (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The various modulators used in the study did not show any effect per se on locomotor activity except bupropion which at a higher dose (15-40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the locomotor activity. The results for the first time demonstrated the involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility effects of bupropion.

  3. Double incretin receptor knockout (DIRKO) mice reveal an essential role for the enteroinsular axis in transducing the glucoregulatory actions of DPP-IV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hansotia, Tanya; Baggio, Laurie L; Delmeire, Dominique; Hinke, Simon A; Yamada, Yuichiro; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Seino, Yutaka; Holst, Jens J; Schuit, Frans; Drucker, D J

    2004-05-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are gut-derived incretins that potentiate glucose clearance following nutrient ingestion. Elimination of incretin receptor action in GIPR(-/-) or GLP-1R(-/-) mice produces only modest impairment in glucose homeostasis, perhaps due to compensatory upregulation of the remaining incretin. We have now studied glucose homeostasis in double incretin receptor knockout (DIRKO) mice. DIRKO mice exhibit normal body weight and fail to exhibit an improved glycemic response after exogenous administration of GIP or the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4. Plasma glucagon and the hypoglycemic response to exogenous insulin were normal in DIRKO mice. Glycemic excursion was abnormally increased and levels of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were decreased following oral but not intraperitoneal glucose challenge in DIRKO compared with GIPR(-/-) or GLP-1R(-/-) mice. Similarly, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and the response to forskolin were well preserved in perifused DIRKO islets. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors valine pyrrolidide (Val-Pyr) and SYR106124 lowered glucose and increased plasma insulin in wild-type and single incretin receptor knockout mice, the glucose-lowering actions of DPP-IV inhibitors were eliminated in DIRKO mice. These findings demonstrate that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is maintained despite complete absence of both incretin receptors, and they delineate a critical role for incretin receptors as essential downstream targets for the acute glucoregulatory actions of DPP-IV inhibitors.

  4. Separating the mechanism-based and off-target actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors with CETP gene polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background—Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive...

  5. Cardiolipins are 'in vitro' inhibitors of rat brain (Na+ + K+)-dependent ATPases. A probable mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Toro-Goyco, E; Rodriguez, M B; Preston, A M; Rosenthal, A F

    1981-03-20

    Cardiolipins were found to potentiate the 'in vitro' inhibitory activity of (-)-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on (Na+ + K+)-dependent rat brain ATPases. The compounds were found to be powerful inhibitors by themselves. At optimal concentrations of cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+), the compounds were found to be noncompetitive inhibitors of ATP (Ki = 3.5 x 10(-6) M) and 'uncompetitive' inhibitors of Na+. From gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the cardiolipin preparations it can be inferred that their effectiveness as inhibitors is related to the linoleic acid contents. The preliminary data presented here suggest that cardiolipins inhibit the Na+-dependent phosphorylation step in the hydrolysis of ATP. Based on the observations reported in this work, a hypothesis is presented suggesting that there may be a functional or evolutionary explanation for the paucity of cardiolipins in cell plasma membranes.

  6. Structure and mechanism of action of the hydroxy-aryl-aldehyde class of IRE1 endoribonuclease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sanches, Mario; Duffy, Nicole M.; Talukdar, Manisha; Thevakumaran, Nero; Chiovitti, David; Canny, Marella D.; Lee, Kenneth; Kurinov, Igor; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Poda, Gennadiy; Prakesch, Michael; Wilson, Brian; Tam, Victor; Schweitzer, Colleen; Toro, Andras; Lucas, Julie L.; Vuga, Danka; Lehmann, Lynn; Durocher, Daniel; Zeng, Qingping; Patterson, John B.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-10-24

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the unfolded protein response and its dysfunction is linked to multiple diseases. The stress transducer IRE1α is a transmembrane kinase endoribonuclease (RNase) that cleaves mRNA substrates to re-establish ER homeostasis. Aromatic ring systems containing hydroxy–aldehyde moieties, termed hydroxy–aryl–aldehydes (HAA), selectively inhibit IRE1α RNase and thus represent a novel chemical series for therapeutic development. We solved crystal structures of murine IRE1α in complex with three HAA inhibitors. HAA inhibitors engage a shallow pocket at the RNase-active site through pi-stacking interactions with His910 and Phe889, an essential Schiff base with Lys907 and a hydrogen bond with Tyr892. Structure–activity studies and mutational analysis of contact residues define the optimal chemical space of inhibitors and validate the inhibitor-binding site. These studies lay the foundation for understanding both the biochemical and cellular functions of IRE1α using small molecule inhibitors and suggest new avenues for inhibitor design.

  7. Evaluation of Inhibitory Action of Novel Non β-Lactam Inhibitor against Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC-2)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arbab; Faheem, Mohammad; Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Asad U.

    2014-01-01

    The use of three classical β-lactamase inhibitors (Clavulanic acid, tazobactam and sulbactam) in combination with β-lactam antibiotics is presently the mainstay of antibiotic therapy against Gram-negative bacterial infections. However these inhibitors are unable to inhibit carbapenemase KPC-2 effectively. They being β-lactam derivatives behave as substrates for this enzyme instead of inactivating it. We have initiated our study to check the in vitro inhibition activity of the two novel screened inhibitors (ZINC01807204 and ZINC02318494) in combination with carbapenems against KPC-2 expressing bacterial strain and their effect on purified enzyme KPC-2. The MIC values of meropenem and ertapenem showed maximum reduction (8 folds) in combination with screened compounds (ZINC01807204 and ZINC02318494). CLSM images also depicted their strong antibacterial activity in comparison to conventional β-lactamase inhibitors. Moreover no toxic effect has been shown on HeLa cell line. Though the IC50 value of ZINC01807204 was high (200 µM), it exhibited fairly good affinity for KPC-2 (Ki = 43.82 µM). With promising results this study identifies ZINC01807204 as a lead molecule for further optimization and development of more potent non β-lactam inhibitors against KPC-2. PMID:25265157

  8. Antithrombotic actions of the thrombin inhibitor, argatroban, in a canine model of coronary cyclic flow: comparison with heparin.

    PubMed Central

    Duval, N.; Lunven, C.; O'Brien, D. P.; Grosset, A.; O'Connor, S. E.; Berry, C. N.

    1996-01-01

    1. The antithrombotic action of argatroban, a synthetic thrombin inhibitor, was studied in a canine model of coronary cyclic flow having some of the characteristics of acute unstable angina. Heparin was studied as a reference anticoagulant. 2. Localized endothelial damage was induced in the circumflex coronary artery of anaesthetized open-chest foxhounds and a critical stenosis was applied by use of a Lexan constrictor placed around the artery at the site of endothelial damage. An electro-magnetic flow probe was placed distal to the lesion, and cyclic flow variations (CFVs) were observed, as thrombi formed at the site of the arterial lesion and were dislodged. Test compounds were administered by i.v. infusion commencing 1 h after the appearance of CFVs, and maintained for 1 h. On termination of the treatments, coronary flow was observed for a further 60 min. A series of blood samples were taken at predetermined times throughout each experiment in order to determine the coagulation parameters, thrombin time (TT) activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and for the determination of fibrinopeptide A (FpA) levels before, during and post-treatment. 3. Argatroban and heparin showed antithrombotic effects in this model. Argatroban dose-dependently increased the minimum coronary flow at the nadir of the CFVs from 5.4 +/- 1.7 to 9.1 +/- 2.1 ml min-1 (30 micrograms kg-1 min-1, P = 0.041) and from 2.9 +/- 0.9 to 16.3 +/- 4.5 ml min-1 (100 micrograms kg-1 min-1, P = 0.023, n = 8 dogs at each dose level). Heparin (5 and 15 iu kg-1 min-1) also increased minimum flow, but the increase was not statistically significant at the 5% level, although the P value in animals treated with 15 iu kg-1 min-1 (P = 0.0521, n = 6 dogs) fell just outside this limit. Although neither compound significantly decreased the overall CFV frequency, argatroban (100 micrograms kg-1 min-1) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the number of large amplitude CFVs (minimum coronary flow < 10 ml min-1) by 63

  9. A Four-Point Screening Method for Assessing Molecular Mechanism of Action (MMOA) Identifies Tideglusib as a Time-Dependent Inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Swinney, Zachary T.; Haubrich, Brad A.; Xia, Shuangluo; Ramesha, Chakk; Gomez, Stephen R.; Guyett, Paul; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo; Swinney, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background New therapeutics are needed for neglected tropical diseases including Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a progressive and fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. There is a need for simple, efficient, cost effective methods to identify new molecules with unique molecular mechanisms of action (MMOAs). The mechanistic features of a binding mode, such as competition with endogenous substrates and time-dependence can affect the observed inhibitory IC50, and differentiate molecules and their therapeutic usefulness. Simple screening methods to determine time-dependence and competition can be used to differentiate compounds with different MMOAs in order to identify new therapeutic opportunities. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report a four point screening methodology to evaluate the time-dependence and competition for inhibition of GSK3β protein kinase isolated from T. brucei. Using this method, we identified tideglusib as a time-dependent inhibitor whose mechanism of action is time-dependent, ATP competitive upon initial binding, which transitions to ATP non-competitive with time. The enzyme activity was not recovered following 100-fold dilution of the buffer consistent with an irreversible mechanism of action. This is in contrast to the T. brucei GSK3β inhibitor GW8510, whose inhibition was competitive with ATP, not time-dependent at all measured time points and reversible in dilution experiments. The activity of tideglusib against T. brucei parasites was confirmed by inhibition of parasite proliferation (GI50 of 2.3 μM). Conclusions/Significance Altogether this work demonstrates a straightforward method for determining molecular mechanisms of action and its application for mechanistic differentiation of two potent TbGSK3β inhibitors. The four point MMOA method identified tideglusib as a mechanistically differentiated TbGSK3β inhibitor. Tideglusib was shown to inhibit parasite

  10. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anders; Pedersen, Søren W.; Dorr, Liam A.; Vallon, Gary; Ripoche, Isabelle; Ducki, Sylvie; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical and biophysical methods, such as fluorescence polarization (FP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and 1H-15N HSQC NMR. Our data show that under the applied in vitro conditions, ZL006 and IC87201 do not interact with the PDZ domains of nNOS or PSD-95, nor inhibit the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interface by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action. PMID:26177569

  11. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  12. Insulinotropic and β-cell protective action of cuminaldehyde, cuminol and an inhibitor isolated from Cuminum cyminum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Patil, Swapnil B; Takalikar, Shreehari S; Joglekar, Madhav M; Haldavnekar, Vivek S; Arvindekar, Akalpita U

    2013-10-01

    Cuminum cyminum, a commonly used spice, is known to have anti-diabetic action. The present study aims towards the isolation of bioactive components from C. cyminum and the evaluation of their insulin secretagogue potential with the probable mechanism and β-cell protective action. The anti-diabetic activity was detected in the petroleum ether (pet ether) fraction of the C. cyminum distillate and studied through in vivo and in vitro experiments. Bioactive components were identified through GC-MS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and NMR analysis. The isolated components were evaluated for their insulin secretagogue action using rat pancreatic islets. Further, the probable mechanism of stimulation of islets was evaluated through in vitro studies using diazoxide, nifedipine and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. β-Cell protection was evaluated using the (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan) (MTT) assay, the alkaline comet assay and nitrite production. The administration of the pet ether fraction for 45 d to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats revealed an improved lipid profile. Cuminaldehyde and cuminol were identified as potent insulinotrophic components. Cuminaldehyde and cuminol (25 μg/ml) showed 3·34- and 3·85-fold increased insulin secretion, respectively, than the 11·8 mm-glucose control. The insulinotrophic action of both components was glucose-dependent and due to the closure of the ATP-sensitive K (K⁺-ATP) channel and the increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration. An inhibitor of insulin secretion with potent β-cell protective action was also isolated from the same pet ether fraction. In conclusion, C. cyminum was able to lower blood glucose without causing hypoglycaemia or β-cell burn out. Hence, the commonly used spice, C. cyminum, has the potential to be used as a novel insulinotrophic therapy for prolonged treatment of diabetes.

  13. Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid are potent inhibitors of vasopressin action on rabbit cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, D L; Capdevila, J; Falck, J R; Breyer, M D; Jacobson, H R

    1989-01-01

    AA is metabolized by a cytochrome P450, NADPH-dependent epoxygenase to four regioisomeric epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). The EETs are further hydrated enzymatically to their respective diols, vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). We studied the effect of pretreatment with DHETs on 10 microU/cm2 arginine vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated hydraulic conductivity (Lp) (Lp x 10(-7) cm/atm/s, mean +/- SE) in rabbit cortical collecting ducts (CCDs) perfused in vitro at 37 degrees C. At 10(-6) M all four DHETs were potent inhibitors of the hydroosmotic effect of AVP. 14,15-DHET was the most potent isomer; it reduced AVP-induced Lp from a control value of 234.75 +/- 11.7, n = 17, to a value of 95.2 +/- 8.39, n = 5, P less than 0.0001, a reduction of AVP-mediated water flow of 60%. The inhibitory effect of 14,15-DHET was dose dependent and significant to nanomolar concentrations. 14,15-DHET at 10(-7) M was as potent an inhibitor of AVP's activity as was 10(-7) M PGE2. AVP's hydroosmotic effect is mediated through its intracellular second messenger, cAMP. 8-p-Chlorophenylthio-cAMP (CcAMP) at 10(-4) M induced a peak Lp of 189.6 +/- 11.0, n = 8; pretreatment with 10(-6) M 14,15-DHET reduced CcAMP-peak Lp to 132.0 +/- 13.4, n = 5, P less than 0.01, demonstrating a post-cAMP effect. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy suggests that EETs are present in extracts purified from CCDs. We conclude that cytochrome P450 epoxygenase eicosanoids are potent inhibitors of the hydroosmotic effect of vasopressin and are endogenous constituents of normal CCDs, the major target tissue for AVP. Images PMID:2556446

  14. Stimulus dependence of the action of small-molecule inhibitors in the CD3/CD28 signalling network.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Karsten; Ganser, Alexander; André, Thomas; Roth, Günter; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram; Brock, Roland

    2008-09-01

    Cells in the body are exposed simultaneously to a multitude of various signals. Inside a cell, molecular signalling networks integrate this information into a physiologically meaningful response. Interestingly, in the cellular testing of drug candidates, this complexity is largely ignored. Compounds are tested for cells that are challenged with one stimulus only. The activation of T lymphocytes through engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex and CD28 coreceptor is a prominent example for a cellular response that depends on the integration of signals. We investigated the cellular response characteristics of this network at different strengths of receptor and coreceptor activation. A novel cellular microarray-based approach, in which various combinations of antibodies directed against the CD3 complex and CD28 were spotted, was employed for analysing the stimulus dependence of activation of the transcription factor NFAT and actin reorganisation. For both responses, quantitative differences in inhibitor activity were observed. Remarkably, for IL-2 expression, which was detected by standard ELISA, low doses of the Src-family kinase inhibitor PP2 strongly potentiated IL-2 expression at high-level, but not at low-level, CD28 co-engagement. Therefore, for a physiologically highly relevant signalling network, the cellular response might vary qualitatively with only quantitative variations of a stimulus. This level of complexity should be considered in early cellular drug testing.

  15. Efficacy and mechanism of action of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, lapatinib and neratinib in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer: preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Segovia-Mendoza, Mariana; González-González, María E; Barrera, David; Díaz, Lorenza; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of tumors, including breast cancer, overexpress proteins of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. The interaction between family members activates signaling pathways that promote tumor progression and resistance to treatment. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type II (HER2) positive breast cancer represents a clinical challenge for current therapy. It has motivated the development of novel and more effective therapeutic EGFR family target drugs, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This review focuses on the effects of three TKIs mostly studied in HER2- positive breast cancer, lapatinib, gefitinib and neratinib. Herein, we discuss the mechanism of action, therapeutic advantages and clinical applications of these TKIs. To date, TKIs seem to be promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast tumors, either as monotherapy or combined with other pharmacological agents. PMID:26609467

  16. Linear biocompatible glyco-polyamidoamines as dual action mode virus infection inhibitors with potential as broad-spectrum microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Nicolò; Ferruti, Paolo; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Manfredi, Amedea; Berzi, Angela; Clerici, Mario; Cagno, Valeria; Lembo, David; Palmioli, Alessandro; Sattin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The initial steps of viral infections are mediated by interactions between viral proteins and cellular receptors. Blocking the latter with high-affinity ligands may inhibit infection. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed by immature dendritic cells and macrophages, mediates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by recognizing mannose clusters on the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Mannosylated glycodendrimers act as HIV entry inhibitors thanks to their ability to block this receptor. Previously, an amphoteric, but prevailingly cationic polyamidoamine named AGMA1 proved effective as infection inhibitor for several heparan sulfate proteoglycan-dependent viruses, such as human papilloma virus HPV-16 and herpes simplex virus HSV-2. An amphoteric, but prevailingly anionic PAA named ISA23 proved inactive. It was speculated that the substitution of mannosylated units for a limited percentage of AGMA1 repeating units, while imparting anti-HIV activity, would preserve the fundamentals of its HPV-16 and HSV-2 infection inhibitory activity. In this work, four biocompatible linear PAAs carrying different amounts of mannosyl-triazolyl pendants, Man-ISA7, Man-ISA14, Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5, were prepared by reaction of 2-(azidoethyl)-α-D-mannopyranoside and differently propargyl-substituted AGMA1 and ISA23. All mannosylated PAAs inhibited HIV infection. Both Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5 maintained the HPV-16 and HSV-2 activity of the parent polymer, proving broad-spectrum, dual action mode virus infection inhibitors. PMID:27641362

  17. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, AT13387, displays a long duration of action in vitro and in vivo in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, Brent; Curry, Jayne; Smyth, Tomoko; Fazal, Lynsey; Feltell, Ruth; Harada, Isobel; Coyle, Joe; Williams, Brian; Reule, Matthias; Angove, Hayley; Cross, David M; Lyons, John; Wallis, Nicola G; Thompson, Neil T

    2012-03-01

    A ubiquitously expressed chaperone, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is of considerable interest as an oncology target because tumor cells and oncogenic proteins are acutely dependent on its activity. AT13387 (2,4-dihydroxy-5-isopropyl-phenyl)-[5-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-ylmethyl)-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl] methanone, l-lactic acid salt) a novel, high-affinity HSP90 inhibitor, which is currently being clinically tested, has shown activity against a wide array of tumor cell lines, including lung cancer cell lines. This inhibitor has induced the degradation of specific HSP90 client proteins for up to 7 days in tumor cell lines in vitro. The primary driver of cell growth (mutant epidermal growth factor receptors) was particularly sensitive to HSP90 inhibition. The long duration of client protein knockdown and suppression of phospho-signaling seen in vitro after treatment with AT13387 was also apparent in vivo, with client proteins and phospho-signaling suppressed for up to 72 h in xenograft tumors after treatment with a single dose of AT13387. Pharmacokinetic analyses indicated that while AT13387 was rapidly cleared from blood, its retention in tumor xenografts was markedly extended, and it was efficacious in a range of xenograft models. AT13387's long duration of action enabled, in particular, its efficacious once weekly administration in human lung carcinoma xenografts. The use of longer-acting HSP90 inhibitors, such as AT13387, on less frequent dosing regimens has the potential to maintain antitumor efficacy as well as minimize systemic exposure and unwanted effects on normal tissues.

  18. Linear biocompatible glyco-polyamidoamines as dual action mode virus infection inhibitors with potential as broad-spectrum microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, Nicolò; Ferruti, Paolo; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Manfredi, Amedea; Berzi, Angela; Clerici, Mario; Cagno, Valeria; Lembo, David; Palmioli, Alessandro; Sattin, Sara

    2016-09-01

    The initial steps of viral infections are mediated by interactions between viral proteins and cellular receptors. Blocking the latter with high-affinity ligands may inhibit infection. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed by immature dendritic cells and macrophages, mediates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by recognizing mannose clusters on the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Mannosylated glycodendrimers act as HIV entry inhibitors thanks to their ability to block this receptor. Previously, an amphoteric, but prevailingly cationic polyamidoamine named AGMA1 proved effective as infection inhibitor for several heparan sulfate proteoglycan-dependent viruses, such as human papilloma virus HPV-16 and herpes simplex virus HSV-2. An amphoteric, but prevailingly anionic PAA named ISA23 proved inactive. It was speculated that the substitution of mannosylated units for a limited percentage of AGMA1 repeating units, while imparting anti-HIV activity, would preserve the fundamentals of its HPV-16 and HSV-2 infection inhibitory activity. In this work, four biocompatible linear PAAs carrying different amounts of mannosyl-triazolyl pendants, Man-ISA7, Man-ISA14, Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5, were prepared by reaction of 2-(azidoethyl)-α-D-mannopyranoside and differently propargyl-substituted AGMA1 and ISA23. All mannosylated PAAs inhibited HIV infection. Both Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5 maintained the HPV-16 and HSV-2 activity of the parent polymer, proving broad-spectrum, dual action mode virus infection inhibitors.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Antimalarial Benzoisothiazolones: Species-Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium spp. MEP Pathway enzyme, IspD

    PubMed Central

    Price, Kathryn E.; Armstrong, Christopher M.; Imlay, Leah S.; Hodge, Dana M.; Pidathala, C.; Roberts, Natalie J.; Park, Jooyoung; Mikati, Marwa; Sharma, Raman; Lawrenson, Alexandre S.; Tolia, Niraj H.; Berry, Neil G.; O’Neill, Paul M.; John, Audrey R. Odom

    2016-01-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway is an essential metabolic pathway found in malaria parasites, but absent in mammals, making it a highly attractive target for the discovery of novel and selective antimalarial therapies. Using high-throughput screening, we have identified 2-phenyl benzo[d]isothiazol-3(2H)-ones as species-selective inhibitors of Plasmodium spp. 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidyltransferase (IspD), the third catalytic enzyme of the MEP pathway. 2-Phenyl benzo[d]isothiazol-3(2H)-ones display nanomolar inhibitory activity against P. falciparum and P. vivax IspD and prevent the growth of P. falciparum in culture, with EC50 values below 400 nM. In silico modeling, along with enzymatic, genetic and crystallographic studies, have established a mechanism-of-action involving initial non-covalent recognition of inhibitors at the IspD binding site, followed by disulfide bond formation through attack of an active site cysteine residue on the benzo[d]isothiazol-3(2H)-one core. The species-selective inhibitory activity of these small molecules against Plasmodium spp. IspD and cultured parasites suggests they have potential as lead compounds in the pursuit of novel drugs to treat malaria. PMID:27857147

  20. Recombinant protein of heptad-repeat HR212, a stable fusion inhibitor with potent anti-HIV action in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Wei; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Liu Changmei; Tien Po Zheng Yongtang

    2008-07-20

    HR212, a recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli, has been previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 membrane fusion at low nanomolar level. Here we report that HR212 is effective in blocking laboratory strain HIV-1{sub IIIB} entry and replication with EC{sub 50} values of 3.92 {+-} 0.62 and 6.59 {+-} 1.74 nM, respectively, and inhibiting infection by clinic isolate HIV-1{sub KM018} with EC{sub 50} values of 44.44 {+-} 10.20 nM, as well as suppressing HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect with an EC{sub 50} value of 3.04 {+-} 1.20 nM. It also inhibited HIV-2{sub ROD} and HIV-2{sub CBL-20} entry and replication in the {mu}M range. Notably, HR212 was highly effective against T20-resistant strains with EC{sub 50} values ranging from 5.09 to 7.75 nM. Unlike T20, HR212 showed stability sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation in a time-of-addition assay, and was insensitive to proteinase K digestion. These results suggest that HR212 has great potential to be further developed as novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients, particularly for those infected by T20-resistant variants.

  1. Mechanism of action of the antibiotic NXL101, a novel nonfluoroquinolone inhibitor of bacterial type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael T; Stachyra, Thérèse; Platel, Denis; Girard, Anne-Marie; Claudon, Monique; Bruneau, Jean-Michel; Miossec, Christine

    2008-09-01

    NXL101 is one of a new class of quinoline antibacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors showing potent activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. NXL101 inhibited topoisomerase IV more effectively than gyrase from Escherichia coli, whereas the converse is true of enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus. This apparent target preference is opposite to that which is associated with most fluoroquinolone antibiotics. In vitro isolation of S. aureus mutants resistant to NXL101 followed by cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding gyrase and topoisomerase IV led to the identification of several different point mutations within, or close to, the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of GyrA. However, the mutations were not those that are most frequently associated with decreased sensitivity to quinolones. A fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant variant of gyrase generated in vitro was highly resistant to inhibition by the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin but remained fully susceptible to inhibition by NXL101. Two mutant gyrases constructed in vitro, with mutations in gyrA engineered according to those most frequently found in S. aureus strains resistant to NXL101, were insensitive to inhibition by NXL101 and had a diminished sensitivity to ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Certain combinations of mutations giving rise to NXL101 resistance and those giving rise to fluoroquinolone resistance may be mutually exclusive.

  2. Serine protease inhibitor kazal-type 6 inhibits tumorigenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via its extracellular action

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Meigang; Dai, Xinchuan; Xu, Yuqiang; Wu, Hongyu; Li, Guodong; Lu, Hairong; Zhong, Jiang; Huang, Qingshan

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) causes significant medical burdens worldwide. Diagnosis, especially in the early stages, is still challenging. Therapeutic options are limited and often ineffective. Although several risk factors have been known important for development of HCC, the molecular basis of the process is rather complex and has not been fully understood. We have found that a subpopulation of HCC cells which are resistant to oncolytic parvovirus H1 superinfection highly express serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 6 (SPINK6). This protein is specifically reduced in all HCC cell lines and tissues we analyzed. When upregulated, SPINK6 could suppress the malignant phenotypes of the HCC cells in several in vitro models. The putative tumor suppression role of SPINK6 is, however, independent of its protease inhibitory activity. To suppress the malignancy of HCC cells, SPINK6 has to be secreted to trigger signals which regulate an intracellular signaling molecule, ERK1/2, as well as a series of downstream factors involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis and migration. Our study supports that SPINK6 is an important tumor suppressor in liver, and further investigations may help develop more effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27999203

  3. Transforming growth factor beta is a potent inhibitor of interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor expression: proposed mechanism of inhibition of IL-1 action

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth and functions of lymphoid and hemopoietic progenitor cells. Cell proliferation depends not only on the presence of growth factors, but also on the development of specific receptor-signal transducing complexes. We therefore investigated whether the inhibitory actions of TGF-beta could be mediated by inhibition of growth factor receptors. TGF-beta inhibited the constitutive level of interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R) expression on several murine lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cell lines, as well as IL-1R expression induced by interleukin 3 (IL-3) on normal murine and human bone marrow cells. Furthermore, treatment of bone marrow progenitor cells with TGF-beta concomitantly inhibited the ability of IL-1 to promote high proliferative potential (HPP) colony formation as well as blocked IL-1- induced IL-2 production by EL-4 6.1 cells. These findings provide the first evidence that the inhibitory action of TGF-beta on the growth and functional activities of hematopoietic and T cells is associated with a reduction in the cell surface receptor expression for IL-1. PMID:2143773

  4. Distinct action of the α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol on SGLT3, enteroendocrine cells, and GLP1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Kaneko, Shuji; Jutabha, Promsuk; Zhang, Xilin; Seino, Susumu; Jomori, Takahito; Anzai, Naohiko; Miki, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Oral ingestion of carbohydrate triggers glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) secretion, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. By measuring GLP1 concentrations in murine portal vein, we found that the ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel is not essential for glucose-induced GLP1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells, while the sodium-glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1) is required, at least in the early phase (5 min) of secretion. By contrast, co-administration of the α-glucosidase inhibitor (α-GI) miglitol plus maltose evoked late-phase secretion in a glucose transporter 2-dependent manner. We found that GLP1 secretion induced by miglitol plus maltose was significantly higher than that by another α-GI, acarbose, plus maltose, despite the fact that acarbose inhibits maltase more potently than miglitol. As miglitol activates SGLT3, we compared the effects of miglitol on GLP1 secretion with those of acarbose, which failed to depolarize the Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human SGLT3. Oral administration of miglitol activated duodenal enterochromaffin (EC) cells as assessed by immunostaining of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin kinase 2 (phospho-CaMK2). In contrast, acarbose activated much fewer enteroendocrine cells, having only modest phospho-CaMK2 immunoreactivity. Single administration of miglitol triggered no GLP1 secretion, and GLP1 secretion by miglitol plus maltose was significantly attenuated by atropine pretreatment, suggesting regulation via vagal nerve. Thus, while α-GIs generally delay carbohydrate absorption and potentiate GLP1 secretion, miglitol also activates duodenal EC cells, possibly via SGLT3, and potentiates GLP1 secretion through the parasympathetic nervous system.

  5. Identification of known drugs that act as inhibitors of NF-kappaB signaling and their mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susanne C; Huang, Ruili; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Shukla, Sunita J; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Shinn, Paul; Van Leer, Danielle; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P; Xia, Menghang

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role across many cellular processes including embryonic and neuronal development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and immune responses to infection and inflammation. Dysregulation of NF-kappaB signaling is associated with inflammatory diseases and certain cancers. Constitutive activation of NF-kappaB signaling has been found in some types of tumors including breast, colon, prostate, skin and lymphoid, hence therapeutic blockade of NF-kappaB signaling in cancer cells provides an attractive strategy for the development of anticancer drugs. To identify small molecule inhibitors of NF-kappaB signaling, we screened approximately 2800 clinically approved drugs and bioactive compounds from the NIH Chemical Genomics Center Pharmaceutical Collection (NPC) in a NF-kappaB mediated beta-lactamase reporter gene assay. Each compound was tested at fifteen different concentrations in a quantitative high throughput screening format. We identified nineteen drugs that inhibited NF-kappaB signaling, with potencies as low as 20 nM. Many of these drugs, including emetine, fluorosalan, sunitinib malate, bithionol, narasin, tribromsalan, and lestaurtinib, inhibited NF-kappaB signaling via inhibition of IkappaBalpha phosphorylation. Others, such as ectinascidin 743, chromomycin A3 and bortezomib utilized other mechanisms. Furthermore, many of these drugs induced caspase 3/7 activity and had an inhibitory effect on cervical cancer cell growth. Our results indicate that many currently approved pharmaceuticals have previously unappreciated effects on NF-kappaB signaling, which may contribute to anticancer therapeutic effects. Comprehensive profiling of approved drugs provides insight into their molecular mechanisms, thus providing a basis for drug repurposing.

  6. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Pedro M.; Freitas, Teresa; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. {yields} Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. {yields} This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  7. Unraveling the role of fermentation in the mode of action of acetolactate synthase inhibitors by metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Zabalza, Ana; Orcaray, Luis; Igal, María; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R; Geigenberger, Peter; van Dongen, Joost T; Royuela, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    Herbicides that inhibit branched chain amino acid biosynthesis induce aerobic fermentation. The role of fermentation in the mode of action of these herbicides is not known, nor is the importance of this physiological response in the growth inhibition and the lethality caused by them. Metabolic profiling was used to compare the effects of the herbicide imazethapyr (IM) on pea plants with two other treatments that also induce fermentation: hypoxia and the exogenous supply pyruvate for seven days. While hypoxic roots did not show internal anoxia, feeding pyruvate or applying IM to the roots led to internal anoxia, probably related to the respiratory burst detected. The three treatments induced ethanol fermentation, but fermentation induced following herbicide treatment was earlier than that following pyruvate supply and was not associated with a decrease in the energy status. No striking changes were detected in the metabolic profiling of hypoxic roots, indicating that metabolism was only slightly impaired. Feeding pyruvate resulted in marked succinate accumulation and a general amino acid accumulation. IM-treated roots showed a general accumulation of glycolytic metabolites upstream of pyruvate, a decrease in some TCA intermediates and an increase in the free amino acid pool sizes. All treatments caused GABA and putrescine accumulation. Our results indicate that IM supply impairs carbon/nitrogen metabolism and this impaired metabolism is likely to be related to the growth arrest detected. As growth is arrested, carbohydrates and glycolytic intermediates accumulate and energy becomes more available.

  8. Substrate-analogous inhibitors exert antimalarial action by targeting the Plasmodium lactate transporter PfFNT at nanomolar scale

    PubMed Central

    Golldack, André; Henke, Björn; Wiechert, Marie; Blancke Soares, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Resistance against all available antimalarial drugs calls for novel compounds that hit unexploited targets in the parasite. Here, we show that the recently discovered Plasmodium falciparum lactate/proton symporter, PfFNT, is a valid druggable target, and describe a new class of fluoroalkyl vinylogous acids that potently block PfFNT and kill cultured parasites. The original compound, MMV007839, is derived from the malaria box collection of potent antimalarials with unknown targets and contains a unique internal prodrug principle that reversibly switches between a lipophilic transport form and a polar, substrate-analogous active form. Resistance selection of cultured P. falciparum parasites with sub-lethal concentrations of MMV007839 produced a single nucleotide exchange in the PfFNT gene; this, and functional characterization of the resulting PfFNT G107S validated PfFNT as a novel antimalarial target. From quantitative structure function relations we established the compound binding mode and the pharmacophore. The pharmacophore largely circumvents the resistance mutation and provides the basis for a medicinal chemistry program that targets lactate and proton transport as a new mode of antimalarial action. PMID:28178358

  9. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling to predict concentrations and actions of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitor canagliflozin in human intestines and renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazumi; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamaru, Yoshinobu; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Canagliflozin is a recently developed sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor that promotes renal glucose excretion and is considered to inhibit renal SGLT2 from the luminal side of proximal tubules. Canagliflozin reportedly inhibits SGLT1 weakly and suppresses postprandial plasma glucose, suggesting that it also inhibits intestinal SGLT1. However, it is difficult to measure the drug concentrations of these assumed sites of action directly. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships of canagliflozin remain poorly characterized. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of canagliflozin was developed based on clinical data from healthy volunteers and it was used to simulate luminal concentrations in intestines and renal tubules. In small intestine simulations, the inhibition ratios for SGLT1 were predicted to be 40%-60% after the oral administration of clinical doses (100-300 mg/day). In contrast, inhibition ratios of canagliflozin for renal SGLT2 and SGLT1 were predicted to be approximately 100% and 0.2%-0.4%, respectively. These analyses suggest that canagliflozin only inhibits SGLT2 in the kidney. Using the simulated proximal tubule luminal concentrations of canagliflozin, the urinary glucose excretion rates in canagliflozin-treated diabetic patients were accurately predicted using the renal glucose reabsorption model as a PD model. Because the simulation of canagliflozin pharmacokinetics was successful, this PBPK methodology was further validated by successfully simulating the pharmacokinetics of dapagliflozin, another SGLT2 inhibitor. The present results suggest the utility of this PBPK/PD model for predicting canagliflozin concentrations at target sites and help to elucidate the pharmacological effects of SGLT1/2 inhibition in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Identification of chebulinic acid as potent natural inhibitor of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase and molecular insights into its binding mode of action.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kunal; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Wahi, Divya; Jain, Ritu; Bharadvaja, Navneeta; Grover, Abhinav

    2015-12-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis has threatened all the advances that have been made in TB control at the global stage in the last few decades. DNA gyrase enzymes are an excellent target for antibacterial drug discovery as they are involved in essential functions like DNA replication. Here we report, a successful application of high throughput virtual screening (HTVS) to identify an inhibitor of Mycobacterium DNA gyrase targeting the wild type and the most prevalent three double mutants of quinolone resistant DNA gyrase namely A90V+D94G, A74S+D94G and A90V+S91P. HTVS of 179.299 compounds gave five compounds with significant binding affinity. Extra presicion (XP) docking and MD simulations gave a clear view of their interaction pattern. Among them, chebulinic acid (CA), a phytocompound obtained from Terminalia chebula was the most potent inhibitor with significantly high XP docking score, -14.63, -16.46, -15.94 and -15.11 against wild type and three variants respectively. Simulation studies for a period of 16 ns indicated stable DNA gyrA-CA complex formation. This stable binding would result in inhibition of the enzyme by two mechanisms. Firstly, binding of CA causes displacement of catalytic Tyr129 away from its target DNA-phosphate molecule from 1.6 Å to 3.8-7.3 Å and secondly, by causing steric hindrance to the binding of DNA strand at DNA binding site of enzyme. The combined effect would result in loss of cleavage and religation activity of enzyme leading to bactericidal effect on tuberculosis. This phytocompound displays desirable quality for carrying forward as a lead compound for anti-tuberculosis drug development. The results presented here are solely based on computations and need to be validated experimentally in order to assert the proposed mechanism of action.

  11. High-throughput screening using the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay identifies ebselen as an inhibitor of diguanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Ori J; Orr, Mona W; Wang, Yan; Lee, Vincent T

    2014-01-17

    The rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has motivated recent efforts to identify new drug candidates that target virulence factors or their regulatory pathways. One such antivirulence target is the cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP) signaling pathway, which regulates biofilm formation, motility, and pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that utilizes cdiGMP-regulated polysaccharides, including alginate and pellicle polysaccharide (PEL), to mediate virulence and antibiotic resistance. CdiGMP activates PEL and alginate biosynthesis by binding to specific receptors including PelD and Alg44. Mutations that abrogate cdiGMP binding to these receptors prevent polysaccharide production. Identification of small molecules that can inhibit cdiGMP binding to the allosteric sites on these proteins could mimic binding defective mutants and potentially reduce biofilm formation or alginate secretion. Here, we report the development of a rapid and quantitative high-throughput screen for inhibitors of protein-cdiGMP interactions based on the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA). Using this approach, we identified ebselen as an inhibitor of cdiGMP binding to receptors containing an RxxD domain including PelD and diguanylate cyclases (DGC). Ebselen reduces diguanylate cyclase activity by covalently modifying cysteine residues. Ebselen oxide, the selenone analogue of ebselen, also inhibits cdiGMP binding through the same covalent mechanism. Ebselen and ebselen oxide inhibit cdiGMP regulation of biofilm formation and flagella-mediated motility in P. aeruginosa through inhibition of diguanylate cyclases. The identification of ebselen provides a proof-of-principle that a DRaCALA high-throughput screening approach can be used to identify bioactive agents that reverse regulation of cdiGMP signaling by targeting cdiGMP-binding domains.

  12. The apoptotic mechanism of action of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor SKI-178 in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dick, Taryn E; Hengst, Jeremy A; Fox, Todd E; Colledge, Ashley L; Kale, Vijay P; Sung, Shen-Shu; Sharma, Arun; Amin, Shantu; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Wang, Hong-Gang; Yun, Jong K

    2015-03-01

    We previously developed SKI-178 (N'-[(1E)-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethylidene]-3-(4-methoxxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carbohydrazide) as a novel sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) selective inhibitor and, herein, sought to determine the mechanism-of-action of SKI-178-induced cell death. Using human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines as a model, we present evidence that SKI-178 induces prolonged mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Further examination of the mechanism of action of SKI-178 implicated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) as critical factors required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. In cell cycle synchronized human AML cell lines, we demonstrate that entry into mitosis is required for apoptotic induction by SKI-178 and that CDK1, not JNK, is required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. We further demonstrate that the sustained activation of CDK1 during prolonged mitosis, mediated by SKI-178, leads to the simultaneous phosphorylation of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family members, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, as well as the phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of Mcl-1. Moreover, multidrug resistance mediated by multidrug-resistant protein1 and/or prosurvival Bcl-2 family member overexpression did not affect the sensitivity of AML cells to SKI-178. Taken together, these findings highlight the therapeutic potential of SKI-178 targeting SphK1 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of AML, including multidrug-resistant/recurrent AML subtypes.

  13. Mechanism of action of hypoglycemic effects of an intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Shohei; Katsumi, Sohei; Mera, Yasuko; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Nashida, Reiko; Kakutani, Makoto; Ohta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Diminished insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissues and failure of pancreatic beta cells to secrete insulin are known major determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus. JTT-130, an intestine-specific microsomal transfer protein inhibitor, has been shown to suppress high fat-induced obesity and ameliorate impaired glucose tolerance while enhancing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. We investigated the effects of JTT-130 on glucose metabolism and elucidated the mechanism of action, direct effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in a high fat diet-induced obesity rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet were treated with a single administration of JTT-130. Glucose tolerance, hyperglycemic clamp and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic testing were performed to assess effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, respectively. Plasma GLP-1 and tissue triglyceride content were also determined under the same conditions. A single administration of JTT-130 suppressed plasma glucose elevations after oral glucose loading and increased the disposition index while elevating GLP-1. JTT-130 also enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in hyperglycemic clamp tests, whereas increased insulin sensitivity was observed in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests. Single-dose administration of JTT-130 decreased lipid content in the liver and skeletal muscle. JTT-130 demonstrated acute and direct hypoglycemic effects by enhancing insulin secretion and/or insulin sensitivity.

  14. Autophagy and ER stress play an essential role in the mechanism of action and drug resistance of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Emilia; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J

    2013-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a mature B cell malignancy and is the most prevalent type of leukemia in adults. There is no curative therapy for this disease; however, several new agents have shown very promising results. Autophagy has not been studied in CLL and in this study we first sought to determine if autophagy was functional in CLL with classic inducers, and if this contributes to direct cytotoxicity or protection from cell death. While autophagy is activated with all classic stimuli of this process, only unfolded protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated autophagy protects from cell death. Interestingly, select therapeutic agents (fludarabine, GS-1101, flavopiridol), which are active in CLL, also induce autophagy. Of interest, only the broad cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol has improved efficacy when autophagy is antagonized biochemically (chloroquine) or by siRNA. This promoted an investigation which demonstrated unexpectedly that flavopiridol mediates ER stress and downstream activation of MAP3K5/ASK1, which ultimately is responsible for cell death. Similarly, autophagy activated in part via ER stress and also CDK5 inhibition is protective against cell death induced by this process. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that in CLL, autophagy is induced by multiple stimuli but only acts as a mechanism of resistance against ER stress-mediating agents. Similarly, flavopiridol mediates ER stress as a primary mechanism of action in CLL, and autophagy serves as a mechanism of resistance to this agent.

  15. Functional characterization and anti-cancer action of the clinical phase II cardiac Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor istaroxime: in vitro and in vivo properties and cross talk with the membrane androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Konstantinos; Dimas, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Tsapara, Anna; Alkahtani, Saad; Honisch, Sabina; Prousis, Kyriakos C.; Alarifi, Saud; Calogeropoulou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Sodium potassium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase) is a validated pharmacological target for the treatment of various cardiac conditions. Recent published data with Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors suggest a potent anti-cancer action of these agents in multiple indications. In the present study, we focus on istaroxime, a Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor that has shown favorable safety and efficacy properties in cardiac phase II clinical trials. Our experiments in 22 cancer cell lines and in prostate tumors in vivo proved the strong anti-cancer action of this compound. Istaroxime induced apoptosis, affected the key proliferative and apoptotic mediators c-Myc and caspase-3 and modified actin cystoskeleton dynamics and RhoA activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, istaroxime was capable of binding to mAR, a membrane receptor mediating rapid, non-genomic actions of steroids in prostate and other cells. These results support a multi-level action of Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors in cancer cells and collectively validate istaroxime as a strong re-purposing candidate for further cancer drug development. PMID:27027435

  16. Salt-sparing diuretic action of a water-soluble urea analog inhibitor of urea transporters UT-A and UT-B in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cil, Onur; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Tas, Sadik Taskin; Su, Tao; Lee, Sujin; Anderson, Marc O.; Ertunc, Mert; Verkman, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of kidney urea transporter (UT) proteins have potential use as salt-sparing diuretics (‘urearetics’) with a different mechanism of action than diuretics that target salt transporters. To study UT inhibition in rats, we screened about 10,000 drugs, natural products and urea analogs for inhibition of rat UT-A1. Drug and natural product screening found nicotine, sanguinarine and an indolcarbonylchromenone with IC50 of 10–20 μM. Urea analog screening found methylacetamide and dimethylthiourea (DMTU). DMTU fully and reversibly inhibited rat UT-A1 and UT-B by a noncompetitive mechanism with IC50 of 2–3 mM. Homology modeling and docking computations suggested DMTU binding sites on rat UT-A1. Following a single intraperitoneal injection of 500 mg/kg DMTU, peak plasma concentration was 9 mM with t1/2 of about 10 hours, and a urine concentration of 20–40 mM. Rats chronically treated with DMTU had a sustained, reversible reduction in urine osmolality from 1800 to 600 mOsm, a 3-fold increase in urine output, and mild hypokalemia. DMTU did not impair urinary concentrating function in rats on a low protein diet. Compared to furosemide-treated rats, the DMTU-treated rats had greater diuresis and reduced urinary salt loss. In a model of Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone secretion, DMTU treatment prevented hyponatremia and water retention produced by water-loading in dDAVP-treated rats. Thus, our results establish a rat model of UT inhibition and demonstrate the diuretic efficacy of UT inhibition. PMID:25993324

  17. 2-Methoxy-3,8,9-trihydroxy coumestan: a new synthetic inhibitor of Na+,K+-ATPase with an original mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Pôças, Elisa Suzana Carneiro; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; da Silva, Alcides José Monteiro; Noël, François

    2003-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyse the interaction between Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and one of our recent synthesized coumestans, namely the original molecule 2-methoxy-3,8,9-trihydroxy coumestan (PCALC36). Rat brain (mainly alpha 2 and alpha 3 Na(+),K(+)-ATPase isoforms) and kidney (alpha 1 isoform) fractions enriched with Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were utilized to compare the inhibition promoted by PCALC36 with that of classical inhibitors like ouabain and vanadate. Analysis of inhibition curves revealed that unlike ouabain, which was about a thousand times more potent to inhibit brain isoforms than kidney isoform, PCALC36 had a similar affinity for brain (IC(50)=4.33+/-0.90 microM) and kidney (IC(50)=11.04+/-0.86 microM) isoforms. The inhibitory effect of PCALC36 was not antagonized by 1-10 mM K(+), as observed with ouabain. Whereas vanadate was more potent in ionic conditions promoting the E2 conformation of the enzyme, the inhibitory effect of PCALC36 was equal in ionic conditions favouring either the E1 or E2 conformations. Equilibrium binding assays with [3H]ouabain revealed that the addition of 2-10 microM PCALC36 did not change the K(d) of ouabain but decreased its maximal binding (B(max)) in a concentration-dependent manner (from 76.6 to 44.0 pmol/mg protein). This inhibitory effect of PCALC36 was not reverted after an extensive washing procedure indicating that it forms a very stable complex with Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. We conclude that PCALC36, a new molecule with a non-steroidal skeleton, inhibits the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase by a mechanism of action different from the cardiac glycosides and could thus serve as a structural paradigm to develop new inotropic drugs.

  18. Clinical Significance of Repetitive Compound Muscle Action Potentials in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis: A Predictor for Cholinergic Side Effects of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Eun; Kim, Yool-hee; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) are widely used to treat myasthenia gravis (MG). Although AChEIs are usually tolerated well, some MG patients suffer from side effects. Furthermore, a small proportion of MG patients show cholinergic hypersensitivity and cannot tolerate AChEIs. Because repetitive compound muscle action potentials (R-CMAPs) are an electrophysiologic feature of cholinergic neuromuscular hyperactivity, we investigated the clinical characteristics of MG patients with R-CMAPs to identify their clinical usefulness in therapeutic decision-making. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records and electrodiagnostic findings of MG patients who underwent electrodiagnostic studies and diagnostic neostigmine testing (NT). Results Among 71 MG patients, 9 could not tolerate oral pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and 17 experienced side effects of PB. R-CMAPs developed in 24 patients after NT. The highest daily dose of PB was lower in the patients with R-CMAPs (240 mg/day vs. 480 mg/day, p<0.001). The frequencies of PB intolerance and side effects were higher in the patients with R-CMAPs than in those without R-CMAPs [37.5% vs. 0% (p<0.001) and 45.8% vs. 12.8% (p=0.002), respectively]. The MG Foundation of America postintervention status did not differ significantly between MG patients with and without R-CMAPs, and the response to immunotherapy was also good in both groups. Conclusions Side effects of and intolerance to AChEIs are more common in MG patients with R-CMAPs than in those without R-CMAPs. AChEIs should be used carefully in MG patients with R-CMAPs. The presence of R-CMAPs after NT may be a good indicator of the risks of PB side effects and intolerance. PMID:27819419

  19. L-Asparaginase as a new molecular target against leishmaniasis: insights into the mechanism of action and structure-based inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasdeep; Srivastava, Ankit; Jha, Pravin; Sinha, Kislay K; Kundu, Bishwajit

    2015-07-01

    l-Asparaginases belong to a family of amidohydrolases that catalyze the conversion of l-asparagine into l-aspartic acid and ammonia. Although bacterial l-asparaginases have been used extensively as anti-leukemic agents, their possible role as potential drug targets for pathogenic organisms has not been explored. The presence of genes coding for putative l-asparaginase enzymes in the Leishmania donovani genome hinted towards the specific role of these enzymes in extending survival benefit to the organism. To investigate whether this enzyme can serve as a potential drug target against the Leishmania pathogen, we obtained structural models of one of the putative Leishmania l-asparaginase I (LdAI). Using an integrated computational approach involving molecular modelling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we found crucial differences between catalytic residues of LdAI as compared to bacterial l-asparaginases. The deviation from the canonical acid-base pair at triad I, along with the structural reorganization of a β-hairpin loop in the presence of a substrate, indicated an altogether new mechanism of action of the LdAI enzyme. Moreover, the finding of compositional and functional differences between LdAI and human asparaginase was used as a criterion to identify specific small molecule inhibitors. Through virtual screening of a library of 11 438 compounds, we report five compounds that showed favorable interactions with the active pocket of LdAI, without adversely affecting human asparaginase. One of these compounds when tested on cultured Leishmania promastigotes displayed a promising leishmanicidal effect. Overall, our work not only provides first hand mechanistic insights of LdAI but also proposes five strongly active compounds which may prove as effective anti-leishmaniasis molecules.

  20. Concerted actions of ameliorated colitis, aberrant crypt foci inhibition and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase induction by sonic hedgehog inhibitor led to prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-03-15

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been known to contribute to carcinogenesis in organ, where hedgehog exerted organogenesis and in cancers, which are developed based on mutagenic inflammation. Therefore, colitis-associated cancer (CAC) can be a good model to prove whether Shh inhibitors can be applied to prevent, as the efforts to discover potent anti-inflammatory agent are active to prevent CAC. Here, under the hypothesis that Shh inhibitors can prevent CAC, mouse model was generated to develop CAC by azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted carcinogenesis. Shh inhibitors, cerulenin and itraconazole were treated by oral gavage and the mice were sacrificed at early phase of 3 weeks and late phase of 16 weeks. Compared to control group, the number of aberrant crypt foci at 3 weeks and tumor incidence at 16 weeks were all significantly decreased with Shh inhibitor. Significant attenuations of macrophage infiltration accompanied with significant decreases of IL-6, COX-2, STAT3 and NF-κB as well as significant ameliorations of β-catenin nuclear translocation, cyclin D1 and CDK4 were imposed with Shh inhibitors. Especially, CAC was accompanied with significant cancellation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), but their levels were significantly preserved with Shh inhibitors. Among inflammatory mediators, significantly decreased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, regulated with repressed NF-κb and STAT3, were prominent with Shh inhibitor, whereas significant inductions of apoptosis were noted with Shh inhibitors. In conclusion, Shh inhibitors significantly prevented CAC covering either ameliorating oncogenic inflammation or suppressing tumor proliferation, especially supported with significant inhibition of IL-6 and STAT3 signaling, 15-PGDH preservation and apoptosis induction.

  1. Prediction of enzyme inhibition and mode of inhibitory action based on calculation of distances between hydrogen bond donor/acceptor groups of the molecule and docking analysis: An application on the discovery of novel effective PTP1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, P; Petrou, A; Geronikaki, A; Liaras, K; Dirnali, S; Anna, M

    2015-01-01

    PTP1B is a protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in insulin receptor desensitization. PTP1B inhibition prolongs the activated state of the receptor, practically enhancing the effect of insulin. Thus PTP1B has become a drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes. PTP1b is an enzyme with multiple binding sites for competitive and allosteric inhibitors. Prediction of inhibitory action using docking analysis has limited success in case of enzymes with multiple binding sites, since the selection of the right crystal structure depends on the kind of inhibitor. In the present study, a two-step strategy for the prediction of PTP1b inhibitory action was applied to 12 compounds. Based on the study of known inhibitors, we isolated the structural characteristics required for binding to each binding site. As a first step, 3D-structures of the molecules were produced and their structural parameters were measured and used for prediction of the binding site of the compound. These results were used for the selection of the appropriate crystal structure for docking analysis of each compound, and the final prediction was based on the estimated binding energies. This strategy effectively predicted the activity of all compounds. A linear correlation was found between estimated binding energy and inhibition measured in vitro (r = -0.894).

  2. Role of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor-mediated antiproteinuric action in type 2 diabetic nephropathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neerja; Kare, Pawan Kumar; Varshney, Parul; Kalra, Om Prakash; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Yadav, Anil; Raizada, Alpana; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of genetic variants of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes in the antiproteinuric efficacy of ACE inhibitor therapy in diabetic nephropathy (DN) patients. METHODS In the present study, 270 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with nephropathy were enrolled and treated with ACE inhibitor (ramipril) and followed at 6 mo for renal function and albumin excretion by estimating serum creatinine, end stage renal disease, and albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) in urine. Genotyping of ACE I/D and AGT M235T polymorphisms were performed by using primer specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-RFLP techniques, respectively. RESULTS Forty-eight percent of DN patients (responders) benefited with respect to proteinuria from ACE inhibitor therapy at 6 mo follow-up. A significant reduction in ACR was observed after 6 mo treatment with ACE inhibitor irrespective of whether DN patients were micro-albuminuric (≥ 30 and < 300 mg/g creatinine) or macro-albuminuric (≥ 300 mg/g creatinine) at the time of enrollment. However, macro-albuminuric patients (55%) showed better response to therapy. A reduction in urinary ACR was found independent of genotypes of ACE I/D and AGT M235T polymorphisms although macro-albuminuric patients having TT genotype showed statistically insignificant increased response (72%). CONCLUSION ACE inhibitor therapy reduced urinary ACR by ≥ 30% in 50% of DN patients and the response is independent of ACE I/D and AGT M235T polymorphisms. PMID:28344754

  3. CRYSTALLINE SOYBEAN TRYPSIN INHIBITOR

    PubMed Central

    Kunitz, M.

    1947-01-01

    A study has been made of the general properties of crystalline soybean trypsin inhibitor. The soy inhibitor is a stable protein of the globulin type of a molecular weight of about 24,000. Its isoelectric point is at pH 4.5. It inhibits the proteolytic action approximately of an equal weight of crystalline trypsin by combining with trypsin to form a stable compound. Chymotrypsin is only slightly inhibited by soy inhibitor. The reaction between chymotrypsin and the soy inhibitor consists in the formation of a reversibly dissociable compound. The inhibitor has no effect on pepsin. The inhibiting action of the soybean inhibitor is associated with the native state of the protein molecule. Denaturation of the soy protein by heat or acid or alkali brings about a proportional decrease in its inhibiting action on trypsin. Reversal of denaturation results in a proportional gain in the inhibiting activity. Crystalline soy protein when denatured is readily digestible by pepsin, and less readily by chymotrypsin and by trypsin. Methods are given for measuring trypsin and inhibitor activity and also protein concentration with the aid of spectrophotometric density measurements at 280 mµ. PMID:19873496

  4. In Vitro Mode of Action and Anti-thrombotic Activity of Boophilin, a Multifunctional Kunitz Protease Inhibitor from the Midgut of a Tick Vector of Babesiosis, Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Teresa C.; Ma, Dongying; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Kotsyfakis, Michail; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hematophagous mosquitos and ticks avoid host hemostatic system through expression of enzyme inhibitors targeting proteolytic reactions of the coagulation and complement cascades. While most inhibitors characterized to date were found in the salivary glands, relatively few others have been identified in the midgut. Among those, Boophilin is a 2-Kunitz multifunctional inhibitor targeting thrombin, elastase, and kallikrein. However, the kinetics of Boophilin interaction with these enzymes, how it modulates platelet function, and whether it inhibits thrombosis in vivo have not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings Boophilin was expressed in HEK293 cells and purified to homogeneity. Using amidolytic assays and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we have demonstrated that Boophilin behaves as a classical, non-competitive inhibitor of thrombin with respect to small chromogenic substrates by a mechanism dependent on both exosite-1 and catalytic site. Inhibition is accompanied by blockade of platelet aggregation, fibrin formation, and clot-bound thrombin in vitro. Notably, we also identified Boophilin as a non-competitive inhibitor of FXIa, preventing FIX activation. In addition, Boophilin inhibits kallikrein activity and the reciprocal activation, indicating that it targets the contact pathway. Furthermore, Boophilin abrogates cathepsin G- and plasmin-induced platelet aggregation and partially affects elastase-mediated cleavage of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI). Finally, Boophilin inhibits carotid artery occlusion in vivo triggered by FeCl3, and promotes bleeding according to the mice tail transection method. Conclusion/Significance Through inhibition of several enzymes involved in proteolytic cascades and cell activation, Boophilin plays a major role in keeping the midgut microenvironment at low hemostatic and inflammatory tonus. This response allows ticks to successfully digest a blood meal which is critical for metabolism and egg

  5. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D; Mislak, Andrea C; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Anderson, Karen S

    2014-06-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3'-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3'-hydroxyl-containing RT inhibitor considered to promote viral lethal mutagenesis. New mechanistic features of RT inhibition by EFdA are revealed.

  6. G-Quadruplex Aptamers to Human Thrombin Versus Other Direct Thrombin Inhibitors: The Focus on Mechanism of Action and Drug Efficiency as Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Zavyalova, Elena; Ustinov, Nikita; Golovin, Andrey; Pavlova, Galina; Kopylov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Thrombin is a key enzyme of blood coagulation system which has multiple functions including pro- and anticoagulant, platelet aggregating and inflammatory activities. Unsurprisingly, this enzyme has been a target for anticoagulant drug development for decades. Among the most interesting direct thrombin inhibitors with intravenous administration route are the following ones: 1) hirudins, proteins with bivalent binding mode to the thrombin, 2) bivalirudin, the peptide with bivalent binding mode to the thrombin, 3) argatroban, the chemical that binds to the thrombin active site, and 4) G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, structured oligonucleotides with an affinity to protein-binding site of the thrombin. Efficiency of all these inhibitors has been studied in vivo in preclinical and clinical trials, as well as in vitro with various tests, allowing to compare them thoroughly. In the review three levels of comparison were used to highlight the features of each inhibitor: 1) thrombin inhibition constants as a characteristic of inhibitor potency in simple enzymatic system; 2) inhibition of fibrin fiber formation and thrombin generation in coagulation cascade as a characteristic of anticoagulant potency in human blood plasma; and 3) therapeutic doses used and therapeutic profiles obtained after intravenous administration into animals and humans. The data clearly demonstrate weak and strong aspects of thrombin binding aptamers providing a solid background for further novel anticoagulant development.

  7. Fiber intake and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in type 2 diabetes: Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Trial findings at baseline and 1 year

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is elevated in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes and may contribute, independently of traditional factors, to increased cardiovascular disease risk. Fiber intake may decrease PAI-1 levels. We examined the associations of fiber intake and its changes wit...

  8. A Cross-over Inhibitor of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Light Chain B: A Natural Product Implicating an Exosite Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Salzameda, Nicholas T.; Eubanks, Lisa M.; Zakhari, Joseph S.; Tsuchikama, Kyoji; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Allen, Karen N.; Hixon, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the most leathal toxins known to man, as such they are high risk terrorist threats, and alarmingly there is no approved therapeutic. We report the first cross-over small molecule inhibitor of these neurotoxins and propose a mechanism by which it may impart its inhibitory activity. PMID:21203627

  9. L-methamphetamine and selective MAO inhibitors decrease morphine-reinforced and non-reinforced behavior in rats; Insights towards selegiline's mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    He, Shuangteng; Grasing, Kenneth

    2006-12-01

    Selegiline is an inhibitor of type B monoamine oxidase (MAO) with psychostimulant effects that can decrease morphine-reinforced and non-reinforced responding. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of MAO inhibition and treatment with L-methamphetamine, the major psychostimulant metabolite of selegiline, on these behaviors. After rats acquired a stable pattern of morphine self-administration under a progressive ratio schedule, chronic treatment was initiated with vehicle, L-methamphetamine, clorgyline (a selective inhibitor of MAO-A), or rasagiline (a selective inhibitor of MAO-B); with both MAO inhibitors administered at a dose selective for one MAO isoform and a higher dose that inhibited both isoforms. Rats were evaluated for up to four cycles of opiate dependence maintained by morphine self-administration and withdrawal during which extinction responding was recorded. Most behavioral measures (92.4%) did not differ in animals evaluated during an initial and subsequent cycles of dependence and withdrawal. All active treatments attenuated non-reinforced responding during extinction. Morphine reinforcement was also decreased by each of the three active treatments, but greater and more prolonged effects were observed following inhibition of MAO-B with rasagiline. Responding during either cue- or morphine-induced reinstatement was attenuated by either clorgyline or rasagiline administered at nonselective doses, but not by either compound administered at selective dose levels. Treatment with L-methamphetamine did not produce significant effects on cue-induced reinstatement, but decreased non-reinforced responding during morphine-induced reinstatement. These findings indicate that morphine reinforcement and different non-reinforced behaviors differ greatly in their susceptibility to modification by psychostimulant treatment or MAO inhibition.

  10. Two different mitotic checkpoint inhibitors of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome antagonize the action of the activator Cdc20

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Braunstein, Ilana; Ganoth, Dvora; Teichner, Adar; Hittle, James C.; Yen, Tim J.; Hershko, Avram

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint system ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation by preventing the completion of mitosis in the presence of any misaligned chromosome. When activated, it blocks the initiation of anaphase by inhibiting the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Little is known about the biochemical mechanisms by which this system inhibits APC/C, except for the existence of a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibitor of APC/C composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 associated with the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3. We have been studying the mechanisms of the mitotic checkpoint system in extracts that reproduce its downstream events. We found that inhibitory factors are associated with APC/C in the checkpoint-arrested state, which can be recovered from immunoprecipitates. Only a part of the inhibitory activity was caused by MCC [Braunstein I, Miniowitz S, Moshe Y, Hershko A (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:4870–4875]. Here, we show that during exit from checkpoint, rapid disassembly of MCC takes place while APC/C is still inactive. This observation suggested the possible involvement of multiple factors in the regulation of APC/C by the mitotic checkpoint. We have separated a previously unknown inhibitor of APC/C from MCC. This inhibitor, called mitotic checkpoint factor 2 (MCF2), is associated with APC/C only in the checkpoint-arrested state. The inhibition of APC/C by both MCF2 and MCC was decreased at high concentrations of Cdc20. We propose that both MCF2 and MCC inhibit APC/C by antagonizing Cdc20, possibly by interaction with the Cdc20-binding site of APC/C. PMID:18591651

  11. PDE5 inhibitors enhance the lethality of pemetrexed through inhibition of multiple chaperone proteins and via the actions of cyclic GMP and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L.; Poklepovic, Andrew; Gordon, Sarah; Dent, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors prevent the breakdown of cGMP that results in prolonged protein kinase G activation and the generation of nitric oxide. PDE5 inhibitors enhanced the anti-NSCLC cell effects of the NSCLC therapeutic pemetrexed. [Pemetrexed + sildenafil] activated an eIF2α – ATF4 – CHOP – Beclin1 pathway causing formation of toxic autophagosomes; activated a protective IRE1 – XBP-1 – chaperone induction pathway; and activated a toxic eIF2α – CHOP – DR4 / DR5 / CD95 induction pathway. [Pemetrexed + sildenafil] reduced the expression of c-FLIP-s, MCL-1 and BCL-XL that was blocked in a cell-type -dependent fashion by either over-expression of HSP90 / GRP78 / HSP70 / HSP27 or by blockade of eIF2α-CHOP signaling. Knock down of PKGI/II abolished the ability of sildenafil to enhance pemetrexed toxicity whereas pan-inhibition of NOS using L-NAME or knock down of [iNOS + eNOS] only partially reduced the lethal drug interaction. Pemetrexed reduced the ATPase activities of HSP90 and HSP70 in an ATM-AMPK-dependent fashion that was enhanced by sildenafil signaling via PKGI/II. The drug combination activated an ATM-AMPK-TSC2 pathway that was associated with reduced mTOR S2448 and ULK-1 S757 phosphorylation and increased ULK-1 S317 and ATG13 S318 phosphorylation. These effects were prevented by chaperone over-expression or by expression of an activated form of mTOR that prevented autophagosome formation and reduced cell killing. In two models of NSCLC, sildenafil enhanced the ability of pemetrexed to suppress tumor growth. Collectively we argue that the combination of [pemetrexed + PDE5 inhibitor] should be explored in a new NSCLC phase I trial. PMID:27903966

  12. New mode of action for a knottin protein bioinsecticide: pea albumin 1 subunit b (PA1b) is the first peptidic inhibitor of V-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Chouabe, Christophe; Eyraud, Vanessa; Da Silva, Pedro; Rahioui, Isabelle; Royer, Corinne; Soulage, Christophe; Bonvallet, Robert; Huss, Markus; Gressent, Frédéric

    2011-10-21

    PA1b (for pea albumin 1 subunit b) is a plant bioinsecticide lethal to several pests that are important in agriculture or human health. PA1b belongs to the inhibitory cystine knot family or knottin family. Originating from a plant (the garden pea) commonly eaten by humans without any known toxic or allergic effects, PA1b is a candidate for transgenic applications and is one of the most promising biopesticides for pest control. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques on Sf9 PA1b-sensitive lepidopteran insect cells, we discovered that PA1b reversibly blocked ramp membrane currents in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) = 0.52 μM). PA1b had the same effect as bafilomycin, a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump (V-type H(+)-ATPase), and the PA1b-sensitive current depended on the internal proton concentration. Biochemical assays on purified V-ATPase from the lepidopteran model Manduca sexta showed that PA1b inhibited the V(1)V(0)-type H(+)-ATPase holoenzyme activity (IC(50) ∼ 70 nM) by interacting with the membrane-bound V(0) part of the V-ATPase. V-ATPase is a complex protein that has been studied increasingly because of its numerous physiological roles. In the midgut of insects, V-ATPase activity is essential for energizing nutrient absorption, and the results reported in this work explain the entomotoxic properties of PA1b. Targeting V-ATPase is a promising means of combating insect pests, and PA1b represents the first peptidic V-ATPase inhibitor. The search for V-ATPase inhibitors is currently of great importance because it has been demonstrated that V-ATPase plays a role in so many physiological processes.

  13. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. PMID:26800261

  14. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6.

    PubMed

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT.

  15. Antitumor action of CDK inhibitor LS-007 as a single agent and in combination with ABT-199 against human acute leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shao; Jiang, Hui; Zhai, Xiao-wen; Wei, Fan; Wang, Shu-dong; Ding, Jian; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: LS-007 is a CDK inhibitor, which exhibits potent antitumor activity against chronic lymphocytic leukemia and ovarian cancer cells. In this study, we further evaluated the antitumor activity of LS-007 alone and in combination with a Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199 in acute leukemia (AL) cells. Methods: Cell viability was detected using resazurin assay, and cell apoptosis was examined using Annexin V/PI double staining and flow cytometry. The inhibition of LS-007 on kinases was evaluated with the mobility shift assay or ELISA. The expression of relevant signaling molecules was assessed using Western blotting and RT-PCR. Primary lymphocytes from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were separated using Ficoll-Paque PLUS. Results: LS-007 inhibited the proliferation of 6 AL cell lines with IC50 values of 100–200 nmol/L, and decreased the survival of ALL and AML patient-derived lymphocytes with mean LD50 value of 67 and 102 nmol/L, respectively. In kinase assays in vitro, LS-007 was more selective for the CDK family, inhibiting CDK2, CDK9, CDK1 and CDK4 at low nanomolar concentrations. In HL-60 and CCRF-CEM cells, LS-007 (0.1–0.4 μmol/L) dose-dependently induced cell apoptosis predominantly through CDK9 inhibition-related dephosphorylation at the ser2 residue of RNA pol II and the corresponding depletion of anti-apoptotic proteins, especially Mcl-1 and XIAP. LS-007 (0.2 and 0.4 μmol/L) also induced cell apoptosis in the patient-derived lymphocytes. In HL-60, CCRF-CEM and Molt-4 cells, combined application of LS-007 with ABT-199 (1 or 2 μmol/L) markedly increased cell apoptosis with a maximal decrease in the XIAP levels as compared with either drug used alone. Conclusion: CDK inhibitor LS-007 potently inhibits the established human AL cell lines and primary AL blasts, and it also shows remarkable synergy with Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199. PMID:27569395

  16. UWA-121, a mixed dopamine and serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, enhances L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours in the MPTP-lesioned common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Johnston, Tom H; Lewis, Katie D; Koprich, James B; Reyes, M Gabriela; Fox, Susan H; Piggott, Matthew J; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2014-07-01

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but its long-term administration is complicated by wearing-off and dyskinesia. UWA-101, a dual, equipotent inhibitor of dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) transporters, has previously been shown to successfully extend duration of anti-parkinsonian benefit of L-DOPA (ON-time), without exacerbating dyskinesia, in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned marmoset. However, UWA-101 is racemic and it is unclear whether one or both enantiomers contribute to its actions, and whether a better therapeutic effect might be attained by using a single antipode. In the current study, we synthesised the two enantiomers of UWA-101, R-101 (UWA-121) and S-101 (UWA-122), characterised their pharmacological profiles and administered them to MPTP-lesioned marmosets. Parkinsonism, dyskinesia, psychosis-like behaviours and duration of ON-time were evaluated. UWA-121 is a dual DAT > SERT inhibitor, with an approximate 10:1 DAT:SERT affinity ratio (inhibitory constants (Ki) of 307 and 3830 nM, respectively). In combination with L-DOPA, UWA-121 extended duration of ON-time when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 40%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 also extended duration of ON-time without dyskinesia (by 215%, P < 0.05) and ON-time without psychosis-like behaviours when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 345%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 did not worsen the severity of dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). UWA-122 is a selective SERT inhibitor (Ki 120 nM, Ki at DAT > 50 μM) and, in combination with L-DOPA, had no effect on ON-time, dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). These data indicate that dual DAT and SERT inhibitors effectively enhance L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia and that compounds with such a pharmacological profile represent promising agents against wearing-off in PD.

  17. Combretastatin A-4 Analogue: A Dual-Targeting and Tubulin Inhibitor Containing Antitumor Pt(IV) Moiety with a Unique Mode of Action.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaochao; Huang, Rizhen; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Zhimei; Liao, Zhixin; Wang, Hengshan

    2016-09-21

    Three new Pt(IV) complexes comprising a combretastatin A-4 analogue were designed and synthesized. The resulting antitumor Pt(IV) complexes could significantly improve the antiproliferative activity and overcome the drug resistance of cisplatin in vitro. Interestingly, these novel compounds not only can carry the DNA binding Pt(II) warhead into the cancer cells but also have a small molecule fragment that can inhibit tubulin polymerization. Among them, complex 13, which was attached to an inhibitor of tubulin at one axial position of Pt(IV) octahedral coordination sphere, could effectively enter cancer cells, arrest the cell cycle in HepG-2 cancer cells at G2/M phases, and induce activation of caspases triggering apoptotic signaling via the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathways. Moreover, complex 13 has the ability to effectively inhibit the tumor growth in the HepG-2 xenograft model without causing significant loss of animal body weight in comparison with cisplatin.

  18. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei—Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha Rao, Krishnamurthy; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  19. Neurochemical and behavioral profiling of the selective GlyT1 inhibitors ALX5407 and LY2365109 indicate a preferential action in caudal vs. cortical brain areas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Kenneth W; Falcone, Julie F; Fell, Matthew J; Ryder, John W; Yu, Hong; Love, Patrick L; Katner, Jason; Gordon, Kimberly D; Wade, Mark R; Man, Teresa; Nomikos, George G; Phebus, Lee A; Cauvin, Annick J; Johnson, Kirk W; Jones, Carrie K; Hoffmann, Beth J; Sandusky, George E; Walter, Magnus W; Porter, Warren J; Yang, Lijuan; Merchant, Kalpana M; Shannon, Harlan E; Svensson, Kjell A

    2008-10-01

    Selective inhibitors of the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) have been implicated in central nervous system disorders related to hypoglutamatergic function such as schizophrenia. The selective GlyT1 inhibitors ALX5407 (NFPS) and LY2365109 {[2-(4-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl-2-tert-butylphenoxy)ethyl]-methylamino}-acetic acid increased cerebrospinal fluid levels of glycine and potentiated NMDA-induced increases in dialysate levels of neurotransmitters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the striatum. However, higher doses produced both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on motor performance and impaired respiration, suggesting significant involvement of cerebellar and brain stem areas. A dual probe microdialysis study showed that ALX5407 transiently elevated extracellular levels of glycine in the PFC with more sustained increases in the cerebellum. In support of these findings, immuno-staining with pan-GlyT1 and GlyT1a antibodies showed a higher abundance of immunoreactivity in the brain stem/cerebellum as compared to the frontal cortical/hippocampal brain areas in four different species studied, including the mouse, rat, monkey and human. In addition, the inhibitory effects of ALX5407 on cerebellar levels of cGMP in the mouse could be reversed by the glycine A receptor antagonist strychnine but not the glycine B receptor antagonist L-701324. We propose that the adverse events seen with higher doses of ALX5407 and LY2365109 are the result of high GlyT1 inhibitory activity in caudal areas of the brain with sustained elevations of extracellular glycine. High levels of glycine in these brain areas may result in activation of strychnine-sensitive glycine A receptors that are inhibitory on both motor activity and critical brain stem functions such as respiration.

  20. Bumetanide, an Inhibitor of NKCC1 (Na-K-2Cl Cotransporter Isoform 1), Enhances Propofol-Induced Loss of Righting Reflex but Not Its Immobilizing Actions in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yukihide; Andoh, Tomio; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Miyazaki, Tomoyuki; Maruyama, Koichi; Kariya, Takayuki; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been shown to induce excitation on immature neurons due to increased expression of Na+-K+-2Cl- co-transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), and the transition of GABAergic signaling from excitatory to inhibitory occurs before birth in the rat spinal cord and spreads rostrally according to the developmental changes in cation-chloride co-transporter expression. We previously showed that midazolam activates the hippocampal CA3 area and induces less sedation in neonatal rats compared with adolescent rats in an NKCC1-dependent manner. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that propofol-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR) but not immobilizing actions are modulated by NKCC1-dependent mechanisms and reduced in neonatal rats compared with adolescent rats. We estimated neuronal activity in the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus after propofol administration with or without bumetanide, an NKCC1 inhibitor, by immunostaining of phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding protein (pCREB). We studied effects of bumetanide on propofol-induced LORR and immobilizing actions in postnatal day 7 and 28 (P7 and P28) rats. The pCREB expression in the cortex (P = 0.001) and hippocampus (P = 0.01) was significantly greater in the rats receiving propofol only than in the rats receiving propofol plus bumetanide at P 7. Propofol-induced LORR or immobilizing effects did not differ significantly between P7 and P28. Bumetanide significantly enhanced propofol-induced LORR (P = 0.031) but not immobilization in P7 rats. These results are partially consistent with our hypothesis. They suggest that propofol may activate the rostral but not caudal central nervous system dependently on NKCC1, and these differential actions may underlie the different properties of sedative and immobilizing actions observed in neonatal rats. PMID:27783647

  1. Regulation of the Action of Early Mitotic Inhibitor 1 on the Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome by Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Moshe, Yakir; Bar-On, Ortal; Ganoth, Dvora; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is characterized by alternating activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). During S-phase APC/C is inhibited by early mitotic inhibitor 1 (Emi1) to allow the accumulation of cyclins A and B and to prevent re-replication. Emi1 is degraded at prophase by a Plk1-dependent pathway. Recent studies in which the degradation pathway of Emi1 was disrupted have shown that APC/C is activated at mitotic entry despite stabilization of Emi1. These results suggested the possibility of additional mechanisms other than degradation of Emi1, which release APC/C from inhibition by Emi1 upon entry into mitosis. In this study we report one such mechanism, by which the ability of Emi1 to inhibit APC/C is negatively regulated by CDKs. We show that in Plk1-inhibited cells Emi1 is stabilized and phosphorylated, that Emi1 is phosphorylated by CDKs in mitotic but not S-phase cell extracts, and that Emi1 phosphorylation by mitotic cell extracts or purified CDKs markedly reduces the ability of Emi1 to bind and to inhibit APC/C. Finally, we show that the addition of extracts from S-phase cells to extracts from mitotic cells protects Emi1 from CDK-mediated inactivation. PMID:21454540

  2. Renal actions of endothelin-1 in newborn piglets: dose-effect relation and the effects of receptor antagonist (BQ-123) and cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin).

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Chari, G; Shankararao, R; Fornell, L; Gulati, A; Vidyasagar, D

    1995-11-01

    Although the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on intact or perfused adult kidney are well understood, its effects in the fetus and the newborn have not been well studied. We examined the effects of infusions of 25, 50, and 100 ng/kg of ET-1 per minute on mean blood pressure (MBP), cardiac index (CI), renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and urine volume (UV) in 7- to 10-day-old piglets (n = 24). In addition, the effects of pretreatment with a receptor antagonist (BQ-123) and with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) were studied in 12 separate piglets. ET-1 produced a dose- and level-dependent decrease in CI (60%), RBF (50% to 75%), GFR (66% to 80%) and MBP 15% to 17%. These changes returned to 75% to 80% of baseline 60 minutes after discontinuation of ET-1. Low-dose infusion (25 ng/kg) did not result in any changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics. Plasma half-life of ET-1 in piglets was 2.1 +/- 0.4 minutes. Pretreatment with the specific ETA receptor antagonist BQ-123 completely blocked the ET-1-induced systemic and renal hemodynamic changes. Indomethacin blocked the ET-1-induced rise in MBP but failed to block any renal changes. In fact, indomethacin accentuated the changes induced by ET-1, especially the changes in RBF, RVR, and GFR. Studies of receptor binding in the renal cortex and medulla showed that, in the cortex, the Ki value for ET-1 was 6.32 +/- 1.57, and for ET-3 it was 20.05 +/- 4.38 (p < 0.05); in the medulla, the Ki values were similar for both ET-1 and ET-3. These results indicate that in piglets the renal vascular bed is highly sensitive to ET-1, and its effects are predominantly mediated through ETA receptors.

  3. [Changes in polarization of myometrial cells plasma and internal mitochondrial membranes under calixarenes action as inhibitors of plasma membrane Na+, K+-ATPase].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, H V; Danylovych, Iu V; Kolomiiets', O V; Kosterin, S O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Chunikhin, O Iu; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O

    2012-01-01

    The influence of supramolecular macrocyclic compounds--calix[4]arenes C-97, C-99, C-107, which are ouabainomymetic high affinity inhibitors of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, on the polarization level of plasmic and mitochondrial membranes of rat uterine smooth muscle cells was investigated. The influence of these compounds on the myocytes characteristic size was studied. By using a confocal microscopy and specific for mitochondrial MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos dye it was proved that the potential-sensitive fluorescent probe DiOC6(3) interacts with mitochondria. Artificial potential collapse of plasmic membrane in this case was modeled by myocytes preincubation with ouabain (1 mM). Further experiments performed using the method of flow cytometry with DiOC6(3) have shown that the compounds C-97, C-99 and C-107 at concentration 50-100 nM caused depolarization of the plasma membrane (at the level of 30% relative to control values) in conditions of artificial collapse of mitochondrial potential by myocytes preincubation in the presence of 5 mM of sodium azide. Under artificial sarcolemma depolarization by ouabain, calixarenes C-97, C-99 and C-107 at 100 nM concentrations caused a transient increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, that is 40% of the control level and lasted about 5 minutes. Calixarenes C-99 and C-107 caused a significant increase in fluorescence of myocytes in these conditions, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy too. It was proved by photon correlation spectroscopy method that the C-99 and C-107 caused an increase of characteristic size of myocytes.

  4. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM.

  5. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... the purpose of inhibiting the effects of ethylene. (b) Applied or used outdoors for...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... the purpose of inhibiting the effects of ethylene. (b) Applied or used outdoors for...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... the purpose of inhibiting the effects of ethylene. (b) Applied or used outdoors for...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... the purpose of inhibiting the effects of ethylene. (b) Applied or used outdoors for...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1220 - 1-Methylcyclopropene; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN... the purpose of inhibiting the effects of ethylene. (b) Applied or used outdoors for...

  10. 1-Methylcyclopropene effects on temporal changes of aroma volatiles and phytochemicals of fresh-cut cantaloupe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange fleshed cantaloupe melons have intense aroma and flavor, but are very perishable. Changes in quality traits were characterized during storage-life of fresh-cut cantaloupe (Cucumis melo var. cantalupensis "Fiesta") cubes treated with 1.0 µL L-1 4 of 1-methylcyclopene for 24 h at 5 ºC, packaged...

  11. Managing ‘Bartlett’ pear fruit ripening with 1-methylcyclopropene reapplication during cold storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repeated low-dose 1-MCP-applications were evaluated during cold storage of ‘Bartlett’ pear fruit to overcome long-term ripening inhibition of a high dose 1-MCP treatment at harvest. Fruit were exposed to 1-MCP at 0, 0.42, 4.2 or 42 umol m-3 at harvest in year one, and to 0, 0.42 or 42 umol m-3 in y...

  12. Opposite and independent actions of cyclic AMP and transforming growth factor beta in the regulation of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor expression.

    PubMed Central

    Thalacker, F W; Nilsen-Hamilton, M

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms by which type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is regulated by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in CCL64 mink lung epithelial cells, BSC-1 monkey kidney epithelial cells, mouse embryo fibroblast (AKR-2B 84A) cells and normal rat kidney fibroblasts (NRK). TGF-beta increases PAI-1 expression in all four cell lines, and EGF acts synergistically with TGF-beta to increase PAI-1 expression in CCL64 cells but not in the other three cell lines. Here we show that PAI-1 expression can be regulated independently through two different signal transduction pathways. One pathway involves protein kinase C and is stimulated by the tumour promoter phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Whereas preincubation with PMA completely eliminated PMA-induced PAI-1 synthesis and secretion in both CCL64 and BSC-1 cells, this treatment had no effect on TGF-beta- and EGF-induced PAI-1 levels. Therefore we conclude that protein kinase C does not mediate the effects of either EGF or TGF-beta on PAI-1 expression. The expression of PAI-1 was decreased by agents increasing intracellular cyclic AMP: (cAMP) cholera toxin, forskolin and dibutyryl cAMP lowered both the basal level and the TGF-beta- and PMA-induced levels of PAI-1 expression. These effects of cAMP-elevating agents and of TGF-beta on PAI-1 protein synthesis were also reflected in changes in TGF-beta-induced PAI-1 gene transcription, as measured by nuclear run-on. These results show that PAI-1 gene expression is sensitive to high levels of intracellular cAMP and that this effect occurs at the transcriptional level. Although increased intracellular cAMP concentrations decrease the absolute level of PAI-1 expression, the ability of TGF-beta and EGF to induce PAI-1 gene expression is unchanged. These results are discussed in relation to the observation that sensitivity to cAMP is a common feature of TGF-beta-regulated genes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig

  13. Mode of action of human pharmaceuticals in fish: the effects of the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride, on reproduction as a case study.

    PubMed

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Hannah, Robert E; Sumpter, John P

    2013-03-15

    In recent years, a growing number of human pharmaceuticals have been detected in the aquatic environment, generally at low concentrations (sub-ng/L-low μg/L). In most cases, these compounds are characterised by highly specific modes of action, and the evolutionary conservation of drug targets in wildlife species suggests the possibility that pharmaceuticals present in the environment may cause toxicological effects by acting through the same targets as they do in humans. Our research addressed the question of whether or not dutasteride, a pharmaceutical used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, may cause adverse effects in a teleost fish, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), by inhibiting the activity of both isoforms of 5α-reductase (5αR), the enzyme that converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Mammalian pharmacological and toxicological information were used to guide the experimental design and the selection of relevant endpoints, according to the so-called "read-across approach", suggesting that dutasteride may affect male fertility and steroid hormone dynamics. Therefore, a 21-day reproduction study was conducted to determine the effects of dutasteride (10, 32 and 100 μg/L) on fish reproduction. Exposure to dutasteride significantly reduced fecundity of fish and affected several aspects of reproductive endocrine functions in both males and females. However, none of the observed adverse effects occurred at concentrations of exposure lower than 32 μg/L; this, together with the low volume of drug prescribed every year (10.34 kg in the UK in 2011), and the extremely low predicted environmental concentration (0.03 ng/L), suggest that, at present, the potential presence of dutasteride in the environment does not represent a threat to wild fish populations.

  14. Thrombin inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P E; Naylor-Olsen, A M

    1998-08-01

    Recently, iv formulated direct thrombin inhibitors have been shown to be safe and efficacious alternatives to heparin. These results have fueled the hopes for an orally active compound. Such a compound could be a significant advance over warfarin if it had predictable pharmacokinetics and a duration of action sufficient for once or twice a day dosing. In order to develop an orally active compound which meets these criteria, the deficiencies of the prototype inhibitor efegatran have had to be addressed. First, using a combination of structure based design and empirical structure optimization, more selective compounds have been identified by modifying the P1 group or by incorporating different peptidomimetic P2/P3 scaffolds. Secondly, this optimization has resulted in the development of potent and selective non-covalent inhibitors, thus bypassing the liabilities of the serine trap. Thirdly, oral bioavailability has been achieved while maintaining selectivity and efficacy through the incorporation of progressively less basic P1 groups. The duration of action of these compounds remains to be optimized. Other advances in thrombin inhibitor design have included the development of uncharged P1 groups and the discovery of two non-peptide templates.

  15. Targeting HER2 aberrations as actionable drivers in lung cancers: phase II trial of the pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kris, M. G.; Camidge, D. R.; Giaccone, G.; Hida, T.; Li, B. T.; O'Connell, J.; Taylor, I.; Zhang, H.; Arcila, M. E.; Goldberg, Z.; Jänne, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HER2 mutations and amplifications have been identified as oncogenic drivers in lung cancers. Dacomitinib, an irreversible inhibitor of HER2, EGFR (HER1), and HER4 tyrosine kinases, has demonstrated activity in cell-line models with HER2 exon 20 insertions or amplifications. Here, we studied dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified lung cancers. Patients and methods As a prespecified cohort of a phase II study, we included patients with stage IIIB/IV lung cancers with HER2 mutations or amplification. We gave oral dacomitinib at 30–45 mg daily in 28-day cycles. End points included partial response rate, overall survival, and toxicity. Results We enrolled 30 patients with HER2-mutant (n = 26, all in exon 20 including 25 insertions and 1 missense mutation) or HER2-amplified lung cancers (n = 4). Three of 26 patients with tumors harboring HER2 exon 20 mutations [12%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2% to 30%] had partial responses lasting 3+, 11, and 14 months. No partial responses occurred in four patients with tumors with HER2 amplifications. The median overall survival was 9 months from the start of dacomitinib (95% CI 7–21 months) for patients with HER2 mutations and ranged from 5 to 22 months with amplifications. Treatment-related toxicities included diarrhea (90%; grade 3/4: 20%/3%), dermatitis (73%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%), and fatigue (57%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%). One patient died on study likely due to an interaction of dacomitinib with mirtazapine. Conclusions Dacomitinib produced objective responses in patients with lung cancers with specific HER2 exon 20 insertions. This observation validates HER2 exon 20 insertions as actionable targets and justifies further study of HER2-targeted agents in specific HER2-driven lung cancers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00818441. PMID:25899785

  16. Angiogenesis Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhibitors: current strategies and future prospects. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2010; 60(4):222–243. [PubMed Abstract] Chen HX, Cleck JN. Adverse effects of anticancer agents that target the VEGF pathway. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 2009; 6(8):465– ...

  17. Carboxylesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, M. Jason; Potter, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Carboxylesterases play major roles in the hydrolysis of numerous therapeutically active compounds. This is, in part, due to the prevalence of the ester moiety in these small molecules. However, the impact these enzymes may play on drug stability and pharmacokinetics is rarely considered prior to molecule development. Therefore, the application of selective inhibitors of this class of proteins may have utility in modulating the metabolism, distribution and toxicity of agents that are subjected to enzyme hydrolysis. Areas covered This review details the development of all such compounds dating back to 1986, but principally focuses on the very recent identification of selective human carboxylesterases inhibitors. Expert opinion The implementation of carboxylesterase inhibitors may significantly revolutionize drug discovery. Such molecules may allow for improved efficacy of compounds inactivated by this class of enzymes and/or reduce the toxicity of agents that are activated by these proteins. Furthermore, since lack of carboxylesterase activity appears to have no obvious biological consequence, these compounds could be applied in combination with virtually any esterified drug. Therefore, inhibitors of these proteins may have utility in altering drug hydrolysis and distribution in vivo. The characteristics, chemical and biological properties, and potential uses of such agents, are discussed here. PMID:21609191

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  19. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  20. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  1. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives.

  2. Techniques for Screening Translation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Sergiev, Petr V.

    2016-01-01

    The machinery of translation is one of the most common targets of antibiotics. The development and screening of new antibiotics usually proceeds by testing antimicrobial activity followed by laborious studies of the mechanism of action. High-throughput methods for new antibiotic screening based on antimicrobial activity have become routine; however, identification of molecular targets is usually a challenge. Therefore, it is highly beneficial to combine primary screening with the identification of the mechanism of action. In this review, we describe a collection of methods for screening translation inhibitors, with a special emphasis on methods which can be performed in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27348012

  3. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported.

  4. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  5. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  6. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  7. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  12. PTEN negatively regulates mTORC2 formation and signaling in grade IV glioma via Rictor hyperphosphorylation at Thr1135 and direct the mode of action of an mTORC1/2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, K; Maiti, S; Mandal, C

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) in mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we found higher activation of mTORC2 in PTENmu cells, as evidenced by enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2481), AKT (Ser473) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) (Ser9) as compared with PTENwt cells. In addition, PTENwt cells upon PTEN depletion showed mTORC2 activation. The reduced mTORC2 signaling in PTENwt cells was related to higher Rictor phosphorylation at Thr1135 residue. Phosphorylation of Rictor at Thr1135 inhibited its association with mTORC and thus there was a reduction in mTORC2 complex formation. In addition, PTENwt cells expressing mutated Rictor in which Thr1135 was substituted with alanine, showed enhanced mTORC2 formation and signaling. This enhanced mTORC2 signaling promoted inactivation of GSK3β. Thus, we established the reciprocal activation of mTORC2 and GSK3β in GBM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing role of PTEN in mTORC2 formation by promoting Rictor phosphorylation (Thr1135) in GBM. Furthermore, the drug sensitivity of mTORC2 was evaluated. A newly identified carbazole alkaloid, mahanine, showed cytotoxicity in both PTENmu and PTENwt cells. It inhibited both mTORC1/2 and AKT completely in PTENmu cells, whereas it inhibited only mTORC1 in PTENwt cells. Cytotoxity and AKT-inhibitory activity of the mTORC1/2 inhibitor was increased either by depleting PTEN or in combination with phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase inhibitors in PTENwt cells. In contrast, depletion of Rictor decreased the cytotoxicity of the mTORC1/2 inhibitor in PTENmu cells. Thus, PTEN has an important role in mTORC2 formation and also influences the effectiveness of an mTORC1/2 inhibitor in GBM. PMID:27239959

  13. Impacts of 1-Methylcyclopropene and controlled atmosphere established during conditioning on development of bitter pit in ‘Honeycrisp’ apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Honeycrisp’ apples are susceptible to develop the physiological disorder bitter pit. This disorder typically develops during storage, but pre-harvest lesion development can also occur. ‘Honeycrisp’ is also chilling sensitive and fruit is typically held at 10-20 oC after harvest for up to 7d to re...

  14. Effect of 1-Methylcyclopropene coupled with controlled atmosphere storage on the ripening and quality of ‘Cavendish’ bananas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh-fruit banana is well known to have a short-life after harvest. A short pre-pilot study was carried out to test the effect of atmospheric condition exposure to 1-MCP on the quality, limited to cosmetic and peel appearance, and shelf life of fresh-fruit bananas. Low level of O2 (3 kPa) and high ...

  15. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene post-harvest treatment on ripening process in cherry tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum var. cerasiforme).

    PubMed

    Opiyo, Arnold M; Ying, Tie-Jin

    2005-02-01

    The responses of cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. cerasiforme) fruits to post-harvest treatment with 1-MCP were investigated. The maturity stage at which 1-MCP application is most effective in delaying the ripening process was determined, and then the effects of different concentrations (0, 0.035, 0.07 and 0.11 microL/L) of 1-MCP on ethylene production, fruit softening, chlorophyll, lycopene and carotenoids contents of mature green (MG) cherry tomato fruits were assessed. 1-MCP at 0.07 and 0.11 microL/L reduced fruit C(2)H(4) production, delayed the C(2)H(4) peak at ambient temperature. Although 1-MCP at 0.035 microL/L was effective in retarding fruit ripening, it did not suppress endogenous ethylene production. Fruit softening was suppressed by 1-MCP, but its initiation was not affected by 1-MCP. The rate of chlorophyll degradation and its pattern of change with time, and the initiation of lycopene biosynthesis as well as its accumulation were all affected by 1-MCP, but only the accumulation of carotenoids was suppressed. Accumulation of lycopene and carotenoids was almost permanently hampered by 1-MCP at 0.07 microL/L or higher concentrations, and fruit color could not reach the control level even 2 weeks after 1-MCP treatment, indicating the close association of the metabolism of these pigments with ethylene perception. Since the concentration of 0.11 microL/L of 1-MCP was so high that it did not elicit additional response very much than 0.07 microL/L, these concentrations were considered to be practically effective concentrations for cherry tomato at MG stage. The effective 1-MCP concentrations might provide a useful reference to the levels of ethylene receptors as well as ethylene sensitivity in a specific fruit at given development stage.

  16. Chromosomal damage and micronucleus induction by MP-124, a novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitor: Evidence for a non-DNA-reactive mode of action.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Eiji; Muto, Shigeharu; Yamada, Katsuya; Sato, Yuko; Iwase, Yumiko; Uno, Yoshifumi

    2015-04-01

    MP-124, a novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitor that competes with the binding of the PARP substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), is being developed as a neuroprotective agent against acute ischemic stroke. MP-124 increased structural chromosomal aberration in CHL/IU cells, but showed negative results in the bacterial reverse mutation test, and the rat bone marrow micronucleus (MN) and the rat liver unscheduled DNA synthesis tests after the intravenous bolus injection. Thus, MP-124 did not appear to be direct-acting mutagen. Since, PARP-1 is a key enzyme in DNA repair, the effect of continuous PARP-1 inhibition by MP-124 was further examined in the rat MN test under 24-h intravenous infusion, and an increase in micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIE) was observed. The increase was clearly reduced by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, which resulted in increased intracellular NAD levels. This is consistent with the established activity of MP-124 as a competitive inhibitor of PARP and provides strong evidence that the DNA-damaging effect that leads to the increase in MNIE is a secondary effect of PARP-1 inhibition. This mechanism is expected to result in a threshold for the induction of MNIE by MP-124, and allows for the establishment of a safe margin of exposure for the therapeutic use of MP-124.

  17. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings…

  18. CUDC-101, a Novel Inhibitor of Full-Length Androgen Receptor (flAR) and Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Activity: Mechanism of Action and In Vivo Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huiying; Mediwala, Sanjay N; Szafran, Adam T; Mancini, Michael A; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent disease expected to cause the death of more than 27,000 Americans in 2015. There are only a few available treatments for CRPC, making the discovery of new drugs an urgent need. We report that CUDC-101 (an inhibitor od HER2/NEU, EGFR and HDAC) inhibits both the full length AR (flAR) and the AR variant AR-V7. This observation prompted experiments to discover which of the known activities of CUDC-101 is responsible for the inhibition of flAR/AR-V7 signaling. We used pharmacologic and genetic approaches, and found that the effect of CUDC-101 on flAR and AR-V7 was duplicated only by other HDAC inhibitors, or by silencing the HDAC isoforms HDAC5 and HDAC10. We observed that CUDC-101 treatment or AR-V7 silencing by RNAi equally reduced transcription of the AR-V7 target gene, PSA, without affecting viability of 22Rv1 cells. However, when cellular proliferation was used as an end point, CUDC-101 was more effective than AR-V7 silencing, raising the prospect that CUDC-101 has additional targets beside AR-V7. In support of this, we found that CUDC-101 increased the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and decreased that of the oncogene HER2/NEU. To determine if CUDC-101 reduces growth in a xenograft model of prostate cancer, this drug was given for 14 days to castrated male SCID mice inoculated with 22Rv1 cells. Compared to vehicle, CUDC-101 reduced xenograft growth in a statistically significant way, and without macroscopic side effects. These studies demonstrate that CUDC-101 inhibits wtAR and AR-V7 activity and growth of 22Rv1 cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects result from the ability of CUDC-101 to target not only HDAC signaling, which was associated with decreased flAR and AR-V7 activity, but multiple additional oncogenic pathways. These observations raise the possibility that treatment of CRPC may be achieved by using similarly multi-targeted approaches.

  19. Benzimidazole derivatives as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole is a common kinase inhibitor scaffold and benzimidazole-based compounds interact with enzymes by multiple binding modes. In some cases, the benzimidazole acts as part of the hinge-binding motif, in others it has a scaffolding role without evidence for direct hinge binding. Several of these compounds are ATP-competitive inhibitors and show high selectivity by exploiting unique structural properties that distinguish one kinase from the majority of other kinases. However, the high specificity for a single target is not always sufficient. Thus another approach, called multi-target therapy, has been developed over the last few years. The simultaneous inhibition of various kinases may be useful because the disease is attacked at several relevant targets. Moreover, if a kinase becomes drug-resistant, a multitargeted drug can act on the other kinases. Some benzimidazole derivatives are multi-target inhibitors. In this article benzimidazole inhibitors are reported with their mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological properties.

  20. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  1. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  2. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  3. NIH study uncovers new mechanism of action for class of chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NIH researchers have discovered a significant new mechanism of action for a class of chemotherapy drugs known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, or PARP inhibitors. They have also identified differences in the toxic capabilities of three drugs in

  4. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors and diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Christopher H S

    2008-01-01

    Current type 2 diabetes therapies are mainly targeted at stimulating pancreatic beta-cell secretion and reducing insulin resistance. A number of alternative therapies are currently being developed to take advantage of the actions of the incretin hormones Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP). These hormones are released from the small intestine in response to nutrient ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. One approach to potentiating their actions is based on inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), the major enzyme responsible for degrading the incretins in vivo. DPP IV exhibits characteristics that have allowed the development of specific orally administered inhibitors with proven efficacy in improving glucose tolerance in animal models of diabetes. A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that DPP IV inhibitors are effective in improving glucose disposal and reducing hemoglobin A1c levels in type 2 diabetic patients and one inhibitor, sitagliptin, is now in therapeutic use, with others likely to receive FDA approval in the near future. Studies aimed at elucidating the mode of action of the inhibitors are still ongoing. Both enhancement of insulin secretion and reduction in glucagon secretion, resulting from the blockade of incretin degradation, are believed to play important roles in DPP IV inhibitor action. Preclinical studies indicate that increased levels of incretins improve beta-cell secretory function and exert effects on beta-cell mitogenesis and survival that can preserve beta-cell mass. Roles for other hormones, neuropeptides and cytokines in DPP IV inhibitor-medicated responses are also possible.

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  6. A critical review of the mechanism of action for the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: do these drugs possess anti-inflammatory properties and how relevant is this in the treatment of depression?

    PubMed

    Walker, Frederick Rohan

    2013-04-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed pharmacological treatment for depression. Since their introduction many have considered the primary mechanism by which the SSRIs produced therapeutic improvement in depression is their effect on monoaminergic signalling. In recent years, however, the credibility of the monoamine theory and the therapeutic efficacy of these compounds in the treatment of depression has been extensively criticized. In the current review the legitimacy of these criticisms is critically examined, in many instances the evidence base used to support these criticisms is found to be weak. Nevertheless, the apparent 'failure' of the monoamine theory has been of benefit in motivating research into alternative mechanisms through which the SSRIs may act. Given research demonstrating that depressive symptoms are intimately linked with disturbances in pro-inflammatory signalling, perhaps the most promising discovery has been the realisation that SSRIs posses significant anti-inflammatory properties. These recent findings are discussed and contextualised with respect to the neurogenic, neurotrophic and gluatamatergic effects that these drugs also possess.

  7. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  8. GS-5759, a Bifunctional β2-Adrenoceptor Agonist and Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with a Unique Mode of Action: Effects on Gene Expression in Human Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Taruna; Yan, Dong; Hamed, Omar; Tannheimer, Stacey L; Phillips, Gary B; Wright, Clifford D; Kim, Musong; Salmon, Michael; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    (R)-6-[(3-{[4-(5-{[2-hydroxy-2-(8-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-5-yl)ethyl]amino}pent-1-yn-1-yl)phenyl] carbamoyl}phenyl)sulphonyl]-4-[(3-methoxyphenyl)amino]-8-methylquinoline-3-carboxamide trifluoroacetic acid (GS-5759) is a bifunctional ligand composed of a quinolinone-containing pharmacophore [β2-adrenoceptor agonist orthostere (β2A)] found in several β2-adrenoceptor agonists, including indacaterol, linked covalently to a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor related to 6-[3-(dimethylcarbamoyl)benzenesulphonyl]-4-[(3-methoxyphenyl)amino]-8-methylquinoline-3-carboxamide (GSK 256066) by a pent-1-yn-1-ylbenzene spacer. GS-5759 had a similar affinity for PDE4B1 and the native β2-adrenoceptor expressed on BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells. However, compared with the monofunctional parent compound, β2A, the KA of GS-5759 for the β2-adrenoceptor was 35-fold lower. Schild analysis determined that the affinities of the β-adrenoceptor antagonists, (2R,3R)-1-[(2,3-dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl) amino]-2-butanol (ICI 118551) and propranolol, were agonist-dependent, being significantly lower for GS-5759 than β2A. Collectively, these data can be explained by "forced proximity," bivalent binding where the pharmacophore in GS-5759 responsible for PDE4 inhibition also interacts with a nonallosteric domain within the β2-adrenoceptor that enhances the affinity of β2A for the orthosteric site. Microarray analyses revealed that, after 2-hour exposure, GS-5759 increased the expression of >3500 genes in BEAS-2B cells that were highly rank-order correlated with gene expression changes produced by indacaterol and GSK 256066 in combination (Ind/GSK). Moreover, the line of regression began close to the origin with a slope of 0.88, indicating that the magnitude of most gene expression changes produced by Ind/GSK was quantitatively replicated by GS-5759. Thus, GS-5759 is a novel compound exhibiting dual β2-adrenoceptor agonism and PDE4 inhibition

  9. Solderability preservation through the use of organic inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Hosking, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Organic inhibitors can be used to prevent corrosion of metals and have application in the electronics industry as solderability preservatives. We have developed a model to describe the action of two inhibitors (benzotriazole and imidazole) during the environmental aging and soldering process. The inhibitors bond with the metal surface and form a barrier that prevents or retards oxidation. At soldering temperatures, the metal-organic complex breaks down leaving an oxide-free metal surface that allows excellent wetting by molten solder. The presence of the inhibitor retards the wetting rate relative to clean copper, but provides a vast improvement relative to oxidized copper.

  10. Tyrosinase inhibitors from terrestrial and marine resources.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional copper-containing enzyme widely distributed in plants and animals, which catalyzes both the hydroxylation of tyrosine into o-diphenols and the oxidation of o-diphenols into o-quinones. Tyrosinase is known to be a key enzyme for melanin biosynthesis in plants and animals. Tyrosinase inhibitors, therefore, can be clinically useful for the treatment of some dermatological disorders associated with melanin hyperpigmentation. They also find uses in cosmetics for whitening and depigmentation after sunburn. This review describes 236 compounds obtained from terrestrial and marine plants, animals, microorganisms and macrofungi which have been shown to inhibit tyrosinase. The mechanism of action of tyrosinase, together with the mode of action of inhibitors is described. The relative activities of the different compounds are recorded. The literature on plant-origin inhibitors is extensive, and their chemistry and biological activity have been intensively reviewed. This review will therefore be deliberately cover new classes of inhibitors from terrestrial and marine plants, animals, microorganisms and macrofungi, as well as the traditional classes. The present paper summarizes and discusses the scientific results on the discovery of natural tyrosinase inhibitors.

  11. Reduction of energy usage in postharvest horticulture through management of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Wills, Ron B H; Golding, John B

    2015-05-01

    Cool chain management is the preferred technology to extend the postharvest life of horticultural produce, but with rising energy costs and community pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, there is a need to use less energy-intensive technologies. Minimising the level of ethylene around horticultural produce inhibits ripening and senescence and therefore has the potential to reduce the use of refrigeration. The long-distance transport of bananas within Australia and from Central America to Europe is used as a case study to show that the need for refrigeration could be reduced if the appropriate concentrations of ethylene were maintained around fruit during transit. Data are also presented to show a similar benefit of ethylene control with green beans, as well as another study showing that apples treated with the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene could be stored at a higher temperature without loss of quality to the consumer. The range of technologies available to manage ethylene levels is discussed.

  12. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer.

  13. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  14. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Qian, Kun; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zheng, Y. George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arginine methylation is an abundant posttranslational modification occurring in mammalian cells and catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). Misregulation and aberrant expression of PRMTs are associated with various disease states, notably cancer. PRMTs are prominent therapeutic targets in drug discovery. Areas covered The authors provide an updated review of the research on the development of chemical modulators for PRMTs. Great efforts are seen in screening and designing potent and selective PRMT inhibitors, and a number of micromolar and submicromolar inhibitors have been obtained for key PRMT enzymes such as PRMT1, CARM1, and PRMT5. The authors provide a focus on their chemical structures, mechanism of action, and pharmacological activities. Pros and cons of each type of inhibitors are also discussed. Expert opinion Several key challenging issues exist in PRMT inhibitor discovery. Structural mechanisms of many PRMT inhibitors remain unclear. There lacks consistency in potency data due to divergence of assay methods and conditions. Physiologically relevant cellular assays are warranted. Substantial engagements are needed to investigate pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the new PRMT inhibitors in pertinent disease models. Discovery and evaluation of potent, isoform-selective, cell-permeable and in vivo-active PRMT modulators will continue to be an active arena of research in years ahead. PMID:26789238

  15. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do. PMID:27667859

  16. Conscious Action/Zombie Action.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co-conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do.

  17. Noncovalent inhibitors of human 20S and 26S proteasome based on trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1.

    PubMed

    Dębowski, Dawid; Cichorek, Mirosława; Lubos, Marta; Wójcik, Sławomir; Łęgowska, Anna; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Sunflower trypsin inhibitor (SFTI-1) is recognized as an attractive scaffold to designed potent inhibitors of various proteases. We have recently found that its analogues inhibit noncovalently both human and yeast 20S proteasomes. Here, a set of novel and more potent in vitro inhibitors is presented. The inhibitory potency of the peptides was assessed with human 20S proteasome in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and with human 26 proteasome. Their antiproliferative action against tumor (human melanoma cells A375) and normal cells (46 BR.1N human fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes) was determined. The selected fluoresceine-labeled inhibitors were able to internalize into A375 cells and were sometimes present as foci in the cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 685-696, 2016.

  18. Inhibitors of Pyruvate Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Maurice, Martin St.; Attwood, Paul V.

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to discuss the varied types of inhibitors of biotin-dependent carboxylases, with an emphasis on the inhibitors of pyruvate carboxylase. Some of these inhibitors are physiologically relevant, in that they provide ways of regulating the cellular activities of the enzymes e.g. aspartate and prohibitin inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase. Most of the inhibitors that will be discussed have been used to probe various aspects of the structure and function of these enzymes. They target particular parts of the structure e.g. avidin – biotin, FTP – ATP binding site, oxamate – pyruvate binding site, phosphonoacetate – binding site of the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate. PMID:22180764

  19. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  20. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  1. Therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-19

    Marijuana and aspirin have been used for millennia to treat a wide range of maladies including pain and inflammation. Both cannabinoids, like marijuana, that exert anti-inflammatory action through stimulating cannabinoid receptors, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, like aspirin, that suppress pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production have shown beneficial outcomes in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Both cannabinoids and COX inhibitors, however, have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including cognitive deficits and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered that the serine hydrolase monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) links the endocannabinoid and eicosanoid systems together through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to provide the major arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pools for pro-inflammatory eicosanoid synthesis in specific tissues. Studies in recent years have shown that MAGL inhibitors elicit anti-nociceptive, anxiolytic, and anti-emetic responses and attenuate precipitated withdrawal symptoms in addiction paradigms through enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. MAGL inhibitors have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory action in the brain and protect against neurodegeneration through lowering eicosanoid production. In cancer, MAGL inhibitors have been shown to have anti-cancer properties not only through modulating the endocannabinoid-eicosanoid network, but also by controlling fatty acid release for the synthesis of protumorigenic signaling lipids. Thus, MAGL serves as a critical node in simultaneously coordinating multiple lipid signaling pathways in both physiological and disease contexts. This review will discuss the diverse (patho)physiological roles of MAGL and the therapeutic potential of MAGL inhibitors in treating a vast array of complex human diseases.

  2. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  3. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  4. SGLT2 Inhibitors and the Diabetic Kidney.

    PubMed

    Fioretto, Paola; Zambon, Alberto; Rossato, Marco; Busetto, Luca; Vettor, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Blood glucose and blood pressure control reduce the risk of developing this complication; however, once DN is established, it is only possible to slow progression. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, the most recent glucose-lowering oral agents, may have the potential to exert nephroprotection not only through improving glycemic control but also through glucose-independent effects, such as blood pressure-lowering and direct renal effects. It is important to consider, however, that in patients with impaired renal function, given their mode of action, SGLT2 inhibitors are less effective in lowering blood glucose. In patients with high cardiovascular risk, the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin lowered the rate of cardiovascular events, especially cardiovascular death, and substantially reduced important renal outcomes. Such benefits on DN could derive from effects beyond glycemia. Glomerular hyperfiltration is a potential risk factor for DN. In addition to the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renal tubular factors, including SGLT2, contribute to glomerular hyperfiltration in diabetes. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule, causing, through tubuloglomerular feedback, afferent arteriole vasoconstriction and reduction in hyperfiltration. Experimental studies showed that SGLT2 inhibitors reduced hyperfiltration and decreased inflammatory and fibrotic responses of proximal tubular cells. SGLT2 inhibitors reduced glomerular hyperfiltration in patients with type 1 diabetes, and in patients with type 2 diabetes, they caused transient acute reductions in glomerular filtration rate, followed by a progressive recovery and stabilization of renal function. Interestingly, recent studies consistently demonstrated a reduction in albuminuria. Although these data are promising, only dedicated renal outcome trials will clarify whether

  5. Three Decades of β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Sarah M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the introduction of penicillin, β-lactam antibiotics have been the antimicrobial agents of choice. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these life-saving antibiotics is significantly threatened by bacterial β-lactamases. β-Lactamases are now responsible for resistance to penicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems. In order to overcome β-lactamase-mediated resistance, β-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam) were introduced into clinical practice. These inhibitors greatly enhance the efficacy of their partner β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious Enterobacteriaceae and penicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. However, selective pressure from excess antibiotic use accelerated the emergence of resistance to β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. Furthermore, the prevalence of clinically relevant β-lactamases from other classes that are resistant to inhibition is rapidly increasing. There is an urgent need for effective inhibitors that can restore the activity of β-lactams. Here, we review the catalytic mechanisms of each β-lactamase class. We then discuss approaches for circumventing β-lactamase-mediated resistance, including properties and characteristics of mechanism-based inactivators. We next highlight the mechanisms of action and salient clinical and microbiological features of β-lactamase inhibitors. We also emphasize their therapeutic applications. We close by focusing on novel compounds and the chemical features of these agents that may contribute to a “second generation” of inhibitors. The goal for the next 3 decades will be to design inhibitors that will be effective for more than a single class of β-lactamases. PMID:20065329

  6. Pyrrole-3-carboxamides as potent and selective JAK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brasca, Maria Gabriella; Nesi, Marcella; Avanzi, Nilla; Ballinari, Dario; Bandiera, Tiziano; Bertrand, Jay; Bindi, Simona; Canevari, Giulia; Carenzi, Davide; Casero, Daniele; Ceriani, Lucio; Ciomei, Marina; Cirla, Alessandra; Colombo, Maristella; Cribioli, Sabrina; Cristiani, Cinzia; Della Vedova, Franco; Fachin, Gabriele; Fasolini, Marina; Felder, Eduard R; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Mirizzi, Danilo; Motto, Ilaria; Panzeri, Achille; Pesenti, Enrico; Vianello, Paola; Gnocchi, Paola; Donati, Daniele

    2014-09-01

    We report herein the discovery, structure guided design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of JAK2 inhibitors. Optimization of the series led to the identification of the potent and orally bioavailable JAK2 inhibitor 28 (NMS-P953). Compound 28 displayed significant tumour growth inhibition in SET-2 xenograft tumour model, with a mechanism of action confirmed in vivo by typical modulation of known biomarkers, and with a favourable pharmacokinetic and safety profile.

  7. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-02-02

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  8. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  9. Engineered protease inhibitors based on sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1) provide insights into the role of sequence and conformation in Laskowski mechanism inhibition.

    PubMed

    de Veer, Simon J; Swedberg, Joakim E; Akcan, Muharrem; Rosengren, K Johan; Brattsand, Maria; Craik, David J; Harris, Jonathan M

    2015-07-15

    Laskowski inhibitors regulate serine proteases by an intriguing mode of action that involves deceiving the protease into synthesizing a peptide bond. Studies exploring naturally occurring Laskowski inhibitors have uncovered several structural features that convey the inhibitor's resistance to hydrolysis and exceptional binding affinity. However, in the context of Laskowski inhibitor engineering, the way that various modifications intended to fine-tune an inhibitor's potency and selectivity impact on its association and dissociation rates remains unclear. This information is important as Laskowski inhibitors are becoming increasingly used as design templates to develop new protease inhibitors for pharmaceutical applications. In this study, we used the cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), as a model system to explore how the inhibitor's sequence and structure relate to its binding kinetics and function. Using enzyme assays, MD simulations and NMR spectroscopy to study SFTI variants with diverse sequence and backbone modifications, we show that the geometry of the binding loop mainly influences the inhibitor's potency by modulating the association rate, such that variants lacking a favourable conformation show dramatic losses in activity. Additionally, we show that the inhibitor's sequence (including both the binding loop and its scaffolding) influences its potency and selectivity by modulating both the association and the dissociation rates. These findings provide new insights into protease inhibitor function and design that we apply by engineering novel inhibitors for classical serine proteases, trypsin and chymotrypsin and two kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK5 and KLK14) that are implicated in various cancers and skin diseases.

  10. PARP Inhibitors for the Treatment and Prevention of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Shaveta; Ford, James M

    2010-12-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, a novel class of drugs that target tumors with DNA repair defects, have received tremendous enthusiasm. Early preclinical studies identified BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors to be highly sensitive to PARP inhibitors as a result of homologous recombination defect. Based on this premise, PARP inhibitors have been tested in early phase clinical trials as a single agent in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers and in combination with chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer patients. For high-risk populations, use of PARP inhibition as a prevention agent has been postulated, but no robust preclinical or clinical studies exist yet. We review the preclinical and clinical studies in treatment of breast cancer and rationale for use of PARP inhibitors as a prevention agent for high-risk populations. Of significance, PARP inhibitors vary significantly in mechanism of action, dosing intervals, and toxicities, which are highlighted in this review.

  11. Influenza treatment and prophylaxis with neuraminidase inhibitors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Amanda; Holodniy, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus is a pathogen that causes morbidity and mortality worldwide. Whereas vaccination is important for prevention of disease, given its limitations, antiviral therapy is at the forefront of treatment and also plays a role in prevention. Currently, two classes of antiviral medications, the adamantanes and the neuraminidase inhibitors, are approved for treatment. Given the resistance patterns of circulating influenza, adamantanes are not recommended. Within the US, two neuraminidase inhibitors are currently approved for both treatment and prevention, while worldwide there are four available. In this review, we will briefly discuss the epidemiology and pathology of influenza and then discuss neuraminidase inhibitors: their mechanism of action, resistance, development, and future applications. PMID:24277988

  12. The Seventh Frederick H. Verhoeff Lecture. Collagenase and collagenase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    François, J

    1977-01-01

    Besides EDTA and cysteine, cystine and penicillamine are the best collagenase inhibitors. The collagenase is produced by the leucocytes. The action mechanism of the collagenase inhibitors is due to the chelation of Zn ions. The best clinical indications for collagenase inhibitors are punctate epithelial keratitis, chemical burns, recurrent corneal erosions in keratoconus, trophic postinfectious ulcerations of the cornea (metaherpetic ulcers), and descemetoceles. Images FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B PMID:206998

  13. Drug discovery considerations in the development of covalent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mah, Robert; Thomas, Jason R; Shafer, Cynthia M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of drug candidates with a covalent mechanism of action progressing through clinical trials or being approved by the FDA has increased significantly. And as interest in covalent inhibitors has increased, the technical challenges for characterizing and optimizing these inhibitors have become evident. A number of new tools have been developed to aid this process, but these have not gained wide-spread use. This review will highlight a number of methods and tools useful for prosecuting covalent inhibitor drug discovery programs.

  14. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A; Gray, Nathanael S

    2014-11-11

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a "DFG-out" covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket.

  15. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  16. [Antimicrobial mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Calvo, Jorge; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A large number of families and groups of antimicrobial agents are of clinical interest. The mechanisms by which compounds with antibacterial activity inhibit growth or cause bacterial death are varied and depend on the affected targets. The bacterial cell wall-a unique structure in most bacteria that is absent in eukaryotic cells-can be affected in several ways: at different stages of synthesis (fosfomycin, cycloserine) or transport (bacitracin, mureidomycins) of its metabolic precursors, or by a direct action on its structural organization (beta-lactams, glycopeptides). The main drugs affecting the cytoplasmic membrane are polymyxins and daptomycin. Protein synthesis can be blocked by a large variety of compounds that affect any of the phases of this process, including activation (mupirocin), initiation (oxazolidinones, aminoglycosides), binding of the tRNA amino acid complex to ribosomes (tetracyclines, glycylcyclines) and elongation (amphenicols, lincosamides, macrolides, ketolides, streptogramins, fusidic acid). The metabolism of nucleic acids can be altered at the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase or in the process of DNA coiling (quinolones); some compounds affect DNA directly (nitroimidazoles, nitrofurans). Trimethoprim and sulfamides (often used in combination) are examples of antimicrobial agents that block bacterial metabolic pathways. Some compounds are unable to inhibit or kill bacteria in themselves, but can block bacterial mechanisms of resistance, enhancing the activity of other antimicrobials administered in combination. Among this group of agents, only certain beta-lactamase inhibitors are currently in clinical use.

  17. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 by fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) is responsible for entry of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells by mediating attachment to target cells and subsequent membrane fusion. Env consists of three gp120 subunits that mediate receptor and co-receptor attachment and three gp41 subunits responsible for membrane fusion. Several steps of the entry process can serve as drug targets. Receptor antagonists prevent attachment of gp120 to the receptor or co-receptor and conformational changes within gp41 required for membrane fusion can be inhibited by fusion inhibitors. Enfuvirtide (T20, Fuzeon) is a peptide based on the gp41 sequence and is the only approved fusion inhibitor. It prevents membrane fusion by competitively binding to gp41 and blocking the formation of the post-fusion structure. New generations of T20-like peptides have been developed with improved potency and stability. Besides T20 and derivatives, other fusion inhibitors have been developed that target different domains of gp41. Here we discuss the development of fusion inhibitors, their mode of action and their potential for incorporation in future drug regimens.

  19. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  20. Protective Action Guides (PAGs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Protective Action Guide (PAG) manual contains radiation dose guidelines that would trigger public safety measures. EPA developed Protective Action Guides to help responders plan for radiation emergencies.

  1. Improving cancer immunotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad H; Wang, Lei; Goldberg, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit to melanoma, lung, and kidney cancer patients. Challengingly, most other solid tumors, including ovarian carcinoma, are not particularly responsive to immunotherapy, so combination with a complementary therapy may be beneficial. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic modifying drugs can prime antitumor immunity by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens, chemokines, and activating ligands by cancer cells as well as cytokines by immune cells. This review, drawing from both preclinical and clinical data, describes some of the mechanisms of action that enable DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to facilitate the establishment of antitumor immunity.

  2. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Fétique-Will, Anne-Catherine; Chevalley, Thierry; Rizzoli, René

    2011-06-15

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) represent the first-line treatment of depression. Several studies demonstrate that use of therapeutical doses of SSRI is associated with a decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fracture. Mechanisms of action of SSRI on bone tissue are not totally clarified. These treatments would be associated with an increased risk of falls and would also have a direct effect on bone metabolism. Regarding proofs existing of the implication of SSRI on osteoporosis, while waiting for larger-scale prospective studies, it appears reasonable that practitioners assess bone loss within risk groups of patients treated with SSRI.

  3. Patient compliance with MAO inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Walker, J I; Davidson, J; Zung, W W

    1984-07-01

    Exaggerated fears of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and of their interactions with foods often restrict their use. A review of the literature reveals seven food items most likely to produce a hypertensive crisis in combination with MAOI administration: aged cheeses, smoked or pickled fish, beef or chicken liver, dry fermented sausage, pods of broad beans, brewer's yeast products, and certain alcoholic beverages. Improved understanding of the dietary restrictions, benefits, and mechanism of action of the MAOIs can enhance cooperation with the prescribed treatment program.

  4. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of aza inhibitors of chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Hediger, Mark E

    2004-09-15

    A series of aza inhibitors (4-9) of chorismate mutase (E.C. 5.4.99.5) was designed, prepared, and evaluated against the enzyme by monitoring the direct inhibition of the chorismate, 1, to prephenate, 2, conversion. None of these aza inhibitors displayed tighter binding to the enzyme than the native substrate chorismate or greater inhibitory action than the previously reported ether analogue, 3. Furthermore, no time-dependent loss of enzyme activity was observed in the presence of the two potentially reactive aza inhibitors (7 and 9). These results in conjunction with inhibition data from a broader series of chorismate mutase inhibitors allowed a novel proposal for the mechanistic role of chorismate mutase to be developed. This proposed mechanism was computationally verified and correlated with crystallographic studies of various chorismate mutases.

  5. Positioning of aminopeptidase inhibitors in next generation cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hitzerd, Sarina M; Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2014-04-01

    Aminopeptidases represent a class of (zinc) metalloenzymes that catalyze the cleavage of amino acids nearby the N-terminus of polypeptides, resulting in hydrolysis of peptide bonds. Aminopeptidases operate downstream of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and are implicated in the final step of intracellular protein degradation either by trimming proteasome-generated peptides for antigen presentation or full hydrolysis into free amino acids for recycling in renewed protein synthesis. This review focuses on the function and subcellular location of five key aminopeptidases (aminopeptidase N, leucine aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1/2) and their association with different diseases, in particular cancer and their current position as target for therapeutic intervention by aminopeptidase inhibitors. Historically, bestatin was the first prototypical aminopeptidase inhibitor that entered the clinic 35 years ago and is still used for the treatment of lung cancer. More recently, new generation aminopeptidase inhibitors became available, including the aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug tosedostat, which is currently tested in phase II clinical trials for acute myeloid leukemia. Beyond bestatin and tosedostat, medicinal chemistry has emerged with additional series of potential aminopeptidases inhibitors which are still in an early phase of (pre)clinical investigations. The expanded knowledge of the unique mechanism of action of aminopeptidases has revived interest in aminopeptidase inhibitors for drug combination regimens in anti-cancer treatment. In this context, this review will discuss relevant features and mechanisms of action of aminopeptidases and will also elaborate on factors contributing to aminopeptidase inhibitor efficacy and/or loss of efficacy due to drug resistance-related phenomena. Together, a growing body of data point to aminopeptidase inhibitors as attractive tools for

  6. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  7. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors-induced autophagy: alternative mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Pan, Jingxuan; Song, Enlin; Cheng, Chao; Lee, Mong-Hong; Yeung, Sai-Ching Jim

    2009-01-01

    Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) were designed to block the action of Ras oncoproteins which depend on posttranslational modification by adding a farnesyl isoprenoid membrane anchor. However, off-target actions are believed to account for most of their antitumor activity. We recently reported the induction of autophagy in cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner by FTIs. We observed similar results of autophagy in a panel of tumor cell lines for the three FTIs tested. Therefore, the induction of autophagy is very likely a pharmacological class effect of inhibition of farnesyltransferase. In this addendum, we discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the induction of autophagy by FTIs, including reactive oxygen species-, DNA damage- and Ras-mediated pathways as alternatives to Rheb-mediated regulation of mTOR and autophagy.

  8. Enkephalinase inhibitors: potential agents for the management of pain.

    PubMed

    Thanawala, V; Kadam, V J; Ghosh, R

    2008-10-01

    Management of acute and chronic pain has always been a key area of clinical research. Enkephalinase inhibitors (EIs) seem to be promising as therapeutic agents having antinociceptive action. They additionally possess anticraving, antidiarrhoeal and antidepressant actions. The antinociceptive action of EIs has been reported for over a decade however, their therapeutic potential is yet to be effectively explored. EIs may be broadly classified as endogenous and those that are obtained synthetically. Endogenous EIs include peptides like spinorphin and opiorphin. And compounds like RB 101, RB 120, RB 3007 constitute the synthetically obtained EIs. Endogenous and synthetic inhibitors enkephalin degrading enzymes have been studied in vivo using standard animal models. The potential EI targets appear to be APN (Aminopeptidase N), NEP (Neutral endopeptidase), DPP-III (Dipeptidyl peptidase). EIs possess the advantage that they lack the opioid side effects. This article reviews the mechanisms by which EIs act and elucidates the pathways involved.

  9. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  10. [SGLT2 inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    SGLT2 is a glucose transporter which plays an important role for reabsorption of urinary glucose depending on the sodium concentration gradient. SGLT2 is mainly present in apical site of S1 segment of renal proximal tubule and accounts for approximately 90% of total urinary glucose reabsorption. SLC5a2, which codes SGLT2, is also known as the causative gene of familial renal glucosuria. SGLT2 inhibitors are attracting attention as newly developed oral anti-diabetic agents which improve glucose intolerance and also have an anti-obese effect by promoting urinary glucose excretion (UGE), which is a different pharmacological effect from other conventional anti-diabetic agents. In this review, we will discuss the effect of SGLT2 inhibitor on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes.

  11. Development of scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    During the last fifty years, scale inhibition has gone from an art to a science. Scale inhibition has changed from simple pH adjustment to the use of optimized dose of designer polymers from multiple monomers. The water-treatment industry faces many challenges due to the need to conserve water, availability of only low quality water, increasing environmental regulations of the water discharge, and concern for human safety when using acid. Natural materials such as starch, lignin, tannin, etc., have been replaced with hydrolytically stable organic phosphates and synthetic polymers. Most progress in scale inhibition has come from the use of synergistic mixtures and copolymerizing different functionalities to achieve specific goals. Development of scale inhibitors requires an understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and its inhibition. This paper discusses the historic perspective of scale inhibition and the development of new inhibitors based on the understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and the use of powerful tools like molecular modeling to visualize crystal-inhibitor interactions.

  12. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  13. PARP Inhibitors for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: Current Treatment Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J.; Braicu, E. I.; Chekerov, R.

    2016-01-01

    More than simply a promising management option, PARP inhibitors can be regarded as a milestone in the development of personalised treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Their mechanism of action, known as “synthetic lethality”, is dependent on functional differences of the DNA repair mechanisms of healthy cells and tumour cells; cells that repair DNA damage less efficiently are particularly sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Olaparib, licensed for use this year, is the best-studied PARP inhibitor used for treatment of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC). The efficacy of PARP inhibitors appears to be increased when used in combination with other treatments. PMID:26941449

  14. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors confer anti-invasive and antimetastatic effects on lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Katrin; Ramer, Robert; Dithmer, Sophie; Ivanov, Igor; Merkord, Jutta; Hinz, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation has been suggested as tool for activation of endogenous tumor defense. One of these strategies lies in blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA], N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]). This study addressed the impact of two FAAH inhibitors (arachidonoyl serotonin [AA-5HT], URB597) on A549 lung cancer cell metastasis and invasion. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of FAAH substrates (AEA, 2-AG, OEA, PEA) in cells incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. In athymic nude mice FAAH inhibitors were shown to elicit a dose-dependent antimetastatic action yielding a 67% and 62% inhibition of metastatic lung nodules following repeated administration of 15 mg/kg AA-5HT and 5 mg/kg URB597, respectively. In vitro, a concentration-dependent anti-invasive action of either FAAH inhibitor was demonstrated, accompanied with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Using siRNA approaches, a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of FAAH inhibitors was confirmed. Moreover, knockdown of FAAH by siRNA was shown to confer decreased cancer cell invasiveness and increased TIMP-1 expression. Inhibitor experiments point toward a role of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in conferring anti-invasive effects of FAAH inhibitors and FAAH siRNA. Finally, antimetastatic and anti-invasive effects were confirmed for all FAAH substrates with AEA and OEA causing a TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive action. Collectively, the present study provides first-time proof for an antimetastatic action of FAAH inhibitors. As mechanism of its anti-invasive properties an upregulation of TIMP-1 was identified. PMID:26930716

  15. Inhibitor of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Sensitizes Glioblastoma Cells to Temozolomide via Activating ROS/JNK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Yan, Peng-Fei; Zhao, Hong-yang; Zhang, Fang-Cheng; Zhao, Wo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming temozolomide (TMZ) resistance is a great challenge in glioblastoma (GBM) treatment. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and has a crucial role in cancer cell metabolism. In this study, we investigated whether FK866 and CHS828, two specific NAMPT inhibitors, could sensitize GBM cells to TMZ. Low doses of FK866 and CHS828 (5 nM and 10 nM, resp.) alone did not significantly decrease cell viability in U251-MG and T98 GBM cells. However, they significantly increased the antitumor action of TMZ in these cells. In U251-MG cells, administration of NAMPT inhibitors increased the TMZ (100 μM)-induced apoptosis and LDH release from GBM cells. NAMPT inhibitors remarkably enhanced the activities of caspase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9. Moreover, NAMPT inhibitors increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and superoxide anion level but reduced the SOD activity and total antioxidative capacity in GBM cells. Treatment of NAMPT inhibitors increased phosphorylation of c-Jun and JNK. Administration of JNK inhibitor SP600125 or ROS scavenger tocopherol with TMZ and NAMPT inhibitors substantially attenuated the sensitization of NAMPT inhibitor on TMZ antitumor action. Our data indicate a potential value of NAMPT inhibitors in combined use with TMZ for GBM treatment. PMID:28097126

  16. Set Goals & Select Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This phase of the Local Climate Action Framework will help users articulate the goals for their climate, energy, and sustainability programs, as well as to identify the actions that are most appropriate to help meet those goals.

  17. American Lead Action Memorandum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ACTION MEMORANDUM— Request for a Time-Critical Removal Action andExemption from the $2 Million and 12-Month Statutory Limits at the AmericanLead Site, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana (Site ID #B56J)

  18. Stimulation of cleavage of membrane proteins by calmodulin inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Esparís-Ogando, A; Montero, J C; Yuste, L; Pandiella, A

    2000-01-01

    The ectodomain of several membrane-bound proteins can be shed by proteolytic cleavage. The activity of the proteases involved in shedding is highly regulated by several intracellular second messenger pathways, such as protein kinase C (PKC) and intracellular Ca(2+). Recently, the shedding of the adhesion molecule L-selectin has been shown to be regulated by the interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with the cytosolic tail of L-selectin. Prevention of CaM-L-selectin interaction by CaM inhibitors or mutation of a CaM binding site in L-selectin induced L-selectin ectodomain shedding. Whether this action of CaM inhibitors also affects other membrane-bound proteins is not known. In the present paper we show that CaM inhibitors also stimulate the cleavage of several other transmembrane proteins, such as the membrane-bound growth factor precursors pro-transforming growth factor-alpha and pro-neuregulin-alpha2c, the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, and the beta-amyloid precursor protein. Cleavage induced by CaM inhibitors was a rapid event, and resulted from the activation of a mechanism that was independent of PKC or intracellular Ca(2+) increases, but was highly sensitive to hydroxamic acid-based metalloprotease inhibitors. Mutational analysis of the intracellular domain of the TrkA receptor indicated that CaM inhibitors may stimulate membrane-protein ectodomain cleavage by mechanisms independent of CaM-substrate interaction. PMID:10677354

  19. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  20. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  1. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and…

  2. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  3. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  4. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  5. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  6. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  7. Comparative toxicity of 20 herbicides to 5 periphytic algae and the relationship with mode of action.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Taya, Kiyoshi; Yoda, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    The authors used 5 species of periphytic algae to conduct toxicity assays of 20 herbicides. The 5 tested species represent riverine primary producers most likely to be affected by herbicides. A fluorescence microplate toxicity assay was used as an efficient and economical high-throughput assay. Toxicity characteristics were analyzed, focusing on their relationship to herbicide mode of action. The relative differences between 50% and 10% effect concentrations depended on herbicide mode of action, rather than tested species. Moreover, a clear relationship between sensitive species and herbicide mode of action was also observed. Green alga was most sensitive to herbicides of 2 mode of action groups: inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. Diatoms were most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: 4-hydroxyphenyl-pyruvate-dioxygenase inhibitors. Cyanobacterium was most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: inhibitors of acetolactate synthase. The species sensitivity distribution based on obtained data was also analyzed. The slopes of the species sensitivity distribution significantly differed among modes of action, suggesting that difference in species sensitivity is specific to the mode of action. In particular, differences in species sensitivity were markedly large for inhibitors of acetolactate synthase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase, and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. The results clearly showed that a single algal species cannot represent the sensitivity of an algal assemblage. Therefore, multispecies algal toxicity data are essential for substances with specific modes of action.

  8. [Biological actions of acetaldehyde].

    PubMed

    Ijiri, I

    1999-11-01

    Acetaldehyde (AcH), the first metabolite of ethanol (EtOH), is a chemically reactive and pharmacologically active compound. The author has been engaged in the study of AcH in cooperation with many researchers for three decades. We have found many biological actions of AcH which cause cardiovascular symptoms after drinking and also inhibited EtOH absorption via the canine and rat intestinal tract. This report covers the following five points. 1. The subjects were classified into a non-flushing group and a flushing group, according to the degree of facial flushing after drinking 200 ml of Sake (Japanese rice wire) at a rate of 100 ml per 5 min. Blood EtOH profile was much the same in both groups, yet peak blood AcH concentration in the flushing group was significantly higher than that in the non-flushing group. All subjects in the flushing group showed marked flushing and an increase in pulse rate after drinking, but these symptoms were not apparent in the non-flushing group. These results suggested that cardiovascular symptoms were caused by AcH itself. 2. Urinary excretions of both norepinephrine and epinephrine increased in the flushing cases after drinking Sake in comparison with those who drank the same volume of water. However, these catecholamines did not change in the non-flushing group. These results suggested that it is catecholamines released from the sympathetic nerve end or the adrenal medulla by AcH which caused an increase in pulse rate. 3. Bradykinin is released from high molecular kininogen by activated kallikrein and acts to dilate distal blood vessels and raise permeability in tissues. On the other hand, kallidin is released from low molecular kininogen by activated glandular kallikrein and its action is weaker than that of bradykinin. Blood low molecular kininogen levels in the flushing group decreased gradually after drinking and were mutually related to the blood AcH concentrations. But levels in the non-flushing group showed no difference

  9. The modern pharmacology of paracetamol: therapeutic actions, mechanism of action, metabolism, toxicity and recent pharmacological findings.

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Davies, Michael J; Day, Richard O; Mohamudally, Anthoulla; Scott, Kieran F

    2013-06-01

    Paracetamol is used worldwide for its analgesic and antipyretic actions. It has a spectrum of action similar to that of NSAIDs and resembles particularly the COX-2 selective inhibitors. Paracetamol is, on average, a weaker analgesic than NSAIDs or COX-2 selective inhibitors but is often preferred because of its better tolerance. Despite the similarities to NSAIDs, the mode of action of paracetamol has been uncertain, but it is now generally accepted that it inhibits COX-1 and COX-2 through metabolism by the peroxidase function of these isoenzymes. This results in inhibition of phenoxyl radical formation from a critical tyrosine residue essential for the cyclooxygenase activity of COX-1 and COX-2 and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. Paracetamol shows selectivity for inhibition of the synthesis of PGs and related factors when low levels of arachidonic acid and peroxides are available but conversely, it has little activity at substantial levels of arachidonic acid and peroxides. The result is that paracetamol does not suppress the severe inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis and acute gout but does inhibit the lesser inflammation resulting from extraction of teeth and is also active in a variety of inflammatory tests in experimental animals. Paracetamol often appears to have COX-2 selectivity. The apparent COX-2 selectivity of action of paracetamol is shown by its poor anti-platelet activity and good gastrointestinal tolerance. Unlike both non-selective NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors, paracetamol inhibits other peroxidase enzymes including myeloperoxidase. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase involves paracetamol oxidation and concomitant decreased formation of halogenating oxidants (e.g. hypochlorous acid, hypobromous acid) that may be associated with multiple inflammatory pathologies including atherosclerosis and rheumatic diseases. Paracetamol may, therefore, slow the development of these diseases. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors all have central and

  10. Current topics on inhibitors of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masatoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2016-07-01

    There are a variety of chemicals which regulate the functions of bacterial and mitochondrial complex I. Some of them, such as rotenone and piericidin A, have been indispensable molecular tools in mechanistic studies on complex I. A large amount of experimental data characterizing the actions of complex I inhibitors has been accumulated so far. Recent X-ray crystallographic structural models of entire complex I may be helpful to carefully interpret this data. We herein focused on recent hot topics on complex I inhibitors and the subjects closely connected to these inhibitors, which may provide useful information not only on the structural and functional aspects of complex I, but also on drug design targeting this enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  11. Inhibitors of the peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzymes MurA-F.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Sosič, Izidor; Sink, Roman; Gobec, Stanislav

    2014-08-01

    The widespread emergence of resistant bacterial strains is becoming a serious threat to public health. This thus signifies the need for the development of new antibacterial agents with novel mechanisms of action. Continuous efforts in the design of novel antibacterials remain one of the biggest challenges in drug development. In this respect, the Mur enzymes, MurA-F, that are involved in the formation of UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide can be genuinely considered as promising antibacterial targets. This review provides an in-depth insight into the recent developments in the field of inhibitors of the MurA-F enzymes. Special attention is also given to compounds that act as multiple inhibitors of two, three or more of the Mur enzymes. Moreover, the reasons for the lack of preclinically successful inhibitors and the challenges to overcome these hurdles in the next years are also debated.

  12. Sequencing of aromatase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bertelli, G

    2005-01-01

    Since the development of the third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), anastrozole, letrozole and exemestane, these agents have been the subject of intensive research to determine their optimal use in advanced breast cancer. Not only have they replaced progestins in second-line therapy and challenged the role of tamoxifen in first-line, but there is also evidence for a lack of cross-resistance between the steroidal and nonsteroidal AIs, meaning that they may be used in sequence to obtain prolonged clinical benefit. Many questions remain, however, as to the best sequence of the two types of AIs and of the other available agents, including tamoxifen and fulvestrant, in different patient groups. PMID:16100523

  13. Blebbistatin, a myosin II inhibitor, is photoinactivated by blue light.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takeshi; Limouze, John; Combs, Christian A; Straight, Aaron F; Sellers, James R

    2005-01-18

    Blebbistatin is a small molecule inhibitor discovered in a screen for inhibitors of nonmuscle myosin IIA. Blebbistatin inhibits the actin-activated MgATPase activity and in vitro motility of class II myosins. In cells, it has been shown to inhibit contraction of the cytokinetic ring. Blebbistatin has some photochemical properties that may affect its behavior in cells. In particular, we have found that exposure to light at wavelengths below 488 nm rapidly inactivates the inhibitory action of blebbistatin using the in vitro motility of myosin as an assay. In addition, the inhibition of cytokinetic ring contraction can be reversed by exposure of the cells to blue light. This property may be useful in locally reversing the action of blebbistatin treatment in a cell. However, caution should be exercised as free radicals may be produced upon irradiation of blebbistatin that could result in cell damage.

  14. Sirtuin activators and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, José M.; Alcaín, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins 1-7 (SIRT1-7) belong to the third class of deacetylase enzymes, which are dependent on NAD+ for activity. Sirtuins activity is linked to gene repression, metabolic control, apoptosis and cell survival, DNA repair, development, inflammation, neuroprotection and healthy aging. Because sirtuins modulation could have beneficial effects on human diseases there is a growing interest in the discovery of small molecules modifying their activity. We review here those compounds known to activate or inhibit sirtuins, discussing the data that support the use of sirtuin-based therapies. Almost all sirtuin activators have been described only for SIRT1. Resveratrol is a natural compound which activates SIRT1, and may help in the treatment or prevention of obesity, and in preventing tumorigenesis and the aging-related decline in heart function and neuronal loss. Due to its poor bioavailability, reformulated versions of resveratrol with improved bioavailability have been developed (resVida, Longevinex®, SRT501). Molecules that are structurally unrelated to resveratrol (SRT1720, SRT2104, SRT2379, among others) have been also developed to stimulate sirtuin activities more potently than resveratrol. Sirtuin inhibitors with a wide range of core structures have been identified for SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3 and SIRT5 (splitomicin, sirtinol, AGK2, cambinol, suramin, tenovin, salermide, among others). SIRT1 inhibition has been proposed in the treatment of cancer, immunodeficiency virus infections, Fragile X mental retardation syndrome and for preventing or treating parasitic diseases, whereas SIRT2 inhibitors might be useful for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22730114

  15. Dissecting PUGNAc-mediated inhibition of the pro-survival action of insulin.

    PubMed

    Teo, Chin Fen; El-Karim, Enas Gad; Wells, Lance

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies utilizing PUGNAc, the most widely used β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (OGA) inhibitor to increase global O-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) levels, have reported a variety of effects including insulin resistance as a direct result of elevated O-GlcNAc levels. The notion of OGA inhibition causing insulin resistance was not replicated in studies in which elevated global O-GlcNAc levels were achieved using two other OGA inhibitors. Related to insulin action, work by others has suggested that O-GlcNAc elevation may inhibit the anti-apoptotic action of insulin. Thus, we examined the pro-survival action of insulin upon serum deprivation in the presence of PUGNAc as well as two selective OGA inhibitors (GlcNAcstatin-g and Thiamet-G), and a selective lysosomal hexosaminidase inhibitor (INJ2). We established that PUGNAc inhibits the pro-survival action of insulin but this effect is not recapitulated by the selective OGA inhibitors suggesting that elevation in O-GlcNAc levels alone is not responsible for PUGNAc's effect on the anti-apoptotic action of insulin. Further, we demonstrate that a selective hexosaminidase A/B (HexA/B) inhibitor does not impact insulin action suggesting that PUGNAc's effect is not due to inhibition of lysosomal hexosaminidase. Finally, we tested a combination of selective OGA and lysosomal hexosaminidase inhibitors but were not able to recapitulate the inhibition of insulin action generated by PUGNAc alone. These results strongly suggest that the defect in insulin action upon PUGNAc treatment does not derive from its inhibition of OGA or HexA/B, and that there is an unknown target of PUGNAc that is the likely culprit in inhibiting the protective effect of insulin from apoptosis.

  16. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  17. [ACE inhibitors from the viewpoint of the clinical pharmacologist].

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, G

    1996-01-01

    For treatment of hypertension drugs are desirable which exert a 24 hours lasting blood pressure control. Among the ACE-inhibitors some drugs exist which have this action. The elimination pathway plays a minor role in this respect. Not only the inhibition of Angiotensin II generation but also the decreased inhibition of bradykinin-degeneration plays a crucial role with regard to several endothelial functions controlling the so called remodeling of the cardiovascular system.

  18. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  19. National Biofuels Action Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Leading the Federal Interagency Biomass Research and Development Initiative October 2008 National Biofuels Action Plan Biomass Research and...REPORT DATE OCT 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE National Biofuels Action Plan 5a. CONTRACT...goal of the National Biofuels Action Plan is to maximize the environmental and economic benefi ts of biofuels use by advancing sustainable practices

  20. Systemic and spinal administration of FAAH, MAGL inhibitors and dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors produce antipruritic effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Cayirli, Mutlu; Sakin, Yusuf Serdar; Seyrek, Melik; Akar, Ahmet; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    The increase of endocannabinoid tonus by inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) represents a promising therapeutic approach in a variety of disease to overcome serious central side effects of exocannabinoids. Recent studies reported that systemic administration of FAAH and MAGL inhibitors produce antipruritic action. Dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors have also been described to get enhanced endocannabinoid therapeutic effect. In this study, we examined and compared dose-related antipruritic effects of systemic (intraperitoneal; ip) or intrathecal (it) administration of selective FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.; 1, 5, and 10 µg, i.t.), MAGL inhibitor JZL184 (4, 20, and 40 mg/kg, i.p.; 1, 5, and 10 µg, i.t.) and dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 (2, 5, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.; 1, 5, and 10 µg, i.t.) on serotonin (5-HT)-induced scratching model. Serotonin (25 μg) was injected intradermally in a volume of 50 μl into the rostral part of skin on the back of male Balb-C mice. Both systemic or intrathecal administration of PF-3845, JZL184 or JZL195 produced similar dose-dependent antipruritic effects. Our results suggest that endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes FAAH and MAGL are involved in pruritic process at spinal level. FAAH, MAGL or dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors have promising antipruritic effects, at least, in part through spinal site of action.

  1. [Microbial metabolites that inhibit sterol biosynthesis, their chemical diversity and characteristics of mode of action].

    PubMed

    Trenin, A S

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis (ISB) are widespread in nature and characterized by appreciable diversity both in their chemical structure and mode of action. Many of these inhibitors express noticeable biological activity and approved themselves in development of various pharmaceuticals. In this review there is a detailed description of biologically active microbial metabolites with revealed chemical structure that have ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis. Inhibitors of mevalonate pathway in fungous and mammalian cells, exhibiting hypolipidemic or antifungal activity, as well as inhibitors of alternative non-mevalonate (pyruvate gliceraldehyde phosphate) isoprenoid pathway, which are promising in the development of affective antimicrobial or antiparasitic drugs, are under consideration in this review. Chemical formulas of the main natural inhibitors and their semi-synthetic derivatives are represented. Mechanism of their action at cellular and biochemical level is discussed. Special attention is given to inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (group of lovastatin) and inhibitors of acyl-CoA-cholesterol-acyl transferase (ACAT) that possess hypolipidemic activity and could be affective in the treatment of atherosclerosis. In case of inhibitors of late stages of sterol biosynthesis (after squalene formation) special attention is paid to compounds possessing evident antifungal and antitumoral activity. Explanation of mechanism of anticancer and antiviral action of microbial ISB, as well as the description of their ability to induce apoptosis is given.

  2. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  3. Action principles in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Tipler, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Physical theories have their most fundamental expression as action integrals. This suggests that the total action of the universe is the most fundamental physical quantity, and hence finite. In this article it is argued that finite universal action implies that the universe is spatially closed. Further, the possible spatial topologies, the types of matter that can dominate the early universe dynamics, and the form of any quadratic additions to the lagrangian of general relativity are constrained. Initial and final cosmological curvature singularities are required to avoid a universal action singularity.

  4. Copper and endogenous mediators of estradiol action.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H; Fishman, J

    1988-04-29

    Divalent copper increases by severalfold specific estradiol binding in rat uterine cytosol at 37 degrees C. Two endogenous substances have now been isolated from the cytosol one of which sharply inhibits the copper effect while the other sharply promotes it. The inhibitor is thermostable, it is adsorbed by dextran coated charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with water. The promoter is thermolabile at 60 degrees C, it is not readily adsorbed by the charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with KCl. The two substances are thought to be mediators of estradiol action.

  5. New Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mona; Adem, Abdu; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) remains a highly viable target for the symptomatic improvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD) because cholinergic deficit is a consistent and early finding in AD. The treatment approach of inhibiting peripheral AchE for myasthenia gravis had effectively proven that AchE inhibition was a reachable therapeutic target. Subsequently tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine were developed and approved for the symptomatic treatment of AD. Since then, multiple cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) continue to be developed. These include newer ChEIs, naturally derived ChEIs, hybrids, and synthetic analogues. In this paper, we summarize the different types of ChEIs in development and their respective mechanisms of actions. This pharmacological approach continues to be active with many promising compounds. PMID:22216416

  6. The TRPM4 channel inhibitor 9-phenanthrol

    PubMed Central

    Guinamard, R; Hof, T; Del Negro, C A

    2014-01-01

    The phenanthrene-derivative 9-phenanthrol is a recently identified inhibitor of the transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 4 channel, a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation channel whose mechanism of action remains to be determined. Subsequent studies performed on other ion channels confirm the specificity of the drug for TRPM4. In addition, 9-phenanthrol modulates a variety of physiological processes through TRPM4 current inhibition and thus exerts beneficial effects in several pathological conditions. 9-Phenanthrol modulates smooth muscle contraction in bladder and cerebral arteries, affects spontaneous activity in neurons and in the heart, and reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced cell death. Among promising potential applications, 9-phenanthrol exerts cardioprotective effects against ischaemia-reperfusion injuries and reduces ischaemic stroke injuries. In addition to reviewing the biophysical effects of 9-phenanthrol, here we present information about its appropriate use in physiological studies and possible clinical applications. PMID:24433510

  7. Reactive oxygen and ethylene are involved in the regulation of regurgitant-induced responses in bean plants.

    PubMed

    Steinite, Ineta; Gailite, Agnese; Ievinsh, Gederts

    2004-02-01

    Application of regurgitant from Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say on wound surfaces of one wounded leaf of intact bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants resulted in activation of ethylene biosynthesis followed by an increase of both peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activity. The aim of the present investigation was to study the source of increased oxidative enzyme activities in regurgitant-treated bean leaves and to determine if hydrogen peroxide and ethylene biosynthesis is responsible for regurgitant-induced amplification of wound responses in bean plants. As the regurgitant contained relative high activities of both peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase, there is a possibility that increased enzyme activities in bean leaves following regurgitant treatment is an artifact of insect-derived enzymes. Localisation experiments and electrophoretic analysis revealed that only part of the increased enzyme activities could be attributed to regurgitant-derived enzymes. Both increase of ethylene production and oxidative enzyme activities depended on protein synthesis. To demonstrate if the increase of oxidative metabolism was ethylene-dependent, seedlings were pretreated with aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action. Increase of both peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activity in wounded and subsequently regurgitant-treated leaf was abolished by both aminooxyacetic acid and 1-MCP. Inhibitor studies indicated that H2O2 generated through NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutase is necessary for regurgitant-induced increase of ethylene production and oxidative enzyme activities.

  8. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  9. Characterization of Potent Fusion Inhibitors of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Michael; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Xian, Tongmei; Khawaja, Sarah; Yamauchi, Yohei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Guoxin; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    New inhibitors of influenza viruses are needed to combat the potential emergence of novel human influenza viruses. We have identified a class of small molecules that inhibit replication of influenza virus at picomolar concentrations in plaque reduction assays. The compound also inhibits replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Time of addition and dilution experiments with influenza virus indicated that an early time point of infection was blocked and that inhibitor 136 tightly bound to virions. Using fluorescently labeled influenza virus, inhibition of viral fusion to cellular membranes by blocked lipid mixing was established as the mechanism of action for this class of inhibitors. Stabilization of the neutral pH form of hemagglutinin (HA) was ruled out by trypsin digestion studies in vitro and with conformation specific HA antibodies within cells. Direct visualization of 136 treated influenza virions at pH 7.5 or acidified to pH 5.0 showed that virions remain intact and that glycoproteins become disorganized as expected when HA undergoes a conformational change. This suggests that exposure of the fusion peptide at low pH is not inhibited but lipid mixing is inhibited, a different mechanism than previously reported fusion inhibitors. We hypothesize that this new class of inhibitors intercalate into the virus envelope altering the structure of the viral envelope required for fusion to cellular membranes. PMID:25803288

  10. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  11. Novel Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arnab; Mills, Debra M.; Mitchell, Daniel; Ndungo, Esther; Williams, John D.; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Moir, Donald T.; Chandran, Kartik; Patterson, Jean L.; Rong, Lijun; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The current Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak has highlighted the troubling absence of available antivirals or vaccines to treat infected patients and stop the spread of EBOV. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) plays critical roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, making it a potential target for the development of anti-EBOV drugs. We report the identification of 2 novel EBOV inhibitors targeting viral entry. Methods. To identify small molecule inhibitors of EBOV entry, we carried out a cell-based high-throughput screening using human immunodeficiency virus–based pseudotyped viruses expressing EBOV-GP. Two compounds were identified, and mechanism-of-action studies were performed using immunoflourescence, AlphaLISA, and enzymatic assays for cathepsin B inhibition. Results. We report the identification of 2 novel entry inhibitors. These inhibitors (1) inhibit EBOV infection (50% inhibitory concentration, approximately 0.28 and approximately 10 µmol/L) at a late stage of entry, (2) induce Niemann-Pick C phenotype, and (3) inhibit GP–Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein interaction. Conclusions. We have identified 2 novel EBOV inhibitors, MBX2254 and MBX2270, that can serve as starting points for the development of an anti-EBOV therapeutic agent. Our findings also highlight the importance of NPC1-GP interaction in EBOV entry and the attractiveness of NPC1 as an antifiloviral therapeutic target. PMID:26206510

  12. DNA-polymerase inhibitors. Rifamycin derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, L Y; Meldrays, Y A; Kochkina, L L; Giller, S A; Eremeyev, A V; Grayevskaya, N A; Kisselev, L L

    1977-01-01

    Ten new derivatives of the antibiotic rifamycin with variable side chains at position 3 were synthesized. The inhibitory activity of these derivatives against DNA-polymerases isolated from avian myeloblastosis virus, E. coli and calf thymus were studied at various conditions. 3-(2,4,6-trinitrophenylhydrazone-(methyl) rifamycin SV is a strong inhibitor for all the polymerases tested and belongs to the C class inhibitors of reverse transcriptase. 3-(monoallylhydrazone-(methyl) rifamycin SV possesses a selective action on polymerases: at 0.1 mg/ml concentration it almost completely inhibits the reverse transcriptase and less than half of the bacterial and eukaryotic enzymes. A drug is found which strongly inhibits the DNA-polymerases from E. coli and calf thymus and weakly the viral enzyme. The inhibitory effect on reverse transcriptase is independent of the choice of template-primer; it could be overcome by the addition of excess enzyme but not of excess template-primer; the inhibition could be completely reversed by dilution of the drug-enzyme mixture. From Lineweaver-Burk analysis, the inhibition is noncompetitive with respect to the template-primer and, thus the drugs bind to the site different from the active site for the template-primer. From protective action of the template-primer and other data it might be suggested that the rifamycin derivatives act at an early step(s) in DNA synthesis catalyzed by reverse transcriptase. The obtained data are in agreement with the results for other derivatives of rifamycin SV described in literature. PMID:68462

  13. Platelet aggregation Inhibitors from Hametophagous Animals

    PubMed Central

    Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands from blood-sucking animals (e.g., mosquitoes, bugs, sandflies, fleas, ticks, leeches, hookworms, bats) are a rich source of bioactive molecules that counteract hemostasis in a redundant and synergistic manner. This review discusses recent progress in the identification of salivary inhibitors of platelet aggregation, their molecular characterization, and detailed mechanism of action. Diversity of inhibitors is remarkable, with distinct families of proteins characterized as apyrases that enzymatically degrade ADP or as collagen-binding proteins that prevent its interaction with vWF, or platelet integrin α2β1 or GPVI. Molecules that bind ADP, TXA2, epinephrine, or serotonin with high affinity have also been cloned, expressed, and their structure determined. In addition, a repertoire of antithrombins and an increasingly number of RGD and non-RGD disintegrins targeting platelet αIIbβ3 have been reported. Moreover, metalloproteases with fibrinogen(olytic) activity and PAF phosphorylcholine hydrolase are enzymes that have been recruited to the salivary gland to block platelet aggregation. Platelet inhibitory prostaglandins, lysophosphatydilcholine, adenosine, and nitric oxide (NO)-carrying proteins are other notable examples of molecules from hematophagous salivary secretions (herein named sialogenins) with antihemostatic properties. Sialogenins have been employed as tools in biochemistry and cell biology and also display potential therapeutic applications. PMID:20035779

  14. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  15. The mutation process in a chlorella population under the combined action of radionuclides and chemical mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyna, S.N.; Sergeeva, S.A.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Shvobene, R.Y.

    1985-09-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of the mutation process under the combined chronic action of radionuclides (/sup 144/Ce, /sup 90/Sr) and inhibitors of repair, acriflavine and caffeine, as well as under the joint action of ethyleneimine and acriflavine, in a Chlorella population. It is shown that the modifying effect of acriflavine is more pronounced under the action of /sup 144/Ce, which is evidently due to its stronger genetic effect, in comparison with /sup 90/Sr. Experiments with inhibitors confirm the participation of the repair systems in the establishment of the visible picture of the mutation process induced by radionuclides and by ethyleneimine (EI).

  16. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  17. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  18. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  19. Training for Nonviolent Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Theodore W.; Shivers, Lynne

    The theory and practice of nonviolent action training as it exists to date are reviewed in this pamphlet. A response to a renewal of interest in alternative forms of social action, the pamphlet results specifically from an international seminar of experienced organizers and trainers held at Preston Patrick, Westmorland, England, June 27 - July 2,…

  20. Affirmative Action Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura County Community Coll. District, CA.

    Guidelines relating to the affirmative action program of the Ventura County Community College District are provided in this manual. Affirmative action is defined as, "A set of specific and result-oriented procedures to which a contractor commits himself/herself to apply every good faith effort. The objective of those procedures, plus such efforts,…

  1. 25 Action Learning Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA.

    This booklet on action-learning reflects an interest in preparing youth for the world of real experiences. Arranged in two major parts, the first offers information on the background and development of action-learning. Included in this section are the conclusions of the Panel on Youth of the President's Science Advisory Committee, the National…

  2. ACTION. 1977 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1977. The first section concentrates on reviews conducted, including a major review of ACTION's domestic volunteer programs and the management systems supporting them and an assessment of its programs using the Zero-Base Budget approach called for by…

  3. Action Learning and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Today's leaders perform the following roles: systems thinker, change agent, innovator, servant, polychronic coordinator, teacher-mentor, and visionary. The elements of action learning (real problems, teams, reflective inquiry, commitment to action, focus on learning) contribute to the development of these critical skills. (Author/SK)

  4. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  5. Conscious Vision in Action.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Robert; Schwenkler, John

    2015-09-01

    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH), according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a "zombie" processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious (Clark, 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner, 1992, 2004a; Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006, 2008). In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to "recognizing objects, selecting targets for action, and determining what kinds of action, broadly speaking, to perform" (Clark, 2007, p. 570). Our aim in this study is to show that the available evidence not only fails to support this dichotomous view but actually reveals a significant role for conscious vision in motor programming, especially for actions that require deliberate attention.

  6. Granzyme M is a regulatory protease that inactivates proteinase inhibitor 9, an endogenous inhibitor of granzyme B.

    PubMed

    Mahrus, Sami; Kisiel, Walter; Craik, Charles S

    2004-12-24

    Granzyme M is a trypsin-fold serine protease that is specifically found in the granules of natural killer cells. This enzyme has been implicated recently in the induction of target cell death by cytotoxic lymphocytes, but unlike granzymes A and B, the molecular mechanism of action of granzyme M is unknown. We have characterized the extended substrate specificity of human granzyme M by using purified recombinant enzyme, several positional scanning libraries of coumarin substrates, and a panel of individual p-nitroanilide and coumarin substrates. In contrast to previous studies conducted using thiobenzyl ester substrates (Smyth, M. J., O'Connor, M. D., Trapani, J. A., Kershaw, M. H., and Brinkworth, R. I. (1996) J. Immunol. 156, 4174-4181), a strong preference for leucine at P1 over methionine was demonstrated. The extended substrate specificity was determined to be lysine = norleucine at P4, broad at P3, proline > alanine at P2, and leucine > norleucine > methionine at P1. The enzyme activity was found to be highly dependent on the length and sequence of substrates, indicative of a regulatory function for human granzyme M. Finally, the interaction between granzyme M and the serpins alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor, and proteinase inhibitor 9 was characterized by using a candidate-based approach to identify potential endogenous inhibitors. Proteinase inhibitor 9 was effectively hydrolyzed and inactivated by human granzyme M, raising the possibility that this orphan granzyme bypasses proteinase inhibitor 9 inhibition of granzyme B.

  7. Aromatase inhibitors: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Séralini, G; Moslemi, S

    2001-06-10

    For the cellular physiology of sex steroid sensitive cells, the androgen/estrogen ratio may be more important than only one hormone action per se, in both sexes. This ratio is controlled in vertebrates by aromatase; its gene expression can be inhibited in different ways, and this is crucial for the treatment of estrogen-dependent diseases such as breast cancer, or gynecomastia in males for instance. To reach this goal, new steroidal and non-steroidal inhibitors are continuously being developed, and some of them are used as first or second line agents. Aromatase inhibition is also an essential tool for studying the role of estrogens in the adult, or during development. Aromatase inhibitors have shown in particular that estrogens are essential also in males for skeletal maturation and bone mineralization, development of masculine dendritic morphology in male brain linked to mating behaviour, and testicular function. Testosterone is often the prohormone converted in situ in active estrogens, at these levels. Several strategies can be used for aromatase inhibition. The first ones employed were blind screening or deductions from in vivo observations, which led for instance to the discovery of the role of aminoglutethimide in aromatase inhibition. Subsequently, in the years 1975-1990, the molecular modeling of compounds to mimic the substrate shape of the enzyme constituted the major idea. Hundreds of chemicals were synthesized by numerous authors, ranging from the well-known and very efficient 4-OHA to complicated imidazole or indane derivatives tested by sophisticated comparative molecular field analyses. Reticulum-bound active aromatase has not as yet been X-ray analyzed. Thus, aromatase inhibitors were also used more recently to probe and understand the active site conformation of the enzyme and its modelization was obtained from comparisons with bacterial-related cytochromes. We developed a mammalian model considerably closer to human aromatase in order to study the

  8. Water-soluble inhibitor on microbiologically influenced corrosion in diesel pipeline.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, N; Maruthamuthu, S; Palaniswamy, N

    2006-12-01

    The effect of water-soluble corrosion inhibitor on the growth of bacteria and its corrosion inhibition efficiency were investigated. Corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by rotating cage test and flow loop techniques. The nature of biodegradation of corrosion inhibitor was also analyzed by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and Gas chromatography and mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The bacterial isolates (Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus cereus ACE4) have the capacity to degrade the aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon present in the corrosion inhibitor. The degraded products of corrosion inhibitor and bacterial activity determine the electrochemical behaviour of API 5LX steel. The influence of bacterial activity on degradation of corrosion inhibitor and its influence on corrosion of API 5LX have been evaluated by employing weight loss techniques and electrochemical studies. The main finding of this paper is that the water-soluble corrosion inhibitor is consumed by the microbial action, which contributes to the decrease in inhibitor efficiency. The present study also emphasis the importance of evaluation of water-soluble corrosion inhibitor in stagnant model (flow loop test) and discusses the demerits of the water-soluble corrosion inhibitors in petroleum product pipeline.

  9. Sodium-glucose linked transporter-2 inhibitors in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoli, L; Granata, A; Lentini, P; Rastelli, S; Fatuzzo, P; Rapisarda, F; Castellino, P

    2015-01-01

    SGLT2 inhibitors are new antihyperglycaemic agents whose ability to lower glucose is directly proportional to GFR. Therefore, in chronic kidney disease (CKD) the blood glucose lowering effect is reduced. Unlike many current therapies, the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors is independent of insulin action or beta-cell function. In addition, the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors is complementary and not alternative to other antidiabetic agents. SGLT2 inhibitors could be potentially effective in attenuating renal hyperfiltration and, consequently, the progression of CKD. Moreover, the reductions in intraglomerular pressure, systemic blood pressure, and uric acid levels induced by SGLT inhibition may potentially be of benefit in CKD subjects without diabetes. However, at present, only few clinical studies were designed to evaluate the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in CKD. Consequently, safety and potential efficacy beyond blood glucose lowering should be better clarified in CKD. In this paper we provide an updated review of the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in clinical practice, with particular attention on subjects with CKD.

  10. Case Reports That Illustrate the Efficacy of SGLT2 Inhibitors in the Type 1 Diabetic Patient.

    PubMed

    Bell, David S H

    2015-01-01

    SGLT2 inhibitors are only approved for use in adults with type 2 diabetes. However, because SGLT2 inhibitors have a mechanism of action that does not require the presence of endogenous insulin, these drugs should also be efficacious in type 1 diabetes where endogenous insulin production is greatly reduced or absent. Herein, I present five cases which illustrate the benefits of utilizing an SGLT2 inhibitor with type 1 diabetes. In these cases the use of SGLT2 inhibitors resulted not only in better glycemic control in most patients but also in some patients' less hypoglycemia, weight loss, and decreased doses of insulin. In type 1 diabetes Candida albicans vaginitis and balanitis may occur more frequently than in type 2 diabetes. These cases show that a large randomized clinical trial of SGLT2 inhibitors in type 1 diabetes needs to be performed.

  11. [ACE inhibitors and the kidney].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment with ACE inhibitors results in kidney protection due to reduction of systemic blood pressure, intraglomerular pressure, an antiproliferative effect, reduction of proteinuria and a lipid-lowering effect in proteinuric patients (secondary due to reduction of protein excretion). Elderly patients with diabetes melitus, coronary heart disease or peripheral vascular occlusion are at risk for deterioration of kidney function due to a high frequency of renal artery stenosis in these patients. In patients with renal insufficiency dose reduction of ACE inhibitors is necessary (exception: fosinopril) but more important is the risk for development of hyperkalemia. Patients at risk for renal artery stenosis and patients pretreated with diuretics should receive a low ACE inhibitor dosage initially ("start low - go slow"). For compliance reasons once daily ACE inhibitor dosage is recommended.

  12. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  13. Skeletal and extraskeletal actions of denosumab.

    PubMed

    Sinningen, Kathrin; Tsourdi, Elena; Rauner, Martina; Rachner, Tilman D; Hamann, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2012-08-01

    Osteoclasts and osteoblasts define skeletal mass, structure and strength through their respective actions in resorbing and forming bone. This remodeling process is orchestrated by the actions of hormones and growth factors, which regulate a cytokine system comprising the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), its receptor RANK and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG). Bone resorption depends on RANKL, which determines osteoclast formation, activity and survival. Importantly, cells of the osteoblastic lineage mainly provide RANKL and therefore, are central in the regulation of osteoclast functions. Catabolic effects of RANKL are inhibited by OPG, a TNF receptor family member that binds RANKL, thereby preventing the activation of its receptor RANK, which is expressed by osteoclast precursors. Because this cytokine network is pivotal for the regulation of bone mass in health and diseases, including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and malignant bone conditions, it has been successfully used for the generation of a targeted therapy to block osteoclast actions. The clinical approval of denosumab, a fully monoclonal antibody against RANKL, provides a novel option to treat bone diseases with a potent, targeted and reversible inhibitor of bone resorption. Although RANKL is also expressed by endothelial cells, T lymphocytes, synovial fibroblasts and various tumor cells, no meaningful clinical extraskeletal effects have been reported after administration of denosumab. This article summarizes the molecular and cellular basis of the RANKL/RANK/OPG system and presents preclinical and clinical studies on the skeletal actions of denosumab.

  14. Topological lattice actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, W.; Gerber, U.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2010-12-01

    We consider lattice field theories with topological actions, which are invariant against small deformations of the fields. Some of these actions have infinite barriers separating different topological sectors. Topological actions do not have the correct classical continuum limit and they cannot be treated using perturbation theory, but they still yield the correct quantum continuum limit. To show this, we present analytic studies of the 1-d O(2) and O(3) model, as well as Monte Carlo simulations of the 2-d O(3) model using topological lattice actions. Some topological actions obey and others violate a lattice Schwarz inequality between the action and the topological charge Q. Irrespective of this, in the 2-d O(3) model the topological susceptibility {χ_t} = {{{left< {{Q^2}} rightrangle }} left/ {V} right.} is logarithmically divergent in the continuum limit. Still, at non-zero distance the correlator of the topological charge density has a finite continuum limit which is consistent with analytic predictions. Our study shows explicitly that some classically important features of an action are irrelevant for reaching the correct quantum continuum limit.

  15. Small molecule phagocytosis inhibitors for immune cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Neschadim, Anton; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Branch, Donald R

    2016-08-01

    Immune cytopenias are conditions characterized by low blood cell counts, such as platelets in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and red blood cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Chronic ITP affects approximately 4 in 100,000 adults annually while AIHA is much less common. Extravascular phagocytosis and massive destruction of autoantibody-opsonized blood cells by macrophages in the spleen and liver are the hallmark of these conditions. Current treatment modalities for ITP and AIHA include the first-line use of corticosteroids; whereas, IVIg shows efficacy in ITP but not AIHA. One main mechanism of action by which IVIg treatment leads to the reduction in platelet destruction rates in ITP is thought to involve Fcγ receptor (FcγR) blockade, ultimately leading to the inhibition of extravascular platelet phagocytosis. IVIg, which is manufactured from the human plasma of thousands of donors, is a limited resource, and alternative treatments, particularly those based on bioavailable small molecules, are needed. In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of ITP, the role of Fcγ receptors, and the mechanisms of action of IVIg in treating ITP, and outline the efforts and progress towards developing novel, first-in-class inhibitors of phagocytosis as synthetic, small molecule substitutes for IVIg in ITP and other conditions where the pathobiology of the disease involves phagocytosis.

  16. Spacelike brane actions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Ho, Pei-Ming; Wang, John E

    2003-04-11

    We derive effective actions for "spacelike branes" (S-branes) and find a solution describing the formation of fundamental strings in the rolling tachyon background. The S-brane action is a Dirac-Born-Infeld action for Euclidean world volumes defined in the context of time-dependent tachyon condensation of non-BPS (Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield) branes. It includes gauge fields and, in particular, a scalar field associated with translation along the time direction. We show that the BIon spike solutions constructed in this system correspond to the production of a confined electric flux tube (a fundamental string) at late time of the rolling tachyon.

  17. Conscious Control over Action.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-06-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges-challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown.

  18. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  19. Inhibitors of pig kidney trehalase.

    PubMed

    Kyosseva, S V; Kyossev, Z N; Elbein, A D

    1995-02-01

    Trehazolin, a new trehalase inhibitor isolated from the culture broth of Micromonospora, was reported to be a highly specific inhibitor for porcine and silk worm trehalases with IC50 values of 5.5 x 10(-9) and 3.7 x 10(-9) M, respectively (O. Ando, H. Satake, K. Itoi, A. Sato, M. Nakajima, S. Takashi, H. Haruyama, Y. Ohkuma, T. Kinoshita, and R. Enokita (1991) J. Antibiot. 44, 1165-1168). We also found that trehazolin is a very powerful and quite specific inhibitor against purified pig kidney trehalase, giving an IC50 value of 1.9 x 10(-8) M. Lineweaver-Burk plots showed that this compound was a competitive inhibitor of the trehalase. However, even at concentrations of 200 micrograms/ml, trehazolin did not inhibit the rat intestinal maltase or sucrase, yeast alpha-glucosidase or almond beta-glucosidase. Validoxylamine A and validamycin A, two other trehalase inhibitors, showed potent competitive inhibition against purified pig kidney trehalase, with IC50 values of 2.4 x 10(-9) and 2.5 x 10(-4) M, respectively. On the other hand, validoxylamine A was almost inactive against rat intestinal sucrase and maltase, with some inhibition being observed at millimolar concentration. A number of other glucosidase inhibitors, such as MDL 25637, castanospermine, and deoxynojirimycin were also tested against the purified trehalase and showed reasonable inhibitory activity.

  20. Alternative Agents in Type 1 Diabetes in Addition to Insulin Therapy: Metformin, Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors, Pioglitazone, GLP-1 Agonists, DPP-IV Inhibitors, and SGLT-2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeGeeter, Michelle; Williamson, Bobbie

    2016-04-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of current treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Due to increasing insulin resistance, insulin doses are often continually increased, which may result in weight gain for patients. Medications currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes offer varying mechanisms of action that can help to reduce insulin resistance and prevent or deter weight gain. A MEDLINE search was conducted to review literature evaluating the use of metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, pioglitazone, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase, and sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, in patients with T1DM. Varying results were found with some benefits including reductions in hemoglobin A1c, decreased insulin doses, and favorable effects on weight. Of significance, a common fear of utilizing multiple therapies for diabetes treatment is the risk of hypoglycemia, and this review displayed limited evidence of hypoglycemia with multiple agents.

  1. Stabilizing bottomless action theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, J.; Halpern, M. B.

    1984-08-01

    We show how to construct the euclidean quantum theory corresponding to classical actions which are unbounded from below. Our method preserves the classical limit, the large- N limit, and the perturbative expansion of the unstabilized theories.

  2. Benzidine Dyes Action Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Action Plan addresses the use of benzidine-based dyes and benzidine congener-based dyes, both metalized and non-metalized, in products that would result in consumer exposure, such as for use to color textiles.

  3. Oak Canyon Action Memo

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This memorandum requests approval for a time-critical removal action at the 27 residential properties that compose the Oak Canyon Site located in the Village of Paguate, Pueblo of Laguna, near Cibola County, New Mexico.

  4. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Fostriecin, Cytostatin, and Key Analogs, with PP1, PP2A, PP5, and (β12–β13)-Chimeras (PP1/PP2A and PP5/PP2A), Provide Further Insight into the Inhibitory Actions of Fostriecin Family Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Swingle, Mark R.; Amable, Lauren; Lawhorn, Brian G.; Buck, Suzanne B.; Burke, Christopher P.; Ratti, Pukar; Fischer, Kimberly L.; Boger, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Fostriecin and cytostatin are structurally related natural inhibitors of serine/threonine phosphatases, with promising antitumor activity. The total synthesis of these antitumor agents has enabled the production of structural analogs, which are useful to explore the biological significance of features contained in the parent compounds. Here, the inhibitory activity of fostriecin, cytostatin, and 10 key structural analogs were tested in side-by-side phosphatase assays to further characterize their inhibitory activity against PP1c (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit), PP2Ac (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit), PP5c (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5 catalytic subunit), and chimeras of PP1 (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1) and PP5 (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5), in which key residues predicted for inhibitor contact with PP2A (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A) were introduced into PP1 and PP5 using site-directed mutagenesis. The data confirm the importance of the C9-phosphate and C11-alcohol for general inhibition and further demonstrate the importance of a predicted C3 interaction with a unique cysteine (Cys269) in the β12–β13 loop of PP2A. The data also indicate that additional features beyond the unsaturated lactone contribute to inhibitory potency and selectivity. Notably, a derivative of fostriecin lacking the entire lactone subunit demonstrated marked potency and selectivity for PP2A, while having substantially reduced and similar activity against PP1 and PP1/PP2A- PP5/PP2A-chimeras that have greatly increased sensitivity to both fostriecin and cytostatin. This suggests that other features [e.g., the (Z,Z,E)-triene] also contribute to inhibitory selectivity. When considered together with previous data, these studies suggest that, despite the high structural conservation of the catalytic site in PP1, PP2A and PP5, the development of highly selective catalytic inhibitors should be feasible. PMID:19592665

  5. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  6. [Addictions and action systems].

    PubMed

    Loonis, E; Apter, M J

    2000-01-01

    Generalizing from some previous analyses of addiction, and introducing the concept of an action system which governs all actions which are focussed on what Brown (1988) calls "hedonic management", we argue that addictions of every kind involve an action system that displays high salience, low variety and low vicariance. Addictions also involve what Apter (1982) calls the "paratelic state". A study was carried out comparing 31 drug addicts with 29 control subjects in terms of action system variables. To measure these variables, we constructed a new instrument, the Activity-System Drawing Test, and also used the Telic Dominance Scale to measure frequency of paratelic states. Dysphoria was measured by means of the BATE (anxiety), IDA-13 (depression), SEI (self-esteem), and TAS-20 (alexithymia) instruments. Strongly significant differences were found between groups for both action system variables and dysphoria, and there were also strong correlations between both groups of variables. This supports the idea that addictions emerge from systemic properties of the action system.

  7. Antisymmetric string actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragone, C.

    1986-12-01

    An action is presented for the free bosonic string on external flat space in terms of an antisymmetric second-rank string background tensor which is classically equivalent to the Nambu-Goto action. Both action and field equations are entirely described in terms of 2D world-sheet forms, without any reference to a 2D metric tensor background. The analysis of its canonical formulation shows how the quadratic Virasoro constraints are generated in this case and what their connection with the Bianchi identities are. Since in the orthonormal gauge the reduced action coincides with the standard one, it has the same critical dimension D = 26. The existence of an interaction term of a purely geometric structure stemming in the extrinsic curvature is pointed out. Its action and the new string field equations are then derived. This polynomial antisymmetric string action is uniformly generalized in order to describe d < D-dimensional extended objects in D-dimensional flat space. On leave of absence from Departamento de Física, Universidad Simon Bolívar, Apartado 80659, Caracas 1080A, Venezuela.

  8. Engineering trypsin for inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Batt, Anna R; St Germain, Commodore P; Gokey, Trevor; Guliaev, Anton B; Baird, Teaster

    2015-09-01

    The development of effective protease therapeutics requires that the proteases be more resistant to naturally occurring inhibitors while maintaining catalytic activity. A key step in developing inhibitor resistance is the identification of key residues in protease-inhibitor interaction. Given that majority of the protease therapeutics currently in use are trypsin-fold, trypsin itself serves as an ideal model for studying protease-inhibitor interaction. To test the importance of several trypsin-inhibitor interactions on the prime-side binding interface, we created four trypsin single variants Y39A, Y39F, K60A, and K60V and report biochemical sensitivity against bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and M84R ecotin. All variants retained catalytic activity against small, commercially available peptide substrates [kcat /KM  = (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(7) M(-1 ) s(-1) . Compared with wild-type, the K60A and K60V variants showed increased sensitivity to BPTI but less sensitivity to ecotin. The Y39A variant was less sensitive to BPTI and ecotin while the Y39F variant was more sensitive to both. The relative binding free energies between BPTI complexes with WT, Y39F, and Y39A were calculated based on 3.5 µs combined explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The BPTI:Y39F complex resulted in the lowest binding energy, while BPTI:Y39A resulted in the highest. Simulations of Y39F revealed increased conformational rearrangement of F39, which allowed formation of a new hydrogen bond between BPTI R17 and H40 of the variant. All together, these data suggest that positions 39 and 60 are key for inhibitor binding to trypsin, and likely more trypsin-fold proteases.

  9. Protein synthesis inhibitors prevent both spontaneous and hormone-dependent maturation of isolated mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, S.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein synthesis in mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. In the first part of this study, the effects of cycloheximide (CX) were tested on spontaneous meiotic maturation when oocytes were cultured in inhibitor-free medium. CX reversibly suppressed maturation of oocytes as long as maturation was either initially prevented by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), or delayed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). In the second part of this study, the actions of protein synthesis inhibitors were tested on hormone-induced maturation. CEO were maintained in meiotic arrest for 21-22 h with hypoxanthine, and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) was induced with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Three different protein synthesis inhibitors (CX, emetine (EM), and puromycin (PUR)) each prevented the stimulatory action of FSH on GVB in a dose-dependent fashion. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent suppression of 3H-leucine incorporation by oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. The action of these inhibitors on FSH- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced GVB was next compared. All three drugs lowered the frequency of GVB in the FSH-treated groups, below even that of the controls (drug + hypoxanthine); the drugs maintained meiotic arrest at the control frequencies in the EGF-treated groups. Puromycin aminonucleoside, an analog of PUR with no inhibitory action on protein synthesis, had no effect. The three inhibitors also suppressed the stimulatory action of FSH on oocyte maturation when meiotic arrest was maintained with the cAMP analog, dbcAMP.

  10. Plan for early action: Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report contains recommendations on the implementation of an action plan to reduce or recapture greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in British Columbia. The report includes the consensus recommendations of the BC Greenhouse Gas Forum, as well as those items on which Forum participants have agreed to disagree, plus the reasons for those differences. The recommendations include: Umbrella actions which may affect several or all sectors of the economy, or support the success of other actions; actions to reduce vehicle kilometers travelled; actions to increase vehicle efficiency or increase the use of alternative fuels or technologies; actions to decrease GHG emissions from energy production; actions to increase end-use energy efficiency; and actions to reduce non-energy-related emissions. Appendices include work sheets on each action, with a description of the action and information on the action`s rationale, experience elsewhere, related policy initiatives, and key issues regarding feasibility and implementation.

  11. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Action Plan? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma Action Plan? ... normal everyday activities without having asthma symptoms. Action Plans Are Unique Each person's experience with asthma is ...

  12. [New anticoagulants - direct thrombin inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Brand, B; Graf, L

    2012-11-01

    Direct thrombin-inhibitors inactivate not only free but also fibrin-bound thrombin. The group of parenteral direct thrombin-inhibitors includes the recombinant hirudins lepirudin and desirudin, the synthetic hirudin bivalirudin, and the small molecule argatroban. All these compounds do not interact with PF4/heparin-antibodies. Therefore, argatroban as well as bivalirudin are currently used to treat heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The oral direct thrombin-inhibitor dabigatran etexilate is already licensed in many countries for the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran etexilate reveals a stable and predictable effect that allows a medication without dose adjustment or monitoring. The substance shows only few interactions with other drugs but strong inhibitors of p-glycoprotein can increase plasma levels of dabigatran substantially. After oral intake, the prodrug dabigatran etexilate is cleaved by esterase-mediated hydrolyses to the active compound dabigatran. Elimination of dabigatran is predominantly renal. Safety and efficacy of dabigatran etexilate were tested in an extensive clinical study program. Non-inferiority compared to current standard treatments was shown for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic events after total knee and hip replacement, for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, and for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism. In daily practice, Dabigatran etexilate competes against the new direct factor Xa-inhibitors. In the absence of direct comparative clinical trials, it is not yet clear if one class of substances has distinct advantages over the other.

  13. Kinobead and Single-Shot LC-MS Profiling Identifies Selective PKD Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Golkowski, Martin; Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Lombard, Chloe K; Suh, Hyong Won; Maly, Dustin J; Ong, Shao-En

    2017-03-03

    ATP-competitive protein kinase inhibitors are important research tools and therapeutic agents. Because there are >500 human kinases that contain highly conserved active sites, the development of selective inhibitors is extremely challenging. Methods to rapidly and efficiently profile kinase inhibitor targets in cell lysates are urgently needed to discover selective compounds and to elucidate the mechanisms of action for polypharmacological inhibitors. Here, we describe a protocol for microgram-scale chemoproteomic profiling of ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors using kinobeads. We employed a gel-free in situ digestion protocol coupled to nanoflow liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to profile ∼200 kinases in single analytical runs using as little as 5 μL of kinobeads and 300 μg of protein. With our kinobead reagents, we obtained broad coverage of the kinome, monitoring the relative expression levels of 312 kinases in a diverse panel of 11 cancer cell lines. Further, we profiled a set of pyrrolopyrimidine- and pyrazolopyrimidine-based kinase inhibitors in competition-binding experiments with label-free quantification, leading to the discovery of a novel selective and potent inhibitor of protein kinase D (PKD) 1, 2, and 3. Our protocol is useful for rapid and sensitive profiling of kinase expression levels and ATP-competitive kinase inhibitor selectivity in native proteomes.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: understanding a new wave of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garea, Ana; Esteller, Manel

    2004-11-01

    Cancer is as much an epigenetic disease as it is a genetic and cytogenetic disease. The discovery that drastic changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications are commonly found in human tumors has inspired various laboratories and pharmaceutical companies to develop and study epigenetic drugs. One of the most promising groups of agents is the inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which have different biochemical and biologic properties but have a single common activity: induction of acetylation in histones, the key proteins in nucleosome and chromatin structure. One of the main mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors is the transcriptional reactivation of dormant tumor-suppressor genes, such as p21WAF1. However, their pleiotropic nature leaves open the possibility that their well-known differentiation, cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic properties are also involved in other functions associated with HDAC inhibition. Many phase I clinical trials indicate that HDAC inhibitors appear to be well-tolerated drugs. Thus, the field is ready for rigorous biologic and clinical scrutiny to validate the therapeutic potential of these drugs. Our current data indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors, probably in association with classical chemotherapy drugs or in combination with DNA-demethylating agents, could be promising for cancer patients.

  15. SF2312 is a natural phosphonate inhibitor of Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, David; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Hammoudi, Naima; Peng, Zhenghong; Pisaneschi, Federica; Link, Todd M.; Lee, Gilbert R.; Sun, Duoli; Prasad, Basvoju A. Bhanu; Di Francesco, Maria Emilia; Czako, Barbara; Asara, John M.; Wang, Y. Alan; Bornmann, William; DePinho, Ronald A.; Muller, Florian L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being critical for energy generation in most forms of life, few if any microbial antibiotics specifically inhibit glycolysis. To develop a specific inhibitor of the glycolytic enzyme Enolase 2 for the treatment of cancers with deletion of Enolase 1, we modeled the synthetic tool compound inhibitor, Phosphonoacetohydroxamate (PhAH) into the active site of human ENO2. A ring-stabilized analogue of PhAH, with the hydroxamic nitrogen linked to the alpha-carbon by an ethylene bridge, was predicted to increase binding affinity by stabilizing the inhibitor in a bound conformation. Unexpectedly, a structure based search revealed that our hypothesized back-bone-stabilized PhAH bears strong similarity to SF2312, a phosphonate antibiotic of unknown mode of action produced by the actinomycete Micromonospora, which is active under anaerobic conditions. Here, we present multiple lines of evidence, including a novel X-ray structure, that SF2312 is a highly potent, low nM inhibitor of Enolase. PMID:27723749

  16. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) and DUB inhibitors: a patent review

    PubMed Central

    Nwankwo, Joseph O.; Arkwright, Richard T.; Cvek, Boris; Liu, Jinbao; Dou, Q. Ping

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deubiquitinating-enzymes (DUBs) are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS). The fundamental role of DUBs is specific removal of ubiquitin from substrates. DUBs contribute to activation/deactivation, recycling and localization of numerous regulatory-proteins, thus playing major roles in diverse cellular-processes. Altered DUB activity is associated with multitudes of pathologies including cancer. Therefore, DUBs represent novel candidates for target-directed drug development. Areas covered The article is a thorough review/accounting of patented compounds targeting DUBs stratifying/classifying the patented compounds based on: chemical-structures, nucleic-acid compositions, modes-of-action and targeting-sites. The review provides a brief background on the UPS and DUBs involvement. Furthermore, methods for assessing efficacy and potential pharmacological utility of DUB inhibitor (DUBi) are discussed. Expert opinion The FDA’s approval of the 20S proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib and carfilzomib for treatment of hematological malignancies established the UPS as an anti-cancer target. Unfortunately, many patients are inherently resistant or develop resistance to proteasome inhibitors (PIs). One potential strategy to combat PI resistance is targeting upstream components of the UPS such as DUBs. DUBs represent a promising potential therapeutic target due to their critical roles in various cellular processes including protein-turnover, localization and cellular homeostasis. While considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop DUB modulators, significant advancement is necessary move DUB inhibitors into the clinic. PMID:26077642

  17. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  18. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  19. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  20. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  1. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  2. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  3. An environmentally friendly scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, J.B.; Brown, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a method of inhibiting the formation of scales such as barium and strontium sulfate in low pH aqueous systems, and calcium carbonate in systems containing high concentrations of dissolved iron. The solution, chemically, involves treating the aqueous system with an inhibitor designed to replace organic-phosphonates. Typical low pH aqueous systems where the inhibitor is particularly useful are oilfield produced-water, resin bed water softeners that form scale during low pH, acid regeneration operations. Downhole applications are recommended where high concentrations of dissolved iron are present in the produced water. This new approach to inhibition replaces typical organic phosphonates and polymers with a non-toxic, biodegradable scale inhibitor that performs in harsh environments.

  4. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  5. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  6. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Silva, José A.; Pompeu, Dávia G.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  7. Auxin influx inhibitors 1-NOA, 2-NOA, and CHPAA interfere with membrane dynamics in tobacco cells

    PubMed Central

    Laňková, Martina; Smith, Richard S.; Pešek, Bedřich; Kubeš, Martin; Zažímalová, Eva; Petrášek, Jan; Hoyerová, Klára

    2010-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is transported through the plant body either via vascular pathways or from cell to cell by specialized polar transport machinery. This machinery consists of a balanced system of passive diffusion combined with the activities of auxin influx and efflux carriers. Synthetic auxins that differ in the mechanisms of their transport across the plasma membrane together with polar auxin transport inhibitors have been used in many studies on particular auxin carriers and their role in plant development. However, the exact mechanism of action of auxin efflux and influx inhibitors has not been fully elucidated. In this report, the mechanism of action of the auxin influx inhibitors (1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (2-NOA), and 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (CHPAA)) is examined by direct measurements of auxin accumulation, cellular phenotypic analysis, as well as by localization studies of Arabidopsis thaliana L. auxin carriers heterologously expressed in Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Bright Yellow cell suspensions. The mode of action of 1-NOA, 2-NOA, and CHPAA has been shown to be linked with the dynamics of the plasma membrane. The most potent inhibitor, 1-NOA, blocked the activities of both auxin influx and efflux carriers, whereas 2-NOA and CHPAA at the same concentration preferentially inhibited auxin influx. The results suggest that these, previously unknown, activities of putative auxin influx inhibitors regulate overall auxin transport across the plasma membrane depending on the dynamics of particular membrane vesicles. PMID:20595238

  8. Auxin influx inhibitors 1-NOA, 2-NOA, and CHPAA interfere with membrane dynamics in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Lanková, Martina; Smith, Richard S; Pesek, Bedrich; Kubes, Martin; Zazímalová, Eva; Petrásek, Jan; Hoyerová, Klára

    2010-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin is transported through the plant body either via vascular pathways or from cell to cell by specialized polar transport machinery. This machinery consists of a balanced system of passive diffusion combined with the activities of auxin influx and efflux carriers. Synthetic auxins that differ in the mechanisms of their transport across the plasma membrane together with polar auxin transport inhibitors have been used in many studies on particular auxin carriers and their role in plant development. However, the exact mechanism of action of auxin efflux and influx inhibitors has not been fully elucidated. In this report, the mechanism of action of the auxin influx inhibitors (1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (2-NOA), and 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (CHPAA)) is examined by direct measurements of auxin accumulation, cellular phenotypic analysis, as well as by localization studies of Arabidopsis thaliana L. auxin carriers heterologously expressed in Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Bright Yellow cell suspensions. The mode of action of 1-NOA, 2-NOA, and CHPAA has been shown to be linked with the dynamics of the plasma membrane. The most potent inhibitor, 1-NOA, blocked the activities of both auxin influx and efflux carriers, whereas 2-NOA and CHPAA at the same concentration preferentially inhibited auxin influx. The results suggest that these, previously unknown, activities of putative auxin influx inhibitors regulate overall auxin transport across the plasma membrane depending on the dynamics of particular membrane vesicles.

  9. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  10. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  11. STAT inhibitors for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins are a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors consisting of 7 members, STAT1 to STAT6, including STAT5a and STAT5b. STAT proteins are thought to be ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy since cancer cells are more dependent on the STAT activity than their normal counterparts. Inhibitors targeting STAT3 and STAT5 have been developed. These included peptidomimetics, small molecule inhibitors and oligonucleotides. This review summarized advances in preclinical and clinical development of these compounds. PMID:24308725

  12. [Kinase inhibitors against hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Arinobu

    2014-06-01

    Dysregulation of protein phosphorylation, especially on tyrosine residues, plays a crucial role in development and progression of hematological malignancies. Since remarkable success in imatinib therapy of CML and Ph+ALL, extensive efforts have made to explore candidate molecular targets and next breakthrough drugs. Now that next generation ABL kinase inhibitors are available for CML, the therapeutic algorithm has been revolutionized. As for AML and lymphoid malignancies, many kinase inhibitors targeting FLT3, BTK and aurora-A are on early and late clinical trials, and a number of promising drugs including ibrutinib are picked up for further evaluation.

  13. Lysine Deacetylase Inhibitors in Parasites: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hailu, Gebremedhin S; Robaa, Dina; Forgione, Mariantonietta; Sippl, Wolfgang; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello

    2017-03-15

    Current therapies for human parasite infections rely on a few drugs, most of which have severe side effects, and their helpfulness is being seriously compromised by the drug resistance problem. Globally, this is pushing discovery research of antiparasitic drugs toward new agents endowed with new mechanisms of action. By using a "drug repurposing" strategy, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), which are presently clinically approved for cancer use, are now under investigation for various parasite infections. Because parasitic Zn(2+)- and NAD(+)-dependent HDACs play crucial roles in the modulation of parasite gene expression and many of them are pro-survival for several parasites under various conditions, they are now emerging as novel potential antiparasitic targets. This Perspective summarizes the state of knowledge of HDACi (both class I/II HDACi and sirtuin inhibitors) targeted to the main human parasitic diseases (schistosomiasis, malaria, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and toxoplasmosis) and provides visions into the main issues that challenge their development as antiparasitic agents.

  14. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jayhyuk; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has emerged as a central player in the regulation of several diverse cellular processes. Here, we describe the important components of this complex biochemical machinery as well as several important cellular substrates targeted by this pathway and examples of human diseases resulting from defects in various components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, this review covers the chemistry of synthetic and natural proteasome inhibitors, emphasizing their mode of actions toward the 20S proteasome. Given the importance of proteasome-mediated protein degradation in various intracellular processes, inhibitors of this pathway will continue to serve as both molecular probes of major cellular networks as well as potential therapeutic agents for various human diseases. PMID:11410931

  15. Checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer: latest developments and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Schvartsman, Gustavo; Ferrarotto, Renata; Massarelli, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The vast majority of patients are diagnosed with metastatic disease with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. After first-line chemotherapy or biomarker-matched targeted therapy, only suitable for a small group of patients, further systemic therapy options rendered very limited, if any, benefit until recently. Checkpoint inhibitors have significantly improved outcomes in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are currently an established second-line therapeutic option. In this manuscript, we review the mechanism of action of checkpoint inhibitors, present the available data with approved and experimental agents, discuss the progress that has already been made in the field, as well as toxicity awareness, and future perspectives. PMID:27800034

  16. Endocrine side effects of broad-acting kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-09-01

    Targeted therapy in oncology consists of drugs that specifically interfere with abnormal signaling pathways that are dysregulated in cancer cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) take advantage of unique oncogenes that are activated in certain types of cancer, and also target common mechanisms of growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. However, many kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy are somewhat nonselective, and most have additional mechanisms of action at the cellular level, which are not completely understood. The use of these agents has increased our knowledge of important side effects, of which the practicing clinician must be aware. Recently, proposed endocrine-related side effects of these agents include alterations in thyroid function, bone metabolism, linear growth, gonadal function, fetal development, and glucose metabolism, and adrenal function. This review summarizes the most recent data on the endocrine side effects of TKIs.

  17. EGFR inhibitors and autophagy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Hu, Yun-Feng; Feng, Xie-Min; Tian, Tao; Guo, Ya-Huan; Ma, Jun-Wei; Nan, Ke-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor treatment is a strategy for cancer therapy. However, innate and acquired resistance is a major obstacle of the efficacy. Autophagy is a self-digesting process in cells, which is considered to be associated with anti-cancer drug resistance. The activation of EGFR can regulate autophagy through multiple signal pathways. EGFR inhibitors can induce autophagy, but the specific function of the induction of autophagy by EGFR inhibitors remains biphasic. On the one hand, autophagy induced by EGFR inhibitors acts as a cytoprotective response in cancer cells, and autophagy inhibitors can enhance the cytotoxic effects of EGFR inhibitors. On the other hand, a high level of autophagy after treatment of EGFR inhibitors can also result in autophagic cell death lacking features of apoptosis, and the combination of EGFR inhibitors with an autophagy inducer might be beneficial. Thus, autophagy regulation represents a promising approach for improving the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of cancer patients.

  18. Characterizations of proper actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Harald

    2004-03-01

    Three kinds of proper actions of increasing strength are defined. We prove that the three definitions specialize to the definitions by Bourbaki, by Palais and by Baum, Connes and Higson in their respective settings. The third of these, which thus turns out to be the strongest, originally only concerns actions of second countable locally compact groups on metrizable spaces. In this situation, it is shown to coincide with the other two definitions if the total space locally has the Lindelöf property and the orbit space is regular.

  19. The mechanism of action of antidepressants revised.

    PubMed

    Ackenheil, M

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the clinical efficacy of imipramine and of the MAO-inhibitor iproniazid intensively stimulated biochemical-pharmacological research on the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Due to these investigations, until recently an enhanced activity of the central noradrenergic and/or serotonergic transmitter system was considered essential for the clinical antidepressive action. Such enhancement could be achieved either presynaptically by blocking alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, or in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting the transmitter reuptake or the main metabolic enzyme, MAO. The common final result, especially of chronic treatment, was the down-regulation of postsynaptic beta-receptors, modulated by interaction with the serotonergic system, neuropeptides, and hormones. The delay of clinical response corresponded better with such receptor alterations. However, the introduction of new, more selective antidepressants led to new reflections upon the mechanism of action. On the level of transmitters, alpha 1-upregulation, increased activity of the dopaminergic system, an alteration in the balance between the different transmitter systems, are reported and seem to be important. Most promising are recent investigations of the second messenger systems, the adenylate cyclase system and the phosphatidylinositol system. Both systems are modulated by antidepressant drugs including lithium and carbamazepine. These second messengers, in turn, modulate the phosphorylation status of neuronal proteins via protein kinase, which may lead to elevations of the above mentioned receptors and again their transduction systems.

  20. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  1. Effect of the enzymatic inhibitor of Kunitz on the gastric lesions from reserpine, from phenylbutazone, from pyloric ligation and by restraint in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrin, F.; Demaille, A.; Merveille, P.; Bel, C.

    1980-01-01

    The protective effects of certain polypeptides on gastric ulcerations caused from reserpine and phenylbutazone in the rate were studied. It was found that the Kunitz enzymatic inhibitor exerts a protective action in regard to gastric lesions. However, the inhibitor did not change the development of Shay ulcers and stress ulcers from restraint.

  2. Current role of neprilysin inhibitors in hypertension and heart failure.

    PubMed

    von Lueder, Thomas G; Atar, Dan; Krum, Henry

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) continue to represent the major cause of death, morbidity and healthcare expenditure worldwide. Current medical therapy fails to effectively halt disease progression and to reduce adverse clinical outcomes, reflecting incomplete understanding of pathomechanisms as well as the need to expand current pharmacotherapeutic strategies. Hypertension and heart failure, the most important CVD entities, are associated with imbalance in neurohormonal systems activity such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelin system. Blockade of the RAAS constitutes the most successful pharmacotherapeutic concept in hypertension and heart failure to date. The RAAS-opposing natriuretic peptide system constitutes the body's own BP-lowering system, and mediates a multitude of beneficial actions within cardiovascular tissues. The metallopeptidase neprilysin (NEP) hydrolyzes natriuretic peptides. Conceptually, NEP inhibition would increase salutary natriuretic peptide actions in CVD. However, stand-alone NEP inhibitors (NEPi) lacked efficacy beyond standard pharmacotherapy. Combined blockers of NEP and the endothelin system demonstrated efficacy in preclinical studies but have not been evaluated in clinical trials. A decade ago, omapatrilat and other dual-acting NEPi-ACEi (vasopeptidase-inhibitors) were promising agents for hypertension and heart failure. Despite greater efficacy, development of vasopeptidase-inhibitors was halted due to significant off-target effects in some cohorts, most notably increased frequency of angioedema in hypertensive subjects. Novel angiotensin-receptor-neprilysin-inhibitors (ARNi) seek to fully exploit clinical efficacy of combined RAAS-blockade and NEPi-mediated natriuretic peptide augmentation, and hopefully do so with improved clinical safety. We herein review current knowledge of NEPi as stand-alone and combined pharmacotherapeutic agents in hypertension and heart

  3. Novel inhibitors of the calcineurin/NFATc hub - alternatives to CsA and FK506?

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, Matthias; Baumgrass, Ria

    2009-01-01

    The drugs cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) revolutionized organ transplantation. Both compounds are still widely used in the clinic as well as for basic research, even though they have dramatic side effects and modulate other pathways than calcineurin-NFATc, too. To answer the major open question - whether the adverse side effects are secondary to the actions of the drugs on the calcineurin-NFATc pathway - alternative inhibitors were developed. Ideal inhibitors should discriminate between the inhibition of (i) calcineurin and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases; the matchmaker proteins of CsA and FK506), (ii) calcineurin and the other Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, and (iii) NFATc and other transcription factors. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about novel inhibitors, synthesized or identified in the last decades, and focus on their mode of action, specificity, and biological effects. PMID:19860902

  4. Angels in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of the placement of action lines to show the direction of movement. The author shows some visuals of angels and discusses in details the texture of the wings, the hair and the clothing.

  5. Executive Mind, Timely Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbert, William R.

    1983-01-01

    The idea of "Executive Mind" carries with it the notion of purposeful and effective action. Part I of this paper characterizes three complements to "Executive Mind"--"Observing Mind,""Theorizing Mind," and "Passionate Mind"--and offers historical figures exemplifying all four types. The concluding…

  6. College Comedy and Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rosanna

    1977-01-01

    A few materials such as yarn and scraps of paper and cloth can provide the media for recording limitless ideas from the imaginations of students. With a little encouragement and a few suggestions of actions, emotions, exaggerations and activities students will produce a vast array of amusing characters. (Author)

  7. Affirmative Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    In order to develop an affirmative action plan at Triton College, the college President appointed a committee made up of nine representatives from the various college constituencies, the majority of which were women and minorities, to determine the objectives to be achieved and how to implement them, and to establish appropriate review procedures.…

  8. Youth Engaged for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Margaret; Little, Priscilla

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how out-of-school time programs can promote youth involvement in civic action by focusing on four interrelated programmatic strategies: establishing organizational readiness that fosters engagement; promoting youth-adult partnerships; engaging youth as leaders and decision makers; and involving youth in research and…

  9. Expert Teacher Action Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Eva

    The expert teacher action program is to improve classroom teaching performance. The program has been tested in workshop sessions involving more than 1,200 educators representing 50 school districts. A set of standards, consisting of 25 variables, lead to the definition of expert teaching. Each variable deals with a major aspect of the duties of…

  10. Court Action for Migrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewald, Thomas R.

    Aiding attorneys who represent migrant farmworkers and their families when affirmative civil action is required, this book helps to raise the level of migrants' legal protection to a minimum standard of adequacy. The text is based on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, a national set of rules. The book is divided into 3 sections: the…

  11. Action for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranly, Donald P.

    The origins, development, and effectiveness of Action for Children's Television (ACT) are examined in this pamphlet. The strategies used by ACT to obtain change at the congressional level and within television stations and networks include the following: a "tuneout" day when people are urged to turn off their television sets, a boycott…

  12. School Reform in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, A. Christine

    This study describes and analyzes the impact on student learning and the learning environment of 55 schools in Broward, Palm Beach, and Miami-Dade school districts as they implemented the schoolwide action-research framework for school improvement. Interviews, observations, document review during site visits, school framework reports, surveys,…

  13. Cognitive framing in action.

    PubMed

    Huhn, John M; Potts, Cory Adam; Rosenbaum, David A

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive framing effects have been widely reported in higher-level decision-making and have been ascribed to rules of thumb for quick thinking. No such demonstrations have been reported for physical action, as far as we know, but they would be expected if cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. To test for such effects, we asked participants to reach for a horizontally-oriented pipe to move it from one height to another while turning the pipe 180° to bring one end (the "business end") to a target on the left or right. From a physical perspective, participants could have always rotated the pipe in the same angular direction no matter which end was the business end; a given participant could have always turned the pipe clockwise or counter-clockwise. Instead, our participants turned the business end counter-clockwise for left targets and clockwise for right targets. Thus, the way the identical physical task was framed altered the way it was performed. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. A tantalizing possibility is that higher-level decision heuristics have roots in the control of physical action, a hypothesis that accords with embodied views of cognition.

  14. Nutrition Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockut, Joanne; Stumpe, Stephanie

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these instructional materials integrate elementary school-level nutrition education into other disciplines--biology, sociology, physiology, mathematics, and art. Contents include four units consisting of twelve activities. Unit 1, Why You Need Food, is a self-examination of what is needed for growth, health,…

  15. Sustainability as Moral Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Merrily S.; Hart-Steffes, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    When one considers sustainability as a moral action, there are equally complex realities at hand--climate change, resource depletion, water and land rights. One author describes this broad sense of sustainability as "the connection of specific social and environmental problems to the functioning of human and ecological systems" (Jenkins, 2011).…

  16. Conjugate flow action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  17. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  18. From Awareness to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklos, John, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    What inspires young people to become activists? Events such as wars or regime changes obviously raise high emotions. But some choose to get involved because they saw a need and felt compelled to take action. Young Americans have a long track record as activists. Among other things, they played a key role in the civil rights movement of the 1950s…

  19. Affirmative Action Fallout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Race-conscious affirmative action in higher education survived a close challenge in 2003 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that race was a valid academic admission criteria in the "Grutter v. Bollinger" case. Two years later, a number of "pipeline" programs to help under-represented minorities gain admission to and complete graduate school have…

  20. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  1. The Constitution in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the experiences middle school students on a field trip to the new Constitution in Action Learning Lab in the Boeing Learning Center at the National Archives can expect. There, middle school students take on the roles of archivists and researchers collecting and analyzing primary sources from the holdings of…

  2. Jump into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Cohen, Ann; Meyer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Jump Into Action (JIA) is a school-based team-taught program to help fifth-grade students make healthy food choices and be more active. The JIA team (physical education teacher, classroom teacher, school nurse, and parent) work together to provide a supportive environment as students set goals to improve food choices and increase activity.…

  3. Hope for Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischer, Barbara J.; DeMoor, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Environmental consciousness-raising programs tend to emphasize the magnitude of imminent ecological disasters, if humans continue on their current trajectory. While these environmental literacy programs also call for action to avoid cataclysmic ecological changes, psychological research on "learned helplessness" suggests that information…

  4. Action Learning Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on adult learning issues and human resource development (HRD). "Creating a Systemic Framework for the Transfer of Learning from an Action Learning Experience" (Suzanne D. Butterfield, Kitty Gold, Verna J. Willis) discusses a study of the organizational elements that affect learning and…

  5. Target: Development Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Freedom from Hunger Foundation, Washington, DC. Young World Development.

    This handbook, suggestive rather than prescriptive, is written for Young World Development and/or similar groups committed to active involvement in community, national, and world improvement. Emphasis is upon organizing high school, college, and adult courses and action programs in the community which will help sensitize participants and make them…

  6. Justifying Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helskog, Guro Hansen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I use a general philosophy of science perspective in looking at the problem of justifying action research. First I try to clarify the concept of justification, by contrasting it with the concept of validity, which seems to be used almost as a synonym in some parts of the literature. I discuss the need for taking a stand in relation…

  7. Classroom Assessment in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then…

  8. Quick action clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calco, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A quick release toggle clamp that utilizes a spring that requires a deliberate positive action for disengagement is presented. The clamp has a sliding bolt that provides a latching mechanism. The bolt is moved by a handle that tends to remain in an engaged position while under tension.

  9. SYRACUSE ACTION FOR YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADDINGTON, HAROLD E.; AND OTHERS

    A PROPOSAL WAS MADE TO PREVENT AND CONTROL JUVENILE DELINQUENCY BY OPENING OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPING COMPETENCE AMONG DISADVANTAGED YOUTH. THE TOTAL COMMUNITY WAS MOBILIZED TO DEVELOP A PROGRAM TO ATTACK THE PROBLEM AT ALL LEVELS THEY WORKED FOR 18 MONTHS TO PLAN A SERIES OF CREATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND COMMUNITY…

  10. Affirmative Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This affirmative action (AA) guide is intended to identify and remove discriminatory employment practices that may still exist in the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction (DPI). DPI extends equal employment opportunity (EEO) to all applicants and employees without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, political…

  11. The Shape of Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, Bridgette Martin; Recchia, Gabriel; Tversky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How do people understand the everyday, yet intricate, behaviors that unfold around them? In the present research, we explored this by presenting viewers with self-paced slideshows of everyday activities and recording looking times, subjective segmentation (breakpoints) into action units, and slide-to-slide physical change. A detailed comparison of…

  12. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  13. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  14. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  15. Inhibitor Discovery by Convolution ABPP.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Hong, Tram Ngoc; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2017-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) has emerged as a powerful proteomic approach to study the active proteins in their native environment by using chemical probes that label active site residues in proteins. Traditionally, ABPP is classified as either comparative or competitive ABPP. In this protocol, we describe a simple method called convolution ABPP, which takes benefit from both the competitive and comparative ABPP. Convolution ABPP allows one to detect if a reduced signal observed during comparative ABPP could be due to the presence of inhibitors. In convolution ABPP, the proteomes are analyzed by comparing labeling intensities in two mixed proteomes that were labeled either before or after mixing. A reduction of labeling in the mix-and-label sample when compared to the label-and-mix sample indicates the presence of an inhibitor excess in one of the proteomes. This method is broadly applicable to detect inhibitors in proteomes against any proteome containing protein activities of interest. As a proof of concept, we applied convolution ABPP to analyze secreted proteomes from Pseudomonas syringae-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves to display the presence of a beta-galactosidase inhibitor.

  16. Antimalarial action of hydroxamate-based iron chelators and potentiation of desferrioxamine action by reversed siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Golenser, J; Tsafack, A; Amichai, Y; Libman, J; Shanzer, A; Cabantchik, Z I

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxamate-based chelators of iron are potent inhibitors of in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum. Two types of such chelators, the natural desferrioxamine and the synthetic reversed siderophore RSFileum2, are prototypes of antimalarial agents whose action spectra differ in the speed of action, stage dependence, and degree of reversibility of effects. This work explores the possibility of improving the antimalarial efficacy of these agents by using them in various combinations on in vitro cultures of P. falciparum. Growth assessment was based both on total nucleic acid synthesis and on parasitemia. The results indicate that the synthetic reversed siderophore more than complements the antimalarial action of desferrioxamine when applied during either ring, trophozoite, or mixed stages. The combined drug effects were significantly higher than the additive effect of the individual drugs. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for both reversible effects and irreversible (i.e., sustained) effects. Following an 8-h window of exposure the combined drug treatment caused parasite growth arrest and prevented its recovery, even 3 days after the treatment. The fact that such a combination of iron chelators displays a wider action spectrum than either drug alone has implications for the design of chemotherapy regimens. PMID:7695330

  17. Clinical utilities of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chumsri, Saranya

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase is an enzyme that converts testosterones to estrogens. Inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to have several clinical utilities in breast cancer. Currently, there are three aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in clinical use, namely anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane. AIs have been used in various clinical settings for breast cancer, ranging from chemoprevention in breast cancer to treating breast cancer in both early stage in the adjuvant setting and metastatic disease. This article reviews mechanism of action, AI classification, and clinical utilities of AIs in various clinical settings in the context of breast cancer. PMID:26005359

  18. Chemical Reactivity Theory Study of Advanced Glycation Endproduct Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Frau, Juan; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2017-02-02

    Several compounds with the known ability to perform as inhibitors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) have been studied with Density Functional Theory (DFT) through the use of anumberofdensityfunctionalswhoseaccuracyhasbeentestedacrossabroadspectrumofdatabases in Chemistry and Physics. The chemical reactivity descriptors for these systems have been calculated through Conceptual DFT in an attempt to relate their intrinsic chemical reactivity with the ability to inhibit the action of glycating carbonyl compounds on amino acids and proteins. This knowledge could be useful in the design and development of new drugs which can be potential medicines for diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Remarkable stereospecific conjugate additions to the Hsp90 inhibitor celastrol

    PubMed Central

    Klaic, Lada; Trippier, Paul C.; Mishra, Rama K.; Morimoto, Richard I.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Celastrol, an important natural product and Hsp90 inhibitor with a wide range of biological and medical activities and broad use as a biological probe, acts by an as yet undetermined mode of action. It is known to undergo Michael additions with biological sulfur nucleophiles. Here it is demonstrated that nucleophiles add to the pharmacophore of celastrol in a remarkable stereospecific manner. Extensive characterization of the addition products have been obtained using NMR spectrometry, nuclear Overhauser effects, and density functional theory to determine facial selectivity and gain insight into the orbital interactions of the reactive centers. This stereospecificity of celastrol may be important to its protein target selectivity. PMID:22087583

  20. A Cell-Permeable Inhibitor to Trap Gαq Proteins in the Empty Pocket Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M.; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H. Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T. Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be “frozen” pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

  1. An overview of the binding models of FGFR tyrosine kinases in complex with small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiyan; Wang, Mixiang; Tian, Xin; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2017-01-27

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) includes four structurally related members, termed as FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Given its intimate role in the progression of several solid tumors, excessive FGFR signaling provides an opportunity for anticancer therapy. Along with extensive pharmacological studies validating the therapeutic potential of targeting the FGFRs for cancer treatment, co-crystal structures of FGFRs/inhibitors are continuously coming up to study the mechanism of actions and explore new inhibitors. Herein, we review the reported co-crystals of FGFRs in complex with the corresponding inhibitors, main focusing our attention on the binding models and the pharmacological activities of the inhibitors.

  2. COX-2 inhibitors: a novel strategy in the management of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Regulski, Miłosz; Regulska, Katarzyna; Prukała, Wiesław; Piotrowska, Hanna; Stanisz, Beata; Murias, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are common anti-inflammatory drugs with pleiotropic, endogenous actions that could be useful in the management of breast cancer. Here, we provide a complete understanding of the biochemistry of COX-2 and discuss the various molecular mechanisms behind its increased expression in breast cancer. We also analyze the possible mechanisms responsible for the anticancer effect of COX-2 inhibitors and provide an overview of the available preclinical and clinical data on the use of COX-2 inhibitors in breast cancer. Finally, we describe a mathematical model of the relation between the structure and biological potency of promising new COX-2 inhibitors (trans-stilbenes) using a 2D quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) technique.

  3. A fluorescence-based assay for measuring the redox potential of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangchul; Park, Youngsam; Kim, Junghwan; Han, Sung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The activities and side effects of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors can be predicted by identifying their redox mechanisms. In this study, we developed a fluorescence-based method to measure the redox potential of 5-LO inhibitors and compared it to the conventional, absorbance-based method. After the pseudo-peroxidase reaction, the amount of remaining lipid peroxide was quantified using the H2DCFDA (2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate) fluorescence dye. Our method showed large signal windows and provided comparable redox potential values. Importantly, the redox mechanisms of known inhibitors were accurately measured with the fluorescence assay, whereas the conventional, absorbance-based method showed contradictory results. Our findings suggest that our developed method is a better alternative for classifying the redox potential of 5-LO inhibitors, and the fluorescence assay can be effectively used to study the mechanisms of action that are related to redox cycling.

  4. Discovery of a novel class of covalent inhibitor for aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, Mary; Chen, Che-Hong; Kimble-Hill, Ann; Parajuli, Bibek; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Kim, Jeewon; Dria, Karl; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-10-23

    Human aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) comprise a family of 17 homologous enzymes that metabolize different biogenic and exogenic aldehydes. To date, there are relatively few general ALDH inhibitors that can be used to probe the contribution of this class of enzymes to particular metabolic pathways. Here, we report the discovery of a general class of ALDH inhibitors with a common mechanism of action. The combined data from kinetic studies, mass spectrometric measurements, and crystallographic analyses demonstrate that these inhibitors undergo an enzyme-mediated {beta}-elimination reaction generating a vinyl ketone intermediate that covalently modifies the active site cysteine residue present in these enzymes. The studies described here can provide the basis for rational approach to design ALDH isoenzyme-specific inhibitors as research tools and perhaps as drugs, to address diseases such as cancer where increased ALDH activity is associated with a cellular phenotype.

  5. Mannostatin A, a new glycoprotein-processing inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tropea, J E; Kaushal, G P; Pastuszak, I; Mitchell, M; Aoyagi, T; Molyneux, R J; Elbein, A D

    1990-10-30

    Mannostatin A is a metabolite produced by the microorganism Streptoverticillium verticillus and reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of rat epididymal alpha-mannosidase. When tested against a number of other arylglycosidases, mannostatin A was inactive toward alpha- and beta-glucosidase and galactosidase as well as beta-mannosidase, but it was a potent inhibitor of jack bean, mung bean, and rat liver lysosomal alpha-mannosidases, with estimated IC50's of 70 nM, 450 nM, and 160 nM, respectively. The type of inhibition was competitive in nature. This compound also proved to be an effective competitive inhibitor of the glycoprotein-processing enzyme mannosidase II (IC50 of about 10-15 nM with p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside as substrate, and about 90 nM with [3H]mannose-labeled GlcNAc-Man5GlcNAc as substrate). However, it was virtually inactive toward mannosidase I. The N-acetylated derivative of mannostatin A had no inhibitory activity. In cell culture studies, mannostatin A also proved to be a potent inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. Thus, in influenza virus infected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, mannostatin A blocked the normal formation of complex types of oligosaccharides on the viral glycoproteins and caused the accumulation of hybrid types of oligosaccharides. This observation is in keeping with other data which indicate that the site of action of mannostatin A is mannosidase II. Thus, mannostatin A represents the first nonalkaloidal processing inhibitor and adds to the growing list of chemical structures that can have important biological activity.

  6. Mannostatin A, a new glycoprotein-processing inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pastuszak, I.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. ); Aoyagi, Takaaki ); Molyneux, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mannostatin A is a metabolite produced by the microorganism Streptoverticillium verticillus and reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of rat epididymal {alpha}-mannosidase. When tested against a number of other arylglycosidases, mannostatin A was inactive toward {alpha}- and {beta}-glucosidase and galactosidase as well as {beta}-mannosidase, but it was a potent inhibitor of jack bean, mung bean, and rat liver lysosomal {alpha}-mannosidases, with estimated IC{sub 50}'s of 70 nM, 450 nM, and 160 nM, respectively. The type of inhibition was competitive in nature. This compound also proved to be an effective competitive inhibitor of the glycoprotein-processing enzyme mannosidase II (IC{sub 50} of about 10-15 nM with p-nitrophenyl {alpha}-D-mannopyranoside as substrate, and about 90 nM with ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled GlcNAc-Man{sub 5}GlcNAc as substrate). However, it was virtually inactive toward mannosidase I. The N-acetylated derivative of mannostatin A had no inhibitory activity. In cell culture studies, mannostatin A also proved to be a potent inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. Thus, in influenza virus infected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, mannostatin A blocked the normal formation of complex types of oligosaccharides on the viral glycoproteins and caused the accumulation of hybrid types of oligosaccharides. This observation is in keeping with other data which indicate that the site of action of mannostatin A is mannosidase II. Thus, mannostatin A represents the first nonalkaloidal processing inhibitor and adds to the growing list of chemical structures that can have important biological activity.

  7. Marine Natural Products as Inhibitors of Hypoxic Signaling in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Marine natural products have become a major source of new chemical entities in the discovery of potential anticancer agents that potently suppress various antitumor molecular targets. As a consequence of insufficient vascularization, hypoxic regions form within rapidly growing solid tumor masses. Specific alterations of gene expression in these hypoxic tumor cells help facilitate the survival and metastatic spread of solid tumors. The transcriptional response to cellular hypoxia is primarily mediated by the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) that regulates the expression of more than 100 genes involved in cellular adaptation and survival under hypoxic stress. Clinical studies in cancer patients indicate that HIF-1 activation is directly correlated with advanced disease stages and treatment resistance. HIF-1 has emerged as an important tumor-selective molecular target for anticancer drug discovery. As a result, natural product-based inhibitors of HIF-1 activation have been identified from plants and microorganisms. Recently, structurally unique natural products from marine sponges, crinoids, and algae have been identified as HIF-1 activation inhibitors. The US National Cancer Institute’s Open Repository of marine invertebrate and algae extracts has proven to be a valuable source of natural product HIF-1 inhibitors. Among the active compounds identified, certain marine natural products have also been shown to suppress the hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Some of these marine HIF-1 inhibitors act by interfering with the generation of mitochondrial signaling molecules in hypoxic cells. However, the precise mechanisms of action for many newly identified marine natural product HIF-1 inhibitors remain unresolved. PMID:20622986

  8. Anticonvulsant action of indazole.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Nobuko; Kikuchi-Utsumi, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Watabe, Masahiko; Aoyama, Koji; Nakaki, Toshio

    2013-05-01

    Here we report that indazole is characterized as a potential anticonvulsant, inhibiting pentylenetetrazole-, electroshock- and strychnine-induced convulsions in mice (ED50's: 39.9, 43.2 and 82.4 mg/kg, respectively) but not bicuculline- and picrotoxin-induced convulsions. The median toxic dose (TD(50)) of indazole was 52.3 mg/kg by the minimal motor impairment test. Therefore, nontoxic doses produced anticonvulsant activity against pentylenetetrazole- and electroshock-induced seizures. Indazole (50 mg/kg) had no effect on spontaneous activity but induced hypothermia. It also inhibited the metabolism of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brain in vivo and the activities of monoamine oxidase A and B in vitro, with IC(50) values of 20.6 μM and 16.3 μM, respectively. However, these inhibitory effects do not account for the anticonvulsant activity because treatment with typical monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as pargyline or tranylcypromine did not completely reproduce the anticonvulsant activity of indazole. In the animal seizure models tested, the anticonvulsant profile of indazole most resembled that of gabapentin and somewhat resembled those of the AMPA/kainate antagonist NBQX and the sodium channel inhibitor phenytoin, but differed from that of benzodiazepine. The isobolographic analyses showed that the interactive mode of indazole with gabapentin, NBQX or phenytoin is additive. These results suggest that indazole has anticonvulsant activity and multiple mechanisms.

  9. Antagonism screen for inhibitors of bacterial cell wall biogenesis uncovers an inhibitor of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Farha, Maya A; Czarny, Tomasz L; Myers, Cullen L; Worrall, Liam J; French, Shawn; Conrady, Deborah G; Wang, Yang; Oldfield, Eric; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Brown, Eric D

    2015-09-01

    Drug combinations are valuable tools for studying biological systems. Although much attention has been given to synergistic interactions in revealing connections between cellular processes, antagonistic interactions can also have tremendous value in elucidating genetic networks and mechanisms of drug action. Here, we exploit the power of antagonism in a high-throughput screen for molecules that suppress the activity of targocil, an inhibitor of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) flippase in Staphylococcus aureus. Well-characterized antagonism within the WTA biosynthetic pathway indicated that early steps would be sensitive to this screen; however, broader interactions with cell wall biogenesis components suggested that it might capture additional targets. A chemical screening effort using this approach identified clomiphene, a widely used fertility drug, as one such compound. Mechanistic characterization revealed the target was the undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of a polyisoprenoid essential for both peptidoglycan and WTA synthesis. The work sheds light on mechanisms contributing to the observed suppressive interactions of clomiphene and in turn reveals aspects of the biology that underlie cell wall synthesis in S. aureus. Further, this effort highlights the utility of antagonistic interactions both in high-throughput screening and in compound mode of action studies. Importantly, clomiphene represents a lead for antibacterial drug discovery.

  10. Antagonism screen for inhibitors of bacterial cell wall biogenesis uncovers an inhibitor of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Maya A.; Czarny, Tomasz L.; Myers, Cullen L.; Worrall, Liam J.; French, Shawn; Conrady, Deborah G.; Wang, Yang; Oldfield, Eric; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Brown, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug combinations are valuable tools for studying biological systems. Although much attention has been given to synergistic interactions in revealing connections between cellular processes, antagonistic interactions can also have tremendous value in elucidating genetic networks and mechanisms of drug action. Here, we exploit the power of antagonism in a high-throughput screen for molecules that suppress the activity of targocil, an inhibitor of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) flippase in Staphylococcus aureus. Well-characterized antagonism within the WTA biosynthetic pathway indicated that early steps would be sensitive to this screen; however, broader interactions with cell wall biogenesis components suggested that it might capture additional targets. A chemical screening effort using this approach identified clomiphene, a widely used fertility drug, as one such compound. Mechanistic characterization revealed the target was the undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of a polyisoprenoid essential for both peptidoglycan and WTA synthesis. The work sheds light on mechanisms contributing to the observed suppressive interactions of clomiphene and in turn reveals aspects of the biology that underlie cell wall synthesis in S. aureus. Further, this effort highlights the utility of antagonistic interactions both in high-throughput screening and in compound mode of action studies. Importantly, clomiphene represents a lead for antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:26283394

  11. Cathepsin D inhibitor from Vicia sativa L.

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Jakimiec, W; Bańkowska, A

    1998-01-01

    Specific inhibitor of cathepsin D has been shown in the extract of Vicia sativa L. seeds. This inhibitor does not inhibit the activity of other aspartic proteases. Also it does not inhibit the activity of cysteine proteases and serine proteases.

  12. Oxygen evolution and phosphorylation in Scenedesmus as influenced by the inhibitor-β complex from potato and by phloridzin.

    PubMed

    Tillberg, J E; Kylin, A

    1966-06-01

    Scenedesmus cells were tried as a photosynthesizing test system for the inhibitor-β complex from potato (var. Majestic). The main effect on oxygen evolution is an inhibition of the second gush during the induction period. The formation of bound phosphate is increased by the inhibitor when the cell suspensions are shaken in the light, whereas no significant trend is observed in similar experiments in the dark. - Phloridzin inhibits the same part of oxygen evolution as inhibitor-β from potato when cells pretreated in light are the test object. Concentrations of 1 mM increase the formation of bound phosphate in light, but at 2 mM there is a decrease in this action. Phloridzin and inhibitor-β from potato have different Rf values. - The biochemical effects studied precede possible effects on cell division. - The results are discussed in relation to the localization of the site(s) of action.

  13. Cytological Profile of Antibacterial FtsZ Inhibitors and Synthetic Peptide MciZ

    PubMed Central

    Araújo-Bazán, Lidia; Ruiz-Avila, Laura B.; Andreu, David; Huecas, Sonia; Andreu, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell division protein FtsZ is the organizer of the cytokinetic ring in almost all bacteria and a target for the discovery of new antibacterial agents that are needed to counter widespread antibiotic resistance. Bacterial cytological profiling, using quantitative microscopy, is a powerful approach for identifying the mechanism of action of antibacterial molecules affecting different cellular pathways. We have determined the cytological profile on Bacillus subtilis cells of a selection of small molecule inhibitors targeting FtsZ on different binding sites. FtsZ inhibitors lead to long undivided cells, impair the normal assembly of FtsZ into the midcell Z-rings, induce aberrant ring distributions, punctate FtsZ foci, membrane spots and also modify nucleoid length. Quantitative analysis of cell and nucleoid length combined, or the Z-ring distribution, allows categorizing FtsZ inhibitors and to distinguish them from antibiotics with other mechanisms of action, which should be useful for identifying new antibacterial FtsZ inhibitors. Biochemical assays of FtsZ polymerization and GTPase activity combined explain the cellular effects of the FtsZ polymer stabilizing agent PC190723 and its fragments. MciZ is a 40-aminoacid endogenous inhibitor of cell division normally expressed during sporulation in B. subtilis. Using FtsZ cytological profiling we have determined that exogenous synthetic MciZ is an effective inhibitor of B. subtilis cell division, Z-ring formation and localization. This finding supports our cell-based approach to screen for FtsZ inhibitors and opens new possibilities for peptide inhibitors of bacterial cell division. PMID:27752253

  14. What determines the inhibition effectiveness of ATA, BTAH, and BTAOH corrosion inhibitors on copper?

    PubMed

    Kokalj, Anton; Peljhan, Sebastijan; Finsgar, Matjaz; Milosev, Ingrid

    2010-11-24

    Three corrosion inhibitors for copper-3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATA), benzotriazole (BTAH), and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (BTAOH)-were investigated by corrosion experiments and atomistic computer simulations. The trend of corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the three inhibitors on copper in near-neutral chloride solution is determined experimentally as BTAH ≳ ATA ≫ BTAOH. A careful analysis of the results of computer simulations based on density functional theory allowed to pinpoint the superior inhibiting action of BTAH and ATA as a result of their ability to form strong N-Cu chemical bonds in deprotonated form. While these bonds are not as strong as the Cl-Cu bonds, the presence of solvent favors the adsorption of inhibitor molecules onto the surface due to stronger solvation of the Cl(-) anions. Moreover, benzotriazole displays the largest affinity among the three inhibitors to form intermolecular aggregates, such as [BTA-Cu](n) polymeric complex. This is another factor contributing to the stability of the protective inhibitor film on the surface, thus making benzotriazole an outstanding corrosion inhibitor for copper. These findings cannot be anticipated on the basis of inhibitors' molecular electronic properties alone, thus emphasizing the importance of a rigorous modeling of the interactions between the components of the corrosion system in corrosion inhibition studies.

  15. Beneficial consequences of a selective glutamine synthetase inhibitor in oats and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1988-01-01

    We report on the effects of administering a unique glutamine synthetase inhibitor to cereals and N/sub 2/-fixing legumes. A bacterium (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci) delivers this inhibitor to provide extended treatment periods; we inoculated the root systems of oat and legume plants with pv. tabaci to provide for delivery of this inhibitor to their root or root/nodule systems. Inoculation of legumes is accompanied by increased plant growth, total plant nitrogen, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation activity. Inoculation of the oats is accompanied by either of two results depending upon the genotype of the oat plant. One result is inhibition of plant growth followed by plant death as consequences of the loss of all of the glutamine synthetase activities in the plant and the subsequent accumulation of ammonia and cessation of nitrate uptake. The second and opposite result is observed in a small population of oats screened from a commercial cultivar and includes increased plant growth and leaf protein. The effects of this inhibitor can be beneficial when applied to appropriate plant material. In an attempt to effectively communicate these findings to the reader, we first introduce the inhibitor (a novel amino acid) and its bacterial delivery systems, the target of the inhibitor (glutamine synthetase-catalyzed ammonia assimilation), and the two different nitrogen economics in the legume and cereal plants used experimentally. The physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic consequences of the inhibitor action in cereals and legumes, as we presently understand them, are then presented. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.,

  16. 2-bromoethylamine, a suicide inhibitor of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, increases hydralazine hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, Horacio; Medina, Martha

    2005-09-01

    Previous work has shown that inhibitors of the predominantly vascular enzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) potentiate the hypotensive response to hydralazine, itself a SSAO inhibitor, in anesthetized rats. The present study was carried out to determine whether the recently described suicide SSAO inhibitor 2-bromoethylamine shares this effect. Hypotensive responses to hydralazine, 0.1 mg/kg IV, were obtained in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized rats, either unpretreated or receiving bromoethylamine at different doses and pretreatment intervals. Parallel experiments were run with semicarbazide, the prototypical hydrazine SSAO inhibitor. Both inhibitors potentiated hydralazine hypotension, bromoethylamine having a longer latency and a shorter duration of action than semicarbazide. High doses of bromoethylamine did not produce potentiation, a phenomenon attributed to SSAO inactivation by excess substrate and decreased formation by the enzyme of the inhibitor product. Experiments with combined administration of both inhibitors were also carried out. When semicarbazide was administered before bromoethylamine, potentiaton was prevented, apparently by a mechanism similar to the above; when it was given after the amine, potentiation was increased. This was attributed to enzyme inhibition by interaction with 2 different active sites. The charactertistics of hydralazine potentiation by bromoethylamine were considered compatible with the mechanism of SSAO inhibition by the amine.

  17. Inhibitors of sex hormones: development of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Frost, P; Gomez, E C

    1972-01-01

    Inhibitors of sex hormones and the development of experimental models are discussed. Compounds that inhibit the action of androgens and estrogens are defined, and the possible mechanisms of action presented are: 1) inhibition of hormone synthesis; 2) inhibition of uptake of hormone into target tissues; 3) inhibition of the retention of hormone in target tissues; 4) inhibition of the binding of hormone to nonenzyme macromolecules; and 5) inhibition of the metabolism of a hormone to a more active form. Effects of antiandrogen on skin such as hirsutism, sebum production, and acne are briefly covered. Methods of study included inhibition of in vitro metabolism of testosterone by human foreskin and the use of the hamster flank organ for the bioassay of antiandrogens.

  18. Probing translation using small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The translational apparatus of the bacterial cell remains one of the principal targets of antibiotics for the clinical treatment of infection worldwide. Since the introduction of specific translation inhibitors into clinical practise in the late 1940’s, intense efforts have been made to understand their precise mechanisms of action. Such research has often revealed significant and sometimes unexpected insights into many fundamental aspects of the translation mechanism. Central to progress in this area, high-resolution crystal structures of the bacterial ribosome identifying the sites of antibiotic binding are now available, which, together with recent developments in single-molecule and fast-kinetic approaches, provide an integrated view of the dynamic translation process. Assays employing these approaches and focusing on specific steps of the overall translation process are amenable for drug-screening. Such assays, coupled with structural studies, have the potential not only to accelerate the discovery of novel and effective antimicrobial agents, but also to refine our understanding of the translation mechanism, since antibiotics often stabilize specific functional states of the ribosome and allow distinct translation steps to be dissected in molecular detail. PMID:20609413

  19. A Metadata Action Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  20. Adipokines and insulin action

    PubMed Central

    Knights, Alexander J; Funnell, Alister PW; Pearson, Richard CM; Crossley, Merlin; Bell-Anderson, Kim S

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern and a strong risk factor for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular disease. The last two decades have seen a reconsideration of the role of white adipose tissue (WAT) in whole body metabolism and insulin action. Adipose tissue-derived cytokines and hormones, or adipokines, are likely mediators of metabolic function and dysfunction. While several adipokines have been associated with obese and insulin-resistant phenotypes, a select group has been linked with insulin sensitivity, namely leptin, adiponectin, and more recently, adipolin. What is known about these insulin-sensitizing molecules and their effects in healthy and insulin resistant states is the subject of this review. There remains a significant amount of research to do to fully elucidate the mechanisms of action of these adipokines for development of therapeutics in metabolic disease. PMID:24719781

  1. [Prothrombotic aldosterone action--a new side of the hormone].

    PubMed

    Gromotowicz, Anna; Osmólska, Urszula; Mantur, Maria; Szoka, Piotr; Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Szemraj, Janusz; Chabielska, Ewa

    2010-10-18

    Recent studies have focused on a new wave of interest in aldosterone due mainly to its growing profile as a local messenger in pathology of the cardiovascular system, rather than its hormonal action. In the last few years strong evidence for a correlation between raised aldosterone level and haemostasis disturbances leading to increased risk of cardiovascular events has been provided. It has been demonstrated that aldosterone contributes to endothelial dysfunction, fibrinolytic disorders and oxidative stress augmentation. It was also shown that chronic aldosterone treatment results in enhanced experimental arterial thrombosis. Our study in a venous model of thrombosis in normotensive rats confirmed that even a short-lasting increase in aldosterone level intensified thrombus formation. One-hour aldosterone infusion shortened bleeding time; increased platelet adhesion to collagen; reduced tissue factor, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor; and increased plasminogen activator plasma level. A fall in plasma nitric oxide metabolite concentration with a decrease in aortic nitric oxide synthase mRNA level was also observed. Moreover, aldosterone increased hydrogen peroxide and malonyl dialdehyde plasma concentration and augmented NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutase aortic expression. Therefore, the mechanism of aldosterone prothrombotic action is multiple and involves primary haemostasis activation, procoagulative and antifibrinolytic action, NO bioavailability impairment and oxidative stress augmentation. The effects of aldosterone were not fully abolished by mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, suggesting the involvement of alternative mechanisms in the prothrombotic aldosterone action.

  2. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  3. Battle Space Action Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-14

    VREEDE, G. J. D., & KOLFSCHOTEN, G. L . (2008). Extending the contextual and organizational elements of adaptive structurization theory in GSS...Reiter-Palmon, R., & Harland, L . (2009). Computer Assisted Collaboration Engineering and Process Support Systems: The BattleSpace ActionCenters...Collaboration Science, 27 February, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE. 18. BRIGGS, R.O., VREEDE, G.J. DE, REITER-PALMON, R., HARLAND, L

  4. In vitro and in silico analysis of the efficiency of tetrahydropyridines as drug efflux inhibitors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lande; Carrion, Lillian Lucas; von Groll, Andrea; Costa, Sofia Santos; Junqueira, Elisabete; Ramos, Daniela Fernandes; Cantos, Jéssica; Seus, Vinicius Rosa; Couto, Isabel; Fernandes, Liana da Silva; Bonacorso, Hélio Gauze; Martins, Marcos Antônio Pinto; Zanatta, Nilo; Viveiros, Miguel; Machado, Karina S; Almeida da Silva, Pedro Eduardo

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate tetrahydropyridine derivatives as efflux inhibitors and to understand the mechanism of action of the compounds by in silico studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination, fluorometric methods and docking simulations were performed. The compounds NUNL02, NUNL09 and NUNL10 inhibited efflux, and NUNL02 is very likely a substrate of the transporter protein AcrB. Docking studies suggested that the mechanism of action could be by competition with substrate for binding sites and protein residues. We showed for the first time the potential of tetrahydropyridines as efflux inhibitors and highlighted compound NUNL02 as an AcrB-specific inhibitor. Docking studies suggested that competition is the putative mechanism of action of these compounds.

  5. Finding minimal action sequences with a simple evaluation of actions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashvin; Gurney, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Animals are able to discover the minimal number of actions that achieves an outcome (the minimal action sequence). In most accounts of this, actions are associated with a measure of behavior that is higher for actions that lead to the outcome with a shorter action sequence, and learning mechanisms find the actions associated with the highest measure. In this sense, previous accounts focus on more than the simple binary signal of “was the outcome achieved?”; they focus on “how well was the outcome achieved?” However, such mechanisms may not govern all types of behavioral development. In particular, in the process of action discovery (Redgrave and Gurney, 2006), actions are reinforced if they simply lead to a salient outcome because biological reinforcement signals occur too quickly to evaluate the consequences of an action beyond an indication of the outcome's occurrence. Thus, action discovery mechanisms focus on the simple evaluation of “was the outcome achieved?” and not “how well was the outcome achieved?” Notwithstanding this impoverishment of information, can the process of action discovery find the minimal action sequence? We address this question by implementing computational mechanisms, referred to in this paper as no-cost learning rules, in which each action that leads to the outcome is associated with the same measure of behavior. No-cost rules focus on “was the outcome achieved?” and are consistent with action discovery. No-cost rules discover the minimal action sequence in simulated tasks and execute it for a substantial amount of time. Extensive training, however, results in extraneous actions, suggesting that a separate process (which has been proposed in action discovery) must attenuate learning if no-cost rules participate in behavioral development. We describe how no-cost rules develop behavior, what happens when attenuation is disrupted, and relate the new mechanisms to wider computational and biological context. PMID:25506326

  6. Platform for Action: update.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Women's Global Leadership (CWGL) has collaborated in the preparation of amendments and strategies designed to withstand the challenges being posed to the Platform for Action of the Fourth World Conference on Women. Specific challenges include the inappropriate use of the word "universal" to modify "human rights." This implies that some human rights are less than universal. The strategy proposed is to accept the use of the word "universal" in this context only when it affirms principles of universality contained in the Vienna Programme of Action and not where its use would restrict the rights to which women are entitled. A second concern is over the use of the word "equity" rather than "equality" when referring to gender relations. The use of these terms will be carefully monitored to insure that "equity" not be used to undermine the principle of gender equality. The third concern is the efforts of some governments to hinder the integration of women's human rights throughout the UN system. Such efforts will be opposed. Fourth, the CWGL will seek the inclusion of language which recognizes the barriers that different groups of women face when trying to secure their rights. Finally, the CWGL will propose inclusion of language recognizing and protecting sexual orientation rights. The CWGL is also going to work to translate the abstract language of the Platform for Action into political organizing potential to insure that governments will follow through on their agreements.

  7. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  8. Archetypes as action patterns.

    PubMed

    Hogenson, George B

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons by researchers at the University of Parma promises to radically alter our understanding of fundamental cognitive and affective states. This paper explores the relationship of mirror neurons to Jung's theory of archetypes and proposes that archetypes may be viewed as elementary action patterns. The paper begins with a review of a proposed interpretation of the fainting spells of S. Freud in his relationship with Jung as an example of an action pattern that also defines an archetypal image. The challenge that mirror neurons present to traditional views in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis, however, is that they operate without recourse to a cognitive processing element. This is a position that is gaining increasing acceptance in other fields as well. The paper therefore reviews the most recent claims made by the Boston Process of Change Study Group as well as conclusions drawn from dynamic systems views of development and theoretical robotics to underline the conclusion that unconscious agency is not a requirement for coherent action. It concludes with the suggestion that this entire body of research may lead to the conclusion that the dynamic unconscious is an unnecessary hypothesis in psychoanalysis and analytical psychology.

  9. Small-molecule arginase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ivanenkov, Yan A; Chufarova, Nina V

    2014-01-01

    Arginase is an enzyme that metabolizes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. In addition to its fundamental role in the hepatic ornithine cycle, it also influences the immune systems in humans and mice. Arginase participates in many inflammatory disorders by decreasing the synthesis of nitric oxide and inducing fibrosis and tissue regeneration. L-arginine deficiency, which is modulated by myeloid cell arginase, suppresses T-cell immune response. This mechanism plays a fundamental role in inflammation-associated immunosuppression. Pathogens can synthesize their own arginase to elude immune reaction. Small-molecule arginase inhibitors are currently described as promising therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases, including allergic asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, cardiovascular diseases (atherosclerosis and hypertension), diseases associated with pathogens (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Salmonella), cancer and induced or spontaneous immune disorders. This article summarizes recent patents in the area of arginase inhibitors and discusses their properties.

  10. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  11. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P; Ferreira, Leandra R; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Welsh, William J; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-10-11

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose antiapicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles.

  12. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  13. Recent progress on fucosyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Merino, Pedro; Tejero, Tomás; Delso, Ignacio; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sádaba, David

    2012-12-01

    Fucosyltransferases (FucTs) are enzymes that transfer L-fucose from GDP-fucose to a glycoside or a peptide. They have important roles in a variety of diseases including cancer and autoimmune disorders, viral and bacterial infections and inflammatory processes, and thus they represent important drug targets for the development of agents for the treatment of such disorders. This review highlights recent developments regarding carbohydrate mimics as inhibitors of FucTs. The most recent and relevant synthetic strategies are described.

  14. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  15. Voglibose: An Alpha Glucosidase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Dabhi, Ajay S.; Bhatt, Nikita R.; Shah, Mohit J.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a morbid disease worldwide, with increasing incidence as time passes. It has macro-vascular and micro-vascular complications. The main cause of these complications is poorly controlled postprandial hyperglycaemia. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors, namely acarbose, voglibose and miglitol, are available for therapy. Voglibose is well tolerated and effective in comparable doses among these drugs. This article highlights the important features of voglibose. PMID:24551718

  16. Kinase Inhibitors from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Skropeta, Danielle; Pastro, Natalie; Zivanovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases play a critical role in cell regulation and their deregulation is a contributing factor in an increasing list of diseases including cancer. Marine sponges have yielded over 70 novel compounds to date that exhibit significant inhibitory activity towards a range of protein kinases. These compounds, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, and ordered based upon the kinase that they inhibit. Relevant synthetic studies on the marine natural product kinase inhibitors have also been included. PMID:22073013

  17. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro, Joycellane Alline; Serquiz, Alexandre Coellho; dos Santos Silva, Priscila Fabíola; Barbosa, Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros; Sampaio, Tarcísio Bruno Montenegro; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; Machado, Richele Janaina Araújo; Maciel, Bruna Leal Lima; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; dos Santos, Elizeu Antunes; de Araújo Morais, Ana Heloneida

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30–60%) following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated. PMID:25789523

  18. Substituted androstanes as aromatase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, Inna S.

    1998-11-01

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships of inhibitors of steroid aromatase which catalyses the last stage of a multistep biotransformation of cholesterol into estrogens, viz., aromatisation of C19-steroids into C18-phenolic steroids, are discussed. Compounds of the androstane series which are structurally related to the natural substrate, viz., androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, are the subjects of consideration. The review encompasses problems of synthesis of various substituted androstanes and their aromatase-inhibiting activities and structural requirements for selective specific aromatase inhibitors based on in vitro and in vivo structure-activity studies of compounds synthesised, their biological properties and the results of clinical trials. Special attention is paid to practical applications of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of hormone-dependent mammary and ovarian tumours as well as benign prostatic tumours. In writing this report, the author has used all the information currently available in the chemical, biochemical, endocrinological and medicinal literature as well as in patents. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  19. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Risk and Prevention Aromatase Inhibitors for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  20. An Update on Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Inhibitors: Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Qing; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Wang, Yu-Ting; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhang, Ao; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2016-11-10

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a critical DNA repair enzyme in the base excision repair pathway. Inhibitors of this enzyme comprise a new type of anticancer drug that selectively kills cancer cells by targeting homologous recombination repair defects. Since 2010, important advances have been achieved in PARP-1 inhibitors. Specifically, the approval of olaparib in 2014 for the treatment of ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations validated PARP-1 as an anticancer target and established its clinical importance in cancer therapy. Here, we provide an update on PARP-1 inhibitors, focusing on breakthroughs in their clinical applications and investigations into relevant mechanisms of action, biomarkers, and drug resistance. We also provide an update on the design strategies and the structural types of PARP-1 inhibitors. Opportunities and challenges in PARP-1 inhibitors for cancer therapy will be discussed based on the above advances.

  1. On the Inclusion of Externally Controlled Actions in Action Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Knoblich, Gunther; Sebanz, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    According to ideomotor theories, perceiving action effects produced by others triggers corresponding action representations in the observer. We tested whether this principle extends to actions performed by externally controlled limbs and tools. Participants performed a go-no-go version of a spatial compatibility task in which their own actions…

  2. Supra-spinal FAAH is required for the analgesic action of paracetamol in an inflammatory context.

    PubMed

    Dalmann, Romain; Daulhac, Laurence; Antri, Myriam; Eschalier, Alain; Mallet, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is the most commonly used analgesic in the world. Recently, a new view of its action has emerged: that paracetamol would be a pro-drug that should be metabolized by the FAAH enzyme into AM404, its active metabolite. However, this hypothesis has been demonstrated only in naive animals, a far cry from the clinical pathologic context of paracetamol use. Moreover, FAAH is a ubiquitous enzyme expressed both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Thus, we explored: (i) the involvement of FAAH in the analgesic action of paracetamol in a mouse model of inflammatory pain; and (ii) the contributions of central versus peripheral FAAH in this action. The analgesic effect of paracetamol was evaluated in thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by an intra-plantar injection of carrageenan (3%) in FAAH knock-out mice or their littermates. Moreover, the contribution of the central and peripheral enzymes was explored by comparing the effect of a global FAAH inhibitor (URB597) to that of a peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitor (URB937) on paracetamol action. Here, we show that in a model of inflammatory pain submitted to different stimuli, the analgesic action of paracetamol was abolished when FAAH was genetically or pharmacologically inhibited. Whereas a global FAAH inhibitor, URB597 (0.3 mg/kg), reduced the anti-hyperalgesic action of paracetamol, a brain-impermeant FAAH inhibitor, URB937 (0.3 mg/kg), had no influence. However, administered intracerebroventricularly, URB937 (5 μg/mouse) reduced the action of paracetamol. These results demonstrate that the supra-spinally-located FAAH enzyme is necessary for the analgesic action of paracetamol.

  3. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively.

  4. HDACiDB: a database for histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kasi; Sangeetha, Shanmugasamy; Ranjitha, Shanmugasamy; Vimala, Antony; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh; Rameshkumar, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    An histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor database (HDACiDB) was constructed to enable rapid access to data relevant to the development of epigenetic modulators (HDAC inhibitors [HDACi]), helping bring precision cancer medicine a step closer. Thousands of HDACi targeting HDACs are in various stages of development and are being tested in clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cancer agents. Despite the abundance of HDACi, information resources are limited. Tools for in silico experiments on specific HDACi prediction, for designing and analyzing the generated data, as well as custom-made specific tools and interactive databases, are needed. We have developed an HDACiDB that is a composite collection of HDACi and currently comprises 1,445 chemical compounds, including 419 natural and 1,026 synthetic ones having the potential to inhibit histone deacetylation. Most importantly, it will allow application of Lipinski's rule of five drug-likeness and other physicochemical property-based screening of the inhibitors. It also provides easy access to information on their source of origin, molecular properties, drug likeness, as well as bioavailability with relevant references cited. Being the first comprehensive database on HDACi that contains all known natural and synthetic HDACi, the HDACiDB may help to improve our knowledge concerning the mechanisms of actions of available HDACi and enable us to selectively target individual HDAC isoforms and establish a new paradigm for intelligent epigenetic cancer drug design. The database is freely available on the http://hdacidb.bioinfo.au-kbc.org.in/hdacidb/website.

  5. Indole based Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitors: An Update on Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Dhanya; Kamath, Pooja R

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of cancer microenvironment and its physiology have exposed a number of potential molecular targets for selective therapeutic intervention by anti-cancer agents. Microtubules are basic cell components formed by polymerization of αβ heterodimers which play a pivotal role in cellular functions as well as cell division. Drugs that can control the microtubule assembly either by hindering tubulin polymerization or by obstructing microtubule disassembly are of great importance in anti-cancer therapy. Diverse classes of naturally occurring as well as synthetic and semi-synthetic compounds with an indole nucleus induce microtubule polymerization and depolymerization and thereby change tubulin dynamics. Rapid development of several novel tubulin polymerization inhibitors has been observed over the past few years and some of them have associated vascular disrupting properties too. The present review starts with the structure, function and importance of microtubules in a eukaryotic cell. The well characterized tubulin binding domains and the corresponding inhibitors including their mechanism of action is also a part of this article. The report mainly focuses on the brief synthetic methodology with the relevant SAR studies of different indole derived molecules that have been reported in the past few years as potential inhibitors of tubulin polymerization is discussed. This review will provide the up-to-date evidence-base for synthetic chemists as well as biologists to design and synthesize new active molecules to inhibit tubulin polymerization.

  6. SGLT2 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Monica Reddy, R P; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-08-01

    The glucose-lowering pharmacopeia continues to grow for patients with type 2 diabetes. The latest drug category, the SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin concentrations by increasing urinary excretion of glucose. They are used mainly in combination with metformin and other antihyperglycemic agents, including insulin. Their glucose-lowering potency is modest. Advantages include lack of hypoglycemia as a side effect, and mild reduction in blood pressure and body weight. Side effects include increased urinary frequency, owing to their mild diuretic action, symptoms of hypovolemia, genitourinary infections. There are also recent reports of rare cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occurring in insulin-treated patients. Recently, a large cardiovascular outcome trial reported that a specific SGLT2 inhibitor, empagliflozin, led to a reduction in the primary endpoint of major cardiovascular events. This effect was mainly the result of a surprising 38 % reduction in cardiovascular death, and the drug was also associated with nearly as large a reduction in heart failure hospitalization. These findings were notable because most drugs used in type 2 diabetes have not been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, there is growing interest in empagliflozin and the entire SGLT2 inhibitor class as drugs that could potentially change the manner in which we approach the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. NF-κB inhibitors from Eurycoma longifolia.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Van Anh; Malainer, Clemens; Schwaiger, Stefan; Atanasov, Atanas G; Heiss, Elke H; Dirsch, Verena M; Stuppner, Hermann

    2014-03-28

    The roots of Eurycoma longifolia have been used in many countries of Southeast Asia to alleviate various diseases including malaria, dysentery, sexual insufficiency, and rheumatism. Although numerous studies have reported the pharmacological properties of E. longifolia, the mode of action of the anti-inflammatory activity has not been elucidated. Bioguided isolation of NF-κB inhibitors using an NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter gene assay led to the identification of a new quassinoid, eurycomalide C (1), together with 27 known compounds including 11 quassinoids (2-12), six alkaloids (13-18), two coumarins (19, 20), a squalene derivative (21), a triterpenoid (22), and six phenolic compounds (23-28) from the extract of E. longifolia. Evaluation of the biological activity revealed that C19-type and C20-type quassinoids, β-carboline, and canthin-6-one alkaloids are potent NF-κB inhibitors, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range, while C18-type quassinoids, phenolic compounds, coumarins, the squalene derivative, and the triterpenoid turned out to be inactive when tested at a concentration of 30 μM. Eurycomalactone (2), 14,15β-dihydroklaieanone (7), and 13,21-dehydroeurycomanone (10) were identified as potent NF-κB inhibitors with IC50 values of less than 1 μM.

  8. Improving L-dopa therapy: the development of enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gershanik, Oscar S

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of levodopa produced a monumental change in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Limitations in its bioavailability and tolerability led to the search for drugs that could improve its pharmacokinetics and safety profile. Dopa-decarboxylase inhibitors were the first such drugs that were developed, and their use in combination with L-dopa has become standard practice. Increasing knowledge on the metabolism of L-dopa allowed the identification of additional targets for intervention in an attempt to improve the symptomatic efficacy of L-dopa. Monoamineoxidase inhibitors, enhancing the central bioavailability of dopamine by blocking its metabolism, were the next step, and despite controversies regarding their efficacy, they have remained as valuable adjuncts to l-dopa in the treatment of PD. More recently, the introduction of potent, selective catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitors have found their place in the therapeutic armamentarium of PD and are prescribed in combination with l-dopa to prolong the duration of its action.

  9. Acridone alkaloids as potent inhibitors of cathepsin V.

    PubMed

    Severino, Richele P; Guido, Rafael V C; Marques, Emerson F; Brömme, Dieter; da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Fernandes, João B; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Vieira, Paulo C

    2011-02-15

    Cathepsin V is a lysosomal cysteine peptidase highly expressed in thymus, testis and corneal epithelium. Eleven acridone alkaloids were isolated from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr. (Rutaceae), with eight of them being identified as potent and reversible inhibitors of cathepsin V (IC(50) values ranging from 1.2 to 3.9 μM). Detailed mechanistic characterization of the effects of these compounds on the cathepsin V-catalyzed reaction showed clear competitive inhibition with respect to substrate, with dissociation constants (K(i)) in the low micromolar range (2, K(i)=1.2 μM; 6, K(i)=1.0 μM; 7, K(i)=0.2 μM; and 11, K(i)=1.7 μM). Molecular modeling studies provided important insight into the structural basis for binding affinity and enzyme inhibition. Experimental and computational approaches, including biological evaluation, mode of action assessment and modeling studies were successfully employed in the discovery of a small series of acridone alkaloid derivatives as competitive inhibitors of catV. The most potent inhibitor (7) has a K(i) value of 200 nM.

  10. NF-κB Inhibitors from Eurycoma longifolia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The roots of Eurycoma longifolia have been used in many countries of Southeast Asia to alleviate various diseases including malaria, dysentery, sexual insufficiency, and rheumatism. Although numerous studies have reported the pharmacological properties of E. longifolia, the mode of action of the anti-inflammatory activity has not been elucidated. Bioguided isolation of NF-κB inhibitors using an NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter gene assay led to the identification of a new quassinoid, eurycomalide C (1), together with 27 known compounds including 11 quassinoids (2–12), six alkaloids (13–18), two coumarins (19, 20), a squalene derivative (21), a triterpenoid (22), and six phenolic compounds (23–28) from the extract of E. longifolia. Evaluation of the biological activity revealed that C19-type and C20-type quassinoids, β-carboline, and canthin-6-one alkaloids are potent NF-κB inhibitors, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range, while C18-type quassinoids, phenolic compounds, coumarins, the squalene derivative, and the triterpenoid turned out to be inactive when tested at a concentration of 30 μM. Eurycomalactone (2), 14,15β-dihydroklaieanone (7), and 13,21-dehydroeurycomanone (10) were identified as potent NF-κB inhibitors with IC50 values of less than 1 μM. PMID:24467387

  11. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  12. The renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors and a mini-review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Andrianesis, Vasileios; Glykofridi, Spyridoula; Doupis, John

    2016-12-01

    Sodium-glucose linked transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new and promising class of antidiabetic agents which target renal tubular glucose reabsorption. Their action is based on the blockage of SGLT2 sodium-glucose cotransporters that are located at the luminal membrane of tubular cells of the proximal convoluted tubule, inducing glucosuria. It has been proven that they significantly reduce glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), along with fasting and postprandial plasma glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The glucosuria-induced caloric loss as well as the osmotic diuresis significantly decrease body weight and blood pressure, respectively. Given that SGLT2 inhibitors do not interfere with insulin action and secretion, their efficacy is sustained despite the progressive β-cell failure in T2DM. They are well tolerated, with a low risk of hypoglycemia. Their most frequent adverse events are minor: genital and urinal tract infections. Recently, it was demonstrated that empagliflozin presents a significant cardioprotective effect. Although the SGLT2 inhibitors' efficacy is affected by renal function, new data have been presented that some SGLT2 inhibitors, even in mild and moderate renal impairment, induce significant HbA1c reduction. Moreover, recent data indicate that SGLT2 inhibition has a beneficial renoprotective effect. The role of this review paper is to explore the current evidence on the renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  13. Flavonoid glycosides isolated from unique legume plant extracts as novel inhibitors of xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Spanou, Chrysoula; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Kerasioti, Thalia; Kontou, Maria; Angelis, Apostolos; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Legumes and the polyphenolic compounds present in them have gained a lot of interest due to their beneficial health implications. Dietary polyphenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, exert antioxidant properties and are potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. XO is the main contributor of free radicals during exercise but it is also involved in pathogenesis of several diseases such as vascular disorders, cancer and gout. In order to discover new natural, dietary XO inhibitors, some polyphenolic fractions and pure compounds isolated from two legume plant extracts were tested for their effects on XO activity. The fractions isolated from both Vicia faba and Lotus edulis plant extracts were potent inhibitors of XO with IC(50) values range from 40-135 µg/mL and 55-260 µg/mL, respectively. All the pure polyphenolic compounds inhibited XO and their K(i) values ranged from 13-767 µM. Ten of the compounds followed the non competitive inhibitory model whereas one of them was a competitive inhibitor. These findings indicate that flavonoid isolates from legume plant extracts are novel, natural XO inhibitors. Their mode of action is under investigation in order to examine their potential in drug design for diseases related to overwhelming XO action.

  14. Flavonoid Glycosides Isolated from Unique Legume Plant Extracts as Novel Inhibitors of Xanthine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Spanou, Chrysoula; Veskoukis, Aristidis S.; Kerasioti, Thalia; Kontou, Maria; Angelis, Apostolos; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Legumes and the polyphenolic compounds present in them have gained a lot of interest due to their beneficial health implications. Dietary polyphenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, exert antioxidant properties and are potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. XO is the main contributor of free radicals during exercise but it is also involved in pathogenesis of several diseases such as vascular disorders, cancer and gout. In order to discover new natural, dietary XO inhibitors, some polyphenolic fractions and pure compounds isolated from two legume plant extracts were tested for their effects on XO activity. The fractions isolated from both Vicia faba and Lotus edulis plant extracts were potent inhibitors of XO with IC50 values range from 40–135 µg/mL and 55–260 µg/mL, respectively. All the pure polyphenolic compounds inhibited XO and their Ki values ranged from 13–767 µM. Ten of the compounds followed the non competitive inhibitory model whereas one of them was a competitive inhibitor. These findings indicate that flavonoid isolates from legume plant extracts are novel, natural XO inhibitors. Their mode of action is under investigation in order to examine their potential in drug design for diseases related to overwhelming XO action. PMID:22396752

  15. Applications of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Christopher H S; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Kim, Su-Jin; Pospisilik, J Andrew; Pederson, Raymond A

    2006-01-01

    A number of alternative therapies for type 2 diabetes are currently under development that take advantage of the actions of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide on the pancreatic beta-cell. One such approach is based on the inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV), the major enzyme responsible for degrading the incretins in vivo. DP IV exhibits characteristics that have allowed the development of specific inhibitors with proven efficacy in improving glucose tolerance in animal models of diabetes and type 2 human diabetics. While enhancement of insulin secretion, resulting from blockade of incretin degradation, has been proposed to be the major mode of inhibitor action, there is also evidence that inhibition of gastric emptying, reduction in glucagon secretion and important effects on beta-cell differentiation, mitogenesis and survival, by the incretins and other DP IV-sensitive peptides, can potentially preserve beta-cell mass, and improve insulin secretory function and glucose handling in diabetics.

  16. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mutation Project (CHAMP) mutation list: a new online resource. Human Mutation. 2012; E2382-E2392. Li T, Miller CH, Payne AB, Hooper CW. The CDC Hemophilia B mutation project mutation list: a new online resource. Molecular Genetics and Genomic Medicine. 2013; 1(4): ...

  17. VIOLENT FRAMES IN ACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; McGrath, Liam R.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-11-17

    We present a computational approach to radical rhetoric that leverages the co-expression of rhetoric and action features in discourse to identify violent intent. The approach combines text mining and machine learning techniques with insights from Frame Analysis and theories that explain the emergence of violence in terms of moral disengagement, the violation of sacred values and social isolation in order to build computational models that identify messages from terrorist sources and estimate their proximity to an attack. We discuss a specific application of this approach to a body of documents from and about radical and terrorist groups in the Middle East and present the results achieved.

  18. Public affairs committee actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Public Affairs Committee will create an ad hoc committee to consider possible AGU position statements concerning the effects of nuclear war.The action was taken at the May 31, 1983, meeting of the Committee at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore. Present were Carroll Ann Hodges, Chairman, and members Thomas J. Ahrens, David Cauffman, Jared Cohon, Stamatios Krimigis, Robert Murphy, Raymond Roble, and George Shaw. Also attending were the current Congressional Fellow Arthur Weissman and SPR—Cosmic Rays Section Secretary Miriam Forman.

  19. Neurobiological actions of cysteamine

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.; Fisher, L.; Mason, R.T.; Rivier, J.; Vale, W.

    1985-06-01

    Somatostatin (SS)-related peptides act within discrete brain regions to inhibit adrenal epinephrine (E) secretion, to prevent hypothermia, and to produce hyperthermia. Depletion of brain concentrations of these SS-related peptides using cysteamine (CSH) or central administration of an SS receptor antagonist increases adrenal E secretion and impairs thermoregulation. These actions of CSH and the SS receptor antagonist are reversed by administration of SS into the central nervous system. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous brain SS-related peptides are involved in the regulation of adrenal E secretion and thermoregulation.

  20. 3RS action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Solid Waste Interim Steering Committee (SWISC) process is to develop a long-term waste management system for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), to be in place by 1996, which is environmentally, socially, economically and technically sound. This background report is being released to the public and member Regional Councils to facilitate input to the SWISC planning process. The report documents current reduction, reuse and recycling initiatives in the GTA, identifies opportunities for coordination and collaboration among the GTA communities, and develops an action plan for improving the effectiveness of the reduction, reuse and recycling efforts within the GTA.

  1. Prokaryote-derived protein inhibitors of peptidases: a sketchy occurrence and mostly unknown function

    PubMed Central

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Rawlings, Neil D.; Potempa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In metazoan organisms protein inhibitors of peptidases are important factors essential for regulation of proteolytic activity. In vertebrates genes encoding peptidase inhibitors constitute up to 1% of genes reflecting a need for tight and specific control of proteolysis especially in extracellular body fluids. In stark contrast unicellular organisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic consistently contain only few, if any, genes coding for putative peptidase inhibitors. This may seem perplexing in the light of the fact that these organisms produce large numbers of proteases of different catalytic classes with the genes constituting up to 6% of the total gene count with the average being about 3%. Apparently, however, a unicellular life-style is fully compatible with other mechanisms of regulation of proteolysis and does not require protein inhibitors to control their intracellular and extracellular proteolytic activity. So in prokaryotes occurrence of genes encoding different types of peptidase inhibitors is infrequent and often scattered among phylogenetically distinct orders or even phyla of microbiota. Genes encoding proteins homologous to alpha-2-macroglobulin (family I39), serine carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor (family I51), alpha-1-peptidase inhibitor (family I4) and ecotin (family I11) are the most frequently represented in Bacteria. Although several of these gene products were shown to possess inhibitory activity, with an exception of ecotin and staphostatins, the biological function of microbial inhibitors is unclear. In this review we present distribution of protein inhibitors from different families among prokaryotes, describe their mode of action and hypothesize on their role in microbial physiology and interactions with hosts and environment. PMID:20558234

  2. Developing an action concept inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on progress towards the development of an Action Concept Inventory (ACI), a test that measures student understanding of action principles in introductory mechanics and optics. The ACI also covers key concepts of many-paths quantum mechanics, from which classical action physics arises. We used a multistage iterative development cycle for incorporating expert and student feedback into successive revisions of the ACI. The student feedback, including think-aloud interviews, enabled us to identify their misconceptions about action physics.

  3. The mechanism of action of ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Dennis, E A; Meadows, D H; Cohen, J S; Jardetzky, O

    1969-04-01

    The possible mechanisms of action of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease are discussed in the light of the detailed knowledge of the geometry of the active site that has been derived from studies of inhibitor binding by X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. When combined with a knowledge of the mechanism of phosphate ester hydrolysis, this information imposes severe geometric constraints on possible mechanisms of action of the enzyme. Two types of mechanism can be distinguished, the linear and the pseudorotation. The linear mechanism includes a catalytic role for both histidine residues at the active site and does not involve pseudorotation of the intermediate. In contrast, in the pseudorotation mechanism one histidine residue performs all the catalytic functions, while the other serves only to bind the phosphate anion; this necessarily involves pseudorotation of the intermediate and specific protonation of the leaving group by the enzyme. The mode of binding of the product of the reaction, cytidine-3'-monophosphate, has been elucidated by X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. If the substrate binds in an analogous way, only the linear mechanism is possible. This mechanism is described in detail.

  4. MEK inhibitors block AICAR-induced maturation in mouse oocytes by a MAPK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    LaRosa, Cean; Downs, Stephen M

    2005-02-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the possible role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the meiosis-inducing action of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-beta-ribofuranoside (AICAR). Cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) or denuded oocytes (DO) from immature, eCG-primed mice were cultured 4 hr in Eagle's minimum essential medium containing dbcAMP plus increasing concentrations of AICAR or okadaic acid (OA). OA is a phosphatase inhibitor known to stimulate both meiotic maturation and MAPK activation and served as a positive control. Both OA and AICAR were potent inducers of meiotic resumption in mouse oocytes and brought about the phosphorylation (and thus, activation) of MAPK, but by different kinetics: MAPK phosphorylation preceded GVB in OA-treated oocytes, while that resulting from AICAR treatment appeared only after GVB. The MEK inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, blocked the meiotic resumption induced by AICAR but not that induced by OA. Although the MEK inhibitors suppressed MAPK phosphorylation in both OA- and AICAR-treated oocytes, meiotic resumption was not causally linked to MAPK phosphorylation in either group. Furthermore, AICAR-induced meiotic resumption in Mos-null oocytes (which are unable to stimulate MAPK) was also abrogated by PD98059 treatment. A non-specific effect of the MEK inhibitors on AICAR accessibility to the oocyte was discounted by showing that they failed to suppress either nucleoside uptake or AICAR-stimulated phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a substrate of AMPK. The suppression of AICAR-induced maturation by MEK inhibitors must, therefore, be occurring by actions unrelated to MEK stimulation of MAPK; consequently, it would be prudent to consider this possible non-specific action of the inhibitors when they are used to block MAPK activation in mouse oocytes.

  5. Ethylene promotes induction of aerenchyma formation and ethanolic fermentation in waterlogged roots of Dendranthema spp.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dongmei; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi; Jiang, Jiafu

    2013-07-01

    The role of ethylene in induction of aerenchyma formation and ethanolic fermentation in waterlogged roots of Dendranthema zawadskii and D. nankingense, two species that differ with respect to waterlogging tolerance, was examined. In the more tolerant D. zawadskii, but not in D. nankingense, ethylene accelerated programmed cell death and promoted formation of lysigenous aerenchyma, both of which were inhibited by treatment with the ethylene inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene. Waterlogged D. zawadskii roots generated a higher quantity of endogenous ethylene than did those of D. nankingense. In waterlogged D. zawadskii roots, transcription of the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) and pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) increased rapidly but transiently, whereas expression of these genes in D. nankingense increased gradually and over a longer period. In D. nankingense, waterlogging elevated both alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase activity, and the production of ethanol and acetaldehyde was increased in the presence of exogenous ethylene and inhibited by 1-methylcyclopropene. In D. zawadskii, in contrast, after a prolonged episode of waterlogging stress, exogenous supply of ethylene suppressed the production of ethanol and acetaldehyde, whereas exogenous 1-methylcyclopropene enhanced their production. In the more tolerant Dendranthema species, ethylene appeared to signal an acceleration of both waterlogging-induced programmed cell death and aerenchyma formation and to alleviate ethanolic fermentation, whereas in the more sensitive species ethylene activated fermentation and increased the release of ethanol and acetaldehyde, which are by-products probably responsible for the collapse of the waterlogging-damaged root.

  6. Collaborative Action Research: Historical Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulyan, Lisa

    This paper presents a historical overview of the use of action research in education and describes the basic assumptions and expectations that continue to characterize collaborative research projects today. Action research was initiated in the 1930's by Kurt Lewin and adapted by educators in the 1940's. Interest in action research declined between…

  7. Action Research: Trends and Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Action research continues to grow as a research tradition, yet misconceptions about what it is and is not remains, even among scholars. For example, some mistakenly believe action research is only about professional development and is not a scholarly research approach. Some assume action research must be accomplished through a collaborative…

  8. Programming Tool-Use Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massen, Cristina; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    When humans plan to execute a tool-use action, they can only specify the bodily movement parameters by taking into account the external target or goal of the tool-use action and the target-movement mapping implemented by the tool. In this study, the authors used the movement precuing method to investigate how people prepare for actions made with…

  9. Developing an Action Concept Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on progress towards the development of an Action Concept Inventory (ACI), a test that measures student understanding of action principles in introductory mechanics and optics. The ACI also covers key concepts of many-paths quantum mechanics, from which classical action physics arises. We used a multistage iterative development cycle for…

  10. Rethinking Actions: Implementation and Association

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Action processing allows us to move through and interact with the world, as well as understand the movements performed by other people. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the semantics of actions as differentiated from the semantics of objects. However, as the understanding of action semantics has evolved, it is evident that the existing literature conflates two senses of the word “action”—one that stems from studies of tool use and the other from event representation. In this paper, we suggest that this issue can be clarified by closely examining differences in how the human parietal and temporal cortices of the brain process action-related stimuli. By contrasting the posterior parietal cortex to the posterolateral temporal cortex, we characterize two complementary action systems in the human brain, each with its own specialization of function. We suggest that these two systems be referred to as the parietal Action Implementation System, and the posterolateral temporal Action Association System. While the fronto-parietal system is concerned primarily with how we perform actions, and simulate others’ actions, the temporal action system is more involved with processing actions from a third-person, conceptual standpoint. Recent work in cognitive neuroscience of perception and language, as well as the neuroanatomical organization of these brain regions support this distinction. We will discuss the implications of this work for cognition-, language-, and neuroscience-based action research. PMID:26352170

  11. Action Principle for Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avignon, Eric; Morrison, Philip; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    A covariant action principle for ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in terms of natural Eulerian field variables is given. This is done by generalizing the covariant Poisson bracket theory of Marsden et al., which uses a noncanonical bracket to implement constrained variations of an action functional. Various implications and extensions of this action principle are also discussed.

  12. Motor Execution Affects Action Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Anne; Brandstadter, Simone; Liepelt, Roman; Birngruber, Teresa; Giese, Martin; Mechsner, Franz; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies provided evidence of the claim that the prediction of occluded action involves real-time simulation. We report two experiments that aimed to study how real-time simulation is affected by simultaneous action execution under conditions of full, partial or no overlap between observed and executed actions. This overlap was analysed by…

  13. Action Research in Music Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Colleen M.; Borst, James

    2001-01-01

    Provides background information on using action research in music education. Offers guidelines for teachers to help them do action research. Includes an example of how a music teacher conducted action research in which the teacher asked, "Why did [the students] continue vocal music from middle school to high school?" (CMK)

  14. Wave action power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, L.V.

    1982-03-16

    A wave action power plant powered by the action of water waves has a drive shaft rotated by a plurality of drive units, each having a lever pivotally mounted on and extending from said shaft and carrying a weight, in the form of a float, which floats on the waves and rocks the lever up and down on the shaft. A ratchet mechanism causes said shaft to be rotated in one direction by the weight of said float after it has been raised by wave and the wave has passed, leaving said float free to move downwardly by gravity and apply its full weight to pull down on the lever and rotate the drive shaft. There being a large number of said drive units so that there are always some of the weights pulling down on their respective levers while other weights are being lifted by waves and thereby causing continuous rotation of the drive shaft in one direction. The said levers are so mounted that they may be easily raised to bring the weights into a position wherein they are readily accessible for cleaning the bottoms thereof to remove any accumulation of barnacles, mollusks and the like. There is also provided means for preventing the weights from colliding with each other as they independently move up and down on the waves.

  15. Capillary action liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Myers, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Capillary action LC (caLC) is introduced as a technique using capillary action as the driving force to perform LC in capillary columns packed with HPLC type microparticulate materials. A dry packing method with centrifugal force was developed to prepare capillary columns in parallel (10 columns per 3 min) to support their disposable use in caLC. Using a digital microscope for real-time imaging and recording separations of components in a dye mixture, caLC was found to have flow characteristics similar to TLC. Based on the investigation of microparticulate HPLC silica gels of different size (1.5-10 microm) and a typical TLC grade irregular medium, Merck 60G silica, the van Deemter curves suggested molecular diffusion as the major contribution to band broadening in caLC. With Waters Xbridge 2.6 microm silica, plate heights down to 8.8 microm were obtained, comparable to those achievable in HPLC. Assisted by an image-processing method, the visual caLC separation was converted to a classical chromatogram for further data analysis and such a facility confirmed the observation of highly efficient bands.

  16. Second generation 2-aminoimidazole based advanced glycation end product inhibitors and breakers.

    PubMed

    Furlani, Robert E; Richardson, Mike A; Podell, Brendan K; Ackart, David F; Haugen, Jessica D; Melander, Roberta J; Basaraba, Randall J; Melander, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) as a result of the action of reducing sugars on host macromolecules plays a role in increased morbidity of diabetic patients. There are currently no clinically available therapeutics for the prevention or eradication of AGEs. Following our previous identification of 2-aminoimidazole (2-AI) based AGE inhibitors and breakers, we now report the use of a rapid, scalable, two-step procedure to access a second generation of 2-AI based anti-AGE compounds from commercially available amino acids. Several second generation compounds exhibit increased AGE inhibition and breaking activty compared to the first generation compounds and to the known AGE inhibitor aminoguanidine.

  17. Development of the pan-DAC inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589): successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Atadja, Peter

    2009-08-08

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging as a highly useful class of anticancer agents that inhibit the enzyme HDAC involved in the deacetylation of histone and non-histone cellular proteins. The HDAC inhibitor, panobinostat (LBH589, Novartis Pharmaceuticals), achieves potent inhibition of all HDAC enzymes implicated in cancer and has demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity in preclinical models and promising clinical efficacy in cancer patients. In this review we discuss the successes and challenges surrounding the development of panobinostat, focusing on its proposed mechanism of action, preclinical anti-tumor activity, and early clinical efficacy in hematologic and solid tumors.

  18. Exploiting Protein Conformational Change to Optimize Adenosine-Derived Inhibitors of HSP70

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    HSP70 is a molecular chaperone and a key component of the heat-shock response. Because of its proposed importance in oncology, this protein has become a popular target for drug discovery, efforts which have as yet brought little success. This study demonstrates that adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors potentially bind to the protein with a novel mechanism of action, the stabilization by desolvation of an intramolecular salt-bridge which induces a conformational change in the protein, leading to high affinity ligands. We also demonstrate that through the application of this mechanism, adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors can be optimized in a rational manner. PMID:27119979

  19. Differential Activities of Thalidomide and Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway Inhibitors in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Tong, Huaxiang; Hohl, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Thalidomide has emerged as an effective agent for treating multiple myeloma, however the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Agents known to target the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) can have cytotoxic effects in myeloma cells. The interactions between thalidomide and IBP inhibitors in human multiple myeloma cells were evaluated. Enhanced cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis was observed in RPMI-8226 cells. Examination of intracellular levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) revealed a wide variance in basal levels and response to IBP inhibitors. These findings provide a mechanism for the differential sensitivity of myeloma cells to pharmacologic manipulation of the IBP. PMID:19646757

  20. Unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev from Sida cordifolia.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Kaneko, Masafumi; Shiomi, Atsushi; Yang, Guang-Ming; Yamaura, Toshiaki; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-03-15

    Bioassay-guided separation from the MeOH extract of the South American medicinal plant Sida cordifolia resulted in isolation of (10E,12Z)-9-hydroxyoctadeca-10,12-dienoic acid (1) as an unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev. This mechanism of action was established by competitive experiment by the biotinylated probe derived from leptomycin B, the known NES antagonistic inhibitor. Additionally, structure-activity relationship analysis by use of the synthesized analogs clarified cooperation of several functionalities in the Rev-export inhibitory activity of 1.

  1. An investigation on the inhibitory action of benzazole derivatives as a consequence of sulfur atom induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Z.; Attar, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    The inhibitory action of three benzazole based molecules namely 2-methyl benzimidazole (2-MBI), 2-methyl benzothiazole (2-MBT) and 2-mercapto benzthiazole (2-SHBT) in 1 M HCl solution was studied by gravimetric analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed that the inhibitor adsorption on the iron surface was according to Langmuir adsorption isotherm for 2-MBI and 2-MBT and Flory Huggins Isotherm for 2-SHBT. Surface roughness obtained by Atomic Forced Microscopy (AFM) revealed that a good inhibitor decreases the surface roughness significantly which can be related to the formation of more integrated molecular film of inhibitor on steel surface. Based on contact angle (CA) measurements as the efficiency of the inhibitor molecules improve the hydrophobicity increases. These three molecules were chosen to see the effect of introducing sulfur atom into the structure the main effect of which would be on electronic parameters. To better understand this effect, the quantum chemical descriptors including: EHOMO, ELUMO, energy gap (ΔE), dipole moment (μ), hardness (η), softness (σ), electronegativity index (χ), fraction of electrons transferred (ΔN), that are most relevant to the potential action of a molecule as corrosion inhibitor, have been calculated in water and vacuum. Electronic parameters of these three inhibitors have been studied using DFT/B3LYP, and HF methods with 6-31G (d,p) basis set.

  2. DPP-4 inhibitors in diabetic complications: role of DPP-4 beyond glucose control.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-08-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) are an emerging class of antidiabetic drugs that constitutes approximately fifty percent of the market share of the oral hypoglycemic drugs. Its mechanism of action for lowering blood glucose is essentially via inhibition of the rapid degradation of incretin hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), thus the plasma concentration of GLP-1 increases, which promotes insulin secretion from the pancreatic β cells and suppresses glucagon secretion from the α cells. In addition to the direct actions on the pancreas, GLP-1 exhibits diverse actions on different tissues through its action on GLP-1 receptor, which is expressed ubiquitously. Moreover, DPP-4 has multiple substrates besides GLP-1 and GIP, including cytokines, chemokines, neuropeptides, and growth factors, which are involved in many pathophysiological conditions. Recently, it was suggested that DPP-4 is a new adipokine secreted from the adipose tissue, which plays an important role in the regulation of the endocrine function in obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. Consequently, DPP-4 inhibitors have been reported to exhibit cytoprotective functions against various diabetic complications affecting the liver, heart, kidneys, retina, and neurons. This review outlines the current understanding of the effect of DPP-4 inhibitors on the complications associated with type 2 diabetes, such as liver steatosis and inflammation, dysfunction of the adipose tissue and pancreas, cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, and neuropathy in preclinical and clinical studies.

  3. Cytological characteristics and classification of spindle inhibitors according to their effects on segmentation mitoses.

    PubMed

    Sentein, P; Ates, Y

    1978-01-01

    The effects of spindle inhibitors and of protein synthesis inhibitors on segmentation mitoses allow us to classify them into six groups : 1. Colchicine type : destruction of the whole achromatic apparatus and centrospheres without storing of dense bodies; 2. Quinoline type : same effect on the achromatic apparatus, but blocked centrospheres with accumulation of dense bodies; 3. Chloralhydrate type : Incomplete destruction of achromatic apparatus, spindle residue which maintains the chromosomes in a star shape, inactive centrospheres sequestered by the reticulum, but without accumulation of dense bodies; 4. Phenylurethane type : Incomplete and reversible action, which leads to easy production of pluripolar mitoses; 5. Carboxylic acid type : dissociation of the spindle, sometimes with blocking of the centrosphere, together with profound chromosome changes without primitive breaks; the intensity and quality of their action is related to the number of carbon atoms in the acid considered; 6. Protein synthesis inhibitor type : (cycloheximide, pederin) characterized by a stop of the nuclear cycle at telo-prophase when the action is sufficient, chromosome abnormalities, sometimes, reduced to strings of beads, and freeing of asters; at weaker concentrations mitosis is possible, but the congression of chromosomes at the equator is abnormal because of functional disturbance of the kinetochores. The nature and grading of these effects, their association (or non - association) to chromosome damage, the soundness of the spindle when only the chromosomes are affected (nitrogen mustard) make this one of the tests which gives the most specific data about the action of antimitotic substances.

  4. MMP Inhibitors on Dentin Stability

    PubMed Central

    Montagner, A.F.; Sarkis-Onofre, R.; Pereira-Cenci, T.; Cenci, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature for in vitro and ex vivo studies that evaluated the effect of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors during the adhesive procedure on the immediate and long-term resin-dentin bond strength. The search was conducted in 6 databases with no publication year or language limits, following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. From 1,336 potentially eligible studies, 48 were selected for full-text analysis, and 30 were included for review, with 17 considered in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the risk of bias. Pooled effect estimates were expressed as the weighted mean difference between groups. The most used MMP inhibitor was chlorhexidine (CHX). Immediate bond strength results showed no difference between 2% CHX and control; however, a difference was found between 0.2% CHX and control at baseline. After aging, CHX presented higher bond strength values compared to control groups (p < .05). However, this was not observed for longer periods of aging. High heterogeneity was found in some comparisons, especially for the water storage aging subgroup. Subgroup analyses showed that self-etching and etch-and-rinse adhesives are benefited by the CHX use. From the studies included, only 1 presented low risk of bias, while the others showed medium or high risk of bias. The use of MMP inhibitors did not affect the immediate bond strength overall, while it influenced the aged bond strength. Aging procedures influenced bond strength values of the dentin adhesion stability. PMID:24935066

  5. Natural products as aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Balunas, Marcy J; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-08-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein.

  6. Controlling Attention through Action: Observing Actions Primes Action-Related Stimulus Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagioli, Sabrina; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that planning an action "backward-primes" perceptual dimension related to this action: planning a grasp facilitates the processing of visual size information, while planning a reach facilitates the processing of location information. Here we show that dimensional priming of perception through action occurs even in the…

  7. The minimalist grammar of action

    PubMed Central

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common ‘syntax’, an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too. PMID:22106430

  8. Antiviral Actions of Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2001-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the antiviral actions of interferons (IFNs), as well as strategies evolved by viruses to antagonize the actions of IFNs. Furthermore, advances made while elucidating the IFN system have contributed significantly to our understanding in multiple areas of virology and molecular cell biology, ranging from pathways of signal transduction to the biochemical mechanisms of transcriptional and translational control to the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis. IFNs are approved therapeutics and have moved from the basic research laboratory to the clinic. Among the IFN-induced proteins important in the antiviral actions of IFNs are the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L, and the Mx protein GTPases. Double-stranded RNA plays a central role in modulating protein phosphorylation and RNA degradation catalyzed by the IFN-inducible PKR kinase and the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate-dependent RNase L, respectively, and also in RNA editing by the IFN-inducible RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR1). IFN also induces a form of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS2) and the major histocompatibility complex class I and II proteins, all of which play important roles in immune response to infections. Several additional genes whose expression profiles are altered in response to IFN treatment and virus infection have been identified by microarray analyses. The availability of cDNA and genomic clones for many of the components of the IFN system, including IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ, their receptors, Jak and Stat and IRF signal transduction components, and proteins such as PKR, 2′,5′-OAS, Mx, and ADAR, whose expression is regulated by IFNs, has permitted the generation of mutant proteins, cells that overexpress different forms of the proteins, and animals in which their expression has been disrupted by targeted gene disruption. The use of these IFN system

  9. Protease Inhibitors Extracted from Caesalpinia echinata Lam. Affect Kinin Release during Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Silva, Ilana; Praxedes-Garcia, Priscila; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Shimamoto, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential process in many pulmonary diseases in which kinins are generated by protease action on kininogen, a phenomenon that is blocked by protease inhibitors. We evaluated kinin release in an in vivo lung inflammation model in rats, in the presence or absence of CeKI (C. echinata kallikrein inhibitor), a plasma kallikrein, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 inhibitor, and rCeEI (recombinant C. echinata elastase inhibitor), which inhibits these proteases and also neutrophil elastase. Wistar rats were intravenously treated with buffer (negative control) or inhibitors and, subsequently, lipopolysaccharide was injected into their lungs. Blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue were collected. In plasma, kinin release was higher in the LPS-treated animals in comparison to CeKI or rCeEI groups. rCeEI-treated animals presented less kinin than CeKI-treated group. Our data suggest that kinins play a pivotal role in lung inflammation and may be generated by different enzymes; however, neutrophil elastase seems to be the most important in the lung tissue context. These results open perspectives for a better understanding of biological process where neutrophil enzymes participate and indicate these plant inhibitors and their recombinant correlates for therapeutic trials involving pulmonary diseases. PMID:28044105

  10. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    PubMed

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases.

  11. Homology modeling, docking and structure-based pharmacophore of inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jakyung; Medina-Franco, José L.

    2011-06-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is an emerging epigenetic target for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. To date, several inhibitors from different structural classes have been published. In this work, we report a comprehensive molecular modeling study of 14 established DNTM1 inhibitors with a herein developed homology model of the catalytic domain of human DNTM1. The geometry of the homology model was in agreement with the proposed mechanism of DNA methylation. Docking results revealed that all inhibitors studied in this work have hydrogen bond interactions with a glutamic acid and arginine residues that play a central role in the mechanism of cytosine DNA methylation. The binding models of compounds such as curcumin and parthenolide suggest that these natural products are covalent blockers of the catalytic site. A pharmacophore model was also developed for all DNMT1 inhibitors considered in this work using the most favorable binding conformations and energetic terms of the docked poses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first pharmacophore model proposed for compounds with inhibitory activity of DNMT1. The results presented in this work represent a conceptual advance for understanding the protein-ligand interactions and mechanism of action of DNMT1 inhibitors. The insights obtained in this work can be used for the structure-based design and virtual screening for novel inhibitors targeting DNMT1.

  12. Natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents for cancers: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Sui; Lei, Jie-Ping; Wei, Guo-Qing; Chen, Hui; Ma, Chao-Ying; Jiang, He-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Context Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is the only mammalian enzyme to catalyse the synthesis of fatty acid. The expression level of FAS is related to cancer progression, aggressiveness and metastasis. In recent years, research on natural FAS inhibitors with significant bioactivities and low side effects has increasingly become a new trend. Herein, we present recent research progress on natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents. Objective This paper is a mini overview of the typical natural FAS inhibitors and their possible mechanism of action in the past 10 years (2004-2014). Method The information was collected and compiled through major databases including Web of Science, PubMed, and CNKI. Results Many natural products induce cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting FAS expression, with fewer side effects than synthetic inhibitors. Conclusion Natural FAS inhibitors are widely distributed in plants (especially in herbs and foods). Some natural products (mainly phenolics) possessing potent biological activities and stable structures are available as lead compounds to synthesise promising FAS inhibitors.

  13. Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Review of Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Arfaei, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme which mediates the bioconversion of arachidonic acid to inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Their use is associated with the side effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs is produced by the inhibition of COX-2, while the undesired side effects arise from inhibition of COX-1 activity. Thus, it was though that more selective COX-2 inhibitors would have reduced side effects. Based upon a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib, valdecoxibetc.) were developed as safer NSAIDs with improved gastric safety profile. However, the recent market removal of some COXIBs such as rofecoxib due to its adverse cardiovascular side effects clearly encourages the researchers to explore and evaluate alternative templates with COX-2 inhibitory activity. Recognition of new avenues for selective COX-2 inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy and neurological diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases still continues to attract investigations on the development of COX-2 inhibitors. This review highlights the various structural classes of selective COX-2 inhibitors with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24250402

  14. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor–induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  15. Inhibitors of c-Jun N-terminal kinases: JuNK no more?

    PubMed

    Bogoyevitch, Marie A; Arthur, Peter G

    2008-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) have been the subject of intense interest since their discovery in the early 1990s. Major research programs have been directed to the screening and/or design of JNK-selective inhibitors and testing their potential as drugs. We begin this review by considering the first commercially-available JNK ATP-competitive inhibitor, SP600125. We focus on recent studies that have evaluated the actions of SP600125 in lung, brain, kidney and liver following exposure to a range of stress insults including ischemia/reperfusion. In many but not all cases, SP600125 administration has proved beneficial. JNK activation can also follow infection, and we next consider recent examples that demonstrate the benefits of SP600125 administration in viral infection. Additional ATP-competitive JNK inhibitors have now been described following high throughput screening of small molecule libraries, but information on their use in biological systems remains limited and thus these inhibitors will require further evaluation. Peptide substrate-competitive ATP-non-competitive inhibitors of JNK have also now been described, and we discuss the recent advances in the use of JNK inhibitory peptides in the treatment of neuronal death, diabetes and viral infection. We conclude by raising a number of questions that should be considered in the quest for JNK-specific inhibitors.

  16. Discovery and molecular basis of potent noncovalent inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH).

    PubMed

    Min, Xiaoshan; Thibault, Stephen T; Porter, Amy C; Gustin, Darin J; Carlson, Timothy J; Xu, Haoda; Lindstrom, Michelle; Xu, Guifen; Uyeda, Craig; Ma, Zhihua; Li, Yihong; Kayser, Frank; Walker, Nigel P C; Wang, Zhulun

    2011-05-03

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an amidase-signature family member, is an integral membrane enzyme that degrades lipid amides including the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and the sleep-inducing molecule oleamide. Both genetic knock out and pharmacological administration of FAAH inhibitors in rodent models result in analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes. Targeting FAAH activity, therefore, presents a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain and other neurological-related or inflammatory disorders. Nearly all FAAH inhibitors known to date attain their binding potency through a reversible or irreversible covalent modification of the nucleophile Ser241 in the unusual Ser-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. Here, we report the discovery and mechanism of action of a series of ketobenzimidazoles as unique and potent noncovalent FAAH inhibitors. Compound 2, a representative of these ketobenzimidazoles, was designed from a series of ureas that were identified from high-throughput screening. While urea compound 1 is characterized as an irreversible covalent inhibitor, the cocrystal structure of FAAH complexed with compound 2 reveals that these ketobenzimidazoles, though containing a carbonyl moiety, do not covalently modify Ser241. These inhibitors achieve potent inhibition of FAAH activity primarily from shape complementarity to the active site and through numerous hydrophobic interactions. These noncovalent compounds exhibit excellent selectivity and good pharmacokinetic properties. The discovery of this distinctive class of inhibitors opens a new avenue for modulating FAAH activity through nonmechanism-based inhibition.

  17. High-Throughput Screen of Natural Product Libraries for Hsp90 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Jason; Balch, Maurie; Galam, Lakshmi; Girgis, Antwan; Hall, Jessica; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Matts, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 has become the target of intensive investigation, as inhibition of its function has the ability to simultaneously incapacitate proteins that function in pathways that represent the six hallmarks of cancer. While a number of Hsp90 inhibitors have made it into clinical trials, a number of short-comings have been noted, such that the search continues for novel Hsp90 inhibitors with superior pharmacological properties. To identify new potential Hsp90 inhibitors, we have utilized a high-throughput assay based on measuring Hsp90-dependent refolding of thermally denatured luciferase to screen natural compound libraries. Over 4,000 compounds were screen with over 100 hits. Data mining of the literature indicated that 51 compounds had physiological effects that Hsp90 inhibitors also exhibit, and/or the ability to downregulate the expression levels of Hsp90-dependent proteins. Of these 51 compounds, seven were previously characterized as Hsp90 inhibitors. Four compounds, anthothecol, garcinol, piplartine, and rottlerin, were further characterized, and the ability of these compounds to inhibit the refolding of luciferase, and reduce the rate of growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells, correlated with their ability to suppress the Hsp90-dependent maturation of the heme-regulated eIF2α kinase, and deplete cultured cells of Hsp90-dependent client proteins. Thus, this screen has identified an additional 44 compounds with known beneficial pharmacological properties, but with unknown mechanisms of action as possible new inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone machine. PMID:24833337

  18. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  19. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  20. Words and actions.

    PubMed

    Kissling, F

    1999-01-01

    This is an editorial that appeared in the journal Conscience. Church leaders have long employed a rhetoric that stigmatizes those who perform abortions and women who have abortions. According to many men in the Church, women who have abortions are either mindless victims or are devoid of moral sensibility. In addition to treating abortion as if it were murder, church leaders also brand it as evil. With this kind of language coming from the church, British Columbia Catholic editor Paul Schratz's assertion that something positive might come from killing a doctor who has provided an abortion can hardly be seen as aberrant. Presently, the reaction of those engaged in the abortion wars is to reject any notion that their language contributes in any way to murders, injuries, and bombings. But language leads to action and violent rhetoric can engender violent deeds.