Science.gov

Sample records for action modified competitive

  1. 77 FR 20413 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive, Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land in Clark County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...: 14X5232] Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive, Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land in Clark County, NV... Management (BLM) proposes to offer by modified competitive, sealed-bid sale, one parcel of public land... (FMV) of $10,560,000. The parcel will be offered in a sale pursuant to the Southern Nevada Public...

  2. 77 FR 33235 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Becker County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Becker County, MN AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of realty action. SUMMARY:...

  3. 78 FR 59055 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land at Schoolhouse Butte...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... land sale and mineral conveyance regulations. DATES: The BLM must receive written comments regarding... procedures and conditions, CERCLA, maps delineating the individual sale parcels, mineral potential report...: 14X5260] Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land at Schoolhouse...

  4. 77 FR 13142 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified-Competitive Sale of Public Land in Pahrump, Nye County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... delineating the proposed sale parcel, mineral potential report, EA, and other environmental documents will be...- way as authorized after the sale. Terms and Conditions: Certain minerals for the parcel will be...; TAS: 14X5232] Notice of Realty Action: Modified-Competitive Sale of Public Land in Pahrump, Nye...

  5. 78 FR 25465 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Auction of Public Lands in Lincoln County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Management (BLM) proposes to offer three parcels of land in one sale totaling approximately 26.39 acres in Lincoln County, Nevada, by modified competitive sale. Bidding on the subject parcels will begin at not... found them suitable for disposal by modified competitive sale. The sale will be subject to...

  6. 78 FR 13079 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sale of Public Land in Marquette County, Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY... preference consideration offered by the modified competitive sale and no successful bid is received, then the... time, at the BLM, Northeastern States Field Office, until a successful bid is received or the sale...

  7. 75 FR 55349 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sealed Bid Sale of Public Lands in Rio Arriba...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... in Rio Arriba County, NM AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of realty action... Manager, Farmington Field Office, 1235 La Plata Highway, Suite A, Farmington, New Mexico 87401. FOR... described contains 160 acres, more or less, in Rio Arriba County. The sale is in conformance with the...

  8. Competitive Arenas and Schools' Logics of Action: A European Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zanten, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the impact of competitive arenas on schools' logics of action in six local European contexts (London, Paris, Lille, Charleroi, Budapest and Lisbon). It first examines how competitive processes affect different schools' activities (recruitment, provision of options, promotion, tracking, provision for children with special…

  9. Different Action Patterns for Cooperative and Competitive Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, Ioanna; Becchio, Cristina; Glover, Scott; Castiello, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to elucidate the influence of context on the kinematics of the reach-to-grasp movement. In particular, we consider two basic modes of social cognition, namely cooperation and competition. In two experiments kinematics of the very same action--reaching-to-grasp a wooden block--were analyzed in two different contexts…

  10. Different action patterns for cooperative and competitive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Ioanna; Becchio, Cristina; Glover, Scott; Castiello, Umberto

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to elucidate the influence of context on the kinematics of the reach-to-grasp movement. In particular, we consider two basic modes of social cognition, namely cooperation and competition. In two experiments kinematics of the very same action - reaching-to-grasp a wooden block - were analyzed in two different contexts provided by a cooperative task and competitive task. For the 'cooperation' tasks two participants were required to reach and grasp their respective objects and to cooperate to join the two objects in specific configurations in the middle of the working surface. For the 'competition' tasks, the two participants had to compete to place their own object first in the middle of the working surface. Results revealed specific kinematic patterns for cooperation and competition which were distinct from similar actions performed by each participant in isolation. Further, during the cooperation tasks, a high level of correlation between key kinematical parameters of the two participants was found. In accordance with evidence from neuroimaging, developmental and social psychology our results suggest the existence of motor patterns which reflect the intention to act in a social context.

  11. Gaining a Competitive Edge through Action Design Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, L.; Alexa, M.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2016-08-01

    The current business environment is characterized by increased competition and highly innovative approach, in order to create products and services to better respond to the costumers’ needs and expectations. In this specific context, the research approaches need to be more flexible and business oriented and so, throughout the paper we have used a research method that combines design research and action research, named Action Design Research which is a research method used for generating prescriptive design knowledge through building and evaluating IT artifacts in an organizational setting [1]. Following the Action Design Research stages and principles: problem identification, building, intervention and evaluation, reflection and learning and formalization of learning, the research team has developed an online instrument used to actively involve the consumer in the product development process, in order to generate a better consumers insight regarding their needs and desires and to design and/or adjust the product accordingly. The customer engagement IT tool created and tested by using Action Design Research, E-PICUS, has been developed within the framework of the research project „E-solutions for innovation through customer pro-active involvement in value creation to increase organisational competitiveness (E-PICUS)”, PN- II-PT-PCCA-2013-4-1811, currently undergoing.

  12. Reputation and Competition in a Hidden Action Model

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The economics models of reputation and quality in markets can be classified in three categories. (i) Pure hidden action, where only one type of seller is present who can provide goods of different quality. (ii) Pure hidden information, where sellers of different types have no control over product quality. (iii) Mixed frameworks, which include both hidden action and hidden information. In this paper we develop a pure hidden action model of reputation and Bertrand competition, where consumers and firms interact repeatedly in a market with free entry. The price of the good produced by the firms is contractible, whilst the quality is noncontractible, hence it is promised by the firms when a contract is signed. Consumers infer future quality from all available information, i.e., both from what they know about past quality and from current prices. According to early contributions, competition should make reputation unable to induce the production of high-quality goods. We provide a simple solution to this problem by showing that high quality levels are sustained as an outcome of a stationary symmetric equilibrium. PMID:25329387

  13. Competition as rational action: Why young children cannot appreciate competitive games

    PubMed Central

    Priewasser, Beate; Roessler, Johannes; Perner, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Understanding rational actions requires perspective taking both with respect to means and with respect to objectives. This study addresses the question of whether the two kinds of perspective taking develop simultaneously or in sequence. It is argued that evidence from competitive behavior is best suited for settling this issue. A total of 71 kindergarten children between 3 and 5 years of age participated in a competitive game of dice and were tested on two traditional false belief stories as well as on several control tasks (verbal intelligence, inhibitory control, and working memory). The frequency of competitive poaching moves in the game correlated with correct predictions of mistaken actions in the false belief task. Hierarchical linear regression after controlling for age and control variables showed that false belief understanding significantly predicted the amount of poaching moves. The results speak for an interrelated development of the capacity for “instrumental” and “telic” perspective taking. They are discussed in the light of teleology as opposed to theory use and simulation. PMID:23182381

  14. Competition as rational action: why young children cannot appreciate competitive games.

    PubMed

    Priewasser, Beate; Roessler, Johannes; Perner, Josef

    2013-10-01

    Understanding rational actions requires perspective taking both with respect to means and with respect to objectives. This study addresses the question of whether the two kinds of perspective taking develop simultaneously or in sequence. It is argued that evidence from competitive behavior is best suited for settling this issue. A total of 71 kindergarten children between 3 and 5 years of age participated in a competitive game of dice and were tested on two traditional false belief stories as well as on several control tasks (verbal intelligence, inhibitory control, and working memory). The frequency of competitive poaching moves in the game correlated with correct predictions of mistaken actions in the false belief task. Hierarchical linear regression after controlling for age and control variables showed that false belief understanding significantly predicted the amount of poaching moves. The results speak for an interrelated development of the capacity for "instrumental" and "telic" perspective taking. They are discussed in the light of teleology as opposed to theory use and simulation. PMID:23182381

  15. Competition as rational action: why young children cannot appreciate competitive games.

    PubMed

    Priewasser, Beate; Roessler, Johannes; Perner, Josef

    2013-10-01

    Understanding rational actions requires perspective taking both with respect to means and with respect to objectives. This study addresses the question of whether the two kinds of perspective taking develop simultaneously or in sequence. It is argued that evidence from competitive behavior is best suited for settling this issue. A total of 71 kindergarten children between 3 and 5 years of age participated in a competitive game of dice and were tested on two traditional false belief stories as well as on several control tasks (verbal intelligence, inhibitory control, and working memory). The frequency of competitive poaching moves in the game correlated with correct predictions of mistaken actions in the false belief task. Hierarchical linear regression after controlling for age and control variables showed that false belief understanding significantly predicted the amount of poaching moves. The results speak for an interrelated development of the capacity for "instrumental" and "telic" perspective taking. They are discussed in the light of teleology as opposed to theory use and simulation.

  16. Action video game modifies visual selective attention.

    PubMed

    Green, C Shawn; Bavelier, Daphne

    2003-05-29

    As video-game playing has become a ubiquitous activity in today's society, it is worth considering its potential consequences on perceptual and motor skills. It is well known that exposing an organism to an altered visual environment often results in modification of the visual system of the organism. The field of perceptual learning provides many examples of training-induced increases in performance. But perceptual learning, when it occurs, tends to be specific to the trained task; that is, generalization to new tasks is rarely found. Here we show, by contrast, that action-video-game playing is capable of altering a range of visual skills. Four experiments establish changes in different aspects of visual attention in habitual video-game players as compared with non-video-game players. In a fifth experiment, non-players trained on an action video game show marked improvement from their pre-training abilities, thereby establishing the role of playing in this effect.

  17. Recognition of Modified Conditioning Sounds by Competitively Trained Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Hisayuki; Horikawa, Junsei

    2015-01-01

    The guinea pig (GP) is an often-used species in hearing research. However, behavioral studies are rare, especially in the context of sound recognition, because of difficulties in training these animals. We examined sound recognition in a social competitive setting in order to examine whether this setting could be used as an easy model. Two starved GPs were placed in the same training arena and compelled to compete for food after hearing a conditioning sound (CS), which was a repeat of almost identical sound segments. Through a 2-week intensive training, animals were trained to demonstrate a set of distinct behaviors solely to the CS. Then, each of them was subjected to generalization tests for recognition of sounds that had been modified from the CS in spectral, fine temporal and tempo (i.e., intersegment interval, ISI) dimensions. Results showed that they discriminated between the CS and band-rejected test sounds but had no preference for a particular frequency range for the recognition. In contrast, sounds modified in the fine temporal domain were largely perceived to be in the same category as the CS, except for the test sound generated by fully reversing the CS in time. Animals also discriminated sounds played at different tempos. Test sounds with ISIs shorter than that of the multi-segment CS were discriminated from the CS, while test sounds with ISIs longer than that of the CS segments were not. For the shorter ISIs, most animals initiated apparently positive food-access behavior as they did in response to the CS, but discontinued it during the sound-on period probably because of later recognition of tempo. Interestingly, the population range and mean of the delay time before animals initiated the food-access behavior were very similar among different ISI test sounds. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a wide aspect of sound discrimination abilities of the GP and will provide a way to examine tempo perception mechanisms using this animal species

  18. Recognition of Modified Conditioning Sounds by Competitively Trained Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ojima, Hisayuki; Horikawa, Junsei

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig (GP) is an often-used species in hearing research. However, behavioral studies are rare, especially in the context of sound recognition, because of difficulties in training these animals. We examined sound recognition in a social competitive setting in order to examine whether this setting could be used as an easy model. Two starved GPs were placed in the same training arena and compelled to compete for food after hearing a conditioning sound (CS), which was a repeat of almost identical sound segments. Through a 2-week intensive training, animals were trained to demonstrate a set of distinct behaviors solely to the CS. Then, each of them was subjected to generalization tests for recognition of sounds that had been modified from the CS in spectral, fine temporal and tempo (i.e., intersegment interval, ISI) dimensions. Results showed that they discriminated between the CS and band-rejected test sounds but had no preference for a particular frequency range for the recognition. In contrast, sounds modified in the fine temporal domain were largely perceived to be in the same category as the CS, except for the test sound generated by fully reversing the CS in time. Animals also discriminated sounds played at different tempos. Test sounds with ISIs shorter than that of the multi-segment CS were discriminated from the CS, while test sounds with ISIs longer than that of the CS segments were not. For the shorter ISIs, most animals initiated apparently positive food-access behavior as they did in response to the CS, but discontinued it during the sound-on period probably because of later recognition of tempo. Interestingly, the population range and mean of the delay time before animals initiated the food-access behavior were very similar among different ISI test sounds. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a wide aspect of sound discrimination abilities of the GP and will provide a way to examine tempo perception mechanisms using this animal species

  19. Bean Type Modifies Larval Competition in Zabrotes subfasciatus (Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S O D; Rodrigues, A S; Vieira, J L; Rosi-Denadai, C A; Guedes, N M P; Guedes, R N C

    2015-08-01

    Larval competition is particularly prevalent among grain beetles that remain within their mother-selected grain throughout development, and the behavioral process of competition is usually inferred by the competition outcome. The Mexican bean weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman) is subjected to resource availability variation because of the diversity of common bean types and sizes, from small (e.g., kidney beans) to large (e.g., cranberry beans). The competition process was identified in the Mexican bean weevil reared on kidney and cranberry beans by inference from the competition outcome and by direct observation through digital X-ray imaging. Increased larval density negatively affected adult emergence in kidney beans and reduced adult body mass in both kidney and cranberry beans. Developmental time was faster in cranberry beans. The results allowed for increased larval fitness (i.e., higher larval biomass produced per grain), with larval density reaching a maximum plateau >5 hatched larvae per kidney bean, whereas in cranberry beans, larval fitness linearly increased with density to 13 hatched larvae per bean. These results, together with X-ray imaging without evidence of direct aggressive interaction among larvae, indicate scramble competition, with multiple larvae emerging per grain. However, higher reproductive output was detected for adults from lower density competition with better performance on cranberry beans. Larger populations and fitter adults are expected in intermediate larval densities primarily in cranberry beans where grain losses should be greater.

  20. Bean Type Modifies Larval Competition in Zabrotes subfasciatus (Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S O D; Rodrigues, A S; Vieira, J L; Rosi-Denadai, C A; Guedes, N M P; Guedes, R N C

    2015-08-01

    Larval competition is particularly prevalent among grain beetles that remain within their mother-selected grain throughout development, and the behavioral process of competition is usually inferred by the competition outcome. The Mexican bean weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman) is subjected to resource availability variation because of the diversity of common bean types and sizes, from small (e.g., kidney beans) to large (e.g., cranberry beans). The competition process was identified in the Mexican bean weevil reared on kidney and cranberry beans by inference from the competition outcome and by direct observation through digital X-ray imaging. Increased larval density negatively affected adult emergence in kidney beans and reduced adult body mass in both kidney and cranberry beans. Developmental time was faster in cranberry beans. The results allowed for increased larval fitness (i.e., higher larval biomass produced per grain), with larval density reaching a maximum plateau >5 hatched larvae per kidney bean, whereas in cranberry beans, larval fitness linearly increased with density to 13 hatched larvae per bean. These results, together with X-ray imaging without evidence of direct aggressive interaction among larvae, indicate scramble competition, with multiple larvae emerging per grain. However, higher reproductive output was detected for adults from lower density competition with better performance on cranberry beans. Larger populations and fitter adults are expected in intermediate larval densities primarily in cranberry beans where grain losses should be greater. PMID:26470357

  1. 76 FR 31627 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Lake County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Lake County, CA..., California. The sale will be conducted as a competitive bid auction in which interested bidders must submit...: Comments regarding the proposed sale must be received by the BLM on or before July 11, 2011. Sealed...

  2. 76 FR 6155 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Sandoval County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Sandoval County... of Land Management (BLM) proposes to offer, by competitive sale, a parcel of Federally owned land near Golden, New Mexico, containing approximately 130.56 acres. The sale will be subject to...

  3. 76 FR 44355 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Land in Carson City, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ...; TAS: 14X1109] Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Land in Carson City, NV AGENCY... BLM Carson City District in Carson City, Nevada. The sales will be conducted as a competitive bid... the proposed sales to the BLM on or before September 8, 2011. The deadline for submission of...

  4. Competitive Intelligence for SMEs. From Intellectual Concepts to Actionable CI Rules and Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Henri

    2000-01-01

    Presents several aspects of the development of actionable competitive intelligence into SMEs (small and medium enterprises). Describes types of information used in SMEs, economic intelligence in France, suggestions for information management, and various works undertaken through the European Community. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/LRW)

  5. Learning from Toyota: How Action Learning Can Foster Competitive Advantage in New Product Development (NPD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    New product development and commercialization are essential to entrepreneurial growth and international competitiveness. Excellence in this area is strongly supported by individual and organizational learning efforts. By analyzing how Japanese car manufacturer Toyota organizes learning, this paper evaluates the potential of action learning to…

  6. Mutual and asynchronous anticipation and action in sports as globally competitive and locally coordinative dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Isaka, Tadao; Kouzaki, Motoki; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Humans interact by changing their actions, perceiving other’s actions and executing solutions in conflicting situations. Using oscillator models, nonlinear dynamics have been considered for describing these complex human movements as an emergence of self-organisation. However, these frameworks cannot explain the hierarchical structures of complex behaviours between conflicting inter-agent and adapting intra-agent systems, especially in sport competitions wherein mutually quick decision making and execution are required. Here we adopt a hybrid multiscale approach to model an attack-and-defend game during which both players predict the opponent’s movement and move with a delay. From both simulated and measured data, one synchronous outcome between two-agent (i.e. successful defence) can be described as one attractor. In contrast, the other coordination-breaking outcome (i.e. successful attack) cannot be explained using gradient dynamics because the asymmetric interaction cannot always assume a conserved physical quantity. Instead, we provide the asymmetric and asynchronous hierarchical dynamical models to discuss two-agent competition. Our framework suggests that possessing information about an opponent and oneself in local-coordinative and global-competitive scale enables us to gain a deeper understanding of sports competitions. We anticipate developments in the scientific fields of complex movement adapting to such uncontrolled environments. PMID:26538452

  7. Mutual and asynchronous anticipation and action in sports as globally competitive and locally coordinative dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Isaka, Tadao; Kouzaki, Motoki; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Humans interact by changing their actions, perceiving other's actions and executing solutions in conflicting situations. Using oscillator models, nonlinear dynamics have been considered for describing these complex human movements as an emergence of self-organisation. However, these frameworks cannot explain the hierarchical structures of complex behaviours between conflicting inter-agent and adapting intra-agent systems, especially in sport competitions wherein mutually quick decision making and execution are required. Here we adopt a hybrid multiscale approach to model an attack-and-defend game during which both players predict the opponent's movement and move with a delay. From both simulated and measured data, one synchronous outcome between two-agent (i.e. successful defence) can be described as one attractor. In contrast, the other coordination-breaking outcome (i.e. successful attack) cannot be explained using gradient dynamics because the asymmetric interaction cannot always assume a conserved physical quantity. Instead, we provide the asymmetric and asynchronous hierarchical dynamical models to discuss two-agent competition. Our framework suggests that possessing information about an opponent and oneself in local-coordinative and global-competitive scale enables us to gain a deeper understanding of sports competitions. We anticipate developments in the scientific fields of complex movement adapting to such uncontrolled environments.

  8. Mutual and asynchronous anticipation and action in sports as globally competitive and locally coordinative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Isaka, Tadao; Kouzaki, Motoki; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Humans interact by changing their actions, perceiving other’s actions and executing solutions in conflicting situations. Using oscillator models, nonlinear dynamics have been considered for describing these complex human movements as an emergence of self-organisation. However, these frameworks cannot explain the hierarchical structures of complex behaviours between conflicting inter-agent and adapting intra-agent systems, especially in sport competitions wherein mutually quick decision making and execution are required. Here we adopt a hybrid multiscale approach to model an attack-and-defend game during which both players predict the opponent’s movement and move with a delay. From both simulated and measured data, one synchronous outcome between two-agent (i.e. successful defence) can be described as one attractor. In contrast, the other coordination-breaking outcome (i.e. successful attack) cannot be explained using gradient dynamics because the asymmetric interaction cannot always assume a conserved physical quantity. Instead, we provide the asymmetric and asynchronous hierarchical dynamical models to discuss two-agent competition. Our framework suggests that possessing information about an opponent and oneself in local-coordinative and global-competitive scale enables us to gain a deeper understanding of sports competitions. We anticipate developments in the scientific fields of complex movement adapting to such uncontrolled environments.

  9. On the Modified Palatini Action Coupled to Fermionic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lagraa, Meriem Hadjer

    2010-10-31

    From the generalized Palatini's action proposed recently in [1], we show that we can obtain the standard effective action of the theory of Einstein-Cartan coupled to the fermionic matter without the usual current-current interaction. Therefore, an effective action which is free from the Barbero-Immirzi parameter [2] and the non-vanishing torsion resulting from the presence of the minimal coupling of fermionic matter. This establishes the equivalence between the theories of general relativity and Einstein-Cartan minimally coupled to fermions [3].

  10. 78 FR 56242 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of 28 Parcels of Public Land in Clark County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Bureau of Land Management [LLNVS00560 L58530000 EU0000 241A; N-78190 et al.; 13-08807; MO 4500053642; TAS: 14X5232] Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of 28 Parcels of Public Land in Clark County, NV AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Realty Action. SUMMARY: The Bureau of...

  11. Competition.

    PubMed

    Chambers, D W

    1997-01-01

    Our ambivalence toward competition can be traced to an unspoken preference for certain types of competition which give us an advantage over the types we value less. Four types are defined (a) pure (same rules, same objectives), (b) collaborative (same rules, shared objective), (c) market share (different rules, same objectives), and (d) market growth (different rules, value added orientation). The defining characteristics of the four types of competition are respectively: needing a referee, arguing over the spoils, differentiation and substitutability, and customer focus. Dentistry has features of all four types of competition, thus making it difficult to have a meaningful discussion or frame a coherent policy on this topic.

  12. 77 FR 67021 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land in Clark County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ...: 14X5232] Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land in Clark County, NV AGENCY...) proposes to offer by competitive sealed-bid sale, one parcel of public land totaling approximately 12.5...), Public Law 105-263, as amended. The sale will be subject to the applicable provisions of Section 203...

  13. High-throughput double quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction for determination of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulou, Anastasia K; Koraki, Theodora; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K

    2005-08-01

    Quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), especially the double competitive PCR methods (DC-PCR), have evolved as reliable approaches to quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in food. However, DC-PCR is a low-throughput method because it requires titration of each sample with various amounts of a competitive internal standard, a protocol that involves several PCRs per sample followed by electrophoresis and densitometry. To address this drawback, we have developed a new method for GMO quantification, namely, a high-throughput double quantitative competitive PCR (HT-DCPCR). In HT-DCPCR, electrophoresis and densitometry are replaced by a rapid, microtiter well-based bioluminometric hybridization assay and there is no need for titration of each sample. The determination of GM soya was chosen as a model. We have constructed internal standards (DNA competitors) both for the 35S promoter sequence and for a plant-specific reference gene (lectin). The competitors have identical size and share the same primer binding sites with the target sequences but differ in a 24-bp internal segment. Each target sequence (35S and lectin) is coamplified with a constant amount (1000 copies) of the respective competitor. The four amplified fragments are hybridized with specific probes and captured on a universal solid phase to achieve simplicity and high throughput. The hybrids are determined by using streptavidin conjugated to the photoprotein aequorin. The ratio of the luminescence values obtained for the target and the competitor is linearly related to the starting amount of target DNA. The limit of quantification for the 35S promoter is 24 copies. The proposed method was evaluated by determining the GMO content of soybean powder certified reference materials. Also HT-DCPCR was compared to real-time PCR in a variety of real samples.

  14. Modifying action sounds influences people's emotional responses and bodily sensations

    PubMed Central

    Tonetto, Leandro Miletto; Klanovicz, Cristiano Porto; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to investigate the effect of modifying the sound of high-heeled shoes on women's self-reported valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as any changes to a variety of measures of bodily sensation. We also assessed whether self-evaluated personality traits and the enjoyment associated with wearing heels were correlated with these effects. Forty-eight women walked down a “virtual runway” while listening to four interaction sounds (leather- and polypropylene-soled high-heeled shoes contacting ceramic flooring or carpet). Analysis of the questionnaires that the participants completed indicated that the type of sonic interaction impacted valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as the evaluated bodily sensations. There were also correlations between these scores and both self-evaluated personality traits and the reported enjoyment associated with wearing high heels. These results demonstrate the effect that the sound of a woman's physical interaction with the environment can have, especially when her contact with the ground while walking makes a louder sound. More generally, these results demonstrate that the manipulation of product extrinsic sounds can modify people's evaluation of their emotional outcomes (valence, arousal, and dominance), as well as their bodily sensations. PMID:25469221

  15. Modifying action sounds influences people's emotional responses and bodily sensations.

    PubMed

    Tonetto, Leandro Miletto; Klanovicz, Cristiano Porto; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to investigate the effect of modifying the sound of high-heeled shoes on women's self-reported valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as any changes to a variety of measures of bodily sensation. We also assessed whether self-evaluated personality traits and the enjoyment associated with wearing heels were correlated with these effects. Forty-eight women walked down a "virtual runway" while listening to four interaction sounds (leather- and polypropylene-soled high-heeled shoes contacting ceramic flooring or carpet). Analysis of the questionnaires that the participants completed indicated that the type of sonic interaction impacted valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as the evaluated bodily sensations. There were also correlations between these scores and both self-evaluated personality traits and the reported enjoyment associated with wearing high heels. These results demonstrate the effect that the sound of a woman's physical interaction with the environment can have, especially when her contact with the ground while walking makes a louder sound. More generally, these results demonstrate that the manipulation of product extrinsic sounds can modify people's evaluation of their emotional outcomes (valence, arousal, and dominance), as well as their bodily sensations.

  16. Genetically modified mouse models in studies of luteinising hormone action.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Ahtiainen, Petteri; Pakarainen, Tomi; Rulli, Susana B; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Poutanen, Matti

    2006-06-27

    Numerous genetically modified mouse models have recently been developed for the study of the pituitary-gonadal interactions. They include spontaneous or engineered knockouts (KO) of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its receptor, the gonadotrophin common-alpha(Calpha), luteinising hormone (LH) beta and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta subunits, and the two gonadotrophin receptors (R), LHR and FSHR. In addition, there are also transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing gonadotrophin subunits and producing supraphysiological levels of these hormones. These models have offered relevant phenocopies for similar mutations in humans and to a great extent expanded our knowledge on normal and pathological functions of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The purpose of this article is to review some of our recent findings on two such mouse models, the LHR KO mouse (LuRKO), and the hCG overexpressing TG mouse (hCG+).

  17. Lipocortin 1 fragment modifies pyrogenic actions of cytokines in rats.

    PubMed

    Carey, F; Forder, R; Edge, M D; Greene, A R; Horan, M A; Strijbos, P J; Rothwell, N J

    1990-08-01

    Lipocortins form a group of proteins that have been proposed as mediators of the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids. Intracerebroventricular injection of a recombinant fragment of lipocortin 1 (NH2-terminal 1-188) caused dose-dependent (0.4-1.2 micrograms) reductions in the acute increases in colonic temperature and oxygen consumption, which occurred in response to central injections of recombinant interleukin 1 beta and gamma-interferon in conscious rats. In contrast the lipocortin fragment did not affect the response to prostaglandin E2, and its activity was prevented by heat treatment or by pretreatment of animals with polyclonal antiserum raised to the fragment. Central injection of antiserum significantly enhanced the thermogenic responses to interleukin 1 beta in rats treated with dexamethasone without affecting the responses in normal animals. These results support a physiological role for lipocortin in the central effects of glucocorticoids.

  18. A robust color image watermarking technique using modified Imperialist Competitive Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Mohsen Ebrahimi; Nemati, Nasibeh

    2013-12-10

    In this paper, a novel robust watermarking technique using Imperialistic Competition Algorithm (ICA) in the spatial domain is proposed to protect the intellectual property rights of color images. The proposed method tries to insert the watermark in the blocks which are selected by Modified ICA. In this method, ICA has been customized for watermarking. The color band for watermark insertion is selected based on color dynamic range in each block. Besides, in the procedure of selecting blocks for watermark insertion and extraction, ensuring higher fidelity and robustness and resilience to several possible image attacks have been considered. The experimental results showed that the proposed method performance created watermarked images with better PSNRs and more robustness versus several attacks such as additive noise and blurring in compare to related works.

  19. Mate competition and evolutionary outcomes in genetically modified zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Howard, Richard D; Rohrer, Karl; Liu, Yiyang; Muir, William M

    2015-05-01

    Demonstrating relationships between sexual selection mechanisms and trait evolution is central to testing evolutionary theory. Using zebrafish, we found that wild-type males possessed a significant advantage in mate competition over transgenic RFP Glofish® males. In mating trials, wild-type males were aggressively superior to transgenic males in male-male chases and male-female chases; as a result, wild-type males sired 2.5× as many young as did transgenic males. In contrast, an earlier study demonstrated that female zebrafish preferred transgenic males as mates when mate competition was excluded experimentally. We tested the evolutionary consequence of this conflict between sexual selection mechanisms in a long-term study. The predicted loss of the transgenic phenotype was confirmed. More than 18,500 adults collected from 18 populations across 15 generations revealed that the frequency of the transgenic phenotype declined rapidly and was eliminated entirely in all but one population. Fitness component data for both sexes indicated that only male mating success differed between wild-type and transgenic individuals. Our predictive demographic model based on fitness components closely matched the rate of transgenic phenotype loss observed in the long-term study, thereby supporting its utility for studies assessing evolutionary outcomes of escaped or released genetically modified animals.

  20. Mate competition and evolutionary outcomes in genetically modified zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Howard, Richard D; Rohrer, Karl; Liu, Yiyang; Muir, William M

    2015-05-01

    Demonstrating relationships between sexual selection mechanisms and trait evolution is central to testing evolutionary theory. Using zebrafish, we found that wild-type males possessed a significant advantage in mate competition over transgenic RFP Glofish® males. In mating trials, wild-type males were aggressively superior to transgenic males in male-male chases and male-female chases; as a result, wild-type males sired 2.5× as many young as did transgenic males. In contrast, an earlier study demonstrated that female zebrafish preferred transgenic males as mates when mate competition was excluded experimentally. We tested the evolutionary consequence of this conflict between sexual selection mechanisms in a long-term study. The predicted loss of the transgenic phenotype was confirmed. More than 18,500 adults collected from 18 populations across 15 generations revealed that the frequency of the transgenic phenotype declined rapidly and was eliminated entirely in all but one population. Fitness component data for both sexes indicated that only male mating success differed between wild-type and transgenic individuals. Our predictive demographic model based on fitness components closely matched the rate of transgenic phenotype loss observed in the long-term study, thereby supporting its utility for studies assessing evolutionary outcomes of escaped or released genetically modified animals. PMID:25873489

  1. Competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihan, Charles E.

    1991-03-01

    Competition is defined as a spirited, sometimes ruthless, engagement of rivals such as in a race, a match, or an effort by one person to sell goods or services to customers in the marketplace of another. Sound familiar? If you will bear with me for a few minutes, I would like to examine competitiveness on a more global basis with emphasis on the rules of the game. You may be thinking that more often than not the competitive arena is relatively small and far from global, and its consequences are singularly influential on a trivial document called the P & L. However, with the newly established freedom of a major segment of the world population and with the industrial capability formerly known as Communist moving into what has heretofore been "our" limited arena, the competition could get very brisk. Brisk, and perhaps ruthless, unless we work together to try to establish an international industrial policy that is truly based on equality of competitive opportunity for all.

  2. Green revolution trees: semidwarfism transgenes modify gibberellins, promote root growth, enhance morphological diversity, and reduce competitiveness in hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ani A; Busov, Victor B; Kosola, Kevin R; Ma, Cathleen; Etherington, Elizabeth; Shevchenko, Olga; Gandhi, Harish; Pearce, David W; Rood, Stewart B; Strauss, Steven H

    2012-10-01

    Semidwarfism has been used extensively in row crops and horticulture to promote yield, reduce lodging, and improve harvest index, and it might have similar benefits for trees for short-rotation forestry or energy plantations, reclamation, phytoremediation, or other applications. We studied the effects of the dominant semidwarfism transgenes GA Insensitive (GAI) and Repressor of GAI-Like, which affect gibberellin (GA) action, and the GA catabolic gene, GA 2-oxidase, in nursery beds and in 2-year-old high-density stands of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba). Twenty-nine traits were analyzed, including measures of growth, morphology, and physiology. Endogenous GA levels were modified in most transgenic events; GA(20) and GA(8), in particular, had strong inverse associations with tree height. Nearly all measured traits varied significantly among genotypes, and several traits interacted with planting density, including aboveground biomass, root-shoot ratio, root fraction, branch angle, and crown depth. Semidwarfism promoted biomass allocation to roots over shoots and substantially increased rooting efficiency with most genes tested. The increased root proportion and increased leaf chlorophyll levels were associated with changes in leaf carbon isotope discrimination, indicating altered water use efficiency. Semidwarf trees had dramatically reduced growth when in direct competition with wild-type trees, supporting the hypothesis that semidwarfism genes could be effective tools to mitigate the spread of exotic, hybrid, and transgenic plants in wild and feral populations.

  3. Finders keepers, losers weepers - drought as a modifier of competition between European beech and Norway spruce -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goisser, Michael; Blanck, Christian; Geppert, Uwe; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E. E.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) frequently reflect over-yielding, when compared to respective monospecific stands. Over-yielding is attributed to enhanced resource uptake efficiency through niche complementarity alleviating species competition. Under climate change, however, with severe and frequent summer drought, water limitation may become crucial in modifying the competitive interaction between neighboring beech and spruce trees. In view of the demands by silvicultural practice, basic knowledge from experimental field work about competitive versus facilitative interaction in maturing mixed beech-spruce forests is scarce. To this end, we investigate species-specific drought response including underlying mechanisms of species interaction in a maturing group-wise mixed beech-spruce forest, amongst 60 and 53 adult trees of beech and spruce, respectively (spruce 65 ± 2, beech 85 ± 4 years old). Severe and repeated experimental drought is being induced over several years through a stand-scale approach of rain throughfall exclusion (Kranzberg Forest Roof Experiment, KROOF). The experimental design comprises 6 roofed (E, automated, closing only during rain) and 6 control (C) plots with a total area of almost 1800 square meters. In 2015 minimum predawn potentials of -2.16 MPa and -2.26 MPa were reached in E for beech and spruce respectively. At the leaf level, spruce displayed high drought susceptibility reflected by a distinct decrease in both stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 80% each, suggesting isohydric response. Beech rather displayed anisohydry indicated by less pronounced yet significant reduction of stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 55% and 45%, respectively. Under the C regime, a negative species interaction effect on stomatal conductance was found in beech, contrasting with a positive effect in spruce. However, drought reversed the effect of

  4. How action selection can be embodied: intracranial gamma band recording shows response competition during the Eriksen flankers test

    PubMed Central

    Caruana, Fausto; Uithol, Sebo; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sartori, Ivana; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Avanzini, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings in monkeys suggest that action selection is based on a competition between various action options that are automatically planned by the motor system. Here we discuss data from intracranial EEG recordings in human premotor cortex (PMC) during a bimanual version of the Eriksen flankers test that suggest that the same principles apply to human action decisions. Recording sites in the dorsal PMC show an early but undifferentiated activation, a delayed response that depends on the experimental conditions and, finally, a movement related activation during action execution. Additionally, we found that the medial part of the PMC show a significant increase in response for ipsilateral trials, suggesting a role in inhibiting the wrong response. The ventral PMC seems to be involved in action execution, rather than action selection. Together these findings suggest that the human PMC is part of a network that specifies, selects, and executes actions. PMID:25206328

  5. Alignment effects in beer mugs: Automatic action activation or response competition?

    PubMed

    Roest, Sander A; Pecher, Diane; Naeije, Lilian; Zeelenberg, René

    2016-08-01

    Responses to objects with a graspable handle are faster when the response hand and handle orientation are aligned (e.g., a key press with the right hand is required and the object handle is oriented to the right) than when they are not aligned. This effect could be explained by automatic activation of specific motor programs when an object is viewed. Alternatively, the effect could be explained by competition at the response level. Participants performed a reach-and-grasp or reach-and-button-press action with their left or right hand in response to the color of a beer mug. The alignment effect did not vary as a function of the type of action. In addition, the alignment effect disappeared in a go/no-go version of the task. The same results were obtained when participants made upright/inverted decisions, so that object shape was task-relevant. Our results indicate that alignment effects are not due to automatic motor activation of the left or right limb.

  6. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2.

    PubMed

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E; Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M; Ogilvie, Donald J; Ward, Simon E; Atack, John R; Pearl, Laurence H; Caldecott, Keith W; Oliver, Antony W

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a 'humanized' form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2.

  7. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M.; Ogilvie, Donald J.; Ward, Simon E.; Atack, John R.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5′-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a ‘humanized’ form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  8. Alignment effects in beer mugs: Automatic action activation or response competition?

    PubMed

    Roest, Sander A; Pecher, Diane; Naeije, Lilian; Zeelenberg, René

    2016-08-01

    Responses to objects with a graspable handle are faster when the response hand and handle orientation are aligned (e.g., a key press with the right hand is required and the object handle is oriented to the right) than when they are not aligned. This effect could be explained by automatic activation of specific motor programs when an object is viewed. Alternatively, the effect could be explained by competition at the response level. Participants performed a reach-and-grasp or reach-and-button-press action with their left or right hand in response to the color of a beer mug. The alignment effect did not vary as a function of the type of action. In addition, the alignment effect disappeared in a go/no-go version of the task. The same results were obtained when participants made upright/inverted decisions, so that object shape was task-relevant. Our results indicate that alignment effects are not due to automatic motor activation of the left or right limb. PMID:27184058

  9. Biomechanical Analysis of Defensive Cutting Actions During Game Situations: Six Cases in Collegiate Soccer Competitions

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Shogo; Koga, Hideyuki; Krosshaug, Tron; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The strengths of interpersonal dyads formed by the attacker and defender in one-on-one situations are crucial for performance in team ball sports such as soccer. The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinematics of one-on-one defensive movements in soccer competitions, and determine the relationships between lower limb kinematics and the center of mass translation during cutting actions. Six defensive scenes in which a player was responding to an offender’s dribble attack were selected for analysis. To reconstruct the three-dimensional kinematics of the players, we used a photogrammetric model-based image-matching technique. The hip and knee kinematics were calculated from the matched skeleton model. In addition, the center of mass height was expressed as a ratio of each participant’s body height. The relationships between the center of mass height and the kinematics were determined by the Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient. The normalized center of mass height at initial contact was correlated with the vertical center of mass displacement (r = 0.832, p = 0.040) and hip flexion angle at initial contact (r = −0.823, p = 0.044). This suggests that the lower center of mass at initial contact is an important factor to reduce the downwards vertical center of mass translation during defensive cutting actions, and that this is executed primarily through hip flexion. It is therefore recommended that players land with an adequately flexed hip at initial contact during one-on-one cutting actions to minimize the vertical center of mass excursion. PMID:26240644

  10. Biomechanical Analysis of Defensive Cutting Actions During Game Situations: Six Cases in Collegiate Soccer Competitions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shogo; Koga, Hideyuki; Krosshaug, Tron; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2015-06-27

    The strengths of interpersonal dyads formed by the attacker and defender in one-on-one situations are crucial for performance in team ball sports such as soccer. The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinematics of one-on-one defensive movements in soccer competitions, and determine the relationships between lower limb kinematics and the center of mass translation during cutting actions. Six defensive scenes in which a player was responding to an offender's dribble attack were selected for analysis. To reconstruct the three-dimensional kinematics of the players, we used a photogrammetric model-based image-matching technique. The hip and knee kinematics were calculated from the matched skeleton model. In addition, the center of mass height was expressed as a ratio of each participant's body height. The relationships between the center of mass height and the kinematics were determined by the Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient. The normalized center of mass height at initial contact was correlated with the vertical center of mass displacement (r = 0.832, p = 0.040) and hip flexion angle at initial contact (r = -0.823, p = 0.044). This suggests that the lower center of mass at initial contact is an important factor to reduce the downwards vertical center of mass translation during defensive cutting actions, and that this is executed primarily through hip flexion. It is therefore recommended that players land with an adequately flexed hip at initial contact during one-on-one cutting actions to minimize the vertical center of mass excursion. PMID:26240644

  11. Promoting Healthy Competition Using Modified Rules and Sports from Other Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinou, Phoebe

    2014-01-01

    A great controversy around the concept of competition exists, not only among researchers but also among teachers, parents, and even the participants themselves. An overemphasis on competitive sports and unhealthy competition has overshadowed the positive benefits of sport participation, including character and moral development and…

  12. 76 FR 37373 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Colusa, Glenn, and Lake Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Colusa, Glenn, and... land totaling 1,003.40 acres in Colusa, Glenn, and Lake Counties, California. The sale will be... sale must be received by the BLM on or before August 11, 2011. Sealed bids must be received no...

  13. 76 FR 68783 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct (Non-Competitive) Sale of Reversionary Interest in Benton County, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct (Non-Competitive) Sale of Reversionary Interest... INFORMATION below has been determined suitable for direct sale and release to the City of West Richland... parcel can be used is restricted by the reversionary clause. DATES: Comments regarding the proposed...

  14. 76 FR 16810 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot Springs County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Hot...: A 10-acre parcel of public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming is being considered for non... following described public land in Hot Springs County, Wyoming has been examined and found suitable for...

  15. 76 FR 56793 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive, Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Lands in Clark County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA) and applicable BLM land sale and mineral conveyance... listed. The patent, when issued for sale parcel N-85660, will contain a mineral reservation to the United...; TAS: 14X5232] Notice of Realty Action: Competitive, Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Lands in Clark...

  16. Patterns and Drivers of Tree Mortality in Iberian Forests: Climatic Effects Are Modified by Competition

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Benito, Paloma; Lines, Emily R.; Gómez-Aparicio, Lorena; Zavala, Miguel A.; Coomes, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Tree mortality is a key process underlying forest dynamics and community assembly. Understanding how tree mortality is driven by simultaneous drivers is needed to evaluate potential effects of climate change on forest composition. Using repeat-measure information from c. 400,000 trees from the Spanish Forest Inventory, we quantified the relative importance of tree size, competition, climate and edaphic conditions on tree mortality of 11 species, and explored the combined effect of climate and competition. Tree mortality was affected by all of these multiple drivers, especially tree size and asymmetric competition, and strong interactions between climate and competition were found. All species showed L-shaped mortality patterns (i.e. showed decreasing mortality with tree size), but pines were more sensitive to asymmetric competition than broadleaved species. Among climatic variables, the negative effect of temperature on tree mortality was much larger than the effect of precipitation. Moreover, the effect of climate (mean annual temperature and annual precipitation) on tree mortality was aggravated at high competition levels for all species, but especially for broadleaved species. The significant interaction between climate and competition on tree mortality indicated that global change in Mediterranean regions, causing hotter and drier conditions and denser stands, could lead to profound effects on forest structure and composition. Therefore, to evaluate the potential effects of climatic change on tree mortality, forest structure must be considered, since two systems of similar composition but different structure could radically differ in their response to climatic conditions. PMID:23451096

  17. Grazing-induced effects on soil properties modify plant competitive interactions in semi-natural mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Medina-Roldán, Eduardo; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Bardgett, Richard D

    2012-09-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks are widely recognized as playing a significant role in structuring plant communities through their effects on plant-plant interactions. However, the question of whether plant-soil feedbacks can be indirectly driven by other ecological agents, such as large herbivores, which are known to strongly modify plant community structure and soil properties, remains poorly explored. We tested in a glasshouse experiment how changes in soil properties resulting from long-term sheep grazing affect competitive interactions (intra- and inter-specific) of two graminoid species: Nardus stricta, which is typically abundant under high sheep grazing pressure in British mountain grasslands; and Eriophorum vaginatum, whose abundance is typically diminished under grazing. Both species were grown in monocultures and mixtures at different densities in soils taken from adjacent grazed and ungrazed mountain grassland in the Yorkshire Dales, northern England. Nardus stricta performed better (shoot and root biomass) when grown in grazing-conditioned soil, independent of whether or not it grew under inter-specific competition. Eriophorum vaginatum also grew better when planted in soil from the grazed site, but this occurred only when it did not experience inter-specific competition with N. stricta. This indicates that plant-soil feedback for E. vaginatum is dependent on the presence of an inter-specific competitor. A yield density model showed that indirect effects of grazing increased the intensity of intra-specific competition in both species in comparison with ungrazed-conditioned soil. However, indirect effects of grazing on the intensity of inter-specific competition were species-specific favouring N. stricta. We explain these asymmetric grazing-induced effects on competition on the basis of traits of the superior competitor and grazing effects on soil nutrients. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our findings for plant community dynamics in grazed, semi

  18. Analyzing after-action reports from Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina: repeated, modified, and newly created recommendations.

    PubMed

    Knox, Claire Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen years after Hurricane Andrew struck Homestead, FL, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, Alabama, and southeastern Louisiana. Along with all its destruction, the term "catastrophic" was redefined. This article extends the literature on these hurricanes by providing a macrolevel analysis of The Governor's Disaster Planning and Response Review Committee Final Report from Hurricane Andrew and three federal after-action reports from Hurricane Katrina, as well as a cursory review of relevant literature. Results provide evidence that previous lessons have not been learned or institutionalized with many recommendations being repeated or modified. This article concludes with a discussion of these lessons, as well as new issues arising during Hurricane Katrina.

  19. Wave action modifies the effects of consumer diversity and warming on algal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Mrowicki, Robert J; O'Connor, Nessa E

    2015-04-01

    To understand the consequences of biodiversity loss, it is necessary to test how biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships may vary with predicted environmental change. In particular, our understanding will be advanced by studies addressing the interactive effects of multiple stressors on the role of biodiversity across trophic levels. Predicted increases in wave disturbance and ocean warming, together with climate-driven range shifts of key consumer species, are likely to have profound impacts on the dynamics of coastal marine communities. We tested whether wave action and temperature modified the effects of gastropod grazer diversity (Patella vulgata, Littorina littorea, and Gibbula umbilicalis) on algal assemblages in experimental rock pools. The presence or absence of L. littorea appeared to drive changes in microalgal and macroalgal biomass and macroalgal assemblage structure. Macroalgal biomass also decreased with increasing grazer species richness, but only when wave action was enhanced. Further, independently of grazer diversity, wave action and temperature had interactive effects on macroalgal assemblage structure. Warming also led to a reversal of grazer-macroalgal interaction strengths from negative to positive, but only when there was no wave action. Our results show that hydrodynamic disturbance can exacerbate the effects of changing consumer diversity, and may also disrupt the influence of other environmental stressors on key consumer-resource interactions. These findings suggest that the combined effects of anticipated abiotic and biotic change on the functioning of coastal marine ecosystems, although difficult to predict, may be substantial. PMID:26230022

  20. Tetracycline modifies competitive interactions in experimental microcosms containing bacteria isolated from freshwater.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alex R; Corno, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    Interspecific microbial interactions are important for community structure, function and evolution, but it is not fully understood how interactions among bacterial species are influenced by some types of abiotic environmental variation, such as exposure to antibiotics. We tested for the effect of an antibiotic, tetracycline, on interspecific interactions in vitro among four species of aquatic bacteria isolated from European water bodies. Interactions among species in experimental microcosms containing artificial lake water (ALW) supplemented with glucose were largely competitive, as detected by comparing mixed cultures to pure cultures of their constituent species. Sublethal concentrations of tetracycline changed the relative competitive abilities of different species and revealed considerable variation in antibiotic sensitivity, but did not reduce the average strength of competition. Interspecific interactions at a given concentration were largely predictable from growth in pure cultures and indirect interactions with other species. These results suggest that antibiotics such as tetracycline may have important consequences for interactions among bacterial species, but in our experiments this was because species varied in their capacities for growth in the presence of tetracycline, rather than reduced competition at increasing tetracycline concentrations. PMID:25056916

  1. Does ligand-receptor mediated competitive effect or penetrating effect of iRGD peptide when co-administration with iRGD-modified SSL?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Ke-Fu; Zhong, Ting; Luo, Li-Min; Du, Ruo; Ren, Wei; Huang, Dan; Song, Ping; Li, Dan; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-mediated targeting of anticancer therapeutic agents is a useful strategy for improving anti-tumor efficacy. It has been reported that co-administration of a tumor-penetrating peptide iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC) enhances the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here, we designed an experiment involving co-administration of iRGD-SSL-DOX with free iRGD to B16-F10 tumor bearing mice to examine the action of free iRGD. We also designed an experiment to investigate the location of iRGD-modified SSL when co-administered with free iRGD or free RGD to B16-F10 tumor bearing nude mice. Considering the sequence of iRGD, we selected the GPDC, RGD and CRGDK as targeting ligands to investigate the targeting effect of these peptides compared with iRGD on B16-F10 and MCF-7 cells, with or without enzymatic degradation. Finally, we selected free RGD, free CRGDK and free iRGD as ligand to investigate the inhibitory effect on RGD-, CRGDK- or iRGD-modified SSL on B16-F10 or MCF-7 cells. Our results indicated that iRGD targeting to tumor cells was ligand-receptor mediated involving RGD to αv-integrin receptor and CRGDK to NRP-1 receptor. Being competitive effect, the administration of free iRGD would not be able to further enhance the anti-tumor activity of iRGD-modified SSL. There is no need to co-administrate of free iRGD with the iRGD-modified nanoparticles for further therapeutic benefit.

  2. Development of a screening method for genetically modified soybean by plasmid-based quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Eri; Kato, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Watanabe, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2008-07-23

    A novel type of quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR) system for the detection and quantification of the Roundup Ready soybean (RRS) was developed. This system was designed based on the advantage of a fully validated real-time PCR method used for the quantification of RRS in Japan. A plasmid was constructed as a competitor plasmid for the detection and quantification of genetically modified soy, RRS. The plasmid contained the construct-specific sequence of RRS and the taxon-specific sequence of lectin1 (Le1), and both had 21 bp oligonucleotide insertion in the sequences. The plasmid DNA was used as a reference molecule instead of ground seeds, which enabled us to precisely and stably adjust the copy number of targets. The present study demonstrated that the novel plasmid-based QC-PCR method could be a simple and feasible alternative to the real-time PCR method used for the quantification of genetically modified organism contents.

  3. Modified 3-alkyl-1,8-dibenzylxanthines as GTP-competitive inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Foley, Louise H; Wang, Ping; Dunten, Pete; Ramsey, Gwendolyn; Gubler, Mary-Lou; Wertheimer, Stanley J

    2003-10-20

    The first non-substrate like inhibitors of human cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) competitive with GTP are reported. An effort to discover orally active compounds that improve glucose homeostasis in Type 2 diabetics by reversibly inhibiting PEPCK led to the discovery of 1-allyl-3-butyl-8-methylxanthine (5). We now report modifications at N-1 and C-8 that improved the in vitro activity of the initial xanthine HTS hit by 100-fold and a developing SAR for this class of inhibitor.

  4. Flexible defense strategies: competition modifies investment in behavioral vs. morphological defenses.

    PubMed

    Teplitsky, Céline; Laurila, Anssi

    2007-07-01

    Competition is predicted to affect the expression of inducible defenses, but because costs of behavioral and morphological antipredator defenses differ along resource gradients, its effects on defenses may depend on the traits considered. We tested the predictions from different defense models in tadpoles of the common frog Rana temporaria, which exhibit both types of defenses. In an outdoor experiment, we exposed the tadpoles to nonlethal predators (Aeshna dragonfly larvae) and to a gradient of intraspecific competition. Morphological responses did not follow any of the expected patterns, since investment in defense was not affected by resource level. Instead, tail depth decreased in the absence of predators. Behavioral defenses followed a state-dependent model. Overall, the defense strategy of the tadpoles revealed a shift from morphological and behavioral defenses at low tadpole density to morphological defense only at high density. This difference probably reflects the different efficiency of the defenses. Hiding is an effective means of defense, but it is unsustainable when resources are scarce. Morphological responses become more important with increasing density to compensate for the increase in behavioral risk-taking. Our results indicate that competition can strongly affect reaction norms of inducible defenses and highlight the importance of integrating ecological parameters that affect the cost-benefit balance of phenotypic plasticity.

  5. Competitive adsorption of Pb2+ and Cd2+ on magnetic modified sugarcane bagasse prepared by two simple steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jun-Xia; Wang, Li-Yan; Chi, Ru-An; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Xu, Zhi-Gao; Guo, Jia

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic modified sugarcane bagasse with high adsorption capacity and rapid adsorption rate was prepared by two simple steps. Experimental results showed that the adsorption capacities of the magnetic sorbent for Pb2+ and Cd2+ were 1.2 and 1.1 mmol g-1, respectively. Pseudo-second-order and pseudo-first-order kinetic model both could predict the adsorption and desorption kinetic process occurred on the modified sorbent. EDX analysis showed that Pb2+ and Cd2+ were adsorbed on the sorbent mainly through ion exchange. Competitive adsorption results showed that the presence of Pb2+ exerted a great inhibitory effect on Cd2+ adsorption, and the inhibitory effect increased with the increase of the initial concentration ratio of Pb2+ and Cd2+ (C0Pb: C0Cd). Pb2+ could be selectively adsorbed by the magnetic sorbent when the values of C0Pb: C0Cd was higher than or equal to 4:1. It was also found that Langmuir competitive model was suitable to predict the sorption isotherm in the binary system. The as prepared magnetic sorbent had a potential in heavy metal wastewater treatment.

  6. Construction and Environmental Release of a Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain Genetically Modified To Be More Competitive for Alfalfa Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    van Dillewijn, Pieter; Soto, María José; Villadas, Pablo J.; Toro, Nicolás

    2001-01-01

    Highly efficient nitrogen-fixing strains selected in the laboratory often fail to increase legume production in agricultural soils containing indigenous rhizobial populations because they cannot compete against these populations for nodule formation. We have previously demonstrated, with a Sinorhizobium meliloti PutA− mutant strain, that proline dehydrogenase activity is required for colonization and therefore for the nodulation efficiency and competitiveness of S. meliloti on alfalfa roots (J. I. Jiménez-Zurdo, P. van Dillewijn, M. J. Soto, M. R. de Felipe, J. Olivares, and N. Toro, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 8:492–498, 1995). In this work, we investigated whether the putA gene could be used as a means of increasing the competitiveness of S. meliloti strains. We produced a construct in which a constitutive promoter was placed 190 nucleotides upstream from the start codon of the putA gene. This resulted in an increase in the basal expression of this gene, with this increase being even greater in the presence of the substrate proline. We found that the presence of multicopy plasmids containing this putA gene construct increased the competitiveness of S. meliloti in microcosm experiments in nonsterile soil planted with alfalfa plants subjected to drought stress only during the first month. We investigated whether this construct also increased the competitiveness of S. meliloti strains under agricultural conditions by using it as the inoculum in a contained field experiment at León, Spain. We found that the frequency of nodule occupancy was higher with inoculum containing the modified putA gene for samples that were analyzed after 34 days but not for samples that were analyzed later. PMID:11525978

  7. 75 FR 35832 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Tehama County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... land sale and mineral conveyance regulations. The sales will be conducted as a competitive bid auction.... The lands identified for sale are considered to have no known mineral value except for oil and gas... proposed land sales, including the appraisal, planning and environmental documents, and a mineral...

  8. Analyzing after-action reports from Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina: repeated, modified, and newly created recommendations.

    PubMed

    Knox, Claire Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen years after Hurricane Andrew struck Homestead, FL, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, Alabama, and southeastern Louisiana. Along with all its destruction, the term "catastrophic" was redefined. This article extends the literature on these hurricanes by providing a macrolevel analysis of The Governor's Disaster Planning and Response Review Committee Final Report from Hurricane Andrew and three federal after-action reports from Hurricane Katrina, as well as a cursory review of relevant literature. Results provide evidence that previous lessons have not been learned or institutionalized with many recommendations being repeated or modified. This article concludes with a discussion of these lessons, as well as new issues arising during Hurricane Katrina. PMID:24180096

  9. Rapid and reversible responses to IVIG in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases suggest mechanisms of action involving competition with functionally important autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Melvin; McCallus, Daniel E; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases whose pathogenesis is undefined. Many different effects of IVIG have been demonstrated in vitro, but few studies actually identify the mechanism(s) most important in vivo. Doses and treatment intervals are generally chosen empirically. Recent studies in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy show that some effects of IVIG are readily reversible and highly dependent on the serum IgG level. This suggests that in some autoantibody-mediated neuromuscular diseases, IVIG directly competes with autoantibodies that reversibly interfere with nerve conduction. Mechanisms of action of IVIG which most likely involve direct competition with autoantibodies include: neutralization of autoantibodies by anti-idiotypes, inhibition of complement deposition, and increasing catabolism of pathologic antibodies by saturating FcRn. Indirect immunomodulatory effects are not as likely to involve competition and may not have the same reversibility and dose-dependency. Pharmacodynamic analyses should be informative regarding most relevant mechanism(s) of action of IVIG as well as the role of autoantibodies in the immunopathogenesis of each disease. Better understanding of the role of autoantibodies and of the target(s) of IVIG could lead to more efficient use of this therapy and better patient outcomes. PMID:24200120

  10. Photodynamic action of curcumin derived polymer modified ZnO nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, R.; Senthilkumar, S.; Suganthi, A.; Rajarajan, M.

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► ZnO/PVA nano sensitized with curcumin and its metal complex were synthesized by vacuum evaporation method. ► M/cur sensitized on ZnO/PVA nanocomposites were characterized. ► Generation of {sup 1}O{sub 2} and ROS were detected by optical and EPR-spin trapping method. ► It was found that photoinduced cleavage of DNA using Zn/cur–ZnO/PVA was superior. ► Photodegradation of MB in water catalyzed by ZnO/PVA–Zn/cur was also superior under visible light. -- Abstract: The photodynamic action of ZnO nano can be improved by modifying the surface by PVA and encapsulating the natural product, curcumin. The synthesized ZnO/PVA nanocomposites have been characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, TG–DTA, etc. Here we are reporting the photodynamic effect of ZnO nanocomposites on pUC18 DNA. Based on optical and EPR measurements, singlet oxygen and other ROS were responsible for photocleavage of DNA. Most importantly, derived curcumin modified ZnO/PVA nanocomposites were comparatively more effective than derived curcumin complex against HeLa cell lines under in vitro condition. In addition, photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in water catalyzed by nano ZnO/PVA–curcumin derivative was investigated at room temperature. Under visible irradiation photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanomaterial sensitized curcumin was higher than those of curcumin and nano ZnO.

  11. Neurochemical mechanism of action of drugs which modify feeding via the serotoninergic system.

    PubMed

    Garattini, S; Mennini, T; Bendotti, C; Invernizzi, R; Samanin, R

    1986-01-01

    The neurochemical mechanisms by which drugs acting on central serotoninergic system modify feeding were reviewed. Fenfluramine, a clinically effective appetite suppressant, releases serotonin from nerve terminals and inhibits its reuptake, and considerable evidence suggests that these effects mediate its anorectic activity. The D isomer of fenfluramine is particularly specific in affecting serotonin mechanisms and causing anorexia. Transmitters other than serotonin such as acetylcholine, catecholamines and GABA are also affected by systemic administration of fenfluramine, but some of these effects are secondary to fenfluramine's action on serotoninergic mechanisms. Moreover, there is no evidence that these brain substances are involved in fenfluramine's ability to cause anorexia. Several studies with drugs affecting different serotonin mechanisms such as release and uptake or mimicking the action of serotonin at post-synaptic receptors suggest that increase serotonin release and direct stimulation of postsynaptic receptors are the most effective mechanisms for causing depression of food intake, although inhibition of serotonin uptake may also contribute in appropriate conditions. Development of serotonin receptor hyposensitivity and, in some instances, decreased serotonin levels may lead to tolerance to the anorectic activity of drugs enhancing serotonin transmission, the degree of this depending critically on the type of effect on serotonin mechanisms and intensity and duration of serotonin receptor activation. Recent evidence suggests that a decrease in serotonin function causes stimulation of feeding. This may lead to development of new strategies for the treatment of clinical anorexias.

  12. The role of Fe(III) modified montmorillonite on fluoride mobility: adsorption experiments and competition with phosphate.

    PubMed

    Bia, Gonzalo; De Pauli, Carlos P; Borgnino, Laura

    2012-06-15

    Fluoride adsorption onto Fe(III) modified montmorillonite was investigated using batch experiments. The effect of reaction time, pH, ionic strength and phosphate, as a competitive anion, was evaluated. Kinetics indicated that adsorption obeys a pseudo-first-order rate law which involves two steps. The fast one (bulk transport/surface reaction) occurs instantaneously. The slower (diffusion in pores) takes hours to complete. The adsorption rate increases by increasing the fluoride concentration and by decreasing pH. The presence of phosphate reduces fluoride adsorption and reveals that both ions are in competition for surface sites. The reduction in fluoride adsorption when phosphate is present depends on the order of adsorbate addition. The higher fluoride adsorption occurs when both anions are added simultaneously, whereas when either fluoride or phosphate is added first, the fluoride adsorption is lower. The presence of fluoride does not have a measurable effect on phosphate adsorption. The results obtained contribute to our understanding of the mobility of fluoride in surface water which has naturally high levels of fluoride, in both the presence and absence of phosphate.

  13. Report on an Action Caucus on Oral Interpretation in Forensic Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Hal; And Others

    The materials in this paper were drawn from an action caucus called to seek common criteria for the presentation and judging of oral interpretation and forensic tournaments. The first section of the paper consists of presentations made by participants. Topics covered in these presentations are (1) consistency in judging, (2) the role of oral…

  14. Toward a workable biosafety system for regulating genetically modified organisms in Ethiopia: balancing conservation and competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Adane

    2013-01-01

    On September 9, 2009, Ethiopia enacted a highly restrictive biosafety law firmly based on precautionary principles as a foundation for its GMO regulation system. Its drafting process, led by the country's Environmental Protection Authority, was judged as biased, focusing only on protecting the environment from perceived risks, giving little attention to potential benefits of GMOs. Many of its provisions are very stringent, exceeding those of Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, while others cannot be fulfilled by applicants, collectively rendering the emerged biosafety system unworkable. These provisions include requirements for advance informed agreement and rigorous socioeconomic assessment in risk evaluation for all GMO transactions, including contained research use-which requires the head of the competent national authority of the exporting country to take full responsibility for GMO-related information provided-and stringent labeling, insurance and monitoring requirements for all GMO activities. Furthermore, there is no provision to establish an independent national biosafety decision-making body(ies). As a result, foreign technology owners that provide highly demanded technologies like Bt cotton declined to work with Ethiopia. There is a fear that the emerged biosafety system might also continue to suppress domestic genetic engineering research and development. Thus, to benefit from GMOs, Ethiopia has to revise its biosafety system, primarily by making changes to some provisions of the law in a way that balances its diverse interests of conserving biodiversity, protecting the environment and enhancing competition in agricultural and other economic sectors. PMID:23580251

  15. An in vitro investigation of bacteria-osteoblast competition on oxygen plasma-modified PEEK.

    PubMed

    Rochford, Edward T J; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Moriarty, T Fintan; Poulsson, Alexandra H C; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Richards, R Geoff

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) films were oxygen plasma treated to increase surface free energy and characterized by X-ray photoelectron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and water contact angles. A parallel plate flow chamber was used to measure Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and U-2 OS osteosarcomal cell-line adhesion to the PEEK films in separate monocultures. In addition, bacteria and U-2 OS cells were cocultured to model competition between osteoblasts and contaminating bacteria for the test surfaces. Plasma treatment of the surfaces increased surface oxygen content and decreased the hydrophobicity of the materials, but did not lead to a significant difference in bacterial or U-2 OS cell adhesion in the monocultures. In the S. epidermidis coculture experiments, the U-2 OS cells adhered in greater numbers on the treated surfaces compared to the untreated PEEK and spread to a similar extent. However, in the presence of S. aureus, cell death of the U-2 OS occurred within 10 h on all surfaces. The results of this study suggest that oxygen plasma treatment of PEEK may maintain the ability of osteoblast-like cells to adhere and spread, even in the presence of S. epidermidis contamination, without increasing the risk of preoperative bacterial adhesion. Therefore, oxygen plasma-treated PEEK remains a promising method to improve implant surface free energy for osseointegration.

  16. Toward a workable biosafety system for regulating genetically modified organisms in Ethiopia: balancing conservation and competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Adane

    2013-01-01

    On September 9, 2009, Ethiopia enacted a highly restrictive biosafety law firmly based on precautionary principles as a foundation for its GMO regulation system. Its drafting process, led by the country's Environmental Protection Authority, was judged as biased, focusing only on protecting the environment from perceived risks, giving little attention to potential benefits of GMOs. Many of its provisions are very stringent, exceeding those of Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, while others cannot be fulfilled by applicants, collectively rendering the emerged biosafety system unworkable. These provisions include requirements for advance informed agreement and rigorous socioeconomic assessment in risk evaluation for all GMO transactions, including contained research use-which requires the head of the competent national authority of the exporting country to take full responsibility for GMO-related information provided-and stringent labeling, insurance and monitoring requirements for all GMO activities. Furthermore, there is no provision to establish an independent national biosafety decision-making body(ies). As a result, foreign technology owners that provide highly demanded technologies like Bt cotton declined to work with Ethiopia. There is a fear that the emerged biosafety system might also continue to suppress domestic genetic engineering research and development. Thus, to benefit from GMOs, Ethiopia has to revise its biosafety system, primarily by making changes to some provisions of the law in a way that balances its diverse interests of conserving biodiversity, protecting the environment and enhancing competition in agricultural and other economic sectors.

  17. Green Revolution Trees: Semidwarfism Transgenes Modify Gibberellins, Promote Root Growth, Enhance Morphological Diversity, and Reduce Competitiveness in Hybrid Poplar1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Ani A.; Busov, Victor B.; Kosola, Kevin R.; Ma, Cathleen; Etherington, Elizabeth; Shevchenko, Olga; Gandhi, Harish; Pearce, David W.; Rood, Stewart B.; Strauss, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Semidwarfism has been used extensively in row crops and horticulture to promote yield, reduce lodging, and improve harvest index, and it might have similar benefits for trees for short-rotation forestry or energy plantations, reclamation, phytoremediation, or other applications. We studied the effects of the dominant semidwarfism transgenes GA Insensitive (GAI) and Repressor of GAI-Like, which affect gibberellin (GA) action, and the GA catabolic gene, GA 2-oxidase, in nursery beds and in 2-year-old high-density stands of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba). Twenty-nine traits were analyzed, including measures of growth, morphology, and physiology. Endogenous GA levels were modified in most transgenic events; GA20 and GA8, in particular, had strong inverse associations with tree height. Nearly all measured traits varied significantly among genotypes, and several traits interacted with planting density, including aboveground biomass, root-shoot ratio, root fraction, branch angle, and crown depth. Semidwarfism promoted biomass allocation to roots over shoots and substantially increased rooting efficiency with most genes tested. The increased root proportion and increased leaf chlorophyll levels were associated with changes in leaf carbon isotope discrimination, indicating altered water use efficiency. Semidwarf trees had dramatically reduced growth when in direct competition with wild-type trees, supporting the hypothesis that semidwarfism genes could be effective tools to mitigate the spread of exotic, hybrid, and transgenic plants in wild and feral populations. PMID:22904164

  18. Development of a screening method for genetically modified soybean by plasmid-based quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Eri; Kato, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Watanabe, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2008-07-23

    A novel type of quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR) system for the detection and quantification of the Roundup Ready soybean (RRS) was developed. This system was designed based on the advantage of a fully validated real-time PCR method used for the quantification of RRS in Japan. A plasmid was constructed as a competitor plasmid for the detection and quantification of genetically modified soy, RRS. The plasmid contained the construct-specific sequence of RRS and the taxon-specific sequence of lectin1 (Le1), and both had 21 bp oligonucleotide insertion in the sequences. The plasmid DNA was used as a reference molecule instead of ground seeds, which enabled us to precisely and stably adjust the copy number of targets. The present study demonstrated that the novel plasmid-based QC-PCR method could be a simple and feasible alternative to the real-time PCR method used for the quantification of genetically modified organism contents. PMID:18558691

  19. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states.

  20. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C.; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.; Damschroder, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  1. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  2. The efficacy of a modified Theory of Reasoned Action to explain gambling behavior in college students.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Robert G; Andrew, Damon P S; Mahony, Daniel F

    2011-09-01

    Recently, Thrasher et al. (College Student Affairs Journal 27(1): 57-75, 2007) explored the efficacy of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA; Ajzen and Fishbein, Attitudes, personality, and behavior, 1980) in explaining gambling behavior of college students. However, their study found the TRA only predicted small amounts of variance in gambling intentions. Heeding their call to enhance the efficacy of the TRA through the addition of explanatory variables to the model, the present study incorporated gambling motivations and locus of control as moderating variables within the TRA to test the potential of a modified TRA in explaining gambling behavior of college students. A total of 345 students at a major metropolitan research university in the Midwest volunteered to participate in the study. A series of hierarchical linear regressions indicated intrinsic motivation to accomplish (p = .002) significantly moderated the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions. Further, internal locus of control (p < .001), chance locus of control (p < .001), and powerful others locus of control (p < .001) also significantly moderated the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions. The significant impact of the moderating variables on the relationship between gambling attitudes and intentions suggests intrinsic motivation and locus of control can alter the impact of the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions.

  3. Your mistake is my mistake . . . or is it? Behavioural adjustments following own and observed actions in cooperative and competitive contexts.

    PubMed

    De Bruijn, Ellen R A; Mars, Rogier B; Bekkering, Harold; Coles, Michael G H

    2012-01-01

    A social speeded choice-reaction-time task was used to study adaptive behaviours following own and observed actions (errors and correct responses) in cooperative and competitive contexts. After making an erroneous response, the appropriate remedial action to avoid future errors in speeded reaction tasks is to slow down. Consistent with previous results, people indeed slow down following their own errors. Importantly, people who slow down most following own errors also slow down following observed errors in a cooperative situation. In a competitive context, a different pattern was found. People accelerated after errors from their opponent. The current findings demonstrate that the social context determines the way people respond to the errors of others, indicating that the neural systems that control remedial actions are highly flexible. These systems may underlie social adaptive behaviour, enabling people to respond flexibly to other people's actions in a wide variety of social contexts.

  4. An investigation of the electrochemical action of the epoxy zinc-rich coatings containing surface modified aluminum nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, M.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-02-01

    Aluminum nanoparticle was modified with amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP). The surface characterization of the nanoparticles was done by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal gravimetric analysis. The influence of the replacement of 2 wt% of zinc dust in the standard zinc-rich epoxy coating by nanoparticles on the electrochemical action of the coating was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray tests. The morphology and phase composition of the zinc rich paints were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and filed-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Results showed that the ATMP molecules successfully adsorbed on the surface of Al nanoparticles. Results obtained from salt spray and electrochemical measurements revealed that the addition of surface modified nanoparticles to the zinc rich coating enhanced its galvanic action and corrosion protection properties.

  5. Dosage-Dependent Modifiers of Position Effect Variegation in Drosophila and a Mass Action Model That Explains Their Effect

    PubMed Central

    Locke, J.; Kotarski, M. A.; Tartof, K. D.

    1988-01-01

    Twelve dominant enhancers of position effect variegation, representing four loci on the second and third chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster, have been induced by P-element mutagenesis. Instead of simple transposon insertions, seven of these mutations are cytologically visible duplications and three are deficiencies. The duplications define two distinct regions, each coinciding with a locus that also behaves as a dominant haplo-dependent suppressor of variegation. Conversely, two of the deficiencies overlap with a region that contains a haplo-dependent enhancer of variegation while duplications of this same region act to suppress variegation. The third deficiency defines another haplo-dependent enhancer. These data indicate that loci capable of modifying variegation do so in an antipodal fashion through changes in the wild-type gene copy number and may be divided into two reciprocally acting classes. Class I modifiers enhance variegation when duplicated or suppress variegation when deficient. Class II modifiers enhance when deficient but suppress when duplicated. From our data, and those of others, we propose that in Drosophila there are about 20 to 30 dominant loci that modify variegation. Most appear to be of the class I type whereas only two class II modifiers have been identified so far. From these observations we put forth a model, based on the law of mass action, for understanding how such suppressor-enhancer loci function. We propose that each class I modifier codes for a structural protein component of heterochromatin and their effects on variegation are a consequence of their dosage dependent influence on the extent of the assembly of heterochromatin at the chromosomal site of the position effect. It is further proposed that class II modifiers may inhibit the class I products directly, bind to hypothetical termination sites that define heterochromatin boundaries or promote euchromatin formation. Consistent with our mass action model we find that

  6. An Ontological Model of Behaviour Theory to Generate Personalized Action Plans to Modify Behaviours.

    PubMed

    Baig, Wasif; Abidi, Samina; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2016-01-01

    Behavior change approaches aim to assist patients in achieving self-efficacy in managing their condition. Social cognitive theory (SCT) stipulates self-efficacy as a central element to behavior change and provides constructs to achieve self-efficacy guided by person-specific action plans. In our work, to administer behaviour change in patient with chronic conditions, our approach entails the computerization of SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in order to generate personalized action plans that are suitable to an individual's current care scenario. We have taken a knowledge management approach, whereby we have computerized the SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in terms of a high-level SCT knowledge model that can be operationalized to generate personalized behaviour change action plans. We have collected and computerized behavior change content targeting healthy living and physical activity. Semantic web technologies have been used to develop the SCT knowledge model, represented in terms of an ontology and SWRL rules. The ontological SCT model can inferred to generate personalized self-management action plans for a given patient profile. We present formative evaluation of the clinical correctness and relevance of the generated personalized action plans for a range of test patient profiles. PMID:27577412

  7. An Ontological Model of Behaviour Theory to Generate Personalized Action Plans to Modify Behaviours.

    PubMed

    Baig, Wasif; Abidi, Samina; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2016-01-01

    Behavior change approaches aim to assist patients in achieving self-efficacy in managing their condition. Social cognitive theory (SCT) stipulates self-efficacy as a central element to behavior change and provides constructs to achieve self-efficacy guided by person-specific action plans. In our work, to administer behaviour change in patient with chronic conditions, our approach entails the computerization of SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in order to generate personalized action plans that are suitable to an individual's current care scenario. We have taken a knowledge management approach, whereby we have computerized the SCT-based self-efficacy constructs in terms of a high-level SCT knowledge model that can be operationalized to generate personalized behaviour change action plans. We have collected and computerized behavior change content targeting healthy living and physical activity. Semantic web technologies have been used to develop the SCT knowledge model, represented in terms of an ontology and SWRL rules. The ontological SCT model can inferred to generate personalized self-management action plans for a given patient profile. We present formative evaluation of the clinical correctness and relevance of the generated personalized action plans for a range of test patient profiles.

  8. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  9. The effect of modifying automatic action tendencies on overt avoidance behaviors.

    PubMed

    Amir, Nader; Kuckertz, Jennie M; Najmi, Sadia

    2013-06-01

    We used the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT) to examine the role of automatic action tendencies. We hypothesized that, after manipulation of automatic action tendencies, participants would be more likely to approach feared objects when compared with participants in a control condition. Participants were instructed to push or pull a joystick, resulting in contamination-related and neutral pictures moving progressively away from or toward them, respectively. We manipulated approach by building a contingency between the arm movement and the picture type in the active condition but not in the control condition. Consistent with our hypothesis, participants in the active manipulation group showed facilitated automatic approach tendencies and reduced avoidance tendencies for contamination-related stimuli and completed more steps approaching their feared objects in a behavioral approach test compared with participants in the control group. Our results suggest that automatic action tendencies may play an important role in the maintenance of fear-related behavioral avoidance.

  10. Factors modifying duration of drug action: a practical for large undergraduate classes on limited laboratory space, staff and budget.

    PubMed

    Kwanashie, K O; Amabeoku, G J; Auta, J

    1989-09-01

    A desperate need for health professionals is answered by yearly increases in university student admissions in many developing countries. Yet economic constraints dictate that subventions for teaching and research remain static or even decrease as student populations increase. Practical teaching, for example in pharmacology, is susceptible to inadequate funding because of the capital and recurrent expenditure needed to procure and maintain laboratories, staff, animals, instruments and chemicals. Class demonstrations, although they provide a partial answer to the problem, are beset with a number of disadvantages. Provision of good training on low funds demands ingenuity to modify teaching/learning processes while still achieving the desired objectives. This paper illustrates such a procedure by describing the logistics of a practical class on 'Factors modifying duration of drug action' to large classes of undergraduate medical and pharmacy students, on limited laboratory space, staff and budget'. A sample laboratory result is included.

  11. Gene cuisine or Frankenfood? The theory of reasoned action as an audience segmentation strategy for messages about genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Silk, Kami J; Weiner, Judith; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are currently a controversial topic about which the lay public in the United States knows little. Formative research has demonstrated that the lay public is uncertain and concerned about GM foods. This study (N = 858) extends focus group research by using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to examine attitudes and subjective norms related to GM foods as a theoretical strategy for audience segmentation. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four unique audiences based on their attitude and subjective norm toward GM foods (ambivalent-biotech, antibiotech, biotech-normer, and biotech individual). Results are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical significance for audience segmentation.

  12. Anticipation of Body-Scaled Action Is Modified in Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardia, Dewi; Lafargue, Gilles; Thomas, Pierre; Dodin, Vincent; Cottencin, Olivier; Luyat, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa frequently believe they are larger than they really are. The precise nature of this bias is not known: is it a false belief related to the patient's aesthetic and emotional attitudes towards her body? Or could it also reflect abnormal processing of the representation of the body in action? We tested this latter…

  13. Molecular mechanisms of the action of miraculin, a taste-modifying protein.

    PubMed

    Misaka, Takumi

    2013-03-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the fruits of Richadella dulcifica, a shrub native to West Africa. Although it is flat in taste at neutral pH, MCL has taste-modifying activity in which sour stimuli produce a sweet perception. Once MCL enters the mouth, strong sweetness can be detected for more than 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. While the human sweet taste receptor (hT1R2-hT1R3) has been identified, the molecular mechanisms underlying the taste-modifying activity of MCL remain unclear. Recently, experimental evidence has been published demonstrating the successful quantitative evaluation of the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system. The results strongly suggested that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH. Since sweet-tasting proteins may be used as low-calorie sweeteners because they contain almost no calories, it is expected that MCL will be used in the near future as a new low-calorie sweetener or to modify the taste of sour fruits. PMID:23466289

  14. Anti-Biofilm Efficacy of Dual-Action Nitric Oxide-Releasing Alkyl Chain Modified Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Worley, Brittany V; Schilly, Kelci M; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2015-05-01

    Herein, we describe the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing alkyl chain modified poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers of various sizes (i.e., generations). Generation 1 (G1) through generation 4 (G4) dendrimers were modified with either short (i.e., butyl) or medium (i.e., hexyl) alkyl chains via a ring-opening reaction. The resulting secondary amines were subsequently modified with N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors to establish NO payloads of ∼1.0 μmol/mg. The bactericidal efficacy of these dendrimers was evaluated against Gram-negative and Gram-positive biofilms, including antibiotic-resistant strains. The anti-biofilm action of the dendrimer biocides was found to be dependent on dendrimer generation, bacterial Gram class, and alkyl chain length, with the most effective biofilm eradication occurring when antibacterial agents were capable of efficient biofilm infiltration. The addition of NO release markedly enhanced anti-biofilm activity of dendrimers incapable of effective biofilm penetration. PMID:25873449

  15. 76 FR 16812 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Bid Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... buyer's responsibility to be aware of all applicable local government policies, laws, and regulations... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... 209 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), as amended (43 U.S.C. 1713):...

  16. 76 FR 6154 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Bid Sale of Public Lands in Santa Cruz County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... government. It is the buyer's responsibility to be aware of all applicable local government policies, laws... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... sale in accordance with Sections 203 and 209 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA)...

  17. 78 FR 64974 - Notice of Realty Action; Modified Competitive Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land at Schoolhouse Butte...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... sealed bids for this public land sale. The original notice, which published on September 25, 2013 (78 FR 59055), incorrectly stated the date. On page 59055, column 2, line 4 below the chart, which...

  18. 78 FR 61380 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sealed-Bid Sale of Public Land at Schoolhouse Butte...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLNV930000.L14300000.EU0000 241A; N-85116; 13-08807; MO 4500053892; TAS... (N-85116), Humboldt County, NV Correction In notice document 2013-23339, appearing on pages...

  19. 78 FR 45270 - Notice of Realty Action; Proposed Modified Competitive Sale of Public Land in Jackson County, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... recreational), road construction, renovation, or road use, within 150 feet of waters of the State, including... Resource Area Field Manager, BLM Medford District Office, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, OR 97504. ADDRESSES: Rik Arndt, Supervisory Realty Specialist, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, OR 97504 or phone at...

  20. Spatial Representations in Older Adults are Not Modified by Action: Evidence from Tool Use

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Matthew C.; Bloesch, Emily K.; Davoli, Christopher C.; Panting, Nicholas D.; Abrams, Richard A.; Brockmole, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Theories of embodied perception hold that the visual system is calibrated by both the body schema and the action system, allowing for adaptive action-perception responses. One example of embodied perception involves the effects of tool-use on distance perception, in which wielding a tool with the intention to act upon a target appears to bring that object closer. This tool-based spatial compression (i.e., tool-use effect) has been studied exclusively with younger adults, but it is unknown whether the phenomenon exists with older adults. In this study, we examined the effects of tool use on distance perception in younger and older adults in two experiments. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults estimated the distances of targets just beyond peripersonal space while either wielding a tool or pointing with the hand. Younger adults, but not older adults, estimated targets to be closer after reaching with a tool. In Experiment 2, younger and older adults estimated the distance to remote targets while using either a baton or laser pointer. Younger adults displayed spatial compression with the laser pointer compared to the baton, although older adults did not. Taken together, these findings indicate a generalized absence of the tool-use effect in older adults during distance estimation suggesting that the visuomotor system of older adults does not remap from peripersonal to extrapersonal spatial representations during tool use. PMID:26052886

  1. Cell Competition Modifies Adult Stem Cell and Tissue Population Dynamics in a JAK-STAT-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J.E.; Kucinski, Iwo; Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mansour, Sarah; Simons, Benjamin D.; Piddini, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Throughout their lifetime, cells may suffer insults that reduce their fitness and disrupt their function, and it is unclear how these potentially harmful cells are managed in adult tissues. We address this question using the adult Drosophila posterior midgut as a model of homeostatic tissue and ribosomal Minute mutations to reduce fitness in groups of cells. We take a quantitative approach combining lineage tracing and biophysical modeling and address how cell competition affects stem cell and tissue population dynamics. We show that healthy cells induce clonal extinction in weak tissues, targeting both stem and differentiated cells for elimination. We also find that competition induces stem cell proliferation and self-renewal in healthy tissue, promoting selective advantage and tissue colonization. Finally, we show that winner cell proliferation is fueled by the JAK-STAT ligand Unpaired-3, produced by Minute−/+ cells in response to chronic JNK stress signaling. PMID:26212135

  2. A situ co-precipitation method to prepare magnetic PMDA modified sugarcane bagasse and its application for competitive adsorption of methylene blue and basic magenta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-Xia; Chi, Ru-An; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Xu, Zhi-Gao; Xiao, Chun-Qiao; Guo, Jia

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) modified sugarcane bagasse (SCB) was prepared by a situ co-precipitation method. Results showed that the magnetic modified SCB could be recycled easily by an applied magnetic field. Adsorption capacities of the magnetic sorbent for cationic dyes: methylene blue and basic magenta were 315.5 and 304.9mgg(-1), respectively. Competitive adsorption in the binary system showed that concentration percentages (C(P)) and initial concentration (C(0)) both had good linear relationship with adsorption capacities of the magnetic sorbent (q(e)(')) in the investigated range. The linear equations between C(P) and q(e)(') almost did not affect by the variation of total initial concentration of the dyes (C(T)), whereas that between C(0) and q(e)(') changed greatly with it. C(P) was the main factor that impacted q(e)(') in the binary competitive adsorption system. Similar linear equations between C(P) and q(e)(') demonstrated that the magnetic sorbent had similar adsorption affinity toward the two dyes.

  3. 78 FR 8188 - Notice of Realty Action: Proposed (Non-Competitive) Direct Sale of Public Land in Carbon County, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... in Carbon County, UT AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of realty action... acres of public land in Carbon County, Utah, at not less than the appraised fair market value to Hunt... Carbon County, Utah, are proposed for direct sale, subject to the applicable provisions of Sections...

  4. 78 FR 76855 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Campbell County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... totaling 4.15 acres in Campbell County, Wyoming, to the Craig G. and Peggy S. Means Revocable Trust under... Campbell County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of realty action. SUMMARY... sale of the lands until February 3, 2014. ADDRESSES: Send written comments concerning this notice...

  5. Genetically modified flax expressing NAP-SsGT1 transgene: examination of anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2014-09-22

    The aim of the work was to define the influence of dietary supplementation with GM (genetically modified) GT#4 flaxseed cake enriched in polyphenols on inflammation development in mice liver. Mice were given ad libitum isoprotein diets: (1) standard diet; (2) high-fat diet rich in lard, high-fat diet enriched with 30% of (3) isogenic flax Linola seed cake; and (4) GM GT#4 flaxseed cake; for 96 days. Administration of transgenic and isogenic seed cake lowered body weight gain, of transgenic to the standard diet level. Serum total antioxidant status was statistically significantly improved in GT#4 flaxseed cake group and did not differ from Linola. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid profile and the liver concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α were ameliorated by GM and isogenic flaxseed cake consumption. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ did not differ between mice obtaining GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes. The C-reactive protein concentration was reduced in animals fed GT#4 flaxseed cake and did not differ from those fed non-GM flaxseed cake-based diet. Similarly, the liver structure of mice consuming diets enriched in flaxseed cake was improved. Dietetic enrichment with GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes may be a promising solution for health problems resulting from improper diet.

  6. Paracrine action of HO-1-modified mesenchymal stem cells mediates cardiac protection and functional improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Ren, Xiaofeng; Lin, Guosheng; Zhu, Chengang; Chen, Honglei; Yin, Jiechao; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Bo; Ding, Danhua

    2008-10-01

    The aim has been to determine whether the supernatants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with adenovirus carrying human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. We have found that hHO-1 infected MSCs (hHO-1-MSCs) increased expression of hHO-1 protein. Apoptosis of cultured hHO-1-MSCs exposed to hypoxia was suppressed. Several cytokines, including HGF, bFGF, TGF-beta, VEGF and IL-1beta, were produced by hHO-1-MSCs, some being significantly enhanced under hypoxia stimulation. Meanwhile, those cytokines reduced caspase-3 level and activity in cultured adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (ARVCs) exposed to hypoxia. Supernatants obtained from hHO-1-MSCs improved left ventricular function, limited myocardial infarct size, increased microvessel density, and inhibited apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in rat myocardial infarction. It can be concluded hHO-1-modified MSCs prevent myocardial cell injury via secretion of paracrine-acting mediators.

  7. 77 FR 24978 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Land in Washakie County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ..., Wyoming, by non- competitive (direct) sale to the town of Ten Sleep under the provisions of the Federal... United States. 3. A reservation of a right-of-way for a Federal-aid Highway (Ten Sleep-Big Trails Road.... This land is being offered by direct sale to the Town of Ten Sleep pursuant to 43 CFR 2711.3-3....

  8. University Rankings in Action? The Importance of Rankings and an Excellence Competition for University Choice of High-Ability Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horstschraer, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes how high-ability students respond to different indicators of university quality when applying for a university. Are prospective students influenced by quality indicators of a university ranking or by an excellence status awarded within a nationwide competition? And if so, are some quality dimensions, e.g. research reputation,…

  9. 75 FR 38545 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Auction of Public Lands in White Pine County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... of 1976 (FLPMA), 43 U.S.C. 1713 and 1719, respectively, and the BLM land sale and mineral conveyance..., Nevada for competitive sale at not less than the appraised fair market value (FMV). The sale will be... proposed sale of public lands until August 16, 2010. If the BLM decision is to proceed with the sale,...

  10. Partially Hydrolyzed Gluten in Fermented Cereal-Based Products by R5 Competitive ELISA: Collaborative Study, First Action 2015.05.

    PubMed

    Lacorn, Markus; Weiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the AACC International Protein Technical Committee (now Protein and Enzymes Technical Committee) initiated a collaborative study of a method for determining gluten in fermented products, using an R5 competitive ELISA system. The method has been approved as AACCI Approved Method AACCI 38-55.02. The new method has been validated for testing fermented foods and beverages to determine that they conform to the Codex threshold of 20 mg of gluten/kg in total for gluten-free products. It is recommended that the method be accepted by AOAC as Official First Action.

  11. Silver-nanoparticles-modified biomaterial surface resistant to staphylococcus: new insight into the antimicrobial action of silver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaxing; Li, Jinhua; Guo, Geyong; Wang, Qiaojie; Tang, Jin; Zhao, Yaochao; Qin, Hui; Wahafu, Tuerhongjiang; Shen, Hao; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are widely used clinically, but postoperative implant infection remains a potential severe complication. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of nano-silver(Ag)-functionalized Ti surfaces against epidemic Staphylococcus from the perspective of the regulation of biofilm-related genes and based on a bacteria-cell co-culture study. To achieve this goal, two representative epidemic Staphylococcus strains, Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, RP62A) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, USA 300), were used, and it was found that an Ag-nanoparticle-modified Ti surface could regulate the expression levels of biofilm-related genes (icaA and icaR for S. epidermidis; fnbA and fnbB for S. aureus) to inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Moreover, a novel bacteria-fibroblast co-culture study revealed that the incorporation of Ag nanoparticles on such a surface can help mammalian cells to survive, adhere and spread more successfully than Staphylococcus. Therefore, the modified surface was demonstrated to possess a good anti-infective capability against both sessile bacteria and planktonic bacteria through synergy between the effects of Ag nanoparticles and ion release. This work provides new insight into the antimicrobial action and mechanism of Ag-nanoparticle-functionalized Ti surfaces with bacteria-killing and cell-assisting capabilities and paves the way towards better satisfying the clinical needs. PMID:27599568

  12. Silver-nanoparticles-modified biomaterial surface resistant to staphylococcus: new insight into the antimicrobial action of silver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxing; Li, Jinhua; Guo, Geyong; Wang, Qiaojie; Tang, Jin; Zhao, Yaochao; Qin, Hui; Wahafu, Tuerhongjiang; Shen, Hao; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are widely used clinically, but postoperative implant infection remains a potential severe complication. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of nano-silver(Ag)-functionalized Ti surfaces against epidemic Staphylococcus from the perspective of the regulation of biofilm-related genes and based on a bacteria-cell co-culture study. To achieve this goal, two representative epidemic Staphylococcus strains, Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, RP62A) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, USA 300), were used, and it was found that an Ag-nanoparticle-modified Ti surface could regulate the expression levels of biofilm-related genes (icaA and icaR for S. epidermidis; fnbA and fnbB for S. aureus) to inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Moreover, a novel bacteria-fibroblast co-culture study revealed that the incorporation of Ag nanoparticles on such a surface can help mammalian cells to survive, adhere and spread more successfully than Staphylococcus. Therefore, the modified surface was demonstrated to possess a good anti-infective capability against both sessile bacteria and planktonic bacteria through synergy between the effects of Ag nanoparticles and ion release. This work provides new insight into the antimicrobial action and mechanism of Ag-nanoparticle-functionalized Ti surfaces with bacteria-killing and cell-assisting capabilities and paves the way towards better satisfying the clinical needs. PMID:27599568

  13. Mechanism of action of disease modifying anti-rheumatic agent, gold sodium thiomalate (GSTM).

    PubMed

    Mangalam, A K; Aggarwal, A; Naik, S

    2001-06-01

    GSTM has been used for long in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. In the last decade, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) has emerged as the major pro-inflammatory cytokine in the pathogenesis of RA. We studied the effect of GSTM on spontaneous and LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal volunteers. PBMCs were isolated from 20 normal volunteers and cultured in the presence of absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS 10 ng/ml) and GSTM (1 microgram/ml). TNF-alpha level was measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The TNF-alpha response to LPS was heterogeneous. PBMCs of 24 subjects showed high LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha production (LPS-responsive group), whereas that of six individuals had low LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha production (LPS-non-responsive group). GSTM-stimulated spontaneous TNF-alpha production and inhibited LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha production in 16 of 24 (75%) individuals of LPS-responsive group and one of six individuals (17%) of LPS-non-responsive group. The suppression of TNF-alpha by GSTM was also demonstrated at the mRNA level. We conclude that there is a heterogeneity among normal population for TNF-alpha production in response to LPS, and GSTM inhibits LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha production, primarily in LPS responders. Further study is needed to establish the relationship between LPS responsiveness and GSTM suppression.

  14. Appetite-modifying actions of pro-neuromedin U-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, David A; Ivanov, Tina R; Luckman, Simon M

    2009-08-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) is known to have potent actions on appetite and energy expenditure. Deletion of the NMU gene in mice leads to an obese phenotype, characterized by hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure. Conversely, transgenic mice that overexpress proNMU exhibit reduced body weight and fat storage. Here, we show that central administration of NMU or the related peptide neuromedin S (NMS) dose-dependently decreases food intake, increases metabolic rate, and leads to significant weight loss in mice. The effects of NMU and NMS on both feeding and metabolism are almost completely lost in mice lacking the putative CNS receptor for NMU and NMS, NMUr2. However, NMUr2 knockout mice do not exhibit overt differences in body weight or energy expenditure compared with wild-type mice, suggesting that the dramatic phenotype of the NMU gene knockout mouse is not due simply to the loss of NMU/NMUr2 signaling. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites indicate that an additional peptide is produced from the NMU precursor protein, which is extremely well conserved between human, mouse, and rat. Here, we demonstrate that this peptide, proNMU(104-136), has a pronounced effect on energy balance in mice. Specifically, central administration of proNMU(104-136) causes a significant but transient ( approximately 4 h) increase in feeding, yet both food intake and body weight are decreased over the following 24 h. proNMU(104-136) administration also significantly increased metabolic rate. These results suggest that proNMU(104-136) is a novel modulator of energy balance and may contribute to the phenotype exhibited by NMU knockout mice.

  15. 75 FR 28278 - Notice of amendment to Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Online Auction of Public Lands in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 46790), to add additional terms and conditions to the sale process. DATES: Interested... Clark County, NV AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of amendment. SUMMARY:...

  16. Branched zinc oxide nanorods arrays modified paper electrode for electrochemical immunosensing by combining biocatalytic precipitation reaction and competitive immunoassay mode.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoqiang; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jinghua; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2015-12-15

    Branched zinc oxide nanorods (BZR) arrays, an array with high charge carries collection efficiency and specific surface area, are grown on the reduced graphene oxide-paper working electrode for the first time to construct a paper-based electrochemical (EC) immunosensor. Typically, the BZR are fabricated via a simple hydrothermal process, which can provide abundant sites for antibodies loading. By combining the large surface area of porous zinc oxide (PZS) and good biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), PZS-AuNPs (PZS@Au) nanocomposites are designed to label horseradish peroxide (HRP) and antigens. After a competitive reaction between antigens and PZS@Au nanocomposites labeled antigens, the signal labels are introduced into the immunosensor, in which, HRP participate in biocatalytic precipitation process. The produced precipitate reduces the electrode surface area and hinders the electron transfer. With the increase of concentration of antigens, the signal labels introduced into the sensor decrease, thus, a signal-on immunoassay for α-fetoprotein detection is constructed. The proposed paper-based EC immunosensor combines enzymatic biocatalytic precipitation reaction and competitive immunoassay mode for the first time, and possesses a wide linear range from 0.2 pg mL(-1) to 500 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.08 pg mL(-1). In addition, the proposed method is simple, sensitive and specific and can be a promising platform for other protein detection.

  17. A 200-m All-out Front-crawl Swim Modifies Competitive Swimmers' Shoulder Joint Position Sense.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, A; Kurita, Y; Inoue, K; Okuno, K; Hortobágyi, T; Suzuki, S

    2015-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an all-out-effort 200-m front-crawl swim trial affects competitive swimmers' shoulder joint position sense. On Day 1, we measured shoulder joint position sense before and after the swim trial, and on Day 2 before and after 2 min of seated rest. On both days, shoulder joint position sense was measured in the seated position using electromagnetic movement sensors in a position-matching paradigm. An investigator abducted participants' left (reference) shoulder joint in the frontal plane to test angles of 90°, 135°, and 180°. Participants then actively abducted the right (indicator) shoulder joint to match the position of the left, reference arm. After the 200-m all-out front-crawl swim trial, the indicator relative to the reference angle differed by 4.4° toward adduction at the 180° (vertical) testing position (P<0.05). Variation in absolute matching error was 3.2° or 2.2 times greater after swim compared with the no-swim control trial. An all-out 200-m front-crawl swim trial can selectively increase competitive swimmers' shoulder joint position sense error and increase variation in matching error in horizontal arm position.

  18. A modified competitive inhibition radioimmunoassay for the detection of C3a. Use of 125I-C3 instead of 125I-C3a.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Paardekooper, J; Eerenberg, A J; Navis, G O; Nijsten, M W; Thijs, L G; Nuijens, J H

    1988-04-01

    Levels of C3a in plasma are currently measured by a competitive inhibition radioimmunoassay (RIA) in which 125I-C3a is used as a tracer. In this paper, we describe a modification of this RIA: 125I-C3 instead of 125I-C3a is used. The lower limit of detection of this modified RIA is 6 ng of C3a per ml of plasma (i.e. 0.66 nmol/l). This RIA, performed with polyclonal anti-C3a antibodies coupled to a solid phase, appeared to be 30 times more sensitive compared with an RIA in which a monoclonal antibody against C3a is used. In vitro activation of the complement system in serum by aggregated IgG, zymosan, and cobra venom factor resulted in the generation of significant amounts of C3a. Assessment of the C3a levels by the modified RIA in serial plasma samples from patients who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass, yielded results very similar to those described in the literature for the established C3a-RIA. Thus, the modified C3a-RIA offers a convenient alternative for the detection of C3a in plasma samples.

  19. Coexpression of Nuclear Receptors and Histone Methylation Modifying Genes in the Testis: Implications for Endocrine Disruptor Modes of Action

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Alison M.; Carter, Kim W.; Anderson, Denise; Wise, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Endocrine disruptor chemicals elicit adverse health effects by perturbing nuclear receptor signalling systems. It has been speculated that these compounds may also perturb epigenetic mechanisms and thus contribute to the early origin of adult onset disease. We hypothesised that histone methylation may be a component of the epigenome that is susceptible to perturbation. We used coexpression analysis of publicly available data to investigate the combinatorial actions of nuclear receptors and genes involved in histone methylation in normal testis and when faced with endocrine disruptor compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression patterns of a set of genes were profiled across testis tissue in human, rat and mouse, plus control and exposed samples from four toxicity experiments in the rat. Our results indicate that histone methylation events are a more general component of nuclear receptor mediated transcriptional regulation in the testis than previously appreciated. Coexpression patterns support the role of a gatekeeper mechanism involving the histone methylation modifiers Kdm1, Prdm2, and Ehmt1 and indicate that this mechanism is a common determinant of transcriptional integrity for genes critical to diverse physiological endpoints relevant to endocrine disruption. Coexpression patterns following exposure to vinclozolin and dibutyl phthalate suggest that coactivity of the demethylase Kdm1 in particular warrants further investigation in relation to endocrine disruptor mode of action. Conclusions/Significance This study provides proof of concept that a bioinformatics approach that profiles genes related to a specific hypothesis across multiple biological settings can provide powerful insight into coregulatory activity that would be difficult to discern at an individual experiment level or by traditional differential expression analysis methods. PMID:22496781

  20. Conifer expansion reduces the competitive ability and herbivore defense of aspen by modifying light environment and soil chemistry.

    PubMed

    Calder, W John; Horn, Kevin J; St Clair, Samuel B

    2011-06-01

    Disturbance patterns strongly influence plant community structure. What remains less clear, particularly at a mechanistic level, is how changes in disturbance cycles alter successional outcomes in plant communities. There is evidence that fire suppression is resulting in longer fire return intervals in subalpine forests and that these lengthened intervals increase competitive interactions between aspen and conifer species. We conducted a field and greenhouse study to compare photosynthesis, growth and defense responses of quaking aspen and subalpine fir regeneration under light reductions and shifts in soil chemistry that occur as conifers increase in dominance. The studies demonstrated that aspen regeneration was substantially more sensitive to light and soil resource limitations than that of subalpine fir. For aspen, light reductions and/or shifts in soil chemistry limited height growth, biomass gain, photosynthesis and the production of defense compounds (phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins). Biomass gain and phenolic glycoside concentrations were co-limited by light reduction and changes in soil chemistry. In contrast, subalpine fir seedlings tended to be more tolerant of low light conditions and showed no sensitivity to changes in soil chemistry. Unlike aspen, subalpine fir increased its root to shoot ratio on conifer soils, which may partially explain its maintenance of growth and defense. The results suggest that increasing dominance of conifers in subalpine forests alters light conditions and soil chemistry in a way that places greater physiological and growth constraints on aspen than subalpine fir, with a likely outcome being more successful recruitment of conifers and losses in aspen cover.

  1. Heterochromatin of the Drosophila melanogaster Y chromosome as modifier of position effect variegation: the time of its action.

    PubMed

    Becker, H J

    1977-03-01

    Addition of heterochromatin suppresses while subtraction enhances position effect variegation. The heterochromatin-sensitive period has been determined in white/white-apricot variegated eyes of YSWa/Wa; Dp (1,3)W264-58 flies. When such larvae, carrying a Y-short (YS) arm at the distal end of one X chromosome, are X-rayed, mitotic recombination leads to one daughter cell with two YS arms and an adjacent daughter cell with no YS arm. When induced after clonal initiation, the frequency of dark clones developing from daughter cells with two YS arms is significantly higher than the frequency of dark clones in the rest of the eye; and this frequency is even higher when induced before clonal initiation. The modifying action of the Y-heterochromatin is exerted, therefore, during and after clonal initiation. Surprisingly, the frequency of dark clones developing from cells with no YS arm is not lower than the frequency of dark clones in the rest of the eye. PMID:406511

  2. Saprotrophic competitiveness and biocontrol fitness of a genetically modified strain of the plant-growth-promoting fungus Trichoderma hamatum GD12.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Lauren S; Harris, Beverley D; Soanes, Darren M; Kershaw, Michael J; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thornton, Christopher R

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma species are ubiquitous soil fungi that hold enormous potential for the development of credible alternatives to agrochemicals and synthetic fertilizers in sustainable crop production. In this paper, we show that substantial improvements in plant productivity can be met by genetic modification of a plant-growth-promoting and biocontrol strain of Trichoderma hamatum, but that these improvements are obtained in the absence of disease pressure only. Using a quantitative monoclonal antibody-based ELISA, we show that an N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase-deficient mutant of T. hamatum, generated by insertional mutagenesis of the corresponding gene, has impaired saprotrophic competitiveness during antagonistic interactions with Rhizoctonia solani in soil. Furthermore, its fitness as a biocontrol agent of the pre-emergence damping-off pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is significantly reduced, and its ability to promote plant growth is constrained by the presence of both pathogens. This work shows that while gains in T. hamatum-mediated plant-growth-promotion can be met through genetic manipulation of a single beneficial trait, such a modification has negative impacts on other aspects of its biology and ecology that contribute to its success as a saprotrophic competitor and antagonist of soil-borne pathogens. The work has important implications for fungal morphogenesis, demonstrating a clear link between hyphal architecture and secretory potential. Furthermore, it highlights the need for a holistic approach to the development of genetically modified Trichoderma strains for use as crop stimulants and biocontrol agents in plant agriculture.

  3. A Modified Method for Studying Behavioral Paradox of Antioxidants and Their Disproportionate Competitive Kinetic Effect to Scavenge the Peroxyl Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Nusrat; Fatima, Kaneez; Luqman, Suaib

    2014-01-01

    We have described a modified method for evaluating inhibitor of peroxyl radicals, a well-recognized and -documented radical involved in cancer initiation and promotion as well as diseases related to oxidative stress and ageing. We are reporting hydrophilic and lipophilic as well as natural and synthetic forms of antioxidants revealing a diversified behaviour to peroxyl radical in a dose-dependent manner (1 nM–10 μM). A simple kinetic model for the competitive oxidation of an indicator molecule (ABTS) and a various antioxidant by a radical (ROO•) is described. The influences of both the concentration of antioxidant and duration of reaction (70 min) on the inhibition of the radical cation absorption are taken into account while determining the activity. The induction time of the reaction was also proposed as a parameter enabling determination of antioxidant content by optimizing and introducing other kinetic parameters in 96-well plate assays. The test evidently improves the original PRTC (peroxyl radical trapping capacity) assay in terms of the amount of chemical used, simultaneous tracking, that is, the generation of the radical taking place continually and the kinetic reduction technique (area under curve, peak value, slope, and Vmax). PMID:24672395

  4. Comparative study of a modified competitive RT-PCR and Amplicor HCV monitor assays for quantitation of hepatitis C virus RNA in serum.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, E; Costa, J; López-Labrador, F X; Forns, X; Ampurdanés, S; Maluenda, M D; Guilera, M; Sánchez-Tapias, J M; Rodes, J; Jimenez de Anta, M T

    1999-05-01

    A modified competitive RT-PCR (mcRT-PCR) to measure HCV RNA in serum and the Amplicor HCV Monitor assay were compared. For mcRT-PCR, the RNA extracted was retrotranscribed and coamplified in one step with a known amount of a DNA internal control (IC). Digoxigenin-labeled amplified products were hybridized to specific HCV DNA and IC-DNA probes and quantified by colorimetry. HCV RNA concentration was calculated by plotting the ratio of HCV/IC ODs against a calibration curve. Multiple samples were analyzed in the same round and tedious titration of each sample with a competitor was unnecessary. The mcRT-PCR assay was linear from 6 x 10(3) to 6 x 10(7) copies/ml, whereas Amplicor was linear up to 1-2 x 10(6) copies/ml. HCV RNA was measured in samples from 75 carriers. There was agreement between both methods in type 1 infections but not in type 2 or type 3 infections, in which the values measured by Amplicor were, on average, 15 times lower than those measured by the mcRT-PCR. HCV RNA measured by Amplicor was higher in type 1 infections than in type 2 or 3 infections, but no differences were found when viral load was assessed by mcRT-PCR. The binding efficiency of the Amplicor-probe was greater for type 1 than for types 2 or 3, suggesting Amplicor underestimates the viral load in the latter types. In contrast, the mcRT-PCR is not affected by genotype-related variation of HCV. This study suggests that mcRT-PCR assay is reliable for sensitive and accurate measurement of HCV RNA over a broad range of values independently of the HCV genotype.

  5. The American Medical Association, et al.; prohibited trade practices, and affirmative corrective actions--Federal Trade Commission. Modifying order.

    PubMed

    1982-06-10

    The FTC, in accordance with a decision and judgment rendered by the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on October 7, 1980, has modified its Final Order In the Matter of The American Medical Association issued on October 12, 1979 (44 FR 64803, 94 F.T.C 701). The modified order, effective May 19, 1982, narrows the scope of the order so as not to encroach upon the valid activities of the AMA.

  6. alpha-Adrenoceptors in the ventricular myocardium: clonidine, naphazoline and methoxamine as partial alpha-agonists exerting a competitive dualism in action to phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Schümann, H J; Endoh, M

    1976-04-01

    Tha alpha-sympathomimetic agonists, clonidine, naphazoline, methoxamine, oxymetazoline and phenylephrine were used to further characterize the alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic effect in the isolated papillary muscle of the rabbit heart. The maximal inotropic effects of these amines were compared with the effect of isoprenaline and it was examined whether or not these amines compete for alpha-adrenoceptors. On the papillary muscle stimulated at 0.5 Hz, phenylephrine showed a high affinity (pD2 value=6.13) and produced the most pronounced intrinsic activity of the alpha-sympathomimetic amines. Therefore, the intrinsic activity of phenylephrine, in the presence of prindolol (3 X 10(-8) M), was used for comparison with those of the other alpha-agonists. Clonidine caused a positive inotropic effect: the intrinsic activity amounted to 0.32 of that of phenylephrine; the affinity was the highest among the amines tested (pD2 value=6.46); its effect was inhibited by 10(-6) M phentolamine. The affinity and the intrinsic activity of naphazoline were slightly lower than those of clonidine. Methoxamine showed a relatively high intrinsic activity (0.56) but the lowest affinity (4.68). Oxymetazoline did not cause any positive inotropic effect. Clonidine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline antagonized the positive inotropic effect of phenylephrine, mediated via the alpha-adrenocaptors in the presence of 3 X 10(-8) M prindolol, in a competitive manner. This observation suggests that these alpha-sympathomimetic amines compete with phenylephrine for the same receptor site. Thus the present results provide additional evidence for alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic actions of sympathomimetic amines in the rabbit papillary muscle.

  7. Inverse problem: Reconstruction of the modified gravity action in the Palatini formalism by supernova type Ia data

    SciTech Connect

    Baghram, Shant; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2009-12-15

    We introduce in f(R) gravity-Palatini formalism the method of the inverse problem to extract the action from the expansion history of the Universe. First, we use an ansatz for the scale factor and apply the inverse method to derive an appropriate action for the gravity. In the second step we use the supernova type Ia data set from the Union sample and obtain a smoothed function for the Hubble parameter up to the redshift 1.7. We apply the smoothed Hubble parameter in the inverse approach and reconstruct the corresponding action in f(R) gravity. In the next step we investigate the viability of reconstruction method, doing a Monte Carlo simulation we generate synthetic SNIa data with the quality of the Union sample and show that roughly more than 1500 SNIa data is essential to reconstruct correct action. Finally, with enough SNIa data, we propose two diagnosis in order to distinguish between the {lambda}CDM model and an alternative theory for the acceleration of the Universe.

  8. School Meal Programs: Competitive Foods Are Available in Many Schools; Actions Taken To Restrict Them Differ by State and Locality. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-04-673

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, David D.

    2004-01-01

    Because of concerns about trends in children's health and eating habits and interest in further understanding issues related to competitive foods in schools, this study addressed: which foods and school food practices fell under the term "competitive foods" and what federal restrictions existed on their sale; what was known about the types of…

  9. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure. PMID:26383867

  10. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure.

  11. Action pattern of Valencia orange PME de-esterification of high methoxyl pectin and characterization of modified pectins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yookyung; Teng, Quincy; Wicker, Louise

    2005-12-12

    Valencia pectinmethylesterase (PME) fractions, B-PME, containing 36 and 13 kDa protein bands and U-PME, containing a 36 and 27 kDa protein bands, were used to de-esterify original pectin (O-Pec) from 73% degree of esterification (%DE) to 63% (B-Pec) and 61% DE (U-Pec), respectively. Most O-Pec eluted from ion exchange chromatography at low salt concentration and a smaller component eluted at higher ionic strength. B-Pec and U-Pec eluted as one broad peak at higher ionic strength. PME modification did not change molecular weight: O-pectin (134,000 g/mol), U-Pec (133,850 g/mol), and B-Pec (132,250 g/mol). The NMR signal of GG and GGG increased after modification, whereas the signal of EE and EEE decreased. The negative zeta-potential increased with pH for all pectins. U-PME and B-PME created differently modified pectins that vary in degree and length of multiple attacks and fraction of the pectin population that was modified.

  12. Modified mass action law-based model to correlate the solubility of solids and liquids in entrained supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    González, J C; Vieytes, M R; Botana, A M; Vieites, J M; Botana, L M

    2001-02-23

    The solubility of solids and liquids in supercritical CO2 with added entrainers was modeled with a modified version of the equation of Chrastil to include the effect of entrainers. By considering the formation of the solute-entrainer-solvent complexes an equation is obtained which predicts an exponential increase of solubility with fluid density and/or entrainer concentration. The correlating model was tested by non-linear regression through a computerized iterative process for several systems where an entrainer was present. Four experimental parameters are easily regressed from experimental data, hence the corresponding properties of components such as chemical potentials or critical parameters are not needed. Instead of its simplicity, this thermodynamical model provided a good correlation of the solubility enhancement in the presence of entrainer effect. PMID:11263564

  13. Emotions predictably modify response times in the initiation of human motor actions: A meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Garrett F; Cranley, Nicole M; Carnaby, Giselle; Janelle, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Emotions motivate individuals to attain appetitive goals and avoid aversive consequences. Empirical investigations have detailed how broad approach and avoidance orientations are reflected in fundamental movement attributes such as the speed, accuracy, and variability of motor actions. Several theoretical perspectives propose explanations for how emotional states influence the speed with which goal directed movements are initiated. These perspectives include biological predisposition, muscle activation, distance regulation, cognitive evaluation, and evaluative response coding accounts. A comprehensive review of literature and meta-analysis were undertaken to quantify empirical support for these theoretical perspectives. The systematic review yielded 34 studies that contained 53 independent experiments producing 128 effect sizes used to evaluate the predictions of existing theories. The central tenets of the biological predisposition (Hedges' g = -0.356), distance regulation (g = -0.293; g = 0.243), and cognitive evaluation (g = -0.249; g = -0.405; g = -0.174) accounts were supported. Partial support was also identified for the evaluative response coding (g = -0.255) framework. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that substantiate existing theoretical perspectives, and provide potential direction for conceptual integration of these independent perspectives. Recommendations for future empirical work in this area are discussed.

  14. Emotions predictably modify response times in the initiation of human motor actions: A meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Garrett F; Cranley, Nicole M; Carnaby, Giselle; Janelle, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Emotions motivate individuals to attain appetitive goals and avoid aversive consequences. Empirical investigations have detailed how broad approach and avoidance orientations are reflected in fundamental movement attributes such as the speed, accuracy, and variability of motor actions. Several theoretical perspectives propose explanations for how emotional states influence the speed with which goal directed movements are initiated. These perspectives include biological predisposition, muscle activation, distance regulation, cognitive evaluation, and evaluative response coding accounts. A comprehensive review of literature and meta-analysis were undertaken to quantify empirical support for these theoretical perspectives. The systematic review yielded 34 studies that contained 53 independent experiments producing 128 effect sizes used to evaluate the predictions of existing theories. The central tenets of the biological predisposition (Hedges' g = -0.356), distance regulation (g = -0.293; g = 0.243), and cognitive evaluation (g = -0.249; g = -0.405; g = -0.174) accounts were supported. Partial support was also identified for the evaluative response coding (g = -0.255) framework. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that substantiate existing theoretical perspectives, and provide potential direction for conceptual integration of these independent perspectives. Recommendations for future empirical work in this area are discussed. PMID:26461243

  15. Joint action of O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/ in modifying plant gas exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Tingey, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    The joint action of O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/ stress on plants was investigated. Gas exchange measurements of O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O vapor were made for garden pea. Plants were grown under controlled environments; O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O vapor fluxes were evaluated with a whole-plant gas exchange chamber using the mass-balance approach. Maximum O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/ fluxes per unit area into leaves averaged 8 nanomoles per square meter per second with exposure to either O/sub 3/ or SO/sub 2/ at 0.1 microliters per liter. Internal fluxes of either O/sub 3/ or SO/sub 2/ were reduced by up to 50% during exposure to combined versus individual pollutants; the greatest reduction occurred with simultaneous versus sequential combinations of the pollutants. Stomatal conductance to H/sub 2/O was substantially altered by the pollutant exposures, with O/sub 3/ molecules twice as effective as SO/sub 2/ molecules in inducing stomatal closure. Stomatal conductance was related to the integrated dose of pollutants. When O/sub 3/ was present at the start of the exposure, then stomatal response resembled that for O/sub 3/ more than the response for SO/sub 2/. The study indicated that stomatal responses with combinations of O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/ are not dependent solely on the integrated dose of pollutants, but suggests that a metabolic synergistic effect exists.

  16. 77 FR 2676 - Competitive Postal Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Postal Service an artificial competitive advantage. The Commission gave considerable weight to the... 39 CFR Part 3015 Competitive Postal Products AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Commission is initiating a review to determine whether...

  17. Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Pierrette; Hiller, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of competitive intelligence since 1994, including terminology and definitions and analytical techniques. Addresses the issue of ethics; explores how information technology supports the competitive intelligence process; and discusses education and training opportunities for competitive intelligence, including core competencies…

  18. Academic Competitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin County Office of Education, San Rafael, CA.

    Descriptions of scholastic competitions for Marin County (California) students are presented. Following a rationale for conducting scholastic competitions, community groups and businesses which lend support are listed along with the type of support given. Participating grade levels, dates of competition during the 1983-84 school year, and a brief…

  19. Viability and Resilience of Languages in Competition

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Laetitia; Castelló, Xavier; Bernard, Claire; Deffuant, Guillaume; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Martin, Sophie; Miguel, Maxi San

    2010-01-01

    We study the viability and resilience of languages, using a simple dynamical model of two languages in competition. Assuming that public action can modify the prestige of a language in order to avoid language extinction, we analyze two cases: (i) the prestige can only take two values, (ii) it can take any value but its change at each time step is bounded. In both cases, we determine the viability kernel, that is, the set of states for which there exists an action policy maintaining the coexistence of the two languages, and we define such policies. We also study the resilience of the languages and identify configurations from where the system can return to the viability kernel (finite resilience), or where one of the languages is lead to disappear (zero resilience). Within our current framework, the maintenance of a bilingual society is shown to be possible by introducing the prestige of a language as a control variable. PMID:20126655

  20. Untangling healthcare competition.

    PubMed

    Harris, I C; McDaniel, R R

    1993-11-01

    Traditional approaches to competition may be inappropriate for healthcare providers. Neoclassical economics makes the implicit assumption that a single actor embodies consumption, compensation, and benefit from a transaction. In healthcare, this assumption does not hold. Instead, such actions are accomplished by three separate actors--consumers (physicians), customers (third-party payers), and clients (patients). A hospital simultaneously competes in three arenas. Hospitals compete for physicians along a technological dimension. Competition for third-party payers takes on a financial dimension. Hospitals compete for patients along a marketing dimension. Because of the complex marketplace interactions among hospital, patient, physician, and third-party payer, the role of price in controlling behavior is difficult to establish. The dynamics underlying the hospital selection decision--that is, the decision maker's expectations of services and the convenience of accessing services--must also be considered. Healthcare managers must understand the interrelationships involved in the three-pronged competitive perspective for several reasons. This perspective clarifies the multiple facets of competition a hospital faces. It also disentangles the actions previously fulfilled by the traditional single buyer. It illuminates the critical skills underlying the competition for each audience. Finally, it defines the primary criterion each audience uses in sorting among hospitals. Recognition of the multifaceted nature of competition among healthcare providers will help demystify market behavior and thereby improve internal organizational communication systems, managers' ability to focus on appropriate activities, and the hospital's ability to adapt to changing market conditions.

  1. Induced Reporter Gene Activity, Enhanced Stress Resistance, and Competitive Ability of a Genetically Modified Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain Released into a Field Plot Planted with Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Van Overbeek, L. S.; Van Veen, J. A.; Van Elsas, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    induction of reporter gene expression in strain RIWE8 in the wheat rhizosphere, the data indicated that there were no great differences in the ecological properties in soil between the lacZ-modified and parental strains. PMID:16535606

  2. A new dual-signalling electrochemical sensing strategy based on competitive host-guest interaction of a β-cyclodextrin/poly(N-acetylaniline)/graphene-modified electrode: sensitive electrochemical determination of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gangbing; Wu, Liang; Zhang, Xia; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Chen, Jinhua

    2013-05-10

    Based on the competitive host-guest interaction between a β-cyclodextrin/poly(N-acetylaniline)/electrogenerated-graphene (β-CD/PNAANI/EG) film and probe or target molecules, a new dual-signalling electrochemical sensing method has been developed for the sensitive and selective determination of organic pollutants. As a model system, rhodamine B (RhB) and 1-aminopyrene (1-AP) were adopted as the probe and target molecules, respectively. Due to the host-guest interaction, RhB molecules can enter into the hydrophobic inner cavity of β-CD, and the β-CD/PNAANI/EG-modified glassy carbon electrode displays a remarkable oxidation peak due to RhB. In the presence of 1-AP, competitive association to β-CD occurs and the RhB molecules are displaced by 1-AP. This results in a decreased oxidation peak current of RhB and the appearance of an oxidation peak current for 1-AP, and the changes of these signals correlate linearly with the concentration of 1-AP. When the value ΔI(1-AP)+∣ΔI(RhB)∣ (ΔI(1-AP) and ΔI(RhB) are the change values of the oxidation peak currents of 1-AP and RhB, respectively) is used as the response signal to quantitatively determine the concentration of 1-AP, the detection limit is much lower than that given by using ΔI(1-AP) or ΔI(RhB) as the response signal. This dual-signalling sensor can provide more sensitive target recognition and will have important applications in the sensitive and selective electrochemical determination of electroactive organic pollutants.

  3. IR action spectroscopy shows competitive oxazolone and diketopiperazine formation in peptides depends on peptide length and identity of terminal residue in the departing fragment.

    PubMed

    Morrison, L J; Chamot-Rooke, J; Wysocki, V H

    2014-05-01

    The interplay between the entropically and enthalpically favored products of peptide fragmentation is probed using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. These b2 ion products can take either an oxazolone or diketopiperazine structure. Cleavage after the second amide bond is often a favorable process because the products are small ring structures that are particularly stable. These structures are structurally characterized by action IRMPD spectroscopy and semi-quantified using gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange. The formation of the oxazolone and diketopiperazine has been thought to be largely governed by the identity of the first two residues at the N-terminus of the peptide. We show here that the length of the precursor peptide and identity of the third residue play a significant role in the formation of the diketopiperazine structure in peptides containing an N-terminal asparagine residue. This is additionally the first instance showing an N-terminal residue with an amide side chain can promote formation of the diketopiperazine b2 ion structure.

  4. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative--additional investments will expand markets--but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized. PMID:26690379

  5. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative--additional investments will expand markets--but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized.

  6. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates

  7. Nanostructural Characterization of Modified Homogalacturonan with Pectin Methylesterase from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) Achenes and Modeling of Enzyme Mode of Action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Justification: Pectin is a major hydrocolloid used in various food, cosmetics, and medicine pharmaceutical products. The relative amount of unmethylesterified galacturonic acid (GalA)residues and their distribution are key determinants of pectin functionality. Pectin methylesterase (PME) modifies...

  8. Competitive morality.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gilbert

    2013-02-01

    Baumard et al. argue that partner choice leads to fairness and mutualism, which then form the basis for morality. I comment that mutualism takes us only so far, and I apply the theory of competitive altruism in arguing how strategic investment in behaviours which make one a desirable partner may drive moral conduct.

  9. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates

  10. Ambient salinity modifies the action of triiodothyronine in the air-breathing fish Anabas testudineus Bloch: effects on mitochondria-rich cell distribution, osmotic and metabolic regulations.

    PubMed

    Peter, M C Subhash; Leji, J; Peter, Valsa S

    2011-04-01

    The hydromineral and metabolic actions of thyroid hormone on osmotic acclimation in fish is less understood. We, therefore, studied the short-term action of triiodothyronine (T(3)), the potent thyroid hormone, on the distribution and the function of gill mitochondria-rich (MR) cells and on the whole body hydromineral and metabolic regulations of air-breathing fish (Anabas testudineus) adapted to either freshwater (FW) or acclimated to seawater (SA; 30 g L(-1)). As expected, 24 h T(3) injection (100 ng g(-1)) elevated (P<0.05) plasma T(3) but classically reduced (P<0.05) plasma T(4). The higher Na(+), K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity and the varied distribution pattern of MR cells in the gills of T(3)-treated FW and SA fish, suggest an action of T(3) on gill MR cell migration, though the density of these cells remained unchanged after T(3) treatment. The ouabain-sensitive Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, a measure of hydromineral competence, showed increases (P<0.05) in the gills of both FW and SA fish after T(3) administration, but inhibited (P<0.05) in the kidney of the FW fish and not in the SA fish. Exogenous T(3) reduced glucose (P<0.05) and urea (P<0.05) in the plasma of FW fish, whereas these metabolites were elevated (P<0.05) in the SA fish, suggesting a modulatory effect of ambient salinity on the T(3)-driven metabolic actions. Our data identify gill MR cell as a target for T(3) action as it promotes the spatial distribution and the osmotic function of these cells in both fresh water and in seawater. The results besides confirming the metabolic and osmotic actions of T(3) in fish support the hypothesis that the differential actions of T(3) may be due to the direct influence of ambient salinity, a major environmental determinant that alters the osmotic and metabolic strategies of fish.

  11. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  12. Malaysian competition

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1994-11-01

    Two years ago, the first tentative steps were taken to privatize the Malaysian electricity supply industry with the flotation of 25 percent of Tenaga Nasional Bhd. At the same time the terms were defined for independent power generation, and plans were drawn up for six projects. Now, with six independent power producer projects under construction adding more capacity than the partly privatized TNB, the utility`s station managers are concerned they will be at a competitive disadvantage unless they can operate under the same type of power sales agreement.

  13. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2011-07-01

    International tests on competences, such as TIMSS or PISA, and knowledge of young students have revealed low average scores in many countries, often unexpectedly. One effective measure to increase the average standard of a population is to bring the last third of the group to a higher level. Therefore, many nations put some effort into this activity. This brings the danger that not enough attention is paid to students at the other end, those who are talented. Indeed, it is a very difficult task for a teacher to support the less able and at the same time challenge the gifted students, to lead them to the limits of their abilities and provide for a smooth transition to university study. Physics competitions have been proven to fulfil these last demands to a large degree, and therefore are an important additional and, to some extent, complementary tool for the promotion of talented students. This third special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics contains three papers, each dealing with a different form of science contest. The first continues the series of presentations of tasks performed at the International Young Physicists' Tournament, which was held in Vienna in 2011. First place went to the team from Singapore, and they have put their investigation on vertical oscillations of coupled magnets into written form (not required by the tournament, where an oral presentation and a defence and discussion are the central aspects). Their paper shows how rich in physics this problem is, and what level of solutions high-school students can already achieve. Sadly, those responsible for the organization of last year's International Physics Olympiad did not provide us with a report on this competition. This is unfortunate, since the Olympiad in Zagreb was very successful and, in particular, the experimental tasks were creative and demanding. Very similar to the aims and the execution of the Physics Olympiad is the International Olympiad on Astronomy

  14. Complex competitive systems and competitive thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, A Y

    2013-01-13

    This publication reviews the framework of abstract competition, which is aimed at studying complex systems with competition in their generic form. Although the concept of abstract competition has been derived from a specific field--modelling of mixing in turbulent reacting flows--this concept is, generally, not attached to a specific phenomenon or application. Two classes of competition rules, transitive and intransitive, need to be distinguished. Transitive competitions are shown to be consistent (at least qualitatively) with thermodynamic principles, which allows for introduction of special competitive thermodynamics. Competitive systems can thus be characterized by thermodynamic quantities (such as competitive entropy and competitive potential), which determine that the predominant direction of evolution of the system is directed towards higher competitiveness. There is, however, an important difference: while conventional thermodynamics is constrained by its zeroth law and is fundamentally transitive, the transitivity of competitive thermodynamics depends on the transitivity of the competition rules. The analogy with conventional thermodynamics weakens as competitive systems become more intransitive, while strongly intransitive competitions can display types of behaviour associated with complexity: competitive cooperation and leaping cycles. Results of simulations demonstrating complex behaviour in abstract competitions are presented in the electronic supplementary material.

  15. Characterization of the mechanism of action of the genetically modified Cry1AbMod toxin that is active against Cry1Ab-resistant insects.

    PubMed

    Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Portugal, Leivi; Pardo-López, Liliana; Jiménez-Juárez, Nuria; Arenas, Ivan; Gómez, Isabel; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Arroyo, Raquel; Holzenburg, Andreas; Savva, Christos G; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2009-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are used in the control of insect pests. They are pore-forming toxins with a complex mechanism that involves the sequential interaction with receptors. They are produced as protoxins, which are activated by midgut proteases. Activated toxin binds to cadherin receptor, inducing an extra cleavage including helix alpha-1, facilitating the formation of a pre-pore oligomer. The toxin oligomer binds to secondary receptors such as aminopeptidase and inserts into lipid rafts forming pores and causing larval death. The primary threat to efficacy of Bt-toxins is the evolution of insect resistance. Engineered Cry1AMod toxins, devoid of helix alpha-1, could be used for the control of resistance in lepidopterans by bypassing the altered cadherin receptor, killing resistant insects affected in this receptor. Here we analyzed the mechanism of action of Cry1AbMod. We found that alkaline pH and the presence of membrane lipids facilitates the oligomerization of Cry1AbMod. In addition, tryptophan fluorescence emission spectra, ELISA binding to pure aminopeptidase receptor, calcein release assay and analysis of ionic-conductance in planar lipid bilayers, indicated that the secondary steps in mode of action that take place after interaction with cadherin receptor such as oligomerization, receptor binding and pore formation are similar in the Cry1AbMod and in the wild type Cry1Ab. Finally, the membrane-associated structure of Cry1AbMod oligomer was analyzed by electron crystallography showing that it forms a complex with a trimeric organization. PMID:19559004

  16. Characterization of the mechanism of action of the genetically modified Cry1AbMod toxin that is active against Cry1Ab-resistant insects.

    PubMed

    Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Portugal, Leivi; Pardo-López, Liliana; Jiménez-Juárez, Nuria; Arenas, Ivan; Gómez, Isabel; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Arroyo, Raquel; Holzenburg, Andreas; Savva, Christos G; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2009-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are used in the control of insect pests. They are pore-forming toxins with a complex mechanism that involves the sequential interaction with receptors. They are produced as protoxins, which are activated by midgut proteases. Activated toxin binds to cadherin receptor, inducing an extra cleavage including helix alpha-1, facilitating the formation of a pre-pore oligomer. The toxin oligomer binds to secondary receptors such as aminopeptidase and inserts into lipid rafts forming pores and causing larval death. The primary threat to efficacy of Bt-toxins is the evolution of insect resistance. Engineered Cry1AMod toxins, devoid of helix alpha-1, could be used for the control of resistance in lepidopterans by bypassing the altered cadherin receptor, killing resistant insects affected in this receptor. Here we analyzed the mechanism of action of Cry1AbMod. We found that alkaline pH and the presence of membrane lipids facilitates the oligomerization of Cry1AbMod. In addition, tryptophan fluorescence emission spectra, ELISA binding to pure aminopeptidase receptor, calcein release assay and analysis of ionic-conductance in planar lipid bilayers, indicated that the secondary steps in mode of action that take place after interaction with cadherin receptor such as oligomerization, receptor binding and pore formation are similar in the Cry1AbMod and in the wild type Cry1Ab. Finally, the membrane-associated structure of Cry1AbMod oligomer was analyzed by electron crystallography showing that it forms a complex with a trimeric organization.

  17. Annual report to Congress on competition, FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report is divided into: Introduction, Organization, Competition Advocacy Program at DOE, Unique Aspects of the DOE Acquisitions, Summary of Activities and Accomplishments of DOE's Advocate for Competition during Fiscal Year 1985, Statistical results of Fiscal Year 1985 DOE Procurement Activities, and FY 1986 Planned Competition Advocacy Program Improvement Actions.

  18. Competitive Science: Is Competition Ruining Science?

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Science has always been a competitive undertaking. Despite recognition of the benefits of cooperation and team science, reduced availability of funding and jobs has made science more competitive than ever. Here we consider the benefits of competition in providing incentives to scientists and the adverse effects of competition on resource sharing, research integrity, and creativity. The history of science shows that transformative discoveries often occur in the absence of competition, which only emerges once fields are established and goals are defined. Measures to encourage collaboration and ameliorate competition in the scientific enterprise are discussed. PMID:25605760

  19. Competitive science: is competition ruining science?

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-04-01

    Science has always been a competitive undertaking. Despite recognition of the benefits of cooperation and team science, reduced availability of funding and jobs has made science more competitive than ever. Here we consider the benefits of competition in providing incentives to scientists and the adverse effects of competition on resource sharing, research integrity, and creativity. The history of science shows that transformative discoveries often occur in the absence of competition, which only emerges once fields are established and goals are defined. Measures to encourage collaboration and ameliorate competition in the scientific enterprise are discussed.

  20. Competitive science: is competition ruining science?

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-04-01

    Science has always been a competitive undertaking. Despite recognition of the benefits of cooperation and team science, reduced availability of funding and jobs has made science more competitive than ever. Here we consider the benefits of competition in providing incentives to scientists and the adverse effects of competition on resource sharing, research integrity, and creativity. The history of science shows that transformative discoveries often occur in the absence of competition, which only emerges once fields are established and goals are defined. Measures to encourage collaboration and ameliorate competition in the scientific enterprise are discussed. PMID:25605760

  1. Lenalidomide as a disease-modifying agent in patients with del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes: linking mechanism of action to clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Mufti, Ghulam J; Fenaux, Pierre; Germing, Ulrich; List, Alan; MacBeth, Kyle J

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), is the most prevalent cytogenetic abnormality in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In isolation, it is traditionally associated with favorable prognosis compared with other subtypes of MDS. However, owing to the inherent heterogeneity of the disease, prognosis for patients with del(5q) MDS is highly variable depending on the presence of factors such as additional chromosomal abnormalities, >5 % blasts in the bone marrow (BM), or transfusion dependence. Over recent years, the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in patients with del(5q) MDS. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease have suggested that lenalidomide targets aberrant signaling pathways caused by haplosufficiency of specific genes in a commonly deleted region on chromosome 5 (e.g., SPARC, RPS14, Cdc25C, and PP2A). As a result, the agent specifically targets del(5q) clones while also promoting erythropoiesis and repopulation of the bone marrow in normal cells. This review discusses recent developments in the understanding of the mechanism of action of lenalidomide, and how this underlies favorable outcomes in patients with del(5q) MDS. In addition, we discuss how improved understanding of the mechanism of disease will facilitate clinicians' ability to predict/monitor response and identify patients at risk of relapse. PMID:24018623

  2. Lenalidomide as a disease-modifying agent in patients with del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes: linking mechanism of action to clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Mufti, Ghulam J; Fenaux, Pierre; Germing, Ulrich; List, Alan; MacBeth, Kyle J

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), is the most prevalent cytogenetic abnormality in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In isolation, it is traditionally associated with favorable prognosis compared with other subtypes of MDS. However, owing to the inherent heterogeneity of the disease, prognosis for patients with del(5q) MDS is highly variable depending on the presence of factors such as additional chromosomal abnormalities, >5 % blasts in the bone marrow (BM), or transfusion dependence. Over recent years, the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in patients with del(5q) MDS. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease have suggested that lenalidomide targets aberrant signaling pathways caused by haplosufficiency of specific genes in a commonly deleted region on chromosome 5 (e.g., SPARC, RPS14, Cdc25C, and PP2A). As a result, the agent specifically targets del(5q) clones while also promoting erythropoiesis and repopulation of the bone marrow in normal cells. This review discusses recent developments in the understanding of the mechanism of action of lenalidomide, and how this underlies favorable outcomes in patients with del(5q) MDS. In addition, we discuss how improved understanding of the mechanism of disease will facilitate clinicians' ability to predict/monitor response and identify patients at risk of relapse.

  3. Plant cell wall extensibility: connecting plant cell growth with cell wall structure, mechanics, and the action of wall-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of user-friendly instruments for measuring force/deflection curves of plant surfaces at high spatial resolution has resulted in a recent outpouring of reports of the 'Young's modulus' of plant cell walls. The stimulus for these mechanical measurements comes from biomechanical models of morphogenesis of meristems and other tissues, as well as single cells, in which cell wall stress feeds back to regulate microtubule organization, auxin transport, cellulose deposition, and future growth directionality. In this article I review the differences between elastic modulus and wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. Some of the inherent complexities, assumptions, and potential pitfalls in the interpretation of indentation force/deflection curves are discussed. Reported values of elastic moduli from surface indentation measurements appear to be 10- to >1000-fold smaller than realistic tensile elastic moduli in the plane of plant cell walls. Potential reasons for this disparity are discussed, but further work is needed to make sense of the huge range in reported values. The significance of wall stress relaxation for growth is reviewed and connected to recent advances and remaining enigmas in our concepts of how cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins are assembled to make an extensible cell wall. A comparison of the loosening action of α-expansin and Cel12A endoglucanase is used to illustrate two different ways in which cell walls may be made more extensible and the divergent effects on wall mechanics.

  4. Lunabotics Mining Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rob; Murphy, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes a competition to design a lunar robot (lunabot) that can be controlled either remotely or autonomously, isolated from the operator, and is designed to mine a lunar aggregate simulant. The competition is part of a systems engineering curriculum. The 2010 competition winners in five areas of the competition were acknowledged, and the 2011 competition was announced.

  5. Competitive spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Leicester University will host the 65 international teams of students who will assemble in July for this year's International Physics Olympiad . The last time the Olympiad came to the UK was in 1986 in London, and it was the notable enthusiasm of the Leicester Physics and Astronomy department which persuaded the Olympiad Committee to give them the chance of organizing the prestigious event. The students taking part from all over the world are studying physics at A-level or an equivalent standard and they will take part in an intellectual marathon of theoretical and practical examinations. Each national team comprises five students selected from three rounds of competition and the teams will receive an official welcome from the city, as well as opportunities to visit some of the important educational and cultural centres of the surrounding region. The finalists will also be able to test their skills and initiative at the Challenger Learning Centre, which forms part of Leicester's new National Space Science Centre. Specific information on the event can be found on the Olympiad-2000 website at www.star.le.ac.uk/IphO-2000 . The Rudolf Ortvay problem solving contest in physics, which takes place in November, is a tradition of Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. The competition was first opened to international participants in 1998, enabling students from universities around the world to show their knowledge, ingenuity, problem-solving skills and physical insight into problems that are far beyond routine level. The problems (30 - 35 each year) are chosen from different branches of theoretical as well as applied physics. They have varying levels of difficulty, and every contestant can send solutions for ten problems. The focus is not on school-level problem-solving routines but rather on the `physical' way of thinking, recognition of the heart of the problem and an appropriate choice of mathematics. The majority of the assigned problems are original, few having

  6. Competitive spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Leicester University will host the 65 international teams of students who will assemble in July for this year's International Physics Olympiad . The last time the Olympiad came to the UK was in 1986 in London, and it was the notable enthusiasm of the Leicester Physics and Astronomy department which persuaded the Olympiad Committee to give them the chance of organizing the prestigious event. The students taking part from all over the world are studying physics at A-level or an equivalent standard and they will take part in an intellectual marathon of theoretical and practical examinations. Each national team comprises five students selected from three rounds of competition and the teams will receive an official welcome from the city, as well as opportunities to visit some of the important educational and cultural centres of the surrounding region. The finalists will also be able to test their skills and initiative at the Challenger Learning Centre, which forms part of Leicester's new National Space Science Centre. Specific information on the event can be found on the Olympiad-2000 website at www.star.le.ac.uk/IphO-2000 . The Rudolf Ortvay problem solving contest in physics, which takes place in November, is a tradition of Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. The competition was first opened to international participants in 1998, enabling students from universities around the world to show their knowledge, ingenuity, problem-solving skills and physical insight into problems that are far beyond routine level. The problems (30 - 35 each year) are chosen from different branches of theoretical as well as applied physics. They have varying levels of difficulty, and every contestant can send solutions for ten problems. The focus is not on school-level problem-solving routines but rather on the `physical' way of thinking, recognition of the heart of the problem and an appropriate choice of mathematics. The majority of the assigned problems are original, few having

  7. Picking battles wisely: plant behaviour under competition.

    PubMed

    Novoplansky, Ariel

    2009-06-01

    Plants are limited in their ability to choose their neighbours, but they are able to orchestrate a wide spectrum of rational competitive behaviours that increase their prospects to prevail under various ecological settings. Through the perception of neighbours, plants are able to anticipate probable competitive interactions and modify their competitive behaviours to maximize their long-term gains. Specifically, plants can minimize competitive encounters by avoiding their neighbours; maximize their competitive effects by aggressively confronting their neighbours; or tolerate the competitive effects of their neighbours. However, the adaptive values of these non-mutually exclusive options are expected to depend strongly on the plants' evolutionary background and to change dynamically according to their past development, and relative sizes and vigour. Additionally, the magnitude of competitive responsiveness is expected to be positively correlated with the reliability of the environmental information regarding the expected competitive interactions and the expected time left for further plastic modifications. Concurrent competition over external and internal resources and morphogenetic signals may enable some plants to increase their efficiency and external competitive performance by discriminately allocating limited resources to their more promising organs at the expense of failing or less successful organs.

  8. The Janus face of Darwinian competition

    PubMed Central

    Hintze, Arend; Phillips, Nathaniel; Hertwig, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Without competition, organisms would not evolve any meaningful physical or cognitive abilities. Competition can thus be understood as the driving force behind Darwinian evolution. But does this imply that more competitive environments necessarily evolve organisms with more sophisticated cognitive abilities than do less competitive environments? Or is there a tipping point at which competition does more harm than good? We examine the evolution of decision strategies among virtual agents performing a repetitive sampling task in three distinct environments. The environments differ in the degree to which the actions of a competitor can affect the fitness of the sampling agent, and in the variance of the sample. Under weak competition, agents evolve decision strategies that sample often and make accurate decisions, which not only improve their own fitness, but are good for the entire population. Under extreme competition, however, the dark side of the Janus face of Darwinian competition emerges: Agents are forced to sacrifice accuracy for speed and are prevented from sampling as often as higher variance in the environment would require. Modest competition is therefore a good driver for the evolution of cognitive abilities and of the population as a whole, whereas too much competition is devastating. PMID:26354182

  9. The Janus face of Darwinian competition.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Arend; Phillips, Nathaniel; Hertwig, Ralph

    2015-09-10

    Without competition, organisms would not evolve any meaningful physical or cognitive abilities. Competition can thus be understood as the driving force behind Darwinian evolution. But does this imply that more competitive environments necessarily evolve organisms with more sophisticated cognitive abilities than do less competitive environments? Or is there a tipping point at which competition does more harm than good? We examine the evolution of decision strategies among virtual agents performing a repetitive sampling task in three distinct environments. The environments differ in the degree to which the actions of a competitor can affect the fitness of the sampling agent, and in the variance of the sample. Under weak competition, agents evolve decision strategies that sample often and make accurate decisions, which not only improve their own fitness, but are good for the entire population. Under extreme competition, however, the dark side of the Janus face of Darwinian competition emerges: Agents are forced to sacrifice accuracy for speed and are prevented from sampling as often as higher variance in the environment would require. Modest competition is therefore a good driver for the evolution of cognitive abilities and of the population as a whole, whereas too much competition is devastating.

  10. The Janus face of Darwinian competition.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Arend; Phillips, Nathaniel; Hertwig, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Without competition, organisms would not evolve any meaningful physical or cognitive abilities. Competition can thus be understood as the driving force behind Darwinian evolution. But does this imply that more competitive environments necessarily evolve organisms with more sophisticated cognitive abilities than do less competitive environments? Or is there a tipping point at which competition does more harm than good? We examine the evolution of decision strategies among virtual agents performing a repetitive sampling task in three distinct environments. The environments differ in the degree to which the actions of a competitor can affect the fitness of the sampling agent, and in the variance of the sample. Under weak competition, agents evolve decision strategies that sample often and make accurate decisions, which not only improve their own fitness, but are good for the entire population. Under extreme competition, however, the dark side of the Janus face of Darwinian competition emerges: Agents are forced to sacrifice accuracy for speed and are prevented from sampling as often as higher variance in the environment would require. Modest competition is therefore a good driver for the evolution of cognitive abilities and of the population as a whole, whereas too much competition is devastating. PMID:26354182

  11. Autonomy Support and Its Links to Physical Activity and Competitive Performance: Mediations through Motivation, Competence, Action Orientation and Harmonious Passion, and the Moderator Role of Autonomy Support by Perceived Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvari, Hallgeir; Ulstad, Svein Olav; Bagoien, Tor Egil; Skjesol, Knut

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a Self-Determination Theory (SDT) process model in relation to involvement in physical activity and competitive performance among students (N = 190). In this model, perceived autonomy support from teachers and coaches was expected to be positively related to autonomous motivation, perceived competence,…

  12. Competition and the utility industry -- Who will survive?

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, S.L.

    1995-05-01

    Much has appeared in the business press recently about competition in the energy industry. Traditional utilities, for the most part, have accepted the emergence of competition, if not on the retail side, at least on the supply side. What does the future hold for traditional utilities and the independent power producers? Competition in the supply (wholesale) side of electrical power, a decade old, is here to stay. Many utilities now agree that cost savings have been realized through the competitive purchase of power. Competition will arrive in the near future to the retail side of the utility industry, ending geographic monopolies enjoyed by local utilities. Which utilities will be affected most by competition is now under debate. The answer to that question depends, in part, on whether retail side competition is controlled by state-initiation action or federal initiated action (such as took place in the natural gas, airline and telephone industries). Some generalizations are made and discussed.

  13. Mixing, entropy and competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, A. Y.

    2012-06-01

    Non-traditional thermodynamics, applied to random behaviour associated with turbulence, mixing and competition, is reviewed and analysed. Competitive mixing represents a general framework for the study of generic properties of competitive systems and can be used to model a wide class of non-equilibrium phenomena ranging from turbulent premixed flames and invasion waves to complex competitive systems. We demonstrate consistency of the general principles of competition with thermodynamic description, review and analyse the related entropy concepts and introduce the corresponding competitive H-theorem. A competitive system can be characterized by a thermodynamic quantity—competitive potential—which determines the likely direction of evolution of the system. Contested resources tend to move between systems from lower to higher values of the competitive potential. There is, however, an important difference between conventional thermodynamics and competitive thermodynamics. While conventional thermodynamics is constrained by its zeroth law and is fundamentally transitive, the transitivity of competitive thermodynamics depends on the transitivity of the competition rules. Intransitivities are common in the real world and are responsible for complex behaviour in competitive systems. This work follows ideas and methods that have originated from the analysis of turbulent combustion, but reviews a much broader scope of issues linked to mixing and competition, including thermodynamic characterization of complex competitive systems with self-organization. The approach presented here is interdisciplinary and is addressed to the general educated readers, whereas the mathematical details can be found in the appendices.

  14. Effect of different factors modifying the activity of some enzyme systems of the endoplasmic reticulum on the sensitivity of cell organelles against the damaging action of chemical agents. II. Studies with chlorpromazine, 2,4-dinitrophenol, phenobarbital and DDT.

    PubMed

    Popov, C S; Yantchev, I; Popova, M P; Vultcheva, G M

    1979-02-01

    Further investigations on the effect of different stress factors on the stability of intracellular membranes were carried out. Large granule fractions derived from livers of sleep-deprived and dehydrated rats and subjected to preincubation at 37 degrees and pH 5 were shown to release latent acid phosphatase with a delayed rate indicating an increased lysosomal stability towards acid media conditioning. Lysosomes of such animals, however, were found to be more sensitive to mechanical treatments (homogenization procedure in this case) than that of controls, a conclusion made on the basis of enhanced "free" and nonsedimentable phosphatase activities in liver homogenates. The stress factors which previously were included in the group of modifiers of the activity of the endoplasmic reticulum-located enzymes caused some changes in the action of certain chemicals on membranes. Earlier such changes were elicited for carbon tetrachloride and only on low-temperature-conditioned rats for chlorpromazine. The present results show that stress factors studied result in deviations (different in extent and in direction) from the usual effects of chlorpromazine, 2,4-dinitrophenol, phenobarbital and DDT on liver lysosomes and peroxisomes. PMID:465308

  15. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  16. FIRST teams watch the competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    FIRST teams watch robots in action during the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  17. Principal components analysis competitive learning.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, Ezequiel; Ortiz-de-Lazcano-Lobato, Juan Miguel; Muñoz-Pérez, José; Gómez-Ruiz, José Antonio

    2004-11-01

    We present a new neural model that extends the classical competitive learning by performing a principal components analysis (PCA) at each neuron. This model represents an improvement with respect to known local PCA methods, because it is not needed to present the entire data set to the network on each computing step. This allows a fast execution while retaining the dimensionality-reduction properties of the PCA. Furthermore, every neuron is able to modify its behavior to adapt to the local dimensionality of the input distribution. Hence, our model has a dimensionality estimation capability. The experimental results we present show the dimensionality-reduction capabilities of the model with multisensor images.

  18. Strategic planning and competition

    SciTech Connect

    Gang, W.G. )

    1994-02-01

    This article discusses how to formulate a successful strategic plan in the face of competition from other electric utilities. Areas covered include reasons for plan failure, competitive simulations to test strategic plans, intelligence gathering, and cost reduction through reorganization.

  19. Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liles, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition is a new competition that needs graphics, logos, rules, as well as an arena. Although this is the first year of the competition, the competition is modeled after an existing competition, the Centennial Lunar Excavator Challenge. This competition however is aimed at college students. This makes the challenge identifying key aspects of the original competition and modeling them to fit into an easier task, and creating exciting advertisement that helps encourage participation. By using a youth focus group, young insight, as well as guiding advice from experts in the field, hopefully an arena can be designed and built, rules can be molded and created to fit, and alluring graphics can be printed to bring about a successful first year of the Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition.

  20. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  1. Competition in Courtship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laner, Mary Riege

    1986-01-01

    Explores both positive and negative competition within premarital relationships using a typology of competitive behaviors. Findings compare competitive activities of men and women in serious mate-choice oriented relationships. Implications for both courtship and marital relationships are offered. (Author/BL)

  2. In Defence of Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prvulovich, Zika Rad

    1982-01-01

    Examines objections to competition as presented by educational philosopher Michael Fielding and others. The two major types of criticism of competition are that it is unfair and divisive and that it is selfish and immoral. The author advocates educational experiences which combine self-competition with cooperation. (AM)

  3. Gaining the Competitive Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Training and Development, Alexandria, VA.

    Economic competitiveness is today's most critical issue. Keeping the United States competitive in the world marketplace means the difference between a rising standard of living for everyone and the disappearance of what is taken for granted as a way of life. Developing human capital is the route toward successful competition, as some examples…

  4. Competitive Anxiety in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rainer; And Others

    This book is a comprehensive review of competitive anxiety research that has used the Sport Competition Anxiety Test, or SCAT (a trait scale), and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2). The book describes the theoretical basis and development procedures for both scales, including detailed information on reliability and validity. In…

  5. Strategizing for Intense Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, William; Bourgeois, Ernest J., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Examines trend toward more aggressive student recruiting strategies by colleges and universities, applying a model that assesses five competitive forces-cause and effect of competition, the expanding marketplace, substitute products, buyer power, and supplier power, and examines various strategies for dealing with these competitive forces, such as…

  6. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  7. Student Perspectives of Competition: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Lucius, Jennifer Evens; Johnson, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The present study involved action research of appraising business students' individual assessments of a classroom competition exercise in which they participated for a university semester. Analysis of in-depth interviews held with each student show four over-arching themes shared by the participants. First, students showed significant self-insight…

  8. Build a Positive Classroom Environment: Avoid Competition!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Nancy S.

    2009-01-01

    Elementary teachers often instigate competition among their students through such common statements as: "Students who make 100 on the spelling test may have 10 minutes of extra center time" and "The most creatively written story this week will be placed on the bulletin board." While such pronouncements motivate some students into action, they…

  9. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  10. Utility competition with small business. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    D'Addario, P.J.

    1986-06-10

    The purpose of the study is to take a further, and broader, look at the competition issue between utilities and small businesses of energy-related utility programs. The contractor examined in greater depth the reasons for utility interest in diversifying into nonregulated, and competitive, energy-related fields; the elements of utility subsidization of these non-regulated activities; the potential remedies that small businesses have to counter unfair or illegal competition; the scope of the cross-subsidy problem; and the effectiveness of specific actions taken by small businesses against utilities. The purpose of the report is, therefore, to address these five areas, including five key case studies of actual small business complaints against alleged unfair or illegal utility competition.

  11. 76 FR 18240 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II South Coal Tract described below in Converse...

  12. 76 FR 11258 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the West Antelope II North Coal Tract described below in Campbell...

  13. 76 FR 64099 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Hilight Field Coal Tract described below in Campbell County,...

  14. 76 FR 35465 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Caballo West Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will...

  15. 76 FR 63951 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... November 7, 2005, are subject to cost recovery on a case-by-case basis (See 43 CFR 3000.10(d)(1), 70 FR... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that that...

  16. 77 FR 40630 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Colorado AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal reserves in the Wadge Seam described below in Routt County, Colorado, will be offered...

  17. 77 FR 28620 - Notice of Determination of No Competitive Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... the Atlantic Wind Connection Proposal (76 FR 79206). DATES: Effective May 15, 2012. FOR FURTHER... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice of Determination of No Competitive Interest AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Determination of No Competitive Interest...

  18. 77 FR 47092 - Notice of Determination of No Competitive Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Wind's proposed Block Island Wind Farm (BIWF), a proposed 30-megawatt offshore wind energy project... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice of Determination of No Competitive Interest AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Determination of No Competitive Interest...

  19. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  20. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches. PMID:25528318

  1. Intensity and direction as dimensions of competitive state anxiety and relationships with competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Jones, G; Swain, A

    1992-04-01

    This study examined differences in intensity and direction of symptoms of competitive state anxiety in high and low competitive subjects from the sports of rugby union, basketball, soccer, and field hockey. The 69 men were dichotomized via a median-split into high and low competitive groups based on their scores on the Sport Orientation Questionnaire. All subjects completed a modified version of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 30 minutes prior to competition. This inventory included the original intensity scale plus a direction scale on which subjects rated the extent the experienced intensity of each symptom was either facilitative or debilitative to subsequent performance. There were no significant group differences on intensity of cognitive anxiety or of somatic anxiety or on direction of somatic anxiety; however, the highly competitive group of 34 subjects reported their anxiety as more facilitative and less debilitative than the low competitive group (n = 35). This supports the proposal that sports performers' directional perceptions of their anxiety symptoms may provide further understanding of the competitive state-anxiety response.

  2. Four paths of competition

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1995-05-01

    The financial community`s focus on utility competition has been riveted on the proceedings now in progress at state regulatory commissions. The fear that something immediately damaging will come out of these proceedings seems to have diminished in recent months, and the stock market has reacted favorably. However, regulatory developments are only one of four paths leading to competition; the others are the marketplace, the legislatures, and the courts. Each could play a critical role in the emergence of competition.

  3. The harms of smoking and benefits of smoking cessation in women compared with men with type 2 diabetes: an observational analysis of the ADVANCE (Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron modified release Controlled Evaluation) trial

    PubMed Central

    Blomster, Juuso I; Woodward, Mark; Zoungas, Sophia; Hillis, Graham S; Harrap, Stephen; Neal, Bruce; Poulter, Neil; Mancia, Giuseppe; Chalmers, John; Huxley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In general populations, the adverse effects of smoking on coronary risk have been demonstrated to be greater in women than in men; whether this is true for individuals with diabetes is unclear. Design Cohort study. Setting 20 countries worldwide participating in the ADVANCE (Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron modified release Controlled Evaluation) trial. Participants 11 140 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥55 years and in cardiovascular risk at the time of randomisation. Primary and secondary outcome measures Major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular disease, non-fatal stroke or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI)), all cardiovascular events (major cardiovascular event or peripheral arterial disease or transient ischaemic attack), and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcome measures were major coronary events (fatal and non-fatal MI), major cerebrovascular events (fatal and non-fatal stroke), nephropathy (new or worsening renal disease), and all cancer. Results At baseline, 6466 (56% women) participants were never-smokers, 1550 (28% women) were daily smokers and 3124 (21% women) were former smokers. Median follow-up time was 5 years. In Cox regression models after multiple adjustments, compared with never smoking, daily smoking was associated with increased risk of all primary and secondary outcomes with the exception of major cerebrovascular disease. Only for major coronary events was there any evidence of a stronger effect in women than in men (ratio of the adjusted HRs women:men; 1.64 (0.83 to 3.26) p=0.08). For all other outcomes considered, the hazards of smoking were similar in men and women. Quitting smoking was associated with a 30% reduction in all-cause mortality (p=0.001) in both sexes. Conclusions In individuals with diabetes, the effects of smoking on all major forms of cardiovascular disease are equally as hazardous in women and men with the possible exception of major coronary events

  4. 47 CFR 0.302 - Record of actions taken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Delegations of Authority Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau § 0.302 Record of actions taken. The application and authorization files are designated as the Commission's official records of action of the Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau...

  5. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  6. Limb apraxia and the "affordance competition hypothesis".

    PubMed

    Rounis, Elisabeth; Humphreys, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Limb apraxia, a disorder of higher order motor control, has long been a challenge for clinical assessment and understanding (Leiguarda and Marsden, 2000). The deficits originally described in limb apraxia (Liepmann, 1920) have been classified by the nature of the errors made by the patients leading to, namely, ideational and ideomotor apraxia. The dual stream hypothesis (Goodale and Milner, 1992) has been used to explain these categories: ideational apraxia is thought to relate to a deficit in the concept of a movement (coded in the ventral stream). Patients have difficulty using objects, sequencing actions to interact with them or pantomiming their use. Ideomotor apraxia, on the other hand, is thought to arise from problems in the accurate implementation of movements within the dorsal stream. One of the limitations on understanding apraxia is the failure by the clinical literature to draw on knowledge of the factors determining actions in the environment. Here we emphasize the role of affordance. There is much recent work indicating that our responses to stimuli are strongly influenced by the actions that the objects "afford", based on their physical properties and the intentions of the actor (e.g., Tucker and Ellis, 1998). The concept of affordance, originally suggested by Gibson (1979) has been incorporated in a recent model of interactive behavior that draws from findings in non-human primates, namely the "affordance competition hypothesis" (Cisek, 2007). This postulates that interactive behavior arises by a process of competition between possible actions elicited by the environment. In this paper we argue that "affordance competition" may play a role in apraxia. We review evidence that at least some aspects of apraxia may reflect an abnormal sensitivity to competition when multiple affordances are present (Riddoch et al., 1998) and/or a poor ability to exert cognitive control over this competition when it occurs. This framework suggests a new way of

  7. Genetically modified probiotics in foods.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2003-11-01

    Probiotics have many potential therapeutic uses, but have not been universally accepted because of a lack of understanding of their action. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been modified by traditional and genetic engineering methods to produce new varieties. Modern techniques of molecular biology have facilitated the identification of probiotic LAB strains, but only a few LAB have been modified by recombinant-DNA technology because of consumer resistance to their introduction to markets, especially in Europe.

  8. Competitiveness, Technology and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lall, Sanjaya

    This document examines competitiveness in the developing world. Chapters 1 through 3, which are largely conceptual, examine the following topics: the concept of competitiveness and why it is important; market-stimulating technology policies in developing countries, and the relationship between import liberalization and industrial performance.…

  9. Competition in Economic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, F.

    1982-01-01

    Considers two alternative views of competition found in the economics literature. The author demonstrates that these alternative views of competition underlie alternative views in other areas of economics, including welfare economics and micro-economic policy. Implications for college students and teachers are examined. (Author/AM)

  10. Competition: Was Kohn Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, David Light; Bredemeier, Brenda Light

    2010-01-01

    Alfie Kohn made the case for competition being destructive to education. The truth may be that there are two separate ways to contest: true competition, which is a healthy desire to excel, and decompetition, which is the unhealthy desire merely to beat the opponent. Decompetition leads to the ills that Kohn enumerated. Educators should teach their…

  11. 78 FR 19799 - National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Program Design Competition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... United States Mint National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Program Design Competition ACTION: Notification of the Opening of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Program Design Competition... (heads side) of the 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coins. The competition, which...

  12. 78 FR 28291 - Announcement of the Fall 2013 Annual Grant Competition for Immediate Release

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Announcement of the Fall 2013 Annual Grant Competition for Immediate Release AGENCY: United States Institute of Peace. ] ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Agency announces its Annual Grant Competition, which offers... and conflict resolution. The Annual Grant Competition is open to any project that falls within...

  13. 78 FR 28292 - Announcement of the Priority Grant Competition For Immediate Release

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Announcement of the Priority Grant Competition For Immediate Release AGENCY: United States Institute of Peace. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Agency announces its ongoing Priority Grant Competition. The Priority Grant Competition focuses on countries and themes as they relate to USIP's mandate. The Priority Grant...

  14. 77 FR 18884 - Announcement of the Priority Grant Competition for Immediate Release

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Announcement of the Priority Grant Competition for Immediate Release AGENCY: United States Institute of Peace. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Agency announces its ongoing Priority Grant Competition. The Priority Grant Competition focuses on countries and themes as they relate to USIP's mandate. The Priority Grant...

  15. 76 FR 61478 - Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC) AGENCY: Departmental Offices, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness will..., President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, Office of the Under Secretary for Domestic Finance,...

  16. 76 FR 31680 - Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC) AGENCY: Departmental Offices, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness will... Officer, President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, Office of the Under Secretary for...

  17. 77 FR 1127 - Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC) AGENCY: Departmental Offices, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness will..., President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, Office of the Under Secretary for Domestic Finance,...

  18. 76 FR 7629 - Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... Open Meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (PCJC) AGENCY: Departmental Offices, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness will... Oxtoby, Designated Federal Officer, President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, Office of the...

  19. Modifiers of the ash properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Vaclav; Najser, Jan; Pilat, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this article is to perform an experimental verification of the impact of added substances to limit or prevent sintering of solid fuel ash, which is formed during the thermochemical conversion of fuels. As a modifiers of ash sintering and melting temperature were used halloysite (aluminosilicate) and limestone, which has similar mechanism of action. Both of them act on the principle of a strong chemical adsorption of potassium ions, which largely cause a reduction of ash fusibility. Influence of the modifiers was observed after tests provided at 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200°C. Modifiers were dosed in amounts of 2, 5 and 10 wt.%.

  20. Foreign Energy Company Competitiveness: Background information

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, M.R.; Freund, K.A.; Roop, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides background information to the report Energy Company Competitiveness: Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994). The main body of this publication consists of data uncovered during the course of research on this DOE report. This data pertains to major government energy policies in each country studied. This report also provides a summary of the DOE report. In October 1993, the Office of Energy Intelligence, US Department of Energy (formerly the Office of Foreign Intelligence), requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepare a report addressing policies and actions used by foreign governments to enhance the competitiveness of their energy firms. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared the report Energy Company Competitiveness Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994), which provided the analysis requested by DOE. An appendix was also prepared, which provided extensive background documentation to the analysis. Because of the length of the appendix, Pacific Northwest Laboratory decided to publish this information separately, as contained in this report.

  1. Justice and competitive markets.

    PubMed

    Brody, B A

    1987-02-01

    This essay challenges the view that the provision of health care must take place within a competitive-free system. The author argues that, presuming that there is a requirement to meet the demands of those who cannot pay for health care, a competitive market provides a good way to deal with injustices within the health care system. The author concludes that the demands for justice are best met when indigent individuals use some portion of the funds they receive from the government to purchase one of the many competing forms of health care. This scheme requires a competitive market in the delivery of health care.

  2. Competitive hybridization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepinsky, Vera; Hashmi, Ghazala; Mishra, Bud

    2010-11-01

    Microarray technology, in its simplest form, allows one to gather abundance data for target DNA molecules, associated with genomes or gene-expressions, and relies on hybridizing the target to many short probe oligonucleotides arrayed on a surface. While for such multiplexed reactions conditions are optimized to make the most of each individual probe-target interaction, subsequent analysis of these experiments is based on the implicit assumption that a given experiment yields the same result regardless of whether it was conducted in isolation or in parallel with many others. It has been discussed in the literature that this assumption is frequently false, and its validity depends on the types of probes and their interactions with each other. We present a detailed physical model of hybridization as a means of understanding probe interactions in a multiplexed reaction. Ultimately, the model can be derived from a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE’s) describing kinetic mass action with conservation-of-mass equations completing the system. We examine pairwise probe interactions in detail and present a model of “competition” between the probes for the target—especially, when the target is effectively in short supply. These effects are shown to be predictable from the affinity constants for each of the four probe sequences involved, namely, the match and mismatch sequences for both probes. These affinity constants are calculated from the thermodynamic parameters such as the free energy of hybridization, which are in turn computed according to the nearest neighbor (NN) model for each probe and target sequence. Simulations based on the competitive hybridization model explain the observed variability in the signal of a given probe when measured in parallel with different groupings of other probes or individually. The results of the simulations can be used for experiment design and pooling strategies, based on which probes have been shown to have a strong

  3. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings from a study…

  4. Aboveground and belowground competition between willow Salix caprea its understory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Hermová, Markéta; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The effects of aboveground and belowground competition with the willow S. caprea on its understory plant community were studied in unreclaimed post-mining sites. Belowground competition was evaluated by comparing (i) frames inserted into the soil that excluded woody roots (frame treatment), (ii) frames that initially excluded woody root growth but then allowed regrowth of the roots (open-frame treatment), and (iii) undisturbed soil (no-frame treatment). These treatments were combined with S. caprea thinning to assess the effect of aboveground competition. Three years after the start of the experiment, aboveground competition from S. caprea (as modified by thinning of the S. caprea canopy) had not affected understory biomass or species number but had affected species composition. In contrast, belowground competition significantly affected both the aboveground and belowground biomass of the understory. The aboveground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame treatment (which excluded woody roots) than in the other two treatments. The belowground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame than in the open-frame treatment. Unlike aboveground competition (light availability), belowground competition did not affect understory species composition. Our results suggest that S. caprea is an important component during plant succession on post-mining sites because it considerably modifies its understory plant community. Belowground competition is a major reason for the low cover and biomass of the herbaceous understory in S. caprea stands on post-mining sites.

  5. Confidentiality: a modified value.

    PubMed Central

    Emson, H E

    1988-01-01

    In its original expression as a medical value confidentiality may have been absolute; this concept has become eroded by patient consent, legal actions and change in the climate of public opinion. In particular requirements arising out of legal statutes and common law judgements have greatly modified the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship in societies deriving their law from English origins. Despite this, confidentiality remains a value which the physician must strive to preserve. He cannot however do this without considering its effect upon possible innocent third parties. PMID:3392723

  6. Costing and competition.

    PubMed

    Bates, K; Brignall, S

    1994-01-01

    Working for patients established a new system of contracts between providers and purchasers of healthcare, with prices based on full costs, avoiding cross-subsidization. The new regime necessitates greatly improved costing systems, to improve the efficiency of service provision by creating price competition between providers. Ken Bates and Stan Brignall argue that non-price competition also occurs, with providers 'differentiating' on quality of service/product, flexibility or innovation. PMID:10136091

  7. 2000 FIRST Robotics Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purman, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The New Horizons Regional Education Center (NHREC) in Hampton, VA sought and received NASA funding to support its participation in the 2000 FIRST Robotics competition. FIRST, Inc. (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an organization which encourages the application of creative science, math, and computer science principles to solve real-world engineering problems. The FIRST competition is an international engineering contest featuring high school, government, and business partnerships.

  8. Competition for land

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pete; Gregory, Peter J.; van Vuuren, Detlef; Obersteiner, Michael; Havlík, Petr; Rounsevell, Mark; Woods, Jeremy; Stehfest, Elke; Bellarby, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for humanity is how a future global population of 9 billion can all be fed healthily and sustainably. Here, we review how competition for land is influenced by other drivers and pressures, examine land-use change over the past 20 years and consider future changes over the next 40 years. Competition for land, in itself, is not a driver affecting food and farming in the future, but is an emergent property of other drivers and pressures. Modelling studies suggest that future policy decisions in the agriculture, forestry, energy and conservation sectors could have profound effects, with different demands for land to supply multiple ecosystem services usually intensifying competition for land in the future. In addition to policies addressing agriculture and food production, further policies addressing the primary drivers of competition for land (population growth, dietary preference, protected areas, forest policy) could have significant impacts in reducing competition for land. Technologies for increasing per-area productivity of agricultural land will also be necessary. Key uncertainties in our projections of competition for land in the future relate predominantly to uncertainties in the drivers and pressures within the scenarios, in the models and data used in the projections and in the policy interventions assumed to affect the drivers and pressures in the future. PMID:20713395

  9. Competitiveness measurement system in the advertising sector.

    PubMed

    Poveda-Bautista, Rocío; García-Melón, Mónica; Baptista, Doris C

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a new approach to find indicators that can be used to measure companies' competitiveness and performance in an efficient and reliable way is presented. The aim is to assist managers of companies within a specific industrial sector by providing information about their relative position in the market so as to define better action plans that may improve the company's performance. The approach combines the use of the Analytic Network Process, a multicriteria decision method, with the Balanced Scorecard. It allows the definition of a number of competitiveness indicators based on the performance and setting of the advertising sector. In this way it is possible to obtain a Competitiveness Index that allows a company to know its relative position with respect to other companies in the sector, and establish a ranking of the companies ordered by their competitiveness level. A case study in the advertising industry of Venezuela is provided. Results show that improvement plans for the agencies analyzed should promote creativity, innovation and the use of new technologies, as a particular form of innovation. These factors were considered to be the most relevant indicators in the advertising sector. The participating experts agreed that the methodology is useful and an improvement over current competitiveness assessment methods.

  10. Competitiveness measurement system in the advertising sector.

    PubMed

    Poveda-Bautista, Rocío; García-Melón, Mónica; Baptista, Doris C

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a new approach to find indicators that can be used to measure companies' competitiveness and performance in an efficient and reliable way is presented. The aim is to assist managers of companies within a specific industrial sector by providing information about their relative position in the market so as to define better action plans that may improve the company's performance. The approach combines the use of the Analytic Network Process, a multicriteria decision method, with the Balanced Scorecard. It allows the definition of a number of competitiveness indicators based on the performance and setting of the advertising sector. In this way it is possible to obtain a Competitiveness Index that allows a company to know its relative position with respect to other companies in the sector, and establish a ranking of the companies ordered by their competitiveness level. A case study in the advertising industry of Venezuela is provided. Results show that improvement plans for the agencies analyzed should promote creativity, innovation and the use of new technologies, as a particular form of innovation. These factors were considered to be the most relevant indicators in the advertising sector. The participating experts agreed that the methodology is useful and an improvement over current competitiveness assessment methods. PMID:24505555

  11. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  12. Healthy Competition and Unsound Comparison: Reforming Educational Competition in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that the "competition state" responds to external competition by making competition increasingly central to its internal processes as well. This article discusses education reform in Singapore as departing from the opposite position. In Singapore "excessive" competition in education is now targeted by…

  13. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  14. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  15. Interspecific competition among Hawaiian forest birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mountainspring, S.; Scott, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether interspecific competition modified local geographic distribution, after taking into account the effect of habitat structure. The tendencies for 14 passerine birds to have positive or negative associations were examined, using 7861 sample points in seven native forests on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai. All birds were at least partly insectivorous and were fairly common in forested areas, although some fed chiefly on nectar or fruit. Species-pairs were classified as primary or secondary potential competitors based on general dietary similarity. To evaluate the association between species and to account for the effect of individual species habitat preferences, partial correlations were computed for each species-pair in a study area from the simple correlations between the species and 26 habitat variables plus two quadratic terms to represent nonlinearity. The partial correlations represented a short-term ('instantaneous') assessment of the strength of competitive interactions, and did not reflect the accumulation of competitive displacement through time. Of 170 partial correlations in the analysis, only 10 indicated significant negative association. The general pattern was of positive association (76 significantly positive partials), which probably resulted from flocking and from attraction of birds to areas of resource superabundance. Two species showed consistent patterns of negative partial correlations over several adjacent study areas, the Japanese White-eye/Iiwi in montane Hawaii, and the Japanese White-eye/Elepaio in windward Hawaii; both patterns could be reasonably attributed to direct competition. Species-pairs were grouped by the native or exotic status of the component species. Native/exotic pairs had a significantly greater proportion of negative partial correlations (37%) than either native/native pairs (8%) or exotic/exotic pairs (0%). This pattern was consistent across the seven study areas and

  16. Price competition in procurement

    SciTech Connect

    Keisler, J.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1996-07-01

    When creating a private market to provide a public good, government agencies can influence the market`s competitive characteristics. Markets have predictable, but often counterintuitive, behaviors. To succeed in applying available controls, and thereby reduce future costs, agencies must understand the behavior of the market. A model has been constructed to examine some issues in establishing competition for a structure in which there are economies of scale and government is obligated to purchase a fixed total quantity of a good. This model is used to demonstrate a way to estimate the cost savings from several alternative plans for a buyer exploring competitive procurement. The results are not and cannot be accurate for budgeting purposes; rather, they indicate the approximate magnitude of changes in cost that would be associated with changes in the market structure within which procurement occurs.

  17. IT product competition Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiu-Lian; Zhou, Lei; Shi, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yong-Li; Feng, Ai-Xia; He, Da-Ren

    2008-03-01

    Along with the technical development, the IT product competition becomes increasingly fierce in recent years. The factories, which produce the same IT product, have to improve continuously their own product quality for taking a large piece of cake in the product sale market. We suggest using a complex network description for the IT product competition. In the network the factories are defined as nodes, and two nodes are connected by a link if they produce a common IT product. The edge represents the sale competition relationship. 2121 factories and 265 products have been investigated. Some statistical properties, such as the degree distribution, node strength distribution, assortativity, and node degree correlation have been empirically obtained.

  18. Experimental evolution of sperm competitiveness in a mammal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When females mate with multiple partners, sperm from rival males compete to fertilise the ova. Studies of experimental evolution have proven the selective action of sperm competition on male reproductive traits. However, while reproductive traits may evolve in response to sperm competition, this does not necessarily provide evidence that sperm competitive ability responds to selection. Indeed, a study of Drosophila failed to observe divergence in sperm competitive ability of males in lines selected for enhanced sperm offence and defence. Results Adopting the naturally polygamous house mouse (Mus domesticus) as our vertebrate model, we performed an experimental evolution study and observed genetic divergence in sperm quality; males from the polygamous selection lines produced ejaculates with increased sperm numbers and greater sperm motility compared to males from the monogamous lines. Here, after 12 generations of experimental evolution, we conducted competitive matings between males from lineages evolving under sperm competition and males from lineages subject to relaxed selection. We reduced variation in paternity arising from embryo mortality by genotyping embryos in utero at 14 days gestation. Our microsatellite data revealed a significant paternity bias toward males that evolved under the selective regime of sperm competition. Conclusion We provide evidence that the sperm competitiveness phenotype can respond to selection, and show that improved sperm quality translates to greater competitive fertilisation success in house mice. PMID:21251249

  19. Utility competition and residential customers

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Residential customers have found themselves either ignored or ill-used by the major participants in the struggle over utility competition. No group is seeking to secure them the benefits of competition, and those who oppose competition have curried their favor by conjuring up misleading horror stories about how competition would harm them. Yet residential customers ultimately stand to gain as much from competition as larger customers.

  20. Advancing Manufacturing Research Through Competitions

    SciTech Connect

    Balakirsky, Stephen; Madhavan, Raj

    2009-01-01

    Competitions provide a technique for building interest and collaboration in targeted research areas. This paper will present a new competition that aims to increase collaboration amongst Universities, automation end-users, and automation manufacturers through a virtual competition. The virtual nature of the competition allows for reduced infrastructure requirements while maintaining realism in both the robotic equipment deployed and the scenarios. Details of the virtual environment as well as the competitions objectives, rules, and scoring metrics will be presented.

  1. Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.

    1994-12-31

    Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

  2. A Metadata Action Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  3. Competition in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Erv

    1981-01-01

    Argues that teacher use of competition in the classroom may lead to anxiety, aggression, or a decrease in self-concept among students and that learning to compete is not so important in a postindustrial society. Advocates cooperative classroom activities. (SJL)

  4. Cost and competition

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E.

    1994-11-01

    The growth of private power is part of the movement away from administrative regulation and toward competitive control of prices for electricity. Despite the substantial success of the private power industry, this process is far from complete. Utility regulators, who preside over the power purchase contracting process, are responsible for assuring that the prices which are presented to them for approval are reasonable.

  5. Competition in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

  6. Reed Hundt's Friendly Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educom Review, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents an interview with Reed Hundt, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), who implemented the Education Task Force to coordinate the FCC's role in educational provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He asserts that writing clear rules for the communications sector will promote competition and ensure educational…

  7. Building Camaraderie from Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions have adopted athletics programs to promote character building. Sports help people feel comfortable in their skins and provide unique opportunities to develop qualities such as cooperation, perseverance, and the ability to cope with fear. But the arena can be a hothouse for more primal feelings that emerge in competition.…

  8. Competitiveness and Campaign '88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan-Schloss, Adam, Ed.; And Others

    This report profiles the positions of the six Democratic and six Republican 1988 presidential candidates on policy issues affecting U.S. competitiveness in the global economy. Candidate profiles are provided for: Bruce Babbitt, Michael Dukakis, Richard Gephardt, Albert Gore, Jr., Jesse Jackson, and Paul Simon (Democrats); and George Bush, Robert…

  9. Human Resources Competitiveness Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    This report distills hundreds of indicators from both domestic and international sources to determine how the United States compares to other countries and to its own past performance in competitiveness. It attempts to establish a baseline of some key education and training indicators that, taken together, show where the nation stands and where it…

  10. Growing Competition for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Questia subscription-based online academic digital books library. Highlights include weaknesses of the collection; what college students want from a library; importance of marketing; competition for traditional academic libraries that may help improve library services; and the ability of Questia to overcome barriers and…

  11. Positioning for Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapovsky, Lucie; Hubbell, Loren Loomis

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes results of the 1999 National Association of College and Business Officers tuition discounting survey and identifies trends. Finds colleges and universities are reactively responding to market pressures and proactively trying to analyze and position themselves ahead of the competition, often regional rather than national, for the…

  12. A Winning Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Kim; Franchini, Elease

    2012-01-01

    As a high school physics teacher, Kim Geddes is constantly searching for new experiences to challenge, motivate, and engage students. Last year, she incorporated ExploraVision into the energy unit of her school's physics curriculum with the help of their media specialist (Elease Franchini). ExploraVision is a competition offered through a…

  13. Competitiveness Index 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    The United States' economic performance in the world economy is compared with that of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom (the Summit 7 countries). Competitiveness is assessed by four economic indicators: standard of living, trade, manufacturing productivity, and investment. The United States continues to outinvest the…

  14. Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  15. Polarization of competition increases with latitude.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2002-10-01

    Many organisms overlap in their use of resources in space and time. Where and when resources are restricted, species must compete for them. Living space, often a critical resource controlling food and mate availability, is directly contested by organisms in most habitats. The ensuing animal interactions generally result in a winner gaining space and a loser, which may die. Contact matrices from studies of interference competition in encrusting marine Bryozoa (clonal and colonial animals), spanning at least 60 degrees latitude in both hemispheres, were analysed and subjected to a modern transitivity index. Only data for Bryozoa were used because (i) use of a single taxon with restricted ecology simplifies the scope for types of encounters, (and therefore) interpretation; and (ii) ecological bias is reduced because bryozoans are abundant at all latitudes. The analysis shows that assemblage competition is more hierarchical towards both poles. Thus, poorer competitors fail more frequently in interactions with increasing latitude. The cause of this trend is the simplification of overall outcomes between competitors, such as fewer ties, reversals in outcome or competitive loops (where low-ranking competitors beat those of higher ranking). The implication of such a trend is that the maintenance of biological diversity at high latitudes may principally be by physical rather than biological (competition) processes. Certainly, ocean surface energy increases with latitude through wind and wave action (and ice scour in polar regions).

  16. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-29

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  17. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-01

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  18. 20 CFR 627.902 - Governor's actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Governor's actions. 627.902 Section 627.902... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLES I, II, AND III OF THE ACT Transition Provisions § 627.902 Governor's actions. The...) Modify the Governor's coordination and special services plan in accordance with instructions issued...

  19. 33 CFR 337.7 - Emergency actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... measures to modify the emergency operation to reduce, avoid, or minimize adverse environmental impacts. If... action would constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, he should, after consultation with the division engineer, coordinate with the Council...

  20. 33 CFR 337.7 - Emergency actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measures to modify the emergency operation to reduce, avoid, or minimize adverse environmental impacts. If... action would constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, he should, after consultation with the division engineer, coordinate with the Council...

  1. 20 CFR 627.902 - Governor's actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Governor's actions. 627.902 Section 627.902... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLES I, II, AND III OF THE ACT Transition Provisions § 627.902 Governor's actions. The...) Modify the Governor's coordination and special services plan in accordance with instructions issued...

  2. 20 CFR 627.902 - Governor's actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Governor's actions. 627.902 Section 627.902... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLES I, II, AND III OF THE ACT Transition Provisions § 627.902 Governor's actions. The...) Modify the Governor's coordination and special services plan in accordance with instructions issued...

  3. American Competitiveness Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2011-01-25

    01/25/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. (text of measure as introduced: CR S128) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Soda Ash Competition Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2011-06-06

    08/03/2011 Subcommittee on Public Lands and Forests. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 112-226. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Competitive brain activity in visual attention.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J; Humphreys, G; Ward, R

    1997-04-01

    Visual attention can be considered from the perspective of distributed brain activity engendered by visual input. We propose that visual objects compete for representation in multiple brain systems, sensory and motor, cortical and subcortical. Competition is integrated, however, such that multiple systems converge, working on the different properties and action implications of a selected object. Top-down priming biases competition towards objects relevant to current behaviour. Recent single-unit studies have shown widespread suppression of ignored-object representations in extrastriate cortex, and patterns of spatial and nonspatial priming by task relevance. Human and monkey lesion studies have demonstrated the strong integration tendency of different spatial and nonspatial systems, also revealed in recent studies of normal behaviour. In many cases, no unitary brain system may be responsible for unitary cognitive events such as attention. Such events may emerge as distinct systems converge to work on common cognitive problems.

  6. Demolishing the competition: the longitudinal link between competitive video games, competitive gambling, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-07-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship between video game competition and aggression. In addition, if competition in video games is a significant reason for the link between video game play and aggression, then other competitive activities, such as competitive gambling, also may predict aggression over time. In the current study, we directly assessed the socialization (competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicts aggression over time) versus selection hypotheses (aggression predicts competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time). Adolescents (N = 1,492, 50.8 % female) were surveyed annually from Grade 9 to Grade 12 about their video game play, gambling, and aggressive behaviors. Greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicted higher levels of aggression over time, after controlling for previous levels of aggression, supporting the socialization hypothesis. The selection hypothesis also was supported, as aggression predicted greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time, after controlling for previous competitive video game play and competitive gambling. Our findings, taken together with the fact that millions of adolescents play competitive video games every day and that competitive gambling may increase as adolescents transition into adulthood, highlight the need for a greater understanding of the relationship between competition and aggression.

  7. Demolishing the competition: the longitudinal link between competitive video games, competitive gambling, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-07-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship between video game competition and aggression. In addition, if competition in video games is a significant reason for the link between video game play and aggression, then other competitive activities, such as competitive gambling, also may predict aggression over time. In the current study, we directly assessed the socialization (competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicts aggression over time) versus selection hypotheses (aggression predicts competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time). Adolescents (N = 1,492, 50.8 % female) were surveyed annually from Grade 9 to Grade 12 about their video game play, gambling, and aggressive behaviors. Greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicted higher levels of aggression over time, after controlling for previous levels of aggression, supporting the socialization hypothesis. The selection hypothesis also was supported, as aggression predicted greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time, after controlling for previous competitive video game play and competitive gambling. Our findings, taken together with the fact that millions of adolescents play competitive video games every day and that competitive gambling may increase as adolescents transition into adulthood, highlight the need for a greater understanding of the relationship between competition and aggression. PMID:23595418

  8. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  9. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  10. An improved competitive inhibition enzymatic immunoassay method for tetrodotoxin quantification.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Amber N; Williams, Becky L; French, Susannah S

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been a challenge in both ecological and medical research due to the cost, time and training required of most quantification techniques. Here we present a modified Competitive Inhibition Enzymatic Immunoassay for the quantification of TTX, and to aid researchers in the optimization of this technique for widespread use with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability.

  11. The Literature of Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Thomas D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes competitive intelligence (CI) literature in terms of its location, quantity, authorship, length, and problems of bibliographic access. Highlights include subject access; competitive intelligence research; espionage and security; monographs; and journals. (21 references) (LRW)

  12. Quick-Release Pin With Lever Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Lever-action quick-release pin operated more easily. Mechanism operated with gloved hand. In modified version, lever added to handle to facilitate actuation. Lever action reduces actuation force. Lever-action pin operated by squeezing on any point of moveable ends of lever and handle together between thumb and forefinger or by simply grasping and squeezing handle and lever with entire hand in more natural grasp.

  13. Competition for finite resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, L. Jonathan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2012-05-01

    The resources in a cell are finite, which implies that the various components of the cell must compete for resources. One such resource is the ribosomes used during translation to create proteins. Motivated by this example, we explore this competition by connecting two totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes (TASEPs) to a finite pool of particles. Expanding on our previous work, we focus on the effects on the density and current of having different entry and exit rates.

  14. 15 CFR 325.10 - Modifying or revoking a certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Modifying or revoking a certificate... CERTIFICATES OF REVIEW § 325.10 Modifying or revoking a certificate. (a) Action subject to modification or revocation. The Secretary shall revoke a certificate, in whole or in part, or modify it, as the Secretary...

  15. Competitive Intelligence and Social Advantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Elisabeth; Cronin, Blaise

    1994-01-01

    Presents an overview of issues concerning civilian competitive intelligence (CI). Topics discussed include competitive advantage in academic and research environments; public domain information and libraries; covert and overt competitive intelligence; data diversity; use of the Internet; cooperative intelligence; and implications for library and…

  16. Factors affecting athletes’ motor behavior after the observation of scenes of cooperation and competition in competitive sport: the effect of sport attitude

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Elisa De; De Marco, Doriana; Gentilucci, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study delineated how observing sports scenes of cooperation or competition modulated an action of interaction, in expert athletes, depending on their specific sport attitude. Method: In a kinematic study, athletes were divided into two groups depending on their attitude toward teammates (cooperative or competitive). Participants observed sport scenes of cooperation and competition (basketball, soccer, water polo, volleyball, and rugby) and then they reached for, picked up, and placed an object on the hand of a conspecific (giving action). Mixed-design ANOVAs were carried out on the mean values of grasping-reaching parameters. Results: Data showed that the type of scene observed as well as the athletes’ attitude affected reach-to-grasp actions to give. In particular, the cooperative athletes were speeded when they observed scenes of cooperation compared to when they observed scenes of competition. Discussion: Participants were speeded when executing a giving action after observing actions of cooperation. This occurred only when they had a cooperative attitude. A match between attitude and intended action seems to be a necessary prerequisite for observing an effect of the observed type of scene on the performed action. It is possible that the observation of scenes of competition activated motor strategies which interfered with the strategies adopted by the cooperative participants to execute a cooperative (giving) sequence. PMID:26579031

  17. Hospital survival in a competitive environment: the competitive constituency model.

    PubMed

    Ehreth, J

    1993-01-01

    Organizational theory is extended to develop a method for administrators to assess hospital effectiveness in a competitive environment. First, the literature pertaining to organizational effectiveness and survival is synthesized to show the lack of consideration for the effects of competition. Second, the article integrates the effects of competition on organizational effectiveness through a competitive constituency model. A step-by-step procedure is proposed to apply the theory in an organizational setting. The model explicitly addresses differences in power relations between hospitals, their competition, and their stakeholders. The relative nature of effectiveness is explored by comparing the hospital to its competition using criteria developed through specific goals of stakeholders. The distinction between managerial and organizational effectiveness constructs is clarified. Finally, the practical application of this model is demonstrated by assessing the effectiveness of a hospital in the competitive environment of Seattle, Washington, where two hospitals have recently closed.

  18. Lexical Selection Is Competitive: Evidence from Indirectly Activated Semantic Associates during Picture Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melinger, Alissa; Rahman, Rasha Abdel

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present 3 picture-word interference (PWI) experiments designed to investigate whether lexical selection processes are competitive. We focus on semantic associative relations, which should interfere according to competitive models but not according to certain noncompetitive models. In a modified version of the PWI paradigm,…

  19. Change in Action: How Infants Learn to Walk down Slopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Simone V.; Adolph, Karen E.; Vereijken, Beatrix

    2009-01-01

    A critical aspect of perception-action coupling is the ability to modify ongoing actions in accordance with variations in the environment. Infants' ability to modify their gait patterns to walk down shallow and steep slopes was examined at three nested time scales. Across sessions, a microgenetic training design showed rapid improvements after the…

  20. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do. PMID:27667859

  1. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do.

  2. Platform for Action: update.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Women's Global Leadership (CWGL) has collaborated in the preparation of amendments and strategies designed to withstand the challenges being posed to the Platform for Action of the Fourth World Conference on Women. Specific challenges include the inappropriate use of the word "universal" to modify "human rights." This implies that some human rights are less than universal. The strategy proposed is to accept the use of the word "universal" in this context only when it affirms principles of universality contained in the Vienna Programme of Action and not where its use would restrict the rights to which women are entitled. A second concern is over the use of the word "equity" rather than "equality" when referring to gender relations. The use of these terms will be carefully monitored to insure that "equity" not be used to undermine the principle of gender equality. The third concern is the efforts of some governments to hinder the integration of women's human rights throughout the UN system. Such efforts will be opposed. Fourth, the CWGL will seek the inclusion of language which recognizes the barriers that different groups of women face when trying to secure their rights. Finally, the CWGL will propose inclusion of language recognizing and protecting sexual orientation rights. The CWGL is also going to work to translate the abstract language of the Platform for Action into political organizing potential to insure that governments will follow through on their agreements.

  3. Cardiovascular indices of challenge and threat states predict competitive performance.

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin J; Jones, Marc V; Sheffield, David; Cross, Sophie L

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) reactivity is proposed by both the Biopsychosocial Model and the Theory of Challenge and Threat States in Athletes to predict competitive performance. The association between CV reactivity and competitive performance was examined in cognitive (Study 1) and motor (Study 2) tasks. In Study 1, 25 participants (9 female) completed a modified Stroop Test, and in Study 2, 21 female netballers completed a netball shooting task, under competition. Measures of CV reactivity, self-report measures of self-efficacy, control, achievement-goals and emotions along with baseline and competitive task performance were taken. CV reactivity indicative of a challenge state predicted superior performance in both tasks compared to CV reactivity indicative of a threat state. In both studies the purported relationships between CV reactivity and the psychological and emotional responses were weak or absent. The mechanisms for the observed association between CV reactivity and task performance are discussed alongside implications of the findings for future research and practice.

  4. Competition, Games, Technology--Boys Are Loving English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Peta

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects one cycle of an action research project that investigated how integrating activity, competition, and visual learning strategies through IWB/ Smart Response technology could engage a lower level Year 12 Advanced English class in NSW--a group of boys who felt disconnected from the course of study. After my initial reconnaissance…

  5. 7 CFR 1726.201 - Formal competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., as described in 7 CFR 1726.201, were followed in awarding this contract.” The certification executed... AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procurement Procedures § 1726.201 Formal... taking any other action necessary to procure full, free and competitive bidding. The borrower should...

  6. Strategic business planning and development for competitive health care systems.

    PubMed

    Nauert, Roger C

    2005-01-01

    The health care industry has undergone enormous evolutionary changes in recent years. Competitive transitions have accelerated the compelling need for aggressive strategic business planning and dynamic system development. Success is driven by organizational commitments to farsighted market analyses, timely action, and effective management. PMID:18975726

  7. 76 FR 63323 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the coal reserves in the lands... by application (LBA) filed by Signal Peak Energy LLC. The Federal coal resource to be...

  8. 77 FR 31385 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the North Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered for...

  9. 77 FR 3790 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered for...

  10. 77 FR 22607 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the South Porcupine Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be reoffered...

  11. 77 FR 21803 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Colorado AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal reserves in the Elk... receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This coal lease sale is...

  12. 77 FR 2316 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the coal reserves in the lands... lease by application (LBA) filed by Signal Peak Energy LLC. The Federal coal resource to be...

  13. 76 FR 28063 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain coal resources in the Belle Ayr North Coal Tract described below in Campbell County, Wyoming, will be offered for...

  14. Accountable Care Organizations and Antitrust Enforcement: Promoting Competition and Innovation.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Deborah L; Kuhlmann, Patrick; Mucchetti, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    The antitrust laws stand to protect consumers of health care services from conduct that would raise prices, lower quality, and decrease innovation by lessening competition. Importantly, though, vigorous antitrust enforcement does not impede accountable care organizations (ACOs) and similar collaborations that advance these same goals of better and more efficient care; in fact, by fostering competitive markets, the antitrust laws encourage such initiatives. This article summarizes the legal framework that the federal antitrust agencies - the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division of the US Department of Justice - use to analyze ACOs and other collaborations among health care providers. It outlines the guidance provided by the federal antitrust agencies concerning when ACOs and other provider collaborations likely would harm competition and consumers. In addition, it reviews common antitrust issues that can arise with ACOs and provides examples of enforcement actions that have prevented health care providers from taking or continuing anticompetitive actions.

  15. The two sides of competition: competition-induced effort and affect during intergroup versus interindividual competition.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Marion; Krimmel, Anna; Kohler, Mischa; Hertel, Guido

    2013-08-01

    Competition strongly affects individual effort and performance for both individuals and groups. Especially in work settings, these effort gains might come at the cost of individual well-being. The present study tested whether competition increases both effort (as indicated by task performance) and stress (in terms of cardiovascular reactivity and affective response), and whether this effect is further qualified by the type of competition (interindividual vs. intergroup), using a cognitive computer-based task and a 2 (Group: Yes, No) × 2 (Competition: Yes, No) × 2 (Gender) factorial design (N = 147). All participants either worked as a representative of a group or as an individual, and were offered performance-related incentives distributed in a lottery. In the competition conditions, participants were informed that they competed with someone else, and that only the winning person/team would take part in the lottery. Consistent with expectations, competition increased both individual effort and cardiovascular reactivity compared to non-competitive work. Moreover, for female participants, intergroup competition triggered increased effort and more positive affect than interindividual competition. Aside from documenting costly side-effects of competition in terms of stress, this study provides evidence for a stress-related explanation of effort gains during intergroup competition as compared to interindividual competition.

  16. 75 FR 52378 - Transfer of Commercial Standard Mail Parcels to Competitive Product List

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Commission to transfer commercial Standard Mail Parcels from the Mail Classification Schedule's Market... to transfer commercial Standard Mail Parcels from the Mail Classification Schedule's Market Dominant... Commercial Standard Mail Parcels to Competitive Product List AGENCY: Postal Service. TM ACTION:...

  17. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  18. Rowing competitions and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alfinio; Bernhardt, Stephen A.; Shipman, Henry L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is about integrating the use of graphing technology (specifically, GeoGebra) with principles of motion, principles of perspective, and the concept of vanishing points to model a dynamic event. Students were asked to analyse video images of a rowing competition filmed with a single camera positioned perpendicular to the race. The fixed position of the camera in such races makes it difficult to determine whether a scull closer to the camera is actually overtaking another, more distant scull. The paper illustrates how students in their first year at the university can integrate the use of technology, science, mathematics, and writing to solve a real world problem involving motion.

  19. Attention competition with advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O.

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  20. Attention competition with advertisement.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant. PMID:25314476

  1. Attention competition with advertisement.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  2. 77 FR 4821 - Public Health Service Act, Non-competitive Replacement Award

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Public Health Service Act, Non-competitive Replacement Award AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Non-competitive Replacement Award to the California Telehealth Network. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and...

  3. Information Systems, Competitive Dynamics, and Firm Performance: An Interpretive and Centering Resonance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoy, Sandra A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines, from a managerial interpretive perspective, how information systems contribute to firms' specific competitive actions and responses, and the resultant impacts upon firm performance. The findings from this research suggest that the answer may well lie within the role of information systems in firms' competitive dynamics…

  4. 78 FR 19520 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale COC-74813, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale COC-74813, CO AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that certain Federal coal reserves (Red Wash Tracts 1 and 2) in Moffat and Rio Blanco Counties, Colorado,...

  5. Optimal control for competitive-cooperative systems: Modeling flexible coalitions in tomorrow`s competitive world

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S. |; Protopopescu, V.

    1994-09-01

    The last years have witnessed a dramatic shift of the world`s military, political, and economic paradigm from a bi-polar competitive gridlock to a more fluid, multi-player environment. This change has necessarily been followed by a re-evaluation of the strategic thinking and by a reassessment of mutual positions, options, and decisions. The essential attributes of the new situation are modeled by a system of nonlinear evolution equations with competitive/cooperative interactions. The mathematical setting is quite general to accommodate models related to military confrontation, arms control, economic competition, political negotiations, etc. Irrespective of the specific details, all these situations share a common denominator, namely the presence of various players with different and often changing interests and goals. The interests, ranging from conflicting to consensual, are defined in a context of interactions between the players that vary from competitive to cooperative. Players with converging interests tend to build up cooperative coalitions while coalitions with diverging interests usually compete among themselves, but this is not an absolute requirement (namely, one may have groups with converging interests and competitive interactions, and vice-versa). Appurtenance to a coalition may change in time according to the shift in one`s perceptions, interests, or obligations. During the time evolution, the players try to modify their strategies as to best achieve their respective goals. An objective functional quantifying the rate of success (payoff) vs. effort (cost) measures the degree of goal attainment for all players involved, thus selecting an optimal strategy based on optimal controls. While the technical details may vary from problem to problem, the general approach described here establishes a standard framework for a host of concrete situations that may arise from tomorrow`s {open_quotes}next competition{close_quotes}.

  6. Competition enhances stochasticity in biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firman, Taylor; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2013-09-01

    We study stochastic dynamics of two competing complexation reactions (i) A + B↔AB and (ii) A + C↔AC. Such reactions are common in biology where different reactants compete for common resources - examples range from binding enzyme kinetics to gene expression. On the other hand, stochasticity is inherent in biological systems due to small copy numbers. We investigate the complex interplay between competition and stochasticity, using coupled complexation reactions as the model system. Within the master equation formalism, we compute the exact distribution of the number of complexes to analyze equilibrium fluctuations of several observables. Our study reveals that the presence of competition offered by one reaction (say A + C↔AC) can significantly enhance the fluctuation in the other (A + B↔AB). We provide detailed quantitative estimates of this enhanced fluctuation for different combinations of rate constants and numbers of reactant molecules that are typical in biology. We notice that fluctuations can be significant even when two of the reactant molecules (say B and C) are infinite in number, maintaining a fixed stoichiometry, while the other reactant (A) is finite. This is purely due to the coupling mediated via resource sharing and is in stark contrast to the single reaction scenario, where large numbers of one of the components ensure zero fluctuation. Our detailed analysis further highlights regions where numerical estimates of mass action solutions can differ from the actual averages. These observations indicate that averages can be a poor representation of the system, hence analysis that is purely based on averages such as mass action laws can be potentially misleading in such noisy biological systems. We believe that the exhaustive study presented here will provide qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of noise and its enhancement in the presence of competition that will be relevant in many biological settings.

  7. More competitive silicon smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1996-02-01

    Over the past several years, foreign manufacturers of ferrosilicon and silicon alloys have been making inroads in American markets such as computer chips. To make domestic smelting of these materials more competitive, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded the development of a direct-current plasma-arc-furnace smelting process by the South Carolina Research Authority (SCRA) in North Charleston. This new technology can reduce the energy consumption of the smelting process, saving million of dollars in energy costs per year. Typically, silicon and ferrosilicon alloys are produced in open-top, submerged-arc, alternating-current furnaces. A mixture of quartz ore and reducing agents are fed into the furnace, multiple electrodes are inserted into the material, and the mixture is charged to produce the desired metal. The process consumes high amounts of electrical power relative to the amount of metal recovered.

  8. Mapping your competitive position.

    PubMed

    D'Aveni, Richard A

    2007-11-01

    A price-benefit positioning map helps you see, through your customers' eyes, how your product compares with all its competitors in a market. You can draw such a map quickly and objectively, without having to resort to costly, time-consuming consumer surveys or subjective estimates of the excellence of your product and the shortcomings of all the others. Creating a positioning map involves three steps: First, define your market to include everything your customers might consider to be your product's competitors or substitutes. Second, track the price your customers actually pay (wholesale or retail? bundled or unbundled?) and identify what your customers see as your offering's primary benefit. This is done through regression analysis, determining which of the product's attributes (as described objectively by rating services, government agencies, R&D departments, and the like) explains most of the variance in its price. Third, draw the map by plotting on a graph the position of every product in the market you've selected according to its price and its level of primary benefit, and draw a line that runs through the middle of the points. What you get is a picture of the competitive landscape of your market, where all the products above the line command a price premium owing to some secondary benefit customers value, and all those below the line are positioned to earn market share through lower prices and reduced secondary benefits. Using examples as varied as Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Motorola cell phones, and the New York restaurant market, Tuck professor D'Aveni demonstrates some of the many ways the maps can be used: to locate unoccupied or less-crowded spaces in highly competitive markets, for instance, or to identify opportunities created through changes in the relationship between the primary benefit and prices. The maps even allow companies to anticipate--and counter-- rivals' strategies. R eprint RO711G PMID:18159791

  9. Mapping your competitive position.

    PubMed

    D'Aveni, Richard A

    2007-11-01

    A price-benefit positioning map helps you see, through your customers' eyes, how your product compares with all its competitors in a market. You can draw such a map quickly and objectively, without having to resort to costly, time-consuming consumer surveys or subjective estimates of the excellence of your product and the shortcomings of all the others. Creating a positioning map involves three steps: First, define your market to include everything your customers might consider to be your product's competitors or substitutes. Second, track the price your customers actually pay (wholesale or retail? bundled or unbundled?) and identify what your customers see as your offering's primary benefit. This is done through regression analysis, determining which of the product's attributes (as described objectively by rating services, government agencies, R&D departments, and the like) explains most of the variance in its price. Third, draw the map by plotting on a graph the position of every product in the market you've selected according to its price and its level of primary benefit, and draw a line that runs through the middle of the points. What you get is a picture of the competitive landscape of your market, where all the products above the line command a price premium owing to some secondary benefit customers value, and all those below the line are positioned to earn market share through lower prices and reduced secondary benefits. Using examples as varied as Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Motorola cell phones, and the New York restaurant market, Tuck professor D'Aveni demonstrates some of the many ways the maps can be used: to locate unoccupied or less-crowded spaces in highly competitive markets, for instance, or to identify opportunities created through changes in the relationship between the primary benefit and prices. The maps even allow companies to anticipate--and counter-- rivals' strategies. R eprint RO711G

  10. Immunological impact of Taekwondo competitions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y W; Shin, K W; Paik, I-Y; Jung, W M; Cho, S-Y; Choi, S T; Kim, H D; Kim, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes in elite adolescent female athletes during Taekwondo competitions were investigated on-field. 6 female athletes (16.7 ± 0.8 year-old) volunteered and performed 5 bouts of demonstration Taekwondo competitions simulating real tournaments in intensity, duration, and break-time intervals on the same day. Blood samples were taken before, after the competitions and during the recovery, respectively. Immunological changes and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated by flow-cytometry. During the competitions, exercise intensity was 92.2 ± 3.8% (86.1~95.7) of the maximal heart rate. Blood lactate increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0165) and decreased to baseline during recovery. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the peripheral blood increased continuously during recovery (p<0.05, respectively). Natural killer cells increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0006), and decreased during recovery. B and T cells increased immediately after the competitions and remained elevated throughout recovery (p<0.05, respectively). CD4/CD8 ratio after the competitions was decreased (p=0.0091) and returned to baseline during recovery. These results suggest that the immunological function of the elite female adolescent athletes could be attenuated after Taekwondo competitions. Further large-scaled Taekwondo studies on immunologic and apoptotic changes related to oxidative stress should be performed for improving and protecting the health of adolescent athletes.

  11. Spatial Aspects of Interspecific Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durrett, Rick; Levin, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Using several variants of a stochastic spatial model introduced by Silvertown et al., we investigate the effect of spatial distribution of individuals on the outcome of competition. First, we prove rigorously that if one species has a competitive advantage over each of the others, then eventually it takes over all the sites in the system. Second, we examine tradeoffs between competition and dispersal distance in a two-species system. Third, we consider a cyclic competitive relationship between three types. In this case, a nonspatial treatment leads to densities that follow neutrally stable cycles or even unstable spiral solutions, while a spatial model yields a stationary distribution with an interesting spatial structure.

  12. Competitive sports for the disabled.

    PubMed

    Clark, M W

    1980-01-01

    A full life experience for people with and without physical disabilities usually includes some form of recreation or sport. Competition adds to enjoyment of sport for many people and can improve morale. This paper reviews some of the competitive opportunities available for people with a physical disability. These include competition within existing "able-bodied" organizations with or without adaptive devices and competition in separate organizations for those with disabilities. The latter include the National Wheelchair Basketball Association and the National Wheelchair Athletic Association.

  13. Gender differences in competitive stress.

    PubMed

    Madden, C C; Kirkby, R J

    1995-06-01

    Stress experienced in competitive basketball was investigated in a sample of 84 men and 49 women recruited from players engaged in regular, organized, competitive grade basketball. Subjects were administered the Stressful Situations in Basketball Questionnaire which provides measures on 5 types of stress in competitive basketball. Analyses of gender differences showed that men reported more stress than female players on the "Team performance" scale. Research is required to evaluate whether this difference is due to a perception of women that they have less influence over the performance of the team or whether it is due to men having a higher stake in the results of competition.

  14. Student Advertising Competitions: Student Perspectives on the AAF Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marra, James L.; Avery, James R.

    An exploratory study examined student perspectives and beliefs about involvement in the American Advertising Federation's (AAF) National Student Advertising Competition. Subjects, 34 students from 7 of the 15 winning regional teams in the 1991 AAF competition, completed a single-page, 2-part questionnaire. Multiple correlations were run on…

  15. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  16. On a modified electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Reiss, H R

    2012-09-01

    A modification of electrodynamics is proposed, motivated by previously unremarked paradoxes that can occur in the standard formulation. It is shown by specific examples that gauge transformations exist that radically alter the nature of a problem, even while maintaining the values of many measurable quantities. In one example, a system with energy conservation is transformed to a system where energy is not conserved. The second example possesses a ponderomotive potential in one gauge, but this important measurable quantity does not appear in the gauge-transformed system. A resolution of the paradoxes comes from noting that the change in total action arising from the interaction term in the Lagrangian density cannot always be neglected, contrary to the usual assumption. The problem arises from the information lost by employing an adiabatic cutoff of the field. This is not necessary. Its replacement by a requirement that the total action should not change with a gauge transformation amounts to a supplementary condition for gauge invariance that can be employed to preserve the physical character of the problem. It is shown that the adiabatic cutoff procedure can also be eliminated in the construction of quantum transition amplitudes, thus retaining consistency between the way in which asymptotic conditions are applied in electrodynamics and in quantum mechanics. The 'gauge-invariant electrodynamics' of Schwinger is shown to depend on an ansatz equivalent to the condition found here for maintenance of the ponderomotive potential in a gauge transformation. Among the altered viewpoints required by the modified electrodynamics, in addition to the rejection of the adiabatic cutoff, is the recognition that the electric and magnetic fields do not completely determine a physical problem, and that the electromagnetic potentials supply additional information that is required for completeness of electrodynamics.

  17. Managed competition in health care and the unfinished agenda

    PubMed Central

    Enthoven, Alain C.

    1986-01-01

    A market made up of health care financing and delivery plans and individual consumers, without a carefully drawn set of rules to mitigate market failures, and without mediation by collective action on the demand side, cannot produce efficiency and equity. The concept of competition that can achieve these goals, at least to a satisfactory approximation, is managed competition, with intelligent active agents on the demand side, called sponsors, that contract with the competing health care plans and continuously structure and adjust the market to overcome its tendencies to failure. A great deal remains to be done to achieve the goals envisioned by the “procompetition reformers.” PMID:10311922

  18. The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

  19. Fresno County Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Fresno County Office of Education and the Fresno Unified School District hosted the Mock Trial Competition. The state competition is sponsored by the Constitutional Rights Foundation, with cosponsorship from the California State Bar Association and the California Young Lawyer's Association. This…

  20. Neurocognitive Performance: Returning to Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; McIntire, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Athletes who suffer from concussions under report their symptoms in order to expedite their return to competition. Athletic trainers and coaches must be aware of what is going on with athletes, even if it means requiring them to refrain from competition. Ninety percent of concussions are minor and can be difficult to diagnosis. There is a lack of…

  1. An Approach to Competitive Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Petrina M.

    1994-01-01

    Offers a detailed discussion of competitive assessment, an efficient and cost-effective method to evaluate competitive products. Describes its three phases: numerical scoring, building a best-of-breed model, and determining the gap between the best-of-breed model and another product. (SR)

  2. Competitive Electricity Prices: An Update

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates a third impact of the move to competitive generation pricing -- the narrowing of the range of prices across regions of the country. This feature article updates information in Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing of Generation Services and Financial Status of Electric Utilities.

  3. Higher Education, Employability and Competitiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlin, Samo; Svetlicic, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between competitiveness and higher education systems in Europe. It explores whether more competitive countries have developed more labour-market-oriented systems of higher education (HE) that thereby give their graduates greater short term employability potential. Based on and a large-scale survey among 45.000…

  4. Competitive strategy a new era.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Alan M

    2007-11-01

    By adopting five basic practices, your organization will be ready to advance to the next level of competitive fitness: Develop a reliable financial baseline. Insist on development of a competitive intelligence database system. Employ rigorous business planning. Advocate for focus and discipline. Really commit to competing.

  5. Feature Discovery by Competitive Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumelhart, David E.; Zipser, David

    1985-01-01

    Reports results of studies with an unsupervised learning paradigm called competitive learning which is examined using computer simulation and formal analysis. When competitive learning is applied to parallel networks of neuron-like elements, many potentially useful learning tasks can be accomplished. (Author)

  6. DOE Collegiate Wind Competition (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation for the January Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar outlines the expanded need for workers in the wind industry and provides an overview of the DOE Wind Competition (to be held in May 2014) and the guiding principles of the competition.

  7. Competitive Skills Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    Almost 180 (22.5 percent) of BP Chemicals/HITCO, Inc. (BPCHI) employees have participated in the basic skills courses offered through the Competitive Skills Project (CSP) at El Camino College (Torrance, California). Workplace basics provide a solid foundation for Total Quality Management (TQM), enabling workers to be globally competitive. Two main…

  8. Establishing Communication between Neuronal Populations through Competitive Entrainment.

    PubMed

    Wildie, Mark; Shanahan, Murray

    2011-01-01

    The role of gamma frequency oscillation in neuronal interaction, and the relationship between oscillation and information transfer between neurons, has been the focus of much recent research. While the biological mechanisms responsible for gamma oscillation and the properties of resulting networks are well studied, the dynamics of changing phase coherence between oscillating neuronal populations are not well understood. To this end we develop a computational model of competitive selection between multiple stimuli, where the selection and transfer of population-encoded information arises from competition between converging stimuli to entrain a target population of neurons. Oscillation is generated by Pyramidal-Interneuronal Network Gamma through the action of recurrent synaptic connections between a locally connected network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Competition between stimuli is driven by differences in coherence of oscillation, while transmission of a single selected stimulus is enabled between generating and receiving neurons via Communication-through-Coherence. We explore the effect of varying synaptic parameters on the competitive transmission of stimuli over different neuron models, and identify a continuous region within the parameter space of the recurrent synaptic loop where inhibition-induced oscillation results in entrainment of target neurons. Within this optimal region we find that competition between stimuli of equal coherence results in model output that alternates between representation of the stimuli, in a manner strongly resembling well-known biological phenomena resulting from competitive stimulus selection such as binocular rivalry. PMID:22275892

  9. Project X: competitive intelligence data mining and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Pagels, Michael A.; Palk, Justin

    2001-03-01

    Competitive Intelligence (CI) is a systematic and ethical program for gathering and analyzing information about your competitors' activities and general business trends to further your own company's goals. CI allows companies to gather extensive information on their competitors and to analyze what the competition is doing in order to maintain or gain a competitive edge. In commercial business this potentially translates into millions of dollars in annual savings or losses. The Internet provides an overwhelming portal of information for CI analysis. The problem is how a company can automate the translation of voluminous information into valuable and actionable knowledge. This paper describes Project X, an agent-based data mining system specifically developed for extracting and analyzing competitive information from the Internet. Project X gathers CI information from a variety of sources including online newspapers, corporate websites, industry sector reporting sites, speech archiving sites, video news casts, stock news sites, weather sites, and rumor sites. It uses individual industry specific (e.g., pharmaceutical, financial, aerospace, etc.) commercial sector ontologies to form the knowledge filtering and discovery structures/content required to filter and identify valuable competitive knowledge. Project X is described in detail and an example competitive intelligence case is shown demonstrating the system's performance and utility for business intelligence.

  10. Action as ejection.

    PubMed

    Franco, Daisy

    2006-01-01

    The systematic analysis of acting-out episodes can be used in assessing analytic progress. Variables to be considered are the nature of the wish, the type of defense, and the degree of concreteness (versus symbolization) of the mental processes used in attempting actualization (as distinct from the resort to action). Two acting-out episodes of a borderline patient who acted out as a character trait, both occurring outside the analytic setting, are presented as illustrations. In the first one, occurring relatively early in the analysis, when split-off negative and positive self-images had to be rigidly maintained, ejection of the negative self-image was actualized via the regressive use of a symbolic equation and the mechanism of displacement, obliterating the distinction between an internal feeling and an external thing that here was literally thrown out. The later episode, occurring after the split was healed and within the context of a frustrating heterosexual involvement, contained an acted-out allusion to identification and competition with the mother. As in a dream, via associations, an unconscious wish for oedipal victory was revealed. Whereas in the first episode the goal of ejection was central, with splitting and denial the underlying defenses, it was absent from the second, in which an attempt was made to actualize a repressed infantile wish and made greater use of symbolization. It is concluded that acting-out episodes at different periods of the analysis, when systematically analyzed, can serve in assessing a patient's progress.

  11. How competition affects evolutionary rescue

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Matthew Miles; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Populations facing novel environments can persist by adapting. In nature, the ability to adapt and persist will depend on interactions between coexisting individuals. Here we use an adaptive dynamic model to assess how the potential for evolutionary rescue is affected by intra- and interspecific competition. Intraspecific competition (negative density-dependence) lowers abundance, which decreases the supply rate of beneficial mutations, hindering evolutionary rescue. On the other hand, interspecific competition can aid evolutionary rescue when it speeds adaptation by increasing the strength of selection. Our results clarify this point and give an additional requirement: competition must increase selection pressure enough to overcome the negative effect of reduced abundance. We therefore expect evolutionary rescue to be most likely in communities which facilitate rapid niche displacement. Our model, which aligns to previous quantitative and population genetic models in the absence of competition, provides a first analysis of when competitors should help or hinder evolutionary rescue. PMID:23209167

  12. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  13. Competition among leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Aflalo, E; Weinstein, Y

    1990-01-01

    We investigated competition among leukemic cells induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoLV) in order to understand the mechanisms involved in the generation of leukemia. We used six leukemic cells lines from Balb/C mice infected with MoLV. Each line had a unique genetic marker which enabled us to trace it in mixtures of cells either in vivo or in vitro. The markers were a unique rearrangement of T-cell receptors, the integration sites of the retrovirus and rearrangements in the Pim-1 oncogene. A mixture of two cell lines (1:1) injected into intact Balb/C mice usually produced a monoclonal tumor originating from one cell line. In most cases, the cell lines that were aggressive in vivo were also dominant in mixing experiments in vitro. In some lines, we could correlate the aggressiveness of the tumor to its superior growth rate and lower requirement for serum factors in vitro. In others, this correlation did not hold, and we assumed that host factors like the immune system contribute to the malignant potential of the leukemic cell.

  14. Mechanics of competition walking.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, G A; Franzetti, P

    1981-06-01

    1. The work done at each step to lift and accelerate the centre of mass of the body has been measured in competition walkers during locomotion from 2 to 20 km/hr. 2. Three distinct phases characterize the mechanics of walking. From 2 to 6 km/hr the vertical displacement during each step, Sv, increases to a maximum (3.5 vs. 6 cm in normal walking) due to an increase in the amplitude of the rotation over the supporting leg. 3. The transfer, R, between potential energy of vertical displacement and kinetic energy of forward motion during this rotation, reaches a maximum at 4-5 km/hr (R = 65%). From 6 to 10 km/hr R decreases more steeply than in normal walking, indicating a smaller utilization of the pendulum-like mechanism characteristic of walking. 4. Above 10 km/hr potential and kinetic energies vary during each step because both are simultaneously taken up and released by the muscles with almost no transfer between them (R = 2-10%). Above 13-14 km/hr an aerial phase (25-60 msec) takes place during the step. 5. Speeds considerably greater than in normal walking are attained thanks to a greater efficiency of doing positive work. This is made possible by a mechanism of locomotion allowing an important storage and recovery of mechanical energy by the muscles.

  15. Female competition in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Pusey, Anne E; Schroepfer-Walker, Kara

    2013-01-01

    Female chimpanzees exhibit exceptionally slow rates of reproduction and raise their offspring without direct paternal care. Therefore, their reproductive success depends critically on long-term access to high-quality food resources over a long lifespan. Chimpanzee communities contain multiple adult males, multiple adult females and their offspring. Because males are philopatric and jointly defend the community range while most females transfer to new communities before breeding, adult females are typically surrounded by unrelated competitors. Communities are fission-fusion societies in which individuals spend time alone or in fluid subgroups, whose size depends mostly on the abundance and distribution of food. To varying extents in different populations, females avoid direct competition by foraging alone or in small groups in distinct, but overlapping core areas within the community range to which they show high fidelity. Although rates of aggression are low, females compete for space and access to food. High rank correlates with high reproductive success, and high-ranking females win direct contests for food and gain preferential access to resource-rich sites. Females are aggressive to immigrant females and even kill the newborn infants of community members. The intensity of such aggression correlates with population density. These patterns are compared to those in other species, including humans.

  16. 5 CFR 351.402 - Competitive area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Competitive area. 351.402 Section 351.402... Competition § 351.402 Competitive area. (a) Each agency shall establish competitive areas in which employees compete for retention under this part. (b) A competitive area must be defined solely in terms of...

  17. 5 CFR 351.402 - Competitive area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Competitive area. 351.402 Section 351.402... Competition § 351.402 Competitive area. (a) Each agency shall establish competitive areas in which employees compete for retention under this part. (b) A competitive area must be defined solely in terms of...

  18. 5 CFR 351.402 - Competitive area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Competitive area. 351.402 Section 351.402... Competition § 351.402 Competitive area. (a) Each agency shall establish competitive areas in which employees compete for retention under this part. (b) A competitive area must be defined solely in terms of...

  19. 5 CFR 351.402 - Competitive area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Competitive area. 351.402 Section 351.402... Competition § 351.402 Competitive area. (a) Each agency shall establish competitive areas in which employees compete for retention under this part. (b) A competitive area must be defined solely in terms of...

  20. 5 CFR 351.403 - Competitive level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Competitive level. 351.403 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.403 Competitive level. (a)(1) Each agency shall establish competitive levels consisting of all positions in a competitive area which are in the same grade (or...

  1. 5 CFR 351.403 - Competitive level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Competitive level. 351.403 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.403 Competitive level. (a)(1) Each agency shall establish competitive levels consisting of all positions in a competitive area which are in the same grade (or...

  2. GENE REGULATION BY MAPK SUBSTRATE COMPETITION

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Andreu, María José; Lim, Bomyi; Chung, Kwanghun; Terayama, Mark; Jiménez, Gerardo; Berg, Celeste A.; Lu, Hang; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Developing tissues are patterned by coordinated activities of signaling systems, which can be integrated by a regulatory region of a gene that binds multiple transcription factors or by a transcription factor that is modified by multiple enzymes. Based on a combination of genetic and imaging experiments in the early Drosophila embryo, we describe a signal integration mechanism that cannot be reduced to a single gene regulatory element or a single transcription factor. This mechanism relies on an enzymatic network formed by Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and its substrates. Specifically, anteriorly localized MAPK substrates, such as Bicoid, antagonize MAPK-dependent downregulation of Capicua, a repressor which is involved in gene regulation along the dorsoventral axis of the embryo. MAPK substrate competition provides a basis for ternary interaction of the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems. A mathematical model of this interaction can explain gene expression patterns with both anteroposterior and dorsoventral polarities. PMID:21664584

  3. How does competition structure affect industry merger waves? A network analysis perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Rui; Yang, Jianmei; Yao, Canzhong; McKelvey, Bill

    2015-07-01

    By taking China's beer industry as an example, this paper establishes a series of industrial competition-pressure networks and examines the correlation between competition structure and merger actions. We present a cascade dynamic-merger agent-based computational model driven by competition pressure diffusion to describe the forming process of industry merger wave. The empirical analyses and agent-based computational simulation results show that the competition structure among rivals has a strong effect on the scale, the duration time, and the stability of industry merger wave. We also give explanations on why there are different simulation results between in single market competition environment and in multi-market competition environment, as well as discuss the management implications for the industry-merger policy makers and the merger-tactics decision makers that are involved in merger wave.

  4. Sperm competition and ejaculate economics.

    PubMed

    Parker, Geoff A; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2010-11-01

    Sperm competition was identified in 1970 as a pervasive selective force in post-copulatory sexual selection that occurs when the ejaculates of different males compete to fertilise a given set of ova. Since then, sperm competition has been much studied both empirically and theoretically. Because sperm competition often favours large ejaculates, an important challenge has been to understand the evolution of strategies through which males invest in sperm production and economise sperm allocation to maximise reproductive success under competitive conditions. Sperm competition mechanisms vary greatly, depending on many factors including the level of sperm competition, space constraints in the sperm competition arena, male mating roles, and female influences on sperm utilisation. Consequently, theoretical models of ejaculate economics are complex and varied, often with apparently conflicting predictions. The goal of this review is to synthesise the theoretical basis of ejaculate economics under sperm competition, aiming to provide empiricists with categorised model assumptions and predictions. We show that apparent contradictions between older and newer models can often be reconciled and there is considerable consensus in the predictions generated by different models. We also discuss qualitative empirical support for some of these predictions, and detail quantitative matches between predictions and observations that exist in the yellow dung fly. We argue that ejaculate economic theory represents a powerful heuristic to explain the diversity in ejaculate traits at multiple levels: across species, across males and within individual males. Future progress requires greater understanding of sperm competition mechanisms, quantification of trade-offs between ejaculate allocation and numbers of matings gained, further knowledge of mechanisms of female sperm selection and their associated costs, further investigation of non-sperm ejaculate effects, and theoretical integration of

  5. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research.

  6. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research. PMID:27103058

  7. Final matches of the FIRST regional robotic competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Student teams behind protective walls operate remote controls to maneuver their robots around the playing field during the 1999 FIRST Southeastern Regional robotic competition held at KSC. The robotic gladiators spent two minutes each trying to grab, claw and hoist large, satin pillows onto their machines. Teams played defense by taking away competitors' pillows and generally harassing opposing machines. On the side of the field are the judges, including (far left) Deputy Director for Launch and Payload Processing Loren Shriver and former KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Robert Sieck. A giant screen TV displays the action on the field. The competition comprised 27 teams, pairing high school students with engineer mentors and corporations. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  8. Unintended imitation affects success in a competitive game.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Vaziri Pashkam, Maryam; Nakayama, Ken

    2013-12-10

    Imitation typically occurs in social contexts where people interact and have common goals. Here, we show that people are also highly susceptible to imitate each other in a competitive context. Pairs of players performed a competitive and fast-reaching task (a variant of the arcade whac-a-mole game) in which money could be earned if players hit brief-appearing visual targets on a large touchscreen before their opponents. In three separate experiments, we demonstrate that reaction times and movements were highly correlated within pairs of players. Players affected their success by imitating each other, and imitation depended on the visibility of the opponent's behavior. Imitation persisted, despite the competitive and demanding nature of the game, even if this resulted in lower scores and payoffs and even when there was no need to counteract the opponent's actions.

  9. Myths and realities of u.s. Competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Krugman, P A

    1991-11-01

    Most discussion of U.S. competitiveness misstates the problem, focusing on the trade deficit and on fears that an economy whose productivity lags that of its rivals will face economic disaster. In fact, strong automatic forces ensure that the U.S. economy will remain in business and indeed roughly balance its trade even if its productivity performance is dismal. The real issue is the effect of international competition on the mix of goods that the U.S. economy produces. In some industries high productivity is an effect as well as a cause of international competitiveness. There is an intellectually respectable but politically problematic case for government action to create or preserve advantage in such industries. PMID:17787169

  10. Unintended imitation affects success in a competitive game

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Marnix; Vaziri Pashkam, Maryam; Nakayama, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Imitation typically occurs in social contexts where people interact and have common goals. Here, we show that people are also highly susceptible to imitate each other in a competitive context. Pairs of players performed a competitive and fast-reaching task (a variant of the arcade whac-a-mole game) in which money could be earned if players hit brief-appearing visual targets on a large touchscreen before their opponents. In three separate experiments, we demonstrate that reaction times and movements were highly correlated within pairs of players. Players affected their success by imitating each other, and imitation depended on the visibility of the opponent’s behavior. Imitation persisted, despite the competitive and demanding nature of the game, even if this resulted in lower scores and payoffs and even when there was no need to counteract the opponent’s actions. PMID:24277821

  11. Final matches of the FIRST regional robotic competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Four robots vie for position on the playing field during the 1999 FIRST Southeastern Regional robotic competition held at KSC. Powered by 12-volt batteries and operated by remote control, the robotic gladiators spent two minutes each trying to grab, claw and hoist large, satin pillows onto their machines. Student teams, shown behind protective walls, play defense by taking away competitors' pillows and generally harassing opposing machines. Two of the robots have lifted their caches of pillows above the field, a movement which earns them points. Along with the volunteer referees, at the edge of the playing field, judges at right watch the action. FIRST is a nonprofit organization, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology. The competition comprised 27 teams, pairing high school students with engineer mentors and corporations. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  12. Final matches of the FIRST regional robotic competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During the 1999 FIRST Southeastern Regional robotic competition held at KSC, a robot carrying its cache of pillow-like disks maneuvers to move around another at left. Powered by 12-volt batteries and operated by remote control, the robotic gladiators spend two minutes each trying to grab, claw and hoist the pillows onto their machines. Teams play defense by taking away competitors' pillows and generally harassing opposing machines. Behind the field are a group of judges, including KSC former KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Robert Sieck (left, in cap), and Center Director Roy Bridges (in white shirt). A giant screen TV in the background displays the action on the playing field. FIRST is a nonprofit organization, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology. The competition comprised 27 teams, pairing high school students with engineer mentors and corporations. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  13. FIRST 2002, 2003, 2004 Robotics Competition(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The New Horizons Regional Education Center (NHREC) in Hampton, VA sought and received NASA funding to support its participation in the 2002, 2003, and 2004 FIRST Robotics Competitions. FIRST, Inc. (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an organization which encourages the application of creative science, math, and computer science principles to solve real-world engineering problems. The FIRST competition is an international engineering contest featuring high school, government, and business partnerships.

  14. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  15. Distributional preferences and competitive behavior.

    PubMed

    Balafoutas, Loukas; Kerschbamer, Rudolf; Sutter, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    We study experimentally the relationship between distributional preferences and competitive behavior. We find that spiteful subjects react strongest to competitive pressure and win in a tournament significantly more often than efficiency-minded and inequality averse subjects. However, when given the choice between a tournament and a piece rate scheme, efficiency-minded subjects choose the tournament most often, while spiteful and inequality averse subjects avoid it. When controlling for distributional preferences, risk attitudes and past performance, the gender gap in the willingness to compete is no longer significant, indicating that gender-related variables explain why twice as many men as women self-select into competition.

  16. Gender and competitive preferences: The role of competition size.

    PubMed

    Hanek, Kathrin J; Garcia, Stephen M; Tor, Avishalom

    2016-08-01

    In a series of 8 studies, we examine whether gender differences in competition entry preferences are moderated by the size of the competition. Drawing on theories of gender roles and stereotypes, we show that women, relative to men, prefer to enter smaller compared with larger competitions. Studies 1a and 1b demonstrate this effect in observational data on preferences for working in differently sized firms and applying to differently sized colleges. Studies 2a and 2b replicate the effect with real behavioral decisions in different domains. We also find empirical evidence that prescriptive gender norms and stereotypes underlie this effect. In Study 3, we find experimental evidence that women and men differ in their preferences for differently sized groups under competition, but not in noncompetitive settings. Three additional experimental studies (Studies 4, 5a, and 5b) show that perceptions of comfort in small versus larger competitions underlie women's preferences. These findings suggest that women's preferences for smaller competitions may be driven by an adherence to prescriptive gender norms. We discuss the implications of the current findings for gender inequalities in organizations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27176148

  17. Competition enhances stochasticity in biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firman, Taylor; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the complex interplay between competition and stochasticity using coupled complexation reactions, (i) A + B <--> AB and (ii) A + C <--> AC , as the model system, a reaction scheme common in biology. Within the master equation formalism, we compute the exact distribution of the number of complexes to analyze equilibrium fluctuations of several observables, which reveals that the presence of competition from one reaction can enhance fluctuation in the other. We provide quantitative estimates of this enhancement for different combinations of rate constants and reactant molecule quantities typical to biology. We notice that fluctuations can be significant even when two of the reactant molecules (say B and C) are infinite in number, maintaining a fixed stoichiometry, while the other reactant (A) is finite. This is purely due to the coupling mediated via resource sharing and is in stark contrast to the single reaction scenario, where large numbers of one component ensure zero fluctuation. These observations indicate that averages can be a poor representation of the system, hence analysis that is purely based on averages such as mass action laws can be potentially misleading in such noisy biological systems.

  18. Gain competition in dual wavelength quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Markus; Pflügl, Christian; Belyanin, Alexey; Wang, Qi Jie; Yu, Nanfang; Edamura, Tadanaka; Yamanishi, Masamichi; Kan, Hirofumi; Fischer, Milan; Wittmann, Andreas; Faist, Jérôme; Capasso, Federico

    2010-05-10

    We investigated dual wavelength mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers based on heterogeneous cascades. We found that due to gain competition laser action tends to start in higher order lateral modes. The mid-infrared mode with the lower threshold current reduces population inversion for the second laser with the higher threshold current due to stimulated emission. We developed a rate equation model to quantitatively describe mode interactions due to mutual gain depletion.

  19. Extinction: a window into attentional competition.

    PubMed

    Riddoch, M Jane; Rappaport, Sarah J; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2009-01-01

    Extinction is an example of how stimulus selection may be affected by an imbalance in competition for attentional selection. Patients with extinction are able to process stimuli in either hemispace, but only when presented in isolation. Following brain injury, stimuli will not be processed as efficiently in the damaged hemisphere and so may fail to be detected when other stimuli are competing for selection. In this review we discuss some of the factors that contribute to the recovery from extinction, and consider their implications for functional and neural theories of selection. Work shows that extinction can be modulated by multiple bottom-up factors including: low-level visual grouping (e.g., reflecting Gestalt properties in an array) and grouping based on higher level factors (such as the lexical identity of a stimulus or action relations between objects). Top-down factors (such as holding items in working memory) can also facilitate recovery from extinction. Furthermore, the competition for selection may also be modulated by the programming of action to a given location, consistent with pre-motor feedback to perceptual processes. While often discussed in terms of spatial biases, non-spatial extinction can also be demonstrated (dictated by the coherence of stimuli). In contrast to extinction, a phenomenon of anti-extinction has also been documented where patients are better at report when two items rather than single items are presented. Although superficially distinct, evidence indicates that grouping may be important in both cases, with temporal grouping being important in generating the anti-extinction effect. Overall, the work indicates that the disorder of extinction plays an important role in the understanding of attentional selection.

  20. Competitive Strategy in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baden, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews strategic variables available to those planning continuing education marketing programs. Discusses generic competitive strategies: (1) overall cost leadership, (2) differentiation, and (3) specialization. Mentions several potential problems. (CH)

  1. Surface acidity and degree of carburization of modified silver catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pestryakov, A.N.; Belousova, V.N.; Roznina, M.I.

    1993-11-10

    The effect has been studied of some compounds as modifying additives on the surface acidity, degree of carburization, aggregation and silver entrainement of silver-pumice catalysts for methanol oxidation. Catalyst samples have been tested in an industrial reactor. The probable mechanism of modifying action of the additives is discussed.

  2. An amusement park physics competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Rachel F.

    2010-07-01

    Amusement park physics is a popular way to reinforce physics concepts and to motivate physics learners. This article describes a novel physics competition where students use simple tools to take amusement park ride measurements and use the data to answer challenging exam questions. Research into the impact of participating in the competition reveals positive effects such as the acquisition of experimentation skills and improved attitudes towards physics.

  3. Chemical defense lowers plant competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Daniel J; Godschalx, Adrienne L; Smart, Savannah M; Kautz, Stefanie; Schädler, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Both plant competition and plant defense affect biodiversity and food web dynamics and are central themes in ecology research. The evolutionary pressures determining plant allocation toward defense or competition are not well understood. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDB), the relative importance of herbivory and competition have led to the evolution of plant allocation patterns, with herbivore pressure leading to increased differentiated tissues (defensive traits), and competition pressure leading to resource investment towards cellular division and elongation (growth-related traits). Here, we tested the GDB hypothesis by assessing the competitive response of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) plants with quantitatively different levels of cyanogenesis-a constitutive direct, nitrogen-based defense against herbivores. We used high (HC) and low cyanogenic (LC) genotypes in different competition treatments (intra-genotypic, inter-genotypic, interspecific), and in the presence or absence of insect herbivores (Mexican bean beetle, Epilachna varivestis) to quantify vegetative and generative plant parameters (above and belowground biomass as well as seed production). Highly defended HC-plants had significantly lower aboveground biomass and seed production than LC-plants when grown in the absence of herbivores implying significant intrinsic costs of plant cyanogenesis. However, the reduced performance of HC- compared to LC-plants was mitigated in the presence of herbivores. The two plant genotypes exhibited fundamentally different responses to various stresses (competition, herbivory). Our study supports the GDB hypothesis by demonstrating that competition and herbivory affect different plant genotypes differentially and contributes to understanding the causes of variation in defense within a single plant species.

  4. The origin and use of the terms competitive and non-competitive in interactions among chemical substances in biological systems.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, H

    1986-01-01

    The terms competition and competitive were in use for appropriate types of interaction in human and animal behaviour from the seventeenth century. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries they reached more technical uses in biology, especially in darwinian studies; and in chemistry in describing competing reactions, surface phenomena and the influence of substituent groupings in reactant molecules. Use of competitive and non-competitive to describe enzyme inhibitors had a specific beginning when J. B. S. Haldane (following premonitory work of others) applied the terms in 1927 and 1930 to types of inhibition already differentiated by Michaelis and co-workers. The theoretical background in kinetics and stereochemistry so acquired gave a firmness to the application of the terms in biochemistry. The first examples concerned glycosidases, especially beta-D-fructofuranosidase or invertase, and interactions of carbon monoxide and oxygen at iron-porphyrin systems. They were thus of interest in toxicology and in enzyme and carrier studies. The sphere of application of the biochemically-defined terms expanded greatly when, following investigation of sulphonamide action, it was realized that concepts of enzyme inhibition by structurally related compounds offered a route to understanding the action of existing medicaments and to the production of new ones. Ideas and terminology based on competitive and non-competitive enzyme inhibition and receptor occupancy have subsequently been applied in many ways. Examples include application to the analysis of feedback inhibition and other processes of metabolic control; to receptor relationships among neurotransmitters and medicaments; and to understanding interactions at sensory receptors. PMID:3030738

  5. National Biofuels Action Plan, October 2008

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2008-10-01

    To help industry achieve the aggressive national goals, Federal agencies will need to continue to enhance their collaboration. The Biomass Research and Development (R&D) Board was created by Congress in the Biomass Research and Development Act of 2000. The National Biofuels Action Plan outlines areas where interagency cooperation will help to evolve bio-based fuel production technologies from promising ideas to competitive solutions.

  6. 76 FR 1158 - Auction of 700 MHz Band Licenses Scheduled for July 19, 2011; Comment Sought on Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Auction of 700 MHz Band Licenses Scheduled for July 19, 2011; Comment Sought on Competitive Bidding Procedures for Auction 92 AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. ]...

  7. 78 FR 38265 - Wireline Competition Bureau Adds Two New Discussion Topics to Connect America Cost Model Virtual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Wireline Competition Bureau adds two new virtual workshop discussion topics.../ecfs2/ . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Virtual Workshop: In addition to the...

  8. 78 FR 23192 - Wireline Competition Bureau Adds New Discussion Topic to Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Wireline Competition Bureau adds a new virtual workshop discussion topic, entitled... for submitting comments. Virtual Workshop: In addition to the usual methods for filing...

  9. Interference competition and parasite virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Ruth C.; Buckling, Angus; ffrench-Constant, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Within-host competition between parasites, a consequence of infection by multiple strains, is predicted to favour rapid host exploitation and greater damage to hosts (virulence). However, the inclusion of biological variables can drastically change this relationship. For example, if competing parasite strains produce toxins that kill each other (interference competition), their growth rates and virulence may be reduced relative to single-strain infections. Bacteriocins are antimicrobial toxins produced by bacteria that target closely related strains and species, and to which the producing strain is immune. We investigated competition between bacteriocin-producing, insect-killing bacteria (Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus) and how this competition affected virulence in caterpillars. Where one strain could kill the other, and not vice versa, the non-killing strain was competitively excluded, and insect mortality was the same as that of the killing strain alone. However, when caterpillars were multiply infected by strains that could kill each other, we did not observe competitive exclusion and their virulence was less than single-strain infections. The ubiquity and diversity of bacteriocins among pathogenic bacteria suggest mixed infections will be, on average, less virulent than single infections. PMID:15255095

  10. Observational bounds on modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukherjee, Pia; Wang Yun

    2008-01-15

    Modified gravity provides a possible explanation for the currently observed cosmic acceleration. In this paper, we study general classes of modified gravity models. The Einstein-Hilbert action is modified by using general functions of the Ricci and the Gauss-Bonnet scalars, both in the metric and in the Palatini formalisms. We do not use an explicit form for the functions, but a general form with a valid Taylor expansion up to second order about redshift zero in the Riemann-scalars. The coefficients of this expansion are then reconstructed via the cosmic expansion history measured using current cosmological observations. These are the quantities of interest for theoretical considerations relating to ghosts and instabilities. We find that current data provide interesting constraints on the coefficients. The next-generation dark energy surveys should shrink the allowed parameter space for modified gravity models quite dramatically.

  11. 21 CFR 123.7 - Corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corrective actions. 123.7 Section 123.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... in accordance with § 123.10, to determine whether the HACCP plan needs to be modified to reduce...

  12. 21 CFR 123.7 - Corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corrective actions. 123.7 Section 123.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... in accordance with § 123.10, to determine whether the HACCP plan needs to be modified to reduce...

  13. 21 CFR 123.7 - Corrective actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corrective actions. 123.7 Section 123.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... in accordance with § 123.10, to determine whether the HACCP plan needs to be modified to reduce...

  14. From glue to gasoline: how competition turns perspective takers unethical.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jason R; Kilduff, Gavin J; Galinsky, Adam D; Sivanathan, Niro

    2013-10-01

    Perspective taking is often the glue that binds people together. However, we propose that in competitive contexts, perspective taking is akin to adding gasoline to a fire: It inflames already-aroused competitive impulses and leads people to protect themselves from the potentially insidious actions of their competitors. Overall, we suggest that perspective taking functions as a relational amplifier. In cooperative contexts, it creates the foundation for prosocial impulses, but in competitive contexts, it triggers hypercompetition, leading people to prophylactically engage in unethical behavior to prevent themselves from being exploited. The experiments reported here establish that perspective taking interacts with the relational context--cooperative or competitive--to predict unethical behavior, from using insidious negotiation tactics to materially deceiving one's partner to cheating on an anagram task. In the context of competition, perspective taking can pervert the age-old axiom "do unto others as you would have them do unto you" into "do unto others as you think they will try to do unto you."

  15. Competitive Bidding in Medicare: Who Benefits From Competition?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zirui; Landrum, Mary Beth; Chernew, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To conduct the first empirical study of competitive bidding in Medicare. Study Design and Methods We analyzed 2006–2010 Medicare Advantage data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services using longitudinal models adjusted for market and plan characteristics. Results A $1 increase in Medicare's payment to health maintenance organization (HMO) plans led to a $0.49 (P <.001) increase in plan bids, with $0.34 (P <.001) going to beneficiaries in the form of extra benefits or lower cost sharing. With preferred provider organization and private fee-for-service plans included, higher Medicare payments increased bids less ($0.33 per dollar), suggesting more competition among these latter plans. Conclusions As a market-based alternative to cost control through administrative pricing, competitive bidding relies on private insurance plans proposing prices they are willing to accept for insuring a beneficiary. However, competition is imperfect in the Medicare bidding market. As much as half of every dollar in increased plan payment went to higher bids rather than to beneficiaries. While having more insurers in a market lowered bids, the design of any bidding system for Medicare should recognize this shortcoming of competition. PMID:23009305

  16. Social dominance and courtship and mating behaviour in rams in non-competitive and competitive pen tests.

    PubMed

    Ungerfeld, R; González-Pensado, S P

    2009-02-01

    A group of 19 Merino rams was used to determine: (i) if body weight, age and testis characteristics are different between high (HR) and low-ranked (LR) rams, and (ii) how the competition between HR and LR rams for oestrous ewes affect their courtship and mating behaviour. Hierarchy was determined using the food competition test. The five first and five last ranked rams were individually exposed to oestrous ewes in pen tests, and the frequency of different courtship behavioural units, mounts and mates, and the time from test onset to each mate was recorded. The sexual behaviour of the five first ranked and the five last ranked rams was also tested in competition, pairing a HR and a LR ram. Age, body weight, body condition score, scrotal circumference, and testis firmness and resilience from HR and LR were not different. The display of courtship behavioural units was lower when rams were tested in competition but was not affected by the rank of the rams. The number of mates per test from HR rams was lower than that observed in LR rams when tested alone. While the number of mates decreased in LR rams in competition tests, it was not affected in HR rams. In summary, there was no relation between social rank and body weight, age or testis characteristics. LR rams were more effective than HR rams when mating oestrous ewes without competition. However, in competitive tests, although all rams modified their courtship strategies, LR rams were more affected by the presence of dominant rams than HR rams were by the presence of LR rams.

  17. Interference competition and species coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2002-01-01

    Interference competition is ubiquitous in nature. Yet its effects on resource exploitation remain largely unexplored for species that compete for dynamic resources. Here, I present a model of exploitative and interference competition with explicit resource dynamics. The model incorporates both biotic and abiotic resources. It considers interference competition both in the classical sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, and interference on, the other species) and in the broad sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, but can experience an increase in growth rate via interference on, the other species). Coexistence cannot occur under classical interference competition even when the species inferior at resource exploitation is superior at interference. Such a trade-off can, however, change the mechanism of competitive exclusion from dominance by the superior resource exploiter to a priority effect. Now the inferior resource exploiter can exclude the superior resource exploiter provided it has a higher initial abundance. By contrast, when interference is beneficial to the interacting species, coexistence is possible via a trade-off between exploitation and interference. These results hold regardless of whether the resource is biotic or abiotic, indicating that the outcome of exploitative and interference competition does not depend on the exact nature of resource dynamics. The model makes two key predictions. First, species that engage in costly interference mechanisms (e.g. territoriality, overgrowth or undercutting, allelopathy and other forms of chemical competition) should not be able to coexist unless they also engage in beneficial interference mechanisms (e.g. predation or parasitism). Second, exotic invasive species that displace native biota should be superior resource exploiters that have strong interference effects on native species with little

  18. Action goals influence action-specific perception.

    PubMed

    Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen; van der Kamp, John

    2009-12-01

    We examined the processes that mediate the emergence of action-specific influences on perception that have recently been reported for baseball batting and golf putting (Witt, Linkenauger, Bakdash, & Proffitt, 2008; Witt & Proffitt, 2005). To this end, we used a Schokokusswurfmaschine: Children threw a ball at a target, which, if hit successfully, launched a ball that the children then had to catch. In two experiments, children performed either a throwing-and-catching task or a throwing-only task, in which no ball was launched. After each task, the size of the target or of the ball was estimated. Results indicate that action-specific influences on perceived size occur for objects that are related to the end goal of the action, but not for objects that are related to intermediate action goals. These results suggest that action-specific influences on perception are contingent upon the primary action goals to be achieved.

  19. Altruistic punishment and between-group competition : evidence from n-person prisoner's dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Rebers, Susanne; Koopmans, Ruud

    2012-06-01

    Collective action, or the large-scale cooperation in the pursuit of public goods, has been suggested to have evolved through cultural group selection. Previous research suggests that the costly punishment of group members who do not contribute to public goods plays an important role in the resolution of collective action dilemmas. If large-scale cooperation sustained by the punishment of defectors has evolved through the mechanism of cultural group selection, two implications regarding costly punishment follow: (1) that people are more willing to punish defecting group members in a situation of intergroup competition than in a single-group social dilemma game and (2) that levels of "perverse" punishment of cooperators are not affected by intergroup competition. We find confirmation for these hypotheses. However, we find that the effect of intergroup competition on the punishment of defectors is fully explained by the stronger conditionality of punishment on expected punishment levels in the competition condition.

  20. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  1. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and Action Research in Context" (Cliff…

  2. Competitive helping in online giving.

    PubMed

    Raihani, Nichola J; Smith, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    Unconditional generosity in humans is a puzzle. One possibility is that individuals benefit from being seen as generous if there is competition for access to partners and if generosity is a costly-and therefore reliable-signal of partner quality [1-3]. The "competitive helping" hypothesis predicts that people will compete to be the most generous, particularly in the presence of attractive potential partners [1]. However, this key prediction has not been directly tested. Using data from online fundraising pages, we demonstrate competitive helping in the real world. Donations to fundraising pages are public and made sequentially. Donors can therefore respond to the behavior of previous donors, creating a potential generosity tournament. Our test of the competitive helping hypothesis focuses on the response to large, visible donations. We show that male donors show significantly stronger responses (by donating more) when they are donating to an attractive female fundraiser and responding to a large donation made by another male donor. The responses for this condition are around four times greater than when males give to less-attractive female (or male) fundraisers or when they respond to a large donation made by a female donor. Unlike males, females do not compete in donations when giving to attractive male fundraisers. These data suggest that males use competitive helping displays in the presence of attractive females and suggest a role for sexual selection in explaining unconditional generosity.

  3. The Scientific Competitiveness of Nations

    PubMed Central

    Cimini, Giulio; Gabrielli, Andrea; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We use citation data of scientific articles produced by individual nations in different scientific domains to determine the structure and efficiency of national research systems. We characterize the scientific fitness of each nation—that is, the competitiveness of its research system—and the complexity of each scientific domain by means of a non-linear iterative algorithm able to assess quantitatively the advantage of scientific diversification. We find that technological leading nations, beyond having the largest production of scientific papers and the largest number of citations, do not specialize in a few scientific domains. Rather, they diversify as much as possible their research system. On the other side, less developed nations are competitive only in scientific domains where also many other nations are present. Diversification thus represents the key element that correlates with scientific and technological competitiveness. A remarkable implication of this structure of the scientific competition is that the scientific domains playing the role of “markers” of national scientific competitiveness are those not necessarily of high technological requirements, but rather addressing the most “sophisticated” needs of the society. PMID:25493626

  4. Business Plan Competitions: An Overview. CELCEE Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Nicole

    This document describes business plan competitions sponsored by universities. The idea began in the early 1980s at the University of Texas when Masters in Business Administration (MBA) students created a friendly competitive activity along the lines of the law schools Moot Court competition. Later the competition became national, and then…

  5. 32 CFR 22.320 - Special competitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special competitions. 22.320 Section 22.320... REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Competition § 22.320 Special competitions. Some... competed specifically among institutions of higher education. All such special competitions shall...

  6. 24 CFR 791.406 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Competition. 791.406 Section 791... Authority for Housing Assistance § 791.406 Competition. (a) All budget authority allocated pursuant to § 791.403(b)(2) shall be reserved and obligated pursuant to a competition. Any such competition shall...

  7. 24 CFR 791.406 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Competition. 791.406 Section 791... Authority for Housing Assistance § 791.406 Competition. (a) All budget authority allocated pursuant to § 791.403(b)(2) shall be reserved and obligated pursuant to a competition. Any such competition shall...

  8. 24 CFR 791.406 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Competition. 791.406 Section 791... Authority for Housing Assistance § 791.406 Competition. (a) All budget authority allocated pursuant to § 791.403(b)(2) shall be reserved and obligated pursuant to a competition. Any such competition shall...

  9. 24 CFR 791.406 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Competition. 791.406 Section 791... Authority for Housing Assistance § 791.406 Competition. (a) All budget authority allocated pursuant to § 791.403(b)(2) shall be reserved and obligated pursuant to a competition. Any such competition shall...

  10. 7 CFR 3430.11 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Competition. 3430.11 Section 3430.11 Agriculture... Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.11 Competition. (a) Standards for competition. Except..., unless restricted by statute, only after competition. (b) Exception. The NIFA ADO and the...

  11. 7 CFR 3430.11 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Competition. 3430.11 Section 3430.11 Agriculture... Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.11 Competition. (a) Standards for competition. Except... agreements, unless restricted by statute, only after competition. (b) Exception. The CSREES ADO and...

  12. 7 CFR 3430.11 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Competition. 3430.11 Section 3430.11 Agriculture... Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.11 Competition. (a) Standards for competition. Except..., unless restricted by statute, only after competition. (b) Exception. The NIFA ADO and the...

  13. 7 CFR 3430.11 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Competition. 3430.11 Section 3430.11 Agriculture... Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.11 Competition. (a) Standards for competition. Except..., unless restricted by statute, only after competition. (b) Exception. The NIFA ADO and the...

  14. 32 CFR 22.320 - Special competitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special competitions. 22.320 Section 22.320... REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Competition § 22.320 Special competitions. Some... competed specifically among institutions of higher education. All such special competitions shall...

  15. 24 CFR 791.406 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Competition. 791.406 Section 791... Authority for Housing Assistance § 791.406 Competition. (a) All budget authority allocated pursuant to § 791.403(b)(2) shall be reserved and obligated pursuant to a competition. Any such competition shall...

  16. 48 CFR 570.203-2 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Competition. 570.203-2... 570.203-2 Competition. (a) Solicit at least three sources to promote competition to the maximum extent..., document the file to explain the lack of competition....

  17. 78 FR 20697 - New Competitive Product

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... is noticing a recent Postal Service filing concerning an addition to the competitive product list... 57 to the competitive product list.\\1\\ It asserts that Priority Mail Contract 57 is a competitive... Priority Mail Contract 57 to Competitive Product List and Notice of Filing (Under Seal) of...

  18. 40 CFR 35.603 - Competitive process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Competitive process. 35.603 Section 35... (section 104(b)(3)) § 35.603 Competitive process. EPA will award water quality cooperative agreement funds through a competitive process in accordance with national program guidance. After the competitive...

  19. 40 CFR 35.382 - Competitive process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Competitive process. 35.382 Section 35...)(3)) § 35.382 Competitive process. State Wetlands Development Grants are awarded on a competitive... established by EPA. After the competitive process is complete, the recipient can, at its discretion,...

  20. 40 CFR 35.382 - Competitive process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Competitive process. 35.382 Section 35...)(3)) § 35.382 Competitive process. State Wetlands Development Grants are awarded on a competitive... established by EPA. After the competitive process is complete, the recipient can, at its discretion,...

  1. 40 CFR 35.382 - Competitive process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Competitive process. 35.382 Section 35...)(3)) § 35.382 Competitive process. State Wetlands Development Grants are awarded on a competitive... established by EPA. After the competitive process is complete, the recipient can, at its discretion,...

  2. 40 CFR 35.382 - Competitive process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Competitive process. 35.382 Section 35...)(3)) § 35.382 Competitive process. State Wetlands Development Grants are awarded on a competitive... established by EPA. After the competitive process is complete, the recipient can, at its discretion,...

  3. Game on: creating competitive advantages.

    PubMed

    Riskind, Patricia; Foreman, M Shane

    2004-01-01

    Whether you are opening a new imaging center or trying to keep an existing center competitive, there are 3 critical factors: customer service, marketing, and a "what's next?" attitude. Customer service: Outstanding customer service is what sticks in the minds of referring physicians and patients. Not only does providing better service differentiate you from the competition, but it also boosts employee morale and motivates people to acquire new skills. Marketing: From the front office staff to the radiologists,promoting the center should be part of every employee's job description. Simply paying lip service to the concept of marketing will not cut it. A "what's next?" attitude: Complacency is a luxury that does not exist in today's competitive health care arena. Three facilities provide examples of how these factors applied to their success.

  4. Infants' Understanding of Actions Performed by Mechanical Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ty W.; Pan, J. Samantha; Bertenthal, Bennett I.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research suggests that 9-month-old infants tested in a modified version of the A-not-B search task covertly imitate actions performed by the experimenter. The current study examines whether infants also simulate actions performed by mechanical devices, and whether this varies with whether or not they have been familiarized with the devices…

  5. Bimetric theory of gravity from the nonchiral Plebanski action

    SciTech Connect

    Speziale, Simone

    2010-09-15

    We study a modification of the Plebanski action for general relativity, which leads to a modified theory of gravity with 8 degrees of freedom. We show how the action can be recasted as a bimetric theory of gravity, and expanding around a biflat background we identify the 6 extra degrees of freedom with a second, massive graviton and a scalar mode.

  6. Belowground competition among invading detritivores.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Han; Szlavecz, Katalin; Filley, Timothy; Buyer, Jeffrey S; Bernard, Michael J; Pitz, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    The factors regulating soil animal communities are poorly understood. Current theory favors niche complementarity and facilitation over competition as the primary forms of non-trophic interspecific interaction in soil fauna; however, competition has frequently been suggested as an important community-structuring factor in earthworms, ecosystem engineers that influence belowground processes. To date, direct evidence of competition in earthworms is lacking due to the difficulty inherent in identifying a limiting resource for saprophagous animals. In the present study, we offer the first direct evidence of interspecific competition for food in this dominant soil detritivore group by combining field observations with laboratory mesocosm experiments using 13C and 15N double-enriched leaf litter to track consumption patterns. In our experiments, the Asian invasive species Amynthas hilgendorfi was a dominant competitor for leaf litter against two European species currently invading the temperate deciduous forests in North America. This competitive advantage may account for recent invasion success of A. hilgendorfi in forests with established populations of European species, and we hypothesize that specific phenological differences play an important role in determining the outcome of the belowground competition. In contrast, Eisenoides lonnbergi, a common native species in the Eastern United States, occupied a unique trophic position with limited interactions with other species, which may contribute to its persistence in habitats dominated by invasive species. Furthermore, our results supported neither the hypothesis that facilitation occurs between species of different functional groups nor the hypothesis that species in the same group exhibit functional equivalency in C and N translocation in the soil. We propose that species identity is a more powerful approach to understand earthworm invasion and its impacts on belowground processes.

  7. Belowground competition among invading detritivores.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Han; Szlavecz, Katalin; Filley, Timothy; Buyer, Jeffrey S; Bernard, Michael J; Pitz, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    The factors regulating soil animal communities are poorly understood. Current theory favors niche complementarity and facilitation over competition as the primary forms of non-trophic interspecific interaction in soil fauna; however, competition has frequently been suggested as an important community-structuring factor in earthworms, ecosystem engineers that influence belowground processes. To date, direct evidence of competition in earthworms is lacking due to the difficulty inherent in identifying a limiting resource for saprophagous animals. In the present study, we offer the first direct evidence of interspecific competition for food in this dominant soil detritivore group by combining field observations with laboratory mesocosm experiments using 13C and 15N double-enriched leaf litter to track consumption patterns. In our experiments, the Asian invasive species Amynthas hilgendorfi was a dominant competitor for leaf litter against two European species currently invading the temperate deciduous forests in North America. This competitive advantage may account for recent invasion success of A. hilgendorfi in forests with established populations of European species, and we hypothesize that specific phenological differences play an important role in determining the outcome of the belowground competition. In contrast, Eisenoides lonnbergi, a common native species in the Eastern United States, occupied a unique trophic position with limited interactions with other species, which may contribute to its persistence in habitats dominated by invasive species. Furthermore, our results supported neither the hypothesis that facilitation occurs between species of different functional groups nor the hypothesis that species in the same group exhibit functional equivalency in C and N translocation in the soil. We propose that species identity is a more powerful approach to understand earthworm invasion and its impacts on belowground processes. PMID:27008785

  8. Can NCLB Survive the Competitiveness Competition? Education Outlook. Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.; Rotherham, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Some see the George W. Bush administration's American Competitiveness Initiative (ACI) as the perfect complement to the No Child Left Behind Act's (NCLB) equity focus. The authors believe, however, that the prospects for synergy of these two agendas are not bright. In this essay, the authors discuss the history behind NCLB and the ACI, and argue…

  9. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers. PMID:10230572

  10. The prefrontal cortex and hybrid learning during iterative competitive games.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroshi; Seo, Hyojung; Lee, Daeyeol

    2011-12-01

    Behavioral changes driven by reinforcement and punishment are referred to as simple or model-free reinforcement learning. Animals can also change their behaviors by observing events that are neither appetitive nor aversive when these events provide new information about payoffs available from alternative actions. This is an example of model-based reinforcement learning and can be accomplished by incorporating hypothetical reward signals into the value functions for specific actions. Recent neuroimaging and single-neuron recording studies showed that the prefrontal cortex and the striatum are involved not only in reinforcement and punishment, but also in model-based reinforcement learning. We found evidence for both types of learning, and hence hybrid learning, in monkeys during simulated competitive games. In addition, in both the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex, individual neurons heterogeneously encoded signals related to actual and hypothetical outcomes from specific actions, suggesting that both areas might contribute to hybrid learning.

  11. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  12. 23 CFR 636.404 - Can a competitive range be used to limit competition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can a competitive range be used to limit competition... used to limit competition? If the solicitation notifies offerors that the competitive range can be... permit an efficient competition. However, you must provide written notice to any offeror whose...

  13. 23 CFR 636.404 - Can a competitive range be used to limit competition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can a competitive range be used to limit competition... used to limit competition? If the solicitation notifies offerors that the competitive range can be... permit an efficient competition. However, you must provide written notice to any offeror whose...

  14. 23 CFR 636.404 - Can a competitive range be used to limit competition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can a competitive range be used to limit competition... used to limit competition? If the solicitation notifies offerors that the competitive range can be... permit an efficient competition. However, you must provide written notice to any offeror whose...

  15. 23 CFR 636.404 - Can a competitive range be used to limit competition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a competitive range be used to limit competition... used to limit competition? If the solicitation notifies offerors that the competitive range can be... permit an efficient competition. However, you must provide written notice to any offeror whose...

  16. 30 CFR 585.306 - What action will BOEM take on my request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Grants and Rue Grants § 585.306 What action will BOEM take on my request? BOEM will consider requests for ROW grants and RUE grants on a case-by-case basis and may issue a grant competitively, as provided in... a ROW grant or RUE grant, the BOEM will first determine if there is competitive interest,...

  17. 30 CFR 585.306 - What action will BOEM take on my request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Grants and Rue Grants § 585.306 What action will BOEM take on my request? BOEM will consider requests for ROW grants and RUE grants on a case-by-case basis and may issue a grant competitively, as provided in... a ROW grant or RUE grant, the BOEM will first determine if there is competitive interest,...

  18. 30 CFR 285.306 - What action will MMS take on my request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Obtaining Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.306 What action will MMS take on my request? The MMS will consider requests for ROW grants and RUE grants on a case-by-case basis and may issue a grant competitively, as... request for a ROW grant or RUE grant, the MMS will first determine if there is competitive interest,...

  19. Future survival requires competitive skills

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    The companies that will succeed in the global power business in 25 years will be those that best understand the productivity implications of the current power game. In the competitive free market for electricity, the inefficient will be driven out. This will include the developer that is unable to achieve higher productivity in developing and financing projects, the engineer-constructor that longs for the old risk-free, cost-plus environment and the trading company that fails to enter into new relationships with the most productive companies in the world. Also in jeopardy will be the operator who can`t reduce O and M costs and the manufacturer who is unable to control overhead or labor costs. Succeeding will be all about productivity. Free market competition drives productivity improvement. In a competitive environment, companies must operate at a more efficient level. The US learned this accidentally through the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act, getting us a side benefit of free market competition and lower electricity prices. In other countries the practice of socialism and its final bankruptcy forced adjustments to free market policies.

  20. Raising Economic Competitiveness with Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    The current school reform movement has been plagued by three false assumptions. The first of these postulates that more academic requirements will strengthen the minds of students, improve their reasoning, prepare them for a rapidly changing economy, and make the U.S. economy more competitive. Although it is true that the workers of the future…

  1. An Amusement Park Physics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moll, Rachel F.

    2010-01-01

    Amusement park physics is a popular way to reinforce physics concepts and to motivate physics learners. This article describes a novel physics competition where students use simple tools to take amusement park ride measurements and use the data to answer challenging exam questions. Research into the impact of participating in the competition…

  2. Teaching the Values of Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buyer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The author of this paper first learned about the values of competition as a member of the 1989 Star of Indiana Drum and Bugle Corps. Because they played more than thirty shows that summer, it was common to compete two nights in a row. He vividly remembers one such occasion. Their first show was outstanding, and they finished second. Everyone was…

  3. The components of kin competition.

    PubMed

    Van Dyken, J David

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that competition among kin alters the rate and often the direction of evolution in subdivided populations. Yet much remains unclear about the ecological and demographic causes of kin competition, or what role life cycle plays in promoting or ameliorating its effects. Using the multilevel Price equation, I derive a general equation for evolution in structured populations under an arbitrary intensity of kin competition. This equation partitions the effects of selection and demography, and recovers numerous previous models as special cases. I quantify the degree of kin competition, α, which explicitly depends on life cycle. I show how life cycle and demographic assumptions can be incorporated into kin selection models via α, revealing life cycles that are more or less permissive of altruism. As an example, I give closed-form results for Hamilton's rule in a three-stage life cycle. Although results are sensitive to life cycle in general, I identify three demographic conditions that give life cycle invariant results. Under the infinite island model, α is a function of the scale of density regulation and dispersal rate, effectively disentangling these two phenomena. Population viscosity per se does not impede kin selection.

  4. Competitive economics of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.

    1981-03-02

    Some 12 components of a valid study of the competitive economics of a newly ordered nuclear power plant are identified and explicated. These are then used to adjust the original cost projections of four authoritative studies of nuclear and coal power economics.

  5. Competition with Charters Motivates Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Marc J.; Lueken, Martin F.; Egalite, Anna J.

    2013-01-01

    Proponents of market-based education reform often argue that introducing charter schools and other school choice policies creates a competitive dynamic that will prompt low-performing districts to improve their practice. Rather than simply providing an alternative to neighborhood public schools for a handful of students, the theory says, school…

  6. Does market competition explain fairness?

    PubMed

    Descioli, Peter

    2013-02-01

    The target article by Baumard et al. uses their previous model of bargaining with outside options to explain fairness and other features of human sociality. This theory implies that fairness judgments are determined by supply and demand but humans often perceive prices (divisions of surplus) in competitive markets to be unfair.

  7. Clean Energy Business Plan Competition

    SciTech Connect

    Maxted, Sara Jane; Lojewski, Brandon; Scherson, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    Top Students Pitch Clean Energy Business Plans The six regional finalists of the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition pitched their business plans to a panel of judges June 13 in Washington, D.C. The expert judges announced NuMat Technologies from Northwestern University as the grand prize winner.

  8. Competitive Cooperation: The Iceberg Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jerry L.

    Competitive athletes' scores on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test create an iceberg-like pattern known as the "Iceberg Profile." Their scores for tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion are low while their scores on vigor juts upward creating the "Iceberg Profile." Persons in a cooperative relationship are often competing against…

  9. Geographic Proximity and Enrollment Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zammuto, Raymond F.

    The use of a measure of geographic proximity to help explain enrollment competition among postsecondary institutions was investigated. The measure, the number of miles between institutions, was obtained by determining the longitude and latitude coordinates for about 99% of the schools in the Higher Education General Information System universe.…

  10. Assessing the New Competitive Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blustain, Harvey; Goldstein, Philip; Lozier, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Argues that complex forces (new delivery technologies, changing demographics, emergence of corporate universities, global economy) have created a new, competitive landscape for higher education that forces institutions to think methodically about how to respond. A framework for college planning, incorporating three critical components, is…

  11. A Sinking Feeling about Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirasuolo, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    A competitive school ambience will further distinguish winners from losers in an increasingly fractured and stratified society. Disadvantaged students have little chance to win the standards game. Educators should examine the gilded age's hypocrisy; what gallantry existed the night the Titanic sank applied only to first-class female passengers.…

  12. Economic Competitiveness: A Campaign Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2008-01-01

    With the dollar's continued swoon and grim news on the job front, American economic competitiveness has become a central theme in the presidential election. Stumping in Ohio and Pennsylvania, old-line industrial states hit hard by the flight of manufacturing jobs, Democrats Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama have called for renegotiating the…

  13. Clean Energy Business Plan Competition

    ScienceCinema

    Maxted, Sara Jane; Lojewski, Brandon; Scherson, Yaniv

    2016-07-12

    Top Students Pitch Clean Energy Business Plans The six regional finalists of the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition pitched their business plans to a panel of judges June 13 in Washington, D.C. The expert judges announced NuMat Technologies from Northwestern University as the grand prize winner.

  14. Competition in a Social Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legara, Erika Fille; Longjas, Anthony; Batac, Rene

    Complex adaptive agents develop strategies in the presence of competition. In modern human societies, there is an inherent sense of locality when describing inter-agent dynamics because of its network structure. One then wonders whether the traditional advertising schemes that are globally publicized and target random individuals are as effective in attracting a larger portion of the population as those that take advantage of local neighborhoods, such as "word-of-mouth" marketing schemes. Here, we demonstrate using a differential equation model that schemes targeting local cliques within the network are more successful at gaining a larger share of the population than those that target users randomly at a global scale (e.g., television commercials, print ads, etc.). This suggests that success in the competition is dependent not only on the number of individuals in the population but also on how they are connected in the network. We further show that the model is general in nature by considering examples of competition dynamics, particularly those of business competition and language death.

  15. Unconscious Effects of Action on Perception

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Veronika; Cunnington, Ross

    2012-01-01

    We spend much of our life predicting the future. This involves developing theories and making predictions about others’ intentions, goals and about the consequences of the actions we are observing. Adapting our actions and behaviours to the environment is required for achieving our goals, and to do this the motor system relies on input from sensory modalities. However, recent theories suggest that the link between motor and perceptual areas is bidirectional, and that predictions based on planned or intended actions can unconsciously influence and modify our perception. In the following review we describe current theories on the link between action and perception, and examine the ways in which the motor system can unconsciously alter our perception. PMID:24962769

  16. Fine-Grained Analysis of Motionese: Eye Gaze, Object Exchanges, and Action Units in Infant-versus Adult-Directed Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Rebecca J.; Shallcross, Wendy L.; Sabatos, Maura G.; Massie, Kara Phaedra

    2007-01-01

    Mothers modify their actions when demonstrating objects to infants versus adults. Such modifications have been called infant-directed action (IDA) or "motionese" (Brand, Baldwin, & Ashburn, 2002). We investigated the IDA features of interactiveness and simplification by quantifying eye gaze, object exchanges, and action units enacted between…

  17. Joint Action Syntax in Japanese Martial Arts

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Yokoyama, Keiko; Okumura, Motoki; Kijima, Akifumi; Kadota, Koji; Gohara, Kazutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Participation in interpersonal competitions, such as fencing or Japanese martial arts, requires players to make instantaneous decisions and execute appropriate motor behaviors in response to various situations. Such actions can be understood as complex phenomena emerging from simple principles. We examined the intentional switching dynamics associated with continuous movement during interpersonal competition in terms of their emergence from a simple syntax. Linear functions on return maps identified two attractors as well as the transitions between them. The effects of skill differences were evident in the second- and third-order state-transition diagrams for these two attractors. Our results suggest that abrupt switching between attractors is related to the diverse continuous movements resulting from quick responses to sudden changes in the environment. This abrupt-switching-quick-response behavior is characterized by a joint action syntax. The resulting hybrid dynamical system is composed of a higher module with discrete dynamics and a lower module with continuous dynamics. Our results suggest that intelligent human behavior and robust autonomy in real-life scenarios are based on this hybrid dynamical system, which connects interpersonal coordination and competition. PMID:24023740

  18. Joint action syntax in Japanese martial arts.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Yokoyama, Keiko; Okumura, Motoki; Kijima, Akifumi; Kadota, Koji; Gohara, Kazutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Participation in interpersonal competitions, such as fencing or Japanese martial arts, requires players to make instantaneous decisions and execute appropriate motor behaviors in response to various situations. Such actions can be understood as complex phenomena emerging from simple principles. We examined the intentional switching dynamics associated with continuous movement during interpersonal competition in terms of their emergence from a simple syntax. Linear functions on return maps identified two attractors as well as the transitions between them. The effects of skill differences were evident in the second- and third-order state-transition diagrams for these two attractors. Our results suggest that abrupt switching between attractors is related to the diverse continuous movements resulting from quick responses to sudden changes in the environment. This abrupt-switching-quick-response behavior is characterized by a joint action syntax. The resulting hybrid dynamical system is composed of a higher module with discrete dynamics and a lower module with continuous dynamics. Our results suggest that intelligent human behavior and robust autonomy in real-life scenarios are based on this hybrid dynamical system, which connects interpersonal coordination and competition.

  19. Hospital pricing: cost shifting and competition.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A

    1993-05-01

    The issue of cost shifting has taken on enormous policy implications. It is estimated that unsponsored and undercompensated hospital costs--one measure of cost shifting--has totaled $21.5 billion in 1991. The health services research literature indicates that hospitals set different prices for different payers. However, the empirical evidence on hospitals' ability to raise prices to one payer to make up for unsponsored care or lower payments by other payers is mixed at best. No study has concluded that hospitals have raised prices to fully adjust for such actions. The extent of cost shifting is limited by the market. When a hospital has market power, it is able to set prices above marginal costs. However, when a buyer has enough patient/subscribers and a willingness to direct them to particular providers based on price considerations, hospitals have less flexibility in raising prices above costs. Thus, the extent of cost shifting is limited by the market. Cost shifting is not as easy as it may have been in the past because the nature of hospital and insurer competition has changed radically in the last decade. While hospital quality, services, and amenities still matter, some buyers are increasingly concerned about the price they pay. Evidence from studies of PPO and HMO negotiations with hospitals suggests that hospitals' market power is eroding, at least in some areas. In areas with relatively few hospital competitors and little PPO or HMO activity, Medicaid and Medicare price reductions and uncompensated care burdens will be partially absorbed by higher prices paid by private payers. In more price sensitive markets and in markets in which prices to private payers have risen to those commensurate with the market power of local hospitals, such cost shifting will not occur. A market-based approach in hospital pricing requires an explicit policy for the uninsured. In a competitive market, a hospital that traditionally cared for the uninsured by spending some of its

  20. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R (2) = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R (2) = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport. PMID:27014132

  1. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, Richard G.; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R2 = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R2 = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport. PMID:27014132

  2. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R (2) = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R (2) = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport.

  3. Electric power competition & the economic doctrine of contestable markets

    SciTech Connect

    Owan, R.E.

    1995-06-01

    This paper addresses electric power competition and ascribes a prototypical market structure for the utility industry. The advent of {open_quotes}limited{close_quotes} competition in the electric utility industry has created interesting market challenges for incumbent companies and those eager to enter the fray. Competition is viewed as limited in the sense that not all aspects of the utility industry have been deregulated. While transmission and distribution remain protected market segments, the metamorphosis is most evident in the generation component of the utility industry. The changes have been orchestrated by favorable actions by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Because of the industry changes, the classical view of the electric utility company as a vertical monopoly is arguable. Welfare considerations not withstanding, part of the rationale for the deregulation of power generation is that the technology and techniques are sufficiently common (i.e. not proprietary) as to allow others to provide the same product or service at competitive prices.

  4. Demolishing the Competition: The Longitudinal Link between Competitive Video Games, Competitive Gambling, and Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Paul J. C.; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-01-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship…

  5. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  6. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  7. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  8. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  9. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  10. Competitive Service Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Tester, Jon [D-MT

    2014-06-26

    06/26/2014 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Freedom from Government Competition Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Thune, John [R-SD

    2013-03-12

    03/12/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Freedom from Government Competition Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Thune, John [R-SD

    2011-04-12

    04/12/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Aged Distilled Spirits Competitiveness Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. McConnell, Mitch [R-KY

    2013-08-01

    08/01/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. (text of measure as introduced: CR S6229) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Understanding affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Faye J; Iyer, Aarti; Sincharoen, Sirinda

    2006-01-01

    Affirmative action is a controversial and often poorly understood policy. It is also a policy that has been widely studied by social scientists. In this review, we outline how affirmative action operates in employment and education settings and consider the major points of controversy. In addition, we detail the contributions of psychologists and other social scientists in helping to demonstrate why affirmative action is needed; how it can have unintended negative consequences; and how affirmative action programs can be most successful. We also review how psychologists have examined variations in people's attitudes toward affirmative action, in part as a means for testing different theories of social behavior. PMID:16318608

  15. Modeling competition between yeast strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the strains. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.

  16. Arizona network improves providers' competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Lipson, E H; McHaney, J E

    1987-01-01

    In the September/October issue of Physician Executive, the Remote Practice Network (RPN) health care delivery system concept was introduced and explained. In this article, the concept is illustrated by a description of Arizona HealthSource (AHS), an RPN developed in Phoenix, Arizona. AHS's design, evolution, and operation demonstrate both the competitive pressures that force hospitals into taking new initiatives and the exciting alternative offered by an RPN. Arizona HealthSource serves the Phoenix, Ariz., region, a highly competitive health care marketplace. The organization was started by St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in cooperation with Magliaro & McHaney, a consulting firm with offices in Atlanta, Ga., and La Jolla, Calif. AHS is currently managed under contract by Magliaro & McHaney, which develop the RPN concept and which designs, implements, markets, and manages health care delivery system. PMID:10312349

  17. Neanderthal Extinction by Competitive Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William E.; d'Errico, Francesco; Peterson, A. Townsend; Kageyama, Masa; Sima, Adriana; Sánchez-Goñi, Maria-Fernanda

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite a long history of investigation, considerable debate revolves around whether Neanderthals became extinct because of climate change or competition with anatomically modern humans (AMH). Methodology/Principal Findings We apply a new methodology integrating archaeological and chronological data with high-resolution paleoclimatic simulations to define eco-cultural niches associated with Neanderthal and AMH adaptive systems during alternating cold and mild phases of Marine Isotope Stage 3. Our results indicate that Neanderthals and AMH exploited similar niches, and may have continued to do so in the absence of contact. Conclusions/Significance The southerly contraction of Neanderthal range in southwestern Europe during Greenland Interstadial 8 was not due to climate change or a change in adaptation, but rather concurrent AMH geographic expansion appears to have produced competition that led to Neanderthal extinction. PMID:19107186

  18. BDS thin film damage competition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2008-10-24

    A laser damage competition was held at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium in order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state-of-the-art of high laser resistance coatings since they are all tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. A normal incidence high reflector multilayer coating was selected at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The substrates were provided by the submitters. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials, and layer count will also be shared.

  19. Plan competitions reveal entrepreneurial talent

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2011-05-15

    Monthly economic diversity column for Tri-City Herald business section. Excerpt below: There’s something to be said for gaining valuable real-world experience in a structured, nurturing environment. Take for instance learning to scuba dive in the comfort of my resort pool rather than immediately hanging out with sharks while I figure out little things like oxygen tanks and avoiding underwater panic attacks. Likewise, graduate students are getting some excellent, supportive real-world training through university business plan competitions. These competitions are places where smart minds, new technologies, months of preparation and coaching, and some healthy pre-presentation jitters collide to reveal not only solid new business ideas, but also some promising entrepreneurial talent. In fact, professionals from around our region descend upon college campuses every spring to judge these events, which help to bridge the gap between academics and the real technology and business-driven economy.

  20. Microscale Titration in Schools Titration Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the requirements of the National Titration Competition and describes how a team in a local competition used the technique. Compares microscale titration to conventional titration. Outlines the benefits of employing microscale techniques. (DDR)

  1. Competitive Intelligence and the Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, H. Frances

    1988-01-01

    Examines the competitive intelligence approach to corporate information gathering, and discusses how it differs from the traditional library information center approach. Steps for developing a competitive intelligence system in the library information center are suggested. (33 references) (MES)

  2. Developing Information Systems for Competitive Intelligence Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhof, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    Discusses issues connected with developing information systems for competitive intelligence support; defines the elements of an effective competitive information system; and summarizes issues affecting system design and implementation. Highlights include intelligence information; information needs; information sources; decision making; and…

  3. 48 CFR 245.7302 - Competitive sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Competitive sales. 245..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Sale of Surplus Contractor Inventory 245.7302 Competitive sales....

  4. 43 CFR 3120.5 - Competitive sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Competitive sale. 3120.5 Section 3120.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Competitive sale....

  5. 43 CFR 3120.5 - Competitive sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Competitive sale. 3120.5 Section 3120.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Competitive sale....

  6. 43 CFR 3120.5 - Competitive sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Competitive sale. 3120.5 Section 3120.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Competitive sale....

  7. 43 CFR 3120.5 - Competitive sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Competitive sale. 3120.5 Section 3120.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Competitive sale....

  8. Human action recognition using motion energy template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yanhua; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Human action recognition is an active and interesting research topic in computer vision and pattern recognition field that is widely used in the real world. We proposed an approach for human activity analysis based on motion energy template (MET), a new high-level representation of video. The main idea for the MET model is that human actions could be expressed as the composition of motion energy acquired in a three-dimensional (3-D) space-time volume by using a filter bank. The motion energies were directly computed from raw video sequences, thus some problems, such as object location and segmentation, etc., are definitely avoided. Another important competitive merit of this MET method is its insensitivity to gender, hair, and clothing. We extract MET features by using the Bhattacharyya coefficient to measure the motion energy similarity between the action template video and the tested video, and then the 3-D max-pooling. Using these features as input to the support vector machine, extensive experiments on two benchmark datasets, Weizmann and KTH, were carried out. Compared with other state-of-the-art approaches, such as variation energy image, dynamic templates and local motion pattern descriptors, the experimental results demonstrate that our MET model is competitive and promising.

  9. Managed competition: the policy context.

    PubMed

    Scotton, R

    1999-01-01

    In order to maintain universal access to medically effective care for all, costs must be contained at both the system-wide and micro levels. The managed competition model offers a framework within which increased efficiency could be pursued without sacrificing the goal of universal access and without impairing health outcomes and social cohesion. It would do this by removing structural impediments to rational decision-making and allocating to markets and governments the functions they perform best. PMID:10558292

  10. Physiological demands of competitive surfing.

    PubMed

    Farley, Oliver R L; Harris, Nigel K; Kilding, Andrew E

    2012-07-01

    This study was a performance analysis of surfing athletes during competitive surfing events in an attempt to inform the development of surfing-specific conditioning. Twelve nationally ranked surfers were fitted with heart rate (HR) monitors and global positioning system (GPS) units and videoed during the heats of 2 sanctioned competitions. Means and SDs represented the centrality and spread of analyzed data. From the 32 videos analyzed, the greatest amount of time spent during surfing was paddling (54 ± 6.3% of the total time) (% TT). The remaining stationary represented 28 ± 6.9% TT, wave riding, and paddling for a wave represented only 8 ± 2% TT and 4 ± 1.5% TT, respectively. Surfers spent 61 ± 7% of the total paddling bouts and 64 ± 6.8% of total stationary bouts between 1 and 10 seconds. The average speed recorded via the GPS for all the subjects was 3.7 ± 0.6 km·h(-1), with an average maximum speed of 33.4 ± 6.5 km·h(-1) (45 km·h(-1) was the highest speed recorded). The average distance covered was 1,605 ± 313 m. The mean HR during the surf competitions was 139 ± 11 b·min(-1) (64% HRmax), with a (mean) peak of 190 ± 12 b·min(-1) (87% HRmax). Sixty percent TT was spent between 56 and 74% of the age-predicted HR maximum (HRmax), 19% TT >46% HRmax, and approximately 3% TT >83% HRmax. Competitive surfing therefore involves intermittent high-intensity bouts of all out paddling intercalated with relatively short recovery periods and repeated bouts of low-intensity paddling, incorporating intermittent breath holding. Surfing-specific conditioning sessions should attempt to replicate such a profile. PMID:21986691

  11. Embodied Choice: How Action Influences Perceptual Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Lepora, Nathan F.; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Embodied Choice considers action performance as a proper part of the decision making process rather than merely as a means to report the decision. The central statement of embodied choice is the existence of bidirectional influences between action and decisions. This implies that for a decision expressed by an action, the action dynamics and its constraints (e.g. current trajectory and kinematics) influence the decision making process. Here we use a perceptual decision making task to compare three types of model: a serial decision-then-action model, a parallel decision-and-action model, and an embodied choice model where the action feeds back into the decision making. The embodied model incorporates two key mechanisms that together are lacking in the other models: action preparation and commitment. First, action preparation strategies alleviate delays in enacting a choice but also modify decision termination. Second, action dynamics change the prospects and create a commitment effect to the initially preferred choice. Our results show that these two mechanisms make embodied choice models better suited to combine decision and action appropriately to achieve suitably fast and accurate responses, as usually required in ecologically valid situations. Moreover, embodied choice models with these mechanisms give a better account of trajectory tracking experiments during decision making. In conclusion, the embodied choice framework offers a combined theory of decision and action that gives a clear case that embodied phenomena such as the dynamics of actions can have a causal influence on central cognition. PMID:25849349

  12. Embodied choice: how action influences perceptual decision making.

    PubMed

    Lepora, Nathan F; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Embodied Choice considers action performance as a proper part of the decision making process rather than merely as a means to report the decision. The central statement of embodied choice is the existence of bidirectional influences between action and decisions. This implies that for a decision expressed by an action, the action dynamics and its constraints (e.g. current trajectory and kinematics) influence the decision making process. Here we use a perceptual decision making task to compare three types of model: a serial decision-then-action model, a parallel decision-and-action model, and an embodied choice model where the action feeds back into the decision making. The embodied model incorporates two key mechanisms that together are lacking in the other models: action preparation and commitment. First, action preparation strategies alleviate delays in enacting a choice but also modify decision termination. Second, action dynamics change the prospects and create a commitment effect to the initially preferred choice. Our results show that these two mechanisms make embodied choice models better suited to combine decision and action appropriately to achieve suitably fast and accurate responses, as usually required in ecologically valid situations. Moreover, embodied choice models with these mechanisms give a better account of trajectory tracking experiments during decision making. In conclusion, the embodied choice framework offers a combined theory of decision and action that gives a clear case that embodied phenomena such as the dynamics of actions can have a causal influence on central cognition.

  13. Modifying Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heifetz, Louis J.; Farber, Barry A.

    1976-01-01

    An introductory framework for analyzing and modifying classroom behavior...is followed by presentation of illustrative case materials, discussion of philosophical and ethical issues, analysis of pitfalls to be avoided, and consideration of limitations inherent in behavioral approaches. (Author)

  14. 7 CFR 1738.210 - Competitive analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Competitive analysis. 1738.210 Section 1738.210... Competitive analysis. The applicant must submit a competitive market analysis for each service area regardless of projected penetration rates. Each analysis must identify all existing service providers and...

  15. 7 CFR 1738.210 - Competitive analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Competitive analysis. 1738.210 Section 1738.210... Competitive analysis. The applicant must submit a competitive market analysis for each service area regardless of projected penetration rates. Each analysis must identify all existing service providers and...

  16. 7 CFR 1738.210 - Competitive analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Competitive analysis. 1738.210 Section 1738.210... Competitive analysis. The applicant must submit a competitive market analysis for each service area regardless of projected penetration rates. Each analysis must identify all existing service providers and...

  17. 7 CFR 550.46 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Competition. 550.46 Section 550.46 Agriculture... Procurement Standards § 550.46 Competition. (a) All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The Cooperator shall be alert...

  18. 14 CFR 1274.504 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Competition. 1274.504 Section 1274.504... FIRMS Procurement Standards § 1274.504 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall...

  19. 7 CFR 3019.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Competition. 3019.43 Section 3019.43 Agriculture... § 3019.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to...

  20. 22 CFR 518.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Competition. 518.43 Section 518.43 Foreign... Procurement Standards § 518.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert...

  1. 14 CFR 1274.504 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Competition. 1274.504 Section 1274.504... FIRMS Procurement Standards § 1274.504 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall...

  2. 28 CFR 70.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Competition. 70.43 Section 70.43 Judicial... Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 70.43 Competition. All procurement transactions must be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The...

  3. 20 CFR 435.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Competition. 435.43 Section 435.43 Employees...-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 435.43 Competition. All procurement transactions must be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The...

  4. 7 CFR 3019.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Competition. 3019.43 Section 3019.43 Agriculture... § 3019.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to...

  5. 36 CFR 1210.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Competition. 1210.43 Section... Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to organizational conflicts of...

  6. 2 CFR 215.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Competition. 215.43 Section 215.43 Grants... A-110) Post Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 215.43 Competition. All procurement... competition. The recipient shall be alert to organizational conflicts of interest as well as...

  7. 48 CFR 13.104 - Promoting competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Promoting competition. 13... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SIMPLIFIED ACQUISITION PROCEDURES Procedures 13.104 Promoting competition. The contracting officer must promote competition to the maximum extent practicable to obtain supplies and...

  8. 7 CFR 550.5 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Competition. 550.5 Section 550.5 Agriculture... Competition. REE agencies may enter into non-assistance cooperative agreements, as authorized by this part, without regard to any requirements for competition. (7 U.S.C. 3318(e))....

  9. 22 CFR 145.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Competition. 145.43 Section 145.43 Foreign... Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to organizational conflicts of...

  10. 7 CFR 3019.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Competition. 3019.43 Section 3019.43 Agriculture... § 3019.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to...

  11. 49 CFR 19.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Competition. 19.43 Section 19.43 Transportation... Requirements Procurement Standards § 19.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall...

  12. 38 CFR 49.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Competition. 49.43... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 49.43 Competition. All... free competition. The recipient shall be alert to organizational conflicts of interest as well...

  13. 43 CFR 12.943 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Competition. 12.943 Section 12.943 Public....943 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to...

  14. 28 CFR 70.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Competition. 70.43 Section 70.43 Judicial... Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 70.43 Competition. All procurement transactions must be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The...

  15. 48 CFR 570.104 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Competition. 570.104... PROGRAMS ACQUIRING LEASEHOLD INTERESTS IN REAL PROPERTY General 570.104 Competition. Unless the contracting officer uses the simplified procedures in subpart 570.2, the competition requirements of FAR part 6...

  16. 48 CFR 570.104 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Competition. 570.104... PROGRAMS ACQUIRING LEASEHOLD INTERESTS IN REAL PROPERTY General 570.104 Competition. Unless the contracting officer uses the simplified procedures in subpart 570.2, the competition requirements of FAR part 6...

  17. 7 CFR 550.5 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Competition. 550.5 Section 550.5 Agriculture... Competition. REE agencies may enter into non-assistance cooperative agreements, as authorized by this part, without regard to any requirements for competition. (7 U.S.C. 3318(e))....

  18. 43 CFR 12.943 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Competition. 12.943 Section 12.943 Public....943 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert to...

  19. 48 CFR 1353.206 - Competition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1353.206 Competition requirements. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1306.303-70, use Form CD-492, Justification for Other Than Full and Open Competition, to support the requirements... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Competition...

  20. 48 CFR 1353.206 - Competition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1353.206 Competition requirements. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1306.303-70, use Form CD-492, Justification for Other Than Full and Open Competition, to support the requirements... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Competition...