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Sample records for action leakage rate

  1. 40 CFR 265.222 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to § 265.221(a). The action leakage rate is the maximum design flow rate that the leak detection... proposed response actions (e.g., the action leakage rate must consider decreases in the flow capacity of... exceeded, the owner or operator must convert the weekly or monthly flow rate from the monitoring...

  2. 40 CFR 264.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... landfill units subject to § 264.301(c) or (d). The action leakage rate is the maximum design flow rate that... action leakage rate has been exceeded, the owner or operator must convert the weekly or monthly flow rate from the monitoring data obtained under § 264.303(c) to an average daily flow rate (gallons per...

  3. 40 CFR 265.255 - Action leakage rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... maximum design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the... the action leakage rate has been exceeded, the owner or operator must convert the weekly flow rate from the monitoring data obtained under § 265.260, to an average daily flow rate (gallons per acre...

  4. 40 CFR 264.252 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the bottom liner... action leakage rate has been exceeded, the owner or operator must convert the weekly flow rate from the monitoring data obtained under § 264.254(c) to an average daily flow rate (gallons per acre per day) for...

  5. 40 CFR 264.222 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the bottom... action leakage rate has been exceeded, the owner or operator must convert the weekly or monthly flow rate from the monitoring data obtained under § 264.226(d) to an average daily flow rate (gallons per...

  6. 40 CFR 264.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... landfill units subject to § 264.301(c) or (d). The action leakage rate is the maximum design flow rate that...) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills... design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material), construction,...

  7. 40 CFR 265.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FACILITIES Landfills § 265.302 Action leakage rate. (a) The owner or operator of landfill units subject to... maximum design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the... for uncertainties in the design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage...

  8. 40 CFR 264.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... landfill units subject to § 264.301(c) or (d). The action leakage rate is the maximum design flow rate that...) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills... design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material), construction,...

  9. 40 CFR 264.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... landfill units subject to § 264.301(c) or (d). The action leakage rate is the maximum design flow rate that...) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills... design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material), construction,...

  10. 40 CFR 265.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FACILITIES Landfills § 265.302 Action leakage rate. (a) The owner or operator of landfill units subject to... maximum design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the... for uncertainties in the design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage...

  11. 40 CFR 265.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FACILITIES Landfills § 265.302 Action leakage rate. (a) The owner or operator of landfill units subject to... maximum design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the... for uncertainties in the design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage...

  12. 40 CFR 265.222 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the bottom liner exceeding 1 foot. The action leakage..., hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material), construction, operation, and location of the LDS... the system over time resulting from siltation and clogging, rib layover and creep of...

  13. 40 CFR 265.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... maximum design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the... flow rate from the monitoring data obtained under § 265.304 to an average daily flow rate (gallons per... average daily flow rate for each sump must be calculated weekly during the active life and closure...

  14. 40 CFR 265.255 - Action leakage rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... maximum design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the... for uncertainties in the design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material... consider decreases in the flow capacity of the system over time resulting from siltation and clogging,...

  15. 40 CFR 265.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... maximum design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the... for uncertainties in the design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material... consider decreases in the flow capacity of the system over time resulting from siltation and clogging,...

  16. 40 CFR 264.252 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the bottom liner... in the design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material), construction... decreases in the flow capacity of the system over time resulting from siltation and clogging, rib...

  17. 40 CFR 264.222 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... design flow rate that the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the bottom... uncertainties in the design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material), construction... decreases in the flow capacity of the system over time resulting from siltation and clogging, rib...

  18. Vacuum test fixture improves leakage rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, H.; Marx, H.

    1966-01-01

    Cylindrical chamber, consisting of two matching halves, forms a vacuum test fixture for measuring leakage rates of individual connections, brazed joints, and entrance ports used in closed fluid flow line systems. Once the chamber has been sufficiently evacuated, atmospheric pressure holds the two halves together.

  19. Measurements of the atmospheric neutron leakage rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Ifedili, S. O.; Jenkins, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The atmospheric neutron leakage rate in the energy range from 0.01 to 10,000,000 eV has been measured as a function of latitude, altitude, and time with a neutron detector on board the Ogo 6 satellite. The latitude dependence of the neutron leakage is in reasonable agreement with that predicted by Lingenfelter (1963) and Light et al. (1973) if the neutron energy spectrum has the shape calculated by Newkirk (1963). The change in the neutron latitude dependence with the cosmic ray modulation agrees with the predictions of Lingenfelter and Light et al. For several solar proton events enhancements were observed in the neutron counting rates at lambda greater than or equal to 70 deg. Such events, however, provide an insignificant injection of protons at E less than or equal to 20 MeV into the radiation belts. An isotropic angular distribution of the neutron leakage in the energy range from 0.1 keV to 10 MeV best fits the observed altitude dependence of the neutron leakage flux.

  20. A study of leakage rates through mine seals in underground coal mines

    PubMed Central

    Schatzel, Steven J.; Krog, Robert B.; Mazzella, Andrew; Hollerich, Cynthia; Rubinstein, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conducted a study on leakage rates through underground coal mine seals. Leakage rates of coal bed gas into active workings have not been well established. New seal construction standards have exacerbated the knowledge gap in our understanding of how well these seals isolate active workings near a seal line. At a western US underground coal mine, we determined seal leakage rates ranged from about 0 to 0.036 m3/s for seven 340 kPa seals. The seal leakage rate varied in essentially a linear manner with variations in head pressure at the mine seals. PMID:26322119

  1. Air Leakage Rates in Typical Air Barrier Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Hun, Diana E.; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Childs, Phillip W.

    2016-11-01

    Estimates for 2010 indicate that infiltration in residential buildings was responsible for 2.85 quads of energy (DOE 2014), which is about 3% of the total energy consumed in the US. One of the mechanisms being implemented to reduce this energy penalty is the use of air barriers as part of the building envelope. These technologies decrease airflow through major leakage sites such as oriented strand board (OSB) joints, and gaps around penetrations (e.g., windows, doors, pipes, electrical outlets) as indicated by Hun et al. (2014). However, most air barrier materials do not properly address leakage spots such as wall-to-roof joints and wall-to-foundation joints because these are difficult to seal, and because air barrier manufacturers usually do not provide adequate instructions for these locations. The present study focuses on characterizing typical air leakage sites in wall assemblies with air barrier materials.

  2. 40 CFR 264.302 - Action leakage rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the leak detection system (LDS) can remove without the fluid head on the bottom liner exceeding l foot... design (e.g., slope, hydraulic conductivity, thickness of drainage material), construction, operation... decreases in the flow capacity of the system over time resulting from siltation and clogging, rib...

  3. Effect of vadose zone on the steady-state leakage rates from landfill barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, B. Rowe, R.K. Unlue, K.

    2009-01-15

    Leakage rates are evaluated for a landfill barrier system having a compacted clay liner (CCL) underlain by a vadose zone of variable thickness. A numerical unsaturated flow model SEEP/W is used to simulate the moisture flow regime and steady-state leakage rates for the cases of unsaturated zones with different soil types and thicknesses. The results of the simulations demonstrate that harmonic mean hydraulic conductivity of coarse textured vadose zones is 3-4 orders of magnitude less than saturated hydraulic conductivity; whereas, the difference is only one order of magnitude for fine textured vadose zones. For both coarse and fine textured vadose zones, the effective hydraulic conductivity of the barrier system and the leakage rate to an underlying aquifer increases with increasing thickness of the vadose zone and ultimately reaches an asymptotic value for a coarse textured vadose zone thickness of about 10 m and a fine textured vadose zone thickness of about 5 m. Therefore, the fine and coarse textured vadose zones thicker than about 5 m and 10 m, respectively, act as an effective part of the barrier systems examined. Although the thickness of vadose zone affects the effective hydraulic conductivity of the overall barrier system, the results demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity of the CCL is the dominant factor controlling the steady-state leakage rates through barrier systems having single low permeability clay layers.

  4. Effect of vadose zone on the steady-state leakage rates from landfill barrier systems.

    PubMed

    Celik, B; Rowe, R K; Unlü, K

    2009-01-01

    Leakage rates are evaluated for a landfill barrier system having a compacted clay liner (CCL) underlain by a vadose zone of variable thickness. A numerical unsaturated flow model SEEP/W is used to simulate the moisture flow regime and steady-state leakage rates for the cases of unsaturated zones with different soil types and thicknesses. The results of the simulations demonstrate that harmonic mean hydraulic conductivity of coarse textured vadose zones is 3-4 orders of magnitude less than saturated hydraulic conductivity; whereas, the difference is only one order of magnitude for fine textured vadose zones. For both coarse and fine textured vadose zones, the effective hydraulic conductivity of the barrier system and the leakage rate to an underlying aquifer increases with increasing thickness of the vadose zone and ultimately reaches an asymptotic value for a coarse textured vadose zone thickness of about 10m and a fine textured vadose zone thickness of about 5m. Therefore, the fine and coarse textured vadose zones thicker than about 5m and 10m, respectively, act as an effective part of the barrier systems examined. Although the thickness of vadose zone affects the effective hydraulic conductivity of the overall barrier system, the results demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity of the CCL is the dominant factor controlling the steady-state leakage rates through barrier systems having single low permeability clay layers.

  5. Space Station Freedom delta pressure leakage rate comparison test data analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E. B.

    1992-01-01

    Results are provided of a series of tests performed to identify the relationship between gas leakage rates across a seal at various internal to external pressure ratios. The results complement and provide insight into the analysis technique used to obtain the results presented in MSFC SSF/DEV/EL91-008, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study with Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report.'

  6. Effects of saline-water flow rate and air speed on leakage current in RTV coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Hackam, R.

    1995-10-01

    Room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber is increasingly being used to coat porcelain and glass insulators in order to improve their electrical performance in the presence of pollution and moisture. A study of the dependence of leakage current, pulse current count and total charge flowing across the surface of RTV on the flow rate of the saline water and on the compressed air pressure used to create the salt-fog is reported. The fog was directed at the insulating rods either from one or two sides. The RTV was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane polymer, a filler of alumina trihydrate (ATH), a polymerization catalyst and fumed silica reinforcer, all dispersed in 1,1,1-trichloroethane solvent. The saline water flow rate was varied in the range 0.4 to 2.0 l/min. The compressed air pressure at the input of the fog nozzles was varied from 0.20 to 0.63 MPa. The air speed at the surface of the insulating rods was found to depend linearly on the air pressure measured at the inlet to the nozzles and varied in the range 3 to 14 km/hr. The leakage current increased with increasing flow rate and increasing air speed. This is attributed to the increased loss of hydrophobicity with a larger quantity of saline fog and a larger impact velocities of fog droplets interacting with the surface of the RTV coating.

  7. Methane leakage from evolving petroleum systems: Masses, rates and inferences for climate feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbesi, L. A.; di Primio, R.; Anka, Z.; Horsfield, B.; Wilkes, H.

    2014-02-01

    The immense mass of organic carbon contained in sedimentary systems, currently estimated at 1.56×1010 Tg (Des Marais et al., 1992), bears the potential of affecting global climate through the release of thermally or biologically generated methane to the atmosphere. Here we investigate the potential of naturally-occurring gas leakage, controlled by petroleum generation and degradation as a forcing mechanism for climate at geologic time scales. We addressed the potential methane contributions to the atmosphere during the evolution of petroleum systems in two different, petroliferous geological settings: the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) and the Central Graben area of the North Sea. Besides 3D numerical simulation, different types of mass balance and theoretical approaches were applied depending on the data available and the processes taking place in each basin. In the case of the WCSB, we estimate maximum thermogenic methane leakage rates in the order of 10-2-10-3 Tg/yr, and maximum biogenic methane generation rates of 10-2 Tg/yr. In the case of the Central Graben, maximum estimates for thermogenic methane leakage are in the order in 10-3 Tg/yr. Extrapolation of our results to a global scale suggests that, at least as a single process, thermal gas generation in hydrocarbon kitchen areas would not be able to influence climate, although it may contribute to a positive feedback. Conversely, only the sudden release of subsurface methane accumulations, formed over geologic timescales, can possibly allow for petroleum systems to exert an effect on climate.

  8. Leakage rates and thermal requirements for the diffusion bonding of microchannel arrays via internal convective heating

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumantra; Palo, Daniel R.; Paul, Brian

    2007-07-24

    Diffusion bonding cycle times can be a large cost factor in the production of metal microchannel devices. The challenge is to significantly minimize this cost by reducing the bonding cycle time through rapid and uniform heating and cooling within the bonding process. Heating rates in diffusion bonding processes are typically limited by the need to minimize thermal gradients during bonding. A novel method is described which takes advantage of the internal flow passages within microchannel devices for convective heat transfer during the bonding process. The internal convective heating (ICH) technique makes use of heated inert gas to provide the microchannel assembly with rapid and uniform heat input. This paper will demonstrate the ability to effectively diffusion bond microchannel laminae using the ICH method by investigating the leakage rates.

  9. Space Station Freedom seal leakage rate analysis and testing summary: Air leaks in ambient versus vacuum exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.; Markovitch, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report is intended to reveal the apparent relationship of air seal leakage rates between 2 atmospheres (atm) to 1 atm and 1 atm to vacuum conditions. Gas dynamics analysis is provided as well as data summarizing the MSFC test report, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study With Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report'.

  10. SU-E-T-628: Effect of Dose Rate and Leakage Correction for Dosimetric Leaf Gap Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, W; Chu, A; Chi, Y; Hu, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the dose rate response of Mapcheck and quantify/correct dose rate/leakage effect on IMRT QA. Evaluate the dose rate/leakage effect on dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) measurement. Methods: Varian Truebeam Linac with HD120 MLC was used for all measurement, it is capable to adjust dose rate from 600MU/min to 5MU/min. Fluke Advanced Therapy Doisemter and PTW 30013 Farmer chamber for chamber measurement; SunNuclear Mapcheck2 with 5cm total buildup for diode measurement. DLG was measured with both chamber and diode.Diode response was measured by varies dose rate, while fixed mapcheck setup and total MU. MLC Leakage was measured with both chamber and diode. Mapcheck measurement was saved as movie file (mcm file), which include measurement updated every 50mSec. The difference between intervals can be converted to dose and dose rate and leakage response correction can be applied to them. Results: DLG measurement results with chamber and diode were showed as follows, the DLG value is 0.36 vs. 0.24mm respectively. Diode dose rate response drops from 100% at 600MU/min to 95.5% at 5MU/min as follows. MLC Leakage measured with diode is 1.021%, which is 9% smaller than 1.112% from chamber measurement. By apply the dose rate and leakage correction, the residue error reduced 2/3. Conclusions: Diode has lower response at lower dose rate, as low as 4.5% for 5MU/min; diode has lower energy response for low energy too, 5% lower for Co-60 than 6MV. It partially explains the leakage difference of 9% between chamber and diode. Lower DLG with diode is because of the lower response at narrower gap, in Eclipse however DLG need to increase to makeup lower response, which is over correction for chamber though. Correction can reduce error by 2/3, the rest 1/3 can be corrected by scatter effect, which is under study.

  11. Numerical simulation of leakage rates of labyrinth seal in reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. N.; Yao, H.; Wang, S. J.; Meng, X. S.; Qiao, H. T.; Qiao, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of labyrinth seal structure on leakage behaviour in a reciprocating compressor was addressed in this paper. The effects of the main labyrinth seal parameters, such as tooth angle, sealing clearance, and cavity depth, were compared using FLUENT software and iterative calculation results. Simulations of the sealing process with the influence of internal structure size of labyrinth seal performance in different structures were conducted to explore the characteristics of fluid flow. By comparing the simulations of leakage of fluid- structure interaction and experience formula calculations, the results revealed the validity of the fluid-structure interaction analysis method. The CFD analysis method for fluid-structure coupling was adopted to verify the theory of labyrinth seals and for the design of a labyrinth structure.

  12. Transanal drainage tube reduces rate and severity of anastomotic leakage in patients with colorectal anastomosis: A case controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, A.; Czipin, S.; Mittermair, R.; Weiss, S.; Pratschke, J.; Kafka-Ritsch, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical usefulness of the placement of a transanal drainage tube to prevent anastomotic leakage in colorectal anastomoses. Material and methods This single-center retrospective trial included all patients treated with surgery for benign or malign colorectal disease between January 2009 and December 2012. The transanal drainage tube was immediately placed after colorectal anastomosis until day five and was routinely used since 2010. Patients treated with a transanal drainage tube were compared with the control group. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests for group comparison and a linear regression model for multivariate analysis. Results This study included 242 patients (46% female; median age 63 years; range 18–93); 34% of the patients underwent a laparoscopic procedure, and 57% of the patients received a placement of a transanal drainage tube. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 19 patients (7.9%). Univariate analysis showed a higher rate of anastomotic leakage in patients with an ASA score 4 (p = 0.02) and a lower rate in patients with transanal drainage placement (3.6% vs. 13.6%; p = 0.007). The grading of the complication of anastomotic leakage was reduced with transanal drainage (e.g., Dindo ≧ 3b: 20.0% vs. 92.9%; p = 0.006), and the hospital stay was shortened (17.6 ± 12.5 vs. 22.1 ± 17.6 days; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed that transanal drainage was the only significant factor (HR = −2.90; −0.168 to −0.032; p = 0.007) affecting anastomotic leakage. Conclusions Placement of a transanal drainage tube in patients with colorectal anastomoses is a safe and simple technique to perform and reduces anastomotic leakage, the severity of the complication and hospital stay. PMID:27158483

  13. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for changing feedwater check valve leakage rate testing methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, R.; Harrell, J.

    1996-12-01

    The current design and testing requirements for the feedwater check valves (FWCVs) at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station are established from original licensing requirements that necessitate extremely restrictive air testing with tight allowable leakage limits. As a direct result of these requirements, the original high endurance hard seats in the FWCVs were modified with elastomeric seals to provide a sealing surface capable of meeting the stringent air leakage limits. However, due to the relatively short functional life of the elastomeric seals compared to the hard seats, the overall reliability of the sealing function actually decreased. This degraded performance was exhibited by frequent seal failures and subsequent valve repairs. The original requirements were based on limited analysis and the belief that all of the high energy feedwater vaporized during the LOCA blowdown. These phenomena would have resulted in completely voided feedwater lines and thus a steam environment within the feedwater leak pathway. To challenge these criteria, a comprehensive design basis accident analysis was developed using the RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydraulic code. Realistic assumptions were used to more accurately model the post-accident fluid conditions within the feedwater system. The results of this analysis demonstrated that no leak path exists through the feedwater lines during the reactor blowdown phase and that sufficient subcooled water remains in various portions of the feedwater piping to form liquid water loop seals that effectively isolate this leak path. These results provided the bases for changing the leak testing requirements of the FWCVs from air to water. The analysis results also established more accurate allowable leakage limits, determined the real effective margins associated with the FWCV safety functions, and led to design changes that improved the overall functional performance of the valves.

  14. Measuring radon exhalation rate in two cycles avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Xiao, Detao

    2013-10-01

    This paper will present a simple method for measuring the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface in two cycles and also avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage. The method is based on a combination of the "accumulation chamber" technique and a radon monitor. The radon monitor performs the measurement of the radon concentration inside the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation rate can be obtained by simple calculation. For reducing the systematic error and the statistical uncertainty, too short of total measurement time is not appropriate, and the first cycle time should be about 70 % of the total measurement. The radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained through this method is in good agreement with the reference value. This simple method can be applied to develop and improve the instruments for measuring radon exhalation rate.

  15. Systematic Review of Anastomotic Leakage Rate According to an International Grading System Following Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guang-Yao; Yu, Min-Hao; Gao, Yun-He; Li, Zhao-Shen; Yu, En-Da; Zhong, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background A generally acceptable definition and a severity grading system for anastomotic leakages (ALs) following rectal resection were not available until 2010, when the International Study Group of Rectal Cancer (ISGRC) proposed a definition and a grading system for AL. Methods A search for published data was performed using the MEDLINE database (2000 to December 5, 2012) to perform a systematic review of the studies that described AL, grade AL according to the grading system, pool data, and determine the average rate of AL for each grade after anterior resection (AR) for rectal cancer. Results A total of 930 abstracts were retrieved; 40 articles on AR, 25 articles on low AR (LAR), and 5 articles on ultralow AR (ULAR) were included in the review and analysis. The pooled overall AL rate of AR was 8.58% (2,085/24,288); the rate of the asymptomatic leakage (Grade A) was 2.57%, that of AL that required active intervention without relaparotomy (Grade B) was 2.37%, and that of AL that required relaparotomy (Grade C) was 5.40%. The pooled rate of AL that required relaparotomy was higher in AR (5.40%) than in LAR (4.70%) and in ULAR (1.81%), which could be attributed to the higher rate of protective defunctioning stoma in LAR (40.72%) and ULAR (63.44%) compared with that in AR (30.11%). Conclusions The new grading system is simple that the ALs of each grade can be easily extracted from past publications, therefore likely to be accepted and applied in future studies. PMID:24086552

  16. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, S; Dhananjay, S; Anju, B; Lilly, G; Sai Ram, M

    2008-09-15

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor kappaB (NFkappaB) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NFkappaB inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NFkappaB in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NFkappaB. The lower levels of NFkappaB observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NFkappaB DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT.

  17. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: Molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, S.; Dhananjay, S.; Anju, B. Lilly, G.; Sai Ram, M.

    2008-09-15

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NF{kappa}B inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NF{kappa}B in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NF{kappa}B. The lower levels of NF{kappa}B observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NF{kappa}B DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT.

  18. Quantifying Molecular Hydrogen Emissions and an Industrial Leakage Rate for the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, M. C.; Schroeder, J.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The poorly understood atmospheric budget and distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) have invited further research since the discovery that emissions from a hydrogen-based economy could have negative impacts on the global climate system and stratospheric ozone. The burgeoning fuel cell electric vehicle industry in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) presents an opportunity to observe and constrain urban anthropogenic H2 emissions. This work presents the first H2 emissions estimate for the SoCAB and calculates an upper limit for the current rate of leakage from production and distribution infrastructure within the region. A top-down method utilized whole air samples collected during the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft from 23-25 June 2015 to estimate H2 emissions from combustion and non-combustion sources. H2:carbon monoxide (CO) and H2:carbon dioxide ratios from airborne observations were compared with experimentally established ratios from pure combustion source ratios and scaled with the well-constrained CO emissions inventory to yield H2 emissions of 24.9 ± 3.6 Gg a-1 (1σ) from combustion engines and 8.2 ± 4.7 Gg a-1 from non-combustion sources. Total daily production of H2 in the SoCAB was compared with the top-down results to estimate an upper limit leakage rate (5%) where all emissions not accounted for by incomplete combustion in engines were assumed to be emitted from H2 infrastructure. For bottom-up validation, the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory dispersion model was run iteratively with all known stationary sources in attempt to constrain emissions. While this investigation determined that H2 emissions from non-combustion sources in the SoCAB are likely significant, more in-depth analysis is required to better predict the atmospheric implications of a hydrogen economy.

  19. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  20. Quantifying canal leakage rates using a mass-balance approach and heat-based hydraulic conductivity estimates in selected irrigation canals, western Nebraska, 2007 through 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hobza, Christopher M.; Andersen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The water supply in areas of the North Platte River Basin in the Nebraska Panhandle has been designated as fully appropriated or overappropriated by the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources (NDNR). Enacted legislation (Legislative Bill 962) requires the North Platte Natural Resources District (NPNRD) and the NDNR to develop an Integrated Management Plan (IMP) to balance groundwater and surface-water supply and demand in the NPNRD. A clear understanding of the groundwater and surface-water systems is critical for the development of a successful IMP. The primary source of groundwater recharge in parts of the NPNRD is from irrigation canal leakage. Because canal leakage constitutes a large part of the hydrologic budget, spatially distributing canal leakage to the groundwater system is important to any management strategy. Surface geophysical data collected along selected reaches of irrigation canals has allowed for the spatial distribution of leakage on a relative basis; however, the actual magnitude of leakage remains poorly defined. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NPNRD, established streamflow-gaging stations at upstream and downstream ends from two selected canal reaches to allow a mass-balance approach to be used to calculate daily leakage rates. Water-level and sediment temperature data were collected and simulated at three temperature monitoring sites to allow the use of heat as a tracer to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of canal bed sediment. Canal-leakage rates were estimated by applying Darcy's Law to modeled vertical hydraulic conductivity and either the estimated or measured hydraulic gradient. This approach will improve the understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of canal leakage in varying geologic settings identified in capacitively coupled resistivity surveys. The high-leakage potential study reach of the Tri-State Canal had two streamflow-gaging stations and two temperature monitoring

  1. The effect of photodynamic action on leakage of ions through liposomal membranes that contain oxidatively modified lipids.

    PubMed

    Ytzhak, Shany; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Singlet oxygen, created in photosensitization, peroxidizes unsaturated fatty acids of the membrane's lipids. This generates alcoholic or aldehyde groups at double bonds' breakage points. In a previous study, we examined the leakage of a K(+) -induced cross-membrane electric potential of liposomes that undergo photosensitization. The question remains to what extent peroxidized lipids can compromise the stability of the membrane. In this study, we studied the effect of the oxidatively modified lipids PGPC and ALDOPC in the membrane on its stability, by monitoring the membrane electric potential with the potentiometric dye DiSC(2)(5). As the content of the modified lipids increases the membrane becomes less stable, and even at just 2% of the modified lipids the membrane's integrity is affected, in respect to the leakage of ions through it. When the liposomes that contain the modified lipids undergo photosensitization by hematoporphyrin, the lipid bilayer becomes even more unstable and passage of ions is accelerated. We conclude that the existence of lipids with a shortened fatty acid that is terminated by a carboxylic acid or an aldehyde and more so when photosensitized damage occurs to unsaturated fatty acids in lecithin, add up to a critical alteration of the membrane, which becomes leaky to ions.

  2. Mechanism of reverse rate-dependent action of cardioactive agents.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Bárándi, L; Harmati, G; Virág, L; Szentandrássy, N; Márton, I; Zaza, A; Varró, A; Nánási, P P

    2011-01-01

    Class 3 antiarrhythmic agents exhibit reverse rate-dependent lengthening of the action potential duration (APD), i.e. changes in APD are greater at longer than at shorter cycle lengths. In spite of the several theories developed to explain this reverse rate-dependency, its mechanism has been clarified only recently. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for reverse rate-dependency in mammalian ventricular myocardium. Action potentials were recorded using conventional sharp microelectrodes from human, canine, rabbit, guinea pig, and rat ventricular myocardium in a rate-dependent manner. Rate-dependent drug-effects of various origin were studied using agents known to lengthen or shorten action potentials allowing thus to determine the drug-induced changes in APD as a function of the cycle length. Both drug-induced lengthening and shortening of action potentials displayed reverse rate-dependency in human, canine, and guinea pig preparations, but not in rabbit and rat myocardium. Similar results were obtained when repolarization was modified by injection of inward or outward current pulses in isolated canine cardiomyocytes. In contrast to reverse rate-dependence, drug-induced changes in APD well correlated with baseline APD values (i.e. that measured before the superfusion of drug or injection of current) in all of the preparations studied. Since the net membrane current (I(net)), determined from the action potential waveform at the middle of the plateau, was inversely proportional to APD, and consequently to cycle length, it is concluded that that reverse rate-dependency may simply reflect the inverse relationship linking I(net) to APD. In summary, reverse rate-dependency is an intrinsic property of drug action in the hearts of species showing positive APD - cycle length relationship, including humans. This implies that development of a pure K(+) channel blocking agent without reverse rate-dependent effects is not likely to be

  3. SENSMG: First-Order Sensitivities of Neutron Reaction Rates, Reaction-Rate Ratios, Leakage, keff, and α Using PARTISN

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-11-21

    SENSMG is a tool for computing first-order sensitivities of neutron reaction rates, reaction-rate ratios, leakage, keff, and α using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. SENSMG computes sensitivities to all of the transport cross sections and data (total, fission, nu, chi, and all scattering moments), two edit cross sections (absorption and capture), and the density for every isotope and energy group. It also computes sensitivities to the mass density for every material and derivatives with respect to all interface locations. The tool can be used for one-dimensional spherical (r) and two-dimensional cylindrical (r-z) geometries. The tool can be used for fixed-source and eigenvalue problems. The tool implements Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) as discussed by Williams and Stacey. Section II of this report describes the theory behind adjoint-based sensitivities, gives the equations that SENSMG solves, and defines the sensitivities that are output. Section III describes the user interface, including the input file and command line options. Section IV describes the output. Section V gives some notes about the coding that may be of interest. Section VI discusses verification, which is ongoing. Section VII lists needs and ideas for future work. Appendix A lists all of the input files whose results are presented in Sec. VI.

  4. The action of nitrophenols on the metabolic rate of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Margaret A. M.

    1958-01-01

    The effect of the mono- and di-nitrophenols and certain related compounds has been determined on the rate of oxygen consumption, the rate of carbon dioxide output and the rectal temperature of the Wistar albino rat. Of the compounds examined, only 2:4-dinitrophenol and its derivative, 3:5-dinitro-o-cresol, stimulated metabolic rate. 2-Nitrophenol and 2:3-, 2:6-, and 3:5-dinitrophenol produced no change in metabolic rate; 3-nitrophenol and 2:5-dinitrophenol had no action on carbon dioxide production although they caused a decrease in oxygen consumption. 4-Nitrophenol and 3:4-dinitrophenol increased only the rate of carbon dioxide output; 2-amino-4-nitrophenol increased the rate of carbon dioxide output and decreased the rate of oxygen consumption; 4-amino-2-nitrophenol caused depression of metabolic rate. It was confirmed that neither rectal temperature nor carbon dioxide output could replace rate of oxygen consumption as a reliable index of metabolic stimulant action. An apparatus is described which facilitates measurement of the oxygen consumption of small mammals. PMID:13523130

  5. Augmented PMMA distribution: improvement of mechanical property and reduction of leakage rate of a fenestrated pedicle screw with diameter-tapered perforations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quan-Chang; Wu, Jian-Wei; Peng, Fei; Zang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xiong; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zi-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the optimum injection volume of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) to augment a novel fenestrated pedicle screw (FPS) with diameter-tapered perforations in the osteoporotic vertebral body, and how the distribution characteristics of PMMA affect the biomechanical performance of this screw. METHODS Two types of FPSs were designed (FPS-A, composed of 6 perforations with an equal diameter of 1.2 mm; and FPS-B, composed of 6 perforations each with a tapered diameter of 1.5 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.9 mm from tip to head. Each of 28 human cadaveric osteoporotic vertebrae were randomly assigned to 1 of 7 groups: FPS-A1.0: FPS-A+1.0 ml PMMA; FPS-A1.5: FPS-A+1.5 ml PMMA; FPS-A2.0: FPS-A+2.0 ml PMMA; FPS-B1.0: FPS-B+1.0 ml PMMA; FPS-B1.5: FPS-B+1.5 ml PMMA; FPS-B2.0: FPS-B+2.0 ml PMMA; and conventional pedicle screws (CPSs) without PMMA. After the augmentation, 3D CT was performed to assess the cement distribution characteristics and the cement leakage rate. Axial pullout tests were performed to compare the maximum pullout force thereafter. RESULTS The CT construction images showed that PMMA bone cement formed a conical mass around FPS-A and a cylindrical mass around FPS-B. When the injection volume was increased from 1.0 ml to 2.0 ml, the distribution region of the PMMA cement was enlarged, the PMMA was distributed more posteriorly, and the risk of leakage was increased. When the injection volume reached 2.0 ml, the risk of cement leakage was lower for screws having diameter-tapered perforations. The pullout strengths of the augmented FPS-A groups and FPS-B groups were higher than that of the CPS group (p < 0.0001). All FPS-B groups had a higher pullout strength than the FPS-A groups. CONCLUSIONS The diameter of the perforations affects the distribution of PMMA cement. The diameter-tapered design enabled PMMA to form larger bone-PMMA interfaces and achieve a relatively higher pullout strength, although statistical significance was not reached. Study

  6. Response Action Plan for the Basin F Interim Response Action Waste Pile.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    requirements of the Resource Conservation I and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and the i Colorado Hazardous...submittal process. Action Leakage Rate (ALR) S Background EPA has historically used the term de minimus In the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments leakage

  7. Rates of Student Disciplinary Action in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has been conducted on student misconduct in universities, quantitative data on disciplinary action undertaken by institutions against student transgressions are largely absent from the literature. This paper provides baseline quantitative data on disciplinary action against students in the universities. It is…

  8. 49 CFR 385.17 - Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES General § 385.17 Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions... proposed rating has become final, it shall remain in effect during the period of any administrative review....

  9. 49 CFR 385.17 - Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES General § 385.17 Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions... proposed rating has become final, it shall remain in effect during the period of any administrative review....

  10. Robust characterization of leakage errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallman, Joel J.; Barnhill, Marie; Emerson, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Leakage errors arise when the quantum state leaks out of some subspace of interest, for example, the two-level subspace of a multi-level system defining a computational ‘qubit’, the logical code space of a quantum error-correcting code, or a decoherence-free subspace. Leakage errors pose a distinct challenge to quantum control relative to the more well-studied decoherence errors and can be a limiting factor to achieving fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here we present a scalable and robust randomized benchmarking protocol for quickly estimating the leakage rate due to an arbitrary Markovian noise process on a larger system. We illustrate the reliability of the protocol through numerical simulations.

  11. 40 CFR 91.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the...

  12. 40 CFR 91.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the...

  13. 40 CFR 91.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the...

  14. 40 CFR 91.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the...

  15. 40 CFR 91.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the...

  16. 49 CFR 385.17 - Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES General § 385.17 Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions..., it shall remain in effect during the period of any administrative review. (k) An upgraded safety rating based upon corrective action under this section will have no effect on an otherwise...

  17. 49 CFR 385.17 - Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES General § 385.17 Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions..., it shall remain in effect during the period of any administrative review. (k) An upgraded safety rating based upon corrective action under this section will have no effect on an otherwise...

  18. Reserves in Context: Planning for Leakage from Protected Areas

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Anna R.; Bode, Michael; Venter, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    When protected areas reduce threats within their boundaries, they often displace a portion of these threats into adjacent areas through a process known as ‘leakage’, undermining conservation objectives. Using theoretical models and a case study of terrestrial mammals in Indonesia, we develop the first theoretical explanation of how leakage impacts conservation actions, and highlight conservation strategies that mitigate these impacts. Although leakage is a socio-economic process, we demonstrate that its negative impacts are also affected by the distribution of species, with leakage having larger impacts in landscapes with homogeneous distribution of species richness. Moreover, leakage has a greater negative effect when conservation strategies are implemented opportunistically, even creating the potential for perversely negative consequences from protected area establishment. Leakage thereby increases the relative benefits of systematic conservation planning over opportunism, especially in areas with high leakage and heterogeneously distributed species. Although leakage has the potential to undermine conservation actions, conservation planning can minimize this risk. PMID:26053163

  19. Leakage diffusion of underwater crude oil in wind fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqiong; Liu, Qi; Li, Yunyun; Lu, Rui; Wu, Shijuan; Li, Xin; Hou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of underwater crude oil pipes causes severe pollution to soil and water, and results in great economic loss. To predict the diffusion area of spilled oil before it reaches the water's surface and to reduce the time required for emergency response, numerical simulations were conducted on underwater spilled oil diffusion of bare crude oil pipes using FLUENT software. The influences of water-surface wind speed, leakage hole diameter, water velocity, and initial leakage velocity on oil diffusion were analyzed. The results revealed the following: (1) with wind blowing on the surface of the water, the vertical displacement of spilled oil jet-flow was affected by the combined action of water flow and wind, making it difficult for a high-speed jet-flow to form. A horizontal oil flow mostly moved in the direction of the bottom water, and frontier oil droplets dispersed quickly; (2) during the diffusion of spilled oil in water, the maximum horizontal displacement mostly increased linearly, while the maximum vertical displacement initially increased quickly and then slowed; (3) the greater the initial velocity and leakage hole diameter, the higher the oil jet-flow and the wider the diffusion area; the higher the water flow rate and water-surface wind speed, the smaller the vertical displacement of spilled oil. The existence of water-surface wind had no obvious influence on the horizontal displacement of underwater spilled oil.

  20. 49 CFR 385.17 - Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES General § 385.17 Change to safety rating based upon corrective actions..., it shall remain in effect during the period of any administrative review. [65 FR 50935, Aug. 22,...

  1. Shroud leakage flow discouragers

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, Jeremy Clyde; Bunker, Ronald Scott

    2002-01-01

    A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  2. Action Recognition Using Rate-Invariant Analysis of Skeletal Shape Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, Boulbaba; Su, Jingyong; Srivastava, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of classifying actions of human subjects using depth movies generated by Kinect or other depth sensors. Representing human body as dynamical skeletons, we study the evolution of their (skeletons’) shapes as trajectories on Kendall’s shape manifold. The action data is typically corrupted by large variability in execution rates within and across subjects and, thus, causing major problems in statistical analyses. To address that issue, we adopt a recently-developed framework of Su et al. [1], [2] to this problem domain. Here, the variable execution rates correspond to re-parameterizations of trajectories, and one uses a parameterization-invariant metric for aligning, comparing, averaging, and modeling trajectories. This is based on a combination of transported square-root vector fields (TSRVFs) of trajectories and the standard Euclidean norm, that allows computational efficiency. We develop a comprehensive suite of computational tools for this application domain: smoothing and denoising skeleton trajectories using median filtering, up- and down-sampling actions in time domain, simultaneous temporal-registration of multiple actions, and extracting invertible Euclidean representations of actions. Due to invertibility these Euclidean representations allow both discriminative and generative models for statistical analysis. For instance, they can be used in a SVM-based classification of original actions, as demonstrated here using MSR Action-3D, MSR Daily Activity and 3D Action Pairs datasets. Using only the skeletal information, we achieve state-of-the-art classification results on these datasets.

  3. Measuring and Suppressing Quantum State Leakage in a Superconducting Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zijun; Kelly, Julian; Quintana, Chris; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Lucero, E.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Korotkov, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Leakage errors occur when a quantum system leaves the two-level qubit subspace. Reducing these errors is critically important for quantum error correction to be viable. To quantify leakage errors, we use randomized benchmarking in conjunction with measurement of the leakage population. We characterize single qubit gates in a superconducting qubit, and by refining our use of derivative reduction by adiabatic gate pulse shaping along with detuning of the pulses, we obtain gate errors consistently below 1 0-3 and leakage rates at the 1 0-5 level. With the control optimized, we find that a significant portion of the remaining leakage is due to incoherent heating of the qubit.

  4. Leakage Suppression in the Toric Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchara, Martin; Cross, Andrew; Gambetta, Jay

    2015-03-01

    Quantum codes excel at correcting local noise but fail to correct leakage faults that excite qubits to states outside the computational space. Aliferis and Terhal have shown that an accuracy threshold exists for leakage faults using gadgets called leakage reduction units (LRUs). However, these gadgets reduce the threshold and increase experimental complexity, and the costs have not been thoroughly understood. We explore a variety of techniques for leakage resilience in topological codes. Our contributions are threefold. First, we develop a leakage model that differs in critical details from earlier models. Second, we use Monte-Carlo simulations to survey several syndrome extraction circuits. Third, given the capability to perform 3-outcome measurements, we present a dramatically improved syndrome processing algorithm. Our simulations show that simple circuits with one extra CNOT per qubit reduce the accuracy threshold by less than a factor of 4 when leakage and depolarizing noise rates are comparable. This becomes a factor of 2 when the decoder uses 3-outcome measurements. Finally, when the physical error rate is less than 2 ×10-4 , placing LRUs after every gate may achieve the lowest logical error rate. We expect that the ideas may generalize to other topological codes.

  5. Mechanism of action of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil on Staphylococcus aureus determined by time-kill, lysis, leakage, and salt tolerance assays and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carson, Christine F; Mee, Brian J; Riley, Thomas V

    2002-06-01

    The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The mechanisms of action of tea tree oil and three of its components, 1,8-cineole, terpinen-4-ol, and alpha-terpineol, against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 were investigated. Treatment with these agents at their MICs and two times their MICs, particularly treatment with terpinen-4-ol and alpha-terpineol, reduced the viability of S. aureus. None of the agents caused lysis, as determined by measurement of the optical density at 620 nm, although cells became disproportionately sensitive to subsequent autolysis. Loss of 260-nm-absorbing material occurred after treatment with concentrations equivalent to the MIC, particularly after treatment with 1,8-cineole and alpha-terpineol. S. aureus organisms treated with tea tree oil or its components at the MIC or two times the MIC showed a significant loss of tolerance to NaCl. When the agents were tested at one-half the MIC, only 1,8-cineole significantly reduced the tolerance of S. aureus to NaCl. Electron microscopy of terpinen-4-ol-treated cells showed the formation of mesosomes and the loss of cytoplasmic contents. The predisposition to lysis, the loss of 260-nm-absorbing material, the loss of tolerance to NaCl, and the altered morphology seen by electron microscopy all suggest that tea tree oil and its components compromise the cytoplasmic membrane.

  6. Duct leakage measurement and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swim, W.B.; Griggs, E.I.

    1995-08-01

    Leakage measurements were made on 6-in. (150-mm) and 10-in. (250-mm) round and 14-in. by 6-in. (350-mm by 150-mm) and 22-in. by 8-in. (560-mm by 200-mm) rectangular ducts for both positive and negative internal pressures. The data were found to fit a power law model, with the leakage rate (Q) increasing with a power, n, of static pressure difference ({Delta}p), i.e., Q {proportional_to} ({Delta}p){sup n}. A convenient leakage prediction equation, Q = C ({Delta}p*){sup n}, uses a normalized pressure difference, {Delta}p* = {Delta}p/{Delta}p{sub ref}, with {Delta}p in in. wg (Pa) and a reference pressure difference, {Delta}p{sub ref}, of 1 in. wg (250 Pa). C{sub D}, the recommended design values of C for a repetitive element of a duct system--one duct section and one joint, ranged from 0.01 cfm (0.005 L/s) for a Vanstone flanged joint to 18.5 cfm (8.7 L/s) for an unsealed 22-in. by 8-in (560-mm by 200-mm) duct with a slip-and-drive joint. Most test ducts had C{sub D} values of 6 to 8 cfm (3 to 4 L/s) and had values of n close to 0.58. Joints were found to account for most of the leakage, and thus most of the value of C{sub D}, in unsealed ducts, with seams contributing only 10% to 38% of the total.

  7. Solute Leakage Resulting from Leaf Desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, A. Carl; Musgrave, Mary E.; Williams, Kathleen M.

    1981-01-01

    The leakage of solutes from foliar tissue is utilized as a dynamic measure of apparent changes in membrane integrity in response to desiccation. It is found that rehydrating leaf discs of cowpea (Vigna sinensis [L.] Endl.) show increasing leakiness in proportion to the extent of prior desiccation, whereas Selaginella lepidophylla Spring., a resurrection plant, does not. The elevated leakage rate of cowpea after desiccation recovers with time, and the passage of time in the stressed condition results in reduced subsequent leakiness. These characteristics are interpreted as suggesting that the leakage of solute reflects the condition of cellular membranes, and that desiccation stress leads to lesions in the membranes. The kinetics of solute leakage is suggested as a simple means of following changes in membrane lesions and associated features of membrane repair and hardening. PMID:16662082

  8. A rabbit ventricular action potential model replicating cardiac dynamics at rapid heart rates.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Aman; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Sato, Daisuke; Baher, Ali; Olcese, Riccardo; Xie, Lai-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jim; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Restrepo, Juan G; Karma, Alain; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2008-01-15

    Mathematical modeling of the cardiac action potential has proven to be a powerful tool for illuminating various aspects of cardiac function, including cardiac arrhythmias. However, no currently available detailed action potential model accurately reproduces the dynamics of the cardiac action potential and intracellular calcium (Ca(i)) cycling at rapid heart rates relevant to ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. The aim of this study was to develop such a model. Using an existing rabbit ventricular action potential model, we modified the L-type calcium (Ca) current (I(Ca,L)) and Ca(i) cycling formulations based on new experimental patch-clamp data obtained in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes, using the perforated patch configuration at 35-37 degrees C. Incorporating a minimal seven-state Markovian model of I(Ca,L) that reproduced Ca- and voltage-dependent kinetics in combination with our previously published dynamic Ca(i) cycling model, the new model replicates experimentally observed action potential duration and Ca(i) transient alternans at rapid heart rates, and accurately reproduces experimental action potential duration restitution curves obtained by either dynamic or S1S2 pacing.

  9. A Rabbit Ventricular Action Potential Model Replicating Cardiac Dynamics at Rapid Heart Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aman; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Sato, Daisuke; Baher, Ali; Olcese, Riccardo; Xie, Lai-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jim; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N.

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the cardiac action potential has proven to be a powerful tool for illuminating various aspects of cardiac function, including cardiac arrhythmias. However, no currently available detailed action potential model accurately reproduces the dynamics of the cardiac action potential and intracellular calcium (Cai) cycling at rapid heart rates relevant to ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. The aim of this study was to develop such a model. Using an existing rabbit ventricular action potential model, we modified the L-type calcium (Ca) current (ICa,L) and Cai cycling formulations based on new experimental patch-clamp data obtained in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes, using the perforated patch configuration at 35–37°C. Incorporating a minimal seven-state Markovian model of ICa,L that reproduced Ca- and voltage-dependent kinetics in combination with our previously published dynamic Cai cycling model, the new model replicates experimentally observed action potential duration and Cai transient alternans at rapid heart rates, and accurately reproduces experimental action potential duration restitution curves obtained by either dynamic or S1S2 pacing. PMID:18160660

  10. Improving Indigenous Completion Rates in Mainstream TAFE: An Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balatti, Jo; Gargano, Lyn; Goldman, Martha; Wood, Gary; Woodlock, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Indigenous engagement with vocational education and training (VET) has improved significantly, but successful Indigenous completion rates are lower nationally when compared to the overall population. This report, based on an action research project, examines intra-institutional factors at four Queensland TAFE (technical and further education)…

  11. User-action-driven view and rate scalable multiview video coding.

    PubMed

    Chakareski, Jacob; Velisavljevic, Vladan; Stankovic, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    We derive an optimization framework for joint view and rate scalable coding of multi-view video content represented in the texture plus depth format. The optimization enables the sender to select the subset of coded views and their encoding rates such that the aggregate distortion over a continuum of synthesized views is minimized. We construct the view and rate embedded bitstream such that it delivers optimal performance simultaneously over a discrete set of transmission rates. In conjunction, we develop a user interaction model that characterizes the view selection actions of the client as a Markov chain over a discrete state-space. We exploit the model within the context of our optimization to compute user-action-driven coding strategies that aim at enhancing the client's performance in terms of latency and video quality. Our optimization outperforms the state-of-the-art H.264 SVC codec as well as a multi-view wavelet-based coder equipped with a uniform rate allocation strategy, across all scenarios studied in our experiments. Equally important, we can achieve an arbitrarily fine granularity of encoding bit rates, while providing a novel functionality of view embedded encoding, unlike the other encoding methods that we examined. Finally, we observe that the interactivity-aware coding delivers superior performance over conventional allocation techniques that do not anticipate the client's view selection actions in their operation.

  12. 40 CFR 90.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.324 Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being...

  13. 40 CFR 90.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.324 Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being...

  14. 40 CFR 90.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.324 Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being...

  15. 40 CFR 90.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.324 Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being...

  16. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  17. 40 CFR 90.324 - Analyzer leakage check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.324 Analyzer leakage check. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Check any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being...

  18. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, E.

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  19. P. falciparum in vitro killing rates allow to discriminate between different antimalarial mode-of-action.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Laura M; Crespo, Benigno; De-Cózar, Cristina; Ding, Xavier C; Llergo, Jose L; Burrows, Jeremy N; García-Bustos, Jose F; Gamo, Francisco-Javier

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is still the cornerstone for malaria control. Developing drugs against Plasmodium parasites and monitoring their efficacy requires methods to accurately determine the parasite killing rate in response to treatment. Commonly used techniques essentially measure metabolic activity as a proxy for parasite viability. However, these approaches are susceptible to artefacts, as viability and metabolism are two parameters that are coupled during the parasite life cycle but can be differentially affected in response to drug actions. Moreover, traditional techniques do not allow to measure the speed-of-action of compounds on parasite viability, which is an essential efficacy determinant. We present here a comprehensive methodology to measure in vitro the direct effect of antimalarial compounds over the parasite viability, which is based on limiting serial dilution of treated parasites and re-growth monitoring. This methodology allows to precisely determine the killing rate of antimalarial compounds, which can be quantified by the parasite reduction ratio and parasite clearance time, which are key mode-of-action parameters. Importantly, we demonstrate that this technique readily permits to determine compound killing activities that might be otherwise missed by traditional, metabolism-based techniques. The analysis of a large set of antimalarial drugs reveals that this viability-based assay allows to discriminate compounds based on their antimalarial mode-of-action. This approach has been adapted to perform medium throughput screening, facilitating the identification of fast-acting antimalarial compounds, which are crucially needed for the control and possibly the eradication of malaria.

  20. Sustainable management of leakage from wastewater pipelines.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, D; Burn, S; Tjandraatmadja, G; Moglia, M; Davis, P; Wolf, L; Held, I; Vollertsen, J; Williams, W; Hafskjold, L

    2005-01-01

    Wastewater pipeline leakage is an emerging concern in Europe, especially with regards to the potential effect of leaking effluent on groundwater contamination and the effects infiltration has on the management of sewer reticulation systems. This paper describes efforts by Australia, in association with several European partners, towards the development of decision support tools to prioritize proactive rehabilitation of wastewater pipe networks to account for leakage. In the fundamental models for the decision support system, leakage is viewed as a function of pipeline system deterioration. The models rely on soil type identification across the service area to determine the aggressiveness of the pipe environment and for division of the area into zones based on pipe properties and operational conditions. By understanding the interaction between pipe materials, operating conditions, and the pipe environment in the mechanisms leading to pipe deterioration, the models allow the prediction of leakage rates in different zones across a network. The decision support system utilizes these models to predict the condition of pipes in individual zones, and to optimize the utilization of rehabilitation resources by targeting the areas with the highest leakage rates.

  1. A review of leakage flow in centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Chan, Weng-Kong; Wong, Yew-Wah

    2006-05-01

    This article presents a new approach in determining the functional relationship between the leakage flow in a centrifugal blood pump and various parameters that affect it. While high leakage flow in a blood pump is essential for good washout and can help prevent thrombus formation, excessive leakage flow will result in higher fluid shear stress that may lead to hemolysis. Dimensional analysis is employed to provide a functional relationship between leakage flow rate and other important parameters governing the operation of a centrifugal blood pump. Results showed that pump performance with a smaller gap clearance is clearly superior compared to those of two other similar pumps with larger gap clearances. It was also observed that the nondimensional leakage flow rate varies almost linearly with dimensionless pump head. It also decreases with increasing volume flow rate. A smaller gap clearance will also increase the flow resistance and hence, decrease the nondimensional leakage flow rate. Increasing surface roughness, length of the gap clearance passage, or loss coefficient of the gap geometry will increase losses and hence, decrease the leakage flow rate. It is also interesting to note that for a given pump and gap clearance geometry, the nondimensional leakage flow rate is almost independent of the Reynolds number when specific speed is constant.

  2. Analysis of U.S. residential air leakage database

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2003-07-01

    The air leakage of a building envelope can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. More than 70,000 air leakage measurements have been compiled into a database. In addition to air leakage, the database includes other important characteristics of the dwellings tested, such as floor area, year built, and location. There are also data for some houses on the presence of heating ducts, and floor/basement construction type. The purpose of this work is to identify house characteristics that can be used to predict air leakage. We found that the distribution of leakage normalized with floor area of the house is roughly lognormal. Year built and floor area are the two most significant factors to consider when predicting air leakage: older and smaller houses tend to have higher normalized leakage areas compared to newer and larger ones. Results from multiple linear regression of normalized leakage with respect to these two factors are presented for three types of houses: low-income, energy-efficient, and conventional. We demonstrate a method of using the regression model in conjunction with housing characteristics published by the US Census Bureau to derive a distribution that describes the air leakage of the single-family detached housing stock. Comparison of our estimates with published datasets of air exchange rates suggests that the regression model generates accurate estimates of air leakage distribution.

  3. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Leakage Potential and Policy Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielicki, J. M.; Peters, C. A.; Fitts, J. P.; Wilson, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    The geologic reservoirs that could be used for long-term sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) may have natural or manmade pathways that allow injected CO2, or the brine it displaces, to leak into overlying formations. Using a basin-scale leakage estimation model, we investigated the geophysical parameters that govern this leakage, and the resulting accumulations of leaked fluids in overlying formations. The results are discussed in the context of two polices aimed at governing long-term sequestration and protecting groundwater: the U.S. DOE guideline for storage permanence and the U.S. EPA UIC Program Class VI Rule. For a case study of CO2 injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone in the Michigan sedimentary basin, we showed that (1) the U.S. DOE guideline would allow for more leakage from larger injection projects than for smaller ones; (2) leakage amounts are determined mostly by well leakage permeability rather than by variation in formation permeabilities; (3) numerous leaking wells with anomalously high leakage permeabilities are necessary in order to achieve substantial leakage rates; (4) leakage can reach potable groundwater but intervening stratigraphic traps reduce the amount to be multiple orders of magnitude less than the leakage out of the reservoir, and (5) this leakage can reduce the Area of Review that is defined by the U.S. EPA as the area within which leakage can threaten groundwater. In summary, leakage that exceeds the U.S. DOE storage permanence goal would occur only under extreme conditions, the amount that reaches shallow potable groundwater may be inconsequential from a pollution standpoint, and leakage may be beneficial. Future federal policies should be harmonized to achieve the dual goals of protecting groundwater while allowing for adaptive management that incorporates uncertainties and imperfections inherent in geologic reservoirs.

  4. Epinephrine plasma metabolic clearance rates and physiologic thresholds for metabolic and hemodynamic actions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Clutter, W E; Bier, D M; Shah, S D; Cryer, P E

    1980-01-01

    To determine the plasma epinephrine thresholds for its metabolic and hemodynamic actions and plasma epinephrine metabolic clearance rates, 60-min intravenous epinephrine infusions at nominal rates of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 microgram/min were performed in each of six normal human subjects. These 30 infusions resulted in steady-state plasma epinephrine concentrations ranging from 24 to 1,020 pg/ml. Plasma epinephrine thresholds were 50-100 pg/ml for increments in heart rate, 75-125 pg/ml for increments in blood glycerol and systolic blood pressure, 150-200 pg/ml for increments in plasma glucose (the resultant of increments in glucose production and decrements in glucose clearance), blood lactate, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and diastolic blood pressure, and greater than 400 pg/ml for early decrements in plasma insulin. Changes in blood alanine, plasma glucagon, plasma growth hormone, and plasma cortisol were not detected. At steady-state plasma epinephrine concentrations of 24-74 pg/ml, values overlapping the basal normal range, the mean (+/-SE) plasma metabolic clearance rate of epinephrine was 52 +/- 4 ml x min-1 x kg-1; this value rose to 89 +/- 6 ml x min-1 x kg-1 (P less than 0.01) at steady-state epinephrine concentrations of 90-1,020 pg/ml. We conclude that in human subjects: (a) the plasma epinephrine thresholds for its hemodynamic and metabolic actions lie within the physiologic range, (b) epinephrine and norepinephrine accelerate their own metabolic clearance, and (c) epinephrine is 10 times more potent than norepinephrine. PMID:6995479

  5. Endoscopic Treatment of Stump Leakage Related to the Ileal Conduit

    PubMed Central

    Odemis, Bulent; Oztas, Erkin; Akpinar, Muhammet Yener; Olcucuoglu, Erkan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Ileal conduit with leakage from either the anastomotic site or the stump is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The standard treatment of stump leakage is surgery. Case Presentation: A 60-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital with complaint of hematuria and bladder carcinoma was diagnosed. After performing radical cystectomy and ileal conduit, he developed fever with abdominal pain within the first week of surgery. Stump leakage was diagnosed by endoscopic examination performed through a gastroscope. After two over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) were applied to the stump, vinyl mesh was inserted into the space between the OTSCs. Later, cyanoacrylat and lipiodol were repelled on the OTSCs and vinyl mesh. Subsequently, stump leakage was resolved. Conclusion: This is the first case of stump leakage related to ileal conduit that has been treated endoscopically, according to the current literature. PMID:27579432

  6. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  7. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  8. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Faakye, Omari; Griffiths, Dianne

    2015-05-08

    “The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deter program participants, and dissuade them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.” This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group for several California interests emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing—the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities—could easily be six times that, and that’s only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. This research seeks to provide an algorithm for predicting the guarded blower door test result based upon a single, total blower door test.

  9. Population growth rate responses of Ceriodaphnia dubia to ternary mixtures of specific acting chemicals: pharmacological versus ecotoxicological modes of action.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Fernández-San Juan, María; Feo, Maria Luisa; Eljarrrat, Ethel; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Barceló, Damià; Baird, Donald J

    2012-09-04

    When considering joint toxic apical effects at higher levels of biological organization, such as the growth of populations, the so-called pharmacological mode of action that relies on toxicological mechanistic effects on molecular target sites may not be relevant. Such effects on population growth rate will depend on the extent to which juvenile and adult survival rates and production rates (juvenile developmental rates and reproduction) are affected by toxic exposure and also by the sensitivity of population growth rates to life-history changes. In such cases, the ecotoxicological mode of action, defined as the crucial life-history trait processes and/or xenobiotic-life-history trait interactions underlying a toxicological effect on population growth rate, should be considered. Life-table response experiments with the crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia exposed to single and ternary mixtures of nine compounds were conducted to test the hypothesis that joint effects on population growth rates could be predicted from the mixture constituent ecotoxicological mode of action. Joint effects of mixtures containing pharmacologically dissimilar compounds (cadmium, λ-cyhalothrin, and chlorpyrifos) that differentially affected life-history traits contributing to population growth rates were accurately predicted by the independent-action concept. Conversely, the concentration-addition concept accurately predicted joint effects of two different mixtures: one containing pharmacologically similar acting pyrethroids that also affected similarly life-history traits, the other one that included pharmacologically dissimilar compounds (3,4-dichloroaniline, sodium bromide, and fenoxycarb) acting mainly on reproduction rates. These results indicate that when assessing combined effects on population growth rate responses, selection of mixture toxicity conceptual models based on the ecotoxicological mode of action of mixture constituents provided more accurate predictions than those based on

  10. Orthopedic board certification and physician performance: an analysis of medical malpractice, hospital disciplinary action, and state medical board disciplinary action rates.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Mininder S; Dichtel, Laura; Kasser, James R; Gebhardt, Mark C; Katz, Jeffery N

    2008-02-01

    Specialty board certification status has become the de facto standard of competency by which the profession and the public recognize physician specialists. However, the relationship between orthopedic board certification and physician performance has not been established. Rates of medical malpractice claims, hospital disciplinary actions, and state medical board disciplinary actions were compared between 1309 board-certified (BC) and 154 non-board-certified (NBC) orthopedic surgeons in 3 states. There was no significant difference between BC and NBC surgeons in medical malpractice claim proportions (BC, 19.1% NBC, 16.9% P = .586) or in hospital disciplinary action proportions (BC, 0.9% NBC, 0.8% P = 1.000). There was a significantly higher proportion of state medical board disciplinary action for NBC surgeons (BC, 7.6% NBC, 13.0% P = .028). An association between board certification status and physician performance is necessary to validate its status as the de facto standard of competency. In this study, BC surgeons had lower rates of state medical board disciplinary action.

  11. Ethanol-induced leakage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: kinetics and relationship to yeast ethanol tolerance and alcohol fermentation productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Salgueiro, S.P.; Sa-Correia, I.; Novais, J.M.

    1988-04-01

    Ethanol stimulated the leakage of amino acids and 260-nm-light-absorbing compounds from cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The efflux followed first-order kinetics over an initial period. In the presence of lethal concentrations of ethanol, the efflux rates at 30 and 36/sup 0/C were an exponential function of ethanol concentration. At 36/sup 0/C, as compared with the corresponding values at 30/sup 0/C, the efflux rates were higher and the minimal concentration of ethanol was lower. The exponential constants for the enhancement of the rate of leakage had similar values at 30 or 36/sup 0/C and were of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding exponential constants for ethanol-induced death. Under isothermic conditions (30/sup 0/C) and up to 22% (vol/vol) ethanol, the resistance to ethanol-induced leakage of 260-nm-light-absorbing compounds was found to be closely related with the ethanol tolerance of three strains of yeasts, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Saccharomyces bayanus. The resistance to ethanol-induced leakage indicates the possible adoption of the present method for the rapid screening of ethanol-tolerant strains. The addition to a fermentation medium of the intracellular material obtained by ethanol permeabilization of yeast cells led to improvements in alcohol fermentation by S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. The action of the intracellular material, by improving yeast ethanol tolerance, and the advantages of partially recycling the fermented medium after distillation were discussed.

  12. TWO NEW DUCT LEAKAGE TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

  13. Glutamate induces series of action potentials and a decrease in circumnutation rate in Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Stolarz, Maria; Król, Elzbieta; Dziubińska, Halina; Kurenda, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Reports concerning the function of glutamate (Glu) in the electrical and movement phenomena in plants are scarce. Using the method of extracellular measurement, we recorded electrical potential changes in the stem of 3-week-old Helianthus annuus L. plants after injection of Glu solution. Simultaneously, circumnutation movements of the stem were measured with the use of time-lapse images. Injection of Glu solution at millimolar (200, 50, 5 mM) concentrations in the basal part of the stem evoked a series of action potentials (APs). The APs appeared in the site of injection and in different parts of the stem and were propagated acropetally and/or basipetally along the stem. Glu injection also resulted in a transient, approximately 5-h-long decrease in the stem circumnutation rate. The APs initiated and propagating in the sunflower stem after Glu injection testify the existence of a Glu perception system in vascular plants and suggest its involvement in electrical, long-distance signaling. Our experiments also demonstrated that Glu is a factor affecting circumnutation movements.

  14. Action of bromazepam on sleep of children with night terrors. I. Sleep organization and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Vela, A; Dobladez, B; Rubio, M E; Ramos, M; Suengas, A; Bujan, M; Arrigain, S

    1982-01-01

    Bromazepam was administered in a single dose of 1.5 mg one-half hour before bedtime to study its short-term action and the effect of its discontinuation on the sleep of 6 children suffering from night terrors. On the third night of the drug's administration, a statistically significant reduction in slow-wave sleep was observed which was maintained after the drug had been discontinued. The other sleep parameters were not significantly affected, although a slight increase in REM sleep was seen after discontinuation of bromazepam, with a statistically significant increase in the second third of the night on the first 2 nights 'off medication'. A comparison of the individual nights yielded no significant change in heart rate, although certain internal changes were observed during the second night 'on medication' and during the nights 'off medication'. These changes can be explained by the changing relationship between cardiac variability and sleep organization. There were insufficient episodes of night terror during the short duration of the study to allow any conclusions to be drawn on the effect of the drug on this aspect.

  15. Plutonium Finishing Plant assessment of confinement system bypass leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document walk-through`s of the safety class confinement systems at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In addition this document outlines the actions taken to assess the confinement system for bypass leakage as well as establishing disposition for discovered deficiencies at the PFP.

  16. Prediction of leakage flow in a shrouded centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ji-Bin; Chan, Weng-Kong; Wong, Yew-Wah

    2010-09-01

    This article proposes a phenomenological model to predict the leakage flow in the clearance gap of shrouded centrifugal blood pumps. A good washout in the gap clearance between the rotating impeller surfaces and volute casing is essential to avoid thrombosis. However, excessive leakage flow will result in higher fluid shear stress that may lead to hemolysis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to investigate the leakage flow in a miniaturized shrouded centrifugal blood pump operating at a speed of 2000 rpm. Based on an analytical model derived earlier, a phenomenological model is proposed to predict the leakage flow. The leakage flow rate is found to be proportional to h(α) , where h is the gap size and the exponent α ranges from 2.955 to 3.15 for corresponding gap sizes of 0.2-0.5 mm. In addition, it is observed that α is a linear function of the gap size h. The exponent α compensates for the variation of pressure difference along the circumferential direction as well as inertia effects that are dominant for larger gap clearances. The proposed model displays good agreement with computational results. The CFD analysis also showed that for larger gap sizes, the total leakage flow rate is of the same order of magnitude as the operating flow rate, thus suggesting low volumetric efficiency.

  17. Nonlinear Acoustics Used To Reduce Leakage Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    attached to one end of the resonator while the other end remained open to ambient pressure. Measurements were taken at several values of applied pressure with the assembly stationary, oscillated at an off-resonance frequency, and then oscillated on-resonance. The three cases show that the flow through the conical resonator can be reduced by oscillating the resonator at the resonance frequency of the air contained within the cavity. The results are currently being compared with results obtained from a commercial computational fluid dynamics code. The objective is to improve the design through numerical simulation before fabricating a next-generation prototype sealing device. Future work is aimed at implementing acoustic seal design improvements to further reduce the leakage flow rate through the device and at reducing the device's overall size.

  18. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial

  19. Results of microwave oven radiation leakage surveys at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of routine microwave oven leakage surveys which were conducted at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) between 1974 and 1985. A total of 80 ovens representing 250 oven-years of operation were examined. The mean maximum leakage at any point 5 cm from the surface was 0.20 x/ 3.1 mW/cm/sup 2/. Although there was a great deal of scatter in sequential measurements for individual ovens, it appears that leakage tends to increase with oven age. The mean logarithmic rate of increase for the 55 ovens with usable data was 0.21 per year. Case histories of ovens leaking in excess of the standard were examined, and improvements in leakage monitoring programs are suggested.

  20. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature.

  1. Resting, and rate-dependent depression of Vmax of guinea-pig ventricular action potentials by amiodarone and desethylamiodarone.

    PubMed Central

    Pallandi, R. T.; Campbell, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    1 The cellular electrophysiological effects of amiodarone and its metabolite desethylamiodarone (DEA) were studied in guinea-pig ventricular myocardium by use of standard microelectrode techniques. 2 Both compounds produced significant increases in action potential duration (Class III antiarrhythmic effect) and decreases in maximum rate of depolarization (Class I effect), at clinically relevant concentrations. 3 The Class I effects were rate-dependent, with small (0-16%) falls in maximum depolarization rate in the absence of stimulation ('resting block') and progressively larger effects at decreasing interstimulus intervals (range 1200-300 ms). 4 The kinetics of onset and offset of the Class I effect in response to a step change in driving rate were quite fast for both drugs (comparable to those reported for Class Ib agents). 5 It is concluded that this unique combination of Class III action plus Class I effects with fast onset and offset kinetics may help explain the great efficacy of amiodarone in antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:3664094

  2. Prevention of biliary leakage after partial liver resection using topical hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Deha; Busch, Olivier R C; Gouma, Dirk J; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Liver resection is widely accepted as the only potentially curative treatment in malignant or benign hepatobiliary lesions. Although not frequent, biliary leakage is a postoperative complication which may have considerable consequences. The field of topical hemostatic agents is rapidly developing, with various products currently available. This article reviews the risk factors associated with biliary leakage and the methods used for testing or prevention of biliary leakage. A literature search was performed using key words related to experimental and clinical studies dealing with biliary leakage. Experimental studies assessed the potential bilio-static effect of different topical hemostatic agents after bile duct reconstruction. Clinical series show biliary leakage rates up to 12%. There is no evidence that flushing of the bile duct system after resection reduces the incidence of biliary leakage. Further controlled studies are needed to clarify the preventive effect of topical hemostatic agents on biliary leakage after liver resection.

  3. The SSME seal test program: Leakage tests for helically-grooved seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Helically grooved annular seal configurations were tested in highly turbulent flow to determine if reduced leakage and enhanced stability would result from the pumping action of the seal. It was found that: (1) leakage of a helically grooved seals decreases with running speed; (2) leakage reduction due to increased running speed is greater at lower values of R sub a; (3) an asymptote for leakage reduction is indicated with increasing running speed; (4) leakage is reduced by reducing the ridge (minimum) and average clearances; (5) leakage increases with increasing pitch angles and with increasing groove depth. Plain seals with smooth rotors and stators will leak more than a helically grooved seal. It was also found that plain seals with a rough rotor and a rough stator leak less than a properly designed helically grooved seal. A properly designed helically grooved seal consumes at least twice as much power as a conventional annular seal.

  4. Reverse rate-dependent changes are determined by baseline action potential duration in mammalian and human ventricular preparations.

    PubMed

    Bárándi, László; Virág, László; Jost, Norbert; Horváth, Zoltán; Koncz, István; Papp, Rita; Harmati, Gábor; Horváth, Balázs; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Zaza, Antonio; Varró, András; Nánási, Péter P

    2010-05-01

    Class III antiarrhythmic agents exhibit reverse rate-dependent lengthening of the action potential duration (APD). In spite of the several theories developed so far to explain this reverse rate-dependency (RRD), its mechanism has not yet been clarified. The aim of the present work was to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for RRD in mammalian ventricular myocardium. Action potentials were recorded using conventional sharp microelectrodes from human, canine, rabbit and guinea pig ventricular myocardium in a rate-dependent manner varying the cycle length (CL) between 0.3 and 5 s. Rate-dependent drug effects were studied using agents known to lengthen or shorten action potentials, and these drug-induced changes in APD were correlated with baseline APD values. Both drug-induced lengthening (by dofetilide, sotalol, E-4031, BaCl(2), veratrine, BAY K 8644) and shortening (by mexiletine, tetrodotoxin, lemakalim) of action potentials displayed RRD, i.e., changes in APD were greater at longer than at shorter CLs. In rabbit, where APD is a biphasic function of CL, the drug-induced APD changes were proportional to baseline APD values but not to CL. Similar results were obtained when repolarization was modified by injection of inward or outward current pulses in isolated canine cardiomyocytes. In each case the change in APD was proportional to baseline APD (i.e., that measured before the superfusion of drug or injection of current). Also, the net membrane current (I (net)), determined from the action potential waveform at the middle of the plateau, was inversely proportional to APD and consequently with to CL. The results indicate that RRD is a common characteristic of all the drugs tested regardless of the modified ion current species. Thus, drug-induced RRD can be considered as an intrinsic property of cardiac membranes based on the inverse relationship between I (net) and APD.

  5. Air-leakage control manual

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, J.

    1991-05-01

    This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the ``how and why`` of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the ``Simple Caulk and Seal`` (SIMPLE{center_dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center_dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

  6. Air-Leakage Control Manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, Jim; Washington State Energy Office; United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-05-01

    This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the how and why'' of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the Simple Caulk and Seal'' (SIMPLE{center dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

  7. Expedient methods of respiratory protection. II. Leakage tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.W.; Hinds, W.C.; Price, J.M.; Weker, R.; Yee, H.S.

    1983-07-01

    The following readily-available materials were tested on a manikin connected to a breathing simulator to determine the fraction of an approximately 2-..mu..m-diameter aerosol that would leak around the seal of the materials to the manikin's face: cotton/polyester shirt material, cotton handkerchief material, toweling (a wash cloth), a surgical mask (Johnson and Johnson Co., model HRI 8137), and a NIOSH-approved disposable face mask (3M, model number 8710). The leakage tests were performed to supplement the measurements of penetration through the materials, conducted as the first phase of this investigation. The leakage tests were performed with the materials held on to the face by three methods, leakage fractions being determined from comparisons with the penetration of the same aerosol for the materials fully taped to the face. At a breathing rate of 37 liters per minute, mean leakages ranged from 0.0 percent to 63 percent. Mean penetrations exclusive of leakage ranged from 0.6 percent to 39 percent. Use of nylon hosiery material (panty hose) to hold the handkerchief material or the disposable face mask to the face was found to be very effective in preventing leakage. Such a combination could be expected to reduce leakage around the handkerchief to about ten percent or less in practice, and around the mask to less than one percent, offering substantial protection from accidentally generated aerosols. The reduction in leakage around the mask provided by the hosiery material suggests the adaptation and use of such an approach in regular industrial hygiene practice. The third and final phase of this investigation is underway, in which the penetration of the materials by particles with diameters between 0.05 and 0.5 ..mu..m is being measured and the effectiveness of the methods for dose reduction in the presence of radioactive aerosols is being modeled.

  8. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....316 Section 89.316 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being checked. The analyzer flows and bypass flows may be used to estimate the...

  9. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....316 Section 89.316 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being checked. The analyzer flows and bypass flows may be used to estimate the...

  10. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....316 Section 89.316 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being checked. The analyzer flows and bypass flows may be used to estimate the...

  11. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....316 Section 89.316 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for the portion of the system being checked. The analyzer flows and bypass flows may be used to estimate the...

  12. THE CARBON DIOXIDE LEAKAGE FROM CHAMBERS MEASURED USING SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In plant chamber studies, if Co2 leaking from a chamber is not quantified, it can lead to an overestimate of assimilation rates and an underestimate of respiration rates: consequently, it is critical that Co2 leakage be determined. Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) was introduced into t...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1867-12 - CO2 credits for reducing leakage of air conditioning refrigerant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lower global warming potential. LeakScore means the annual refrigerant leakage rate determined according....1 grams/year for systems using only electric compressors). GWPREF means the global warming potential... with a lower global warming potential. LeakScore means the annual refrigerant leakage rate...

  14. 40 CFR 86.1867-12 - CO2 credits for reducing leakage of air conditioning refrigerant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... refrigerant with a lower global warming potential. LeakScore means the annual refrigerant leakage rate... (or 4.1 grams/year for systems using only electric compressors). GWPREF means the global warming... with a lower global warming potential. LeakScore means the annual refrigerant leakage rate...

  15. Do monkey F5 mirror neurons show changes in firing rate during repeated observation of natural actions?

    PubMed

    Kilner, J M; Kraskov, A; Lemon, R N

    2014-03-01

    Mirror neurons were first discovered in area F5 of macaque monkeys. In humans, noninvasive studies have demonstrated an increased blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in homologous motor areas during action observation. One approach to demonstrating that this indicates the existence of mirror neurons in humans has been to employ functional (f)MRI adaptation to test whether the same population of neurons is active during both observation and execution conditions. Although a number of human studies have reported fMRI adaptation in these areas, a recent study has shown that macaque mirror neurons do not attenuate their firing rate with two repetitions. Here we investigated whether mirror neurons modulate their firing rate when monkeys observed the same repeated natural action multiple times. We recorded from 67 mirror neurons in area F5 of two macaque monkeys while they observed an experimenter perform a reach-to-grasp action on a small food reward using a precision grip. Although no changes were detectable for the first two repetitions, we show that both the firing rate and the latency at which mirror neurons discharged during observation were subtly modulated by the repetition of the observed action over 7-10 trials. Significant adaption was mostly found in the period immediately before the grasp was performed. We also found that the local field potential activity in F5 (beta-frequency range, 16-23 Hz), which is attenuated during action observation, also showed systematic changes with repeated observation. These LFP changes occurred well in advance of the mirror neuron adaptation. We conclude that macaque mirror neurons can show intra-modal adaptation, but whether this is related to fMRI adaptation of the BOLD signal requires further investigation.

  16. 49 CFR 229.59 - Leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Leakage from the main air reservoir and related piping may not exceed an average of 3 pounds per square... shall remain applied at least 5 minutes. (d) Leakage from control air reservoir, related piping,...

  17. Instantaneous Leakage Evaluation of Metal Cask at Drop Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Hirofumi Takeda; Norihiro Kageyama; Masumi Wataru; Ryoji Sonobe; Koji Shirai; Toshiari Saegusa

    2006-07-01

    There have been a lot of tests and analyses reported for evaluation of drop tests of metal casks. However, no quantitative measurement has ever been made for any instantaneous leakage through metal gaskets during the drop tests due to loosening of the bolts in the containments and lateral sliding of the lids. In order to determine a source term for radiation exposure dose assessment, it is necessary to obtain fundamental data of instantaneous leakage. In this study, leak tests were performed by using scale models of the lid structure and a full scale cask without impact limiters simulating drop accidents in a storage facility, with aim of measuring and evaluating any instantaneous leakage at drop impact. Prior to drop tests of a full scale metal cask, a series of leakage tests using scale models were carried out to establish the measurement method and to examine a relationship between the amount of the lateral sliding of the lid and the leak rate. It was determined that the leak rate did not depend on the lateral sliding speeds. Drop tests of a full scale metal cask without impact limiters were carried out by simulating drop accidents during handling in a storage facility. The target was designed to simulate a reinforced concrete floor in the facility. The first test was a horizontal drop from a height of 1 m. The second test simulated a rotational impact around an axis of a lower trunnion of the cask from the horizontal status at a height of 1 m. In the horizontal drop test, the amount of helium gas leakage was calculated by integrating the leak rate with time. The total amount of helium gas leakage from the primary and secondary lids was 1.99 x 10{sup -6} Pa.m{sup 3}. This value is 9.61 x 10{sup -9}% of the initially installed helium gas. The amount of leakage was insignificant. In the rotational drop test, the total amount of leakage from the primary and secondary lids was 1.74 x 10{sup -5} Pa.m{sup 3}. This value is 8.45 x 10{sup -8}% of the initially installed

  18. Monetizing Leakage Risk of Geologic CO2 Storage using Wellbore Permeability Frequency Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielicki, Jeffrey; Fitts, Jeffrey; Peters, Catherine; Wilson, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) may be captured from large point sources (e.g., coal-fired power plants, oil refineries, cement manufacturers) and injected into deep sedimentary basins for storage, or sequestration, from the atmosphere. This technology—CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS)—may be a significant component of the portfolio of technologies deployed to mitigate climate change. But injected CO2, or the brine it displaces, may leak from the storage reservoir through a variety of natural and manmade pathways, including existing wells and wellbores. Such leakage will incur costs to a variety of stakeholders, which may affect the desirability of potential CO2 injection locations as well as the feasibility of the CCS approach writ large. Consequently, analyzing and monetizing leakage risk is necessary to develop CCS as a viable technological option to mitigate climate change. Risk is the product of the probability of an outcome and the impact of that outcome. Assessment of leakage risk from geologic CO2 storage reservoirs requires an analysis of the probabilities and magnitudes of leakage, identification of the outcomes that may result from leakage, and an assessment of the expected economic costs of those outcomes. One critical uncertainty regarding the rate and magnitude of leakage is determined by the leakiness of the well leakage pathway. This leakiness is characterized by a leakage permeability for the pathway, and recent work has sought to determine frequency distributions for the leakage permeabilities of wells and wellbores. We conduct a probabilistic analysis of leakage and monetized leakage risk for CO2 injection locations in the Michigan Sedimentary Basin (USA) using empirically derived frequency distributions for wellbore leakage permeabilities. To conduct this probabilistic risk analysis, we apply the RISCS (Risk Interference of Subsurface CO2 Storage) model (Bielicki et al, 2013a, 2012b) to injection into the Mt. Simon Sandstone. RISCS monetizes leakage risk

  19. Leakage Current Measurements in SOI Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Total dose response of both NMOS and PMOS FETs fabrication on SOI substrates were studied. Back channel leakage currents were studied. Two types of...dose of the back channel and front channel of SIMOX and ZMR SOI substrates are reported. Some preliminary reports on the buried oxide leakage current are also provided. Bach channel leakage, SIMOX, ZMR, Total Dose Response .

  20. "Geyser" leakage on fluorescein angiography.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jaime; Fagan, Xavier J; Lifshitz, Tova; Schneck, Marina

    2013-11-22

    An 82-year-old patient with diabetes was followed up due to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema in the right eye. Visual acuity was 6/36. Focal macular laser was conducted (A). Three years later, the patient presented with blurry vision in the right eye. Visual acuity was 3/60. Vitreous hemorrhage was observed (B), and neovascularization of the disc was suspected (C). Fluorescein angiography (D, mid venous phase; E-F, recirculation phase) confirmed neovascularization of the disc and depicted a striking vertical leakage. Panretinal photocoagulation was started. Possible explanations for the "geyser" leakage may be either a partial posterior vitreous detachment allowing the fluorescein to track upwards but not elsewhere or a pocket of syneretic vitreous allowing the fluorescein passage in which to diffuse, much like the passage the blood would have taken.

  1. Studies of axial-leakage simulations for homogeneous and heterogeneous EBR-II core configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1985-08-01

    When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, leakage-absorption cross sections are normally used to model leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. Since the neutron flux is axially dependent, the leakages, and hence the leakage-absorption cross sections, are also axially dependent. Therefore, to obtain axial flux profiles (or reaction rates) for individual subassemblies, an XY-geometry calculation delineating each subassembly has to be done at several axial heights with space- and energy-dependent leakage-absorption cross sections that are appropriate for each height. This report discusses homogeneous and heterogeneous XY-geometry calculations at various axial locations and using several differing assumptions for the calculation of the leakage-absorption cross section. The positive (outward) leakage-absorption cross sections are modeled as actual leakage absorptions, but the negative (inward) leakage-absorption cross sections are modeled as either negative leakage absorptions (+-B/sup 2/ method) or positive downscatter cross sections (the ..sigma../sub s/(1 ..-->.. g) method). 3 refs., 52 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Ethanol-Induced Leakage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Kinetics and Relationship to Yeast Ethanol Tolerance and Alcohol Fermentation Productivity.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, S P; Sá-Correia, I; Novais, J M

    1988-04-01

    Ethanol stimulated the leakage of amino acids and 260-nm-light-absorbing compounds from cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The efflux followed first-order kinetics over an initial period. In the presence of lethal concentrations of ethanol, the efflux rates at 30 and 36 degrees C were an exponential function of ethanol concentration: k(e) = k(e)e, where k(e) and k(e) are the efflux rate constants, respectively, in the presence of a concentration X of ethanol or the minimal concentration of ethanol, X(m), above which the equation was applicable, coincident with the minimal lethal concentration of ethanol. E is the enhancement constant. At 36 degrees C, as compared with the corresponding values at 30 degrees C, the efflux rates were higher and the minimal concentration of ethanol (X(m)) was lower. The exponential constants for the enhancement of the rate of leakage (E) had similar values at 30 or 36 degrees C and were of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding exponential constants for ethanol-induced death. Under isothermic conditions (30 degrees C) and up to 22% (vol/vol) ethanol, the resistance to ethanol-induced leakage of 260-nm-light-absorbing compounds was found to be closely related with the ethanol tolerance of three strains of yeasts, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Saccharomyces bayanus. The resistance to ethanol-induced leakage indicates the possible adoption of the present method for the rapid screening of ethanol-tolerant strains. The addition to a fermentation medium of the intracellular material obtained by ethanol permeabilization of yeast cells led to improvements in alcohol fermentation by S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. The action of the intracellular material, by improving yeast ethanol tolerance, and the advantages of partially recycling the fermented medium after distillation were discussed.

  3. Ethanol-Induced Leakage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Kinetics and Relationship to Yeast Ethanol Tolerance and Alcohol Fermentation Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Salgueiro, Sancha P.; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Novais, Júlio M.

    1988-01-01

    Ethanol stimulated the leakage of amino acids and 260-nm-light-absorbing compounds from cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The efflux followed first-order kinetics over an initial period. In the presence of lethal concentrations of ethanol, the efflux rates at 30 and 36°C were an exponential function of ethanol concentration: keX = keXmeE (X-Xm), where keX and keXm are the efflux rate constants, respectively, in the presence of a concentration X of ethanol or the minimal concentration of ethanol, Xm, above which the equation was applicable, coincident with the minimal lethal concentration of ethanol. E is the enhancement constant. At 36°C, as compared with the corresponding values at 30°C, the efflux rates were higher and the minimal concentration of ethanol (Xm) was lower. The exponential constants for the enhancement of the rate of leakage (E) had similar values at 30 or 36°C and were of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding exponential constants for ethanol-induced death. Under isothermic conditions (30°C) and up to 22% (vol/vol) ethanol, the resistance to ethanol-induced leakage of 260-nm-light-absorbing compounds was found to be closely related with the ethanol tolerance of three strains of yeasts, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Saccharomyces bayanus. The resistance to ethanol-induced leakage indicates the possible adoption of the present method for the rapid screening of ethanol-tolerant strains. The addition to a fermentation medium of the intracellular material obtained by ethanol permeabilization of yeast cells led to improvements in alcohol fermentation by S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. The action of the intracellular material, by improving yeast ethanol tolerance, and the advantages of partially recycling the fermented medium after distillation were discussed. PMID:16347612

  4. Ratios between acute aquatic toxicity and effects on population growth rates in relation to toxicant mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Roex, E.W.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Wezel, A.P. Van; Straalen, N.M. Van

    2000-03-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is mostly based on the results of standardized toxicity tests. To obtain environmental quality criteria, extrapolation factors are used that depend on the amount and quality of available data. These extrapolation factors do not, however, take into account the mode of action of the compound tested or the life history of the test organism. In this study, the authors analyzed the variability in acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) for various chemicals in relation to their mode of action. Chemicals were classified as nonpolar narcotics, polar narcotics, specifically acting compounds, and heavy metals. As an acute endpoint, the LC50 was used; as a chronic endpoint, the lowest test concentration at which the natural rate of population increase (r) is affected, or LOEC(r), was used. Data were derived from the on-line literature. Nonpolar narcotic chemicals demonstrate the smallest variation in ACRs, and acute tests can be used to derive chronic endpoints for this class. For the other classes, the variation in ACRs is larger. Fish species especially show a relatively large ACR. For heavy metals, differences in the mode of action may play an important role in explaining differences in ACRs. For the other three classes, however, it is less reliable to predict chronic toxicity using the results of acute tests. In general, differences in species sensitivity rather than in mode of action for the chemical seem to determine differences in ACRs.

  5. Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    White, Curt; Wells, Arthur; Diehl, J. Rodney; Strazisar, Brian

    2010-04-27

    The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

  6. Investigative techniques used to locate the liquid hydrogen leakage on the Space Shuttle Main Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammock, William R., Jr.; Cota, Phillip E., Jr.; Rosenbaum, Bernard J.; Barrett, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Standard leak detection methods at ambient temperature have been developed in order to prevent excessive leakage from the Space Shuttle liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen Main Propulsion System. Unacceptable hydrogen leakage was encountered on the Columbia and Atlantis flight vehicles in the summer of 1990 after the standard leak check requirements had been satisfied. The leakage was only detectable when the fuel system was exposed to subcooled liquid hydrogen during External Tank loading operations. Special instrumentation and analytical tools were utilized during a series of propellant tanking tests in order to identify the sources of the hydrogen leakage. After the leaks were located and corrected, the physical characteristics of the leak sources were analyzed in an effort to understand how the discrepancies were introduced and why the leakage had evaded the standard leak detection methods. As a result of the post-leak analysis, corrective actions and leak detection improvements have been implemented in order to preclude a similar incident.

  7. Microvascular leakage of plasma proteins after PUVA and UVA

    SciTech Connect

    Staberg, B.; Worm, A.M.; Rossing, N.; Brodthagen, H.

    1982-04-01

    The transcapillary escape rate of albumin (TERalb), is a parameter of the leakage of macromolecules from the total microvasculature. In patients with psoriasis short-term PUVA treatment induces an increase in TERalb. In this study TERalb was measured in 3 groups of normal humans treated with PUVA, UVA and 8-methoxypsoralen. Treatment with PUVA and UVA caused a statistically significant increase in TERalb, whereas treatment with 8-methoxypsoralen did not induce any measurable changes. It is concluded that the UVA irradiation causes the abnormal leakage of macromolecules, whereas psoralen is not the responsible component. Furthermore the phenomenon can be elicited in normals and is not based on a preexisting psoriasis.

  8. Importance of the PMMA viscoelastic rheology on the reduction of the leakage risk during osteoporotic bone augmentation: A numerical leakage model through a porous media.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Salem; Jerban, Saeed; Elkoun, Saïd

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures poses one of the most problematic health issues that affects millions of people by weakening their bones (Osteoporosis). Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement is usually used to augment the bone and stabilize the fractures. Despite the benefit of using PMMA, it might cause a leakage where the cement undesirably access the surrounding tissues or vessels and lead to a serious complications. Consequently, it is important to study the leakage phenomenon and associated geometric and operation interactions. Although the experimental leakage models have been reported in many studies, a representative numerical leakage model is not exist. Therefore, the objectives of the present paper are to: (a) to develop and validate a representative numerical leakage model; and (b) to investigate numerically and analytically the importance of the rheological parameters (viscosity and relaxation time) on the cement flow to reduce the risk of leakage. ANSYS Polyflow was utilized to implement a 2D numerical leakage model to study the interaction of complex rheological parameters of the cement with the operational and geometrical structure of the representative porous media. In this model, the cement (represented by the upper-convected Maxwell model) flows from the entrance (tip of an 8 gauge cannula) through a porous media with a leakage path (blood vessels) toward the output (Bottom side). The verified and validated numerical leakage model showed the importance of the elastic and viscous part of the cement to control the uniformity of the distributed cement and augmentation pressure, respectively. Moreover, increasing the flow rate can lead to reduce the risk of leakage since the elastic effect will increase. Geometrical parameters of the porous media has a minor effect on changing the elasticity and subsequently on the uniformity of the distributed cement. In conclusion, Cement rheological parameters are found to be the most influential parameters to reduce the

  9. Investigation on the influence of leakage clearance on the flow field and performance of scroll hydraulic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuaihui; Huang, Yi; Guo, Pengcheng; Zuo, Juanli; Luo, Xingqi

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the computer fluid dynamics(CFD) with dynamic mesh model had been applied in scroll hydraulic pump to obtain its flow field at different leakage clearance. The fluid force on the orbiting scroll, the mass flow rate and the hydraulic efficiency at different leakage clearance were calculated based on the flow field data. The results indicated that when the leakage clearance increased from 0.5mm to 1.5mm, the average pressure, maximum of pressure fluctuation, leakage jet flow velocity, shaft power, cavitation degree decreased and the leakage flow rate increased. If the leakage clearance was 2.0mm, the high pressure discharge fluid flowed through the clearance and led to the increase of the average pressure and fluid force. When the leakage clearance is 1.0mm, the average pressure is far lower than that at the 0.5mm clearance, and the hydraulic efficiency is the highest.

  10. 24 CFR 985.107 - Required actions for PHA with troubled performance rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8 MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (SEMAP) Program Operation...-site review of PHA program management for any PHA assigned an overall performance rating of troubled to... required to address the program deficiencies. (b) HUD written report. HUD must provide the PHA a...

  11. Community and Videos: An Action Plan to Increase Success Rates in California Community College Developmental Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Success rates in California community college developmental mathematics courses have hovered around 50% for decades. These gatekeeper courses have prevented many students from earning college degrees. Since community college is the starting point for the majority of California's potential college graduates and the majority of these students…

  12. The effect of an active arm action on heart rate and predicted VO(2max) during the Chester step test.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Abt, Grant; Barry, Tim

    2008-04-01

    This study examined whether the predictive outcomes of the Chester step test (CST) would be influenced by arm dynamics. Participants completed the CST on two separate occasions, once using active arms and once using passive arms. Results revealed that when compared to the passive arm protocol, the use of active arms led to a mean increase in heart rate of approximately 7 beats per minute across all of the incremental stages. However, this increase had little impact upon predicted VO(2max). Consequently, these results indicate that when performing the CST, participants are able to adopt an arm action that is compatible with personal preference.

  13. Factors affecting apical leakage assessment.

    PubMed

    Karagöz-Küçükay, I; Küçükay, S; Bayirli, G

    1993-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of immediate versus delayed immersion time, and passive dye immersion versus centrifuged dye on apical leakage measurements. Eighty-four extracted human teeth with single straight canals were instrumented and divided into four experimental groups of 20 teeth each plus 2 negative and 2 positive controls. Low-temperature injection thermoplasticized gutta-percha and sealer were used to obturate the root canals. In groups A and B the filling materials were allowed to set for 72 h before the teeth were placed in India ink. In groups C and D the teeth were placed in India ink immediately after obturation. Also, in groups B and D the teeth were centrifuged in India ink for 20 min at 3,000 rpm before being immersed in ink. After 72 h in India ink, the teeth were cleared, and the linear extent of ink penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis of the data revealed no significant difference in leakage among the experimental groups whether the teeth were immersed in ink immediately after obturation or after setting of the filling materials for 72 h, and whether or not the teeth were centrifuged in ink prior to immersion.

  14. Influence of a change in stimulation rate on action potentials, currents and contractions in rat ventricular cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M R; Powell, T; Terrar, D A; Twist, V W

    1985-07-01

    The effects of a change in stimulation rate on electrical activity and accompanying contraction were investigated in ventricular cells isolated from rat heart; the cells were stimulated to contract either by brief depolarization pulses which evoked action potentials, or, under voltage-clamp conditions, by step depolarizations. An increase in stimulation rate from 0.3 to 3 Hz resulted in a gradual reduction in the amplitude of contraction and attenuation of the late phase of the action potential. These changes were less marked at more depolarized potentials. The ventricular cells were voltage clamped at -40 mV and initially stimulated at 0.3 Hz by step depolarizations to 0 mV for 10 or 100 ms, which activated the second inward current (Isi) and an accompanying contraction. The amplitude and time course of contraction were similar with the two pulse durations. When the duration of the depolarization was 100 ms, an increase in stimulation rate to 3 Hz caused a gradual decline in the amplitude of Isi and of the evoked contraction; at the same time extra contractions and small, transient inward currents appeared in addition to the evoked contractions and Isis. There was a reduction in the early component of decay of Isi at 3 Hz. With a depolarizing pulse duration of 10 ms, an increase in stimulation rate to 3 or to 4.2 Hz did not change the amplitude of the evoked Isi or contraction and no extra contractions or currents appeared. Intracellular EGTA abolished all contractions in the cells and an increase in the rate of stimulation with 100 ms pulses did not then induce transient inward currents. There was some decrease in the Isi amplitude but this was not as marked as in the absence of EGTA and the time course of current decay was similar at the two rates. Ryanodine prevented the appearance of extra contractions and currents when the stimulation rate was increased to 3 Hz and, as in the presence of intracellular EGTA, there was a small decrease in Isi amplitude while

  15. Effect of mental challenge induced by movie clips on action potential duration in normal human subjects independent of heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Child, Nicholas; Hanson, Ben; Bishop, Martin; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Bostock, Julian; Western, David; Cooklin, Michael; O’Neil, Mark; Wright, Matthew; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress and emotion have long been associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in animal models and humans. The effect of mental challenge on ventricular action potential duration (APD) in conscious healthy humans has not been reported. Methods and Results Activation recovery intervals (ARI) measured from unipolar electrograms as a surrogate for APD (n=19) were recorded from right and left ventricular endocardium during steady state pacing while subjects watched an emotionally charged film clip. To assess the possible modulating role of altered respiration on APD, the subjects then repeated the same breathing pattern they had during the stress, but without the movie clip. Haemodynamic parameters (mean, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, and rate of pressure increase) and respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (p=0.001). APD decreased during the stressful parts of the film clip, eg for global RV ARI at end of film clip 193.8ms (SD 14) vs 198.0ms (SD13) during the matched breathing control (end film LV 199.8ms (SD16) vs control 201.6ms (SD15), p=0.004. Respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (by 2 breaths/minute), and was well matched in the respective control period without any haemodynamic or ARI changes. Conclusions Our results document for the first time direct recordings of the effect of a mental challenge protocol on ventricular action potential duration in conscious humans. The effect of mental challenge on APD was not secondary to emotionally-induced altered respiration or heart rate. PMID:24833641

  16. Leakage of K+ ions from Staphylococcus aureus in response to tea tree oil.

    PubMed

    Hada, Toshiko; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Shiraishi, Akiko; Hamashima, Hajime

    2003-06-01

    The leakage of K(+) ions from Staphylococcus aureus in response to tea tree oil (TTO) was investigated with an ion-selective electrode. The amount of leaked K(+) ions and the rate of leakage of K(+) ions induced by TTO were dependent on the concentration of TTO. Measurements of initial rates required less time than measurements of total amounts and provided an index of the interaction between TTO and the cell membrane. Thus, the initial rate of leakage might be a more useful measure of the antibacterial activity of TTO than the total amount.

  17. High Rate of Positive Circumferential Resection Margins Following Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Rickles, Aaron S.; Dietz, David W.; Chang, George J.; Wexner, Steven D.; Berho, Mariana E.; Remzi, Feza H.; Greene, Frederick L.; Fleshman, James W.; Abbas, Maher A.; Peters, Walter; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R.T.; Fleming, Fergal J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of positive circumferential resection margin following rectal cancer resection in the United States. Background Positive circumferential resection margin is associated with a high rate of local recurrence and poor morbidity and mortality for rectal cancer patients. Prior study has shown poor compliance with national rectal cancer guidelines, but whether this finding is reflected in patient outcomes has yet to be shown. Methods Patients who underwent resection for stage I-III rectal cancer were identified from the 2010-2011 National Cancer Database. The primary outcome was a positive circumferential resection margin. The relationship between patient, hospital, tumor, and treatment-related characteristics was analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Findings A positive circumferential resection margin was noted in 2,859 (17.2%) of the 16,619 patients included. Facility location, clinical T and N stage, histologic type, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, type of operation, and operative approach were significant predictors of positive circumferential resection margin on multivariable analysis. Total proctectomy had nearly a 30% increased risk of positive margin compared to partial proctectomy (OR 1.293, 95%CI 1.185-1.411) and a laparoscopic approach had nearly 22% less risk of a positive circumferential resection margin compared to an open approach (OR 0.882, 95%CI 0.790-0.985). Interpretation Despite advances in surgical technique and multimodality therapy, rates of positive circumferential resection margin remain high in the United States. Several tumor and treatment characteristics were identified as independent risk factors, and advances in rectal cancer care are necessary to approach the outcomes seen in other countries. PMID:26473651

  18. Rate Dependence and Regulation of Action Potential and Calcium Transient in a Canine Cardiac Ventricular Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Thomas J.; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Background Computational biology is a powerful tool for elucidating arrhythmogenic mechanisms at the cellular level, where complex interactions between ionic processes determine behavior. A novel theoretical model of the canine ventricular epicardial action potential and calcium cycling was developed and used to investigate ionic mechanisms underlying Ca2+ transient (CaT) and action potential duration (APD) rate dependence. Methods and Results The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) regulatory pathway was integrated into the model, which included a novel Ca2+-release formulation, Ca2+ subspace, dynamic chloride handling, and formulations for major ion currents based on canine ventricular data. Decreasing pacing cycle length from 8000 to 300 ms shortened APD primarily because of ICa(L) reduction, with additional contributions from Ito1, INaK, and late INa. CaT amplitude increased as cycle length decreased from 8000 to 500 ms. This positive rate–dependent property depended on CaMKII activity. Conclusions CaMKII is an important determinant of the rate dependence of CaT but not of APD, which depends on ion-channel kinetics. The model of CaMKII regulation may serve as a paradigm for modeling effects of other regulatory pathways on cell function. PMID:15505083

  19. Effects of the number of players and game type constraints on heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, and technical actions of small-sided soccer games.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Catarina I; Nunes, Marta I; Maçãs, Victor M; Leite, Nuno M; Sampaio, Jaime E

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the variation of heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and technical actions between 2 soccer small-sided games (SSGs; 3 × 3 and 4 × 4) in 3 game type constraints (when playing only offense [OFF], playing only defense [DEF], and both situations [GAME]). Sixteen high-level young male players were analyzed (age 15.75 ± 0.45 years; height 172.4 ± 4.83 cm; body mass 64.5 ± 6.44 kg; HRmax199.1 ± 9.08 b·min(-1); and 8.06 ± 1.98 years of soccer practice). All tasks were performed in 4 periods of 4 minutes interspersed with 2 minutes of active recovery. The HR was measured continuously and then analyzed by the time spent into 4 training zones according to individual %HRmax (zone 1 <75%; zone 2 75-84.9%; zone 3 85-89.9%; and zone 4 ≥90%). Results identified that players were most frequently in zones 2 and 3. The 3 × 3 SSGs elicited higher HR and RPE and the most intense situation was GAME. Despite the known higher frequencies from technical actions in SSGs with fewer players, player effectiveness in 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 was identical. The use of GAME, OFF, and DEF game type constraints should be carefully planned. Using the 3 × 3 format seems more adequate when aiming for aerobic performance optimal effects; however, DEF situations should only be used to promote aerobic recovery effects. The inclusion of an additional player in SSGs had different interactions in game type constraints, and only GAME presented adequate intensity.

  20. Zero leakage separable and semipermanent ducting joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischel, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    A study program has been conducted to explore new methods of achieving zero leakage, separable and semipermanent, ducting joints for space flight vehicles. The study consisted of a search of literature of existing zero leakage methods, the generation of concepts of new methods of achieving the desired zero leakage criteria and the development of detailed analysis and design of a selected concept. Other techniques of leak detection were explored with a view toward improving this area.

  1. Energy Conservation Through Duct Leakage Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-26

    Energy Conservation Through Duct Leakage Reduction February 26, 2004 Rich Glatt – Lindab Inc. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Energy Conservation Through Duct Leakage Reduction 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Wall – DW that installs like SW - easiest installing DW system on the market – Eliminates the need for costly flanged connections – SMACNA Leakage

  2. Leakage-current properties of encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical modeling of leakage current in ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) modules is being developed and is described. The modeling effort derives mathematical relationships for the bulk and surface conductivites of EVA and PVB, the surface conductivities of glass and polymeric films, and the EVA and PVB pottants, all as functions of environmental parameters. Results from the modeling indicate that for glass/EVA, the glass surface controls the interfacial conductivity, although EVA bulk conductivity controls total leakage current. For PVB/glass, the interface conductivity controls leakage currents for relative humidity (RH) less than 40 to 50%, but PVB bulk conductivity controls leakage current above 50% RH.

  3. Correlating antimicrobial activity and model membrane leakage induced by nylon-3 polymers and detergents.

    PubMed

    Hovakeemian, Sara G; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2015-09-14

    Most antimicrobial peptides act upon target microorganisms by permeabilizing their membranes. The mode of action is often assessed by vesicle leakage experiments that use model membranes, with the assumption that biological activity correlates with the permeabilization of the lipid bilayer. The current work aims to extend the interpretation of vesicle leakage results and examine the correlation between vesicle leakage and antimicrobial activity. To this end, we used a lifetime-based leakage assay with calcein-loaded vesicles to study the membrane permeabilizing properties of a novel antifungal polymer poly-NM, two of its analogs, and a series of detergents. In conjunction, the biological activities of these compounds against Candida albicans were assessed and correlated with data from vesicle leakage. Poly-NM induces all-or-none leakage in polar yeast lipid vesicles at the polymer's MIC, 3 μg mL(-1). At this and higher concentrations, complete leakage after an initial lag time was observed. Concerted activity tests imply that this polymer acts independently of the detergent octyl glucoside (OG) for both vesicle leakage and activity against C. albicans spheroplasts. In addition, poly-NM was found to have negligible activity against zwitterionic vesicles and red blood cells. Our results provide a consistent, detailed picture of the mode of action of poly-NM: this polymer induces membrane leakage by electrostatic lipid clustering. In contrast, poly-MM:CO, a nylon-3 polymer comprised of both cationic and hydrophobic segments, seems to act by a different mechanism that involves membrane asymmetry stress. Vesicle leakage for this polymer is transient (limited to <100%) and graded, non-specific among zwitterionic and polar yeast lipid vesicles, additive with detergent action, and correlates poorly with biological activity. Based on these results, we conclude that comprehensive leakage experiments can provide a detailed description of the mode of action of membrane

  4. Correlating antimicrobial activity and model membrane leakage induced by nylon-3 polymers and detergents

    PubMed Central

    Hovakeemian, Sara G.; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H.; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Most antimicrobial peptides act upon target microorganisms by permeabilizing their membranes. The mode of action is often assessed by vesicle leakage experiments that use model membranes, with the assumption that biological activity arises from permeabilization of the lipid bilayer. The current work aims to extend the interpretation of vesicle leakage results and examine the correlation between vesicle leakage and antimicrobial activity. To this end, we used a lifetime-based leakage assay with calcein-loaded vesicles to study the membrane permeabilizing properties of a novel antifungal polymer poly-NM, two of its analogs, and a series of detergents. In conjunction, the biological activities of these compounds against Candida albicans were assessed and correlated with data from vesicle leakage. Poly-NM induces all-or-none leakage in polar yeast lipid vesicles at the polymer’s MIC, 3 μg/mL. At this and higher concentrations, complete leakage after an initial lag time was observed. Concerted activity tests imply that this polymer acts independently of the detergent octyl glucoside (OG) for both vesicle leakage and activity against C. albicans spheroplasts. In addition, Poly-NM was found to have negligible activity against zwitterionic vesicles and red blood cells. Our results provide a consistent, detailed picture of the mode of action of Poly-NM: this polymer induces membrane leakage by electrostatic lipid clustering. In contrast, Poly-MM:CO, a nylon-3 polymer comprised of both cationic and hydrophobic segments, seems to act by a different mechanism that involves membrane asymmetry stress. Vesicle leakage for this polymer is transient (limited to <100%) and graded, non-specific among zwitterionic and polar yeast lipid vesicles, additive with detergent action, and correlates poorly with biological activity. Based on these results, we conclude that comprehensive leakage experiments can provide a detailed description of the mode of action of membrane permeabilizing

  5. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across the... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  6. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across the... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  7. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across the... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  8. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across the... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  9. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across the... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  10. 49 CFR 229.59 - Leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inch per minute for 3 minutes after the pressure has been reduced to 60 percent of the maximum pressure. (b) Brake pipe leakage may not exceed 5 pounds per square inch per minute. (c) With a full service... shall remain applied at least 5 minutes. (d) Leakage from control air reservoir, related piping,...

  11. 16 CFR 1507.5 - Pyrotechnic leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pyrotechnic leakage. 1507.5 Section 1507.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.5 Pyrotechnic leakage. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall be...

  12. 16 CFR 1507.5 - Pyrotechnic leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pyrotechnic leakage. 1507.5 Section 1507.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.5 Pyrotechnic leakage. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall be...

  13. 16 CFR 1507.5 - Pyrotechnic leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pyrotechnic leakage. 1507.5 Section 1507.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.5 Pyrotechnic leakage. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall be...

  14. 16 CFR 1507.5 - Pyrotechnic leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pyrotechnic leakage. 1507.5 Section 1507.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.5 Pyrotechnic leakage. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall be...

  15. 16 CFR 1507.5 - Pyrotechnic leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pyrotechnic leakage. 1507.5 Section 1507.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.5 Pyrotechnic leakage. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall be...

  16. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

    2013-07-01

    The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

  17. Bag Test Measures Leakage From Insulated Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Kent D.; Easter, Barry P.

    1994-01-01

    Test quantifies leakage of gas from pipe even though pipe covered with insulation. Involves use of helium analyzer to measure concentration of helium in impermeable bag around pipe. Test administered after standard soap-solution bubble test indicates presence and general class of leakage.

  18. Radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Sharabati, Afifeh

    2013-12-01

    This work presents data on the amount of radiation leakage from 117 microwave ovens in domestic and restaurant use in the West Bank, Palestine. The study of leakage is based on the measurements of radiation emissions from the oven in real-life conditions by using a frequency selective field strength measuring system. The power density from individual ovens was measured at a distance of 1 m and at the height of centre of door screen. The tested ovens were of different types, models with operating powers between 1000 and 1600 W and ages ranging from 1 month to >20 y, including 16 ovens with unknown ages. The amount of radiation leakage at a distance of 1 m was found to vary from 0.43 to 16.4 μW cm(-2) with an average value equalling 3.64 μW cm(-2). Leakages from all tested microwave ovens except for seven ovens (∼6 % of the total) were below 10 μW cm(-2). The highest radiation leakage from any tested oven was ∼16.4 μW cm(-2), and found in two cases only. In no case did the leakage exceed the limit of 1 mW cm(-2) recommended by the ICNIRP for 2.45-GHz radiofrequency. This study confirms a linear correlation between the amount of leakage and both oven age and operating power, with a stronger dependence of leakage on age.

  19. A two-dimensional simulation of plasma leakage due to dengue infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, N.; Windarto, Jayanti, Swarna; Soewono, Edy

    2014-03-01

    Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is a disease caused by Dengue virus infection. One major characteristic in a patient with DHF is the occurrence of plasma leakage. Plasma leakage is a consequence of the immune system mechanism which activates cytokine. As a result, permeability of vascular will increase. Another characteristic in a DHF patient is hypoalbuminea (decreasing of albumin concentration). Plasma leakage can be modelled by constructing mathematical model of albumin concentration in plasma blood due to increasing of cytokine. In this paper, decreasing of albumin concentration in blood plasma is modelled using diffusion equation. In addition, two-dimensional numerical simulations of albumin concentration are also presented. From the simulation, it is found that the greater leakage rate or the wider leakage area, the greater decreasing albumin concentration will be. Furthermore, when time t increases, the albumin concentration decreases to zero.

  20. Leakage Currents and Gas Generation in Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Currently, military grade, established reliability wet tantalum capacitors are among the most reliable parts used for space applications. This has been achieved over the years by extensive testing and improvements in design and materials. However, a rapid insertion of new types of advanced, high volumetric efficiency capacitors in space systems without proper testing and analysis of degradation mechanisms might increase risks of failures. The specifics of leakage currents in wet electrolytic capacitors is that the conduction process is associated with electrolysis of electrolyte and gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure in the parts. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. In this work, in Part I, leakages currents in various types of tantalum capacitors have been analyzed in a wide range of voltages, temperatures, and time under bias. Gas generation and the level of internal pressure have been calculated in Part II for different case sizes and different hermeticity leak rates to assess maximal allowable leakage currents. Effects related to electrolyte penetration to the glass seal area have been studied and the possibility of failures analyzed in Part III. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  1. Leakage assessment and identification of fluid leakage scenarios at CO2 storage sites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunz, S.

    2013-12-01

    scenarios have been formulated for both the Sleipner and Snøhvit CO2 storage sites. The leakage scenarios largely include leakage along a chimney (blow-out structure) or along a fault but are adapted to the specific geological background at each storage site and hence, depending on its exact subsurface location and context may yield a complex migration pathway for CO2 from the storage formation to the seafloor. Initial modeling work shows that the leakage scenarios can be successfully implemented into the simulations of fluid flow. This modeling work is integrated with seismic modeling work on detection thresholds of CO2 in the overburden in order to develop simulation-assisted monitoring strategies for seabed and sub-seabed leakage detection of CO2. Within ECO2, the modeling of leakage scenarios provides important constraints on flux rates at the seafloor interface for associated activities in other work packages.

  2. Preoperative Nutritional Therapy Reduces the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage in Patients with Crohn's Disease Requiring Resections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Zuo, Lugen; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background. The rate of anastomotic leakage is high in surgeries for Crohn's disease, and therefore a temporary diverting stoma is often needed. We conducted this study to investigate whether preoperative nutritional therapy could reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage while decreasing the frequency of temporary stoma formation. Methods. This was a retrospective study. Patients requiring bowel resections due to Crohn's disease were reviewed. The rate of anastomotic leakage and temporary diverting stoma was compared between patients who received preoperative nutritional therapy and those on a normal diet before surgery. Possible predictive factors for anastomotic leakage were also analyzed. Results. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing 123 surgeries were included. Patients in nutritional therapy (NT) group had a significantly lower level of C-reactive protein on the day before surgery. Patients in NT group suffered less anastomotic leakage (2.3% versus 17.9%, P = 0.023) and less temporary diverting stoma (22.8% versus 40.9%, P = 0.036). Serum albumin of the day before surgery ≤35 g/L and preoperative nutritional therapy were identified as factors which independently affected the rate of anastomotic leakage. Conclusion. Preoperative nutritional therapy reduced the risk of anastomotic leakage and the frequency of temporary diverting stoma formation in patients with Crohn's disease requiring resections. PMID:26858749

  3. Review on water leakage control in distribution networks and the associated environmental benefits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Liu, Ruiping; Chen, Qiuwen; Li, Ruonan

    2014-05-01

    Water supply is the primary element of an urban system. Due to rapid urbanization and water scarcity, maintaining a stable and safe water supply has become a challenge to many cities, whereas a large amount of water is lost from the pipes of distribution systems. Water leakage is not only a waste of water resources, but also incurs great socio-economic costs. This article presents a comprehensive review on the potential water leakage control approaches and specifically discusses the benefits of each to environmental conservation. It is concluded that water leakage could be further reduced by improving leakage detection capability through a combination of predictive modeling and monitoring instruments, optimizing pipe maintenance strategy, and developing an instant pressure regulation system. The environment could benefit from these actions because of water savings and the reduction of energy consumption as well as greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S.

    1995-08-18

    Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Detecting and Reducing Gate Leakage in Superconducting Qubits using Randomized Benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Korotkov, A. N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting qubits are a promising platform for building a quantum computer due to their scalability and ease of control. One potential drawback is the existence of more than two energy levels, which can allow the qubit to leak out of the computational subspace when performing operations. This leakage error is particularly detrimental in the surface code scheme, where it leads to correlated errors. I will present a method for characterizing gate leakage rates using randomized benchmarking, and present strategies based on these results for reducing leakage.

  6. Multigas Leakage Correction in Static Environmental Chambers Using Sulfur Hexafluoride and Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; von Fischer, Joseph C; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-11-03

    In static environmental chamber experiments, the precision of gas flux measurements can be significantly improved by a thorough gas leakage correction to avoid under- or overestimation of biological activity such as respiration or photosynthesis. Especially in the case of small biological net gas exchange rates or gas accumulation phases during long environmental monitoring experiments, gas leakage fluxes could distort the analysis of the biogenic gas kinetics. Here we propose and demonstrate a general protocol for online correction of diffusion-driven gas leakage in plant chambers by simultaneous quantification of the inert tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and the investigated biogenic gases using enhanced Raman spectroscopy. By quantifying the leakage rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with SF6 in the test chamber, their effective diffusivity ratios of approximately 1.60, 1.96, and 5.65 were determined, each related to SF6. Because our experiments suggest that the effective diffusivity ratios are reproducible for an individual static environmental chamber, even under varying concentration gradients and slight changes of the chamber sealing, an experimental method to quantify gas leakage fluxes by using effective diffusivity ratios and SF6 leakage fluxes is proposed. The method is demonstrated by quantifying the CO2 net exchange rate of a plant-soil ecosystem (Mirabilis jalapa). By knowing the effective chamber diffusivity ratio CO2/SF6 and the measured SF6 leakage rate during the experiment, the leakage contribution to the total CO2 exchange rate could be calculated and the biological net CO2 concentration change within the chamber atmosphere determined.

  7. Differential action for ethanol on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate and sympathetic efferent discharge in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Z.; Abdel-Rahman, A.R.A.; Wooles, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol (0.33, 0.66, or 1 g/kg) on baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and sympathetic efferent discharge (SED) were investigated in rats. The two higher doses of ethanol caused a progressive and significant increase in baseline SED and a slight increase in HR. The findings suggest that the sensitivity of the reflex control of SED was preserved whereas that of HR was impaired after acute ethanol administration. Since these findings were obtained in the same animals, the data suggest that acute ethanol has a differential action on reflex control of SED and HR. Further, the significant increase in SED after moderate and high doses of ethanol suggests an increased central sympathetic tone as recordings were made from preganglionic nerve fibers (splanchnic nerve). The absence of an increase in baseline MAP, in spite of a significant increase in baseline SED following acute ethanol injection, could be explained, at least in part, by an ethanol-evoked reduction in pressor responsiveness to phenylephrine, an ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist.

  8. Apparatus for detecting leakage of liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Himeno, Yoshiaki

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting the leakage of liquid sodium includes a cable-like sensor adapted to be secured to a wall of piping or other equipment having sodium on the opposite side of the wall, and the sensor includes a core wire electrically connected to the wall through a leak current detector and a power source. An accidental leakage of the liquid sodium causes the corrosion of a metallic layer and an insulative layer of the sensor by products resulted from a reaction of sodium with water or oxygen in the atmospheric air so as to decrease the resistance between the core wire and the wall. Thus, the leakage is detected as an increase in the leaking electrical current. The apparatus is especially adapted for use in detecting the leakage of liquid sodium from sodium-conveying pipes or equipment in a fast breeder reactor.

  9. [Bile leakage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Authors' experience].

    PubMed

    Sperlongano, P; Pisaniello, D; Corsale, I; Cozza, G

    1999-01-01

    The Authors report their experience of two patients with bile leakage following videocholecystectomy (VLC) among a series of 163 cases. Reviewing the Literature, they analyze possible causes and mechanisms of bile spillage occurring after VCL. They also suggest some guidelines for a safe VLC, stressing the importance of the routinary placement of the sub-hepatic drainage to remove 48 hours to early detect possible bile leakages after surgery.

  10. Technology evaluation for space station atmospheric leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Friesel, M.A.; Griffin, J.W.; Skorpik, J.R.; Shepard, C.L.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1990-02-01

    A concern in operation of a space station is leakage of atmosphere through seal points and through the walls as a result of damage from particle (space debris and micrometeoroid) impacts. This report describes a concept for a monitoring system to detect atmosphere leakage and locate the leak point. The concept is based on analysis and testing of two basic methods selected from an initial technology survey of potential approaches. 18 refs., 58 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Continued Investigation of Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    2007-01-01

    Seal leakage decreases with increasing surface speed due to reduced clearances from disk centrifugal growth. Annular and labyrinth seal leakage are 2-3 times greater than brush and finger seal leakage. Seal leakage rates increase with increasing temperature because of seal clearance growth due to different coefficients of thermal expansion between the seal and test disk. Seal power loss is not strongly affected by inlet temperature. Seal power loss increases with increasing surface speed, seal pressure differential, mass flow rate or flow factor, and radial clearance. The brush and finger seals had nearly the same power loss. Annular and labyrinth seal power loss were higher than finger or brush seal power loss. The brush seal power loss was the lowest and 15-30% lower than annular and labyrinth seal power loss.

  12. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  13. EFFECTS OF LEAKAGE NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2012-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate effects of neutral particles on shocks propagating into the partially ionized medium. We find that for 120 km s{sup -1} < u {sub sh} < 3000 km s{sup -1} (u {sub sh} is the shock velocity), about 10% of upstream neutral particles leak into the upstream region from the downstream region. Moreover, we investigate how the leakage neutral particles affect the upstream structure of the shock and particle accelerations. Using four-fluid approximations (upstream ions, upstream neutral particles, leakage neutral particles, and pickup ions), we provide analytical solutions of the precursor structure due to leakage neutral particles. It is shown that the upstream flow is decelerated in the precursor region and the shock compression ratio becomes smaller than without leakage neutral particles, but the total compression ratio does not change. Even if leakage of neutral particles is small (a few percent of total upstream particles), this smaller compression ratio of the shock can explain steep gamma-ray spectra from young supernova remnants. Furthermore, leakage neutral particles could amplify the magnetic field and heat the upstream region.

  14. Leakage predictions for Rayleigh-step, helium-purge seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1988-01-01

    Rayleigh-step, helium purge, annular shaft seals, studied for use in liquid oxygen turbopumps, generate a hydrodynamic force that enables the seal to follow shaft perturbations. Hence, smaller clearances can be used to reduce seal leakage. FLOWCAL, a computer code developed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated, predicts gas flow rate through an annular seal with an axial pressure gradient. Analysis of a 50-mm Rayleigh-step, helium-purge, annular seal showed the flow rate increased axial pressure gradient, downstream pressure, and eccentricity ratio. Increased inlet temperature reduced leakage. Predictions made at maximum and minimum clearances (due to centrifugal and thermal growths, machining tolerances and + or - 2 percent uncertainty in the clearance measurement) placed wide boundaries on expected flow rates. The widest boundaries were set by thermal growth conditions. Predicted flow rates for a 50-mm Rayleigh-step, helium-purge, annular seal underestimated measured flow rates by three to seven times. However, the analysis did accurately predict flow rates for choked gas flow through annular seals when compared to flow rates measured in two other independent studies.

  15. Analysis of anastomotic leakage after rectal surgery: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of anastomotic leakage in rectal surgery is around 10 percent. Poor blood supply to the anastomosis, high anastomotic pressure and tension, increased operative blood loss, long operative time, and male sex are risk factors of anastomotic leakage. In the present study, we examined anastomotic leakage cases in rectal surgery at our institute and tried to ascertain the risk factors. Methods Three hundred fifty-seven consecutive patients who underwent rectal resection with anastomosis between January 2008 and October 2013 were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the existence of anastomotic leakage. Clinicopathological features, operative procedures, and intraoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Regarding intraoperative procedure, we focused on the ligation level of the inferior mesenteric artery, installing a transanal drainage tube in the rectum, and constructing a diverting stoma. Results Anastomotic leakage occurred in eight patients. All of them were male (p = 0.0284). There were no statistical differences in other characteristics of the patients or tumors, in operative procedures, or in intraoperative outcomes. Conclusions In the present study, no statistically significant risk factors for anastomotic leakage in rectal surgery were detected, except for male sex. However, the rate of anastomotic leakage at our institute was revealed to be rather low. Our exertion to preserve good blood flow and to prevent high tension and pressure on the anastomosis in operation may have led to this result. PMID:26042185

  16. Effect of phentolamine, alprenolol and prenylamine on maximum rate of rise of action potential in guinea-pig papillary muscles.

    PubMed

    Sada, H

    1978-10-01

    Effects of phentolamine (13.3, 26.5 and 53.0 micron), alprenolol (3.5, 7.0 and 17.5 micron) and prenylamine (2.4, 4.8 and 11.9 micron) on the transmembrane potential were studied in isolated guinea-pig papillary muscles, superfused with Tyrode's solution. 1. Phentolamine, alprenolol and prenylamine reduced the maximum rate of rise of action potential (.Vmax) dose-dependently. Higher concentrations of phentolamine and prenylamine caused a loss of plateau in a majority of the preparations. Resting potential was not altered by any of the drugs. Readmittance of drug-free Tyrode's solution reversed these changes induced by 13.3 micron of phentolamine and all conconcentrations of alprenolol almost completely but those induced by higher concentrations of phentolamine and all concentrations of prenylamine only slightly. 2. .Vmax at steady state was increased with decreasing driving frequencies (0.5 and 0.25 Hz) and was decreased with increasing ones (2--5 Hz) in comparison with that at 1 Hz. Such changes were all exaggerated by the above drugs, particularly by prenylamine. 3. Prenylamine and, to a lesser degree, phentolamine and alprenolol delayed dose-dependently the recovery process of .Vmax in premature responses. 4. .Vmax in the first response after interruption of stimulation recovered toward the predrug value in the presence of the above three drugs. The time constants of recovery process ranged between 10.5 and 15.0s for phentolamine, between 4.5 and 15.5s for alprenolol. The time constant of the main component was estimated to be approximately 2s for the recovery process with prenylamine. 5. On the basis of the model recently proposed by Hondeghem and Katzung (1977), it is suggested that the drug molecules associate with the open sodium channels and dissociated slowly from the closed channels and that the inactivation parameter in the drug-associated channels is shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction.

  17. 49 CFR 192.723 - Distribution systems: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. 192.723... Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. (a) Each operator of a distribution system shall conduct periodic leakage surveys in accordance with this section. (b) The type and scope of the leakage control...

  18. 49 CFR 192.706 - Transmission lines: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. 192.706... Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. Leakage surveys of a transmission line must be conducted at intervals not... transports gas in conformity with § 192.625 without an odor or odorant, leakage surveys using leak...

  19. 49 CFR 192.723 - Distribution systems: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. 192.723... Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. (a) Each operator of a distribution system shall conduct periodic leakage surveys in accordance with this section. (b) The type and scope of the leakage control...

  20. 49 CFR 192.706 - Transmission lines: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. 192.706... Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. Leakage surveys of a transmission line must be conducted at intervals not... transports gas in conformity with § 192.625 without an odor or odorant, leakage surveys using leak...

  1. 49 CFR 192.723 - Distribution systems: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. 192.723... Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. (a) Each operator of a distribution system shall conduct periodic leakage surveys in accordance with this section. (b) The type and scope of the leakage control...

  2. 49 CFR 192.706 - Transmission lines: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. 192.706... Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. Leakage surveys of a transmission line must be conducted at intervals not... transports gas in conformity with § 192.625 without an odor or odorant, leakage surveys using leak...

  3. 49 CFR 192.706 - Transmission lines: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. 192.706... Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. Leakage surveys of a transmission line must be conducted at intervals not... transports gas in conformity with § 192.625 without an odor or odorant, leakage surveys using leak...

  4. 49 CFR 192.723 - Distribution systems: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. 192.723... Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. (a) Each operator of a distribution system shall conduct periodic leakage surveys in accordance with this section. (b) The type and scope of the leakage control...

  5. 49 CFR 192.723 - Distribution systems: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. 192.723... Distribution systems: Leakage surveys. (a) Each operator of a distribution system shall conduct periodic leakage surveys in accordance with this section. (b) The type and scope of the leakage control...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Portable leakage current alarm. 870.2640 Section... leakage current alarm. (a) Identification. A portable leakage current alarm is a device used to measure the electrical leakage current between any two points of an electrical system and to sound an alarm...

  7. Oil Leakage from the Seal Ring of a Scroll Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Fukui, Atsushi; Horiguchi, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu; Toyama, Toshiyuki

    In scroll compressors for air conditioners, there is a compressor with back-pressure chamber spaced by seal ring behind orbiting scroll. High pressure in the backpressure chamber presses the orbiting scroll to fixed scroll. In the case that lubrication oil and refrigerant gas with high pressure and temperature in the backpressure chamber leak to low pressure chamber through the seal ring, the efficiency of compressor decreases and the oil circulation rate can increase. In the present study the leakage characteristics of lubrication oil from the backpressure chamber to the low pressure chamber were investigated. In experiment, it was found that the oil leakage is larger for higher rotational speed of rotating disk, higher viscosity of oil and smaller pressure difference between the backpressure and low-pressure chambers. This could be explained by the calculation in which the seal ring was assumed to have a tilt angle. It was also found in the calculation that oil leakage is larger due to the thicker oil film between the seal ring and the rotating disk in the case of higher rotational speed of the disk, higher viscosity of oil and smaller pressure difference between the backpressure and low-pressure chambers.

  8. Subsurface Barrier Formation as a CO2 Leakage Mitigation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaneda Herrera, C. A.; Stevens, G.; Haese, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term CO2 containment in a geological storage reservoir is a key criterion for successfully implementing carbon capture and storage (CCS), however, CO2 leakage through different pathways cannot be completely ruled out in some instances. In this study we investigate the conditions for reactive barrier formation as a technology to mitigate and remediate CO2 leakage. We propose to inject a liquid reagent consistent of an alkaline sodium-silicate solution on top of the storage caprock, which will lead to silica mineral precipitation when in contact with an acidic, CO2-enriched fluid. This reaction will create a barrier that seals the leakage by reducing the permeability. Preliminary modelling has shown that the density, viscosity and alkalinity of the reagent fluid are critical for a successful seal formation, whereas differences in formation water composition and in the rock mineral composition are less important. In order to study the reaction through experiments, different reagent solutions were prepared and characterised in terms of silica concentration, density, viscosity and buffer capacity. In a static, diffusion-controlled batch experiment we observed silica mineral precipitation in the outer layer of the piece of rock inhibiting further mixing of the two fluids and slowing down the initial reaction rate. Core-flood experiments will be carried out to simulate barrier formation under fluid flow conditions. Here, the sealing efficiency of the reaction will be continuously measured in terms of a change in permeability.

  9. Multicenter Analysis of Long-Term Oncologic Impact of Anastomotic Leakage After Laparoscopic Total Mesorectal Excision

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeonghyun; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Nam Kyu; Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Kang Young; Baik, Seung Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to validate the oncologic outcomes of anastomotic leakage (AL) after laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) in a large multicenter cohort. The impact of AL after laparoscopic TME for rectal cancer surgery has not yet been clearly described. This was a multicenter retrospective study of 1083 patients who underwent laparoscopic TME for nonmetastatic rectal cancer (stage 0–III). AL was defined as an anastomotic complication within 30 days of surgery irrespective of requiring a reoperation or interventional radiology. Estimated local recurrence (LR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between the leakage group and the no leakage group using the log-rank method. Multivariate Cox-regression analysis was used to adjust confounding for survival. The incidence of AL was 6.4%. Mortality within 30 days of surgery occurred in 1 patient (1.4%) in the leakage group and 2 patients (0.2%) in the no leakage group. The leakage group showed a higher LR rate (6.4% vs 1.8%, P = 0.011). Five-year DFS and OS were significantly lower in the leakage group than the no leakage group (DFS 71.7% vs 82.1%, P = 0.016, OS 81.8% vs 93.5%, P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis showed that AL was an independent poor prognostic factor for DFS and OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.0–2.6; P = 0.042, HR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0–4.2; P = 0.028, respectively). AL after laparoscopic TME was significantly associated with an increased rate of LR, systemic recurrence and poor OS. PMID:26200636

  10. Geologic Storage of CO2: Leakage Pathways and Environmental Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celia, M. A.; Peters, C. A.; Bachu, S.

    2002-05-01

    of the overall storage scheme and contributes to possible climate change. To characterize these environmental consequences, reliable models of leakage characteristics and rates are needed. While leakage through natural flowpaths in the subsurface may occur, a more likely pathway is leakage through abandoned wells. This may be especially troublesome in mature sedimentary basins, which are often "punctured" by a very large number of exploration and production wells. For example, in the Alberta Basin there are more than 100,000 abandoned wells, the oldest from 1883. The cement used in the completion and abandonment of these wells, historically of variable quality and quantity, most probably has degraded with age and under the effect of formation brines. The cement may degrade even more rapidly when contacted by CO2 and possibly other components in the injection mixture (such as H2S). Cement properties and their modification through time must be understood in order to provide reliable estimates of leakage rates. Those leakage rates must then be linked to models of environmental consequences, and ultimately the entire analysis must be embedded in a probabilistic framework. Such an approach will allow leakage to be addressed rationally in terms of safety and long-term environmental impacts.

  11. Air heater leakage: worse than you think

    SciTech Connect

    Guffre, J.

    2006-04-15

    Every good engineer knows that you cannot control what you cannot measure. In the case of rotary regenerative air heaters, many plants fail to limit the negative impact of heater leakage because they use measurement procedures and/or devices that fail to take into account its indirect effects. For a 500 MW coal-fired plant the heat energy that air heaters capture and recycle amounts to about 60% of that existing in the boiler, equivalent to 1.5 Btu per hour. This article explains the importance of accurately measuring leakage levels and the need to use modern seals to make heaters air-tight. 4 figs.

  12. A method to investigate inter-aquifer leakage using hydraulics and multiple environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Stacey; Love, Andrew; Wohling, Daniel; Post, Vincent; Shand, Paul; Kipfer, Rolf; Tyroller, Lina

    2016-04-01

    Informed aquifer management decisions regarding sustainable yields or potential exploitation require an understanding of the groundwater system (Alley et al. 2002, Cherry and Parker 2004). Recently, the increase in coal seam gas (CSG) or shale gas production has highlighted the need for a better understanding of inter-aquifer leakage and contaminant migration. In most groundwater systems, the quantity or location of inter-aquifer leakage is unknown. Not taking into account leakage rates in the analysis of large scale flow systems can also lead to significant errors in the estimates of groundwater flow rates in aquifers (Love et al. 1993, Toth 2009). There is an urgent need for robust methods to investigate inter-aquifer leakage at a regional scale. This study builds on previous groundwater flow and inter-aquifer leakage studies to provide a methodology to investigate inter-aquifer leakage in a regional sedimentary basin using hydraulics and a multi-tracer approach. The methodology incorporates geological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical information in the basin to determine the likelihood and location of inter-aquifer leakage. Of particular benefit is the analysis of hydraulic heads and environmental tracers at nested piezometers, or where these are unavailable bore couplets comprising bores above and below the aquitard of interest within a localised geographical area. The proposed methodology has been successful in investigating inter-aquifer leakage in the Arckaringa Basin, South Australia. The suite of environmental tracers and isotopes used to analyse inter-aquifer leakage included the stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, chloride-36, 87Sr/86Sr and helium isotopes. There is evidence for inter-aquifer leakage in the centre of the basin ~40 km along the regional flow path. This inter-aquifer leakage has been identified by a slight draw-down in the upper aquifer during pumping in the lower aquifer, overlap in Sr isotopes, δ2H, δ18O and chloride

  13. Kinetics of rate-dependent shortening of action potential duration in guinea-pig ventricle; effects of IK1 and IKr blockade.

    PubMed

    Williams, B A; Dickenson, D R; Beatch, G N

    1999-03-01

    1. The kinetics of shortening of action potential duration (APD) following an increase in pacing rate, from 2 to 3.3 Hz, was characterized in guinea-pig ventricular preparations. Terikalant (RP62719), an inhibitor of the inwardly rectifying K+ current (IK1), and dofetilide, a specific inhibitor of the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier current (IKr), were applied to determine the effect of inhibition of these ion currents on slow APD shortening. 2. Action potentials were recorded from isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes using the perforated-patch patch-clamp technique, and monophasic action potentials were recorded from Langendorff-perfused guinea-pig ventricles using a contact epicardial probe. 3. Under control conditions, after an increase in pacing rate, APD immediately decreased, and then shortened slowly with an exponential time course. In ventricular myocytes, the time constant of this exponential shortening was 28+/-4 s and the amount of slow shortening was 21.9+/-0.9 ms (n=8) for an increase in rate from 2 to 3.3 Hz. Similar values were observed in Langendorff-perfused ventricles. 4. Terikalant dose-dependently increased APD and the increase was enhanced by rapid pacing ('positive' rate-dependence). The drug dose-dependently decreased the time constant of shortening and amount of slow APD shortening. In contrast, dofetilide, an inhibitor of IKr, which shows 'reverse' rate-dependent APD widening, had no significant effect on the time constant or amount of slow shortening. 5. These observations suggest that IK1 plays a role in rate-dependent shortening of APD. The results appear to support the hypothesis that 'reverse' rate-dependent effects of IKr blockers are due to these drugs not affecting the ion current(s) mediating intrinsic rate-dependent slow shortening of APD.

  14. Using Group Counseling to Improve the Attendance of Elementary School Students with High Rates of Absenteeism: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb-Landman, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    The foundations of academic and social learning are laid in the early years of school, and attendance is critical to school success. However, research suggests that chronic absenteeism is a significant problem at the elementary school level (Chang & Romero, 2008; Romero & Lee, 2007). This paper presents the results of an action research…

  15. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  16. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Wärme und Feuchte instationär Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  17. Control of Air Leakage in Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, A. Grant

    This discussion of air leakage emphasizes cause and provides suggestions for elimination of undesirable effects. Cause parameters described are--(1) pressure differential, (2) building shape, (3) temperature differential, (4) opening sizes, (5) mechanical system pressures, and (6) climatic factors. Effects discussed are--(1) increased mechanical…

  18. How Much Leakage Renders the Greenhouse Gas Footprint of Natural Gas Equivalent to Coal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N., II; Mays, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Under ideal circumstances, generating electricity from natural gas releases approximately half the carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions of coal. However, because the primary component of natural gas (i.e., methane) is a potent greenhouse gas, accounting for leakage is crucial when considering natural gas as a bridge fuel. This presentation answers the question: How much leakage renders the greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of natural gas equivalent to coal? To answer this question, we present a simple model that assumes the GHG footprint for each fuel is the sum of emissions from (1) electricity generation and (2) natural gas leakage. Emissions resulting from electricity generation are taken from published life-cycle assessments (LCAs). Emissions from natural gas leakage are estimated assuming that natural gas is 80% methane, which is converted to carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC's) global warming potential (GWP). One complication in using the GWP is its dependence on time horizon, where shorter time horizons penalize methane emissions more, and longer time horizons less. Specifically, the IPCC considers time horizons of 20, 100 and 500 years for comparison between the differing greenhouse gases. To explicitly account for the effect of time horizon, the results presented here are shown on a straightforward plot of GHG footprint versus time horizon for natural gas leakage rates of 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8%. This plot shows that natural gas leakage of 2.0% or 4.8% eliminates half of natural gas's GHG footprint advantage over coal at 20- or 100-year time horizons, respectively. Leakage of 3.9% or 9.1% completely eliminates the GHG footprint advantage over coal at 20- and 100-year time horizons, respectively. Results indicate that leakage control is essential for the electricity generated from the combustion of natural gas to create a smaller GHG footprint than the electricity generated from the combustion of coal.

  19. High rate of methane leakage from natural gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Natural gas production is growing as the United States seeks domestic sources of relatively clean energy. Natural gas combustion produces less carbon dioxide emissions than coal or oil for the amount of energy produced. However, one source of concern is that some natural gas leaks to the atmosphere from the extraction point, releasing methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

  20. 19 CFR 158.7 - Allowance for reduction or loss of merchandise by a natural force or by leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... subject to ad valorem, specific, or compound rates of duty found at the time of importation to be reduced or diminished by a natural force, such as evaporation, or by leakage, shall be appraised in...

  1. 19 CFR 158.7 - Allowance for reduction or loss of merchandise by a natural force or by leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... subject to ad valorem, specific, or compound rates of duty found at the time of importation to be reduced or diminished by a natural force, such as evaporation, or by leakage, shall be appraised in...

  2. An Advanced Leakage Scheme for Neutrino Treatment in Astrophysical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A.; Cabezón, R. M.; Käppeli, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively) separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of CCSNe. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL scheme, coupling it to an axisymmetric Eulerian and to a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate core collapse. Therefore, the neutrino treatment presented here is ideal for large parameter-space explorations, parametric studies, high-resolution tests, code developments, and long-term modeling of asymmetric configurations, where more detailed neutrino treatments are not available or are currently computationally too expensive.

  3. AN ADVANCED LEAKAGE SCHEME FOR NEUTRINO TREATMENT IN ASTROPHYSICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Perego, A.; Cabezón, R. M.; Käppeli, R.

    2016-04-15

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively) separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of CCSNe. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL scheme, coupling it to an axisymmetric Eulerian and to a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate core collapse. Therefore, the neutrino treatment presented here is ideal for large parameter-space explorations, parametric studies, high-resolution tests, code developments, and long-term modeling of asymmetric configurations, where more detailed neutrino treatments are not available or are currently computationally too expensive.

  4. Using the extended finite element method for simulation of transient well leakage in multilayer aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, James R.; Gracie, Robert

    2011-09-01

    The extended finite element (XFEM) is applied to the problem of transient leakage from abandoned or free-flowing artesian wells in perforated aquifer-aquitard systems. To more accurately capture the singularities in potentiometric head at the wells, the standard linear finite element basis is locally augmented with asymptotic analytical solutions which enable more accurate calculations of leakage rates between aquifers. Highly accurate flux estimates are obtained without the need for higher mesh resolution near wells. Simulations are carried out to test both the accuracy and convergence properties of the XFEM implementation, and the XFEM results are compared to those of a high-resolution standard finite element model. It is seen that for the type of singularity-driven problem posed here, the standard FEM is unable to resolve leakage rates without very fine discretization, but that the XFEM performs robustly with fewer degrees of freedom. The impact of aquifer geometric heterogeneity on leakage rates is assessed and seen to be an important factor in determining total leakage. It is demonstrated that the XFEM may be a valuable tool in many water resources applications where small-scale effects can impact global system behavior.

  5. Cuff leakage, not paravalvular leakage, in the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Cho, Tomoki; Izubuchi, Ryo; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-12-01

    Though the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease valve is a bioprosthesis with documented excellent haemodynamics and easy implantability, this valve has a gap between the cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy stent and silicone sewing ring. This gap, which is widest just below each of the three commissural struts, lacks silicone and leaves the two-layer polytetrafluoroethylene fabric unsupported and unprotected. If the needle of a valve suture is placed in this structurally weak area of the sewing ring, the resultant fabric tear may result in a true cuff leakage, not the usual paravalvular leakage. We describe this pitfall in the context of a recent operation to alert surgeons everywhere that suture placement too close to the stent (missing the silicone sewing ring) can result in postoperative cuff leakage. We need to be very careful to include the silicone ring in each stitch to prevent injury to the valve cuff of this prosthesis and to avoid cuff leakage.

  6. Could legal requirements in nursing practice trigger actions that would change the rates of urinary tract infections? A case study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Rodrigues, Clesnan; Pereira, Eliana Borges Silva; Sousa Neto, Renata Lemos de; Resende, Jaqueline; Fontes, Astrídia Marília de Souza

    2017-03-07

    We evaluated the influence of a Brazilian resolution, published in 2013, that restricts the performing of urinary catheterization to nurses, as opposed to others from different nursing professional categories, on indicators of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in an intensive care unit. The resolution triggered actions such as the implementation of protocols and nursing staff training that led to behavior changes related to the reduction of catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates.

  7. Technical Actions, Heart Rate, and Locomotor Activity in 7v7 and 8v8 Games for Female Youth Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Ørntoft, Christina; Larsen, Malte N; Andersen, Thomas B; Rasmussen, Lasse S; Póvoas, Susana C A; Randers, Morten B; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Ørntoft, C, Larsen, MN, Andersen, TB, Rasmussen, LS, Póvoas, SCA, Randers, MB, and Krustrup, P. Technical actions, heart rate, and locomotor activity in 7v7 and 8v8 games for female youth soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3298-3303, 2016-The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical performance, heart rate (HR), and activity profile in 7v7 and 8v8 soccer games for 9- to 10-year-old girls (U11). A total of 24 female youth players participated in the study, all playing 20-minute 7v7 and 8v8 games with 160 and 223 m per player, respectively. Technical actions, HR, and activity profile were measured during the games using video filming, HR monitors, and 5-Hz Global positioning system (GPS) units. The number of technical actions was higher in 7v7 than in 8v8 games (34 ± 19 vs. 28 ± 14; p = 0.03; d = 0.37), as was the number of successful actions (25 ± 16 vs. 20 ± 12; p = 0.01; d = 0.35), with no difference in success rate for technical actions (70 ± 13 vs. 69 ± 14%; p = 0.63; d = 0.07). No differences were found between 7v7 and 8v8 in total distance covered (1,574 ± 251 and 1,622 ± 281 m; p = 0.66; d = 0.18), peak speed (19.5 ± 2.6 and 20.7 ± 1.5 km·h; p = 0.16; d = 0.56), mean HR values (85 ± 5 and 86 ± 6%HRpeak; p = 0.85; d = 0.18), and time of >90% HRpeak (37 ± 16 and 35 ± 14% of playing time; p = 0.70; d = 0.13). Distance covered at the highest running speeds of >16 km·h was lower in 7v7 than in 8v8 games (34 ± 24 vs. 63 ± 34 m; p = 0.018; d = 0.98), as was the number of entries into this speed zone (8 ± 5 vs. 13 ± 7; p = 0.006; d = 0.82). In conclusion, more technical actions and successful actions were observed in 7v7 than in 8v8 games, but players covered more ground with high-speed running in 8v8 games. This study also revealed that HR values were high in both game formats for U11 adolescent female players, with no difference between formats.

  8. Structural and leakage integrity of tubes affected by circumferential cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hernalsteen, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper the author deals with the notion that circumferential cracks are generally considered unacceptable. He argues for the need to differentiate two facets of such cracks: the issue of the size and growth rate of a crack; and the issue of the structural strength and leakage potential of the tube in the presence of the crack. In this paper the author tries to show that the second point is not a major concern for such cracks. The paper presents data on the structural strength or burst pressure characteristics of steam generator tubes derived from models and data bases of experimental work. He also presents a leak rate model, and compares the performance of circumferential and axial cracks as far as burst strength and leak rate. The final conclusion is that subject to improvement in NDE capabilities (sizing, detection, growth), that Steam Generator Defect Specific Management can be used to allow circumferentially degraded tubes to remain in service.

  9. Uncertainty Quantification of CO2 Leakage through a Fault with Multiphase and Geo-mechanic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; White, J. A.; Hao, Y.; Sun, Y.; Chiaramonte, L.; Carroll, S.

    2012-12-01

    The potential for CO2 leakage through a permeable fault is a key concern for geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) in saline formations, which typically involves CO2 being injected under supercritical conditions. If CO2 migrates vertically upward through a fault from the storage reservoir to an overlying fresh-water aquifer, phase change can occur because temperature and pressure decrease with decreasing depth. The decrease in CO2 density during phase transition causes an additional reduction in temperature (Joule-Thomson cooling effect), which reduces CO2 viscosity, resulting in an increase in the CO2 leakage rate. In this paper, we present a computational model for simulating the behavior of a leaky fault connecting a saline CO2 storage reservoir and an overlying fresh-water aquifer. We address phase transition, considering the nonlinear CO2 enthalpy and viscosity functions, the impact of geo-mechanics on rock hydraulic properties. The model is initialized to represent the hydrostatic and geothermal temperature gradients in the model domain, which extends from 230 to 2000 m below the ground surface. Time-varying boundary conditions of pressure and CO2 saturation are specified at the lower boundary to a hypothetical fault to represent conditions in an operating CO2 storage reservoir during both the injection and post-injection periods. The model results indicate that the CO2 leakage rate initially increases when CO2 migration is driven by both buoyancy and overpressure during the period of injection-driven pressure buildup in the reservoir. For the post-injection period when overpressure in the reservoir dissipates, CO2 leakage is only driven by buoyancy and the leakage rate decreases. The deterministic model of this faulted reservoir system is used within an uncertainty quantification (UQ) sampling framework in order to rigorously quantify the sensitivity of the brine and CO2 leakage response to the uncertain model parameters, including the input constitutive

  10. Scintigraphic detection of urinary leakage after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    DeLange, E E; Pauwels, E K; Lobatto, S; Tjon Pian Gi-van Loon, C E; van Hooff, J P

    1982-01-01

    Urinary leakage after kidney transplantation is a serious complication. In a retrospective study we analyzed 8 relevant cases of 14 patients with urinary leakage. In these eight patients kidney scintigraphy indicated the presence of urinary extravasation. Compared with other imaging modalities such as IV urography, cystography and ultrasound, scintigraphy seems to be an easy and safe method to detect urinary leakage. Moreover scintigraphic examination may suggest leakage, while this may not be clinically evident or suspected.

  11. Trending of Overboard Leakage of ISS Cabin Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaezler, Ryan N.; Cook, Anthony J.; Leonard, Daniel J.; Ghariani, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) overboard leakage of cabin atmosphere is continually tracked to identify new or aggravated leaks and to provide information for planning of nitrogen supply to the ISS. The overboard leakage is difficult to trend with various atmosphere constituents being added and removed. Changes to nitrogen partial pressure is the nominal means of trending the overboard leakage. This paper summarizes the method of the overboard leakage trending and presents findings from the trending.

  12. Experimental determination of methane dissolution from simulated subsurface oil leakages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauthoff, W.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Brewer, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Subsurface oil leakages and increased offshore drilling efforts have raised concern over the fate of hydrocarbon mixtures of oil and gas in ocean environments. Recent wellhead and pipeline failures in the Gulf of Mexico are extreme examples of this problem. Understanding the mechanism and rate of vertical transport of hydrocarbon chemical species is necessary to predict the environmental impact of subsurface leakages. In a series of controlled experiments, we carried out a deep-sea field experiment in Monterey Canyon to investigate the behavior of a gas-saturated liquid hydrocarbon mass rising from the seafloor. Aboard the R/V Rachel Carson, we used the ROV Ventana to transport a laboratory prepared volume of decane (C10H22) saturated with methane gas (CH4) to mimic a subsurface seafloor discharge. We released the oil and gas mixture into a vertically oriented open bottom glass tube followed by methane loss rate measurements both at discrete depths, and during rapid, continuous vehicle ascent from 800 to 100 m water depth to monitor changes in dissolution and bubble nucleation. Using laser Raman techniques and HD video we quantified the chemical state of the hydrocarbon fluid, including rate of methane gas dissolution. The primary methane Raman peak was readily observable within the decane C-H stretching complex. Variation in the amount of gas dissolved in the oil greatly influences oil plume density and in turn oil plume vertical rise rate. Our results show that the rise rate of the hydrocarbon mass significantly exceeds the rate at which the excess methane was lost by dissolution. This result implies that vertical transport of methane in the saturated hydrocarbon liquid phase can greatly exceed a gas bubble plume ascending the water column from a seafloor source. These results and observations may be applicable to improved understanding of the composition, distribution, and environmental fate of leaked hydrocarbon mixtures and inform remediation efforts.

  13. Engine panel seals for hypersonic engine applications: High temperature leakage assessments and flow modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Du, Guang-Wu; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Ko, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A critical mechanical system in advanced hypersonic engines is the panel-edge seal system that seals gaps between the articulating horizontal engine panels and the adjacent engine splitter walls. Significant advancements in seal technology are required to meet the extreme demands placed on the seals, including the simultaneous requirements of low leakage, conformable, high temperature, high pressure, sliding operation. In this investigation, the seal concept design and development of two new seal classes that show promise of meeting these demands will be presented. These seals include the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal. Presented are key elements of leakage flow models for each of these seal types. Flow models such as these help designers to predict performance-robbing parasitic losses past the seals, and estimate purge coolant flow rates. Comparisons are made between measured and predicted leakage rates over a wide range of engine simulated temperatures and pressures, showing good agreement.

  14. Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Price, Phillip N.

    2012-09-01

    Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage. In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate interzone leakage.

  15. 49 CFR 192.706 - Transmission lines: Leakage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. 192.706... Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. Leakage surveys of a transmission line must be conducted at intervals not exceeding 15 months, but at least once each calendar year. However, in the case of a transmission line...

  16. Liver Cirrhosis/Severe Fibrosis Is a Risk Factor for Anastomotic Leakage after Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Irina; Willi, Niels; Stickel, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Liver cirrhosis associated with high perioperative morbidity/mortality. This retrospective study determines whether liver cirrhosis represents a risk factor for anastomotic leakage after colonic anastomosis or not. Methods. Based on a prospective database with all consecutive colorectal resections performed at the authors' institution from 07/2002 to 07/2012 (n = 2104) all colonic and rectal anastomoses were identified (n = 1875). A temporary loop ileostomy was constructed in 257 cases (13.7%) either due to Mannheimer Peritonitis-Index > 29 or rectal anastomosis below 6 cm from the anal verge. More than one-third of the patients (n = 691) had postoperative contrast enema, either at the occasion of another study or prior to closure of ileostomy. The presence of liver cirrhosis and the development of anastomotic leakage were assessed by chart review. Results. The overall anastomotic leakage rate was 2.7% (50/1875). In patients with cirrhosis/severe fibrosis, the anastomotic leakage rate was 12.5% (3/24), while it was only 2.5% (47/1851) in those without (p = 0.024). The difference remained statistically significant after correction for confounding factors by multivariate analysis. Conclusion. Patients with liver cirrhosis/severe fibrosis have an increased risk of leakage after colonic anastomosis. PMID:28105046

  17. Efficient quantum dialogue without information leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ai-Han; Tang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Dong

    2015-02-01

    A two-step quantum dialogue scheme is put forward with a class of three-qubit W state and quantum dense coding. Each W state can carry three bits of secret information and the measurement result is encrypted without information leakage. Furthermore, we utilize the entangle properties of W state and decoy photon checking technique to realize three-time channel detection, which can improve the efficiency and security of the scheme.

  18. Implementing the ICPD Plan of Action in Central Asian Republics and Kazakhstan (CARAK). Turkmenistan. Abortion rate declines.

    PubMed

    Mamedov, K

    1995-05-01

    Turkmenistan has a population of 4,361,300. Its composition by nationality is 72% Turmen; 9.5% Russian; 9% Uzbek; 2.5% Kazakh; and 7% other. The majority of the population is Muslim. The annual rate of increase in population is 3%. The birth rate is 33.1 per 1000, and the natural growth rate is 25.2 per 1000. The maternal mortality rate is 105.3 per 100,000 live births. The main cause of maternal mortality is obstetrical hemorrhage, which accounts for one-third of deaths. The perinatal mortality rate is 23.8 per 1000 live births (stillbirths, 14.5; neonates, 9.3). Preterm infants account for 42.2% of perinatal mortality. A family planning service has existed in the country since 1989. The IUD is the most popular contraceptive method; 41,666 coils were inserted in 1993. Hormonal contraception was received by 0.2% (1610 women). In the past five years, the rate of abortion per 1000 women of childbearing age has declined by 27.2%. The widespread revival of the traditional practice of exclusive breast feeding has aided family planning; a level of up to 98% natural contraceptive protection can be achieved as a result of lactation amenorrhea until the infant is six months old, and up to 90-92% until the infant is 12 months old.

  19. A national program for energy-efficient mortgages and home energy rating systems: A blueprint for action. Review draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Review Draft reports findings and recommendations of the National Collaborative on Home Energy Rating Systems and Mortgage Incentives for Energy Efficiency. The US Department of Energy, in cooperation with the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, formed this National Collaborative as a National Energy Strategy initiative. Participating in the Collaborative were representatives of the primary and secondary mortgage markets, builder and remodeler organizations, real estate and appraiser associations, the home energy rating system industry, utility associations, consumer and public interest groups, state and local government interest groups, and environmental organizations. The Collaborative`s purpose was to develop a voluntary national program encouraging energy efficiency in homes through mortgage incentives linked to home energy ratings.

  20. Regulating emotions uniquely modifies reaction time, rate of force production, and accuracy of a goal-directed motor action.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Garrett F; Fawver, Bradley; Hancock, Gabriella M; Janelle, Christopher M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how emotion regulation (ER) strategies influence the execution of a memory guided, ballistic pinch grip. Participants (N=33) employed ER strategies (expressive suppression, emotional expression, and attentional deployment) while viewing emotional stimuli (IAPS images). Upon stimulus offset, participants produced a targeted pinch force aimed at 10% of their maximum voluntary contraction. Performance measures included reaction time (RT), rate of force production, and performance accuracy. As hypothesized, attentional deployment resulted in the slowest RT, largest rate of force production, and poorest performance accuracy. In contrast, expressive suppression reduced the rate of force production and increased performance accuracy relative to emotional expression and attentional deployment. Findings provide evidence that emotion regulation strategies uniquely influence human movement. Future work should further delineate the interacting role that emotion regulation strategies have in modulating both affective experience and motor performance.

  1. A national program for energy-efficient mortgages and home energy rating systems: A blueprint for action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Review Draft reports findings and recommendations of the National Collaborative on Home Energy Rating Systems and Mortgage Incentives for Energy Efficiency. The US Department of Energy, in cooperation with the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, formed this National Collaborative as a National Energy Strategy initiative. Participating in the Collaborative were representatives of the primary and secondary mortgage markets, builder and remodeler organizations, real estate and appraiser associations, the home energy rating system industry, utility associations, consumer and public interest groups, state and local government interest groups, and environmental organizations. The Collaborative's purpose was to develop a voluntary national program encouraging energy efficiency in homes through mortgage incentives linked to home energy ratings.

  2. Measurement of LINAC 90 degrees head leakage radiation TVL values.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel

    2006-09-01

    One of the key components in modern LINAC room shielding design is the amount of 90 degrees head leakage radiation levels. With the general clinical acceptance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique, accurate knowledge of this quantity has become even more important. Measurement of 90 degrees head leakage radiation of medical linear accelerators can be technically challenging due to the low dose rate causing poor signal-to-noise ratios in most detectors. 90 degrees leakage tenth-value layer (TVL) values in concrete have not been reported for the Elekta linear accelerators. This report describes our measurements of 90 degrees leakage TVL values for 6, 10, and 18 MV x-ray beams for an Elekta Precise Treatment System. A large-volume (1000 cm3) unpressurized ionization chamber and a high sensitivity electrometer, together with a separate chamber bias power supply, were used in these measurements in order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A lead enclosure, of minimum thickness 10 cm, was constructed inside the treatment room to house the ion chamber to reduce the influence of room-scattered radiation. A square aperture of 10 X 10 cm2 area was left in the shield and aimed towards the accelerator head. Measurements were performed with the chamber placed at approximately 2 m from the accelerator isocenter. Concrete slabs with individual dimensions of approximately 40 X 40 cm2 cross-sectional area and 5 cm thickness were placed between the accelerator head and the ion chamber for these measurements. The measurements were performed with total concrete thickness of up to 80 cm, so that values up to the third TVL were measured. These measurements showed thatthe first concrete TVL values are 22, 23, and 28 cm (8.6, 9.1, and 10.5 in.) for 6, 10, and 18 MV beams, while the average of the first 3 TVL's were 25, 26, and 29 cm (9.9, 10.2, and 11.5 in.). Measured values agreed to within 10% of previously reported values for Varian linear accelerators for

  3. Gas pipeline leakage detection based on PZT sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junxiao; Ren, Liang; Ho, Siu-Chun; Jia, Ziguang; Song, Gangbing

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an innovative method for rapid detection and location determination of pipeline leakage utilizing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sensors is proposed. The negative pressure wave (NPW) is a stress wave generated by leakage in the pipeline, and propagates along the pipeline from the leakage point to both ends. Thus the NPW is associated with hoop strain variation along the pipe wall. PZT sensors mounted on the pipeline were used to measure the strain variation and allowed accurate (within 2% error) and repeatable location (within 4% variance) of five manually controlled leakage points. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the location accuracy for leakage in a 55 meter long model pipeline.

  4. Observation of anomalous leakage increase of narrow and short BCPMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. Z.; Pohland, O.; Cai, C.; Puchner, H.

    2004-07-01

    Leakage performance of BCPMOS (Buried channel PMOS) is investigated by experimentally varying the LDD implant conditions. An anomalous leakage increase with Boron LDD implant is observed for a small geometry (narrow and short) PMOS. Experimental results indicate that the increase of leakage current for narrow and short channel PMOS can be explained by boron piling up at the edge of STI isolation and from source/drain towards the middle of channel. Further confirmation of boron piling up is proven by the surface channel NMOS threshold voltage. Based on the leakage sensitivity, BCPMOS LDD is optimized to reduce leakage current for the small geometry transistors.

  5. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  6. Rationale for Measuring Duct Leakage Flows in Large Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Diamond, Richard C.; Sherman, Max H.

    2005-07-01

    Industry-wide methods of assessing duct leakage are based on duct pressurization tests, and focus on ''high pressure'' ducts. Even though ''low pressure'' ducts can be a large fraction of the system and tend to be leaky, few guidelines or construction specifications require testing these ducts. We report here on the measured leakage flows from ten large commercial duct systems at operating conditions: three had low leakage (less than 5% of duct inlet flow), and seven had substantial leakage (9 to 26%). By comparing these flows with leakage flows estimated using the industry method, we show that the latter method by itself is not a reliable indicator of whole-system leakage flow, and that leakage flows need to be measured.

  7. FELERION: a new approach for leakage power reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Anjana; Somkuwar, Ajay

    2014-12-01

    The circuit proposed in this paper simultaneously reduces the sub threshold leakage power and saves the state of art aspect of the logic circuits. Sleep transistors and PMOS-only logic are used to further reduce the leakage power. Sleep transistors are used as the keepers to reduce the sub threshold leakage current providing the low resistance path to the output. PMOS-only logic is used between the pull up and pull down devices to mitigate the leakage power further. Our proposed fast efficient leakage reduction circuit not only reduces the leakage current but also reduces the power dissipation. Power and delay are analyzed at the 32 nm BSIM4 model for a chain of four inverters, NAND, NOR and ISCAS-85 c17 benchmark circuits using DSCH3 and the Microwind tool. The simulation results reveal that our proposed approach mitigates leakage power by 90%-94% as compared to the conventional approach.

  8. Heparin Leakage in Central Venous Catheters by Hemodynamic Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava for hemodialysis, are routinely filled with heparin, an anticoagulant, while not in use to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. However, the heparin-lock procedure places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences, as heparin is known to leak into the blood stream. We propose that the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage is advective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile blood flow surrounding the catheter tip. This novel hypothesis is based on Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of heparin transport from a CVC placed inside an in vitro pulsatile flow loop and validated with CFD simulations. The results show an initial, fast (<10s), advection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin at the CVC tip, followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin at the tip. These results, which estimate leakage rates consistent with published in vivo data, predict that the concentration of heparin at the catheter tip is effectively zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin lock ineffective.

  9. A quantitative methodology to assess the risks to human health from CO 2 leakage into groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siirila, Erica R.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; McCray, John E.

    2012-02-01

    Leakage of CO 2 and associated gases into overlying aquifers as a result of geologic carbon capture and sequestration may have adverse impacts on aquifer drinking-water quality. Gas or aqueous-phase leakage may occur due to transport via faults and fractures, through faulty well bores, or through leaky confining materials. Contaminants of concern include aqueous salts and dissolved solids, gaseous or aqueous-phase organic contaminants, and acidic gas or aqueous-phase fluids that can liberate metals from aquifer minerals. Here we present a quantitative risk assessment framework to predict potential human health risk from CO 2 leakage into drinking water aquifers. This framework incorporates the potential release of CO 2 into the drinking water aquifer; mobilization of metals due to a decrease in pH; transport of these metals down gradient to municipal receptors; distributions of contaminated groundwater to multiple households; and exposure and health risk to individuals using this water for household purposes. Additionally, this framework is stochastic, incorporates detailed variations in geological and geostatistical parameters and discriminates between uncertain and variable parameters using a two-stage, or nested, Monte Carlo approach. This approach is demonstrated using example simulations with hypothetical, yet realistic, aquifer characteristics and leakage scenarios. These example simulations show a greater risk for arsenic than for lead for both cancer and non-cancer endpoints, an unexpected finding. Higher background groundwater gradients also yield higher risk. The overall risk and the associated uncertainty are sensitive to the extent of aquifer stratification and the degree of local-scale dispersion. These results all highlight the importance of hydrologic modeling in risk assessment. A linear relationship between carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic risk was found for arsenic and suggests action levels for carcinogenic risk will be exceeded in exposure

  10. Effects of deuterium oxide on the rate and dissociation constants for saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin action. Voltage-clamp studies on frog myelinated nerve

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The actions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) in normal water and in deuterium oxide (D2O) have been studied in frog myelinated nerve. Substitution of D2O for H2O in normal Ringer's solution has no effect on the potency of TTX in blocking action potentials but increases the potency of STX by approximately 50%. Under voltage clamp, the steady-state inhibition of sodium currents by 1 nM STX is doubled in D2O as a result of a halving of the rate of dissociation of STX from the sodium channel; the rate of block by STX is not measurably changed by D2O. Neither steady-state inhibition nor the on- or off-rate constants of TTX are changed by D2O substitution. The isotopic effects on STX binding are observed less than 10 min after the toxin has been added to D2O, thus eliminating the possibility that slow-exchange (t 1/2 greater than 10 h) hydrogen-binding sites on STX are involved. The results are consistent with a hypothesis that attributes receptor-toxin stabilization to isotopic changes of hydrogen bonding; this interpretation suggests that hydrogen bonds contribute more to the binding of STX than to that of TTX at the sodium channel. PMID:6268735

  11. A reactive transport model for the geochemical response, detection and potential mitigation of CO2 leakage into a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.; Druhan, J. L.; Vialle, S.; Benson, S. M.; Agarwal, A.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface generally assumes that caprock formations will serve as physical barriers to upward migration of CO2. Stability and coherence of the caprocks are thus important criteria for site selection, but caprock integritycannot be guaranteed with total certainty over the lifetime of the project. As a result, carbon capture and storage projects require reliable techniques to monitor geologic storage sites for newly formed leaks, and the ability to rapidly deploy mitigation measures should leakage occur. Here, we present two-dimensional reactive transport simulations to evaluate the hydrogeochemical characteristics of a newly formed CO2 leak into an overlying reservoir. Simulations use the ToughReact multi-component reactive transport code and hypothetical reservoir characteristics. We focus on the comparatively short time period of days to months following formation of the leak to consider (1) geochemical shifts in formation water indicative of the leak, (2) hydrodynamics of pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak, and (3) delivery of a sealant to the leak through an adjacent well bore. Our results suggest that characteristic shifts in pH and dissolved inorganic carbon might be detected in down-gradient mentoring wells prior to the breakthrough of CO2, and could offer a potential means of identifying small and newly formed leaks. Injecting water into the aquifer through pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak provides a hydrodynamic control that can prevent CO2 from reaching the top of the reservoir, but this action will likely have only minor influence on the rate of leakage through the caprock defect. Injection of a hypothetical sealant through an adjacent pumping well is considered using an aqueous solute with pH-dependent equilibrium constraints such that the species is soluble in the basic pH range but forms a precipitate at neutral to acidic pH conditions associated with CO2-rich water. Injection of this

  12. Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced brush and finger seal technologies offer reduced leakage rates over conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines. To address engine manufacturers concerns about the heat generation and power loss from these contacting seals, brush, finger, and labyrinth seals were tested in the NASA High Speed, High Temperature Turbine Seal Test Rig. Leakage and power loss test results are compared for these competing seals for operating conditions up to 922 K (1200 F) inlet air temperature, 517 KPa (75 psid) across the seal, and surface velocities up to 366 m/s (1200 ft/s).

  13. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results are included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approx. the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  14. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in.), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in.), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in. circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approximately the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  15. Extensive paternal mtDNA leakage in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria D S; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Strict maternal inheritance is considered a hallmark of animal mtDNA. Although recent reports suggest that paternal leakage occurs in a broad range of species, it is still considered an exceptionally rare event. To evaluate the impact of paternal leakage on the evolution of mtDNA, it is essential to reliably estimate the frequency of paternal leakage in natural populations. Using allele-specific real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we show that heteroplasmy is common in natural populations with at least 14% of the individuals carrying multiple mitochondrial haplotypes. However, the average frequency of the minor mtDNA haplotype is low (0.8%), which suggests that this pervasive heteroplasmy has not been noticed before due to a lack of power in sequencing surveys. Based on the distribution of mtDNA haplotypes in the offspring of heteroplasmic mothers, we found no evidence for strong selection against one of the haplotypes. We estimated that the rate of paternal leakage is 6% and that at least 100 generations are required for complete sorting of mtDNA haplotypes. Despite the high proportion of heteroplasmic individuals in natural populations, we found no evidence for recombination between mtDNA molecules, suggesting that either recombination is rare or recombinant haplotypes are counter-selected. Our results indicate that evolutionary studies using mtDNA as a marker might be biased by paternal leakage in this species. PMID:23452233

  16. Agglomeration rate and action forces between atomized particles of agglomerator and inhaled-particles from coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Zhang, Jun-ying; Zheng, Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    In order to remove efficiently haled-particles emissions from coal combustions, a new way was used to put forward the process of agglomeration and the atomization was produced by the nozzle and then sprayed into the flue before precipitation devices of power station boiler in order to make inhaled-particles agglomerate into bigger particles, which can be easily removed but not change existing running conditions of boiler. According to this idea, a model is set up to study agglomeration rate and effect forces between fly ash inhaled-particles and atomized agglomerator particles. The developed agglomeration rate was expressed by relative particle number decreasing speed per unit volume. The result showed that viscosity force and flow resistance force give main influences on agglomeration effect of inhaled-particles, while springiness force and gravity have little effect on agglomeration effect of theirs. Factors influencing the agglomeration rate and effect forces are studied, including agglomerator concentration, agglomerator flux and agglomerator density, atomized-particles diameters and inhaled-particles diameter and so on.

  17. Endoluminal vacuum therapy for the treatment of anastomotic leakage after anterior rectal resection.

    PubMed

    Weidenhagen, R; Gruetzner, K U; Wiecken, T; Spelsberg, F; Jauch, K-W

    2008-08-01

    Anastomotic leakage is the most important complication after (deep) anterior rectal resection, and is the main cause for the high level of patient mortality and morbidity. It can lead to generalized peritonitis, with a severe septic progression involving multiple organ failure and potentially culminating in the death of the patient. Despite numerous improvements in the surgical technique, it has so far not been possible to reduce the leakage rate significantly. An innovative endoscopic method for treating anastomotic leakage has now been developed and established clinically at the Department of Surgery, University of Munich-Grosshadern. Working together with B. Braun, we have been able to develop the technique of endoluminal vacuum therapy further into the Endo-SPONGE treatment, and prepare it as an autonomous therapeutic method. In the following report we present our experiences to date in the area of endoluminal vacuum therapy.

  18. Oscillatory behavior of ventricular action potential duration in heart failure patients at respiratory rate and low frequency

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ben; Child, Nick; Van Duijvenboden, Stefan; Orini, Michele; Chen, Zhong; Coronel, Ruben; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Gill, Jaspal S.; Gill, Jaswinder S.; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressure occur spontaneously at a frequency of approximately 0.1 Hz coupled with synchronous oscillations of sympathetic nerve activity (“Mayer waves”). This study investigated the extent to which corresponding oscillations may occur in ventricular action potential duration (APD). Fourteen ambulatory (outpatient) heart failure patients with biventricular pacing devices were studied while seated upright watching movie clips to maintain arousal. Activation recovery intervals (ARI) as a measure of ventricular APD were obtained from unipolar electrograms recorded from the LV epicardial pacing lead during steady state RV pacing from the device. Arterial blood pressure was measured non-invasively (Finapress) and respiration monitored. Oscillations were quantified using time frequency and coherence analysis. Oscillatory behavior of ARI at the respiratory frequency was observed in all subjects. The magnitude of the ARI variation ranged from 2.2 to 6.9 ms (mean 5.0 ms). Coherence analysis showed a correlation with respiratory oscillation for an average of 43% of the recording time at a significance level of p < 0.05. Oscillations in systolic blood pressure in the Mayer wave frequency range were observed in all subjects for whom blood pressure was recorded (n = 13). ARI oscillation in the Mayer wave frequency range was observed in 6/13 subjects (46%) over a range of 2.9 to 9.2 ms. Coherence with Mayer waves at the p < 0.05 significance level was present for an average of 29% of the recording time. In ambulatory patients with heart failure during enhanced mental arousal, left ventricular epicardial APD (ARI) oscillated at the respiratory frequency (approximately 0.25 Hz). In 6 patients (46%) APD oscillated at the slower Mayer wave frequency (approximately 0.1 Hz). These findings may be important in understanding sympathetic activity-related arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25389408

  19. Determination of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium Release Rates of Slow- and Controlled-Release Fertilizers: Single-Laboratory Validation, First Action 2015.15.

    PubMed

    Thiex, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    A previously validated method for the determination of nitrogen release patterns of slow- and controlled-release fertilizers (SRFs and CRFs, respectively) was submitted to the Expert Review Panel (ERP) for Fertilizers for consideration of First Action Official Method(SM) status. The ERP evaluated the single-laboratory validation results and recommended the method for First Action Official Method status and provided recommendations for achieving Final Action. The 180 day soil incubation-column leaching technique was demonstrated to be a robust and reliable method for characterizing N release patterns from SRFs and CRFs. The method was reproducible, and the results were only slightly affected by variations in environmental factors such as microbial activity, soil moisture, temperature, and texture. The release of P and K were also studied, but at fewer replications than for N. Optimization experiments on the accelerated 74 h extraction method indicated that temperature was the only factor found to substantially influence nutrient-release rates from the materials studied, and an optimized extraction profile was established as follows: 2 h at 25°C, 2 h at 50°C, 20 h at 55°C, and 50 h at 60°C.

  20. Chemical stress and metabolic rate in aquatic invertebrates: Threshold, dose-response relationships, and mode of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, O.P.; Kukkonen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Four automatic compounds were evaluated in laboratory studies to investigate their accumulation and toxicant-induced changes in the rate of heat dissipation in the freshwater invertebrates Chironomus riparius and Lumbriculus variegatus. The sublethal energetic response detected by direct calorimetry was related to tissue chemical concentration by the threshold model and an attempt was made to apply the critical body residue (CBR) concept. Below the compound-specific tissue threshold concentration or CBR, no correlations were found between the dose and the metabolic rate, and the slopes of the regression were close to zero. Above the threshold, depending on the chemical, metabolic rate either increased or decreased. An increase in heat output produced by 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) was closely correlated with the dose. The order of toxicity for these phenols was 2,4-DNP = PCP > 2,4,5-TCP, which reflects the interaction of compounds` lipophilicities and acidities and their combined influence on bioaccumulation and effects on the energy-transducing membrane by uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. A decrease in the heat output caused by 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB) was more variable relative to dose. Also, 1,2,4-TCB required a much higher molar tissue threshold concentration ({approximately}2.0 {micro}mol/g wet weight) than required by phenols to generate the response. Both the metabolic response and the chemical threshold value were those expected to result from narcosis. Results suggest that calorimetric measures can identify not only the integrated physiologic response but also have some resolution of the mechanism of toxic effects.

  1. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, Jay; Baker, Christopher; Clayton, Ronald; Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during simulated planetary exploration activities. Data will be released to the planetary protection and science communities, and advanced EVA system designers. In the best case scenario, we will discover that very little microbial contamination leaks from our current or prototype suit designs, in the worst case scenario, we will identify leak paths, learn more about what affects leakage--and we'll have a new, flight-certified swab tool for our EVA toolbox.

  2. Detecting margin leakage of dental composite restorations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Cobb, E.; Dermann, K.; Rupp, N.W.

    1983-01-01

    The degree of microleakage between a restoration and the cavity wall is difficult to quantify objectively. A silver-staining method is used and compared to the radioisotope method with results that indicate a superior definition and more accurate evaluation of microleakage. In addition to the accuracy, two advantages are presented: (1) scoring of the leakage can be refined and divided into more precise numbers, and (2) teeth can be observed directly in a microscope without resorting to the indirect interpretation of film or photograph.

  3. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached housing, the single blower door test measures leakage to the outside. In attached housing, however, this "solo" test method measures both air leakage to the outside and air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces. Although minimizing leakage to neighboring units is highly recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly overpredicted if the solo air leakage number is used in the energy analysis. Guarded blower door testing is more appropriate for isolating and measuring leakage to the outside in attached housing. This method uses multiple blower doors to depressurize adjacent spaces to the same level as the unit being tested. Maintaining a neutral pressure across common walls, ceilings, and floors acts as a "guard" against air leakage between units. The resulting measured air leakage in the test unit is only air leakage to the outside. Although preferred for assessing energy impacts, the challenges of performing guarded testing can be daunting.

  4. Continued Investigation of Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary seal leakage in jet engine applications results in power losses to the engine cycle. Likewise, seal power loss in jet engines not only result in efficiency loss but also increase the heat input into the engine resulting in reduced component lives. Experimental work on labyrinth and annular seals was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center to quantify seal leakage and power loss at various temperatures, seal pressure differentials, and surface speeds. Data from annular and labyrinth seals are compared with previous brush and finger seal test results. Data are also compared to literature. Annular and labyrinth seal leakage rates are 2 to 3 times greater than brush and finger seal rates. Seal leakage decreases with increasing speed but increases with increasing test temperature due to thermal expansion mismatch. Also seal power loss increases with surface speed, seal pressure differential, mass flow rate, and radial clearance. Annular and labyrinth seal power losses were higher than those of brush or finger seal data. The brush seal power loss was 15 to 30 percent lower than annular and labyrinth seal power loss.

  5. Modeling of the double leakage and leakage spillage flows in axial flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hui; Yu, Xianjun; Liu, Baojie

    2014-04-01

    A model to predict the double leakage and tip leakage leading edge spillage flows was developed. This model was combined by a TLV trajectory model and a TLV diameter model and formed as a function of compressor one-dimensional design parameters, i.e. the compressor massflow coefficient, ϕ and compressor loading coefficient, Ψ, and some critical blade geometrical parameters, i.e. blade solidity, σ, stagger angle, β S , blade chord length, C, and blade pitch length, S. By using this model, the double leakage and tip leakage leading edge spillage flow could be predicted even at the compressor preliminary design process. Considering the leading edge spillage flow usually indicates the inception of spike-type stall, i.e. the compressor is a tip critical design, this model could also be used as a tool to choose the critical design parameters for designers. At last, some experimental data from literature was used to validate the model and the results proved that the model was reliable.

  6. Surface Monitoring of Leakage From Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazisar, B. R.; Klusman, R. W.; Wells, A. W.

    2003-12-01

    The capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from large point sources and long term storage in geological formations has received much recent attention as a potential green house gas mitigation option. Among the proposed storage locations are active and depleted oil and natural gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. The success of any candidate storage location greatly depends on its ability to keep CO2 underground for a long period of time. In order to evaluate the success or failure of a CO2 storage operation, it is important to monitor injection sites to detect CO2 released at the surface. The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the development of inexpensive, effective methods to measure, monitor, and verify long term sequestration of CO2 in geological sinks. Monitoring the leakage of CO2 is a challenging task, due to the small expected concentrations above a leaking reservoir as well as the relatively large background of CO2 present in the atmosphere. Another complication is the fact that CO2 continually diffuses from the soil into the atmosphere due to plant and microbial respiration. Any leak of CO2 from a reservoir would have to be differentiated from these other processes. In cooperation with the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas, the National Energy Technology Laboratory is conducting a comprehensive surface monitoring effort at the site of a pilot scale injection project. In this project, approximately 4000 tons of CO2 will be injected into the Frio formation, a deep, non-petroleum bearing saline aquifer. Surface monitoring includes the detection of injected tracer molecules, direct measurement of CO2 soil flux, soil gas analysis, and carbon isotope analysis from soil gas CO2. These measurements, in conjunction with a parallel modeling effort and deep seismic surveys, will provide an accurate measure of the leak rate of CO2 to the surface (or an upper limit of leakage). Such an understanding

  7. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-07-18

    Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by

  8. Optical imaging to map blood-brain barrier leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, Hayder; Adjei, Isaac M.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    Vascular leakage in the brain is a major complication associated with brain injuries and certain pathological conditions due to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have developed an optical imaging method, based on excitation and emission spectra of Evans Blue dye, that is >1000-fold more sensitive than conventional ultraviolet spectrophotometry. We used a rat thromboembolic stroke model to validate the usefulness of our method for vascular leakage. Optical imaging data show that vascular leakage varies in different areas of the post-stroke brain and that administering tissue plasminogen activator causes further leakage. The new method is quantitative, simple to use, requires no tissue processing, and can map the degree of vascular leakage in different brain locations. The high sensitivity of our method could potentially provide new opportunities to study BBB leakage in different pathological conditions and to test the efficacy of various therapeutic strategies to protect the BBB.

  9. Tasman leakage in a fine-resolution ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, Erik; England, Matthew H.; Zika, Jan D.; Sloyan, Bernadette M.

    2012-03-01

    Tasman leakage, the westward flow of thermocline waters south of Australia from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean, is one of the lesser-studied of the inter-ocean exchanges. Here, some of the properties of the Tasman leakage are inferred from Lagrangian particles integrated using the three-dimensional velocity fields of the 1/10 degree resolution OFES model. The mean Tasman leakage in this model is 4.2 Sv, with a standard deviation of 4.3 Sv. The heat flux associated with this leakage lies in the range 0.08-0.18 PW. There is large variability in the Tasman leakage on both sub-weekly and inter-annual scales, but no trend over the 1983-1997 period. Despite the large weekly variability, with peaks of more than 20 Sv, it appears that less than half of the Tasman leakage is carried within eddies.

  10. A harmonic pulse testing method for leakage detection in deep subsurface storage formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Alexander Y.; Lu, Jiemin; Hovorka, Susan

    2015-06-01

    Detection of leakage in deep geologic storage formations (e.g., carbon sequestration sites) is a challenging problem. This study investigates an easy-to-implement frequency domain leakage detection technology based on harmonic pulse testing (HPT). Unlike conventional constant-rate pressure interference tests, HPT stimulates a reservoir using periodic injection rates. The fundamental principle underlying HPT-based leakage detection is that leakage modifies a storage system's frequency response function, thus providing clues of system malfunction. During operations, routine HPTs can be conducted at multiple pulsing frequencies to obtain experimental frequency response functions, using which the possible time-lapse changes are examined. In this work, a set of analytical frequency response solutions is derived for predicting system responses with and without leaks for single-phase flow systems. Sensitivity studies show that HPT can effectively reveal the presence of leaks. A search procedure is then prescribed for locating the actual leaks using amplitude and phase information obtained from HPT, and the resulting optimization problem is solved using the genetic algorithm. For multiphase flows, the applicability of HPT-based leakage detection procedure is exemplified numerically using a carbon sequestration problem. Results show that the detection procedure is applicable if the average reservoir conditions in the testing zone stay relatively constant during the tests, which is a working assumption under many other interpretation methods for pressure interference tests. HPT is a cost-effective tool that only requires periodic modification of the nominal injection rate. Thus it can be incorporated into existing monitoring plans with little additional investment.

  11. Fluid leakage near the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2016-02-01

    Percolation is a concept widely used in many fields of research and refers to the propagation of substances through porous media (e.g., coffee filtering), or the behaviour of complex networks (e.g., spreading of diseases). Percolation theory asserts that most percolative processes are universal, that is, the emergent powerlaws only depend on the general, statistical features of the macroscopic system, but not on specific details of the random realisation. In contrast, our computer simulations of the leakage through a seal—applying common assumptions of elasticity, contact mechanics, and fluid dynamics—show that the critical behaviour (how the flow ceases near the sealing point) solely depends on the microscopic details of the last constriction. It appears fundamentally impossible to accurately predict from statistical properties of the surfaces alone how strongly we have to tighten a water tap to make it stop dripping and also how it starts dripping once we loosen it again.

  12. Fluid leakage near the percolation threshold

    PubMed Central

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Percolation is a concept widely used in many fields of research and refers to the propagation of substances through porous media (e.g., coffee filtering), or the behaviour of complex networks (e.g., spreading of diseases). Percolation theory asserts that most percolative processes are universal, that is, the emergent powerlaws only depend on the general, statistical features of the macroscopic system, but not on specific details of the random realisation. In contrast, our computer simulations of the leakage through a seal—applying common assumptions of elasticity, contact mechanics, and fluid dynamics—show that the critical behaviour (how the flow ceases near the sealing point) solely depends on the microscopic details of the last constriction. It appears fundamentally impossible to accurately predict from statistical properties of the surfaces alone how strongly we have to tighten a water tap to make it stop dripping and also how it starts dripping once we loosen it again. PMID:26839261

  13. Torque Transmission Device at Zero Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    In a few critical applications, mechanical transmission of power by rotation at low speed is required without leakage at an interface. Herein we examine a device that enables torque to be transmitted across a sealed environmental barrier. The barrier represents the restraint membrane through which the torque is transmitted. The power is transferred through elastic deformation of a circular tube into an elliptical cross-section. Rotation of the principle axis of the ellipse at one end results in a commensurate rotation of an elliptical cross section at the other end of the tube. This transfer requires no rigid body rotation of the tube allowing a membrane to seal one end from the other. Both computational and experimental models of the device are presented.

  14. A catchment-scale groundwater model including sewer pipe leakage in an urban system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peche, Aaron; Fuchs, Lothar; Spönemann, Peter; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: pipe leakage, urban hydrogeology, catchment scale, OpenGeoSys, HYSTEM-EXTRAN Wastewater leakage from subsurface sewer pipe defects leads to contamination of the surrounding soil and groundwater (Ellis, 2002; Wolf et al., 2004). Leakage rates at pipe defects have to be known in order to quantify contaminant input. Due to inaccessibility of subsurface pipe defects, direct (in-situ) measurements of leakage rates are tedious and associated with a high degree of uncertainty (Wolf, 2006). Proposed catchment-scale models simplify leakage rates by neglecting unsaturated zone flow or by reducing spatial dimensions (Karpf & Krebs, 2013, Boukhemacha et al., 2015). In the present study, we present a physically based 3-dimensional numerical model incorporating flow in the pipe network, in the saturated zone and in the unsaturated zone to quantify leakage rates on the catchment scale. The model consists of the pipe network flow model HYSTEM-EXTAN (itwh, 2002), which is coupled to the subsurface flow model OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012). We also present the newly developed coupling scheme between the two flow models. Leakage functions specific to a pipe defect are derived from simulations of pipe leakage using spatially refined grids around pipe defects. In order to minimize computational effort, these leakage functions are built into the presented numerical model using unrefined grids around pipe defects. The resulting coupled model is capable of efficiently simulating spatially distributed pipe leakage coupled with subsurficial water flow in a 3-dimensional environment. References: Boukhemacha, M. A., Gogu, C. R., Serpescu, I., Gaitanaru, D., & Bica, I. (2015). A hydrogeological conceptual approach to study urban groundwater flow in Bucharest city, Romania. Hydrogeology Journal, 23(3), 437-450. doi:10.1007/s10040-014-1220-3. Ellis, J. B., & Revitt, D. M. (2002). Sewer losses and interactions with groundwater quality. Water Science and Technology, 45(3), 195

  15. 49 CFR 178.345-13 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adjacent cargo tanks empty and at atmospheric pressure. Each closure, except pressure relief devices and... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.345-13 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-13 Pressure and leakage tests. (a)...

  16. 49 CFR 178.345-13 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adjacent cargo tanks empty and at atmospheric pressure. Each closure, except pressure relief devices and... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.345-13 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-13 Pressure and leakage tests. (a)...

  17. 49 CFR 178.345-13 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... adjacent cargo tanks empty and at atmospheric pressure. Each closure, except pressure relief devices and... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.345-13 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-13 Pressure and leakage tests. (a)...

  18. 49 CFR 178.345-13 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... adjacent cargo tanks empty and at atmospheric pressure. Each closure, except pressure relief devices and... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.345-13 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-13 Pressure and leakage tests. (a)...

  19. 49 CFR 178.347-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.347-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.347-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  20. 49 CFR 178.346-5 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.346-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.346-5 Pressure and leakage tests. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  1. 49 CFR 178.348-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.348-5 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b)...

  2. 49 CFR 178.346-5 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.346-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.346-5 Pressure and leakage tests. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  3. 49 CFR 178.346-5 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.346-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.346-5 Pressure and leakage tests. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  4. 49 CFR 178.347-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.347-5 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.347-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b)...

  5. 49 CFR 178.348-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.348-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  6. 49 CFR 178.347-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.347-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.347-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  7. 49 CFR 178.347-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.347-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.347-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  8. 49 CFR 178.348-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.348-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  9. 49 CFR 178.347-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.347-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.347-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  10. 49 CFR 178.346-5 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.346-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.346-5 Pressure and leakage tests. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  11. 49 CFR 178.348-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.348-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  12. 49 CFR 178.348-5 - Pressure and leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure and leakage test. 178.348-5 Section 178... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-5 Pressure and leakage test. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b) Pressure test....

  13. 49 CFR 178.346-5 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.346-5 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.346-5 Pressure and leakage tests. (a) Each cargo tank must be tested in accordance with § 178.345-13 and this section. (b)...

  14. A CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING OF LEAKAGE DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A heuristic model is developed to develop a conceptual understanding of leakage during soil-gas sampling. Leakage is shown to be simply a function of the permeability contrast between the formation and borehole and geometric factors. As the ratio of formation to borehole permea...

  15. Key Molecular Mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi Decoction in Alleviating the Pulmonary Albumin Leakage Caused by Endotoxemia in Severe Acute Pancreatitis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Luo, Ruijie; Lin, Ziqi; Xia, Qing

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the key molecular mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi decoction (CQCQD) in alleviating the pulmonary albumin leakage caused by endotoxemia in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats. Rats models of SAP endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury were established, the studies in vivo provided the important evidences that the therapy of CQCQD significantly ameliorated the increases in plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), sCd14, and Lbp, the elevation of serum amylase level, the enhancements of systemic and pulmonary albumin leakage, and the depravation of airways indicators, thus improving respiratory dysfunction and also pancreatic and pulmonary histopathological changes. According to the analyses of rats pulmonary tissue microarray and protein-protein interaction network, c-Fos, c-Src, and p85α were predicted as the target proteins for CQCQD in alleviating pulmonary albumin leakage. To confirm these predictions, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were employed in in vitro studies, which provide the evidences that (1) LPS-induced paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release were suppressed by pretreatment with inhibitors of c-Src (PP1) or PI3K (LY294002) or by transfection with siRNAs of c-Fos; (2) fortunately, CQCQD imitated the actions of these selective inhibitions agents to inhibit LPS-induced high expressions of p-Src, p-p85α, and c-Fos, therefore attenuating paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release. PMID:27413385

  16. Leakage Performance of the GM + CCL Liner System for the MSW Landfill

    PubMed Central

    Jingjing, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The contaminants in the landfill leachate press pose a grave threat to environment of the soil and the groundwater beneath the landfill. Despite there being strict requirements in relevant provisions of both domestic and foreign countries for the design of the bottom liner system. Pollution of the soil and the groundwater still took place in a number of landfills because of the leakage. To investigate the leakage rate of the liner systems, the minimum design requirements of the liner systems are summarized according to the provisions of four countries, including China, USA, Germany, and Japan. Comparative analyses using one-dimensional transport model are conducted to study the leakage performance of these liner systems composed of geomembrance (GM) and compacted clay layer (CCL) meeting the relevant minimum design requirements. Then parametric analyses are conducted to study the effects of the hydraulic head, the thickness of GM, the hydraulic conductivity of CCL, and so forth on the leakage performance of the liner system. It is concluded that the liner system designed according to the minimum design requirements of Germany provide the best antileakage performance, while that of Japan performs the lowest. The key parameters affecting the failure time of the liner system are summarized. Finally, some suggestions for the design of the liner systems are made according to the analyses. PMID:24719569

  17. Leakage performance of the GM + CCL liner system for the MSW landfill.

    PubMed

    Jingjing, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The contaminants in the landfill leachate press pose a grave threat to environment of the soil and the groundwater beneath the landfill. Despite there being strict requirements in relevant provisions of both domestic and foreign countries for the design of the bottom liner system. Pollution of the soil and the groundwater still took place in a number of landfills because of the leakage. To investigate the leakage rate of the liner systems, the minimum design requirements of the liner systems are summarized according to the provisions of four countries, including China, USA, Germany, and Japan. Comparative analyses using one-dimensional transport model are conducted to study the leakage performance of these liner systems composed of geomembrance (GM) and compacted clay layer (CCL) meeting the relevant minimum design requirements. Then parametric analyses are conducted to study the effects of the hydraulic head, the thickness of GM, the hydraulic conductivity of CCL, and so forth on the leakage performance of the liner system. It is concluded that the liner system designed according to the minimum design requirements of Germany provide the best antileakage performance, while that of Japan performs the lowest. The key parameters affecting the failure time of the liner system are summarized. Finally, some suggestions for the design of the liner systems are made according to the analyses.

  18. Comparing Natural Gas Leakage Detection Technologies Using an Open-Source "Virtual Gas Field" Simulator.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Chandler E; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Brandt, Adam R

    2016-04-19

    We present a tool for modeling the performance of methane leak detection and repair programs that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of detection technologies and proposed mitigation policies. The tool uses a two-state Markov model to simulate the evolution of methane leakage from an artificial natural gas field. Leaks are created stochastically, drawing from the current understanding of the frequency and size distributions at production facilities. Various leak detection and repair programs can be simulated to determine the rate at which each would identify and repair leaks. Integrating the methane leakage over time enables a meaningful comparison between technologies, using both economic and environmental metrics. We simulate four existing or proposed detection technologies: flame ionization detection, manual infrared camera, automated infrared drone, and distributed detectors. Comparing these four technologies, we found that over 80% of simulated leakage could be mitigated with a positive net present value, although the maximum benefit is realized by selectively targeting larger leaks. Our results show that low-cost leak detection programs can rely on high-cost technology, as long as it is applied in a way that allows for rapid detection of large leaks. Any strategy to reduce leakage should require a careful consideration of the differences between low-cost technologies and low-cost programs.

  19. Simulation of permeability evolution of leakage pathway in carbonate-rich caprocks in carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Fitts, J. P.; Dobossy, M. E.; Peters, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration in deep saline aquifers is a promising strategy for mitigating climate change. A major concern is the possibility of brine and CO2 migration through the caprock such as through fractures and faults. In this work, we examine the extent to which mineral dissolution will substantially alter the porosity and permeability of caprock leakage pathways as CO2-acidified brine flows through them. Three models were developed. Firstly, a reactive transport model, Permeability Evolution of Leakage pathway (PEL), was developed to simulate permeability evolution of a leakage pathway during the injection period, and assumes calcite is the only reactive mineral. The system domain is a 100 m long by 0.2 m diameter cylindrical flow path with fixed boundaries containing a rock matrix with an initial porosity of 30% and initial permeability of 1×10-13 m2. One example result is for an initial calcite volume fraction (CVF) of 0.20, in which all the calcite is dissolved after 50 years and the permeability reaches 3.2×10-13 m2. For smaller values of CVF, the permeability reaches its final value earlier but the increase in permeability is minimal. For a large value of CVF such as 0.50, the permeability could eventually reach 1×10-12 m2, but the large amount of dissolved calcium buffers the solution and slows the reaction. After 50 years the permeability change is negligible. Thus, there is a non-monotonic relationship between the amount of calcite in the rock and the resulting permeability change because of the competing dynamics of calcite dissolution and alkalinity build-up. In the second model, PEL was coupled to an existing basin-scale multiphase flow model, Princeton's Estimating Leakage Semi-Analytical (ELSA) model. The new model, ELSA-PEL, estimates the brine and CO2 leakage rates during the injection period under conditions of permeability evolution. The scenario considered in this work is for 50 years of CO2 injection into the Mt. Simon formation in

  20. Atmospheric leakage and condensate production in NASA's biomass production chamber. Effect of diurnal temperature cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Drese, John H.; Sager, John C.

    1991-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to monitor atmospheric leakage rate and condensate production in NASA's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Water was circulated through the 64 plant culture trays inside the chamber during the tests but no plants were present. Environmental conditions were set to a 12-hr photoperiod with either a matching 26 C (light)/20 C (dark) thermoperiod, or a constant 23 C temperature. Leakage, as determined by carbon dioxide decay rates, averaged about 9.8 percent for the 26 C/20 C regime and 7.3 percent for the constant 23 C regime. Increasing the temperature from 20 C to 26 C caused a temporary increase in pressure (up to 0.5 kPa) relative to ambient, while decreasing the temperature caused a temporary decrease in pressure of similar magnitude. Little pressure change was observed during transition between 23 C (light) and 23 C (dark). The lack of large pressure events under isothermal conditions may explain the lower leakage rate observed. When only the plant support inserts were placed in the culture trays, condensate production averaged about 37 liters per day. Placing acrylic germination covers over the tops of culture trays reduced condensate production to about 7 liters per day. During both tests, condensate production from the lower air handling system was 60 to 70 percent greater than from the upper system, suggesting imbalances exist in chilled and hot water flows for the two air handling systems. Results indicate that atmospheric leakage rates are sufficiently low to measure CO2 exchange rates by plants and the accumulation of certain volatile contaminants (e.g., ethylene). Control system changes are recommended in order to balance operational differences (e.g., humidity and temperature) between the two halves of the chamber.

  1. Midcourse correction to a clinical trial when the event rate is underestimated: the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study.

    PubMed

    Brancati, Frederick L; Evans, Mary; Furberg, Curt D; Geller, Nancy; Haffner, Steven; Kahn, Steven E; Kaufmann, Peter G; Lewis, Cora E; Nathan, David M; Pitt, Bertram; Safford, Monika M

    2012-02-01

    The Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study is a long-term clinical trial that aims to determine the cardiovascular disease (CVD) benefits of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The study was designed to have 90% statistical power to detect an 18% reduction in the CVD event rate in the ILI Group compared to the Diabetes Support and Education (DSE) Group over 10.5 years of follow-up. The original power calculations were based on an expected CVD rate of 3.125% per year in the DSE group; however, a much lower-than-expected rate in the first 2 years of follow-up prompted the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) to recommend that the Steering Committee undertake a formal blinded evaluation of these design considerations. The Steering Committee created an Endpoint Working Group (EPWG) that consisted of individuals masked to study data to examine relevant issues. The EPWG considered two primary options: (1) expanding the definition of the primary endpoint and (2) extending follow-up of participants. Ultimately, the EPWG recommended that the Look AHEAD Steering Committee approve both strategies. The DSMB accepted these modifications, rather than recommending that the trial continue with inadequate statistical power. Trialists sometimes need to modify endpoints after launch. This decision should be well justified and should be made by individuals who are fully masked to interim results that could introduce bias. This article describes this process in the Look AHEAD study and places it in the context of recent articles on endpoint modification and recent trials that reported endpoint modification.

  2. Eddy covariance mapping and quantification of surface CO2 leakage fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.

    2009-08-01

    We present eddy covariance measurements of net CO{sub 2} flux (F{sub c}) made during a controlled release of CO{sub 2} (0.3 t d{sup -1} from 9 July to 7 August 2008) from a horizontal well {approx}100 m in length and {approx}2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, MT. We isolated fluxes arising from the release (F{sub cr}) by subtracting fluxes corresponding to a model for net ecosystem exchange from F{sub c}. A least-squares inversion of 611 F{sub cr} and corresponding modeled footprint functions recovered the location, length, and magnitude of the surface CO{sub 2} flux leakage signal, although high wavenumber details of the signal were poorly resolved. The estimated total surface CO{sub 2} leakage rate (0.32 t d{sup ?1}) was within 7% of the release rate.

  3. Quantum Speed Limits for Leakage and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce state-independent, nonperturbative Hamiltonian quantum speed limits for population leakage and fidelity loss, for a gapped open system interacting with a reservoir. These results hold in the presence of initial correlations between the system and the reservoir, under the sole assumption that their interaction and its commutator with the reservoir Hamiltonian are norm bounded. The reservoir need not be thermal and can be time dependent. We study the significance of energy mismatch between the system and the local degrees of freedom of the reservoir that directly interact with the system. We demonstrate that, in general, by increasing the system gap we may reduce this energy mismatch, and, consequently, drive the system and the reservoir into resonance; this can accelerate fidelity loss, irrespective of the thermal properties or state of the reservoir. This implies that quantum error suppression strategies based on increasing the gap are not uniformly beneficial. Our speed limits also yield an elementary lower bound on the relaxation time of spin systems.

  4. Effect of Viscosity on Fuel Leakage Between Lapped Plungers and Sleeves and on the Discharge from a Pump-Injection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Marsh, E T

    1935-01-01

    Test data and analysis show that the rate of fuel leakage between a lapped plunger and sleeve varies directly with the density of the fuel, the diameter of the plunger, the pressure producing the leakage, and the cube of the mean clearance between the plunger and sleeve. The rate varies inversely as the length of the lapped fit and the viscosity of the fuel. With a mean clearance between the plunger and sleeve of 0.0001 inch the leakage amounts to approximately 0.2 percent of the fuel injected with gasoline and as low as 0.01 percent with diesel fuel oils. With this mean clearance an effective seal is obtained when the length of the lap is three times the diameter of the lap. The deformation of the sleeve and plunger under pressure is sufficient to change the rate of leakage appreciably from that which would be obtained if the clearance was constant under pressure.

  5. Tropical nature reserves are losing their buffer zones, but leakage is not to blame.

    PubMed

    Lui, Gillian V; Coomes, David A

    2016-05-01

    Tropical forests provide important ecosystem services to humanity, yet are threatened by habitat loss resulting from deforestation and land-use change. Although reserves are considered the cornerstones of conservation efforts in the tropics, their efficacy remains equivocal. One question that remains unresolved is whether leakage - the unanticipated displacement of deforestation from inside reserves into the unrestricted zones just beyond a reserve's administrative boundary - is common around tropical forest reserves, or whether the zones are acting as buffers between the protected area and the outside world. To resolve this question, we used the Landsat-derived Global Forest Change dataset to estimate deforestation rates between 2000 and 2012 inside and outside of 60 nature reserves spread across the tropics. Deforestation rates inside reserves (within 5km of the administrative boundary) were generally lower than those immediately outside the reserves (i.e. in buffer zones 0-10km from the boundary), suggesting that reserves are effective at protecting forests. We hypothesised that leakage would result in greater deforestation rates in reserve buffer zones than in the broader reserve landscapes, but such a pattern was observed in only five African sites, suggesting that leakage does not often occur on the edge of established reserves. However, roughly 80% of reserves experienced deforestation rates that increased gradually from their interiors to the outer periphery of their buffer zones. Thus, while leakage may not be a pervasive phenomenon around tropical reserves worldwide, tropical reserves are often losing their buffer zones, resulting in increased isolation that could have ramifications for ecosystem services provisioning and tropical conservation strategies.

  6. [Effect of sodium cromoglycate on airway vascular leakage caused by hypertonic saline in the rat trachea].

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, I; Tamaoki, J; Takeda, Y; Konno, K

    1996-09-01

    The action of the anti-asthmatic drug sodium cromoglycate (SCG) on airway inflammation remains uncertain. Using Evans blue dye as a maker of plasma leakage, we studied the effect of SCG on neurogenic vascular extravasation evoked by hypertonic saline (HTS) in the rat trachea. Inhalation of HTS (5-15%) caused a concentration-dependent increase in plasma leakage, but inhaled 0.9% NaCl had no effect. Inhalation of SCG did not affect the baseline level of vascular permeability, but it inhibited the effect of HTS in a dose-dependent manner: plasma extravasation induced by 10% NaCl was significantly reduced by 2 minutes of inhalation of SCG at concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/ml (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). SCG (10 mg/ml), also inhibited the changes in microvascular permeability caused by aerosols of substance P (10(-4) M), whereas it did not affect the responses to aerosols of platelet-activating factor (3 x 10(-4) M). A similar dose of SCG did not significantly alter microvascular leakage caused by 5% NaCl. However, phosphoramidon, a selective inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase, potentiated the response to 5% NaCl, an effect that was inhibited by SCG (p < 0.05). These results suggest that SCG inhibits HTS-induced airway vascular permeability, presumably through a tachykinin-antagonist-like property, and that this inhibition is exaggerated when the activity of endogenous neutral endopeptidase is low.

  7. Quantifying the leakage of quantum protocols for classical two-party cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Louis; Schaffner, Christian; Sotáková, Miroslava

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum protocols among two distrustful parties. By adopting a rather strict definition of correctness — guaranteeing that honest players obtain their correct outcomes only — we can show that every strictly correct quantum protocol implementing a non-trivial classical primitive necessarily leaks information to a dishonest player. This extends known impossibility results to all non-trivial primitives. We provide a framework for quantifying this leakage and argue that leakage is a good measure for the privacy provided to the players by a given protocol. Our framework also covers the case where the two players are helped by a trusted third party. We show that despite the help of a trusted third party, the players cannot amplify the cryptographic power of any primitive. All our results hold even against quantum honest-but-curious adversaries who honestly follow the protocol but purify their actions and apply a different measurement at the end of the protocol. As concrete examples, we establish lower bounds on the leakage of standard universal two-party primitives such as oblivious transfer.

  8. Quantifying the leakage of quantum protocols for classical two-party cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Louis; Schaffner, Christian; Sotáková, Miroslava

    2015-12-01

    We study quantum protocols among two distrustful parties. By adopting a rather strict definition of correctness — guaranteeing that honest players obtain their correct outcomes only — we can show that every strictly correct quantum protocol implementing a non-trivial classical primitive necessarily leaks information to a dishonest player. This extends known impossibility results to all non-trivial primitives. We provide a framework for quantifying this leakage and argue that leakage is a good measure for the privacy provided to the players by a given protocol. Our framework also covers the case where the two players are helped by a trusted third party. We show that despite the help of a trusted third party, the players cannot amplify the cryptographic power of any primitive. All our results hold even against quantum honest-but-curious adversaries who honestly follow the protocol but purify their actions and apply a different measurement at the end of the protocol. As concrete examples, we establish lower bounds on the leakage of standard universal two-party primitives such as oblivious transfer.

  9. Very Early Colorectal Anastomotic Leakage within 5 Post-operative Days: a More Severe Subtype Needs Relaparatomy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Wei; Lian, Peng; Huang, Ben; Zheng, Hong-Tu; Wang, Ming-He; Gu, Wei-Lie; Li, Xin-Xiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, San-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Early anastomotic leakage (AL), usually defined as leakage within 30 post-operative days, represents a severe entity. However, mounting evidence has indicated that majorities of leakage occur within one week after surgery, making late AL rarity. Here we analyzed 101 consecutive colorectal AL, all of which occurred within 30 post-operative days, during Jan 2013 and Dec 2015 in cancer hospital of Fudan University. AL occurring within 5 post-operative days was defined as very early AL (vE-AL). We evaluated risk factors of vE-AL compared with non-vEAL and correlated with post-leakage peritonitis and need of relaparatomy. We found that AL occurred at median time of 7 days after surgery. 23 cases were vE-AL. Reconstruction of post-peritoneum for mid-low rectal carcinoma significantly reduced incidence of vE-AL compared with non-vE-AL (p = 0.042). Patients with vE-AL was associated with presence of peritonitis (p = 0.031), the latter significantly correlated with increased re-operation rate (p = 6.8E-13). Besides, patients with vE-AL trended to correlate with increased re-operation rate after leakage (p = 0.088). In concludsion, vE-AL occurring within 5 post-operative days represents a severe subtype associated with general peritonitis and need of relaparatomy. PMID:28084305

  10. Treatment of esophagojejunal anastomosis leakage: a systematic review from the last two decades.

    PubMed

    Aurello, Paolo; Magistri, Paolo; D'Angelo, Francesco; Valabrega, Stefano; Sirimarco, Dario; Tierno, Simone Maria; Nava, Andrea Kazemi; Ramacciato, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Esophagojejunal anastomosis leakage is one of the major complications after total gastrectomy for gastric cancer and is an independent predictor of survival. Our aim is to systematically review the literature and discuss the reported therapeutic approaches to identify the best therapeutic approach. Pubmed, EMbase, Cochrane Library, CILEA Archive, BMJ Clinical Evidence, and Up ToDate databases were screened limiting the research to articles written in English from January 1992 through December 2013. This way a total of 474 manuscripts were retrieved for furthermore evaluation. Eleven manuscripts were considered eligible and the study is focused on those works. We analyzed a total of 3,893 patients and 114 cases of esophagojejunal anastomosis leakage. Different treatments were grouped into three main categories: conservative approach (66 cases), endoscopic approach (21 cases), and surgical approach (27 cases). The overall mortality rate is 26.32 per cent and surgical approach showed the higher rate. According to the reported data, a complete resolution of the leakage can be achieved in an interval ranging from 7 to 28 days in the group treated conservatively. Conservative approach should always be considered as the treatment of choice. Reoperation may be necessary in case of wide dehiscence or when other treatments fail; therefore, the high mortality rate related to this procedure is due to the comorbidities of patients undergoing relaparotomy. Finally, endoscopic approach with endoclips seems promising but needs furthermore studies.

  11. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage

    PubMed Central

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Morrison, Adele K.; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, ‘Agulhas leakage', forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870–2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. This is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic. PMID:26656850

  12. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage.

    PubMed

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V; Morrison, Adele K; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M

    2015-12-10

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, 'Agulhas leakage', forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870-2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. This is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic.

  13. Theory and Application of Magnetic Flux Leakage Pipeline Detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Rui; Cai, Maolin; Jia, Guanwei

    2015-12-10

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) detection is one of the most popular methods of pipeline inspection. It is a nondestructive testing technique which uses magnetic sensitive sensors to detect the magnetic leakage field of defects on both the internal and external surfaces of pipelines. This paper introduces the main principles, measurement and processing of MFL data. As the key point of a quantitative analysis of MFL detection, the identification of the leakage magnetic signal is also discussed. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different identification methods are analyzed. Then the paper briefly introduces the expert systems used. At the end of this paper, future developments in pipeline MFL detection are predicted.

  14. Theory and Application of Magnetic Flux Leakage Pipeline Detection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Rui; Cai, Maolin; Jia, Guanwei

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) detection is one of the most popular methods of pipeline inspection. It is a nondestructive testing technique which uses magnetic sensitive sensors to detect the magnetic leakage field of defects on both the internal and external surfaces of pipelines. This paper introduces the main principles, measurement and processing of MFL data. As the key point of a quantitative analysis of MFL detection, the identification of the leakage magnetic signal is also discussed. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different identification methods are analyzed. Then the paper briefly introduces the expert systems used. At the end of this paper, future developments in pipeline MFL detection are predicted. PMID:26690435

  15. A quantitative methodology to assess the risks to human health from CO2 leakage into groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siirila, E.; Sitchler, A.; Maxwell, R. M.; McCray, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    suggests action levels for carcinogenic risk will be exceeded in exposure situations before noncarcinogenic action levels, a reflection of the ratio of cancer and non-cancer toxicity values. Finally, implications for ranking aquifer vulnerability due to geologic configuration, aquifer mineralogy, and leakage scenarios are discussed.

  16. Caffeine-induced effects on heart rate in zebrafish embryos and possible mechanisms of action: an effective system for experiments in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Rana, Neha; Moond, Mamta; Marthi, Amarnath; Bapatla, Swetha; Sarvepalli, Tejasudha; Chatti, Kiranam; Challa, Anil Kumar

    2010-03-01

    Zebrafish embryos are well suited as a model system to perform chemical biology experiments effectively in educational settings. We studied the effect of caffeine on heart rate (HR) and other phenotypes of zebrafish embryos using visual microscopy and simple imaging. Acute treatment with millimolar concentrations of caffeine in embryo medium caused a dose-dependent decrease in HR in 2-3-day-old zebrafish embryos, ultimately resulting in complete HR cessation. A characteristic pattern of decrease in HR was observed, with an initial acute drop in HR and a period of stabilization followed by complete cessation. The effects of caffeine were not reversed by cotreatment with ruthenium red and adenosine, agents known to be antagonistic to caffeine, or by changes in calcium concentration in embryo medium. Apparent cardiac arrhythmia and a typical kinking effect in the trunk/tail region were also observed because of caffeine treatment. Our results, taken together with previous reports, raise the possibility that caffeine exerts its effects on embryonic HR of zebrafish by inhibition of ether-a-go-go potassium channels. However, further experimentation is required to dissect the molecular basis of caffeine action. We demonstrate that such experiments can be used to explore the effect of small molecules, such as caffeine, on cardiovascular phenotypes and to encourage experimental design in chemical biology.

  17. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; Dai, Zhenxue; Sun, Yunwei; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney; Brown, Chris; Bacon, Diana

    2014-09-07

    are the most likely conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.

  18. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; ...

    2014-09-07

    conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.« less

  19. Response surfaces for CO2 leakage from geologic storage along abandoned wellbores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Carey, J. W.; Pawar, R. J.; Stauffer, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    The storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic reservoirs that have previously been drilled for oil and gas exploration is under investigation worldwide as an option for reducing the amount of anthropogenic carbon introduced to the atmosphere. Reservoirs that have already been tapped for hydrocarbon production have several benefits over development of new sites: they tend to be geologically well-understood, with existing wellbore data to help further characterize the local geologic framework; are known to be conducive to trapping buoyant or pressurized fluids; may have infrastructure in place; and are likely to be already impacted ecologically as compared to pristine sites. One downside to using depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs is the potential for CO2 leakage along pre-existing wellbores that were either not designed for CO2 sequestration or have been improperly plugged and abandoned. The primary goal of this study is to develop estimates of possible wellbore leakage rates of CO2 from storage reservoirs to the surface and/or into overlaying aquifers, as a function of wellbore properties and the surrounding geologic framework. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) was used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of multiphase flow along wellbores across a wide range of geologic and wellbore parameters. Several wellbore scenarios were studied, including a simple wellbore between the CO2 storage reservoir and the surface; a wellbore intersecting a saline aquifer ("thief zone"); and a wellbore intersecting both a thief zone and a freshwater aquifer. The Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE) software was used to analyze results and produce response surfaces for the estimation of wellbore flow rate as a function of the primary factors that influence leakage. These results will be used to develop abstractions for leakage rates to be incorporated in performance assessments of geologic CO2 storage, which will help

  20. Detection of infusate leakage in the brain using real-time imaging of convection-enhanced delivery

    PubMed Central

    Varenika, Vanja; Dickinson, Peter; Bringas, John; LeCouteur, Richard; Higgins, Robert; Park, John; Fiandaca, Massimo; Berger, Mitchel; Sampson, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2009-01-01

    Object The authors have shown that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of gadoteridol-loaded liposomes (GDLs) into different regions of normal monkey brain results in predictable, widespread distribution of this tracking agent as detected by real-time MR imaging. They also have found that this tracking technique allows monitoring of the distribution of similar nanosized agents such as therapeutic liposomes and viral vectors. A limitation of this procedure is the unexpected leakage of liposomes out of targeted parenchyma or malignancies into sulci and ventricles. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of CED after the onset of these types of leakage. Methods The authors documented this phenomenon in a study of 5 nonhuman primates and 7 canines, comprising 54 CED infusion sessions. Approximately 20% of these infusions resulted in leakage into cerebral ventricles or sulci. All of the infusions and leakage events were monitored with real-time MR imaging. The authors created volume-distributed versus volume-infused graphs for each infusion session. These graphs revealed the rate of distribution of GDL over the course of each infusion and allowed the authors to evaluate the progress of CED before and after leakage. Results The distribution of therapeutics within the target structure ceased to increase or resulted in significant attenuation after the onset of leakage. Conclusions An analysis of the cases in this study revealed that leakage undermines the efficacy of CED. These findings reiterate the importance of real-time MR imaging visualization during CED to ensure an accurate, robust distribution of therapeutic agents. PMID:18976077

  1. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced PressurePerturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-AquitardSystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-07-15

    A number of (semi-)analytical solutions are available to drawdown analysis and leakage estimation of shallow aquifer-aquitard systems. These solutions assume that the systems are laterally infinite. When a large-scale pumping from (or injection into) an aquifer-aquitard system of lower specific storativity occurs, induced pressure perturbation (or hydraulic head drawdown/rise) may reach the lateral boundary of the aquifer. We developed semi-analytical solutions to address the induced pressure perturbation and vertical leakage in a 'laterally bounded' system consisting of an aquifer and an overlying/underlying aquitard. A one-dimensional radial flow equation for the aquifer was coupled with a one-dimensional vertical flow equation for the aquitard, with a no-flow condition imposed on the outer radial boundary. Analytical solutions were obtained for (1) the Laplace-transform hydraulic head drawdown/rise in the aquifer and in the aquitard, (2) the Laplace-transform rate and volume of leakage through the aquifer-aquitard interface integrated up to an arbitrary radial distance, (3) the transformed total leakage rate and volume for the entire interface, and (4) the transformed horizontal flux at any radius. The total leakage rate and volume depend only on the hydrogeologic properties and thicknesses of the aquifer and aquitard, as well as the duration of pumping or injection. It was proven that the total leakage rate and volume are independent of the aquifer's radial extent and wellbore radius. The derived analytical solutions for bounded systems are the generalized solutions of infinite systems. Laplace-transform solutions were numerically inverted to obtain the hydraulic head drawdown/rise, leakage rate, leakage volume, and horizontal flux for given hydrogeologic and geometric conditions of the aquifer-aquitard system, as well as injection/pumping scenarios. Application to a large-scale injection-and-storage problem in a bounded system was demonstrated.

  2. [A serious complication in colorectal surgery: anastomotic leakage. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Petitti, T; Lippolis, G; Ferrozzi, L

    2005-10-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a severe complication in colorectal surgery with a lot of generic and specific risk factors. There are still controversies about the possibility to prevent it or to limit its severity with the use of faecal diversions. We report our experience on 189 patients operated in five years on colon-rectum, in election and emergency, with manual or mechanical anastomoses in the last 20 cm from the anal verge. We have had 21 anastomotic leakages (11%), symptomatic in 10 cases (5.5%), and 5 deaths (2.6%), 3 directly correlated to the leakage. In the patients (n 98) with loop-ileostomy there wasn't anastomotic leakages reduction, but only of clinical impact. We prefer loop-ileostomy in cases of extraperitoneal anastomoses, always in emergency and in anastomoses at risk.

  3. Agulhas leakage dynamics affects decadal variability in Atlantic overturning circulation.

    PubMed

    Biastoch, A; Böning, C W; Lutjeharms, J R E

    2008-11-27

    Predicting the evolution of climate over decadal timescales requires a quantitative understanding of the dynamics that govern the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). Comprehensive ocean measurement programmes aiming to monitor MOC variations have been established in the subtropical North Atlantic (RAPID, at latitude 26.5 degrees N, and MOVE, at latitude 16 degrees N) and show strong variability on intraseasonal to interannual timescales. Observational evidence of longer-term changes in MOC transport remains scarce, owing to infrequent sampling of transoceanic sections over past decades. Inferences based on long-term sea surface temperature records, however, supported by model simulations, suggest a variability with an amplitude of +/-1.5-3 Sv (1 Sv = 10(6) m(3) s(-1)) on decadal timescales in the subtropics. Such variability has been attributed to variations of deep water formation in the sub-arctic Atlantic, particularly the renewal rate of Labrador Sea Water. Here we present results from a model simulation that suggest an additional influence on decadal MOC variability having a Southern Hemisphere origin: dynamic signals originating in the Agulhas leakage region at the southern tip of Africa. These contribute a MOC signal in the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic that is of the same order of magnitude as the northern source. A complete rationalization of observed MOC changes therefore also requires consideration of signals arriving from the south.

  4. Degradation of Leakage Currents and Reliability Prediction for Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Two types of failures in solid tantalum capacitors, catastrophic and parametric, and their mechanisms are described. Analysis of voltage and temperature reliability acceleration factors reported in literature shows a wide spread of results and requires more investigation. In this work, leakage currents in two types of chip tantalum capacitors were monitored during highly accelerated life testing (HALT) at different temperatures and voltages. Distributions of degradation rates were approximated using a general log-linear Weibull model and yielded voltage acceleration constants B = 9.8 +/- 0.5 and 5.5. The activation energies were Ea = 1.65 eV and 1.42 eV. The model allows for conservative estimations of times to failure and was validated by long-term life test data. Parametric degradation and failures are reversible and can be annealed at high temperatures. The process is attributed to migration of charged oxygen vacancies that reduce the barrier height at the MnO2/Ta2O5 interface and increase injection of electrons from the MnO2 cathode. Analysis showed that the activation energy of the vacancies' migration is 1.1 eV.

  5. GRACE leakage error correction with regularization technique: Case studies in Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Dapeng; Yan, Haoming; Feng, Wei; Peng, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Filtering is a necessary step in the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data processing, but leads to signal leakage and attenuation obviously, and adversely affects the quality of global and regional mass change estimates. We propose to use the Tikhonov regularization technique with the L-curve method to solve a correction equation which can reduce the leakage error caused by filter involved in GRACE data processing. We first demonstrate that the leakage error caused by the Gaussian filter can be well corrected by our regularization technique with simulation studies in Greenland and Antarctica. Furthermore, our regularization technique can restore the spatial distribution of original mass changes. For example, after applying the regularization method to GRAEC data (2003-2012), we find that GRACE mass changes tend to move from interior to coastal area in Greenland, which are consistent with recent other studies. After being corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) effect, our results show that the ice mass loss rates were 274 ± 30 and 107 ± 34 Gt/yr in Greenland and Antarctica from 2003 to 2012, respectively. And a 10 ± 4 Gt/yr increase rate in Greenland interior is also detected.

  6. Uncertainty Quantification and Assessment of CO2 Leakage in Groundwater Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, S.; Mansoor, K.; Sun, Y.; Jones, E.

    2011-12-01

    Complexity of subsurface aquifers and the geochemical reactions that control drinking water compositions complicate our ability to estimate the impact of leaking CO2 on groundwater quality. We combined lithologic field data from the High Plains Aquifer, numerical simulations, and uncertainty quantification analysis to assess the role of aquifer heterogeneity and physical transport on the extent of CO2 impacted plume over a 100-year period. The High Plains aquifer is a major aquifer over much of the central United States where CO2 may be sequestered in depleted oil and gas reservoirs or deep saline formations. Input parameters considered included, aquifer heterogeneity, permeability, porosity, regional groundwater flow, CO2 and TDS leakage rates over time, and the number of leakage source points. Sensitivity analysis suggest that variations in sand and clay permeability, correlation lengths, van Genuchten parameters, and CO2 leakage rate have the greatest impact on impacted volume or maximum distance from the leak source. A key finding is that relative sensitivity of the parameters changes over the 100-year period. Reduced order models developed from regression of the numerical simulations show that volume of the CO2-impacted aquifer increases over time with 2 order of magnitude variance.

  7. Energy Efficient High-Pressure Turbine Leakage Technology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    The leakage test program was one of such supporting technology programs structured to provide guidance to the Energy Efficient Engine High Pressure Turbine Component Design Effort. Leakage reduction techniques were identified and evaluated. Test models were used to simulate component leak paths and to evaluate leakage reduction techniques. These models simulated the blade/disk attachment, the vane inner platform attachment, and the vane outer platform attachment combined with the blade outer airseal. Disk blade attachment testing indicated that leakage in this area could be reduced to very low levels by paying careful attention to the tolerances along the contact surface between the blade vibration damper and the blade platform contact surface. The aim of feather seal testing was to achieve a goal for an effective leakage gap of one mil (.001 inch) per inch of feather seal length. Results indicated that effective gaps even below the goal level were achievable by (1) maintaining close tolerances between feather seals and their slots to minimize end gaps and limit seal rotation, (2) avoiding feather seal overlap, and (3) minimizing feather seal intersections. W seals were shown to be effective leakage control devices. Wire rope, in its present state of development, was shown not to be an effective sealing concept for application to the component design.

  8. Subtotal petrosectomy and cerebrospinal fluid leakage in unilateral anacusis.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; Re, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis.

  9. Subtotal Petrosectomy and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage in Unilateral Anacusis

    PubMed Central

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Appiani, Mario Ciniglio; Re, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis. PMID:25452896

  10. Field size dependent mapping of medical linear accelerator radiation leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Veres, Attila; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chavaudra, Jean; Deutsch, Eric; de Vathaire, Florent; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of a graphics library based model for the assessment of linear accelerator radiation leakage. Transmission through the shielding elements was evaluated using the build-up factor corrected exponential attenuation law and the contribution from the electron guide was estimated using the approximation of a linear isotropic radioactive source. Model parameters were estimated by a fitting series of thermoluminescent dosimeter leakage measurements, achieved up to 100 cm from the beam central axis along three directions. The distribution of leakage data at the patient plane reflected the architecture of the shielding elements. Thus, the maximum leakage dose was found under the collimator when only one jaw shielded the primary beam and was about 0.08% of the dose at isocentre. Overall, we observe that the main contributor to leakage dose according to our model was the electron beam guide. Concerning the discrepancies between the measurements used to calibrate the model and the calculations from the model, the average difference was about 7%. Finally, graphics library modelling is a readily and suitable way to estimate leakage dose distribution on a personal computer. Such data could be useful for dosimetric evaluations in late effect studies.

  11. Leakage Currents in Low-Voltage PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of BME capacitors to high-reliability electronics as a replacement for PME capacitors requires better understanding of changes in performance and reliability of MLCCs to set justified screening and qualification requirements. In this work, absorption and leakage currents in various lots of commercial and military grade X7R MLCCs rated to 100V and less have been measured to reveal difference in behavior of PME and BME capacitors in a wide range of voltages and temperatures. Degradation of leakage currents and failures in virgin capacitors and capacitors with introduced cracks has been studied at different voltages and temperatures during step stress highly accelerated life testing. Mechanisms of charge absorption, conduction and degradation have been discussed and a failure model in capacitors with defects suggested.

  12. The design and fabrication of a single leakage-channel grating coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roncone, Ronald L.; Li, Lifeng; Bates, Keith A.; Burke, James J.; Weisenbach, Lori; Zelinski, Brian J. J.

    1992-01-01

    The modeling and fabrication is described of waveguide grating couplers with out-coupling efficiencies into a single diffracted order nearing 100 pct. Termed Single Leakage Channel Grating Couplers (SLCGCs), these devices use a high reflectivity dielectric stack to reflect the out-coupled beam diffracted toward the substrate, back up into the air region where it constructively adds with the beam diffracted into the air region. Computer modeling shows that the branching ratio and the leakage rate can be independently controlled, and that the branching ratio is independent of grating depth and grating period. A SLCGC with a branching ratio of 97.1 pct. was fabricated using a combination of vacuum evaporation and wet chemical techniques.

  13. Agulhas leakage as a key process in the modes of Quaternary climate changes.

    PubMed

    Caley, Thibaut; Giraudeau, Jacques; Malaizé, Bruno; Rossignol, Linda; Pierre, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    Heat and salt transfer from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean (Agulhas leakage) has an important effect on the global thermohaline circulation and climate. The lack of long transfer record prevents elucidation of its role on climate changes throughout the Quaternary. Here, we present a 1,350-ka accumulation rate record of the planktic foraminiferal species Globorotalia menardii. We demonstrate that, according to previous assumptions, the presence and reseeding of this fauna in the subtropical southeast Atlantic was driven by interocean exchange south of Africa. The Agulhas transfer strengthened at glacial ice-volume maxima for every glacial-interglacial transition, with maximum reinforcements organized according to a 400-ka periodicity. The long-term dynamics of Agulhas leakage may have played a crucial role in regulating meridional overturning circulation and global climate changes during the Mid-Brunhes event and the Mid-Pleistocene transition, and could also play an important role in the near future.

  14. Agulhas leakage as a key process in the modes of Quaternary climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Thibaut; Giraudeau, Jacques; Malaizé, Bruno; Rossignol, Linda; Pierre, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Heat and salt transfer from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean (Agulhas leakage) has an important effect on the global thermohaline circulation and climate. The lack of long transfer record prevents elucidation of its role on climate changes throughout the Quaternary. Here, we present a 1,350-ka accumulation rate record of the planktic foraminiferal species Globorotalia menardii. We demonstrate that, according to previous assumptions, the presence and reseeding of this fauna in the subtropical southeast Atlantic was driven by interocean exchange south of Africa. The Agulhas transfer strengthened at glacial ice-volume maxima for every glacial-interglacial transition, with maximum reinforcements organized according to a 400-ka periodicity. The long-term dynamics of Agulhas leakage may have played a crucial role in regulating meridional overturning circulation and global climate changes during the Mid-Brunhes event and the Mid-Pleistocene transition, and could also play an important role in the near future. PMID:22508999

  15. Integrated Framework for Assessing Impacts of CO₂ Leakage on Groundwater Quality and Monitoring-Network Efficiency: Case Study at a CO₂ Enhanced Oil Recovery Site.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changbing; Hovorka, Susan D; Treviño, Ramón H; Delgado-Alonso, Jesus

    2015-07-21

    This study presents a combined use of site characterization, laboratory experiments, single-well push-pull tests (PPTs), and reactive transport modeling to assess potential impacts of CO2 leakage on groundwater quality and leakage-detection ability of a groundwater monitoring network (GMN) in a potable aquifer at a CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2 EOR) site. Site characterization indicates that failures of plugged and abandoned wells are possible CO2 leakage pathways. Groundwater chemistry in the shallow aquifer is dominated mainly by silicate mineral weathering, and no CO2 leakage signals have been detected in the shallow aquifer. Results of the laboratory experiments and the field test show no obvious damage to groundwater chemistry should CO2 leakage occur and further were confirmed with a regional-scale reactive transport model (RSRTM) that was built upon the batch experiments and validated with the single-well PPT. Results of the RSRTM indicate that dissolved CO2 as an indicator for CO2 leakage detection works better than dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, and alkalinity at the CO2 EOR site. The detection ability of a GMN was assessed with monitoring efficiency, depending on various factors, including the natural hydraulic gradient, the leakage rate, the number of monitoring wells, the aquifer heterogeneity, and the time for a CO2 plume traveling to the monitoring well.

  16. THERMAL REGAIN FROM DISPLACEMENT OF DUCT LEAKAGE WITHIN INSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2002-05-01

    In one type of duct efficiency retrofit, additional insulation is added to a duct system that is already insulated. For example, a layer of R-4 insulation might be: added to a duct system that already has R-4 installed. It is possible that--either by chance or by design--the add-on layer, while not stopping duct leaks, might cause the leakage air to flow longitudinally for a distance, parallel to the duct, before it finds a way out of the newly added outer layer. This could happen by chance if the outer and inner layers of insulation have seams at different locations. Perhaps more usefully, if such longitudinal displacement of the leakage air turned out to be useful, it might be designed into the makeup of the outer insulation layer intended to be used in the retrofit. It is plausible that this leakage air might serve a useful function in keeping the insulation layer warmer (or, in the air-conditioning mode, cooler) than it would be in the absence of the leakage. By being held close to the ducts for a while, it might establish an artificially warmer (or cooler, in air conditioning) zone around the ducts. To the extent that this effect would reduce the heat losses from the ducts, the leakage should be credited with a ''thermal regain'' in the same way that leakage into buffer zones is credited with thermal regain when the leakage air warms (or cools) the buffer zone relative to the temperature it would have in the absence of such duct leakage. The purpose of this report is to investigate whether and to what extent such thermal regain exists. The model developed below applies to a situation where there are two distinct layers of insulation around the duct, with leakage air moving between them in a longitudinal direction for a distance before it finds its way out from the outer insulation layer. It may also apply approximately where there is a single insulation layer with an air barrier on the outside. Leakage air may pass into the insulation itself and thence

  17. Direct Measurement of Pore Dynamics and Leakage Induced by a Model Antimicrobial Peptide in Single Vesicles and Cells.

    PubMed

    Burton, Matthew G; Huang, Qi M; Hossain, Mohammed A; Wade, John D; Palombo, Enzo A; Gee, Michelle L; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-06-28

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising therapeutic alternatives to counter growing antimicrobial resistance. Their precise mechanism of action remains elusive, however, particularly with respect to live bacterial cells. We investigated the interaction of a fluorescent melittin analogue with single giant unilamellar vesicles, giant multilamellar vesicles, and bilamellar Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Time-lapse fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was employed to determine the population distribution of the fluorescent melittin analogue between pore state and membrane surface state, and simultaneously measure the leakage of entrapped fluorescent species from the vesicle (or bacterium) interior. In giant unilamellar vesicles, leakage from vesicle interior was correlated with an increase in level of pore states, consistent with a stable pore formation mechanism. In giant multilamellar vesicles, vesicle leakage occurred more gradually and did not appear to correlate with increased pore states. Instead pore levels remained at a low steady-state level, which is more in line with coupled equilibria. Finally, in single bacterial cells, significant increases in pore levels were observed over time, which were correlated with only partial loss of cytosolic contents. These observations suggested that pore formation, as opposed to complete dissolution of membrane, was responsible for the leakage of contents in these systems, and that the bacterial membrane has an adaptive capacity that resists peptide attack. We interpret the three distinct pore dynamics regimes in the context of the increasing physical and biological complexity of the membranes.

  18. Air-leakage effects on stone cladding panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    1995-03-01

    This paper looks at the effects of air leakage on insulated stone clad precast panels used in present day construction of large commercial buildings. The building investigated was a newly built twenty story office building in a high density urban setting. Air leakage was suspected as a possible cause for thermal comfort complaints at isolated locations within the perimeter zones of the building. During the warrantee period the building owner asked for a quality control inspection of the air barrier assembly of the building envelope. Infrared thermography was used to locate areas of suspected air leakage within the building envelope. In order to differentiate thermal patterns produced by air leakage, conduction and convection as well as radiation from external sources, the building was inspected from the exterior; (1) after being pressurized for three hours, (2) one hour after the building was depressurized and (3) two and a half hours after total building depressurization was maintained by the building mechanical systems. Thermal images from similar locations were correlated for each time and pressure setting to verify air leakage locations within the building envelope. Areas exhibiting air leakage were identified and contractors were requested to carry out the necessary repairs. The pressure differential across the building envelope needs to be known in order to properly carry out an inspection to identify all locations of air leakage within a building envelope. As well the direction of the air movement and the density of the cladding material need to be accounted for in the proper inspection of these types of wall assemblies.

  19. Degradation of Leakage Currents in Solid Tantalum Capacitors Under Steady-State Bias Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    Degradation of leakage currents in various types of solid tantalum capacitors under steady-state bias conditions was investigated at temperatures from 105 oC to 170 oC and voltages up to two times the rated voltage. Variations of leakage currents with time under highly accelerated life testing (HALT) and annealing, thermally stimulated depolarization currents, and I-V characteristics were measured to understand the conduction mechanism and the reason for current degradation. During HALT the currents increase gradually up to three orders of magnitude in some cases, and then stabilize with time. This degradation is reversible and annealing can restore the initial levels of leakage currents. The results are attributed to migration of positively charged oxygen vacancies in tantalum pentoxide films that diminish the Schottky barrier at the MnO2/Ta2O5 interface and increase electron injection. A simple model allows for estimation of concentration and mobility of oxygen vacancies based on the level of current degradation.

  20. An experimental investigation on the tip leakage noise in axial-flow fans with rotating shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio; Milanese, Gabriele; Parodi, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The tip leakage noise generated by a shrouded rotor of an axial-flow fan has been experimentally studied. The measurements have been taken at high flow rate and at the design point in a hemi-anechoic chamber, at constant rotational speed and during speed ramps. A test plenum designed according to ISO 10302 has been employed to modify the operating conditions and different inlet configurations, ducted and unducted with standard and reduced tip gap, have been considered. The basic features of the inflow have been studied by means of aerodynamic measurements taken upstream of the rotor. To separate the noise generating mechanisms from the acoustic propagation effects, the acoustic response function of the test configuration has been computed employing the spectral decomposition method, and then it has been compared with the velocity-scaled, constant-Strouhal number SPL. In this way, the noise components related to the tip leakage flow have been identified and their connection with geometry have been highlighted. The broadband part of the spectra and the peaks related to the tip leakage flow are affected by the same propagation effects, but show a different dependence on the rotational speed and on the operating point. The upstream geometry affects the radiated noise much more than the performance and even a strong reduction in the tip-gap cannot completely eliminate the related noise.

  1. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Amoretti, Nicolas Huwart, Laurent

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  2. Geochemical implications of gas leakage associated with geologic CO2 storage--a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Omar R; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Cantrell, Kirk J; Lee, Giehyeon; Amonette, James E; Brown, Christopher F

    2013-01-02

    Gas leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). A systematic understanding of how such leakage would impact the geochemistry of potable aquifers and the vadose zone is crucial to the maintenance of environmental quality and the widespread acceptance of GCS. This paper reviews the current literature and discusses current knowledge gaps on how elevated CO(2) levels could influence geochemical processes (e.g., adsorption/desorption and dissolution/precipitation) in potable aquifers and the vadose zone. The review revealed that despite an increase in research and evidence for both beneficial and deleterious consequences of CO(2) migration into potable aquifers and the vadose zone, significant knowledge gaps still exist. Primary among these knowledge gaps is the role/influence of pertinent geochemical factors such as redox condition, CO(2) influx rate, gas stream composition, microbial activity, and mineralogy in CO(2)-induced reactions. Although these factors by no means represent an exhaustive list of knowledge gaps we believe that addressing them is pivotal in advancing current scientific knowledge on how leakage from GCS may impact the environment, improving predictions of CO(2)-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface, and facilitating science-based decision- and policy-making on risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration.

  3. Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-07-09

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

  4. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Christopher E.; Dinc, Osman S.; Bagepalli, Bharat S.; Correia, Victor H.; Aksit, Mahmut F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the "plane" of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member.

  5. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

    1996-04-23

    A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

  6. Suppression and control of leakage field in electromagnetic helical microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shortening the period of electromagnetic wiggler introduces both the radical increase of the leakage field and the decrease of the field in the gap region. The leakage field is severer problem in planar electromagnetic wiggler than in helical wiggler. Hence, in order to develop a short period electromagnetic wiggler, we have adopted {open_quotes}three poles per period{close_quotes} type electromagnetic helical microwiggler. In this work, we inserted the permanent magnet (PM) blocks with specific magnetized directions in the space between magnetic poles, for suppressing the leakage field flowing out from a pole face to the neighboring pole face. These PM-blocks must have higher intrinsic coersive force than saturation field of pole material. The gap field due to each pole is adjustable by controlling the leakage fields, that is, controlling the position of each iron screw set in each retainer fixing the PM-blocks. At present time, a test wiggler with period 7.8mm, periodical number 10 and gap length 4.6mm has been manufactured. Because the ratio of PM-block aperture to gap length is important parameter to suppress the leakage field, the parameter has been surveyed experimentally for PM-blocks with several dimensions of aperture. The field strength of 3-5kG (K=0.2-0.4) would be expected in the wiggler.

  7. Vadose Zone Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Geologic CO2 Storage Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

    2004-03-03

    In the unlikely event that CO2 leakage from deep geologic CO2 sequestration sites reaches the vadose zone, remediation measures for removing the CO2 gas plume may have to be undertaken. Carbon dioxide leakage plumes are similar in many ways to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapor plumes, and the same remediation approaches are applicable. We present here numerical simulation results of passive and active remediation strategies for CO2 leakage plumes in the vadose zone. The starting time for the remediation scenarios is assumed to be after a steady-state CO2 leakage plume is established in the vadose zone, and the source of this plume has been cut off. We consider first passive remediation, both with and without barometric pumping. Next, we consider active methods involving extraction wells in both vertical and horizontal configurations. To compare the effectiveness of the various remediation strategies, we define a half-life of the CO2 plume as a convenient measure of the CO2 removal rate. For CO2 removal by passive remediation approaches such as barometric pumping, thicker vadose zones generally require longer remediation times. However, for the case of a thin vadose zone where a significant fraction of the CO2 plume mass resides within the high liquid saturation region near the water table, the half-life of the CO2 plume without barometric pumping is longer than for somewhat thicker vadose zones. As for active strategies, results show that a combination of horizontal and vertical wells is the most effective among the strategies investigated, as the performance of commonly used multiple vertical wells was not investigated.

  8. Adjacent disc height reduction and clinical outcome after intradiscal cement leakage

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Minjie; Niu, Junjie; Zhou, Haifei; Meng, Qian; Gan, Minfeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of intradiscal cement leakage on the height of adjacent cement-containing discs and the resulting clinical efficacy after kyphoplasty. Methods A total of 124 patients were included and classified into two groups: group A included 20 patients with intradiscal leakage, and group B contained 104 patients without intradiscal leakage. The mean follow-up time was 20.56±3.51 months. The height of the corresponding discs in both groups was measured using Farfan’s method. Clinical efficacy was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores at each follow-up time. Results The anterior disc height, posterior disc height and Farfan Index significantly decreased in both groups at last follow-up. The disc height reduction was 9.19±2.89% in group A and 3.88±2.70% in group B, which was significantly different between the groups (P<0.01). The disc height reduction rate was 29.39±7.90% in group A and 12.75±8.18% in group B, which was also a statistically significant difference (P<0.01). The VAS and ODI scores improved significantly after surgery and maintained at last follow-up, and there was no statistically significant difference between Groups A and B. Conclusion Intradiscal cement leakage was associated with the degeneration of cement-containing disc but did not reduce the clinical efficacy at early stages. PMID:27909655

  9. Analytical Assessment of a Gross Leakage Event Within the International Space Station (ISS) Node 2 Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, James M.; Clanton, Stephen E.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the International Space Station (ISS) Node 2 Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) gross leakage analysis are presented for evaluating total leakage flow rates and volume discharge caused by a gross leakage event (i.e. open boundary condition). A Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA85/FLUINT) thermal hydraulic mathematical model (THMM) representing the Node 2 IATCS was developed to simulate system performance under steady-state nominal conditions as well as the transient flow effect resulting from an open line exposed to ambient. The objective of the analysis was to determine the adequacy of the leak detection software in limiting the quantity of fluid lost during a gross leakage event to within an acceptable level.

  10. Geomechanical effects on CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frédéric

    2013-12-01

    The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large-scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO2 to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this paper extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO2 to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO2 injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Finally, and consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO2 will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  11. Identifying and Managing Gas Leakage from Subsurface Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface gas accumulations exist from both natural sources such as hydrocarbon reservoirs, as well as, man-made sources such as natural gas storage, gas pipelines, CO2 storage, or even H2 storage. Both natural and manmade sources of subsurface gases have the potential to leak to the surface. Leakage can cause safety hazards and detrimental impacts associated with the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Leak management, which involves identifying, characterizing, assessing, and remediating leakage requires a coordinated and systematic approach to effectively deal with these occurrences. Here an overall workflow for leak management is presented, along with technological options and challenges for successful implementation. Many tools and approaches for leak management are available and in use today. However, the increased attention to leakage from a larger variety of sources, particularly associated with legacy facilities and infrastructure, raises new issues and challenges that are highlighted here.

  12. Dynamic sealing principles. [design configurations for fluid leakage control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental principles governing dynamic sealing operation are discussed. Different seals are described in terms of these principles. Despite the large variety of detailed construction, there appear to be some basic principles, or combinations of basic principles, by which all seals function. They are: (1) selection and control of seal geometry, (2) control of leakage fluid properties, and (3) control of forces acting on leakage fluids. Theoretical and practical considerations in the application of these principles are discussed. Advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and application examples of various conventional and special seals are presented. Fundamental equations governing liquid and gas flows in thin-film seals, which enable leakage calculations to be made, are also presented.

  13. Crack detection and leakage monitoring on reinforced concrete pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qian; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2015-11-01

    Reinforced concrete underground pipelines are some of the most widely used types of structures in water transportation systems. Cracks and leakage are the leading causes of pipeline structural failures which directly results in economic losses and environmental hazards. In this paper, the authors propose a piezoceramic based active sensing approach to detect the cracks and the further leakage of concrete pipelines. Due to the piezoelectric properties, piezoceramic material can be utilized as both the actuator and the sensor in the active sensing approach. The piezoceramic patch, which is sandwiched between protective materials called ‘smart aggregates,’ can be safely embedded into concrete structures. Circumferential and axial cracks were investigated. A wavelet packet-based energy analysis was developed to distinguish the type of crack and determine the further leakage based on different stress wave energy attenuation propagated through the cracks.

  14. Leakage radiation microscope for observation of non-transparent samples.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-09-22

    We describe a leakage radiation microscope technique that can be used to extend the leakage radiation microscopy to optically non-transparent samples. In particular, two experiments are presented, first to demonstrate that acquired images with our configuration correspond to the leakage radiation phenomenon and second, to show possible applications by directly imaging a plasmonic structure that previously could only be imaged with a near-field scanning optical microscope. It is shown that the measured surface plasmon wavelength and propagation length agree with theoretically-calculated values. This configuration opens the possibility to study important effects where samples are optically non-transparent, as in plasmonic cavities and single hole plasmonic excitation, without the use of time-consuming near-field scanning optical microscopy.

  15. An Investigation of Tendon Corrosion-Inhibitor Leakage into Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1999-07-05

    During inspections performed at US nuclear power plants several years ago, some of the prestressed concrete containment had experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler. A study was conducted to indicate the extent of the leakage into the concrete and its potential effects on concrete properties. Concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant. Examination and testing of the core samples indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the surface was due to leakage of the filler from the conduits and its subsequent migration to the concrete surface through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks with no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength tests indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased relative to the strength at 28 days age.

  16. Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

  17. Albumin leakage in online hemodiafiltration, more convective transport, more losses?

    PubMed

    Vega, Almudena; Quiroga, Borja; Abad, Soraya; Aragoncillo, Inés; Arroyo, David; Panizo, Nayara; López-Gómez, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) has now demonstrated some benefits in reducing mortality. It seems that rising convective volumes improve the outcomes, but the risks of it, such as albumin leakage, are not well defined yet. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the albumin leakage using two different filters with 20 and 30 L of post-dilution OL-HDF. In this cross-sectional study, 20 prevalent patients receiving post-dilution OL-HDL were included. We analyzed two dialyzers: FX1000, FMC and Polyflux 210H, Gambro. During four consecutive dialysis sessions, monitors were programmed using control-volume to obtain 20 or 30 L with both dialyzers. We collected albumin samples of the effluent at 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min and performed area under the curve (AUC) determinations for evaluating the losses. Mean patient age was 60 ± 9 years, and 70% were men. Albumin leakage was significant higher with Polyflux 210H when compared to FX 1000 FMC. A convective volume of 30 L produced greater albumin leakage than 20 L with both filters, though only with the FX 1000 FMC was it significant (minimum albumin leakage during first hour with FX 1000 FMC 20 L: 79.2 [0.0-175.7] mg; 30 liters: 403.3 [63.5-960.7] mg; with PF 210 Gambro 20 L: 869.1 [420.0-3214.7] mg; 30 L: 1841.7 [443.8-3417.5] mg). During OL-HDF, convective transport causes albumin leakage at least during the first hour. The albumin concentration in the effluent differs according to the type of filter used and the convective volume.

  18. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Morrison, Adele K.; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2015-12-10

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, ‘Agulhas leakage’, forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870–2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. Lastly, this is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic.

  19. Leakage estimation using Kalman filtering in noninvasive mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G G; Freitas, U S; Bounoiare, D; Aguirre, L A; Letellier, C

    2013-05-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation is today often used to assist patient with chronic respiratory failure. One of the main reasons evoked to explain asynchrony events, discomfort, unwillingness to be treated, etc., is the occurrence of nonintentional leaks in the ventilation circuit, which are difficult to account for because they are not measured. This paper describes a solution to the problem of variable leakage estimation based on a Kalman filter driven by airflow and the pressure signals, both of which are available in the ventilation circuit. The filter was validated by showing that based on the attained leakage estimates, practically all the untriggered cycles can be explained.

  20. Leakage Current and Floating Gate Capacitor Matching Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Weidong; Trogolo, Joe R.; Todd, Bob

    Capacitor mismatch is an important device parameter for precision analog applications. In the last ten years, the floating gate measurement technique has been widely used for its characterization. In this paper we describe the impact of leakage current on the technique. The leakage can come from, for example, thin gate oxide MOSFETs or high dielectric constant capacitors in advanced technologies. SPICE simulation, bench measurement, analytical model and numerical analyses are presented to illustrate the problem and key contributing factors. Criteria for accurate capacitor systematic and random mismatch characterization are developed, and practical methods of increasing measurement accuracy are discussed.

  1. Midcourse correction to a clinical trial when the event rate is underestimated: The Look AHEAD (Action of health in diabetes) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study is a long-term clinical trial that aims to determine the cardiovascular disease (CVD) benefits of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The study was designed to have 90% statistical power to detect an 18%...

  2. Phosphate-limited continuous culture of Rhodotorula rubra: kinetics of transport, leakage, and growth.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B R; Button, D K

    1979-01-01

    The phosphate-limited growth kinetics of Rhodotorula rubra, a small yeast of marine origin, were examined by analysis of 32P distributions in continuous cultures. Isotope relaxation procedures were used to identify unidirectional flows of Pi and organic phosphate among compartments modeled during growth. The concentrations of phosphates in these compartments at various growth rates were used, together with attendant flows, to produce a mathematical model of growth. Both Pi and phosphate-containing metabolic intermediates leaked from cells during growth. Total leakage ranged from 4 to 10% of influx and was comprised mostly of Pi. Transport capacity was at least 10 times that required for growth at saturating Pi concentrations, so that influx was linear with concentration during growth. This led to the realization that the curvature of Monod plots (Kmu = 12 nM mumax = 0.18/h, and the threshold At = 2.5 nM) is due to change in yield with growth rate. Growth rate related to Pi by the affinity, aA (= 0.43 liter/mg of cells.h) of cells for Pi and the growth rate-dependent yield. It was also specified by a series of kinetic constants that specified flow among the various compartments and equilibrium compartment concentrations as they were set by extracellular Pi. The importance of leakage by healthy cells to the organic chemistry of aquatic systems is noted. PMID:37231

  3. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  4. USAF bioenvironmental noise data handbook. Volume 168: MB-3 tester, pressurized cabin leakage, aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, T. H.

    1982-06-01

    The MB-3 Tester is an electric motor-driven cabin leakage tester designed to furnish pressurized air to the aircraft at controlled pressures and temperatures during ground pressurization of aircraft cockpits and pressurized compartments. This report provides measured data defining the bioacoustic environments produced by this unit operating at a normal rated/load condition. Near-field data are reported for 37 locations in a wide variety of physical and psychoacoustic measures: overall and band sound pressure levels, C-weighted and A-weighted sound levels, preferred speech interference level, perceived noise level, and limiting times for total daily exposure of personnel with and without standard Air Force ear protectors.

  5. Using the Bongwana natural CO2 release to understand leakage processes and develop monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David; Johnson, Gareth; Hicks, Nigel; Bond, Clare; Gilfillan, Stuart; Kremer, Yannick; Lister, Bob; Nkwane, Mzikayise; Maupa, Thulani; Munyangane, Portia; Robey, Kate; Saunders, Ian; Shipton, Zoe; Pearce, Jonathan; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Natural CO2 leakage along the Bongwana Fault in South Africa is being studied to help understand processes of CO2 leakage and develop monitoring protocols. The Bongwana Fault crops out over approximately 80 km in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. In outcrop the fault is expressed as a broad fracture corridor in Dwyka Tillite, with fractures oriented approximately N-S. Natural emissions of CO2 occur at various points along the fault, manifest as travertine cones and terraces, bubbling in the rivers and as gas fluxes through soil. Exposed rock outcrop shows evidence for Fe-staining around fractures and is locally extensively kaolinitised. The gas has also been released through a shallow water well, and was exploited commercially in the past. Preliminary studies have been carried out to better document the surface emissions using near surface gas monitoring, understand the origin of the gas through major gas composition and stable and noble gas isotopes and improve understanding of the structural controls on gas leakage through mapping. In addition the impact of the leaking CO2 on local water sources (surface and ground) is being investigated, along with the seismic activity of the fault. The investigation will help to build technical capacity in South Africa and to develop monitoring techniques and plans for a future CO2 storage pilot there. Early results suggest that CO2 leakage is confined to a relatively small number of spatially-restricted locations along the weakly seismically active fault. Fracture permeability appears to be the main method by which the CO2 migrates to the surface. The bulk of the CO2 is of deep origin with a minor contribution from near surface biogenic processes as determined by major gas composition. Water chemistry, including pH, DO and TDS is notably different between CO2-rich and CO2-poor sites. Soil gas content and flux effectively delineates the fault trace in active leakage sites. The fault provides an effective testing ground for

  6. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  7. Hydrogeology from 10,000 ft below: lessons learned in applying pulse testing for leakage detection in a carbon sequestration formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Lu, J.; Hovorka, S. D.; Freifeld, B. M.; Islam, A.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring techniques capable of deep subsurface detection are desirable for early warning and leakage pathway identification in geologic carbon storage formations. This work investigates the feasibility of a leakage detection technique based on pulse testing, which is a traditional hydrogeological characterization tool. In pulse testing, the monitoring reservoir is stimulated at a fixed frequency and the acquired pressure perturbation signals are analyzed in the frequency domain to detect potential deviations in the reservoir's frequency domain response function. Unlike traditional time-domain analyses, the frequency-domain analysis aims to minimize the interference of reservoir noise by imposing coded injection patterns such that the reservoir responses to injection can be uniquely determined. We have established the theoretical basis of the approach in previous work. Recently, field validation of this pressure-based, leakage detection technique was conducted at a CO2-EOR site located in Mississippi, USA. During the demonstration, two sets of experiments were performed using 90-min and 150-min pulsing periods, for both with and without leak scenarios. Because of the lack of pre-existing leakage pathways, artificial leakage CO2 was simulated by rate-controlled venting from one of the monitoring wells. Our results show that leakage events caused a significant deviation in the amplitude of the frequency response function, indicating that pulse testing may be used as a cost-effective monitoring technique with a strong potential for automation.

  8. Visual Inspection of Water Leakage from Ground Penetrating Radar Radargram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimshah, N. N.; Yusup, A.; Mat Amin, Z.; Ghazalli, M. D.

    2015-10-01

    Water loss in town and suburban is currently a significant issue which reflect the performance of water supply management in Malaysia. Consequently, water supply distribution system has to be maintained in order to prevent shortage of water supply in an area. Various techniques for detecting a mains water leaks are available but mostly are time-consuming, disruptive and expensive. In this paper, the potential of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) as a non-destructive method to correctly and efficiently detect mains water leaks has been examined. Several experiments were designed and conducted to prove that GPR can be used as tool for water leakage detection. These include instrument validation test and soil compaction test to clarify the maximum dry density (MDD) of soil and simulation studies on water leakage at a test bed consisting of PVC pipe burying in sand to a depth of 40 cm. Data from GPR detection are processed using the Reflex 2D software. Identification of water leakage was visually inspected from the anomalies in the radargram based on GPR reflection coefficients. The results have ascertained the capability and effectiveness of the GPR in detecting water leakage which could help avoiding difficulties with other leak detection methods.

  9. Blower-door techniques for measuring interzonal leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The standard blower door test methods, such as ASTM E779, describe how to use a single blower door to determine the total leakage of a single-zone structure such as a detached single-family home. There are no standard test methods for measuring interzonal leakage in a two-zone or multi-zone building envelope such as might be encountered in with an attached garage or in a multifamily building. Some practitioners have been using techniques that involve making multiple measurements with a single blower door as well as combined measurements using multiple blower doors. Even for just two zones there are dozens of combinations of one-door and two-door test protocols that could conceivably be used to determine the interzonal air tightness. We examined many of these two-zone configurations using both simulation and measured data to estimate the accuracy and precision of each technique for realistic measurement scenarios. We also considered the impact of taking measurements at a single pressure versus over multiple pressures. We compared the various techniques and evaluated them for specific uses. Some techniques work better in one leakage regime; some are more sensitive to wind and other noise; some are more suited to determining only a subset of the leakage values. This paper makes recommendations on which techniques to use or not use for various cases and provides data that could be used to develop future test methods.

  10. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2640 Portable... the electrical leakage current between any two points of an electrical system and to sound an alarm if... exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2640 Portable... the electrical leakage current between any two points of an electrical system and to sound an alarm if... exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2640 Portable... the electrical leakage current between any two points of an electrical system and to sound an alarm if... exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2640 - Portable leakage current alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2640 Portable... the electrical leakage current between any two points of an electrical system and to sound an alarm if... exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to...

  14. 75 FR 20546 - Total Inward Leakage Requirements for Respirators

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... (CDC) is reopening the comment period for the notice of proposed rulemaking by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of CDC, entitled ``Total Inward Leakage Requirements for...://www.regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. E-mail:...

  15. 49 CFR 178.345-13 - Pressure and leakage tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be tested with the adjacent cargo tanks empty and at atmospheric pressure. Each closure, except... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure and leakage tests. 178.345-13 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-13 Pressure and...

  16. Closure of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after transsphenoidal surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Freidberg, S R; Hybels, R L; Bohigian, R K

    1994-07-01

    It is necessary to pack the sella turcica to prevent the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid after transsphenoidal surgery if the arachnoid has been torn. The packing is usually supported by nasal cartilage. If this is not available, we recommend the Synthes minifragment plate to support the intradural pack.

  17. 42 CFR 84.123 - Exhalation valve leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test. 84.123 Section 84.123 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  18. Thresholds of information leakage for speech security outside meeting rooms.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew; Hopkins, Carl; Worrall, Ken; Jackson, Tim

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes an approach to provide speech security outside meeting rooms where a covert listener might attempt to extract confidential information. Decision-based experiments are used to establish a relationship between an objective measurement of the Speech Transmission Index (STI) and a subjective assessment relating to the threshold of information leakage. This threshold is defined for a specific percentage of English words that are identifiable with a maximum safe vocal effort (e.g., "normal" speech) used by the meeting participants. The results demonstrate that it is possible to quantify an offset that links STI with a specific threshold of information leakage which describes the percentage of words identified. The offsets for male talkers are shown to be approximately 10 dB larger than for female talkers. Hence for speech security it is possible to determine offsets for the threshold of information leakage using male talkers as the "worst case scenario." To define a suitable threshold of information leakage, the results show that a robust definition can be based upon 1%, 2%, or 5% of words identified. For these percentages, results are presented for offset values corresponding to different STI values in a range from 0.1 to 0.3.

  19. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  20. Osmotic Stressing, Membrane Leakage, and Fluorescence: An Introductory Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seu, Kalani J.

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence demonstration is described that incorporates several fundamental aspects of an introductory biochemistry course. A variation of a known leakage assay is utilized to prepare vesicles containing a quenched fluorophore. The vesicles are exposed to several osmotic environments ranging from isotonic to hypotonic. The degree of vesicle…

  1. Minimum permissible leakage resistance established for instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Mathematical formulas are used to determine if, and to what extent, an instrumentation system that has been exposed to the elements should be dried out to restore minimum permissible leakage resistance to ground. Formulas are also derived and used for an intermediate number of systems that are exposed to moisture penetration.

  2. 42 CFR 84.123 - Exhalation valve leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test. 84.123 Section 84.123 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  3. 42 CFR 84.123 - Exhalation valve leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test. 84.123 Section 84.123 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  4. 42 CFR 84.123 - Exhalation valve leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test. 84.123 Section 84.123 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  5. 42 CFR 84.123 - Exhalation valve leakage test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test. 84.123 Section 84.123 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  6. Exploitation of Unintentional Information Leakage from Integrated Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, William E.

    2011-01-01

    The information leakage of electronic devices, especially those used in cryptographic or other vital applications, represents a serious practical threat to secure systems. While physical implementation attacks have evolved rapidly over the last decade, relatively little work has been done to allow system designers to effectively counter the…

  7. Can paternal leakage maintain sexually antagonistic polymorphism in the cytoplasm?

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, B; Lane, N; Pomiankowski, A

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies in multicellular organisms highlight low or moderate frequencies of paternal transmission of cytoplasmic organelles, including both mitochondria and chloroplasts. It is well established that strict maternal inheritance is selectively blind to cytoplasmic elements that are deleterious to males – ’mother's curse’. But it is not known how sensitive this conclusion is to slight levels of paternal cytoplasmic leakage. We assess the scope for polymorphism when individuals bear multiple cytoplasmic alleles in the presence of paternal leakage, bottlenecks and recurrent mutation. When fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements within an individual are additive, we find that sexually antagonistic polymorphism is restricted to cases of strong selection on males. However, when fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements are nonlinear, much more extensive polymorphism can be supported in the cytoplasm. In particular, mitochondrial mutants that have strong beneficial fitness effects in males and weak deleterious fitness effects in females when rare (i.e. ’reverse dominance’) are strongly favoured under paternal leakage. We discuss how such epistasis could arise through preferential segregation of mitochondria in sex-specific somatic tissues. Our analysis shows how paternal leakage can dampen the evolution of deleterious male effects associated with predominant maternal inheritance of cytoplasm, potentially explaining why ’mother's curse’ is less pervasive than predicted by earlier work. PMID:25653025

  8. Comparison of natural aquifer geochemical variability with uncertainty from model-predicted CO2 induced geochemical changes: How detectable is leakage from carbon sequestration sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarre-Sitchler, A. K.; Moore, J.

    2012-12-01

    in hydrologic parameters and leakage rates was quantified using stochastic approaches in reactive transport models. Comparison of the model results to groundwater variability provides guidance for the development of geochemical monitoring of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers.

  9. Probability assessment of pressure and geochemical monitoring for CO2 leakage detection in the above zones at geological carbon sequestration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Meckel, T. A.; Hovorka, S. D.; Trevino, R.; Zou, Y.; Delgado, J.

    2015-12-01

    Above-zone monitoring of pressure has been proposed as one of means to quality a geological carbon sequestration site by detection of leakage. Advancements in chemical monitoring, such as fiber optic sensors, will make it possible to monitor geochemical chemical parameters needed for CO2 leakage detection in the same zones. The main objective of this study is to assess pressure and geochemical monitoring for CO2 leakage detection with Montecarlo simulations at a hypothetic site where CO2 is potentially leaked into an above zone through a flawed well. Configuration of the above-zone in the hypothetic site was taken from a real site where CO2 has been injected into the deep reservoir since 2008 because over three years of pressure data in the above zone has been recorded at this site. Because geochemical data in the above zone at this site is limited, we also extracted some geochemical data from the TWDB database. Threshold values (or background noises) were estimated (or characterized) from the pressure and geochemical data for identifying CO2 leakage signals in the above zone. In the model set-up, pressure, dissolved CO2, pH and salinity in the above zone caused by CO2 leakage from a flawed well were simulated with analytical approaches, depending on the parameters, such as CO2 leakage rate, permeability, porosity, thickness of the monitoring interval, distance of the monitoring well to the leakage location. More than one million set of the parameters, simulated with the Monte-Carlo method, were used to model responses of pressure, dissolved CO2, pH, and salinity which were further compared to the threshold values to estimate probability of CO2 leakage detection using the pressure and the geochemical parameters. Our study shows that pressure in the morning well has much shorter time to respond to the CO2 leakage from the flawed well than geochemical parameters. However, if the monitoring well was in a favorable location, the geochemical monitoring may have better

  10. Depression of the Thoracolumbar Posterior Vertebral Body on the Estimation of Cement Leakage in Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty Operations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Jia, Pu; Bao, Li; Feng, Fei; Yang, He; Li, Jin-Jun; Tang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cross-section of thoracolumbar vertebral body is kidney-shaped with depressed posterior boundary. The anterior wall of the vertebral canal is separated from the posterior wall of the vertebral body on the lateral X-ray image. This study was designed to determine the sagittal distance between the anterior border of the vertebral canal and the posterior border of the vertebral body (DBCV) and to analyze the potential role of DBCV in the estimation of cement leakage during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP). Methods: We retrospectively recruited 233 patients who had osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and were treated with PVP or PKP. Computed tomography images of T11–L2 normal vertebrae were measured to obtain DBCV. The distance from cement to the posterior wall of the vertebral body (DCPW) of thoracolumbar vertebrae was measured from C-arm images. The selected vertebrae were divided into two groups according to DCPW, with the fracture levels, fracture grades and leakage rates of the two groups compared. A relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve was applied to determine whether the DCPW difference can be used to estimate the degree of cement leakage. The data were processed by statistical software SPSS version 21.0 using independent sample t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: The maximum DBCV was 6.40 mm and the average DBCV was 3.74 ± 0.95 mm. DBCV appeared to be longer in males than in females, but the difference was not statistically significant. The average DCPW of type-B leakage vertebrae (2.59 ± 1.20 mm) was shorter than that of other vertebrae (7.83 ± 2.38 mm, P < 0.001). The leakage rate of group DCPW ≤6.40 mm was lower than that of group DCPW >6.40 mm for type-C and type-S, but much higher for type-B. ROC curve revealed that DCPW only has a predictive value for type-B leakage (area under the curve: 0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.95–0.99, P < 0.001), and when the cut-off value was 4

  11. Induced seismicity and CO2 leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection in a multilayered sedimentary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio Rinaldi, Antonio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jeanne, Pierre; Cappa, Frederic; Guglielmi, Yves

    2014-05-01

    whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. In the second part of this work we address the three following questions: (1) is there a link between fault-zone architecture and fault reactivation by CO2 injection? (2) what is the impact of the fault architecture on the induced seismicity and on CO2 leakage? and (3) how do caprock and reservoir thickness impact the results? We analyze the hydromechanical behavior of a fault zone represented either by: (i) a continuous damage zone, or by a discontinuous damage zone caused by (ii) variations in lithology of the different layers (shale caprock and limestone aquifers), and also by (iii) the initial properties of the sedimentary layers within the injection reservoir itself. We use the model to estimate the moment magnitude associated with a sudden fault slip event as well as the amount of CO2 migrating from the injection aquifer and upwards across the primary caprock located just above the injection aquifer after a long-term post-injection period. We recognize that such migration out of the injection aquifer may not formally constitute CO2 leakage up into potable shallow aquifers, if for example there is leak-off into intervening aquifers or multiple overlying low permeability formations that prevent further upward migration of the CO2. Finally, results show that a thin caprock or aquifer allows smaller events, but a much higher percentage of leakage in the upper aquifer. The elevate amount of leakage reduces drastically by assuming a multi-caprock, multi-aquifer system.

  12. The simulated effects of wastewater-management actions on the hydrologic system and nitrogen-loading rates to wells and ecological receptors, Popponesset Bay Watershed, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of excess nitrogen into Popponesset Bay, an estuarine system on western Cape Cod, has resulted in eutrophication and the loss of eel grass habitat within the estuaries. Septic-system return flow in residential areas within the watershed is the primary source of nitrogen. Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for nitrogen have been assigned to the six estuaries that compose the system, and local communities are in the process of implementing the TMDLs by the partial sewering, treatment, and disposal of treated wastewater at wastewater-treatment facilities (WTFs). Loads of waste-derived nitrogen from both current (1997–2001) and future sources can be estimated implicitly from parcel-scale water-use data and recharge areas delineated by a groundwater-flow model. These loads are referred to as “instantaneous” loads because it is assumed that the nitrogen from surface sources is delivered to receptors instantaneously and that there is no traveltime through the aquifer. The use of a solute-transport model to explicitly simulate the transport of mass through the aquifer from sources to receptors can improve implementation of TMDLs by (1) accounting for traveltime through the aquifer, (2) avoiding limitations associated with the estimation of loads from static recharge areas, (3) accounting more accurately for the effect of surface waters on nitrogen loads, and (4) determining the response of waste-derived nitrogen loads to potential wastewater-management actions. The load of nitrogen to Popponesset Bay on western Cape Cod, which was estimated by using current sources as input to a solute-transport model based on a steady-state flow model, is about 50 percent of the instantaneous load after about 7 years of transport (loads to estuary are equal to loads discharged from sources); this estimate is consistent with simulated advective traveltimes in the aquifer, which have a median of 5 years. Model-calculated loads originating from recharge areas reach 80

  13. Radiation leakage dose from Elekta electron collimation system.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Garrett M; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L

    2016-09-08

    This study provided baseline data required for a greater project, whose objective was to design a new Elekta electron collimation system having significantly lighter electron applicators with equally low out-of field leakage dose. Specifically, off-axis dose profiles for the electron collimation system of our uniquely configured Elekta Infinity accelerator with the MLCi2 treatment head were measured and calculated for two primary purposes: 1) to evaluate and document the out-of-field leakage dose in the patient plane and 2) to validate the dose distributions calculated using a BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) model for out-of-field dose profiles. Off-axis dose profiles were measured in a water phantom at 100 cm SSD for 1 and 2 cm depths along the in-plane, cross-plane, and both diagonal axes using a cylindrical ionization chamber with the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators and 7, 13, and 20 MeV beams. Dose distributions were calculated using a previously developed BEAMnrc MC model of the Elekta Infinity accelerator for the same beam energies and applicator sizes and compared with measurements. Measured results showed that the in-field beam flatness met our acceptance criteria (± 3% on major and ±4% on diagonal axes) and that out-of-field mean and maximum percent leakage doses in the patient plane met acceptance criteria as specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Cross-plane out-of-field dose profiles showed greater leakage dose than in-plane profiles, attributed to the curved edges of the upper X-ray jaws and multileaf collimator. Mean leakage doses increased with beam energy, being 0.93% and 0.85% of maximum central axis dose for the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators, respectively, at 20 MeV. MC calculations predicted the measured dose to within 0.1% in most profiles outside the radiation field; however, excluding model-ing of nontrimmer applicator components led to calculations exceeding measured data by as much as 0.2% for some regions

  14. Evaluation of particulate filtering respirators using inward leakage (IL) or total inward leakage (TIL) testing--Korean experience.

    PubMed

    Han, Don-Hee; Lee, Jinheon

    2005-10-01

    Korean certification regulation for particulate filtering respirators requires inward leakage (IL) or total inward leakage (TIL) testing according to European Standard EN 13274-1, and the standard levels of compliance are similar to those of the European Standard. This study was conducted to evaluate particulate filtering respirators being commercially used in the Korean market using an IL or TIL test and the validity of standard level in Korea. Three half masks and 10 filtering facepieces (two top class, four 1st class and four 2nd class)-a total of 13 brand name respirators-were selected for the test with panels of 10 subjects. Each subject was classified with nine facial dimension grid squares in accordance with face length and lip length. IL or TIL testing was conducted at the laboratory of the 3M Innovation Center in which the experimental instruments and systems were established in compliance with European standards. The testing procedure followed EN 13274-1 (2001). As expected, leakages of half masks were less than those of filtering facepieces and the latter were significantly different among brands. TILs of the 1st class filtering facepieces were found to be much more than those of the 2nd class and the result may cause a wearer to get confused when selecting a mask. The main route leakage for filtering facepieces may not be the filter medium but the face seal. Therefore, it is necessary to develop well-fitting filtering facepieces for Koreans. Because leakages were significantly different for different facial dimensions, a defined test panel for IL or TIL testing according to country or race should be developed. A more precise method to demonstrate fit, for example, fit testing such as in the US regulations, will be needed before IL or TIL testing or when selecting a respirator. Another finding implies that geometric mean of five exercises for IL or TIL may be better than arithmetic mean to establish a standard individual subject mean.

  15. Action of Steroidal Diamines on Active Transport and Permeability Properties of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Simon; Levine, Elaine

    1968-01-01

    The steroidal diamine irehdiamine A (IDA) is a potent inhibitor of bacteriophage growth and macromolecular synthesis in Escherichia coli. By using radioactive 42K and 14C-thiomethylgalactoside (TMG), rapid effects of IDA and related steroids, both on the influx of potassium and TMG via their respective transport systems and on the efflux (leakage) of radioactivity from the treated cells, have been measured. IDA affects both the influx and efflux of 42K at concentrations of steroid as low as 2 × 10−5m. Because of the increased leakage, it is not possible to tell whether there is a direct effect reducing the rate of active transport of potassium. The primary diamine, IDA, and its bis-secondary, bis-tertiary, and bis-quaternary diamine analogues are decreasingly effective in altering cell permeability properties in the order 1° > 2° > 3° > 4°. The effects of IDA on potassium transport are mirrored by similar effects on the transport of TMG. Therefore, the action of IDA is on the cell membrane and not directly on one or another transport system. The effects of IDA on cell permeability can reasonably explain the inhibitory actions of the drugs on bacteriophage growth and cellular metabolism. PMID:4877122

  16. Numerical investigation of methane and formation fluid leakage along the casing of a decommissioned shale gas well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowamooz, A.; Lemieux, J.-M.; Molson, J.; Therrien, R.

    2015-06-01

    Methane and brine leakage rates and associated time scales along the cemented casing of a hypothetical decommissioned shale gas well have been assessed with a multiphase flow and multicomponent numerical model. The conceptual model used for the simulations assumes that the target shale formation is 200 m thick, overlain by a 750 m thick caprock, which is in turn overlain by a 50 m thick surficial sand aquifer, the 1000 m geological sequence being intersected by a fully penetrating borehole. This succession of geological units is representative of the region targeted for shale gas exploration in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Québec, Canada). The simulations aimed at assessing the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine leakage at the base of a surficial aquifer. The leakage of fluids can subsequently lead to the contamination of groundwater resources and/or, in the case of methane migration to ground surface, to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. The minimum reported surface casing vent flow (measured at ground level) for shale gas wells in Quebec (0.01 m3/d) is used as a reference to evaluate the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine migration. The simulations suggest that an adequately cemented borehole (with a casing annulus permeability kc≤ 1 mD) can prevent methane and brine leakage over a time scale of up to 100 years. However, a poorly cemented borehole (kc≥ 10 mD) could yield methane leakage rates at the base of an aquifer ranging from 0.04 m3/d to more than 100 m3/d, depending on the permeability of the target shale gas formation after abandonment and on the quantity of mobile gas in the formation. These values are compatible with surface casing vent flows reported for shale gas wells in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada). The simulated travel time of methane from the target shale formation to the surficial aquifer is between a few months and 30 years, depending on cementation quality and

  17. Leakage of Experimental Information to Potential Future Subjects by Debriefed Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Edward; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Leakage of experimental information from debreifed subjects into a university subject pool was studied. It was concluded that in settings similar to those of the experiment, leakage of information is not a serious problem. (Authors)

  18. Constraining Effects of Brine Leakage from Carbon Sequestration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, A.; Navarre-Sitchler, A. K.; McCray, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Research has shown that pressure build up associated with injection of CO2 into a deep saline aquifer has the potential to promote brine leakage into overlying formations. In order to understand and quantify chemical changes in an underground source of drinking water (USDW) invaded by deep saline brines, we analyzed over 90,000 brine geochemical data entries from the NETL NATCARB brine database to identify potential brine constituents of concern. Using a variety of statistical methods and EPA regulatory levels or standards (RLS) we narrowed the list of brine constituents of potential concern to USDWs to TDS, thallium, chloride, sulfate and arsenic. Somewhat surprisingly, the distribution of reported pH had a fairly narrow distribution around a median value of 7.4, with over 78% of values complying with EPA recommended secondary standard for drinking water acidity. The pH distribution implies that unlike pure CO2 leakage, far-field brine leakage (i.e., brine not in contact with CO2) is not expected to bear a low-pH signature, thus suggesting use of other means of geochemical monitoring for brine leakage, such as electrical conductivity. Geochemical mixing models of brine and dilute water were used to constrain mixing ratios where RLS values are exceeded for the TDS, thallium and chloride. TDS and chloride exceed the EPA secondary standards at a brine/USDW mixing ratio of 0.012 and 0.459, respectively. The thallium maximum contaminant level (MCL) is exceeded at a brine/USDW mixing ratio of 0.3753, smaller than the chloride mixing ratio. However, sorption and/or desorption processes may alter thallium concentrations along a leakage pathway resulting in lower concentrations in the aquifer than predicted by simple mixing models. While leakage into USDWs has received considerable attention, brine contamination of groundwater used for irrigation of agricultural crops is also an important area of research. Our calculations suggest that almost all crops grown in the United

  19. The measured energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1991-06-01

    Infiltration is customarily assumed to increase the heating and cooling load of a building by an amount equal to the mass flow rate of the infiltration times the enthalpy difference between the inside and outside air -- with the latent portion of the enthalpy difference sometimes neglected. An experimental and analytical investigation has been conducted on the actual energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems. Calorimetric measurements conducted on a small test cell and on a well characterized stud-cavity wall specimen with measured amounts of air leakage introduced under a variety of controlled conditions and configurations show convincingly that infiltration can lead to a much smaller change in the energy load than is customarily calculated. The data also suggest that the phenomenon occurs in full-sized houses as well. Infiltration Heat Exchange Effectiveness (IHEE),{var_epsilon}, is introduced as a measure of the effectiveness of a building in ``recovering`` heat otherwise lost (or gained) because of infiltration. Measurements show that {var_epsilon} increases as: (a) flow rate decreases; (b) flow path length increases; and, (c) hole/crack size decreases.

  20. The measured energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1991-06-01

    Infiltration is customarily assumed to increase the heating and cooling load of a building by an amount equal to the mass flow rate of the infiltration times the enthalpy difference between the inside and outside air -- with the latent portion of the enthalpy difference sometimes neglected. An experimental and analytical investigation has been conducted on the actual energy impact of air leakage on frame wall systems. Calorimetric measurements conducted on a small test cell and on a well characterized stud-cavity wall specimen with measured amounts of air leakage introduced under a variety of controlled conditions and configurations show convincingly that infiltration can lead to a much smaller change in the energy load than is customarily calculated. The data also suggest that the phenomenon occurs in full-sized houses as well. Infiltration Heat Exchange Effectiveness (IHEE),{var epsilon}, is introduced as a measure of the effectiveness of a building in recovering'' heat otherwise lost (or gained) because of infiltration. Measurements show that {var epsilon} increases as: (a) flow rate decreases; (b) flow path length increases; and, (c) hole/crack size decreases.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Elastomer Docking Seal Compression Set, Adhesion, and Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Oswald, Jay J.; Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Smith, Ian; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    A universal docking and berthing system is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to support all future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), to the Moon, and to Mars. An investigation of the compression set of two seals mated in a seal-on-seal configuration and the force required to separate the two seals after periods of mating was conducted. The leakage rates of seals made from two silicone elastomer compounds, S0383-70 and S0899-50, configured in seal-on-seal mating were quantified. The test specimens were sub-scale seals with representative cross-sections and a 12 inch outside diameter. The leakage rate of the seals manufactured from S0899-50 was higher than that of the seals made from S0383-70 by a factor of 1.8. Similarly, the adhesion of the 50 durometer elastomer was significantly higher than that of the 70 durometer compound. However, the compression set values of the S0899-50 material were observed to be significantly lower than those for the S0383-70.

  2. Estimating the leakage contribution of phosphate dosed drinking water to environmental phosphorus pollution at the national-scale.

    PubMed

    Ascott, M J; Gooddy, D C; Lapworth, D J; Stuart, M E

    2016-12-01

    Understanding sources of phosphorus (P) to the environment is critical for the management of freshwater and marine ecosystems. Phosphate is added at water treatment works for a variety of reasons: to reduce pipe corrosion, to lower dissolved lead and copper concentrations at customer's taps and to reduce the formation of iron and manganese precipitates which can lead to deterioration in the aesthetic quality of water. However, the spatial distribution of leakage into the environment of phosphate added to mains water for plumbosolvency control has not been quantified to date. Using water company leakage rates, leak susceptibility and road network mapping, we quantify the total flux of P from leaking water mains in England and Wales at a 1km grid scale. This is validated against reported leaks for the UKs largest water utility. For 2014, we estimate the total flux of P from leaking mains to the environment to be c. 1.2ktP/year. Spatially, P flux is concentrated in urban areas where pipe density is highest, with major cities acting as a significant source of P (e.g. London into the Thames, with potentially 30% of total flux). The model suggests the majority (69%) of the P flux is likely to be to surface water. This is due to leakage susceptibility being a function of soil corrosivity and shrink-swell behaviour which are both controlled by presence of low-permeability clays. The location of major cities such as London close to the coast results in a potentially significant flux of P from mains leakage to estuarine environments. The contribution of leakage of phosphate dosed mains water should be considered in future source apportionment and ecosystem management. The methodology presented is generic and can be applied in other countries where phosphate dosing is undertaken or used prior to dosing during investment planning.

  3. Liquid helium boil-off measurements of heat leakage from sinter-forged BSCCO current leads under DC and AC conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Y. S.; Niemann, R. C.; Hull, J. R.; Youngdahl, C. A.; Lanagan, M. T.; Nakade, M.; Hara, T.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid helium boil-off experiments are conducted to determine the heat leakage rate of a pair of BSCCO 2223 high-temperature superconductor current leads made by sinter forging. The experiments are carried out in both DC and AC conditions and with and without an intermediate heat intercept. Current ranges are from 0-500 A for DC tests and 0-1,000 A(sub rms) for AC tests. The leads are self-cooled. Results show that magnetic hysteresis (AC) losses for both the BSCCO leads and the low-temperature superconductor current jumper are small for the current range. It is shown that significant reduction in heat leakage rate (liquid helium boil-off rate) is realized by using the BSCCO superconductor leads. At 100 A, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is approximately 29% of that of the conventional copper lead. Further reduction in liquid helium boil-off rate can be achieved by using an intermediate heat intercept. For example, at 500 K, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is only 7% of that of the conventional copper lead when an intermediate heat intercept is used.

  4. Liquid helium boil-off measurements of heat leakage from sinter-forged BSCCO current leads under DC and AC conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Y.S.; Niemann, R.C.; Hull, J.R.; Youngdahl, C.A.; Lanagan, M.T.; Nakade, M.; Hara, T.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid helium boil-off experiments are conducted to determine the heat leakage rate of a pair of BSCCO 2223 high-temperature superconductor current leads made by sinter forging. The experiments are carried out in both DC and AC conditions and with and without an intermediate heat intercept. Current ranges are from 0-500 A for DC tests and 0-1,000 A{sub rms} for AC tests. The leads are self-cooled. Results show that magnetic hysteresis (AC) losses for both the BSCCO leads and the low-temperature superconductor current jumper are small for the current range. It is shown that significant reduction in heat leakage rate (liquid helium boil-off rate) is realized by using the BSCCO superconductor leads. At 100 A, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is approximately 29% of that of the conventional copper lead. Further reduction in liquid helium boil-off rate can be achieved by using an intermediate heat intercept. For example, at 500 K, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is only 7% of that of the conventional copper lead when an intermediate heat intercept is used.

  5. 77 FR 14445 - Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment of Radioactive Material

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment of Radioactive Material AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Commission) is issuing a revision to Regulatory Guide 7.4, ``Leakage Tests on Packages for Radioactive... Standard N14.5-1997, ``Radioactive Materials--Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment'' approved...

  6. 47 CFR 76.1706 - Signal leakage logs and repair records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signal leakage logs and repair records. 76.1706... leakage logs and repair records. Cable operators shall maintain a log showing the date and location of... the probable cause of the leakage. The log shall be kept on file for a period of two years and...

  7. 47 CFR 76.1706 - Signal leakage logs and repair records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal leakage logs and repair records. 76.1706... leakage logs and repair records. Cable operators shall maintain a log showing the date and location of... the probable cause of the leakage. The log shall be kept on file for a period of two years and...

  8. 47 CFR 76.1706 - Signal leakage logs and repair records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signal leakage logs and repair records. 76.1706... leakage logs and repair records. Cable operators shall maintain a log showing the date and location of... the probable cause of the leakage. The log shall be kept on file for a period of two years and...

  9. 47 CFR 76.1706 - Signal leakage logs and repair records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signal leakage logs and repair records. 76.1706... leakage logs and repair records. Cable operators shall maintain a log showing the date and location of... the probable cause of the leakage. The log shall be kept on file for a period of two years and...

  10. 47 CFR 76.1706 - Signal leakage logs and repair records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal leakage logs and repair records. 76.1706... leakage logs and repair records. Cable operators shall maintain a log showing the date and location of... the probable cause of the leakage. The log shall be kept on file for a period of two years and...

  11. 40 CFR 265.224 - Response actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... leakage rate for any sump, the owner or operator must: (1) Notify the Regional Administrator in writing of the exceedance within 7 days of the determination; (2) Submit a preliminary written assessment to the...) Document why such assessments are not needed....

  12. Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Farrell, Thomas Raymond

    1999-01-01

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges.

  13. Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Aksit, M.F.; Farrell, T.R.

    1999-08-10

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges. 5 figs.

  14. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Quentin; Alnega, Ahmed

    2011-12-06

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  15. Bacteriocin typing by leakage of ultraviolet light-absorbing material.

    PubMed Central

    Farkas-Himsley, H; Pagel, A

    1977-01-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of bacteriocin typing is described based on leakage of ultraviolet light-absorbing material (UVAM), detectable in supernatants of bacteriocin-sensitive cultures, by means of a spectrophotometer. The prerequisites for reproducible results, with nonsignificant fluctuations in standard error of the mean, are: a set of standardized bacteriocins, produced under defined conditions and of determined strength. These must interact with the unknown bacterial culture in suspension and at a given ratio in order to achieve an optimal multiplicity of interaction. Pyocin and colicin typing by the "scrape and streak" technique of Gillies (J. Hyg. 62:1-10, 1963) was compared with the UVAM leakage method in 275 tests; the two tests were found to be in good agreement for the strains tested. PMID:406200

  16. Leakage current measurements of a pixelated polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, R. M.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Cunnigham, L.; Stehl, C.; Berderman, E.; Rahim, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Diamond has several desirable features when used as a material for radiation detection. With the invention of synthetic growth techniques, it has become feasible to look at developing diamond radiation detectors with reasonable surface areas. Polycrystalline diamond has been grown using a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique by the University of Augsburg and detector structures fabricated at the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) in the University of Glasgow in order to produce pixelated detector arrays. The anode and cathode contacts are realised by depositing gold to produce ohmic contacts. Measurements of I-V characteristics were performed to study the material uniformity. The bias voltage is stepped from -1000V to 1000V to investigate the variation of leakage current from pixel to pixel. Bulk leakage current is measured to be less than 1nA.

  17. Leakage currents in 4H-SiC JBS diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A. Grekhov, I. V.; Potapov, A. S.; Kon'kov, O. I.; Il'inskaya, N. D.; Samsonova, T. P.; Korol'kov, O.; Sleptsuk, N.

    2012-03-15

    Leakage currents in high-voltage 4H-SiC diodes, which have an integrated (p-n) Schottky structure (Junction Barrier Schottky, JBS), have been studied using commercial diodes and specially fabricated (based on a commercial epitaxial material) test Schottky diodes with and without the JBS structure. It is shown that (i) the main role in reverse charge transport is played by SiC crystal structure defects, most probably, by threading dislocations (density {approx}10{sup 4} cm{sup -2}), and (ii) the JBS structure, formed by the implantation of boron, partially suppresses the leakage currents (by up to a factor of 10 at optimal separation, 8 {mu}m between local p-type regions).

  18. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  19. Reducing leakage error in GRACE-observed long-term ice mass change: a case study in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Wilson, C. R.; Li, Jin; Zhang, Zizhan

    2015-09-01

    Spatial leakage is a major limitation for quantitative interpretation of satellite gravity measurements from the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE). Using synthetic data to simulate ice mass changes in the Amundsen Sea Embayment and Antarctic Peninsula, we analyze quantitatively the effects of a limited range of spherical harmonics (SH) coefficients and additional filtering, which in combination can significantly attenuate signal amplitudes. We present details of a forward modeling algorithm and show that it is capable of removing these biases from GRACE estimates. Examples show how to implement the method by constraining locations of presumed mass changes, or leaving these locations unspecified within a continental region. Our analysis indicates that leakage effects from far-field mass signals (e.g., terrestrial water storage change and glacial melting over other continents) on Antarctic mass rate estimates appear to be negligible. However, leakage from long-term ocean bottom pressure change in the surrounding Antarctic Circumpolar Current regions may bias Antarctic mass rate estimates by up to 20 Gigatonne per year (Gt/year). Experiments based on proxy GRACE measurement noise indicate that the effects of GRACE spatial noise on estimated Antarctic mass rates via constrained and unconstrained forward modelings are 5 and 15 Gt/year, respectively.

  20. The use of tracers to assess leakage from the sequestration of CO2 in a depleted oil reservoir, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, A.W.; Diehl, J.R.; Bromhal, G.S.; Strazisar, B.R.; Wilson, T.H.; White, C.M.

    2007-05-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is a potentially useful strategy for greenhouse gas management and can be combined with enhanced oil recovery. Development of methods to estimate CO2 leakage rates is essential to assure that storage objectives are being met at sequestration facilities. Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) were added as three 12 h slugs at about one week intervals during the injection of 2090 tons of CO2 into the West Pearl Queen (WPQ) depleted oil formation, sequestration pilot study site located in SE New Mexico. The CO2 was injected into the Permian Queen Formation. Leakage was monitored in soil–gas using a matrix of 40 capillary adsorbent tubes (CATs) left in the soil for periods ranging from days to months. The tracers, perfluoro-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane (PDCH), perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH) and perfluorodimethylcyclobutane (PDCB), were analyzed using thermal desorption, and gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Monitoring was designed to look for immediate leakage, such as at the injection well bore and at nearby wells, and to develop the technology to estimate overall CO2 leak rates based on the use of PFTs. Tracers were detected in soil–gas at the monitoring sites 50 m from the injection well within days of injection. Tracers continued to escape over the following years. Leakage appears to have emanated from the vicinity of the injection well in a radial pattern to about 100 m and in directional patterns to 300 m. Leakage rates were estimated for the 3 tracers from each of the 4 sets of CATs in place following the start of CO2 injection. Leakage was fairly uniform during this period. As a first approximation, the CO2 leak rate was estimated at about 0.0085% of the total CO2 sequestered per annum.

  1. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  2. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  3. Peptic ulcer perforation: sonographic imaging of active fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Minardos, Ioannis; Ioannis, Minardos; Ziogana, Dimitra; Dimitra, Ziogana; Hristopoulos, Hristos; Hristos, Hristopoulos; Dermitzakis, Ioannis; Ioannis, Dermitzakis

    2006-01-01

    Sonography is not the method of choice for the evaluation of suspected peptic ulcer perforation (PUP). However, indirect sonographic signs and direct visualization of PUP have been reported by several authors in recent years. We report a case of an elderly woman who presented with severe abdominal pain and positive rebound sign, in whom abdominal sonography demonstrated indirect signs of PUP, the site of perforation, and active air fluid leakage through the perforated anterior prepyloric antral wall.

  4. Alternative magnetic flux leakage modalities for pipeline inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Katragadda, G.; Lord, W.; Sun, Y.S.; Udpa, S.; Udpa, L.

    1996-05-01

    Increasing quality consciousness is placing higher demands on the accuracy and reliability of inspection systems used in defect detection and characterization. Nondestructive testing techniques often rely on using multi-transducer approaches to obtain greater defect sensitivity. This paper investigates the possibility of taking advantage of alternative modalities associated with the standard magnetic flux leakage tool to obtain additional defect information, while still using a single excitation source.

  5. Rotordynamic and Leakage Characteristics of a 4-Stage Brush Seal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    AD-A266 012 WL-TR-92-2125 .AP ROTORDYNAMIC AND LEAKAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF A 4-STAGE BRUSH SEAL K. J. CONNER D. W. CHILDS TURBOMACHINERY LABORATORIES...pre-rotation, and seal spacing. Direct damping is shown to increase with running speed; otherwise, the rotordynamic coefficients are relatively...test results for the 4-stage brush seal with an 8-cavity labyrinth showed superior rotordynamics performance for the brush seal; viz., larger values for

  6. Binding and leakage of barium in alginate microbeads.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Yrr A; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L

    2012-11-01

    Microbeads of alginate crosslinked with Ca(2+) and/or Ba(2+) are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared with high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. To reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation.

  7. Single-Photon Secure Quantum Dialogue Protocol Without Information Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan-Run; Hua, Tian-Xiang; Wu, Gui-Tong; He, Chao-Sheng; Zhang, Ye

    2014-11-01

    Combining the idea of ping-pong protocol with Controlled-NOT operation, we propose a secure quantum dialogue protocol based on single-photonss. Bob obtains the information of the encrypted quantum state by performing Controlled-NOT operation on the auxiliary particle and the encrypted single-photonss. Unlike the previous quantum dialogue protocols based on single-photonss, the proposed protocol not only overcomes information leakage but also possesses an acceptable efficiency.

  8. CO2 leakage risk in 3D heterogeneous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Z.; Murray, C. J.; Rockhold, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we use a stochastic sensitivity analysis framework to evaluate the impact of 3D spatial heterogeneity in permeability on CO2 leakage risk. The leakage is defined as the total mass of CO2 moving into the overburden through the caprock-overburden interface, in both gaseous and liquid (dissolved) phases. The entropy-based framework has the ability to quantify the uncertainty associated with the input parameters/factors in the form of prior pdfs (probability density functions). Effective sampling of the prior pdfs enables us to explore the parameter space and systematically evaluate the individual and combined effects of the factors/parameters of interest on CO2 leakage risk. The parameters that are considered in the study include: mean, variance, and horizontal to vertical spatial anisotropy ratio for caprock permeability, and those same parameters for reservoir permeability. Given the sampled spatial variogram parameters, multiple realizations of permeability fields were generated using GSLIB subroutines. For each permeability field, a numerical simulator STOMP (water-salt-CO2-energy operational mode) is used to simulate the CO2 migration within the reservoir and caprock up to 50 years after injection. Due to intensive computational demand, a scalable version simulator, eSTOMP, is run on the Jaguar supercomputer. We then perform statistical analyses and summarize the relationships between the parameters of interest (mean/variance/anisotropy ratio of caprock/reservoir permeability) and CO2 leakage ratio. We will also present the effects of those parameters on CO2 plume radius and reservoir injectivity.

  9. Tension-induced pore formation and leakage in adhering vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, P.; Johnson, J. M.; Chan, Y.-H. M.; Boxer, S. G.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of inclusion-induced tension on pore formation is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that fluorescently labeled lipids can enhance pore formation and induce leakage of adhering vesicles. These effects are more pronounced for smaller vesicles. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental two-color fluorescent data. Finally, the influence of the pore formation dynamics on rupture processes of vesicles is analyzed yielding a new picture of the transition to bilayer disks.

  10. Magnetic flux leakage modeling for mechanical damage in transmission pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Zhang, Z.; Yeoh, C.H.; Udpa, L.; Sun, Y.; Udpa, S.S.; Lord, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents a two stage FE model for prediction of magnetic flux leakage, resulting from mechanical damage. In the first stage the stress distribution associated with mechanical damage is obtained from a structural model. In the second stage the stress distribution is incorporated into a magnetic FE model, by mapping stress levels to permeability. MFL signals are calculated and compared with experimental gouge MFL signatures.

  11. Gas Turbine Tip Region Leakage Flow and Heat Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-07

    overlapped with a color map of scalar SMOKE VISULIZATION magnitudes, which are divided by the cascade exit velocity, in Smoke visualization was carried out...34Rotor-Tip Leakage: Part I - Basic Methodology," pressure on the over-tip casing wall of an axial turbine ASME Journal of Engineering for Power, Vol. 104...blade was compared with results ofwerewrapedarond rofledribs Th tet badedifers Durham University and revealed excellent match, assuring thefrom the

  12. Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

    2013-03-20

    This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

  13. Using Biomineralization Sealing for Leakage Mitigation in Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Rothman, A.; Hiebert, R.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of the number of abandoned wells in the U.S and abroad range in the millions, all of which have a high probability of leaking at some point during their lifetime. We are currently focusing on developing technologies for sealing unwanted leakage pathways in fractured shales. We are investigating the feasibility of a plugging technology, which is based on the microbially-induced precipitation of carbonate minerals. Microbes can hydrolyze urea to ultimately change the saturation state of various minerals, including carbonates, such as calcium carbonate. The resulting biocement (calcium carbonate) has been demonstrated by us to cement together heavily fractured shale and drastically reduce the permeability of fractures in shale cores. We propose this technology for mitigating leakage from abandoned wells and as an alternative to more traditional, cement-based plugging technologies. We have demonstrated the principal feasibility of this technology for ensuring geologic CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers through the plugging of small aperture leaks such as fractures or delamination interfaces in the vicinity of injection wells. Fractured shale might reduce production efficiency as well as pose a risk to the environment due to leakage of hydrocarbons in the form of gas and liquid. The biomineralization technology can be delivered via low viscosity fluids and could potentially have significant advantages including a time- and space-dependent placement of biocement plugs in the immediate vicinity of wells as well as further away from the wellbore in the rock formation.

  14. Surface Leakage Mechanisms in III-V Infrared Barrier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidor, D. E.; Savich, G. R.; Wicks, G. W.

    2016-09-01

    Infrared detector epitaxial structures employing unipolar barriers exhibit greatly reduced dark currents compared to simple pn-based structures. When correctly positioned within the structure, unipolar barriers are highly effective at blocking bulk dark current mechanisms. Unipolar barriers are also effective at suppressing surface leakage current in infrared detector structures employing absorbing layers that possess the same conductivity type in their bulk and at their surface. When an absorbing layer possesses opposite conductivity types in its bulk and at its surface, unipolar barriers are not solutions to surface leakage. This work reviews empirically determined surface band alignments of III-V semiconductor compounds and modeled surface band alignments of both gallium-free and gallium-containing type-II strained layer superlattice material systems. Surface band alignments are used to predict surface conductivity types in several detector structures, and the relationship between surface and bulk conductivity types in the absorbing layers of these structures is used as the basis for explaining observed surface leakage characteristics.

  15. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed.

  16. Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.

    SciTech Connect

    Salay, Michael; Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

    2008-10-01

    Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

  17. Dosimetry of a thyroid uptake detected in seed migration survey following a patient's iodine-125 prostate implant and in vitro measurements of intentional seed leakages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinsheng; Russell, John L. Jr.; Macklis, Roger R.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Blair, Henry F.

    2006-07-15

    leakage rates were observed. Considering the body fluid is more complex than saline, the in vivo leakage half-life, in case a source leak is encountered, may vary significantly from what is presented in this paper due to chemical reactions. In vivo measurements thus may produce a more accurate estimation of leakage half-life and thyroid uptake dose.

  18. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well.

  19. Eddy covariance observations of surface leakage during shallow subsurface CO2 releases

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G.E.; Fischer, M.L.; Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-04-01

    We tested the ability of eddy covariance (EC) to detect, locate, and quantify surface CO{sub 2} flux leakage signals within a background ecosystem. For 10 days starting on 07/09/2007, and for seven days starting on 08/03/2007, 0.1 (Release 1) and 0.3 (Release 2) t CO{sub 2}d{sup -1}, respectively, were released from a horizontal well {approx}100 m in length and {approx}2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, MT. An EC station measured net CO{sub 2} flux (F{sub c}) from 06/08/2006 to 09/04/2006 (mean and standard deviation = -12.4 and 28.1 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively) and from 05/28/2007 to 09/04/2007 (mean and standard deviation = -12.0 and 28.1 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively). The Release 2 leakage signal was visible in the F{sub c} time series, whereas the Release 1 signal was difficult to detect within variability of ecosystem fluxes. To improve detection ability, we calculated residual fluxes (F{sub cr}) by subtracting fluxes corresponding to a model for net ecosystem exchange from F{sub c}. F{sub cr} had reduced variability and lacked the negative bias seen in corresponding F{sub c} distributions. Plotting the upper 90th percentile F{sub cr} versus time enhanced the Release 2 leakage signal. However, values measured during Release 1 fell within the variability assumed to be related to unmodeled natural processes. F{sub cr} measurements and corresponding footprint functions were inverted using a least-squares approach to infer the spatial distribution of surface CO{sub 2} fluxes during Release 2. When combined with flux source area evaluation, inversion results roughly located the CO{sub 2} leak, while resolution was insufficient to quantify leakage rate.

  20. [Remote system of natural gas leakage based on multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lu, Xu-Tao; Yang, Ze-Hui

    2014-05-01

    In order to be able to quickly, to a wide range of natural gas pipeline leakage monitoring, the remote detection system for concentration of methane gas was designed based on static Fourier transform interferometer. The system used infrared light, which the center wavelength was calibrated to absorption peaks of methane molecules, to irradiated tested area, and then got the interference fringes by converging collimation system and interference module. Finally, the system calculated the concentration-path-length product in tested area by multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis algorithm, furthermore the inversion of the corresponding concentration of methane. By HITRAN spectrum database, Selected wavelength position of 1. 65 microm as the main characteristic absorption peaks, thereby using 1. 65 pm DFB laser as the light source. In order to improve the detection accuracy and stability without increasing the hardware configuration of the system, solved absorbance ratio by the auxiliary wave-length, and then get concentration-path-length product of measured gas by the method of the calculation proportion of multi-wavelength characteristics. The measurement error from external disturbance is caused by this innovative approach, and it is more similar to a differential measurement. It will eliminate errors in the process of solving the ratio of multi-wavelength characteristics, and can improve accuracy and stability of the system. The infrared absorption spectrum of methane is constant, the ratio of absorbance of any two wavelengths by methane is also constant. The error coefficients produced by the system is the same when it received the same external interference, so the measured noise of the system can be effectively reduced by the ratio method. Experimental tested standards methane gas tank with leaking rate constant. Using the tested data of PN1000 type portable methane detector as the standard data, and were compared to the tested data of the system

  1. Review of leakage-flow-induced vibrations of reactor components. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1983-05-01

    The primary-coolant flow paths of a reactor system are usually subject to close scrutiny in a design review to identify potential flow-induced vibration sources. However, secondary-flow paths through narrow gaps in component supports, which parallel the primary-flow path, occasionally are the excitation source for significant vibrations even though the secondary-flow rates are orders of magnitude smaller than the primary-flow rate. These so-called leakage flow problems are reviewed here to identify design features and excitation sources that should be avoided. Also, design rules of thumb are formulated that can be employed to guide a design, but quantitative prediction of component response is found to require scale-model testing.

  2. The acute effects of static stretching on peak force, peak rate of force development and muscle activity during single- and multiple-joint actions in older women.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Raquel; Gurjão, André Luiz Demantova; Jambassi Filho, José Claudio; Farinatti, Paulo De Tarso Veras; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Gobbi, Sebastião

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the acute effects of static stretching on peak force, peak rate of force development and integrated electromyography (iEMG) in 27 older women (65 ± 4 years; 69 ± 9 kg; 157 ± 1 cm; 28 ± 4 kg · m(-2)). The participants were tested during two exercises (leg press and knee extension) after two conditions: stretching and control. The data were collected on four days (counterbalanced with a 24-hour rest period). In the stretching condition, the quadriceps muscle was stretched (knee flexion) for three sets of 30 s with 30 s rest intervals. No significant difference was detected for peak force and peak rate of force development during the single- and multiple-joint exercises, regardless of the following interactions: condition (stretching and control) vs. time (pre x post x 10 x 20 x 30 minutes post; P > 0.05) and exercise vs. time (P > 0.05). Additionally, no significant interaction was found for the iEMG activity (condition vs. time; P > 0.05) in the single- and multiple-joint exercises. In conclusion, a small amount of stretching of an agonist muscle (quadriceps) did not affect the peak force, peak rate of force development and EMG activity in older women during single- and multiple-joint exercises.

  3. Characterization of emergent leakage neutrons from multiple layers of hydrogen/water in the lunar regolith by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SU, J.; Sagdeev, R.; Usikov, D.; Chin, G.; Boyer, L.; Livengood, T. A.; McClanahan, T. P.; Murray, J.; Starr, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The leakage flux of lunar neutrons produced by precipitation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles in the upper layer of the lunar regolith and measured by orbital instruments such as the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) is investigated by Monte Carlo simulation. Previous Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to investigate neutron production and leakage from the lunar surface to assess the elemental composition of lunar soil [1-6] and its effect on the leakage neutron flux. We investigate effects on the emergent flux that depend on the physical distribution of hydrogen within the regolith. We use the software package GEANT4 [7] to calculate neutron production from spallation by GCR particles [8,9] in the lunar soil. Multiple layers of differing hydrogen/water at different depths in the lunar regolith model are introduced to examine enhancement or suppression of leakage neutron flux. We find that the majority of leakage thermal and epithermal neutrons are produced in 25 cm to 75 cm deep from the lunar surface. Neutrons produced in the shallow top layer retain more of their original energy due to fewer scattering interactions and escape from the lunar surface mostly as fast neutrons. This provides a diagnostic tool in interpreting leakage neutron flux enhancement or suppression due to hydrogen concentration distribution in lunar regolith. We also find that the emitting angular distribution of thermal and epithermal leakage neutrons can be described by cos3/2(theta) where the fast neutrons emitting angular distribution is cos(theta). The energy sensitivity and angular response of the LEND detectors SETN and CSETN are investigated using the leakage neutron spectrum from GEANT4 simulations. A simplified LRO model is used to benchmark MCNPX[10] and GEANT4 on CSETN absolute count rate corresponding to neutron flux from bombardment of 120MV solar potential GCR particles on FAN lunar soil. We are able to interpret the count rates of SETN and

  4. Automated detection of leakage in fluorescein angiography images with application to malarial retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yitian; MacCormick, Ian J C; Parry, David G; Leach, Sophie; Beare, Nicholas A V; Harding, Simon P; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-06-01

    The detection and assessment of leakage in retinal fluorescein angiogram images is important for the management of a wide range of retinal diseases. We have developed a framework that can automatically detect three types of leakage (large focal, punctate focal, and vessel segment leakage) and validated it on images from patients with malarial retinopathy. This framework comprises three steps: vessel segmentation, saliency feature generation and leakage detection. We tested the effectiveness of this framework by applying it to images from 20 patients with large focal leak, 10 patients with punctate focal leak, and 5,846 vessel segments from 10 patients with vessel leakage. The sensitivity in detecting large focal, punctate focal and vessel segment leakage are 95%, 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to manual annotation by expert human observers. Our framework has the potential to become a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy, and other conditions involving retinal leakage.

  5. Automated Detection of Leakage in Fluorescein Angiography Images with Application to Malarial Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yitian; J. C. MacCormick, Ian; G. Parry, David; Leach, Sophie; A. V. Beare, Nicholas; P. Harding, Simon; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    The detection and assessment of leakage in retinal fluorescein angiogram images is important for the management of a wide range of retinal diseases. We have developed a framework that can automatically detect three types of leakage (large focal, punctate focal, and vessel segment leakage) and validated it on images from patients with malarial retinopathy. This framework comprises three steps: vessel segmentation, saliency feature generation and leakage detection. We tested the effectiveness of this framework by applying it to images from 20 patients with large focal leak, 10 patients with punctate focal leak, and 5,846 vessel segments from 10 patients with vessel leakage. The sensitivity in detecting large focal, punctate focal and vessel segment leakage are 95%, 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to manual annotation by expert human observers. Our framework has the potential to become a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy, and other conditions involving retinal leakage. PMID:26030010

  6. Sourcing methane and carbon dioxide emissions from a small city: Influence of natural gas leakage and combustion.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Samuel D; Ingraffea, Anthony R; Sparks, Jed P

    2016-11-01

    Natural gas leakage and combustion are major sources of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), respectively; however, our understanding of emissions from cities is limited. We mapped distribution pipeline leakage using a mobile CH4 detection system, and continuously monitored atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations and carbon isotopes (δ(13)C-CO2 and δ(13)C-CH4) for one-year above Ithaca, New York. Pipeline leakage rates were low (<0.39 leaks mile(-1)), likely due to the small extent of cast iron and bare steel within the distribution pipeline system (2.6%). Our atmospheric monitoring demonstrated that the isotopic composition of locally emitted CO2 approached the δ(13)C range of natural gas combustion in winter, correlating to natural gas power generation patterns at Cornell's Combined Heat and Power Plant located 600 m southeast of the monitoring site. Atmospheric CH4 plumes were primarily of natural gas origin, were observed intermittently throughout the year, and were most frequent in winter and spring. No correlations between the timing of atmospheric natural gas CH4 plumes and Cornell Plant gas use patterns could be drawn. However, elevated CH4 and CO2 concentrations were observed coincident with high winds from the southeast, and the plant is the only major emission source in that wind sector. Our results demonstrate pipeline leakage rates are low in cities with a low extent of leak prone pipe, and natural gas power facilities may be an important source of urban and suburban emissions.

  7. Physiological action of dissolved organic matter in rainbow trout in the presence and absence of copper: sodium uptake kinetics and unidirectional flux rates in hard and softwater.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Aline Y O; Playle, Richard C; Val, Adalberto L; Wood, Chris M

    2004-10-18

    We investigated the physiological effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on sodium (Na+) transport in juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss (approximately 2.5 g) in the presence and absence of simultaneous acute exposure to copper (Cu2+; 0, 70, and 300 microg l(-1)). Trout were acclimated in either hardwater (approximately 1000 microM Ca2+) or softwater (approximately 100 microM Ca2+), and DOM was tested at approximately 8 mg C l(-1) using a natural (NOM) and a commercial (AHA) source. Ion transport was evaluated based on kinetics estimates (maximum Na+ uptake rates, Jmax; substrate affinity, Km) and unidirectional flux measurements (Jin, Jout, Jnet). Jmax was higher and unidirectional flux rates were greater in softwater-acclimated trout. Fish exposed to DOM alone in hardwater exhibited an increased Na+ transport capacity indicated by both the kinetics (67% higher Jmax for AHA) and Jin measurements (153% higher for AHA and 125% higher for NOM). In softwater, the effects of DOM alone on kinetic parameters and unidirectional flux rates were negligible. Cu2+ affected Na+ uptake by a mixed-type inhibition (both non-competitive and competitive). In hardwater, only Km was increased (i.e., affinity decreased), whereas in softwater, Km was increased and Jmax was decreased, with more marked effects at the higher Cu2+ level. In hardwater, the stimulatory effect of AHA on Jmax persisted even in the presence of 300 microg l(-1) Cu2+, whereas both AHA and NOM prevented the increase in Km caused by Cu2+; these effects were reflected in Jin measurements. In softwater, AHA helped to protect against the increased Km caused by high Cu2+, but there was no protection against the inhibition of Jmax. Unidirectional flux measurements indicated that in softwater, Cu2+ inhibited Jin at 70 microg l(-1), whereas at 300 microg l(-1) Cu2+, Jout was also stimulated. Fish were more affected by Cu2+ in softwater, as indicated by the inability to control diffusive losses of Na+ and a reduced ability to

  8. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings…

  9. Low-dose-rate high-let radiation cytogenetic effects on mice in vivo as model of space radiation action on mammalian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Rozanova, Olga; Aptikaeva, Gella; Romanchenko, Sergei; Smirnova, Helene; Dyukina, Alsu; Peleshko, Vladimir

    At present time little is known concerning the biological effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation exposure in space. The currently available experimental data on the biological effect of low doses of chronic radiation with high-LET values, which occur under the conditions of aircraft and space flights, have been primarily obtained in the examinations of pilots and astronauts after flights. Another way of obtaining this kind of evidence is the simulation of irradiation conditions during aircraft and space flights on high-energy accelerators and the conduction of large-scale experiments on animals under these conditions on Earth. In the present work, we investigated the cytogenetic effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation in the dose ranges of 0.2-30 cGy (1 cGy/day) and 0.5-16 cGy (0.43 cGy/day) in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the Serpukhov accelerator of 70 GeV protons that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on SHK mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response (AR) and the growth of solid tumor were examined. For induction of AR, two groups of mice were exposed to adapting doses of 0.2-30 cGy and the doses of 0.5-16 cGy of high-LET radiation. For comparison, third group of mice from unirradiated males was chronically irradiated with X-rays at adapting doses of 10 cGy (1 cGy/day). After a day, the mice of all groups were exposed to a challenging dose of 1.5 Gy of X-rays (1 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed by the method of cervical dislocation. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared by a conventional method with minor modifications. The influence of adapting dose of 16 cGy on the growth of solid tumor of Ehrlich ascite carcinoma was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells s.c. into the femur. It was

  10. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  11. Power Beaming Leakage Radiation as a SETI Observable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James N.; Benford, Dominic J.

    2016-07-01

    The most observable leakage radiation from an advanced civilization may well be from the use of power beaming to transfer energy and accelerate spacecraft. Applications suggested for power beaming involve launching spacecraft to orbit, raising satellites to a higher orbit, and interplanetary concepts involving space-to-space transfers of cargo or passengers. We also quantify beam-driven launch to the outer solar system, interstellar precursors, and ultimately starships. We estimate the principal observable parameters of power beaming leakage. Extraterrestrial civilizations would know their power beams could be observed, and so could put a message on the power beam and broadcast it for our receipt at little additional energy or cost. By observing leakage from power beams we may find a message embedded on the beam. Recent observations of the anomalous star KIC 8462852 by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) set some limits on extraterrestrial power beaming in that system. We show that most power beaming applications commensurate with those suggested for our solar system would be detectable if using the frequency range monitored by the ATA, and so the lack of detection is a meaningful, if modest, constraint on extraterrestrial power beaming in that system. Until more extensive observations are made, the limited observation time and frequency coverage are not sufficiently broad in frequency and duration to produce firm conclusions. Such beams would be visible over large interstellar distances. This implies a new approach to the SETI search: instead of focusing on narrowband beacon transmissions generated by another civilization, look for more powerful beams with much wider bandwidth. This requires a new approach for their discovery by telescopes on Earth. Further studies of power beaming applications should be performed, potentially broadening the parameter space of the observable features that we have discussed here.

  12. Assessment of different dyes used in leakage studies.

    PubMed

    Mente, Johannes; Ferk, Stephan; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Deckert, Andreas; Legner, Milos; Staehle, Hans Joerg

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to identify the most suitable dye for endodontic dye leakage studies, which could be a further step towards standardisation. The root canals of 70 extracted, single-rooted human adult teeth were enlarged to apical size 50 using hand instruments. The teeth were divided into seven groups (n = 10 each), and all root canals were completely filled by injection with one of the following dyes: methylene blue 0.5% and 5%, blue ink, black ink, eosin 5%, basic fuchsin 0.5% and drawing ink. Transverse root sections from the coronal, middle and apical part of the roots were examined, and the percentage of the dentine penetrated by dye was evaluated by software-supported light microscopy. In addition, the range of particle size of drawing ink particles was evaluated. There were conspicuous differences in the relative dye penetration into the root dentine and the penetration behaviour in the different root sections (two-way ANOVA, both p < 0.0001). One dye (drawing ink) penetrated less into the root dentine compared with all the others (p <0.0001). The particle size of this agent (0.1-2 microm) corresponds best with the size range of a representative selection of 21 species of pathogenic endodontic bacteria. Compared to the other dyes tested, drawing ink appears to be superior for use in endodontic dye leakage studies. The penetration behaviour into the root dentine of all the other dyes tested might be one factor that limits the applicability of these dyes in dye leakage studies.

  13. Impeller leakage flow modeling for mechanical vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.

    1996-01-01

    HPOTP and HPFTP vibration test results have exhibited transient and steady characteristics which may be due to impeller leakage path (ILP) related forces. For example, an axial shift in the rotor could suddenly change the ILP clearances and lengths yielding dynamic coefficient and subsequent vibration changes. ILP models are more complicated than conventional-single component-annular seal models due to their radial flow component (coriolis and centrifugal acceleration), complex geometry (axial/radial clearance coupling), internal boundary (transition) flow conditions between mechanical components along the ILP and longer length, requiring moment as well as force coefficients. Flow coupling between mechanical components results from mass and energy conservation applied at their interfaces. Typical components along the ILP include an inlet seal, curved shroud, and an exit seal, which may be a stepped labyrinth type. Von Pragenau (MSFC) has modeled labyrinth seals as a series of plain annular seals for leakage and dynamic coefficient prediction. These multi-tooth components increase the total number of 'flow coupled' components in the ILP. Childs developed an analysis for an ILP consisting of a single, constant clearance shroud with an exit seal represented by a lumped flow-loss coefficient. This same geometry was later extended to include compressible flow. The objective of the current work is to: supply ILP leakage-force impedance-dynamic coefficient modeling software to MSFC engineers, base on incompressible/compressible bulk flow theory; design the software to model a generic geometry ILP described by a series of components lying along an arbitrarily directed path; validate the software by comparison to available test data, CFD and bulk models; and develop a hybrid CFD-bulk flow model of an ILP to improve modeling accuracy within practical run time constraints.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2

  15. Effects of photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salet, C; Moreno, G; Ricchelli, F

    1998-10-15

    We have studied the effects of singlet oxygen produced by photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria (state 4). Isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with 3 microM hematoporphyrin and irradiated at 365 nm with a fluence rate of 25 W/m2. After short durations of irradiation, state 4 respiration with beta-hydroxybutyrate as substrate increases while respiration with succinate is negligibly affected. When mitochondria have been uncoupled with carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone before irradiation, no change occurs in beta-hydroxybutyrate-driven respiration, while succinate-driven respiration strongly decreases. Stimulation of state 4 NADH respiration cannot be explained by slippage of the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase because the stoichiometry of the redox pump was found insensitive to photodynamic action. In the light of the metabolite theory for linear enzymatic chains applied to state 4 respiration (Brand et al., Biochem. J. 255, 535-539, 1988), these results suggest that stimulation of NADH respiration is simply due to an increase of membrane leaks which occurs after irradiation. In the case of succinate-driven respiration, a strong inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity has been demonstrated after irradiation. It can be suggested that this inhibition introduces a negative control coefficient over state 4 respiration, counterbalancing the effects due to leakage.

  16. Application Of The Climafor Baseline To Determine Leakage: TheCase Of Scolel Te.

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, B.H.J.; Bazan, E. Esquivel; Quechulpa Montalvo, S.

    2007-06-01

    The acceptance of forestry-based project activities tomitigate greenhouse gases emissions has been subjected to a number ofmethodological questions to be answered, of which the most challengingare baseline establishment and identification of and measuring leakage.Here we pose hypotheses for and quantify leakage of the Scolel Te projectin Chiapas, Mexico. In this project small-scale farmers are implementingforestry, agroforestry, and forest conservation activities, with carbonsequestration as one of the goals. The main leakage monitoring domain isdefined as the area owned by the participating farmers or communitiesoutside the area where the specific project activities take place. Thenull-hypothesis (no leakage) is that non-project land owned by the farmeror community will experience the same carbon stock changes as predictedby the regional baseline, specifically developed for the project. Firstwe assessed the most likely causes and sources of leakage that may occurin the project. From this analysis, one type of leakage seems to beimportant, i.e., activity shifting. Second we estimated the leakage of asample of participating farmers and communities. Actual land use was thencompared with expected land use derived from the baseline. The Plan Vivoof each participant, complemented with readily available tools toidentify the main sources and drivers of leakage are used to developsimple leakage assessment procedures, as demonstrated in this paper.Negative leakage was estimated to be negligible in this study.Incorporating these procedures already in the project planning stage willreduce the uncertainties related to the actual carbon mitigationpotential of any forestry project.

  17. A novel method to determine air leakage in heat pump clothes dryers

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep; Mohabir, Amar; Miller, William

    2016-01-06

    A heat pump clothes dryer offers the potential to save a significant amount of energy as compared with conventional vented electric dryers. Although heat pump clothes dryers (HPCD) offer higher energy efficiency; it has been observed that they are prone to air leakages, which inhibits the HPCD's gain in efficiency. This study serves to develop a novel method of quantifying leakage, and to determine specific leakage locations in the dryer drum and air circulation system. The basis of this method is the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E779 10, which is used to determine air leakage area in a household ventilation system through fan pressurization. This ASTM method is adapted to the dryer system, and the leakage area is determined by an analysis of the leakage volumetric flow - pressure relationship. Easily accessible leakage points were quantified: the front and back crease (in the dryer drum), the leakage in the dryer duct, the air filter, and the remaining leakage in the drum. The procedure allows investigators to determine major components contributing to leakage in HPCDs, thus improving component design features that result in more efficient HPCD systems.

  18. A novel method to determine air leakage in heat pump clothes dryers

    DOE PAGES

    Bansal, Pradeep; Mohabir, Amar; Miller, William

    2016-01-06

    A heat pump clothes dryer offers the potential to save a significant amount of energy as compared with conventional vented electric dryers. Although heat pump clothes dryers (HPCD) offer higher energy efficiency; it has been observed that they are prone to air leakages, which inhibits the HPCD's gain in efficiency. This study serves to develop a novel method of quantifying leakage, and to determine specific leakage locations in the dryer drum and air circulation system. The basis of this method is the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E779 10, which is used to determine air leakage areamore » in a household ventilation system through fan pressurization. This ASTM method is adapted to the dryer system, and the leakage area is determined by an analysis of the leakage volumetric flow - pressure relationship. Easily accessible leakage points were quantified: the front and back crease (in the dryer drum), the leakage in the dryer duct, the air filter, and the remaining leakage in the drum. The procedure allows investigators to determine major components contributing to leakage in HPCDs, thus improving component design features that result in more efficient HPCD systems.« less

  19. Dispersion of Relaxation Rates in the Rotating Frame Under the Action of Spin-Locking Pulses and Diffusion in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Spear, John T.; Zu, Zhongliang; Gore, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A method is described for characterizing magnetically inhomogeneous media and the spatial scales of intrinsic susceptibility variations within samples. The rate of spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, R1ρ, is affected by diffusion effects to a degree that depends on the magnitude of an applied spin-locking field. Appropriate analysis of the dispersion of R1ρ with locking field may be used to characterize susceptibility variations in inhomogeneous tissues. Theory and Methods The contribution of diffusion to R1ρ is quantified by an analytic expression derived by analyzing of the effects of diffusion through periodic variations of magnetic susceptibility and is used to predict the effects of inhomogeneities in simple phantoms. The theory is further applied to imaging to derive parametric images that portray the dimensions of susceptibility inhomogeneities independent of their magnitude. Results Significant dispersion of R1ρ with locking field was predicted and measured experimentally for suspensions of microspheres ranging from 1 to 90 µm in diameter. For scales of practical interest, these dispersion effects occur at much lower locking fields than the range in which chemical exchange effects cause similar dispersion. Conclusion There is good agreement between theory and experiment, and the method has potential for quantitative tissue characterization and functional imaging. PMID:23804212

  20. CCS Site Optimization by Applying a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm to Semi-Analytical Leakage Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, B. M.; Gonzalez-Nicolas, A.; Bau, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been proposed as a method of reducing global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although CCS has the potential to greatly retard greenhouse gas loading to the atmosphere while cleaner, more sustainable energy solutions are developed, there is a possibility that sequestered CO2 may leak and intrude into and adversely affect groundwater resources. It has been reported [1] that, while CO2 intrusion typically does not directly threaten underground drinking water resources, it may cause secondary effects, such as the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in aquifer minerals and changes in pH values. These risks must be fully understood and minimized before CCS project implementation. Combined management of project resources and leakage risk is crucial for the implementation of CCS. In this work, we present a method of: (a) minimizing the total CCS cost, the summation of major project costs with the cost associated with CO2 leakage; and (b) maximizing the mass of injected CO2, for a given proposed sequestration site. Optimization decision variables include the number of CO2 injection wells, injection rates, and injection well locations. The capital and operational costs of injection wells are directly related to injection well depth, location, injection flow rate, and injection duration. The cost of leakage is directly related to the mass of CO2 leaked through weak areas, such as abandoned oil wells, in the cap rock layers overlying the injected formation. Additional constraints on fluid overpressure caused by CO2 injection are imposed to maintain predefined effective stress levels that prevent cap rock fracturing. Here, both mass leakage and fluid overpressure are estimated using two semi-analytical models based upon work by [2,3]. A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm coupled with these semi-analytical leakage flow models is used to determine Pareto-optimal trade-off sets giving minimum total cost vs. maximum mass

  1. Experiences in the management of anastomotic leakages and analysis of the factors affecting leakage healing in patients with esophagogastric junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ningning; He, Jie; Gao, Shugeng; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Ding; Sun, Kelin; Cheng, Guiyu; Mu, Juwei; Xue, Qi; Wang, Dali; Zhao, Jun; Gao, Yushun; Liu, Xiangyang; Fang, Dekang; Li, Jian; Wang, Yonggang; Huang, Jinfeng; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Liangze

    2017-01-01

    Background It was reported in the literatures that the incidence of anastomotic leakage in patients with esophagogastric junction cancer decreased due to application of staplers and closure devices as well as gastric conduit technique in recent years, however, it increased slightly at our center since widely using the above devices and gastric conduit techniques from 2009. The objective of this study was to summarize our experiences in the management of anastomotic leakages and analyze the factors affecting leakage healing in the patients with esophagogastric junction cancer after surgical resection in recent 6 years. Methods All patients who received surgical resections for esophagogastric junction cancer and diagnosed anastomotic leak at our center between January 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively analyzed, we also enrolled the patients who had a longer hospital stay (>30 days) as they may develop anastomotic leak. The binary logistic regression in SPSS 16.0 was applied to analyze the factors that may affect leakage healing. Results Of the 1,815 surgically treated esophagogastric junction cancer patients, 91 cases were diagnosed anastomotic leakage postoperatively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the median leakage healing time (40 days) in this series: fast healing group (37 cases) and slowly healing group (54 cases). All factors that may affect the leakage healing were put into analysis by using binary logistic regression. The results of the analysis showed that leakage size (OR =1.073, P=0.004), thoracic drainage (OR =12.937, P=0.037) and smoking index ≤400 (OR =1.001, P=0.04) significantly affected the healing time, while drinking history (P=0.177), duration of fever after anastomotic leak developed (P=0.084), and hypoproteinemia after leak (P=0.169) also apparently but not significantly affect the healing time. Conclusions Though many factors may affect leakage healing in the esophagogastric junction carcinoma patients, leakage

  2. Capillary leakage syndrome: a case report and a review.

    PubMed

    Garcês, S; Araújo, F; Rego, F; Soares, J L Ducla; Carlos, A G Palma

    2002-12-01

    Capillary leakage Syndrome (CLS) is a rare clinical syndrome, that was first described in 1960, characterized by acute episodes of generalized edema, hemoconcentration, hypoproteinemia and monoclonal gammopathy, in the vast majority of cases. We describe a 39-year-old man with anasarca, bilateral pleural and pericardial effusions, ascites and diffuse alveolo-intersticial edema. Clinical and laboratory findings were consistent with an acute episode of CLS. Treatment with prednisone, furosemide and aminophylline was started, which lead to a gradual improvement in 48 hours. Pathophysiologically there is an increase in capillary permeability with the extravasation of fluid and plasmatic proteins to the extravascular space that can lead to hypovolaemic shock. In the second phase there is a reentry of the fluid overload leading to pulmonary edema. The etiology of this hyperpermeability still remains unclear. The role of cytokines has become central in the comprehension of pathophysiology of CLS. Adhesion molecules are probably also involved in the genesis of capillary leakage. CLS treatment remains empirical. However, at present it seems that the association of steroids with furosemide, aminophylline and terbutaline are capable of controlling the clinical manifestation of the acute episodes in most cases. To our knowledge no prophylatic therapy has clearly proven its efficacy. There are only a few series analyzing the long-term evolution of patients with CLS. Further studies are necessary with the objective to collect enough patients with CLS to observe natural history of the disease and evaluate the efficacy of empiric treatments.

  3. Investigation of the Operating Properties of the Leakage Current Anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucks, Wilhelm

    1947-01-01

    Freedom from inertia, erosion of electrodes, and reaction make the leakage current particularly appropriate for the measurement of flow velocities in gases. Apparatus previously described has now been improved by reducing the size of the electrodes by one -thousandth, as is necessary aerodynamically, and by increasing the magnitude of the current from 1000 to 10,000 times; the latter result was obtained.by use of mercury high-pressure lamps set up at the one focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector with the cathodes arranged at the other focal point or by use of suitable X-ray radiation. Families of calibration curves were taken with a number of vivid tests conditions of the greatest variety and the operating properties of the instrument were widely elucidated by calculation of the sensitivity to fluctuation; this was done at first for operation at stationary conditions only; due to the freedom from inertia the instationary conditions were thus also given. Accordingly, the leakage current anemometer ought to be appropriate for investigations of turbulence,

  4. Greater focus needed on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Ramón A.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Winebrake, James J.; Chameides, William L.; Hamburg, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Natural gas is seen by many as the future of American energy: a fuel that can provide energy independence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the process. However, there has also been confusion about the climate implications of increased use of natural gas for electric power and transportation. We propose and illustrate the use of technology warming potentials as a robust and transparent way to compare the cumulative radiative forcing created by alternative technologies fueled by natural gas and oil or coal by using the best available estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from each fuel cycle (i.e., production, transportation and use). We find that a shift to compressed natural gas vehicles from gasoline or diesel vehicles leads to greater radiative forcing of the climate for 80 or 280 yr, respectively, before beginning to produce benefits. Compressed natural gas vehicles could produce climate benefits on all time frames if the well-to-wheels CH4 leakage were capped at a level 45–70% below current estimates. By contrast, using natural gas instead of coal for electric power plants can reduce radiative forcing immediately, and reducing CH4 losses from the production and transportation of natural gas would produce even greater benefits. There is a need for the natural gas industry and science community to help obtain better emissions data and for increased efforts to reduce methane leakage in order to minimize the climate footprint of natural gas. PMID:22493226

  5. Greater focus needed on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ramón A; Pacala, Stephen W; Winebrake, James J; Chameides, William L; Hamburg, Steven P

    2012-04-24

    Natural gas is seen by many as the future of American energy: a fuel that can provide energy independence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the process. However, there has also been confusion about the climate implications of increased use of natural gas for electric power and transportation. We propose and illustrate the use of technology warming potentials as a robust and transparent way to compare the cumulative radiative forcing created by alternative technologies fueled by natural gas and oil or coal by using the best available estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from each fuel cycle (i.e., production, transportation and use). We find that a shift to compressed natural gas vehicles from gasoline or diesel vehicles leads to greater radiative forcing of the climate for 80 or 280 yr, respectively, before beginning to produce benefits. Compressed natural gas vehicles could produce climate benefits on all time frames if the well-to-wheels CH(4) leakage were capped at a level 45-70% below current estimates. By contrast, using natural gas instead of coal for electric power plants can reduce radiative forcing immediately, and reducing CH(4) losses from the production and transportation of natural gas would produce even greater benefits. There is a need for the natural gas industry and science community to help obtain better emissions data and for increased efforts to reduce methane leakage in order to minimize the climate footprint of natural gas.

  6. Low standby leakage 12T SRAM cell characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arjun; Nakhate, Sangeeta

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a low power and variability-aware static random access memory (SRAM) architecture based on a twelve-transistor (12T) cell is proposed. This cell obtains low static power dissipation due to a parallel global latch (G-latch) and storage latch (S-latch), along with a global wordline (GWL), which offer a high cell ratio and pull-up ratio for reliable read and write operations and a low cell ratio and pull-up ratio during idle mode to reduce the standby power dissipation. In the idle state, only the S-latch stores bits, while the G-latch is isolated from the S-latch and the GWL is deactivated. The leakage power consumption of the proposed SRAM cell is thereby reduced by 38.7% compared to that of the conventional six-transistor (6T) SRAM cell. This paper evaluates the impact of the chip supply voltage and surrounding temperature variations on the standby leakage power and observes considerable improvement in the power dissipation. The read/write access delay, read static noise margin (SNM) and write SNM were evaluated, and the results were compared with those of the standard 6T SRAM cell. The proposed cell, when compared with the existing cell using the Monte Carlo method, shows an appreciable improvement in the standby power dissipation and layout area.

  7. Variable cycle stirling engine and gas leakage control system therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Otters, J.

    1984-12-25

    An improved thermal engine of the type having a displacer body movable between the hot end and the cold end of a chamber for subjecting a fluid within that chamber to a thermodynamic cycle and having a work piston driven by the fluid for deriving a useful work output. The work piston pumps a hydraulic fluid and a hydraulic control valve is connected in line with the hydraulic output conduit such that the flow of hydraulic fluid may be restricted to any desired degree or stopped altogether. The work piston can therefore be controlled by means of a controller device independently from the movement of the displacer such that a variety of engine cycles can be obtained for optimum engine efficiency under varying load conditions. While a Stirling engine cycle is particularly contemplated, other engine cycles may be obtained by controlling the movement of the displacer and work pistons. Also disclosed are a working gas recovery system for controlling leakage of working gas from the displacer chamber, and a compound work piston arrangement for preventing leakage of hydraulic fluid around the work piston into the displacer chamber.

  8. Analysis Of Leakage In Carbon Sequestration Projects In Forestry:A Case Study Of Upper Magat Watershed, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Lasco, Rodel D.; Pulhin, Florencia B.; Sales, Renezita F.

    2007-06-01

    The role of forestry projects in carbon conservation andsequestration is receiving much attention because of their role in themitigation of climate change. The main objective of the study is toanalyze the potential of the Upper Magat Watershed for a carbonsequestration project. The three main development components of theproject are forest conservation, tree plantations, and agroforestry farmdevelopment. At Year 30, the watershed can attain a net carbon benefit of19.5 M tC at a cost of US$ 34.5 M. The potential leakage of the projectis estimated using historical experience in technology adoption inwatershed areas in the Philippines and a high adoption rate. Two leakagescenarios were used: baseline and project leakage scenarios. Most of theleakage occurs in the first 10 years of the project as displacement oflivelihood occurs during this time. The carbon lost via leakage isestimated to be 3.7 M tC in the historical adoption scenario, and 8.1 MtC under the enhanced adoption scenario.

  9. Enhancement of farmland greenhouse gas emissions from leakage of stored CO2: simulation of leaked CO2 from CCS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueyan; Ma, Xin; Wu, Yang; Li, Yue

    2015-06-15

    The effects of leaked CO2 on plant and soil constitute a key objective of carbon capture and storage (CCS) safety. The effects of leaked CO2 on trace soil gas (e.g., methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in farmlands are not well-understood. This study simulated the effects of elevated soil CO2 on CH4 and N2O through pot experiments. The results revealed that significant increases of CH4 and N2O emissions were induced by the simulated CO2 leakages; the emission rates of CH4 and N2O were substantial, reaching about 222 and 48 times than that of the control, respectively. The absolute global warming potentials (GWPs) of the additional CH4 and N2O are considerable, but the cumulative GWPs of the additional CH4 and N2O only accounted for 0.03% and 0.06%, respectively, of the cumulative amount of leaked CO2 under high leakage conditions. The results demonstrate that leakage from CCS projects may lead to additional greenhouse gas emissions from soil; however, in general, the amount of additional CH4 and N2O emissions is negligible when compared with the amount of leaked CO2.

  10. Design and development of a helium injection system to improve external leakage detection during liquid nitrogen immersion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    The testing of assemblies for use in cryogenic systems commonly includes evaluation at or near operating (therefore cryogenic) temperature. Typical assemblies include valves and pumps for use in liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen rocket engines. One frequently specified method of cryogenic external leakage testing requires the assembly, pressurized with gaseous helium (GHe), be immersed in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN2) and allowed to thermally stabilize. Component interfaces are then visually inspected for leakage (bubbles). Unfortunately the liquid nitrogen will be boiling under normal, bench-top, test conditions. This boiling tends to mask even significant leakage. One little known and perhaps under-utilized property of helium is the seemingly counter-intuitive thermodynamic property that when ambient temperature helium is bubbled through boiling LN2 at a temperature of -195.8 °C, the temperature of the liquid nitrogen will reduce. This paper reports on the design and testing of a novel proof-of-concept helium injection control system confirming that it is possible to reduce the temperature of an LN2 bath below boiling point through the controlled injection of ambient temperature gaseous helium and then to efficiently maintain a reduced helium flow rate to maintain a stabilized liquid temperature, enabling clear visual observation of components immersed within the LN2. Helium saturation testing is performed and injection system sizing is discussed.

  11. Mechanisms of action for an anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high dose and dose-rate, low-linear energy transfer radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Maliev, V; Popov, D; Casey, R C; Jones, J A

    2007-01-01

    The development of an anti-radiation vaccine could be very useful in reducing acute radiation syndromes. Existing principles for the treatment of acute radiation syndromes are based on the amelioration of progressive pathophysiological changes, using the concept of replacement therapy. Active immunization by small quantities of the essential radiation-induced systemic toxins of what we call the Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD) before irradiation increased duration of life among animals that were irradiated by lethal or sub-lethal doses of gamma-radiation. The SRD toxins possess antigenic properties that are specific to different forms of acute radiation sickness. Intramuscular injection of larger quantities of the SRD toxins induce signs and symptoms in irradiated naive animals similar to those observed in acute radiation syndromes, including death. Providing passive immunization, at variable periods of time following radiation, with preparations of immune-globulins directed at the SRD molecules, can confer some protection in the development of clinical sequelae in irradiated animals. Improved survival rates and times were observed in animals that received lower, sublethal doses of the same SRDs prior to irradiation. Therefore, active immunization can be induced by SRD molecules as a prophylaxis. The protective effects of the immunization begin to manifest 15-35 days after an injection of a biologically active SDR preparation. The SRD molecules are a group of radiation toxins with antigenic properties that correlate specifically with different forms of radiation disease. The SRD molecules are composed of glycoproteins and lipoproteins that accumulate in the lymphatic system of mammals in the first hours after irradiation, and preliminary analysis suggests that they may originate from cellular membrane components. The molecular weight of the SRD group ranges from 200-250 kDa. The SRD molecules were isolated from the lymphatic systems of laboratory animals that

  12. Metal loss characterization in 55-gallon drum steel by the magnetic flux leakage method

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, R.; Riechers, D.; Duncan, D.

    1995-12-31

    A technique, using Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), has been developed for imaging corrosion damage in real-time on the inner surface of sealed 55-gallon drums. An experimental study and theoretical background are presented showing the sensitivity of an MFL technique for detecting and imaging both general and localized corrosion on the inner surface of sealed 55-gallon drums, inspected from the outer surface. Measurements resulting from studies on natural corrosion and machined defects in 55-gallon drum steel will be discussed. Image processing techniques applied to scan data show metal loss in 2-D gray scale images. This work suggests an approach to designing a real-time, full-coverage, 55-gallon drum inspection system to characterize drum wall thickness for comparison over time to determine corrosion rate.

  13. Rate-dependent force, intracellular calcium, and action potential voltage alternans are modulated by sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of thin filament regulation in human heart failure: A myocyte modeling study.

    PubMed

    Zile, Melanie A; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) testing identifies heart failure patients at risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias at near-resting heart rates (<110 beats per minute). Since pressure alternans occurs simultaneously with MTWA and has a higher signal to noise ratio, it may be a better predictor of arrhythmia, although the mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between force alternans (FORCE-ALT), the cellular manifestation of pressure alternans, and action potential voltage alternans (APV-ALT), the cellular driver of MTWA. Our goal was to uncover the mechanisms linking APV-ALT and FORCE-ALT in failing human myocytes and to investigate how the link between those alternans was affected by pacing rate and by physiological conditions such as sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters. To achieve this, a mechanically-based, strongly coupled human electromechanical myocyte model was constructed. Reducing the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake current (Iup) to 27% was incorporated to simulate abnormal calcium handling in human heart failure. Mechanical remodeling was incorporated to simulate altered thin filament activation and crossbridge (XB) cycling rates. A dynamical pacing protocol was used to investigate the development of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i), voltage, and active force alternans at different pacing rates. FORCE-ALT only occurred in simulations incorporating reduced Iup, demonstrating that alternans in the intracellular calcium concentration (CA-ALT) induced FORCE-ALT. The magnitude of FORCE-ALT was found to be largest at clinically relevant pacing rates (<110 bpm), where APV-ALT was smallest. We found that the magnitudes of FORCE-ALT, CA-ALT and APV-ALT were altered by heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters and sarcomere length due to the presence of myofilament feedback. These findings provide important insight into the relationship between heart

  14. Accurate Evaluation of Microwave-Leakage-Induced Frequency Shifts in Fountain Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Liang; Liu, Nian-Feng; Suo, Rui; Li, Tian-Chun

    2014-10-01

    We report theoretical calculations of the transition probability errors introduced by microwave leakage in Cs fountain clocks, which will shift the clock frequency. The results show that the transition probability errors are affected by the Ramsey pulse amplitude, the relative phase between the Ramsey field and the leakage field, and the asymmetry of the leakage fields for the upward and downward passages. This effect is quite different for the leakage fields presenting below the Ramsey cavity and above the Ramsey cavity. The leakage-field-induced frequency shifts of the NIM5 fountain clock in different cases are measured. The results are consistent with the theoretical calculations, and give an accurate evaluation of the leakage-field-induced frequency shifts, as distinguished from other microwave-power-related effects for the first time.

  15. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  16. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  17. The study on leakage reappearance test of high pressure hose for power steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gi-Chun; Kim, Hyoung-Eui; Park, Jong-Won; Jeong, Won-Wook; Lee, Jong-Hwang; Lim, Young-Han; Hwang, Kwon-Tae; Lee, Young-Shin; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2009-07-01

    Generally, a leakage in a high pressure hose assembly can be determined if hydraulic fluid falls down through fitting which is swaged with a rubber hose. This study tried to visualize leakage, which is considered a failure occurring often in the hydraulic system. In the case of methods which verify leakage paths in the power steering hydraulic system equipped with a high pressure hose assembly, three types of leakage paths, which could be seen by cutting the swaging part, were generally found. However, it was difficult to find out leakage paths by using power steering oil. In this study, four methods, including the thermal burn image method, the hole drilling method of fitting metal, the white paint infiltration method, and the fluorescent infiltration method, were tried to introduce. The thermal burn image method failed to find out the leakage path between the fitting part and the rubber part. The hole drilling method is the way to check a leakage path on the fitting part, which doesn't need to cut a hose assembly. This method succeeds to visualize the leakage path partially but it could not check a sequential path of leakage, either, because it needs to drill more closely. The white paint infiltration method also could find the leakage path partially by using white paint mixed with thinner, which was pressurized by hand pump, instead of power steering oil. This method could check the leakage path by cutting the swaging part. The fluorescent infiltration method could verify the leakage path with naked eyes simply by holding the cutting swaging part closely to the ray of light. Reappearance test methods in the high pressure hose assembly, which include a hole drilling, a white paint infiltration, and a fluorescent infiltration method, can be applied to find the failure mode and to approve the test before the mass production of the high pressure hose.

  18. Dye leakage and modification of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Challenger, Hereward; Lane, Jason; Becker, Ryan; Nassiripour, Sepehr; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine and decrease dye leakage of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (FSMTA). Specimens using differing setting times or concentrations of calcium sulfate modified FSMTA were assessed for dye penetration. Based on the results, no statistical difference was found in the dye leakage of FSMTA compared with regular mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The addition of 10 percent calcium sulfate resulted in a statistical reduction in dye leakage compared to both unmodified FSMTA and regular MTA.

  19. Dynamical back-action at 5.5 GHz in a corrugated optomechanical beam

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Urrios, D.; Gomis-Bresco, J.; Alzina, F.; El-Jallal, S.; Oudich, M.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Pitanti, A.; Capuj, N.; Tredicucci, A.; Griol, A.; Martínez, A.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the optomechanical properties of a breathing mechanical mode oscillating at 5.5 GHz in a 1D corrugated Si nanobeam. This mode has an experimental single-particle optomechanical coupling rate of |g{sub o,OM}| = 1.8 MHz (|g{sub o,OM}|/2π = 0.3 MHz) and shows strong dynamical back-action effects at room temperature. The geometrical flexibility of the unit-cell would lend itself to further engineering of the cavity region to localize the mode within the full phononic band-gap present at 4 GHz while keeping high g{sub o,OM} values. This would lead to longer lifetimes at cryogenic temperatures, due to the suppression of acoustic leakage.

  20. Tectonic leakage of fault bounded aquifers subject to non-isothermal recharge: a mechanism generating thermal precursors to seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Valiya M.

    2001-11-01

    The thermal consequences of flow transients generated by deformation induced leakage at fault zones intersecting confined aquifers have been examined using a simple analytical model. The recharge of the aquifer is assumed to take place by vertical infiltration through the confining layers. The energy equation relevant in this case has been derived by evaluating enthalpy fluxes associated with lateral and vertical components of fluid flows as well as that due to volume changes in the permeable layer, generated by deformation induced alterations in the hydraulic head. Results of numerical simulations indicate that thermal transients arise during the stress build-up period when the infiltrating fluids mix with those in the aquifer, but relatively rapid return to equilibrium conditions occur as soon as the leakage is cut-off. The model is thus capable of reproducing the characteristic features of thermal precursors found in observational records. According to model results, the growth of thermal perturbation as well as the time for attaining steady-state conditions is proportional to the recharge rate. The magnitude of the perturbation is related to the thermal gradients in the confining layers but permeability contrast between the confining layer and the aquifer also plays a significant role. The model results also indicate that precursory signals are likely to be significant only in areas close to the fault plane where tectonic leakage has a direct influence on the hydraulic head of the aquifer. If the fault plane is sensitive to deformation the tectonic leakage rate may undergo substantial changes in response to changing stress patterns and this in turn may easily lead to abrupt and substantial changes in the local thermal regime. Some of the transient thermal anomalies observed in records of temperatures in boreholes in tectonically active areas have characteristics similar to those predicted by the 'deformation induced leakage' model. Examples are presented

  1. Two-Phase Fluid Leakage through Faults Using a Multi-Scale Analytical-Numerical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Nordbotten, J. M.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow through faults must be considered in many applications including geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), deep storage of hazardous waste, groundwater contamination, and petroleum engineering. In the case of CO2 storage, the presence of faults is of concern, because they can act as leakage pathways. Therefore, modeling tools that can accurately and efficiently quantify fluid leakage through faults in basin-scale models are necessary. In basin-scale models, the flow around and through faults is a local-scale process and this local-scale variation is important when determining leakage rates. We present a multi-scale modeling approach based on embedding local-scale analytical solutions within basin-scale numerical models. At the local scale, steady-state analytical solutions that represent fluid flow in the vicinity of leaky faults, including any vertical flow effects, are derived. Using both numerical simulations and analytical solutions, an empirical model representing fault properties, permeabilities and widths, is also developed. The combination of this empirical fault model and the analytical solutions captures the local-scale effects of leakage through faults. The local-scale model is used within a multi-scale modeling framework to determine the flow in and around faults and the associated local-scale pressure and saturation corrections that are applied to the coarse model. Here, a fault is viewed as a 2-D surface on one side of a coarse-scale grid block. The corrections relate local-scale pressure and saturation at the fault to coarse-scale pressures and saturations in numerical grid blocks. The corrections are used to determine the vertical and lateral flow in the fault and horizontal flows perpendicular and parallel to the fault in the grid block. At every coarse-scale time step, the local-scale fault model is implemented using the coarse-scale information from the previous time step. The resulting leakage rates and pressure and saturation

  2. An analysis of turbulent shear stresses in leakage flow through a bileaflet mechanical prostheses.

    PubMed

    Travis, Brandon R; Leo, Hwa L; Shah, Parina A; Frakes, David H; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2002-04-01

    In this work, estimates of turbulence were made from pulsatile flow laser Doppler velocimetry measurements using traditional phase averaging and averaging after the removal of cyclic variation. These estimates were compared with estimates obtained from steady leakage flow LDV measurements and an analytical method. The results of these studies indicate that leakage jets which are free and planar in shape may be more unstable than other leakage jets, and that cyclic variation does not cause a gross overestimation of the Reynolds stresses at large distances from the leakage jet orifice.

  3. Suppressing Leakage in High Fidelity Single Qubit Gates for Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Kelly, J.; Quintana, C.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Lucero, E.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Korotkov, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    Recent results show that superconducting qubits are approaching the threshold for fault tolerant quantum error correction. However, leakage into non-qubit states remains a significant hurdle because leakage errors are highly detrimental for error correction schemes such as the surface code. I will demonstrate that with a simple addition to DRAG pulse shaping, leakage can be suppressed to the 10-5 level while simultaneously maintaining 10-3 gate fidelity. I will also show that the remaining leakage errors are due to heating of the qubit, suggesting further avenues for improvement. The work was supported by Google Inc., and by the NSFGRF under Grant No. DGE 1144085.

  4. Passive electrical monitoring and localization of fluid leakages from wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Mao, D.; Haas, A. K.; Karaoulis, M.; Frash, L.

    2015-02-01

    Electrokinetic phenomena are a class of cross-coupling phenomena involving the relative displacement between the pore water (together with the electrical diffuse layer) with respect to the solid phase of a porous material. We demonstrate that electrical fields of electrokinetic nature can be associated with fluid leakages from wells. These leakages can be remotely monitored and the resulting signals used to localize their causative source distribution both in the laboratory and in field conditions. The first laboratory experiment (Experiment #1) shows how these electrical fields can be recorded at the surface of a cement block during the leakage of a brine from a well. The measurements were performed with a research-grade medical electroencephalograph and were inverted using a genetic algorithm to localize the causative source of electrical current and therefore, localize the leak in the block. Two snapshots of electrical signals were used to show how the leak evolved over time. The second experiment (Experiment #2) was performed to see if we could localize a pulse water injection from a shallow well in field conditions in the case of a heterogeneous subsurface. We used the same equipment as in Experiment #1 and processed the data with a trend removal algorithm, picking the amplitude from 24 receiver channels just after the water injection. The amplitude of the electric signals changed from the background level indicating that a volume of water was indeed flowing inside the well into the surrounding soil and then along the well. We used a least-square inversion algorithm to invert a snapshot of the electrical potential data at the injection time to localize the source of the self-potential signals. The inversion results show positive potential anomalies in the vicinity of the well. For both experiments, forward numerical simulations of the problem using a finite element package were performed in order to assess the underlying physics of the causative source of the

  5. Major controlling factors on hydrocarbon generation and leakage in South Atlantic conjugate margins: A comparative study of Colorado, Orange, Campos and Lower Congo basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcano, Gabriela; Anka, Zahie; di Primio, Rolando

    2013-09-01

    We present a supra-regional comparative study of the major internal and external factors controlling source rock (SR) maturation and hydrocarbon (HC) generation and leakage in two pairs of conjugate margins across the South Atlantic: the Brazil (Campos Basin)-Angola (Lower Congo Basin) margins located in the "central segment", and the Argentina (Colorado Basin)-South Africa (Orange Basin) in the "southern segment". Our approach is based on the analysis and integration of borehole data, 1D numerical modeling, 2D seismic reflection data, and published reports. Coupling of modeling results, sedimentation rate calculation and seal-bypass system analysis reveal that: (1) oil window is reached by syn-rift SRs in the southern segment during the Early to Late Cretaceous when thermal subsidence is still active, while in the central segment they reach it in Late-Cretaceous-Neogene during a salt remobilization phase, and (2) early HC generation from post-rift SRs in the southern segment and from all SRs in the central segment appears to be controlled mainly by episodes of increased sedimentation rates. The latter seems to be associated with the Andes uplift history for the western South Atlantic basins (Campos and Colorado) and to a possibly climate-driven response for the eastern South Atlantic basins (Orange and Lower Congo). Additionally, we observe that the effect of volcanism on SR maturation in the southern segment is very local. The comparison of Cretaceous mass transport deposit (MTD) episodes with HC peak of generation and paleo-leakage indicators in the southern segment revealed the possible causal effect that HC generation and leakage have over MTD development. Interestingly, Paleogene leakage indicators, which were identified in the Argentina-South Africa conjugate margins, occur contemporaneously to low sedimentation rate periods. Nonetheless, present-day leakage indicators which were also identified in both pairs of conjugate margins might be related to seal

  6. REDUCED LEAKAGE CURRENT AND ENHANCED MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF (Bi,Nd)FeO3 THIN FILMS GROWN ON (Ba,Sr)TiO3 BOTTOM LAYER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. B.; Tang, X. G.; Chen, D. G.; Liu, Q. X.; Jiang, Y. P.; Xiong, D. P.; Zhou, Y. C.

    2012-09-01

    A multiferroic heterostructure composed of (Bi0.875Nd0.125)FeO3 (BNF) are grown on (Ba0.65Sr0.35)TiO3(BST) buffered Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si(100) substrate by rf-magnetron sputtering. The heterostructure BNF/BST exhibits a quite low leakage current (3.7 × 10-7 A/cm2 at 300 kV/cm) and dielectric loss (0.0036 at 100 kHz) at room temperature. The saturated magnetization and the coercive field of the BST/BNF heterostructure are 37.7 emu/cm3 and 357.6 Oe, respectively. The low leakage current owed to the action of BST in the charge transfer between BNF and the bottom electrode, the coupling reaction between BST and BNF films. And the better crystallization in BNF/BST heterostructure thin film lead to the ferromagnetic properties enhanced.

  7. On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-14

    Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

  8. Comprehensive failure analysis of leakage faults in bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domengès, B.; Murray, H.; Schwindenhammer, P.; Imbert, G.

    2004-02-01

    The origin of a leakage current in several failed NPN bipolar transistors has been identified by complementary advanced failure analysis techniques. After precise localization of the failing area by photon emission microscopy and optical beam induced resistance change investigations, a focus ion beam technique was used to prepare thin lamellae adequate for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study. Characterization of the related microstructure was performed by TEM and energy-dispersive spectrometry nanobeam analyses. It was identified as Ti-W containing trickle-like residue located at the surface of the spacers. Current-voltage measurements could be related to such structure defects and the involved conduction mechanism was identified as the Poole-Frenkel effect.

  9. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way.

  10. Highly sensitive optical sensor system for blood leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Jie, Chen; Sanae, Mizuno; Touma, Yasunori

    A highly sensitive method for the detection of blood leakage has been developed, and a practical sensor system for blood concentration measurement has been constructed. The present method is based on the attenuation of laser light by blood cells. The effects of the fluctuations of the incident laser light power are eliminated by normalizing the attenuated light intensity by the incident light intensity. A part of the incident laser light is reflected by a beam splitter mounted at the entrance of the test cell, of which the power is measured to provide base data for normalization. The optical path is extended to enhance sensitivity by using a pair of side mirrors. This multi-reflection method is very effective to increase sensitivity; the maximum sensitivity obtained for blood concentration is about 4 X 10 -6 by volume, which is significantly higher than that of the conventional sensors.

  11. Quench tank in-leakage diagnosis at St. Lucie

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.E.; Au-Yang, M.K.; Beckner, D.A.; Vickery, A.N.

    1996-12-01

    In February 1995, leakage into the quench tank of the St. Lucie Nuclear Station Unit 1 was becoming an operational concern. This internal leak resulted in measurable increases in both the temperature and level of the quench tank water, and was so severe that, if the trend continued, plant shut down would be necessary. Preliminary diagnosis based on in-plant instrumentation indicated that any one of 11 valves might be leaking into the quench tank. This paper describes the joint effort by two teams of engineers--one from Florida Power & Light, the other from Framatome Technologies--to identify the sources of the leak, using the latest technology developed for valve diagnosis.

  12. Leakage currents in degraded multi-layer ceramic capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, L. C.

    1984-03-01

    Leakage currents in new and degraded X7R type multi-layer ceramic capacitors show both ohmic and space charge limited behavior. The near-3/2 power voltage characteristic (I proportional to V to the 3/2 power) of new devices can be attributed to electron emission from electrode points. The quadratic behavior (I proportional to V squared) for moderately degraded devices represents space charge limited emission from planar electrodes. This emission may evolve from the point emission due to resistivity decreases that occur in the emission region as a result of ion movement. For these currents, electrons are believed to be the dominant charge carriers. Neither Schottky nor Poole-Frenkel currents were identified.

  13. A Study of Neutron Leakage in Finite Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for simple shielded objects. Monte Carlo (MC) benchmarks were used to verify the 3DHZETRN methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with MC codes to the degree that various MC codes agree among themselves. One limitation in the verification process is that all of the codes (3DHZETRN and three MC codes) utilize different nuclear models/databases. In the present report, the new algorithm, with well-defined convergence criteria, is used to quantify the neutron leakage from simple geometries to provide means of verifying 3D effects and to provide guidance for further code development.

  14. Managing faecal incontinence or leakage: the Peristeen Anal Plug.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Willie

    Incontinence can be a devastating problem to many individuals. It is embarrassing and limiting socially, and prevents those with the problem from going about their day-to-day activities. People adopt coping strategies to manage the problem and those with urinary incontinence often look for containment products such as disposable pads or nappy-style products. These products have been developed using different absorbent materials and are accessible to sufferers in local supermarkets. Absorbency of the products has improved so that once wetted, they hold urine more easily. However, the same cannot be said for faecal incontinence management products and there are few that can be called upon to manage this devastating condition. The Peristeen Anal Plug, developed originally as the Conveen Anal Plug, stands alone in the search for a device to manage faecal incontinence or leakage.

  15. Compensation for booster leakage field in the Duke storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Popov, Victor; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2017-01-01

    The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is an accelerator-driven Compton gamma-ray source, providing high flux gamma-ray beam from 1 MeV to 100 MeV for photo-nuclear physics research. The HIGS facility operates three accelerators, a linac pre-injector (0.16 GeV), a booster injector (0.16—1.2 GeV), and an electron storage ring (0.24—1.2 GeV). Because of the proximity of the booster injector to the storage ring, the magnetic field of the booster dipoles close to the ring can significantly alter the closed orbit in the storage ring being operated in the low energy region. This type of orbit distortion can be a problem for certain precision experiments which demand a high degree of energy consistency of the gamma-ray beam. This energy consistency can be achieved by maintaining consistent aiming of the gamma-ray beam, and therefore a steady electron beam orbit and angle at the Compton collision point. To overcome the booster leakage field problem, we have developed an orbit compensation scheme. This scheme is developed using two fast orbit correctors and implemented as a feedforward which is operated transparently together with the slow orbit feedback system. In this paper, we will describe the development of this leakage field compensation scheme, and report the measurement results, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the scheme. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  16. SETI via Leakage from Light Sails in Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillochon, James; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-10-01

    The primary challenge of rocket propulsion is the burden of needing to accelerate the spacecraft’s own fuel, resulting in only a logarithmic gain in maximum speed as propellant is added to the spacecraft. Light sails offer an attractive alternative in which fuel is not carried by the spacecraft, with acceleration being provided by an external source of light. By artificially illuminating the spacecraft with beamed radiation, speeds are only limited by the area of the sail, heat resistance of its material, and power use of the accelerating apparatus. In this paper, we show that leakage from a light sail propulsion apparatus in operation around a solar system analogue would be detectable. To demonstrate this, we model the launch and arrival of a microwave beam-driven light sail constructed for transit between planets in orbit around a single star, and find an optimal beam frequency on the order of tens of GHz. Leakage from these beams yields transients with flux densities of Jy and durations of tens of seconds at 100 pc. Because most travel within a planetary system would be conducted between the habitable worlds within that system, multiply transiting exoplanetary systems offer the greatest chance of detection, especially when the planets are in projected conjunction as viewed from Earth. If interplanetary travel via beam-driven light sails is commonly employed in our galaxy, this activity could be revealed by radio follow-up of nearby transiting exoplanetary systems. The expected signal properties define a new strategy in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).

  17. SETI VIA LEAKAGE FROM LIGHT SAILS IN EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillochon, James; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-10-01

    The primary challenge of rocket propulsion is the burden of needing to accelerate the spacecraft’s own fuel, resulting in only a logarithmic gain in maximum speed as propellant is added to the spacecraft. Light sails offer an attractive alternative in which fuel is not carried by the spacecraft, with acceleration being provided by an external source of light. By artificially illuminating the spacecraft with beamed radiation, speeds are only limited by the area of the sail, heat resistance of its material, and power use of the accelerating apparatus. In this paper, we show that leakage from a light sail propulsion apparatus in operation around a solar system analogue would be detectable. To demonstrate this, we model the launch and arrival of a microwave beam-driven light sail constructed for transit between planets in orbit around a single star, and find an optimal beam frequency on the order of tens of GHz. Leakage from these beams yields transients with flux densities of Jy and durations of tens of seconds at 100 pc. Because most travel within a planetary system would be conducted between the habitable worlds within that system, multiply transiting exoplanetary systems offer the greatest chance of detection, especially when the planets are in projected conjunction as viewed from Earth. If interplanetary travel via beam-driven light sails is commonly employed in our galaxy, this activity could be revealed by radio follow-up of nearby transiting exoplanetary systems. The expected signal properties define a new strategy in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI)

  18. Mind the gap - tip leakage vortex in axial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, M.; Decaix, J.; Münch-Alligné, C.; Farhat, M.

    2014-03-01

    The tendency of designing large Kaplan turbines with a continuous increase of output power is bringing to the front the cavitation erosion issue. Due to the flow in the gap between the runner and the discharge ring, axial turbine blades may develop the so called tip leakage vortex (TLV) cavitation with negative consequences. Such vortices may interact strongly with the wake of guide vanes leading to their multiple collapses and rebounds. If the vortex trajectory remains close to the blade tip, these collapses may lead to severe erosion. One is still unable today to predict its occurrence and development in axial turbines with acceptable accuracy. Numerical flow simulations as well as the actual scale-up rules from small to large scales are unreliable. The present work addresses this problematic in a simplified case study representing TLV cavitation to better understand its sensitivity to the gap width. A Naca0009 hydrofoil is used as a generic blade in the test section of EPFL cavitation tunnel. A sliding mounting support allowing an adjustable gap between the blade tip and wall was manufactured. The vortex trajectory is visualized with a high speed camera and appropriate lighting. The three dimensional velocity field induced by the TLV is investigated using stereo particle image velocimetry. We have taken into account the vortex wandering in the image processing to obtain accurate measurements of the vortex properties. The measurements were performed in three planes located downstream of the hydrofoil for different values of the flow velocity, the incidence angle and the gap width. The results clearly reveal a strong influence of the gap width on both trajectory and intensity of the tip leakage vortex.

  19. CO2-Brine Rheology Could Suppress Leakage From Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Clarens, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) in the deep subsurface is an attractive means for storing large volumes of CO2 over the long term. GCS is predicated on there being minimal leakage of CO2 to the surface since this would negate the climate change benefits and could also create a human health risk. Despite the importance of understanding leakage processes to GCS deployment, the phenomena remain especially difficult to characterize because CO2, driven by buoyant forces out of host formations, must travel over long length scales, encountering varied geologic formations and endogenous brines, and experiencing a wide range of shear, temperature and pressure conditions that result in complex phase behavior. This study explores the rheology of CO2-brine mixtures in an effort to better characterize the geophysics of a rising parcel of CO2 in the subsurface. Experimental work in this area to date has assumed that CO2-brine mixtures will exhibit simple Newtonian behavior. The hypothesis of this work is that CO2-brine mixtures will move through porous media generating high shear rates, caused by the small pore sizes, that could result in more complex flow phenomena. The rheological properties of single and multiphase CO2-brine mixtures were measured over a range of GCS-relevant temperature, pressure, ionic strength, and shear conditions using a rotational rheometer fitted with a high-pressure vessel and a low viscosity measurement unit. Under liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) conditions CO2-brine mixtures were found to exhibit consistently Newtonian behavior with the effective viscosity generally increasing with respect to CO2(aq) concentration. A small dip in viscosity occurs at the pressure corresponding to the transition of CO2 from liquid to gas but this minor effect is not likely to have an appreciable impact on leakage rates. More significantly, under vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) conditions, CO2-brine suspensions exhibit complex viscoelastic behavior that could

  20. Design Support of an Above Cap-rock Early Detection Monitoring System using Simulated Leakage Scenarios at the FutureGen2.0 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermuel, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Oostrom, Mart; USA, Richland Washington; Porse, Sean L.; USA, Richland Washington; Thorne, Paul D.; USA, Richland Washington; Szecsody, Jim E.; USA, Richland Washington; Horner, Jake A.; USA, Richland Washington; Gilmore, Tyler J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. This preliminary modeling study described here focuses on hypothetical leakage scenarios into the first permeable unit above the primary confining zone (Ironton Sandstone) and is used to support assessment of early-leak detection capabilities. Future updates of the model will be used to assess potential impacts on the lowermost underground source of drinking water (Saint Peter Sandstone) for a range of theoretical leakage scenarios. This preliminary modeling evaluation considers both pressure response and geochemical signals in the overlying Ironton Sandstone. This model is independent of the FutureGen 2.0 reservoir model in that it does not simulate caprock discontinuities, faults, or failure scenarios. Instead this modeling effort is based on theoretical, volumetric-rate based leakage scenarios. The scenarios include leakage of 1% of the total injected CO2 mass, but spread out over different time periods (20, 100, and 500 years) with each case yielding a different mass flux (i.e., smaller mass fluxes for longer duration leakage cases]. A brine leakage scenario using a volumetric leakage similar to the 20 year 1% CO2 case was also considered. A framework for the comparison of the various cases was developed based on the exceedance of selected pressure and geochemical thresholds at different

  1. Design Support of an Above Cap-rock Early Detection Monitoring System using Simulated Leakage Scenarios at the FutureGen2.0 Site

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, Mark D.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermuel, Vince R.; ...

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. This preliminary modeling study described here focuses on hypothetical leakage scenarios intomore » the first permeable unit above the primary confining zone (Ironton Sandstone) and is used to support assessment of early-leak detection capabilities. Future updates of the model will be used to assess potential impacts on the lowermost underground source of drinking water (Saint Peter Sandstone) for a range of theoretical leakage scenarios. This preliminary modeling evaluation considers both pressure response and geochemical signals in the overlying Ironton Sandstone. This model is independent of the FutureGen 2.0 reservoir model in that it does not simulate caprock discontinuities, faults, or failure scenarios. Instead this modeling effort is based on theoretical, volumetric-rate based leakage scenarios. The scenarios include leakage of 1% of the total injected CO2 mass, but spread out over different time periods (20, 100, and 500 years) with each case yielding a different mass flux (i.e., smaller mass fluxes for longer duration leakage cases]. A brine leakage scenario using a volumetric leakage similar to the 20 year 1% CO2 case was also considered. A framework for the comparison of the various cases was developed based on the exceedance of selected pressure and geochemical thresholds at different distances from the point of leakage and at

  2. Simulation of CO2 Sequestration at Rock Spring Uplift, Wyoming: Heterogeneity and Uncertainties in Storage Capacity, Injectivity and Leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hailin; Dai, Zhenxue; Jiao, Zunsheng; Stauffer, Philip H.; Surdam, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    Many geological, geochemical, geomechanical and hydrogeological factors control CO{sub 2} storage in subsurface. Among them heterogeneity in saline aquifer can seriously influence design of injection wells, CO{sub 2} injection rate, CO{sub 2} plume migration, storage capacity, and potential leakage and risk assessment. This study applies indicator geostatistics, transition probability and Markov chain model at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming generating facies-based heterogeneous fields for porosity and permeability in target saline aquifer (Pennsylvanian Weber sandstone) and surrounding rocks (Phosphoria, Madison and cap-rock Chugwater). A multiphase flow simulator FEHM is then used to model injection of CO{sub 2} into the target saline aquifer involving field-scale heterogeneity. The results reveal that (1) CO{sub 2} injection rates in different injection wells significantly change with local permeability distributions; (2) brine production rates in different pumping wells are also significantly impacted by the spatial heterogeneity in permeability; (3) liquid pressure evolution during and after CO{sub 2} injection in saline aquifer varies greatly for different realizations of random permeability fields, and this has potential important effects on hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock, reactivation of pre-existing faults and the integrity of the cap-rock; (4) CO{sub 2} storage capacity estimate for Rock Springs Uplift is 6614 {+-} 256 Mt at 95% confidence interval, which is about 36% of previous estimate based on homogeneous and isotropic storage formation; (5) density profiles show that the density of injected CO{sub 2} below 3 km is close to that of the ambient brine with given geothermal gradient and brine concentration, which indicates CO{sub 2} plume can sink to the deep before reaching thermal equilibrium with brine. Finally, we present uncertainty analysis of CO{sub 2} leakage into overlying formations due to heterogeneity in both the target saline

  3. Numerical studies on the performance of an aerosol respirator with faceseal leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaripov, S. K.; Mukhametzanov, I. T.; Grinshpun, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    We studied the efficiency of a facepiece filtering respirator (FFR) in presence of a measurable faceseal leakage using the previously developed model of a spherical sampler with porous layer. In our earlier study, the model was validated for a specific filter permeability value. In this follow-up study, we investigated the effect of permeability on the overall respirator performance accounting for the faceseal leakage. The Total Inward Leakage (TIL) was calculated as a function of the leakage-to-filter surface ratio and the particle diameter. A good correlation was found between the theoretical and experimental TIL values. The TIL value was shown to increase and the effect of particle size on TIL to decrease as the leakage-to- filter surface ratio grows. The model confirmed that within the most penetrating particle size range (∼50 nm) and at relatively low leakage-to-filter surface ratios, an FFR performs better (TIL is lower) when the filter has a lower permeability which should be anticipated as long as the flow through the filter represents the dominant particle penetration pathway. An increase in leak size causes the TIL to rise; furthermore, under certain leakage-to-filter surface ratios, TIL for ultrafine particles becomes essentially independent on the filter properties due to a greater contribution of the aerosol flow through the faceseal leakage. In contrast to the ultrafine fraction, the larger particles (e.g., 800 nm) entering a typical high- or medium-quality respirator filter are almost fully collected by the filter medium regardless of its permeability; at the same time, the fraction penetrated through the leakage appears to be permeability- dependent: higher permeability generally results in a lower pressure drop through the filter which increases the air flow through the filter at the expense of the leakage flow. The latter reduces the leakage effect thus improving the overall respiratory protection level. The findings of this study provide

  4. Using mineral trioxide aggregate powder as an apical barrier: a bacterial leakage study.

    PubMed

    Milani, Amin Salem; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Pakdel, Mahdi Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for the treatment of necrotic immature teeth as part of a 2-step apical barrier. Recently, some researchers have used MTA powder instead of wet-mix MTA. It has also been used in a single-step approach in order to decrease the number of patient appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial microleakage of MTA powder in comparison with wet-mix MTA, in single or 2-step barrier approaches. This ex vivo study was carried out on 70 extracted single-rooted teeth. The canals were enlarged to simulate immature teeth. The prepared specimens were assigned to 4 experimental (n = 15) and 2 control (n = 5) groups. In Group 1, a wet paper point was placed in the canal following placement of wet-mix MTA. In Group 2, a dry paper point was placed on wet-mix MTA. In Group 3, the samples were treated similar to Group 1, but MTA powder was used instead of wet-mix MTA. In Group 4, the same procedures were followed as Group 3 except that a dry paper point was used. Microleakage of the samples was compared using a 2-chamber bacterial leakage apparatus. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the number of leaked samples or rate of leakage over time (P > 0.05) among the experimental groups. It can be concluded that MTA used in a single step approach has the same resistance against bacterial penetration as in a 2-step approach, and MTA powder provides the same sealing ability as wet-mix MTA.

  5. Aerodynamic and heat transfer aspects of tip and casing treatments used for turbine tip leakage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumusel, Baris

    Axial flow turbine stages are usually designed with a gap between the tips of the rotating blades and a stationary outer casing. The presence of a strong pressure gradient across this gap drives flow from the pressure side of the blade to the suction side. This leakage flow creates a significant amount of energy loss of working fluid in the turbine stage. In a modern gas turbine engine the outer casing of the high-pressure turbine is also exposed to a combination of high flow temperatures and heat transfer coefficients. The casing is consequently subjected to high levels of convective heat transfer, a situation that is aggravated by flow unsteadiness caused by periodic blade-passing events. An experimental investigation of the aerodynamic and heat transfer effect of tip and casing treatments used in turbine tip leakage control was conducted in a large scale, low speed, rotating research turbine facility. The effects of casing treatments were investigated by measuring the total pressure field at the exit of the rotor using a high frequency response total pressure probe. A smooth wall as a baseline case was also investigated. The test cases presented include results of casing treatments with varying dimensions for tip gap height of t/h=2.5%. The results of the rotor exit total pressure indicate that the casing treatment significantly reduced the leakage mass flow rate and the momentum deficit in the core of the tip vortex. The reductions obtained in the tip vortex size and strength influenced the tip-side passage vortex and other typical core flow characteristics in the passage. Casing treatments with the highest ridge height was the most effective in reducing the total pressure loss in the leakage flow of the test blades. This was observed at a radius near the core of the tip vortex. It appears that casing treatments with the highest ridge height is also the most effective from a global point of view, as shown by the passage averaged pressure coefficient obtained in

  6. Experimental observation of signature changes in bulk soil electrical conductivity in response to engineered surface CO2 leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou X.; Wielopolski L.; Lakkaraju, V. R.; Apple, M.; Dobeck, L. M.; Gullickson, K.; Shaw, J. A.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L. H.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental observations of signature changes of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC) due to CO{sub 2} leakage were carried out at a field site at Bozeman, Montana, to investigate the change of soil geophysical properties in response to possible leakage of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The dynamic evolution of bulk soil EC was measured during an engineered surface leakage of CO{sub 2} through in situ continuous monitoring of bulk soil EC, soil moisture, soil temperature, rainfall rate, and soil CO{sub 2} concentration to investigate the response of soil bulk EC signature to CO{sub 2} leakage. Observations show that: (1) high soil CO{sub 2} concentration due to CO{sub 2} leakage enhances the dependence of bulk soil EC on soil moisture. The bulk soil EC is a linear multivariate function of soil moisture and soil temperature, the coefficient for soil moisture increased from 2.111 dS for the non-leaking phase to 4.589 dS for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase; and the coefficient for temperature increased from 0.003 dS/C for the non-leaking phase to 0.008 dS/C for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase. The dependence of bulk soil EC on soil temperature is generally weak, but leaked CO{sub 2} enhances the dependence, (2) after the CO{sub 2} release, the relationship between soil bulk EC and soil CO{sub 2} concentration observes three distinct CO{sub 2} decay modes. Rainfall events result in sudden changes of soil moisture and are believed to be the driving forcing for these decay modes, and (3) within each mode, increasing soil CO{sub 2} concentration results in higher bulk soil EC. Comparing the first 2 decay modes, it is found that the dependence of soil EC on soil CO{sub 2} concentration is weaker for the first decay mode than the second decay mode.

  7. Coupling of Multiphase Flow and Geomechanics in Fractured Porous Media: Application to CO2 Leakages from Natural and Stimulated Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Leakage to the atmosphere of a significant fraction of injected CO2 would constitute a failure of a geological CO2 storage project from a greenhouse gas mitigation perspective. We present a numerical model that simulates flow and transport of CO2 into heterogeneous subsurface systems. The model, StoTran, is a flexible numerical environment that uses state-of-the-art finite element and finite volume methods and unstructured adaptive mesh refinement scheme implemented using MPI and OpenMP protocols. Multiphase flow equations and the geomechanical equations are implicitly solved and either fully or sequentially coupled. StoTran can address inverse and forward problems under deterministic or stochastic conditions. For the current study, StoTran has been used to simulate several scenarios spanning from a homogeneous single layered reservoir to heterogeneous multi-layered systems, which including cap-rock with embedded fractures, have been simulated under different operations of CO2 injection and CO2 leakages conditions. Results show the impact of the injection and leakage rates on the time evolution of the spread of the CO2 plume, its interception of the fractured cap-rock and the risk associated with the contamination of the overlaying aquifer. Spatial and temporal moments have been calculated for different, deterministic of stochastic, subsurface physical and chemical properties. Spatial moments enable assessing the extent of the region of investigation under conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, several leakage scenarios show the intermittence behavior and development of the CO2 plume in the subsurface; its first interception with the fractures located further far from the injection well then, at a second stage, its interception with the fracture within the immediate vicinity of the injection well. We will present a remedy to CO2 leakages from the reservoir in order to enhance a long term containment of the injected CO2. This work performed under the auspices of

  8. Law of mass action in the Arctic lower stratospheric polar vortex January-March 2000: ClO scaling and the calculation of ozone loss rates in a turbulent fractal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, Adrian F.; Hovde, Susan J.; Gao, Ru-Shan; Richard, Erik C.

    2003-08-01

    We consider the effects of power law scaling in the 1999-2000 Arctic lower stratospheric vortex from the point of view of the law of mass action and its application to the chemical kinetics of ozone loss embedded in a turbulent, macroscopic, fractal medium. The ER-2 observations of ClO obey power law scaling; the exponent varies with time in a manner shown to be consistent with the scaling of NOy and O3, via the influences of polar stratospheric clouds and actinic solar radiation. While the microscopic rate coefficient for ClO three-body recombination to the dimer applies as measured to three-dimensional volumes in which the sole transport mechanism is molecular diffusion, this cannot be true in the 2.56-dimensional space in which macroscopically fluctuating ClO reacts in the lower stratosphere. We show that the rate of loss of ozone via the ClO dimer mechanism is proportional to [ClO]2.20 in late January/early February and to [ClO]2.55 in March. Chemical ozone loss had already occurred by the date of the first flight, 20000120.

  9. Prognostic Factors for Anastomotic Urinary Leakage Following Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy and Correlation With Voiding Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cormio, Luigi; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Scavone, Carmen; Maroscia, Domenico; Mancini, Vito; Ruocco, Nicola; Bellanti, Francesco; Selvaggio, Oscar; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the occurrence and grade of cystographically detected urinary leakage (UL) in a contemporary series of open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RP), whether patients’ clinical variables predict occurrence of UL, and whether occurrence of UL correlates with patients’ voiding outcomes in terms of urinary continence and anastomotic stricture (AS). Enrolled patients underwent cystography 7 days after retropubic RP; in case of UL, the catheter was left in situ and cystography repeated at 7 days intervals until demonstrating absence of UL. Leakage was classified as grade I = extraperitoneal leak <6 cm, grade II = extraperitoneal leak >6 cm, grade III = leak freely extending in the small pelvis. Voiding was evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months after RP using the 24-hour pad test and uroflowmetry; in cases of maximum flow rate <10 mL/s, urethrocystoscopy was carried out to determine presence and location of an AS. The first postoperative cystogram showed UL in 52.6% of patients (grade I in 48.1%, grade II in 21.5%, and grade III in 30.4% of the cases). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients with UL had significantly greater prostate volume (64.5 vs 34.8 cc, P < 0.001), loss of serum hemoglobin (4.77 vs 4.19 g/dL, P < 0.001), lower postoperative serum total proteins (4.85 vs 5.4 g/dL, P < 0.001), and higher rate of AS (20.6% vs. 2.8%, p < 0.001) than those without UL. Continence rate at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively was 34.2%, 76%, and 90%, respectively, in patients with UL compared with 77.5%, 80.3%, and 93% in patients without UL; such difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001) only at 3 months follow-up. ROC curve analysis showed that prostate volume and postoperative serum total proteins had the best AUC (0.821 and 0.822, respectively) and when combined, their positive and negative predictive values for UL were 90% and 93%, respectively. In conclusion, half of the patients

  10. Large eddy simulation of tip-leakage flow in an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keuntae; Choi, Haecheon; Choi, Seokho; Sa, Yongcheol; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung

    2016-11-01

    An axial flow fan with a shroud generates a complicated tip-leakage flow by the interaction of the axial flow with the fan blades and shroud near the blade tips. In this study, large eddy simulation is performed for tip-leakage flow in a forward-swept axial flow fan inside an outdoor unit of an air-conditioner, operating at the design condition of the Reynolds number of 547,000 based on the radius of blade tip and the tip velocity. A dynamic global model is used for a subgrid-scale model, and an immersed boundary method in a non-inertial reference frame is adopted. The present simulation clearly reveals the generation and evolution of tip-leakage vortex near the blade tip by the leakage flow. At the inception of the leakage vortex near the leading edge of the suction-side of the blade tip, the leakage vortex is composed of unsteady multiple vortices containing high-frequency fluctuations. As the leakage vortex develops downstream along a slant line toward the following blade, large and meandering movements of the leakage vortex are observed. Thus low-frequency broad peaks of velocity and pressure occur near the pressure surface. Supported by the KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2016-C3-0027).

  11. 49 CFR 176.710 - Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Radioactive Materials § 176.710 Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials. (a) In case of fire, collision, or breakage involving any shipment...

  12. 49 CFR 176.710 - Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Radioactive Materials § 176.710 Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials. (a) In case of fire, collision, or breakage involving any shipment...

  13. 49 CFR 176.710 - Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Radioactive Materials § 176.710 Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials. (a) In case of fire, collision, or breakage involving any shipment...

  14. 49 CFR 176.710 - Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Radioactive Materials § 176.710 Care following leakage or sifting of radioactive materials. (a) In case of fire, collision, or breakage involving any shipment...

  15. 40 CFR 86.166-12 - Method for calculating emissions due to air conditioning leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to air conditioning leakage. 86.166-12 Section 86.166-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY... for calculating emissions due to air conditioning leakage. This section describes procedures used...

  16. Microvascular dysfunction with increased vascular leakage response in mice systemically exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Shin-Yin; Lu, Chi-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Hung; Wang, Dean-Chuan

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease induced by arsenic exposure are not completely understood. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether arsenic-fed mice have an increased vascular leakage response to vasoactive agents and whether enhanced type-2 protein phosphatase (PP2A) activity is involved in mustard oil-induced leakage. ICR mice were fed water or sodium arsenite (20 mg/kg) for 4 or 8 weeks. The leakage response to vasoactive agents was quantified using the Evans blue (EB) technique or vascular labeling with carbon particles. Increased EB leakage and high density of carbon-labeled microvessels were detected in arsenic-fed mice treated with mustard oil. Histamine induced significantly higher vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice than in water-fed mice. Pretreatment with the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid or the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) blocker RP67580 significantly reduced mustard oil-induced vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice. The protein levels of PP2Ac and NK1R were similar in both groups. PP2A activity was significantly higher in the arsenic-fed mice compared with the control group. These findings indicate that microvessels generally respond to vasoactive agents, and that the increased PP2A activity is involved in mustard oil-induced vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice. Arsenic may initiate endothelial dysfunction, resulting in vascular leakage in response to vasoactive agents.

  17. A conservation planning approach to mitigate the impacts of leakage from protected area networks.

    PubMed

    Bode, Michael; Tulloch, Ayesha I T; Mills, Morena; Venter, Oscar; Ando, Amy W

    2015-06-01

    Protected area networks are designed to restrict anthropogenic pressures in areas of high biodiversity. Resource users respond by seeking to replace some or all of the lost resources from locations elsewhere in the landscape. Protected area networks thereby perturb the pattern of human pressures by displacing extractive effort from within protected areas into the broader landscape, a process known as leakage. The negative effects of leakage on conservation outcomes have been empirically documented and modeled using homogeneous descriptions of conservation landscapes. Human resource use and biodiversity vary greatly in space, however, and a theory of leakage must describe how this heterogeneity affects the magnitude, pattern, and biodiversity impacts of leakage. We combined models of household utility, adaptive human foraging, and biodiversity conservation to provide a bioeconomic model of leakage that accounts for spatial heterogeneity. Leakage had strong and divergent impacts on the performance of protected area networks, undermining biodiversity benefits but mitigating the negative impacts on local resource users. When leakage was present, our model showed that poorly designed protected area networks resulted in a substantial net loss of biodiversity. However, the effects of leakage can be mitigated if they are incorporated ex-ante into the conservation planning process. If protected areas are coupled with nonreserve policy instruments such as market subsidies, our model shows that the trade-offs between biodiversity and human well-being can be further and more directly reduced.

  18. Estimating the environmental and resource costs of leakage in water distribution systems: A shadow price approach.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Senante, María; Mocholí-Arce, Manuel; Sala-Garrido, Ramon

    2016-10-15

    Water scarcity is one of the main problems faced by many regions in the XXIst century. In this context, the need to reduce leakages from water distribution systems has gained almost universal acceptance. The concept of sustainable economic level of leakage (SELL) has been proposed to internalize the environmental and resource costs within economic level of leakage calculations. However, because these costs are not set by the market, they have not often been calculated. In this paper, the directional-distance function was used to estimate the shadow price of leakages as a proxy of their environmental and resource costs. This is a pioneering approach to the economic valuation of leakage externalities. An empirical application was carried out for the main Chilean water companies. The estimated results indicated that for 2014, the average shadow price of leakages was approximately 32% of the price of the water delivered. Moreover, as a sensitivity analysis, the shadow prices of the leakages were calculated from the perspective of the water companies' managers and the regulator. The methodology and findings of this study are essential for supporting the decision process of reducing leakage, contributing to the improvement of economic, social and environmental efficiency and sustainability of urban water supplies.

  19. 47 CFR 76.611 - Cable television basic signal leakage performance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable television basic signal leakage...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.611 Cable television basic signal leakage performance criteria. (a) No cable television system shall commence...

  20. 47 CFR 76.611 - Cable television basic signal leakage performance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cable television basic signal leakage...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.611 Cable television basic signal leakage performance criteria. (a) No cable television system shall commence...