Science.gov

Sample records for action network part

  1. Local Area Networks: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses five approaches used by industry/colleges to provide local area network (LAN) capabilities in the analytical laboratory: (1) mixed baseband bus network coupled to a star net; (2) broadband bus network; (3) ring network; (4) star network coupled to broadband net; and (5) simple multiprocessor center. Part I (September issue) focused on…

  2. Action Research Networks: Role and Purpose in the Evaluation of Research Outcomes and Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zornes, Deborah; Ferkins, Lesley; Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to share thinking about networks in action research (AR) and to consider their role, purpose, and how networks' outcomes and impacts might be evaluated. Networks are often a by-product of AR projects, yet research focused on the network itself as part of a project is rare. The paper is one of several associated with the…

  3. Local Area Networks: Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E.

    1982-01-01

    Local area networks are common communication conduits allowing various terminals, computers, discs, printers, and other electronic devices to intercommunicate over short distances. Discusses the vocabulary of such networks including RS-232C point-to-point and IEEE-488 multidrop protocols; error detection; message packets; multiplexing; star, ring,…

  4. Responses to irrational actions in action observation and mentalising networks of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lauren E; Mullett, Timothy L; Ropar, Danielle; Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2014-12-01

    By observing other people, we can often infer goals and motivations behind their actions. This study examines the role of the action observation network (AON) and the mentalising network (MZN) in the perception of rational and irrational actions. Past studies in this area report mixed results, so the present paper uses new stimuli which precisely control motion path, the social form of the actor and the rationality of the action. A cluster in medial prefrontal cortex and a large cluster in the right inferior parietal lobule extending to the temporoparietal junction distinguished observation of irrational from rational actions. Activity within the temporoparietal region also correlated on a trial-by-trial basis with each participant's judgement of action rationality. These findings demonstrate that observation of another person performing an irrational action engages both action observation and mentalising networks. Our results advance current theories of action comprehension and the roles of action observation and mentalising networks in this process.

  5. Using Action Research and Action Learning for Entrepreneurial Network Capability Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Helen; O'Toole, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper applies an action research (AR) design and action learning (AL) approach to network capability development in an entrepreneurial context. Recent research suggests that networks are a viable strategy for the entrepreneurial firm to overcome the liabilities associated with newness and smallness. However, a gap emerges as few, if any,…

  6. A neural network model of causative actions

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Hand, Jeremy; Knott, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    A common idea in models of action representation is that actions are represented in terms of their perceptual effects (see e.g., Prinz, 1997; Hommel et al., 2001; Sahin et al., 2007; Umiltà et al., 2008; Hommel, 2013). In this paper we extend existing models of effect-based action representations to account for a novel distinction. Some actions bring about effects that are independent events in their own right: for instance, if John smashes a cup, he brings about the event of the cup smashing. Other actions do not bring about such effects. For instance, if John grabs a cup, this action does not cause the cup to “do” anything: a grab action has well-defined perceptual effects, but these are not registered by the perceptual system that detects independent events involving external objects in the world. In our model, effect-based actions are implemented in several distinct neural circuits, which are organized into a hierarchy based on the complexity of their associated perceptual effects. The circuit at the top of this hierarchy is responsible for actions that bring about independently perceivable events. This circuit receives input from the perceptual module that recognizes arbitrary events taking place in the world, and learns movements that reliably cause such events. We assess our model against existing experimental observations about effect-based motor representations, and make some novel experimental predictions. We also consider the possibility that the “causative actions” circuit in our model can be identified with a motor pathway reported in other work, specializing in “functional” actions on manipulable tools (Bub et al., 2008; Binkofski and Buxbaum, 2013). PMID:26175685

  7. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks, Part II: Localization and Network Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zazo, Javier; Macua, Sergio Valcarcel; Zazo, Santiago; Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Álvarez, Iván; Jiménez, Eugenio; Cardona, Laura; Brito, Joaquín Hernández; Quevedo, Eduardo

    2016-12-17

    In the first part of the paper, we modeled and characterized the underwater radio channel in shallowwaters. In the second part,we analyze the application requirements for an underwaterwireless sensor network (U-WSN) operating in the same environment and perform detailed simulations. We consider two localization applications, namely self-localization and navigation aid, and propose algorithms that work well under the specific constraints associated with U-WSN, namely low connectivity, low data rates and high packet loss probability. We propose an algorithm where the sensor nodes collaboratively estimate their unknown positions in the network using a low number of anchor nodes and distance measurements from the underwater channel. Once the network has been self-located, we consider a node estimating its position for underwater navigation communicating with neighboring nodes. We also propose a communication system and simulate the whole electromagnetic U-WSN in the Castalia simulator to evaluate the network performance, including propagation impairments (e.g., noise, interference), radio parameters (e.g., modulation scheme, bandwidth, transmit power), hardware limitations (e.g., clock drift, transmission buffer) and complete MAC and routing protocols. We also explain the changes that have to be done to Castalia in order to perform the simulations. In addition, we propose a parametric model of the communication channel that matches well with the results from the first part of this paper. Finally, we provide simulation results for some illustrative scenarios.

  8. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks, Part II: Localization and Network Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zazo, Javier; Valcarcel Macua, Sergio; Zazo, Santiago; Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Álvarez, Iván; Jiménez, Eugenio; Cardona, Laura; Brito, Joaquín Hernández; Quevedo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, we modeled and characterized the underwater radio channel in shallow waters. In the second part, we analyze the application requirements for an underwater wireless sensor network (U-WSN) operating in the same environment and perform detailed simulations. We consider two localization applications, namely self-localization and navigation aid, and propose algorithms that work well under the specific constraints associated with U-WSN, namely low connectivity, low data rates and high packet loss probability. We propose an algorithm where the sensor nodes collaboratively estimate their unknown positions in the network using a low number of anchor nodes and distance measurements from the underwater channel. Once the network has been self-located, we consider a node estimating its position for underwater navigation communicating with neighboring nodes. We also propose a communication system and simulate the whole electromagnetic U-WSN in the Castalia simulator to evaluate the network performance, including propagation impairments (e.g., noise, interference), radio parameters (e.g., modulation scheme, bandwidth, transmit power), hardware limitations (e.g., clock drift, transmission buffer) and complete MAC and routing protocols. We also explain the changes that have to be done to Castalia in order to perform the simulations. In addition, we propose a parametric model of the communication channel that matches well with the results from the first part of this paper. Finally, we provide simulation results for some illustrative scenarios. PMID:27999309

  9. Learning Networks--Enabling Change through Community Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Learning networks are a critical element of ethos of the community action research approach taken by the Early Learning Initiative at the National College of Ireland, a community-based educational initiative in the Dublin Docklands. Key criteria for networking, whether at local, national or international level, are the individual's and…

  10. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Louise P.; Cross, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation. PMID:26209850

  11. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Cross, Emily S

    2015-12-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation.

  12. Lust remediation technologies. Part 2. Soil corrective action descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (LUSTs) have been recognized as a major potential source of ground water contamination in the U.S. Current state and federal regulations require the remediation of sites where the soil and/or ground water has been contaminated by leaking underground storage tanks. The document presents information on technologies for the remediation of contaminated soils at LUST sites. A companion volume, LUST Remediation Technologies: Part III - Ground Water Corrective Action Descriptions, presents information on technologies for the remediation of contaminated ground water at LUST sites.

  13. Network analysis of perception-action coupling in infants

    PubMed Central

    Rotem-Kohavi, Naama; Hilderman, Courtney G. E.; Liu, Aiping; Makan, Nadia; Wang, Jane Z.; Virji-Babul, Naznin

    2014-01-01

    The functional networks that support action observation are of great interest in understanding the development of social cognition and motor learning. How infants learn to represent and understand the world around them remains one of the most intriguing questions in developmental cognitive neuroscience. Recently, mathematical measures derived from graph theory have been used to study connectivity networks in the developing brain. Thus far, this type of analysis in infancy has only been applied to the resting state. In this study, we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) from infants (ages 4–11 months of age) and adults while they observed three types of actions: (a) reaching for an object; (b) walking; and (c) object motion. Graph theory based analysis was applied to these data to evaluate changes in brain networks. Global metrics that provide measures of the structural properties of the network (characteristic path, density, global efficiency, and modularity) were calculated for each group and for each condition. We found statistically significant differences in measures for the observation of walking condition only. Specifically, in comparison to adults, infants showed increased density and global efficiency in combination with decreased modularity during observation of an action that is not within their motor repertoire (i.e., independent walking), suggesting a less structured organization. There were no group differences in global metric measures for observation of object motion or for observation of actions that are within the repertoire of infants (i.e., reaching). These preliminary results suggest that infants and adults may share a basic functional network for action observation that is sculpted by experience. Motor experience may lead to a shift towards a more efficient functional network. PMID:24778612

  14. Network analysis of perception-action coupling in infants.

    PubMed

    Rotem-Kohavi, Naama; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Liu, Aiping; Makan, Nadia; Wang, Jane Z; Virji-Babul, Naznin

    2014-01-01

    The functional networks that support action observation are of great interest in understanding the development of social cognition and motor learning. How infants learn to represent and understand the world around them remains one of the most intriguing questions in developmental cognitive neuroscience. Recently, mathematical measures derived from graph theory have been used to study connectivity networks in the developing brain. Thus far, this type of analysis in infancy has only been applied to the resting state. In this study, we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) from infants (ages 4-11 months of age) and adults while they observed three types of actions: (a) reaching for an object; (b) walking; and (c) object motion. Graph theory based analysis was applied to these data to evaluate changes in brain networks. Global metrics that provide measures of the structural properties of the network (characteristic path, density, global efficiency, and modularity) were calculated for each group and for each condition. We found statistically significant differences in measures for the observation of walking condition only. Specifically, in comparison to adults, infants showed increased density and global efficiency in combination with decreased modularity during observation of an action that is not within their motor repertoire (i.e., independent walking), suggesting a less structured organization. There were no group differences in global metric measures for observation of object motion or for observation of actions that are within the repertoire of infants (i.e., reaching). These preliminary results suggest that infants and adults may share a basic functional network for action observation that is sculpted by experience. Motor experience may lead to a shift towards a more efficient functional network.

  15. Imaginary Part of Action, Future Functioning as Hidden Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, H. B.

    2011-03-01

    Beginning with a review the logically first stages in the project of Random Dynamics, hoping for all laws nature being emergent, we also review what can be considered a consequence of Random Dynamics, a model—by myself and Masao Ninomiya—, which in principle predicts the initial conditions in such a way as to minimize a certain functional of the history of the Universe through both past and future. This functional is indeed the imaginary part of the action, which exists (only) in our model of complex action. The main point of the present is to suggest this complex action model to be also helpfull in solving some problems for quantum mechanics. Especially as our model almost makes it possible in principle to calculate the full history of the universe, it even makes it in principle calculable, which one among several measurement results in a quantum experiment will actually be realized! Our "complex action model" thus is a special case of superdeterminism—in Bells way—and does not have true causality, but rather even in some cases true backward causation. In fact we claim in our model that the SSC(Superconducting Supercollider) were stopped by the US Congress due to the backward causation from the big amounts of Higgs particles, which it would have produced, if it had been allowed to run. The noumenon ("das Ding an sich") in our model is the Feyman path integrand or better some fundamental quantities determined from second order effects of the latter integrand. The quantum mechanics interpretation here is strongly similar to the much criticized "transactional interpretation" by John Cramer (Rev. Mod. Phys. 58:647-688, 1986), but we might respond to some of the criticism.

  16. Using Action Research to Investigate Social Networking Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrall, Lisa; Harris, Katy

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the first cycle of an Action Research (AR) investigation into why professional learners are not using the Social Networking Technologies (SNTs) of their bespoke website. It presents the rationale of how this study came about, the ontological and epistemological stance of the authors and how this led to the particular choice…

  17. Evaluating Action Learning: A Critical Realist Complex Network Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, John G.

    2010-01-01

    This largely theoretical paper will argue the case for the usefulness of applying network and complex adaptive systems theory to an understanding of action learning and the challenge it is evaluating. This approach, it will be argued, is particularly helpful in the context of improving capability in dealing with wicked problems spread around…

  18. Tropical forests: a call for action. Part 1: the plan. Part 2: case studies. Part 3: country investment profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The World Resources Institute (WRI), in cooperation with multi- and bi-lateral organizations, has launched a major initiative to conserve forests in the humid and semiarid/arid areas of developing countries. The 3-part WRI report is a call to political action on this subject. Part 1 describes the high costs exacted by deforestation, but asserts that the process can be arrested and reversed by a partnership of governments, local participants, and development-assistance agencies. Proposals are presented for a 5-year action plan in farm, community, and arid-zone forestry. Parts 2 and 3 include case studies of the successful projects listed in Part 1 and 5-year investment profiles of 56 developing countries affected by deforestation.

  19. Antibacterial action of quinolones: from target to network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-08-01

    Quinolones are widely used broad-spectrum antibacterials with incomplete elucidated mechanism of action. Here, molecular basis for the antibacterial action of quinolones, from target to network, is fully discussed and updated. Quinolones trap DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV to form reversible drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes, resulting in bacteriostasis. Cell death arises from chromosome fragmentation in protein synthesis-dependent or -independent pathways according to distinguished quinolone structures. In the former pathway, irreversible oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species kills bacteria eventually. Toxin-antitoxin mazEF is triggered as an additional lethal action. Bacteria survive and develop resistance by SOS and other stress responses. Enlarged knowledges of quinolone actions and bacterial response will provide new targets for drug design and approaches to prevent bacterial resistance.

  20. Fluctuations in Mass-Action Equilibrium of Protein Binding Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Walker, Dylan; Maslov, Sergei

    2008-12-01

    We consider two types of fluctuations in the mass-action equilibrium in protein binding networks. The first type is driven by slow changes in total concentrations of interacting proteins. The second type (spontaneous) is caused by quickly decaying thermodynamic deviations away from equilibrium. We investigate the effects of network connectivity on fluctuations by comparing them to scenarios in which the interacting pair is isolated from the network and analytically derives bounds on fluctuations. Collective effects are shown to sometimes lead to large amplification of spontaneous fluctuations. The strength of both types of fluctuations is positively correlated with the complex connectivity and negatively correlated with complex concentration. Our general findings are illustrated using a curated network of protein interactions and multiprotein complexes in baker’s yeast, with empirical protein concentrations.

  1. Variability in functional brain networks predicts expertise during action observation.

    PubMed

    Amoruso, Lucía; Ibáñez, Agustín; Fonseca, Bruno; Gadea, Sebastián; Sedeño, Lucas; Sigman, Mariano; García, Adolfo M; Fraiman, Ricardo; Fraiman, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Observing an action performed by another individual activates, in the observer, similar circuits as those involved in the actual execution of that action. This activation is modulated by prior experience; indeed, sustained training in a particular motor domain leads to structural and functional changes in critical brain areas. Here, we capitalized on a novel graph-theory approach to electroencephalographic data (Fraiman et al., 2016) to test whether variability in functional brain networks implicated in Tango observation can discriminate between groups differing in their level of expertise. We found that experts and beginners significantly differed in the functional organization of task-relevant networks. Specifically, networks in expert Tango dancers exhibited less variability and a more robust functional architecture. Notably, these expertise-dependent effects were captured within networks derived from electrophysiological brain activity recorded in a very short time window (2s). In brief, variability in the organization of task-related networks seems to be a highly sensitive indicator of long-lasting training effects. This finding opens new methodological and theoretical windows to explore the impact of domain-specific expertise on brain plasticity, while highlighting variability as a fruitful measure in neuroimaging research.

  2. The COST Action on cyberbullying: developing an international network.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter K; Steffgen, Georges

    2013-01-01

    The COST Action IS0801 on cyberbullying had the aim of a) sharing of developing expertise in knowledge base and measurement techniques across researchers, b) sharing of input from outside the research community; specifically, from legal experts as well as from mobile phone companies and internet service providers c) sharing of already nationally published guidelines, and recommended coping strategies, including positive uses of new technologies, and d) increasing awareness of the issue, as well as of the outcomes of the Action. Besides the conferences and Training schools organised, the Action has fostered or facilitated a considerable number of grant applications, publications as well as other outreach activities, and has established a fruitful international network.

  3. Both novelty and expertise increase action observation network activity

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Sheng, Tong; Margetis, John L.; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Our experiences with others affect how we perceive their actions. In particular, activity in bilateral premotor and parietal cortices during action observation, collectively known as the action observation network (AON), is modulated by one's expertise with the observed actions or individuals. However, conflicting reports suggest that AON activity is greatest both for familiar and unfamiliar actions. The current study examines the effects of different types and amounts of experience (e.g., visual, interpersonal, personal) on AON activation. fMRI was used to scan 16 healthy participants without prior experience with individuals with amputations (novices), 11 experienced occupational therapists (OTs) who had varying amounts of experience with individuals with amputations, and one individual born with below-elbow residual limbs (participant CJ), as they viewed video clips of goal-matched actions performed by an individual with residual limbs and by an individual with hands. Participants were given increased visual exposure to actions performed by both effectors midway through the scanning procedure. Novices demonstrated a large AON response to the initial viewing of an individual with residual limbs compared to one with hands, but this signal was attenuated after they received visual exposure to both effectors. In contrast, OTs, who had moderate familiarity with residual limbs, demonstrated a lower AON response upon initial viewing—similar to novices after they received visual exposure. At the other extreme, CJ, who has extreme familiarity with residual limbs both visually and motorically, shows a largely increased left-lateralized AON response, exceeding that of novices and experienced OTs, when viewing the residual limb compared to hand actions. These results suggest that a nuanced model of AON engagement is needed to explain how cases of both extreme experience (CJ) and extreme novelty (novices) can result in the greatest AON activity. PMID:24062656

  4. Analyzing Enterprise Networks Needs: Action Research from the Mechatronics Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnazzo, Luca; Taticchi, Paolo; Bidini, Gianni; Baglieri, Enzo

    New business models and theories are developing nowadays towards collaborative environments direction, and many new tools in sustaining companies involved in these organizations are emerging. Among them, a plethora of methodologies to analyze their needs are already developed for single companies. Few academic works are available about Enterprise Networks (ENs) need analysis. This paper presents the learning from an action research (AR) in the mechatronics sector: AR has been used in order to experience the issue of evaluating network needs and therefore define, develop, and test a complete framework for network evaluation. Reflection on the story in the light of the experience and the theory is presented, as well as extrapolation to a broader context and articulation of usable knowledge.

  5. Pennsylvania Action Research Network (PA-ARN) Staff Development through Five Regional Staff Development Centers. Final Report, July 1998-June 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., McKeesport.

    With the existence of 67 monographs and approximately 60 practitioners trained in action research in the western and central parts of Pennsylvania from project years 1995-98, the 1998-99 Section 353 project expanded the action research network (ARN) to include teachers, administrators, and researchers in the northeastern and southeastern parts of…

  6. Neural networks for harmonic structure in music perception and action.

    PubMed

    Bianco, R; Novembre, G; Keller, P E; Kim, Seung-Goo; Scharf, F; Friederici, A D; Villringer, A; Sammler, D

    2016-11-15

    The ability to predict upcoming structured events based on long-term knowledge and contextual priors is a fundamental principle of human cognition. Tonal music triggers predictive processes based on structural properties of harmony, i.e., regularities defining the arrangement of chords into well-formed musical sequences. While the neural architecture of structure-based predictions during music perception is well described, little is known about the neural networks for analogous predictions in musical actions and how they relate to auditory perception. To fill this gap, expert pianists were presented with harmonically congruent or incongruent chord progressions, either as musical actions (photos of a hand playing chords) that they were required to watch and imitate without sound, or in an auditory format that they listened to without playing. By combining task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with functional connectivity at rest, we identified distinct sub-regions in right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) interconnected with parietal and temporal areas for processing action and audio sequences, respectively. We argue that the differential contribution of parietal and temporal areas is tied to motoric and auditory long-term representations of harmonic regularities that dynamically interact with computations in rIFG. Parsing of the structural dependencies in rIFG is co-determined by both stimulus- or task-demands. In line with contemporary models of prefrontal cortex organization and dual stream models of visual-spatial and auditory processing, we show that the processing of musical harmony is a network capacity with dissociated dorsal and ventral motor and auditory circuits, which both provide the infrastructure for predictive mechanisms optimising action and perception performance.

  7. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 553 - Statement of Policy: Action on Petitions for Reconsideration

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reconsideration A Appendix A to Part 553 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued..., App. A Appendix A to Part 553—Statement of Policy: Action on Petitions for Reconsideration It is the policy of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to issue notice of the action taken on...

  8. 38 CFR Appendix C to Part 200 - Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Environmental Impact Statement C Appendix C to Part 200 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 200, App. C Appendix C to Part 200—Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement The following actions are considered to be major...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 553 - Statement of Policy: Action on Petitions for Reconsideration

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Reconsideration A Appendix A to Part 553 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued..., App. A Appendix A to Part 553—Statement of Policy: Action on Petitions for Reconsideration It is the policy of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to issue notice of the action taken on...

  10. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved. Volume 14, No. 2, Part 1: Individual actions. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1995) and includes copies of Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  11. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved -- individual actions. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1997; Volume 16, Number 2, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1997) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  12. What part of an action interferes with ongoing perception?

    PubMed

    Zwickel, Jan; Grosjean, Marc; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated specific interference effects between concurrent perception and action. In the following we address the possible causes of such effects by employing a continuous paradigm in which participants were asked to produce movements in a specified direction and to judge the direction of a concurrently presented stimulus motion. In such paradigms, a repulsion of the perceived by the produced movement direction is typically observed. The first question addressed in the current study was whether passive displacements of the hand would be sufficient for inducing the repulsion effect. This was done by sometimes moving the participants' hands with a robot. No repulsion effect was found for these passive movements, which shows that the integration of visual and proprioceptive information is not sufficient for repulsion to arise. However, repulsion was present for active movements, that is when participants intended to move. In a second experiment, participants' movements were sometimes unexpectedly blocked by a robot. No repulsion was observed in the blocked condition. We conclude that the intention to move (Experiment 1) and actual movement execution (Experiment 2) are both necessary preconditions for this type of specific interference to arise in continuous and concurrent perception-action tasks.

  13. New policy to manage tools in flexible manufacturing systems using network part programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Andrea; Tolio, Tullio; Grieco, Antonio; Nucci, Francesco

    2000-10-01

    The high investment related to the acquisition of Flexible Manufacturing Systems forces firms to a better utilization of the machines. Different actions can be taken in order to avoid idle times of the machines: reduction of the unproductive times (time dedicated to rapid movements, tool exchange, pallet exchange, etc.), improvement of machines and, not last, a better management of the resources. The paper proposes a new policy for the management of tool operations in parallel machine FMS to minimize the idle times due to the lack of tools. The proposed policy uses new opportunities in manufacturing technology related with the use of network part programs in NC machines. It is already known in literature the potentiality of network part programs, more flexible than traditional sequential part programs that execute simply the rigid list of operations. Network part programs allow the different alternative ways to process each part. The way in which network part programs are executed by machines depends on the state of the tools and availability of the tools. The proposed method has been compared with other existing ones based on a real test case, a parallel machine FMS with two machines and a tool carrier.

  14. Ethical Research Practices: Collaborative Action Research, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This is part II of a case study involving a large federally funded technology grant program implemented across several central Texas school districts and was followed by the researcher-participant at the university level as well as one of the campus sites. Many ethical research questions were raised during this study such as the use of participant…

  15. [Action mechanism of drugs for preventing and treating coronary heart disease based on biological networks].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ling; Huang, Ming-Feng; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2013-08-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) related genes and targets, as well as drug targets for preventing and treating CHD were taken as the study objects to build a CHD disease network and a drug action network preventing and treating CHD. Such topological characteristic parameters of the networks as degree distribution, characteristic path length, connectivity and heterogeneity were analyzed to verify the reliability of the networks. On that basis, the intersection calculation was conducted for both networks to analyze the drug action mechanism of their sub-networks. The disease network are composed of 15,221 nodes and 31,177 sides, while the drug action network preventing and treating CHD has 15,073 nodes and 32,376 sides. Both of their topological characteristic parameters showed scale-free small world structural characteristics. Two reaction pathways in the sub-networks-calcitonin gene-related peptide and IL-6 activated JAK/STAT were taken as examples to discuss the indirect action mechanism for preventing and treating CHD. The results showed that the biological network analysis method combining the disease network and the drug action network is helpful to further studies on the action mechanism of the drugs, and significant to the prevention and treatment of diseases.

  16. Innovation and communicative action: health management networks and technologies.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Francisco Javier Uribe; Artmann, Elizabeth

    2016-11-03

    This article discusses elements of a theory of innovation from the perspective of innovation networks and social construction of technology, based on Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action and authors from the Sociology of Innovation. Based on the theoretical framework of the communicative production of scientific facts, we focus on innovation management as a basic dimension that must meet some organizational and methodological requirements in order to power its results. We present and discuss instruments such as Situational Planning, Prospective Analysis, Strategic Portfolio Management, and Networks Management that can help deal with the challenge of innovation and exploration of the future. We conclude that network organizational formats centered on reflexivity of interdisciplinary groups and planning approaches that encourage innovation criteria in assessing the attractiveness of activities and that help anticipate forms of innovation through systematic prospective analysis can potentiate the process of generating innovation as a product of networks. Resumo: No artigo são discutidos elementos de uma teoria da inovação numa perspectiva de redes de inovação e de construção social da tecnologia, a partir da Teoria do Agir Comunicativo de Habermas e de autores da Sociologia da Inovação. Com base no marco teórico da produção comunicativa de fatos científicos, focamos a gestão da inovação como uma dimensão fundamental que deve contemplar alguns requisitos, tanto de natureza organizacional quanto metodológica, para potencializar seus resultados. Apresentamos e discutimos instrumentos como o Planejamento Situacional, a Análise Prospectiva, a Gestão Estratégica de Portfólios e a Gestão de Redes que podem contribuir para o desafio da inovação e exploração do futuro. Conclui-se que formas organizativas em rede, centradas na reflexividade de grupos interdisciplinares, e enfoques de planejamento que estimulem o uso de critérios de inovação na

  17. Pragmatics in action: indirect requests engage theory of mind areas and the cortical motor network.

    PubMed

    van Ackeren, Markus J; Casasanto, Daniel; Bekkering, Harold; Hagoort, Peter; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann

    2012-11-01

    Research from the past decade has shown that understanding the meaning of words and utterances (i.e., abstracted symbols) engages the same systems we used to perceive and interact with the physical world in a content-specific manner. For example, understanding the word "grasp" elicits activation in the cortical motor network, that is, part of the neural substrate involved in planned and executing a grasping action. In the embodied literature, cortical motor activation during language comprehension is thought to reflect motor simulation underlying conceptual knowledge [note that outside the embodied framework, other explanations for the link between action and language are offered, e.g., Mahon, B. Z., & Caramazza, A. A critical look at the embodied cognition hypothesis and a new proposal for grouding conceptual content. Journal of Physiology, 102, 59-70, 2008; Hagoort, P. On Broca, brain, and binding: A new framework. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 9, 416-423, 2005]. Previous research has supported the view that the coupling between language and action is flexible, and reading an action-related word form is not sufficient for cortical motor activation [Van Dam, W. O., van Dijk, M., Bekkering, H., & Rueschemeyer, S.-A. Flexibility in embodied lexical-semantic representations. Human Brain Mapping, doi: 10.1002/hbm.21365, 2011]. The current study goes one step further by addressing the necessity of action-related word forms for motor activation during language comprehension. Subjects listened to indirect requests (IRs) for action during an fMRI session. IRs for action are speech acts in which access to an action concept is required, although it is not explicitly encoded in the language. For example, the utterance "It is hot here!" in a room with a window is likely to be interpreted as a request to open the window. However, the same utterance in a desert will be interpreted as a statement. The results indicate (1) that comprehension of IR sentences activates cortical

  18. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes

    SciTech Connect

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  19. Dynamic Simulation and Static Matching for Action Prediction: Evidence from Body Part Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Anne; Brandstadter, Simone; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Accurately predicting other people's actions may involve two processes: internal real-time simulation (dynamic updating) and matching recently perceived action images (static matching). Using a priming of body parts, this study aimed to differentiate the two processes. Specifically, participants played a motion-controlled video game with…

  20. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 323 - Privacy Act Enforcement Actions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Privacy Act Enforcement Actions G Appendix G to... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM Pt. 323, App. G Appendix G to Part 323—Privacy Act Enforcement Actions A. Administrative Remedies. Any individual who feels he or she has...

  1. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 323 - Privacy Act Enforcement Actions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Privacy Act Enforcement Actions G Appendix G to... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM Pt. 323, App. G Appendix G to Part 323—Privacy Act Enforcement Actions A. Administrative Remedies. Any individual who feels he or she has...

  2. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

  3. Predicting others' actions via grasp and gaze: evidence for distinct brain networks.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Richard; Cross, Emily S; Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2012-07-01

    During social interactions, how do we predict what other people are going to do next? One view is that we use our own motor experience to simulate and predict other people's actions. For example, when we see Sally look at a coffee cup or grasp a hammer, our own motor system provides a signal that anticipates her next action. Previous research has typically examined such gaze and grasp-based simulation processes separately, and it is not known whether similar cognitive and brain systems underpin the perception of object-directed gaze and grasp. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine to what extent gaze- and grasp-perception rely on common or distinct brain networks. Using a 'peeping window' protocol, we controlled what an observed actor could see and grasp. The actor could peep through one window to see if an object was present and reach through a different window to grasp the object. However, the actor could not peep and grasp at the same time. We compared gaze and grasp conditions where an object was present with matched conditions where the object was absent. When participants observed another person gaze at an object, left anterior inferior parietal lobule (aIPL) and parietal operculum showed a greater response than when the object was absent. In contrast, when participants observed the actor grasp an object, premotor, posterior parietal, fusiform and middle occipital brain regions showed a greater response than when the object was absent. These results point towards a division in the neural substrates for different types of motor simulation. We suggest that left aIPL and parietal operculum are involved in a predictive process that signals a future hand interaction with an object based on another person's eye gaze, whereas a broader set of brain areas, including parts of the action observation network, are engaged during observation of an ongoing object-directed hand action.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 307 - Application for Preauthorization of a CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Application for Preauthorization of a CERCLA Response Action A Appendix A to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 307 - Application for Preauthorization of a CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application for Preauthorization of a CERCLA Response Action A Appendix A to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 307 - Application for Preauthorization of a CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CERCLA Response Action A Appendix A to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 307 - Claim for CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claim for CERCLA Response Action B Appendix B to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. B Appendix B to Part 307—Claim for...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 307 - Application for Preauthorization of a CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CERCLA Response Action A Appendix A to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 307 - Claim for CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Claim for CERCLA Response Action B Appendix B to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. B Appendix B to Part 307—Claim for...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 307 - Application for Preauthorization of a CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CERCLA Response Action A Appendix A to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 307 - Claim for CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Claim for CERCLA Response Action B Appendix B to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. B Appendix B to Part 307—Claim for...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 307 - Claim for CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claim for CERCLA Response Action B Appendix B to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. B Appendix B to Part 307—Claim for...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 307 - Claim for CERCLA Response Action

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim for CERCLA Response Action B Appendix B to Part 307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. B Appendix B to Part 307—Claim for...

  14. 38 CFR Appendix C to Part 200 - Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement C Appendix C to Part 200 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 200, App. C Appendix C to Part...

  15. 38 CFR Appendix B to Part 200 - The Action Requiring an Environmental Assessment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Action Requiring an Environmental Assessment B Appendix B to Part 200 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 200, App. B Appendix B to Part...

  16. 38 CFR Appendix C to Part 200 - Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement C Appendix C to Part 200 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 200, App. C Appendix C to Part...

  17. 38 CFR Appendix C to Part 200 - Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement C Appendix C to Part 200 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 200, App. C Appendix C to Part...

  18. Development of the action observation network during early adolescence: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Daniel J.; Grosbras, Marie-Helene; Leonard, Gabriel; Pike, G. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence places high demands on inter-personal interactions and, hence, on the extraction and processing of social cues. Here we assess longitudinally the development of brain activity within a network implicated in social cognition—the action observation network. We performed activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses to define regions of interest based upon the mature action observation network of adults. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we then examined developmental trajectories of functional brain activity within these brain regions. Using this approach, we reveal quadratic trajectories within a fronto-parietal network previously shown to demonstrate correlated morphological development. PMID:21278194

  19. Part mutual information for quantifying direct associations in networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Zhou, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiujun; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-03

    Quantitatively identifying direct dependencies between variables is an important task in data analysis, in particular for reconstructing various types of networks and causal relations in science and engineering. One of the most widely used criteria is partial correlation, but it can only measure linearly direct association and miss nonlinear associations. However, based on conditional independence, conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to quantify nonlinearly direct relationships among variables from the observed data, superior to linear measures, but suffers from a serious problem of underestimation, in particular for those variables with tight associations in a network, which severely limits its applications. In this work, we propose a new concept, "partial independence," with a new measure, "part mutual information" (PMI), which not only can overcome the problem of CMI but also retains the quantification properties of both mutual information (MI) and CMI. Specifically, we first defined PMI to measure nonlinearly direct dependencies between variables and then derived its relations with MI and CMI. Finally, we used a number of simulated data as benchmark examples to numerically demonstrate PMI features and further real gene expression data from Escherichia coli and yeast to reconstruct gene regulatory networks, which all validated the advantages of PMI for accurately quantifying nonlinearly direct associations in networks.

  20. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-09

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

  1. "Scaffolding" of Action Learning within a Part-Time Management Development Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joesbury, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This Account of Practice describes the introduction and development of action learning within a level 5 module of "Communications at Work" delivered as part of a Business & Technology Education Council (BTEC) Professional Certificate in Management (CMS) between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. This will commence with a personal narrative and…

  2. Culminating Experience Action Research Projects, Volume 15, Part 2, Fall 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Deborah A., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the teacher licensure program at the graduate level at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC), the M.Ed. Licensure candidate is required to complete an action research project during a 3-semester-hour course that coincides with the 9-semester-hour student teaching experience or with school employment. This course, Education…

  3. Culminating Experience Action Research Projects, Volume 15, Part 1, Fall 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Deborah A., Ed.; Cutcher, Cortney L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the teacher licensure program at the graduate level at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC), the M.Ed. Licensure candidate is required to complete an action research project during a 3-semester-hour course that coincides with the 9-semester-hour student teaching experience. This course, Education 590 Culminating…

  4. Culminating Experience Action Research Projects, Volume 8, Part 1, Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Deborah A., Ed.; Fritch, Sarah C., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    As a part of the teacher licensure program at the graduate level at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC), the M.Ed. Licensure candidate is required to complete an action research project during a 3-semester-hour course that coincides with the 9-semester-hour student teaching experience. This course, Education 590 Culminating…

  5. Culminating Experience Action Research Projects, Volume 16, Part 1, Spring 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Deborah A., Ed.; Cutcher, Cortney L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the teacher licensure program at the graduate level at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC), the M.Ed. Licensure candidate is required to complete an action research project during a 3-semester-hour course that coincides with the 9-semester-hour student teaching experience. This course, Education 590 Culminating…

  6. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Deepjyoti; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-02-13

    Traditionally power distribution networks are either not observable or only partially observable. This complicates development and implementation of new smart grid technologies, such as those related to demand response, outage detection and management, and improved load-monitoring. In this two part paper, inspired by proliferation of the metering technology, we discuss estimation problems in structurally loopy but operationally radial distribution grids from measurements, e.g. voltage data, which are either already available or can be made available with a relatively minor investment. In Part I, the objective is to learn the operational layout of the grid. Part II of this paper presents algorithms that estimate load statistics or line parameters in addition to learning the grid structure. Further, Part II discusses the problem of structure estimation for systems with incomplete measurement sets. Our newly suggested algorithms apply to a wide range of realistic scenarios. The algorithms are also computationally efficient – polynomial in time– which is proven theoretically and illustrated computationally on a number of test cases. The technique developed can be applied to detect line failures in real time as well as to understand the scope of possible adversarial attacks on the grid.

  7. 42 CFR 423.124 - Special rules for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. 423.124 Section 423.124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. (a) Out-of-network access to covered part D drugs—(1) Out-of-network pharmacy access. A Part D sponsor must ensure that...

  8. 42 CFR 423.124 - Special rules for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. 423.124 Section 423.124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. (a) Out-of-network access to covered part D drugs—(1) Out-of-network pharmacy access. A Part D sponsor must ensure that...

  9. 42 CFR 423.124 - Special rules for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. 423.124 Section 423.124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. (a) Out-of-network access to covered part D drugs—(1) Out-of-network pharmacy access. A Part D sponsor must ensure that...

  10. Library Networking: The Interface of Ideas and Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molholt, Pat

    This report, which considers the role of networking activities associated with the technical telecommunication links that bind libraries, services, and patrons together, begins with a historical review of libraries and automation-based systems over the last 19 years. The importance of the development and implementation of standards in interactive…

  11. Action observation: the less-explored part of higher-order vision

    PubMed Central

    Platonov, Artem; Orban, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Little is presently known about action observation, an important perceptual component of high-level vision. To investigate this aspect of perception, we introduce a two-alternative forced-choice task for observed manipulative actions while varying duration or signal strength by noise injection. We show that accuracy and reaction time in this task can be modeled by a diffusion process for different pairs of action exemplars. Furthermore, discrimination of observed actions is largely viewpoint-independent, cannot be reduced to judgments about the basic components of action: shape and local motion, and requires a minimum duration of about 150–200 ms. These results confirm that action observation is a distinct high-level aspect of visual perception based on temporal integration of visual input generated by moving body parts. This temporal integration distinguishes it from object or scene perception, which require only very brief presentations and are viewpoint-dependent. The applicability of a diffusion model suggests that these aspects of high-level vision differ mainly at the level of the sensory neurons feeding the decision processes. PMID:27857160

  12. 42 CFR 423.124 - Special rules for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. 423.124 Section 423.124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. (a) Out-of-network access to covered part D drugs—(1) Out-of-network pharmacy access. A Part D sponsor must ensure that Part D enrollees...

  13. 42 CFR 423.124 - Special rules for out-of-network access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. 423.124 Section 423.124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... access to covered Part D drugs at out-of-network pharmacies. (a) Out-of-network access to covered part D drugs. (1) Out-of-network pharmacy access. A Part D sponsor must ensure that Part D enrollees...

  14. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D&D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword.

  15. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 73 - List of Some Offenses for Which Disciplinary Action May Be Taken

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Action May Be Taken A Appendix A to Part 73 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Pt. 73, App. A Appendix A to Part 73—List of Some Offenses for Which Disciplinary Action May Be Taken Following is a list of some offenses for which...

  16. A Dynamic Network Approach to the Assessment of Terrorist Groups and the Impact of Alternative Courses of Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    courses of action ORA Statistical analysis of dynamic networks AutoMap Automated extraction of network from texts DyNet Simulation of dynamic...networks from texts, ORA for analyzing the extracted networks, and DyNet for what-if reasoning about the networks (see figure 1). Each of these...actors, groups, knowledge, resources, etc. that influence and are influenced by that node. DyNet is a multi-agent network simulation package for

  17. Gene networks activated by specific patterns of action potentials in dorsal root ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip R.; Cohen, Jonathan E.; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Fields, R. Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks underlie the long-term changes in cell specification, growth of synaptic connections, and adaptation that occur throughout neonatal and postnatal life. Here we show that the transcriptional response in neurons is exquisitely sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential firing patterns. Neurons were electrically stimulated with the same number of action potentials, but with different inter-burst intervals. We found that these subtle alterations in the timing of action potential firing differentially regulates hundreds of genes, across many functional categories, through the activation or repression of distinct transcriptional networks. Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional response in neurons to environmental stimuli, coded in the pattern of action potential firing, can be very sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential delivery rather than the intensity of stimulation or the total number of action potentials delivered. These data identify temporal kinetics of action potential firing as critical components regulating intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression in neurons to extracellular cues during early development and throughout life. PMID:28256583

  18. Gene networks activated by specific patterns of action potentials in dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip R; Cohen, Jonathan E; Iacobas, Dumitru A; Iacobas, Sanda; Fields, R Douglas

    2017-03-03

    Gene regulatory networks underlie the long-term changes in cell specification, growth of synaptic connections, and adaptation that occur throughout neonatal and postnatal life. Here we show that the transcriptional response in neurons is exquisitely sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential firing patterns. Neurons were electrically stimulated with the same number of action potentials, but with different inter-burst intervals. We found that these subtle alterations in the timing of action potential firing differentially regulates hundreds of genes, across many functional categories, through the activation or repression of distinct transcriptional networks. Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional response in neurons to environmental stimuli, coded in the pattern of action potential firing, can be very sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential delivery rather than the intensity of stimulation or the total number of action potentials delivered. These data identify temporal kinetics of action potential firing as critical components regulating intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression in neurons to extracellular cues during early development and throughout life.

  19. Constructing Networks of Action-Relevant Episodes: An In Situ Research Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barab, Sasha A.; Hay, Kenneth E.; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa C.

    2001-01-01

    Advances a methodology for capturing and tracing the emergence, evolution, and diffusion of a practice, conceptual understanding, resource, or student-constructed artifact. Presents the Constructing Networks of Action-Relevant Episodes (CN-ARE) methodology which allows researchers to identify relevant data from a complex, evolving environment, and…

  20. Followup Audit: DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-29

    Followup Audit : DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle A P R I L...Results in Brief Followup Audit : DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled...and Maritime Paid Too Much for High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle Repair Parts,” (HMMWV) was issued on April 4, 2014. The audit

  1. Social Networking: Boundaries and Limits Part 1: Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Antonette; AlDoubi, Suzan; Kaminski, Karen; Anderson, Sharon K.; Isaacs, Nelda

    2014-01-01

    The number of educators, administrators, and institutions that utilize social networking has increased dramatically. Many have adopted social networking in order to be up-to-date and connected with their students' learning beyond the boundaries of the classroom. However, this increase in the use of social networking in academia presents many…

  2. Speech networks at rest and in action: interactions between functional brain networks controlling speech production.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Fuertinger, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Speech production is one of the most complex human behaviors. Although brain activation during speaking has been well investigated, our understanding of interactions between the brain regions and neural networks remains scarce. We combined seed-based interregional correlation analysis with graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI data during the resting state and sentence production in healthy subjects to investigate the interface and topology of functional networks originating from the key brain regions controlling speech, i.e., the laryngeal/orofacial motor cortex, inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, supplementary motor area, cingulate cortex, putamen, and thalamus. During both resting and speaking, the interactions between these networks were bilaterally distributed and centered on the sensorimotor brain regions. However, speech production preferentially recruited the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and cerebellum into the large-scale network, suggesting the importance of these regions in facilitation of the transition from the resting state to speaking. Furthermore, the cerebellum (lobule VI) was the most prominent region showing functional influences on speech-network integration and segregation. Although networks were bilaterally distributed, interregional connectivity during speaking was stronger in the left vs. right hemisphere, which may have underlined a more homogeneous overlap between the examined networks in the left hemisphere. Among these, the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) established a core network that fully overlapped with all other speech-related networks, determining the extent of network interactions. Our data demonstrate complex interactions of large-scale brain networks controlling speech production and point to the critical role of the LMC, IPL, and cerebellum in the formation of speech production network.

  3. Bringing Ideals into Dialogue with Practices: On the Principles and Practices of the Nordic Network for Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rönnerman, Karin; Salo, Petri; Furu, Eli Moksnes; Lund, Torbjørn; Olin, Anette; Jakhelln, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present the Nordic Network for Action Research, established in 2004. We describe how the network has explored, bridged and nurtured the inherent action research dynamics of ideology and methodology. This has been done through an understanding anchored in educational traditions, and by focus on three important ideal-shaping…

  4. Research on technique of measuring space position change of equipment action part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Deng, Shijie; Wang, Ping

    2008-12-01

    At present, a large number of electronic machinery and equipment was launched into military or civilian field. Such kind of equipments can rotates and moves precisely under control of micro-electronics device. It is an important task how to measure space position change of the mechanical parts. And it only can be proved by test that whether the space position change value of action parts meted the specification requirements. And the test must satisfy some accuracy requirements. In response to the test demand, we have developed out a system based on of photoelectricity theodolite. The system belongs to non-touched device, it is convenient and precise to use. In large-scale Space position changes with high-precision demand test mission, We think this method is the most feasible so far.

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part B, Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1. and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. Remedial action is the focus of Vol. 2, Pt. B, which has been divided into the three necessary subelements of the RA: characterization, RA, and robotics and automation. Each of these sections address general ORNL problems, which are then broken down by problem area/constituents and linked to potential remedial technologies. The diagrams also contain summary information about a technology`s status, its science and technology needs, and its implementation needs.

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved, reactor licensees. Semiannual progress report, January--June 1997; Volume 16, Number 1, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (January--June 1997) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved, material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1997; Volume 16, Number 2, Part 3

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1997) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994, Volume 13, No. 4, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1994) and includes copies of letters Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Volume 14, No. 2, Part 2, Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  10. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved medical licensees. Quarterly progress report, January 1995--March 1995. Volume 14, No. 1, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January-March 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to medical licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  11. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved, reactor licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1997; Volume 16, Number 2, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1997) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  12. Scotland's Knowledge Network: translating knowledge into action to improve quality of care.

    PubMed

    Wales, A; Graham, S; Rooney, K; Crawford, A

    2012-11-01

    The Knowledge Network (www.knowledge.scot.nhs.uk) is Scotland's online knowledge service for health and social care. It is designed to support practitioners to apply knowledge in frontline delivery of care, helping to translate knowledge into better health-care outcomes through safe, effective, person-centred care. The Knowledge Network helps to combine the worlds of evidence-based practice and quality improvement by providing access to knowledge about the effectiveness of clinical interventions ('know-what') and knowledge about how to implement this knowledge to support individual patients in working health-care environments ('know-how'). An 'evidence and guidance' search enables clinicians to quickly access quality-assured evidence and best practice, while point of care and mobile solutions provide knowledge in actionable formats to embed in clinical workflow. This research-based knowledge is complemented by social networking services and improvement tools which support the capture and exchange of knowledge from experience, facilitating practice change and systems improvement. In these cases, the Knowledge Network supports key components of the knowledge-to-action cycle--acquiring, creating, sharing and disseminating knowledge to improve performance and innovate. It provides a vehicle for implementing the recommendations of the national Knowledge into Action review, which outlines a new national approach to embedding knowledge in frontline practice and systems improvement.

  13. Functional Integration between Salience and Central Executive Networks: A Role for Action Video Game Experience.

    PubMed

    Gong, Diankun; He, Hui; Ma, Weiyi; Liu, Dongbo; Huang, Mengting; Dong, Li; Gong, Jinnan; Li, Jianfu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    Action video games (AVGs) have attracted increasing research attention as they offer a unique perspective into the relation between active learning and neural plasticity. However, little research has examined the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of neural network mechanisms. It has been proposed that AVG experience is related to the integration between Salience Network (SN) and Central Executive Network (CEN), which are responsible for attention and working memory, respectively, two cognitive functions essential for AVG playing. This study initiated a systematic investigation of this proposition by analyzing AVG experts' and amateurs' resting-state brain functions through graph theoretical analyses and functional connectivity. Results reveal enhanced intra- and internetwork functional integrations in AVG experts compared to amateurs. The findings support the possible relation between AVG experience and the neural network plasticity.

  14. Functional Integration between Salience and Central Executive Networks: A Role for Action Video Game Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Diankun; He, Hui; Ma, Weiyi; Liu, Dongbo; Huang, Mengting; Dong, Li; Gong, Jinnan; Li, Jianfu; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    Action video games (AVGs) have attracted increasing research attention as they offer a unique perspective into the relation between active learning and neural plasticity. However, little research has examined the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of neural network mechanisms. It has been proposed that AVG experience is related to the integration between Salience Network (SN) and Central Executive Network (CEN), which are responsible for attention and working memory, respectively, two cognitive functions essential for AVG playing. This study initiated a systematic investigation of this proposition by analyzing AVG experts' and amateurs' resting-state brain functions through graph theoretical analyses and functional connectivity. Results reveal enhanced intra- and internetwork functional integrations in AVG experts compared to amateurs. The findings support the possible relation between AVG experience and the neural network plasticity. PMID:26885408

  15. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  16. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  17. A Planning Guide for Instructional Networks, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    This second in a series of articles on planning for instructional computer networks focuses on site preparation, installation, service, and support. Highlights include an implementation schedule; classroom and computer lab layouts; electrical power needs; workstations; network cable; telephones; furniture; climate control; and security. (LRW)

  18. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  19. 29 CFR 1608.6 - Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission conciliation or settlement agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AFFIRMATIVE ACTION APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.6 Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission... determination of no reasonable cause under § 1608.10(a) and will advise the respondent of its right...

  20. 29 CFR 1608.6 - Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission conciliation or settlement agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AFFIRMATIVE ACTION APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.6 Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission... determination of no reasonable cause under § 1608.10(a) and will advise the respondent of its right...

  1. 29 CFR 1608.6 - Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission conciliation or settlement agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AFFIRMATIVE ACTION APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.6 Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission... determination of no reasonable cause under § 1608.10(a) and will advise the respondent of its right...

  2. 29 CFR 1608.6 - Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission conciliation or settlement agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AFFIRMATIVE ACTION APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.6 Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission... determination of no reasonable cause under § 1608.10(a) and will advise the respondent of its right...

  3. 29 CFR 1608.6 - Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission conciliation or settlement agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AFFIRMATIVE ACTION APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.6 Affirmative action plans which are part of Commission... determination of no reasonable cause under § 1608.10(a) and will advise the respondent of its right...

  4. 29 CFR 37.7 - What specific discriminatory actions based on disability are prohibited by this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What specific discriminatory actions based on disability... (WIA) General Provisions § 37.7 What specific discriminatory actions based on disability are prohibited by this part? (a) In providing any aid, benefits, services, or training under a WIA Title...

  5. 29 CFR 37.7 - What specific discriminatory actions based on disability are prohibited by this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What specific discriminatory actions based on disability... (WIA) General Provisions § 37.7 What specific discriminatory actions based on disability are prohibited by this part? (a) In providing any aid, benefits, services, or training under a WIA Title...

  6. 29 CFR 37.7 - What specific discriminatory actions based on disability are prohibited by this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What specific discriminatory actions based on disability... (WIA) General Provisions § 37.7 What specific discriminatory actions based on disability are prohibited by this part? (a) In providing any aid, benefits, services, or training under a WIA Title...

  7. Aplysia Locomotion: Network and Behavioral Actions of GdFFD, a D-Amino Acid-Containing Neuropeptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Ye; Chen, Song-An; Liu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Zheng-Yang; Su, Yan-Nan; Yang, Shao-Zhong; Chen, Ting-Ting; Livnat, Itamar; Vilim, Ferdinand S; Cropper, Elizabeth C; Weiss, Klaudiusz R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Jing, Jian

    2016-01-01

    One emerging principle is that neuromodulators, such as neuropeptides, regulate multiple behaviors, particularly motivated behaviors, e.g., feeding and locomotion. However, how neuromodulators act on multiple neural networks to exert their actions remains poorly understood. These actions depend on the chemical form of the peptide, e.g., an alternation of L- to D-form of an amino acid can endow the peptide with bioactivity, as is the case for the Aplysia peptide GdFFD (where dF indicates D-phenylalanine). GdFFD has been shown to act as an extrinsic neuromodulator in the feeding network, while the all L-amino acid form, GFFD, was not bioactive. Given that both GdFFD/GFFD are also present in pedal neurons that mediate locomotion, we sought to determine whether they impact locomotion. We first examined effects of both peptides on isolated ganglia, and monitored fictive programs using the parapedal commissural nerve (PPCN). Indeed, GdFFD was bioactive and GFFD was not. GdFFD increased the frequency with which neural activity was observed in the PPCN. In part, there was an increase in bursting spiking activity that resembled fictive locomotion. Additionally, there was significant activity between bursts. To determine how the peptide-induced activity in the isolated CNS is translated into behavior, we recorded animal movements, and developed a computer program to automatically track the animal and calculate the path of movement and velocity of locomotion. We found that GdFFD significantly reduced locomotion and induced a foot curl. These data suggest that the increase in PPCN activity observed in the isolated CNS during GdFFD application corresponds to a reduction, rather than an increase, in locomotion. In contrast, GFFD had no effect. Thus, our study suggests that GdFFD may act as an intrinsic neuromodulator in the Aplysia locomotor network. More generally, our study indicates that physiological and behavioral analyses should be combined to evaluate peptide actions.

  8. Detecting communities in clustered networks based on group action on set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhanli; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Lili; Tang, Shaoting; Zheng, Zhiming

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a well targeted algorithm (GAS algorithm) for detecting communities in high clustered networks by presenting group action technology on community division. During the processing of this algorithm, the underlying community structure of a clustered network emerges simultaneously as the corresponding partition of orbits by the permutation groups acting on the node set are achieved. As the derivation of the orbit partition, an algebraic structure r-cycle can be considered as the origin of the community. To be a priori estimation for the community structure of the algorithm, the community separability is introduced to indicate whether a network has distinct community structure. By executing the algorithm on several typical networks and the LFR benchmark, it shows that this GAS algorithm can detect communities accurately and effectively in high clustered networks. Furthermore, we compare the GAS algorithm and the clique percolation algorithm on the LFR benchmark. It is shown that the GAS algorithm is more accurate at detecting non-overlapping communities in clustered networks. It is suggested that algebraic techniques can uncover fresh light on detecting communities in complex networks.

  9. Dynamic noise from action errors enhances network reciprocity in the prisoner's dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Ogasawara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the fact that people make mistakes in a transient, fluctuating or chaotic environment, we establish a spatial prisoner's dilemma model where an agent commits action errors proportionally varying with the increasing/decreasing rate of the global cooperation fraction. A series of numerical simulations reveal that the cooperation level is enhanced in games in which the stag hunt (SH)-type dilemma is dominant; however, it is slightly diminished in games in which the chicken-type dilemma is dominant, compared with the standard network reciprocity model. Intensive analysis reveals that the noise created by the action error contribute to the spatial expansion of a cooperators' cluster, because a dilemma that is less chicken-type and more SH-type makes it disadvantageous for defectors to neighbor cooperators. Our finding, that errors in behavior in a chaotic environment contribute to the evolution of cooperation, might aim to explain the problem of how network reciprocity works.

  10. The medial frontal-prefrontal network for altered awareness and control of action in corticobasal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moore, James W.; Rae, Charlotte L.; Rittman, Timothy; Altena, Ellemarije; Haggard, Patrick; Rowe, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The volitional impairments of alien limb and apraxia are a defining feature of the corticobasal syndrome, but a limited understanding of their neurocognitive aetiology has hampered progress towards effective treatments. Here we combined several key methods to investigate the mechanism of impairments in voluntary action in corticobasal syndrome. We used a quantitative measure of awareness of action that is based on well-defined processes of motor control; structural and functional anatomical information; and evaluation against the clinical volitional disorders of corticobasal syndrome. In patients and healthy adults we measured ‘intentional binding’, the perceived temporal attraction between voluntary actions and their sensory effects. Patients showed increased binding of the perceived time of actions towards their effects. This increase correlated with the severity of alien limb and apraxia, which we suggest share a core deficit in motor control processes, through reduced precision in voluntary action signals. Structural neuroimaging analyses showed the behavioural variability in patients was related to changes in grey matter volume in pre-supplementary motor area, and changes in its underlying white matter tracts to prefrontal cortex. Moreover, changes in functional connectivity at rest between the pre-supplementary motor area and prefrontal cortex were proportional to changes in binding. These behavioural, structural and functional results converge to reveal the frontal network for altered awareness and control of voluntary action in corticobasal syndrome, and provide candidate markers to evaluate new therapies. PMID:24293266

  11. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  12. Equipment Management for Sensor Networks: Linking Physical Infrastructure and Actions to Observational Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. S.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Matos, M.; Caraballo, J.

    2015-12-01

    Networks conducting long term monitoring using in situ sensors need the functionality to track physical equipment as well as deployments, calibrations, and other actions related to site and equipment maintenance. The observational data being generated by sensors are enhanced if direct linkages to equipment details and actions can be made. This type of information is typically recorded in field notebooks or in static files, which are rarely linked to observations in a way that could be used to interpret results. However, the record of field activities is often relevant to analysis or post-processing of the observational data. We have developed an underlying database schema and deployed a web interface for recording and retrieving information on physical infrastructure and related actions for observational networks. The database schema for equipment was designed as an extension to the Observations Data Model 2 (ODM2), a community-developed information model for spatially discrete, feature based earth observations. The core entities of ODM2 describe location, observed variable, and timing of observations, and the equipment extension contains entities to provide additional metadata specific to the inventory of physical infrastructure and associated actions. The schema is implemented in a relational database system for storage and management with an associated web interface. We designed the web-based tools for technicians to enter and query information on the physical equipment and actions such as site visits, equipment deployments, maintenance, and calibrations. These tools were implemented for the iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydrosustainability) ecohydrologic observatory, and we anticipate that they will be useful for similar large-scale monitoring networks desiring to link observing infrastructure to observational data to increase the quality of sensor-based data products.

  13. The macaque lateral grasping network: A neural substrate for generating purposeful hand actions.

    PubMed

    Borra, Elena; Gerbella, Marzio; Rozzi, Stefano; Luppino, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    In primates, neural mechanisms for controlling skilled hand actions primarily rely on sensorimotor transformations. These transformations are mediated by circuits linking specific inferior parietal with ventral premotor areas in which sensory coding of objects' features automatically triggers appropriate hand motor programs. Recently, connectional studies in macaques showed that these parietal and premotor areas are nodes of a large-scale cortical network, designated as "lateral grasping network," including specific temporal and prefrontal sectors involved in object recognition and executive functions, respectively. These data extend grasping models so far proposed in providing a possible substrate for interfacing perceptual, cognitive, and hand-related sensorimotor processes for controlling hand actions based on object identity, goals, and memory-based or contextual information and for the contribution of motor signals to cognitive motor functions. Human studies provided evidence for a possible counterpart of the macaque lateral grasping network, suggesting that in primate evolution the neural mechanisms for controlling hand actions described in the macaque have been retained and exploited for the emergence of human-specific motor and cognitive motor capacities.

  14. Neural Action Fields for Optic Flow Based Navigation: A Simulation Study of the Fly Lobula Plate Network

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Alexander; Weber, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Optic flow based navigation is a fundamental way of visual course control described in many different species including man. In the fly, an essential part of optic flow analysis is performed in the lobula plate, a retinotopic map of motion in the environment. There, the so-called lobula plate tangential cells possess large receptive fields with different preferred directions in different parts of the visual field. Previous studies demonstrated an extensive connectivity between different tangential cells, providing, in principle, the structural basis for their large and complex receptive fields. We present a network simulation of the tangential cells, comprising most of the neurons studied so far (22 on each hemisphere) with all the known connectivity between them. On their dendrite, model neurons receive input from a retinotopic array of Reichardt-type motion detectors. Model neurons exhibit receptive fields much like their natural counterparts, demonstrating that the connectivity between the lobula plate tangential cells indeed can account for their complex receptive field structure. We describe the tuning of a model neuron to particular types of ego-motion (rotation as well as translation around/along a given body axis) by its ‘action field’. As we show for model neurons of the vertical system (VS-cells), each of them displays a different type of action field, i.e., responds maximally when the fly is rotating around a particular body axis. However, the tuning width of the rotational action fields is relatively broad, comparable to the one with dendritic input only. The additional intra-lobula-plate connectivity mainly reduces their translational action field amplitude, i.e., their sensitivity to translational movements along any body axis of the fly. PMID:21305019

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

  16. Differential Effects of Age-of-Acquisition for Concrete Nouns and Action Verbs: Evidence for Partly Distinct Representations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulenger, Veronique; Decoppet, Nathalie; Roy, Alice C.; Paulignan, Yves; Nazir, Tatjana A.

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that words that are acquired early in life are processed faster and more accurately than words acquired later, even by adults. As neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated different brain networks in the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns, the present study was aimed at contrasting reaction…

  17. Protecting drinkable water: an analysis of action plans and stakeholders' networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Menard, Marjorie

    2015-04-01

    Since WFD the policy for protecting drinkable water has been enhanced in France. This policy establish the main components and the different steps for protecting drinkable water, and ask for defining and implementing an action plan for each contributing catchment. Despite ambitious objectives, the local implementation is difficult. Firstly there is a high diversity of stakeholders involved with local authorities, which are mainly: water agencies, agricultural chambers and consultants, authorities at regional and departmental levels. Most of the local authorities do not feel qualified enough for carrying out such a policy, as they are not really used to deal with technical and political issues related to agricultural diffuse pollutions. As a consequence assessed action plans are based on regulation and/or agri-environmental measures. More ambitious and complementary measures can be included, but without any support measure nor accurate objectives for their implementation. In the end, action plans reflect more a formal implementation of protection approaches than a search for efficiency by defining ambitious measures and the setting-up a consistent support scheme. The way stakeholders' networks mobilize knowledge have been analyzed based on ten case studies located in three different regions. Three local authorities profiles are defined: (1) the "passive" ones, not really convinced of the necessity to undertake actions against diffuse pollutions and/or having low level of knowledge to support local reflexion, that delegate project management; (2) the local authorities that support local protection approach but that, for different reasons, do not search for an effective action plan, and that only consider an improvement approach; (3) the local authorities that more rarely, aim at efficient actions, motivated by the urgent need of action for preserving threatened resources. According to these profiles, local authorities and their project coordinators will be looking

  18. NASULGC Council on Extension, Committee on Program Innovation and Action Oriented Research; 1968 Report. Part 1. Program Innovations. Part 2. Action Oriented Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This report on extension activities of member institutions of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges describes 91 program innovations and action oriented research activities. Objectives, sponsorship, program evaluations, and other data are cited for program innovations in such areas as continuing medical education,…

  19. The Study of Collective Actions in a University Anchored Community Wireless Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchibhotla, Hari N.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of wireless devices and the ease in setting up wireless devices has created opportunities for various entities, and in particular to universities, by partnering with their local communities in the form of a university anchored community wireless network. This provides opportunities for students to be part of the community-based…

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Volume 14, Nos. 3 and 4, Part 1. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July - December 1995) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  1. Illuminating drug action by network integration of disease genes: a case study of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-04-26

    Drug discovery has produced many successful therapeutic agents; however, most of these drugs were developed without a deep understanding of the system-wide mechanisms of action responsible for their indications. Gene-disease associations produced by molecular and genetic studies of complex diseases provide great opportunities for a system-level understanding of drug activity. In this study, we focused on acute myocardial infarction (MI) and conducted an integrative network analysis to illuminate drug actions. We integrated MI drugs, MI drug interactors, drug targets, and MI disease genes into the human interactome and showed that MI drug targets are significantly proximate to MI disease proteins. We then constructed a bipartite network of MI-related drug targets and MI disease proteins and derived 12 drug-target-disease (DTD) modules. We assessed the biological relevance of these modules and demonstrated the benefits of incorporating disease genes. The results indicate that DTD modules provide insights into the mechanisms of action of MI drugs and the cardiovascular (side) effects of non-MI drugs.

  2. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks-Part I: Link Characterization.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Díaz, Gara; Mena-Rodríguez, Pablo; Pérez-Álvarez, Iván; Jiménez, Eugenio; Dorta-Naranjo, Blas-Pablo; Zazo, Santiago; Pérez, Marina; Quevedo, Eduardo; Cardona, Laura; Hernández, J Joaquín

    2017-01-19

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) using electromagnetic (EM) technology in marine shallow waters are examined, not just for environmental monitoring but for further interesting applications. Particularly, the use of EM waves is reconsidered in shallow waters due to the benefits offered in this context, where acoustic and optical technologies have serious disadvantages. Sea water scenario is a harsh environment for radiocommunications, and there is no standard model for the underwater EM channel. The high conductivity of sea water, the effect of seabed and the surface make the behaviour of the channel hard to predict. This justifies the need of link characterization as the first step to approach the development of EM underwater sensor networks. To obtain a reliable link model, measurements and simulations are required. The measuring setup for this purpose is explained and described, as well as the procedures used. Several antennas have been designed and tested in low frequency bands. Agreement between attenuation measurements and simulations at different distances was analysed and made possible the validation of simulation setups and the design of different communications layers of the system. This leads to the second step of this work, where data and routing protocols for the sensor network are examined.

  3. Online Actions with Offline Impact: How Online Social Networks Influence Online and Offline User Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Tim; Jindal, Pranav; Leskovec, Jure

    2017-01-01

    Many of today’s most widely used computing applications utilize social networking features and allow users to connect, follow each other, share content, and comment on others’ posts. However, despite the widespread adoption of these features, there is little understanding of the consequences that social networking has on user retention, engagement, and online as well as offline behavior. Here, we study how social networks influence user behavior in a physical activity tracking application. We analyze 791 million online and offline actions of 6 million users over the course of 5 years, and show that social networking leads to a significant increase in users’ online as well as offline activities. Specifically, we establish a causal effect of how social networks influence user behavior. We show that the creation of new social connections increases user online in-application activity by 30%, user retention by 17%, and user offline real-world physical activity by 7% (about 400 steps per day). By exploiting a natural experiment we distinguish the effect of social influence of new social connections from the simultaneous increase in user’s motivation to use the app and take more steps. We show that social influence accounts for 55% of the observed changes in user behavior, while the remaining 45% can be explained by the user’s increased motivation to use the app. Further, we show that subsequent, individual edge formations in the social network lead to significant increases in daily steps. These effects diminish with each additional edge and vary based on edge attributes and user demographics. Finally, we utilize these insights to develop a model that accurately predicts which users will be most influenced by the creation of new social network connections. PMID:28345078

  4. Action of the mechanical disruption of the actin network on the gravisensitivity of the root statocyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefranc, A.; Jeune, B.; Driss-Ecole, D.; Perbal, G.

    The effects of the mechanical disruption of the thin actin network of statocytes on gravisensitivity have been studied on lentil roots. Seedling roots were first inverted for 7 min (root tip upward) and then placed in the downward (normal) position for 7 min before gravitropic stimulation in the horizontal position. The period of inversion allowed the amyloplasts to move from the distal part to the proximal part of the statocyte, but did not fully sediment. When the roots were returned to the tip down position, the amyloplasts moved toward the distal part, but also did not completely sediment by the time the roots were placed horizontally. Thus, in these roots the amyloplasts could be still moving toward the distal wall after they had been replaced in the normal position and the actin network should not be fully restored. Gravisensitivity was estimated by the analysis of the dose-response curves of vertical and treated (inverted and returned to downward position) roots. The only effect, which has been observed on treated roots, was a delay of graviresponse for about 1 min. Our interpretation of this result is that in vertical roots the amyloplasts can exert tensions in the actin network that are directly transmitted to mechanoreceptors located in the plasma membrane. In roots with a partially disrupted actin network, a delay of 1 min is necessary for the amyloplasts to activate mechanoreceptors.

  5. Learning Associations between Action and Perception: Effects of Incompatible Training on Body Part and Spatial Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggett, Alison J.; Hudson, Matt; Tipper, Steve P.; Downing, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Observation of another person executing an action primes the same action in the observer's motor system. Recent evidence has shown that these priming effects are flexible, where training of new associations, such as making a foot response when viewing a moving hand, can reduce standard action priming effects (Gillmeister, Catmur, Liepelt, Brass,…

  6. The Impact of Being Part of an Action Learning Set for New Lecturers: A Reflective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haith, Mark P.; Whittingham, Katrina A.

    2012-01-01

    What is an action learning set (ALS)? An ALS is a regular, action focused peer discussion group, generally facilitated, to address work place issues. Methods of undertaking ALS: methods are flexible within a range of approaches according to the group's developing needs. Benefits of ALS: builds trust, professional development, enables action,…

  7. A Bayesian network model for predicting aquatic toxicity mode of action using two dimensional theoretical molecular descriptors-abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mode of toxic action (MoA) has been recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity but MoA classification in aquatic toxicology has been limited. We developed a Bayesian network model to classify aquatic toxicity mode of action using a recently published dataset contain...

  8. Lessons Learnt from Applying Action Research to Support Strategy Formation Processes in Long-Term Care Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Hendrik; Dewulf, Geert; Voordijk, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates how action research (AR) that is aimed at scaling-up experiments can be applied to support a strategy formation process (SFP) in a subsidized long-term care network. Previous research has developed numerous AR frameworks to support experiments in various domains, but has failed to explain how to apply AR and action learning…

  9. Novel dynamic Bayesian networks for facial action element recognition and understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Park, Jeong-Seon; Choi, Dong-You; Lee, Sang-Woong

    2011-12-01

    In daily life, language is an important tool of communication between people. Besides language, facial action can also provide a great amount of information. Therefore, facial action recognition has become a popular research topic in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). However, facial action recognition is quite a challenging task due to its complexity. In a literal sense, there are thousands of facial muscular movements, many of which have very subtle differences. Moreover, muscular movements always occur simultaneously when the pose is changed. To address this problem, we first build a fully automatic facial points detection system based on a local Gabor filter bank and principal component analysis. Then, novel dynamic Bayesian networks are proposed to perform facial action recognition using the junction tree algorithm over a limited number of feature points. In order to evaluate the proposed method, we have used the Korean face database for model training. For testing, we used the CUbiC FacePix, facial expressions and emotion database, Japanese female facial expression database, and our own database. Our experimental results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  10. The COST Action IC0604 "Telepathology Network in Europe" (EURO-TELEPATH).

    PubMed

    García-Rojo, Marcial; Gonçalves, Luís; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The COST Action IC0604 "Telepathology Network in Europe" (EURO-TELEPATH) is a European COST Action that has been running from 2007 to 2011. COST Actions are funded by the COST (European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research) Agency, supported by the Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development (FP7), of the European Union. EURO-TELEPATH's main objectives were evaluating and validating the common technological framework and communication standards required to access, transmit and manage digital medical records by pathologists and other medical professionals in a networked environment. The project was organized in four working groups. orking Group 1 "Business modeling in pathology" has designed main pathology processes - Frozen Study, Formalin Fixed Specimen Study, Telepathology, Cytology, and Autopsy -using Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN). orking Group 2 "Informatics standards in pathology" has been dedicated to promoting the development and application of informatics standards in pathology, collaborating with Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE), Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), Health Level Seven (HL7), and other standardization bodies. Working Group 3 "Images: Analysis, Processing, Retrieval and Management" worked on the use of virtual or digital slides that are fostering the use of image processing and analysis in pathology not only for research purposes, but also in daily practice. Working Group 4 "Technology and Automation in Pathology" was focused on studying the adequacy of current existing technical solutions, including, e.g., the quality of images obtained by slide scanners, or the efficiency of image analysis applications. Major outcome of this action are the collaboration with international health informatics standardization bodies to foster the development of standards for digital pathology, offering a new approach for workflow analysis, based in business process

  11. Enhanced activation of motor execution networks using action observation combined with imagination of lower limb movements.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Michael; Estévez, Natalia; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kiper, Daniel; Kollias, Spyros S; Eng, Kynan; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    The combination of first-person observation and motor imagery, i.e. first-person observation of limbs with online motor imagination, is commonly used in interactive 3D computer gaming and in some movie scenes. These scenarios are designed to induce a cognitive process in which a subject imagines himself/herself acting as the agent in the displayed movement situation. Despite the ubiquity of this type of interaction and its therapeutic potential, its relationship to passive observation and imitation during observation has not been directly studied using an interactive paradigm. In the present study we show activation resulting from observation, coupled with online imagination and with online imitation of a goal-directed lower limb movement using functional MRI (fMRI) in a mixed block/event-related design. Healthy volunteers viewed a video (first-person perspective) of a foot kicking a ball. They were instructed to observe-only the action (O), observe and simultaneously imagine performing the action (O-MI), or imitate the action (O-IMIT). We found that when O-MI was compared to O, activation was enhanced in the ventralpremotor cortex bilaterally, left inferior parietal lobule and left insula. The O-MI and O-IMIT conditions shared many activation foci in motor relevant areas as confirmed by conjunction analysis. These results show that (i) combining observation with motor imagery (O-MI) enhances activation compared to observation-only (O) in the relevant foot motor network and in regions responsible for attention, for control of goal-directed movements and for the awareness of causing an action, and (ii) it is possible to extensively activate the motor execution network using O-MI, even in the absence of overt movement. Our results may have implications for the development of novel virtual reality interactions for neurorehabilitation interventions and other applications involving training of motor tasks.

  12. Understanding IT-enabled social action networks: construction, sustainability, and user participation.

    PubMed

    Banks, M Shane

    2012-01-01

    Innovative, humanitarian individuals and organizations are seeking to leverage the power of information technologies by constructing IT-enabled social action networks (ITSANs), networks of actors, connected via an IT platform, working together to improve social conditions and the lives of others. ITSANs are primarily web-based platforms that allow users to collaborate, share information, and pool resources to enhance efforts to address a common social mission. The goal of this research is to investigate how ITSANs are used to positively affect social needs by examining how these platforms are constructed and sustained. Also of interest are factors influencing user participation. To develop an in-depth understanding of ITSANs, this research proposes a qualitative multi-case study approach that seeks to understand ITSANs through the lived experiences of key actors.

  13. Mass-action equilibrium and non-specific interactions in protein binding networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Large-scale protein binding networks serve as a paradigm of complex properties of living cells. These networks are naturally weighted with edges characterized by binding strength and protein-nodes -- by their concentrations. However, the state-of-the-art high-throughput experimental techniques generate just a binary (yes or no) information about individual interactions. As a result, most of the previous research concentrated just on topology of these networks. In a series of recent publications [1-4] my collaborators and I went beyond purely topological studies and calculated the mass-action equilibrium of a genome-wide binding network using experimentally determined protein concentrations, localizations, and reliable binding interactions in baker's yeast. We then studied how this equilibrium responds to large perturbations [1-2] and noise [3] in concentrations of proteins. We demonstrated that the change in the equilibrium concentration of a protein exponentially decays (and sign-alternates) with its network distance away from the perturbed node. This explains why, despite a globally connected topology, individual functional modules in such networks are able to operate fairly independently. In a separate study [4] we quantified the interplay between specific and non-specific binding interactions under crowded conditions inside living cells. We show how the need to limit the waste of resources constrains the number of types and concentrations of proteins that are present at the same time and at the same place in yeast cells. [1] S Maslov, I. Ispolatov, PNAS 104:13655 (2007). [2] S. Maslov, K. Sneppen, I. Ispolatov, New J. of Phys. 9: 273 (2007). [3] K-K. Yan, D. Walker, S. Maslov, PRL accepted (2008). [4] J. Zhang, S. Maslov, and E. I. Shakhnovich, Mol Syst Biol 4, 210 (2008).

  14. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Deepjyoti; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  15. Distinctive laterality of neural networks supporting action understanding in left- and right-handed individuals: An EEG coherence study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Rachel; Mizelle, J C; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2015-08-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that perspective and handedness of observed actions can affect action understanding differently in right and left-handed persons, suggesting potential differences in the neural networks underlying action understanding between right and left-handed individuals. We sought to evaluate potential differences in these neural networks using electroencephalography (EEG). Right- and left-handed participants observed images of tool-use actions from egocentric and allocentric perspectives, with right- and left-handed actors performing the actions. Participants judged the outcome of the observed actions, and response accuracy and latency were recorded. Behaviorally, the highest accuracy and shortest latency was found in the egocentric perspective for right- and left-handed observers. Handedness of subject showed an effect on accuracy and latency also, where right-handed observers were faster to respond than left-handed observers, but on average were less accurate. Mu band (8-10 Hz) cortico-cortical coherence analysis indicated that right-handed observers have coherence in the motor dominant left parietal-premotor networks when looking at an egocentric right or allocentric left hands. When looking in an egocentric perspective at a left hand or allocentric right hand, coherence was lateralized to right parietal-premotor areas. In left-handed observers, bilateral parietal-premotor coherence patterns were observed regardless of actor handedness. These findings suggest that the cortical networks involved in understanding action outcomes are dependent on hand dominance, and notably right handed participants seem to utilize motor systems based on the limb seen performing the action. The decreased accuracy for right-handed participants on allocentric images could be due to asymmetrical lateralization of encoding action and motoric dominance, which may interfere with translating allocentric limb action outcomes. Further neurophysiological studies will

  16. 38 CFR Appendix B to Part 200 - The Action Requiring an Environmental Assessment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment and, therefore, require an... disturbed property where there is the potential for an increase in traffic and people....

  17. 38 CFR Appendix B to Part 200 - The Action Requiring an Environmental Assessment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment and, therefore, require an... disturbed property where there is the potential for an increase in traffic and people....

  18. 38 CFR Appendix B to Part 200 - The Action Requiring an Environmental Assessment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment and, therefore, require an... disturbed property where there is the potential for an increase in traffic and people....

  19. Suit the action to the word, the word to the action: Hypothetical choices and real decisions in Medicare Part D

    PubMed Central

    Kesternich, Iris; Heiss, Florian; McFadden, Daniel; Winter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, consumer choice has become an important element of public policy. One reason is that consumers differ in their tastes and needs, which they can express most easily through their own choices. Elements that strengthen consumer choice feature prominently in the design of public insurance markets, for instance in the United States in the recent introduction of prescription drug coverage for older individuals via Medicare Part D. For policy makers who design such a market, an important practical question in the design phase of such a new program is how to deduce enrollment and plan selection preferences prior to its introduction. In this paper, we investigate whether hypothetical choice experiments can serve as a tool in this process. We combine data from hypothetical and real plan choices, elicited around the time of the introduction of Medicare Part D. We first analyze how well the hypothetical choice data predict willingness to pay and market shares at the aggregate level. We then analyze predictions at the individual level, in particular how insurance demand varies with observable characteristics. We also explore whether the extent of adverse selection can be predicted using hypothetical choice data alone. PMID:23317633

  20. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 73 - List of Some Offenses for Which Disciplinary Action May Be Taken

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false List of Some Offenses for Which Disciplinary Action May Be Taken A Appendix A to Part 73 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... U.S.C. 285.) 10. Unauthorized use of a Government vehicle; serious or repeated violations of...

  1. 24 CFR 55.12 - Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of proposed actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Application of Executive Order on Floodplain Management § 55.12 Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of... approved action with no additional adverse impact on or from a floodplain; (6) HUD's approval of a...

  2. 24 CFR 55.12 - Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of proposed actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Application of Executive Order on Floodplain Management § 55.12 Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of... approved action with no additional adverse impact on or from a floodplain; (6) HUD's approval of a...

  3. 24 CFR 55.12 - Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of proposed actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Application of Executive Order on Floodplain Management § 55.12 Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of... approved action with no additional adverse impact on or from a floodplain; (6) HUD's approval of a...

  4. 24 CFR 55.12 - Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of proposed actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Application of Executive Order on Floodplain Management § 55.12 Inapplicability of 24 CFR part 55 to certain categories of... approved action with no additional adverse impact on or from a floodplain; (6) HUD's approval of a...

  5. 34 CFR 86.301 - What actions may the Secretary take if an IHE violates this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What actions may the Secretary take if an IHE violates this part? 86.301 Section 86.301 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Responses and Sanctions Issued or Imposed by the Secretary for Violations by...

  6. An fMRI approach to particularize the frontoparietal network for visuomotor action monitoring: Detection of incongruence between test subjects' actions and resulting perceptions.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Knut; Heekeren, Karsten; Schnitker, Ralf; Daumann, Jörg; Weber, Jochen; Hesselmann, Volker; Möller-Hartmann, Walter; Thron, Armin; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary theories of motor control assume that motor actions underlie a supervisory control system which utilizes reafferent sensory feedbacks of actions for comparison with the original motor programs. The functional network of visuomotor action monitoring is considered to include inferior parietal, lateral and medial prefrontal cortices. To study both sustained monitoring for visuomotor incongruence and the actual detection of incongruence, we used a hybrid fMRI epoch-/event-related design. The basic experimental task was a continuous motor task, comprising a simple racing game. Within certain blocks of this task, incongruence was artificially generated by intermittent takeover of control over the car by the computer. Fifteen male subjects were instructed to monitor for incongruence between their own and the observed actions in order to abstain from their own action whenever the computer took over control. As a result of both sustained monitoring and actual detection of visuomotor incongruence, the rostral inferior parietal lobule displayed a BOLD signal increase. In contrast, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) exhibited two different activation patterns. Dorsolateral (BA 9/46) and medial/cingulate (BA 8, BA 32) areas of the PFC displayed a greater increase of activation in sustained monitoring, while ventrolateral PFC showed greater event-related activation for the actual detection of visuomotor incongruence. Our results suggest that the rostral inferior parietal lobule is specifically involved in the reafferent comparison of the test subjects' own actions and visually perceived actions. Different activation patterns of the PFC may reflect different frontoparietal networks for sustained action monitoring and actual detection of reafferent incongruence.

  7. Network Analysis Shows Novel Molecular Mechanisms of Action for Copper-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Mejía, Carmen; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms associated with the action of chemotherapeutic agents is fundamental to assess and account for possible side-effects of such treatments. Casiopeínas have demonstrated a cytotoxic effect by activation of pro-apoptotic processes in malignant cells. Such processes have been proved to activate the apoptotic intrinsic route, as well as cell cycle arrest. Despite this knowledge, the whole mechanism of action of Casiopeínas is yet to be completely understood. In this work we implement a systems biology approach based on two pathway analysis tools (Over-Representation Analysis and Causal Network Analysis) to observe changes in some hallmarks of cancer, induced by this copper-based chemotherapeutic agent in HeLa cell lines. We find that the metabolism of metal ions is exacerbated, as well as cell division processes being globally diminished. We also show that cellular migration and proliferation events are decreased. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms of liver protection are increased in the cell cultures under the actions of Casiopeínas, unlike the case in many other cytotoxic drugs. We argue that this chemotherapeutic agent may be promising, given its protective hepatic function, concomitant with its cytotoxic participation in the onset of apoptotic processes in malignant cells. PMID:26793116

  8. Changing the culture of academic medicine: the C-Change learning action network and its impact at participating medical schools.

    PubMed

    Krupat, Edward; Pololi, Linda; Schnell, Eugene R; Kern, David E

    2013-09-01

    The culture of academic medicine has been described as hierarchical, competitive, and not highly supportive of female or minority faculty. In response to this, the authors designed the Learning Action Network (LAN), which was part of the National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine (C-Change). The LAN is a five-school consortium aimed at changing the organizational culture of its constituent institutions. The authors selected LAN schools to be geographically diverse and representative of U.S. medical schools. Institutional leaders and faculty representatives from constituent schools met twice yearly for four years (2006-2010), forming a cross-institutional learning community. Through their quarterly listing of institutional activities, schools reported a wide array of actions. Most common were increased faculty development and/or mentoring, new approaches to communication, and adoption of new policies and procedures. Other categories included data collection/management, engagement of key stakeholders, education regarding gender/diversity, and new/expanded leadership positions. Through exit interviews, most participants reported feeling optimistic about maintaining the momentum of change. However, some, especially in schools with leadership changes, expressed uncertainty. Participants reported that they felt that the LAN enabled, empowered, facilitated, and/or caused the reported actions.For others who might want to work toward changing the culture of academic medicine, the authors offer several lessons learned from their experiences with C-Change. Most notably, people, structures, policies, and reward systems must be put into place to support cultural values, and broad-based support should be created in order for changes to persist when inevitable transitions in leadership occur.

  9. Design mobile satellite system architecture as an integral part of the cellular access digital network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, E. S. K.; Marinho, J. A.; Russell, J. E., Sr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cellular Access Digital Network (CADN) is the access vehicle through which cellular technology is brought into the mainstream of the evolving integrated telecommunications network. Beyond the integrated end-to-end digital access and per call network services provisioning of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the CADN engenders the added capability of mobility freedom via wireless access. One key element of the CADN network architecture is the standard user to network interface that is independent of RF transmission technology. Since the Mobile Satellite System (MSS) is envisioned to not only complement but also enhance the capabilities of the terrestrial cellular telecommunications network, compatibility and interoperability between terrestrial cellular and mobile satellite systems are vitally important to provide an integrated moving telecommunications network of the future. From a network standpoint, there exist very strong commonalities between the terrestrial cellular system and the mobile satellite system. Therefore, the MSS architecture should be designed as an integral part of the CADN. This paper describes the concept of the CADN, the functional architecture of the MSS, and the user-network interface signaling protocols.

  10. Emergence of collective action and environmental networking in relation to radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.G.; Payne, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the national environmental movement and nuclear technology in relation to a local emergent group. The historical development of nuclear technology in this conutry has followed a path leading to continued fear and mistrust of waste management by a portion of the population. At the forefront of opposition to nuclear technology are people and groups endorsing environmental values. Because of the antinuclear attitudes of environmentalists and the value orientation of appropriate technologists in the national environmental movement, it seems appropriate for local groups to call on these national groups for assistance regarding nuclear-related issues. A case study is used to illustrate how a local action group, once integrated into a national environmental network, can become an effective, legitimate participant in social change. The formation, emergence, mobilization, and networking of a local group opposed to a specific federal radioactive waste management plan is described based on organizational literature. However, inherent contradictions in defining the local versus national benefits plus inherent problems within the environmental movement could be acting to limit the effectiveness of such networks. 49 refs.

  11. Anesthetic actions of thiopental remain largely unaffected during cholinergic overstimulation in cultured cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Isabel; Worek, Franz; Seeger, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Grasshoff, Christian; Antkowiak, Bernd; Balk, Monika

    2016-02-26

    In case of military or terrorist use of organophosphorus (OP) compounds victims are likely to suffer from not only intoxication but physical trauma as well. Appropriate emergency care may therefore include general anesthesia to allow life-saving surgical intervention. Since there is evidence that drug potency and efficacy of several anesthetics are attenuated by high concentrations of acetylcholine in the CNS, this study was designed to evaluate the anesthetic actions of thiopental during cholinergic overstimulation. Making use of organotypic slice cultures derived from the mouse neocortex, drug effects were assessed by extracellular voltage recordings of network activity at basal cholinergic tone and during simulated cholinergic crisis (high cholinergic tone). The latter was achieved by inhibition of acetylcholinesterases via soman and an ambient acetylcholine concentration of 10μM. The induction of cholinergic crisis in vitro increased the network activity of cortical neurons significantly. Surprisingly, differences in network activity between basal and high cholinergic tone became less pronounced with rising concentrations of thiopental and drug potency and efficacy were almost equivalent. These results clearly distinguish thiopental from previously tested general anesthetics and make it a promising candidate for in vivo studies to identify suitable anesthetics for victims of OP intoxication.

  12. Spatial learning and action planning in a prefrontal cortical network model.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Louis-Emmanuel; Sheynikhovich, Denis; Benchenane, Karim; Arleo, Angelo

    2011-05-01

    The interplay between hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) is fundamental to spatial cognition. Complementing hippocampal place coding, prefrontal representations provide more abstract and hierarchically organized memories suitable for decision making. We model a prefrontal network mediating distributed information processing for spatial learning and action planning. Specific connectivity and synaptic adaptation principles shape the recurrent dynamics of the network arranged in cortical minicolumns. We show how the PFC columnar organization is suitable for learning sparse topological-metrical representations from redundant hippocampal inputs. The recurrent nature of the network supports multilevel spatial processing, allowing structural features of the environment to be encoded. An activation diffusion mechanism spreads the neural activity through the column population leading to trajectory planning. The model provides a functional framework for interpreting the activity of PFC neurons recorded during navigation tasks. We illustrate the link from single unit activity to behavioral responses. The results suggest plausible neural mechanisms subserving the cognitive "insight" capability originally attributed to rodents by Tolman & Honzik. Our time course analysis of neural responses shows how the interaction between hippocampus and PFC can yield the encoding of manifold information pertinent to spatial planning, including prospective coding and distance-to-goal correlates.

  13. Sixth IASLIC Seminar Papers. Part I: Reference Service-in-Action. Part II: Processing & Servicing of Special Materials in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Association of Special Libraries & Information Centres, Calcutta (India).

    Part I contains 22 papers covering all aspects of the library reference services including sources of reference materials, an evaluation of reference sources, building a reference collection, training a reference librarian, and the needs of the industrial and medical communities for reference services. All the papers are slanted toward the special…

  14. Right sensory-motor functional networks subserve action observation therapy in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Gili, Tommaso; Fiori, Valentina; De Pasquale, Giada; Sabatini, Umberto; Caltagirone, Carlo; Marangolo, Paola

    2016-10-12

    Recent studies have shown that the systematic and repetitive observation of actions belonging to the experiential human motor repertoire without verbal facilitation enhances the recovery of verbs in non fluent aphasia. However, it is still an open question whether this approach extends its efficacy also on discourse productivity by improving the retrieval of other linguistic units (i.e. nouns, sentences, content words). Moreover, nothing is known regarding the neural substrates which support the language recovery process due to action observation treatment.In the present study, ten non fluent aphasics were presented with two videoclips (real everyday life context vs. familiar pantomimed context), each video for six consecutive weeks (Monday to Friday, weekend off). During the treatment, they were asked to observe each video and to describe it without verbal facilitation from the therapist. In all patients, language measures were collected before and at the end of treatment. Before and after each treatment condition (real vs. pantomimed context), each subject underwent a resting state fMRI. After the treatment, significant changes in functional connectivity were found in right sensory-motor networks which were accompanied by a significant improvement for the different linguistic units in the real context condition. On the contrary, the language recovery obtained in the pantomimed context did not match any functional modification. The evidence for a recruitment of the sensory-motor cortices during the observation of actions embedded in real context suggests to potentially enhance language recovery in non fluent aphasia through a simulation process related to the sensory-motor properties of actions.

  15. Till stress do us part: On the interplay between perceived stress and communication network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Yuval; Luria, Gil; Toker, Sharon; Westman, Mina

    2015-11-01

    This study of perceived stress and communication networks fills 2 theoretical gaps in the literature: First, drawing predominantly on conservation of resource theory and faultline theory, we demonstrate the role of stress as an "engine of action" in network evolution. Second, we extend the stress literature to the interpersonal domain by arguing that others' levels of stress influence the individual's communication network, and this, in turn, changes his or her stress level. At 3 time points, we evaluated the communication ties and perceived stress in a unique field setting comprising 115 male participants (in 6 groups) performing group-based tasks. We introduce stochastic actor-based models for the coevolution of network ties and actor attributes, statistical models that enable causal inferences to be drawn regarding the interplay between dynamic networks and individual attributes. Using these models, we find that over time, individuals experiencing higher levels of perceived stress were less likely to create new communication ties and were more likely to maintain existing ties to others. Participants also tended to communicate with similarly stressed others. Such communication network dynamics further increased individuals' levels of perceived stress over time, leading to stress-related vicious cycles. We discuss organizational implications that relate to stress and network-related interventions.

  16. Perturbing the action observation network during perception and categorization of actions' goals and grips: state-dependency and virtual lesion TMS effects.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Pierre O; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Watching others grasping and using objects activates an action observation network (AON), including inferior frontal (IFC), anterior intraparietal (AIP), and somatosensory cortices (S1). Yet, causal evidence of the differential involvement of such AON sensorimotor nodes in representing high- and low-level action components (i.e., end-goals and grip type) is meager. To address this issue, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation-adaptation (TMS-A) during 2 novel action perception tasks. Participants were shown adapting movies displaying a demonstrator performing goal-directed actions with a tool, using either power or precision grips. They were then asked to match the end-goal (Goal-recognition task) or the grip (Grip-recognition task) of actions shown in test pictures to the adapting movies. TMS was administered over IFC, AIP, or S1 during presentation of test pictures. Virtual lesion-like effects were found in the Grip-recognition task where IFC stimulation induced a general performance decrease, suggesting a critical role of IFC in perceiving grips. In the Goal-recognition task, IFC and S1 stimulation differently affected the processing of "adapted" and "nonadapted" goals. These "state-dependent" effects suggest that the overall goal of seen actions is encoded into functionally distinct and spatially overlapping neural populations in IFC-S1 and such encoding is critical for recognizing and understanding end-goals.

  17. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  18. Frequency decoding of periodically timed action potentials through distinct activity patterns in a random neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    Frequency discrimination is a fundamental task of the auditory system. The mammalian inner ear, or cochlea, provides a place code in which different frequencies are detected at different spatial locations. However, a temporal code based on spike timing is also available: action potentials evoked in an auditory-nerve fiber by a low-frequency tone occur at a preferred phase of the stimulus—they exhibit phase locking—and thus provide temporal information about the tone's frequency. Humans employ this temporal information for discrimination of low frequencies. How might such temporal information be read out in the brain? Here we employ statistical and numerical methods to demonstrate that recurrent random neural networks in which connections between neurons introduce characteristic time delays, and in which neurons require temporally coinciding inputs for spike initiation, can perform sharp frequency discrimination when stimulated with phase-locked inputs. Although the frequency resolution achieved by such networks is limited by the noise in phase locking, the resolution for realistic values reaches the tiny frequency difference of 0.2% that has been measured in humans.

  19. An Implementation of the SNR High Speed Network Communication Protocol (Receiver Part).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    This thesis work is to implement the receiver pan of the SNR high speed network transport protocol. The approach was to use the Systems of...the SCM specification itself. The result was a correctly functioning program which implemented the SNR protocol. The system was tested using different...part of the SNR high speed transport protocol; (2) testing and integration with the transmitter part of the SNR transport protocol on an FDDI data

  20. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 300 - Appropriate Actions and Methods of Remedying Releases

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for hazardous substances or pollutants or contaminants to contaminate other media (ground water, surface water, or air) and to reduce or eliminate the potential for such substances to be inhaled...) Incineration. (c) In response to contaminated ground water, the following types of response actions...

  1. Kinematic Constraints Associated with the Acquisition of Overarm Throwing Part I: Step and Trunk Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stodden, David F.; Langendorfer, Stephen J.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Andrews, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine differences within specific kinematic variables and ball velocity associated with developmental component levels of step and trunk action (Roberton & Halverson, 1984), and (b) if the differences in kinematic variables were significantly associated with the differences in component levels, determine…

  2. Kinematic Constraints Associated with the Acquisition of Overarm Throwing Part II: Upper Extremity Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stodden, David F.; Langendorfer, Stephen J.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Andrews, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the differences within 11 specific kinematic variables and an outcome measure (ball velocity) associated with component developmental levels of humerus and forearm action (Roberton & Halverson, 1984), and (b) if the differences in kinematic variables were significantly associated with the differences…

  3. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 300 - Appropriate Actions and Methods of Remedying Releases

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contaminated soil, sediment, or waste, the following types of response actions shall generally be considered: removal, treatment, or containment of the soil, sediment, or waste to reduce or eliminate the potential..., absorbed, or ingested. (1) Techniques for removing contaminated soil, sediment, or waste include...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 300 - Appropriate Actions and Methods of Remedying Releases

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... contaminated soil, sediment, or waste, the following types of response actions shall generally be considered: removal, treatment, or containment of the soil, sediment, or waste to reduce or eliminate the potential..., absorbed, or ingested. (1) Techniques for removing contaminated soil, sediment, or waste include...

  5. 38 CFR Appendix C to Part 200 - Actions Requiring Environmental Impact Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Environmental Impact Statement C Appendix C to Part 200 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 200, App. C Appendix C to Part 200... of EIS, as indicates may have significant environmental effects: C.1Acquisition of space by...

  6. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 58 - Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...—Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring 1. Monitoring Objectives and Spatial Scales 2.... References 1. Monitoring Objectives and Spatial Scales The purpose of this appendix is to describe monitoring... and path placement, are described in appendix E to this part. 1.2Spatial Scales. (a) To clarify...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 58 - Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...—Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring 1. Monitoring Objectives and Spatial Scales 2.... References 1. Monitoring Objectives and Spatial Scales The purpose of this appendix is to describe monitoring... and path placement, are described in appendix E to this part. 1.2Spatial Scales. (a) To clarify...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 58 - Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...—Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring 1. Monitoring Objectives and Spatial Scales 2.... References 1. Monitoring Objectives and Spatial Scales The purpose of this appendix is to describe monitoring... and path placement, are described in appendix E to this part. 1.2Spatial Scales. (a) To clarify...

  10. Anti-spasmodic action of crude methanolic extract and a new compound isolated from the aerial parts of Myrsine africana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myrsine africana is an herbaceous plant that is traditionally used as appetizer and carminative. Locally, it is used for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, rheumatism and diarrhea by healers. The aims of the current study were to screen the crude methanol extract obtained from the aerial parts (leaves and stem) of M. africana, for antispasmodic actions on isolated tissues and further to subject the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of plant to column chromatography for isolation of pure compounds. Methods The antispasmodic action of the crude methanol extract was measured on the spontaneous rabbit's jejunum preparations at concentration 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/ml. The crude extract was also applied, in similar concentrations, on KCl (80 mM) induced contractions to explain its possible mode of action. Results A new compound Myrsigenin was isolated from the EtOAc fraction of M. africana. The structure of the compound was identified with the help of 13C-NMR, 1H-NMR, HMBC, HMQC, NOESY and COSY. The plant crude methanol extract showed a significant antispasmodic action on rabbit jejunum and abolished the tissue contraction completely at concentration of 5.0 mg/ml. Conclusion The study concludes that the methanol crude extract of aerial parts of M. africana has antispasmodic action possibly through the calcium channel blocking mechanisms. A new compound Myrsigenin was isolated from the EtOAc fraction of the plant. PMID:21733176

  11. A Bayesian network model for predicting aquatic toxicity mode of action using two dimensional theoretical molecular descriptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mode of toxic action (MoA) has been recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity, but development of predictive MoA classification models in aquatic toxicology has been limited. We developed a Bayesian network model to classify aquatic toxicity MoA using a recently pu...

  12. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 323 - Privacy Act Enforcement Actions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM Pt. 323, App. G Appendix G to Part 323... legitimate complaint or grievance against the Defense Logistics Agency or any DLA employee concerning...

  13. COST Action ES1401 TIDES: a European network on TIme DEpendent Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Using the full-length records of seismic events and background ambient noise, today seismology is going beyond still-life snapshots of the interior of the Earth, and look into time-dependent changes of its properties. Data availability has grown dramatically with the expansion of seismographic networks and data centers, so as to enable much more detailed and accurate analyses. COST Action ES1401 TIDES (TIme DEpendent Seismology; http://tides-cost.eu) aims at structuring the EU seismological community to enable development of data-intensive, time-dependent techniques for monitoring Earth active processes (e.g., earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, glacial earthquakes) as well as oil/gas reservoirs. The main structure of TIDES is organised around working groups on: Workflow integration of data and computing resources; Seismic interferometry and ambient noise; Forward problems and High-performance computing applications; Seismic tomography, full waveform inversion and uncertainties; Applications in the natural environment and industry. TIDES is an open network of European laboratories with complementary skills, and is organising a series of events - workshops and advanced training schools - as well as supporting short-duration scientific stays. The first advanced training school was held in Bertinoro (Italy) on June 2015, with attendance of about 100 participants from 20 European countries, was devoted to how to manage and model seismic data with modern tools. The next school, devoted to ambient noise, will be held in 2016 Portugal: the program will be announced at the time of this conference. TIDES will strengthen Europe's role in a critical field for natural hazards and natural resource management.

  14. Joint toxic actions of organic flocculating polymers: Impact on Whole Effluent Toxicity testing. Part 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, D.J.; Stover, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Most states and/or US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regions have adopted narrative water quality criteria requiring various forms of Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) testing as a component of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge criteria. Because polymers and inorganic coagulant aids are commonly used in conjunction with one another for wastewater treatment, an assessment of potential interactions between the two types of additives was warranted. Thus, joint-compound interaction studies with both the polymer and FeCl{sub 3} or Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} were conducted to determine the effect of co-treatment on WET. Results from these studies clearly demonstrated that the toxicity of these additives during combined treatment was much more dramatic than for each compound individually and that individual toxic assessment would not account for the total magnitude of toxicity induced during combined treatment. Combinations of flocculating polymers with different physical/chemical characteristics (i.e., chemical structure, molecular weight, hydrophobicity, molar refractivity, and charge density) are also commonly used in wastewater treatment. Thus, joint-polymer action studies with several polymer mixtures were performed. Polymers used in these studies included cationic polyquaternary amine (PQA), cationic epichlorohydrin/dimethylamine (EPI/DMA), anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM), and non-ionic polyacrylamide (N-PAM) polymers. Results from these studies are presented in this manuscript. Overall, results from these studies indicated that the type of polymer mixture was important in determining the joint toxic actions of the flocculating polymers.

  15. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections.

  16. Evolution of posterior parietal cortex and parietal-frontal networks for specific actions in primates.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Jon H; Stepniewska, Iwona

    2016-02-15

    Posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is an extensive region of the human brain that develops relatively late and is proportionally large compared with that of monkeys and prosimian primates. Our ongoing comparative studies have led to several conclusions about the evolution of this posterior parietal region. In early placental mammals, PPC likely was a small multisensory region much like PPC of extant rodents and tree shrews. In early primates, PPC likely resembled that of prosimian galagos, in which caudal PPC (PPCc) is visual and rostral PPC (PPCr) has eight or more multisensory domains where electrical stimulation evokes different complex motor behaviors, including reaching, hand-to-mouth, looking, protecting the face or body, and grasping. These evoked behaviors depend on connections with functionally matched domains in premotor cortex (PMC) and motor cortex (M1). Domains in each region compete with each other, and a serial arrangement of domains allows different factors to influence motor outcomes successively. Similar arrangements of domains have been retained in New and Old World monkeys, and humans appear to have at least some of these domains. The great expansion and prolonged development of PPC in humans suggest the addition of functionally distinct territories. We propose that, across primates, PMC and M1 domains are second and third levels in a number of parallel, interacting networks for mediating and selecting one type of action over others.

  17. The School Action Effectiveness Study: Second Interim Report, Part II. Report No. 342.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Gary D.; And Others

    This report, the second part of a longer study prepared by the Delinquency and School Environments Program, further describes interim results of the program's national evaluation of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's (OJJDP's) Alternative Education Program. The report consists of evaluations of 14 specific projects: (1)…

  18. Carbenoxolone blockade of neuronal network activity in culture is not mediated by an action on gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Rouach, N; Segal, M; Koulakoff, A; Giaume, C; Avignone, E

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous activity in the central nervous system is strongly suppressed by blockers of gap junctions (GJs), suggesting that GJs contribute to network activity. However, the lack of selective GJ blockers prohibits the determination of their site of action, i.e. neuronal versus glial. Astrocytes are strongly coupled through GJs and have recently been shown to modulate synaptic transmission, yet their role in neuronal network activity was not analysed. The present study investigated the effects and site of action of the GJ blocker, carbenoxolone (CBX), on neuronal network activity. To this end, we used cultures of hippocampal or cortical neurons, plated on astrocytes. In these cultures neurons display spontaneous synchronous activity and GJs are found only in astrocytes. CBX induced in these neurons a reversible suppression of spontaneous action potential discharges, synaptic currents and synchronised calcium oscillations. Moreover, CBX inhibited oscillatory activity induced by the GABAA antagonist, bicuculline. These effects were not due to blockade of astrocytic GJs, since they were not mimicked nor occluded by endothelin-1 (ET-1), a peptide known to block astrocytic GJs. Also, these effects were still present in co-cultures of wild-type neurons plated on astrocytes originating from connexin-43 (Cx43) knockout mice, and in neuronal cultures which contain few isolated astrocytes. CBX was not likely to exert its effect through neuronal GJs either, as immunostaining for major neuronal connexins (Cx) as well as dye or electrical coupling, were not detected in the different models of cultured neurons examined. Finally while CBX (at 100 μm) did not modify presynaptic transmitter release and postsynaptic responses to glutamate, it did cause an increase in the action potential threshold and strongly decreased the firing rate in response to a sustained depolarising current. These data demonstrate that CBX does not exert its action on network activity of cultured neurons

  19. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory.

  20. Anti-Hypertensive Herbs and Their Mechanisms of Action: Part II.

    PubMed

    Anwar, M Akhtar; Al Disi, Sara S; Eid, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Traditional medicine has a history extending back to thousands of years, and during the intervening time, man has identified the healing properties of a very broad range of plants. Globally, the use of herbal therapies to treat and manage cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise. This is the second part of our comprehensive review where we discuss the mechanisms of plants and herbs used for the treatment and management of high blood pressure. Similar to the first part, PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were utilized, and the following keywords and phrases were used as inclusion criteria: hypertension, high blood pressure, herbal medicine, complementary and alternative medicine, endothelial cells, nitric oxide (NO), vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, hydrogen sulfide, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB), oxidative stress, and epigenetics/epigenomics. Each of the aforementioned keywords was co-joined with plant or herb in question, and where possible with its constituent molecule(s). This part deals in particular with plants that are used, albeit less frequently, for the treatment and management of hypertension. We then discuss the interplay between herbs/prescription drugs and herbs/epigenetics in the context of this disease. The review then concludes with a recommendation for more rigorous, well-developed clinical trials to concretely determine the beneficial impact of herbs and plants on hypertension and a disease-free living.

  1. Anti-Hypertensive Herbs and Their Mechanisms of Action: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, M. Akhtar; Al Disi, Sara S.; Eid, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional medicine has a history extending back to thousands of years, and during the intervening time, man has identified the healing properties of a very broad range of plants. Globally, the use of herbal therapies to treat and manage cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise. This is the second part of our comprehensive review where we discuss the mechanisms of plants and herbs used for the treatment and management of high blood pressure. Similar to the first part, PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were utilized, and the following keywords and phrases were used as inclusion criteria: hypertension, high blood pressure, herbal medicine, complementary and alternative medicine, endothelial cells, nitric oxide (NO), vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, hydrogen sulfide, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB), oxidative stress, and epigenetics/epigenomics. Each of the aforementioned keywords was co-joined with plant or herb in question, and where possible with its constituent molecule(s). This part deals in particular with plants that are used, albeit less frequently, for the treatment and management of hypertension. We then discuss the interplay between herbs/prescription drugs and herbs/epigenetics in the context of this disease. The review then concludes with a recommendation for more rigorous, well-developed clinical trials to concretely determine the beneficial impact of herbs and plants on hypertension and a disease-free living. PMID:27014064

  2. A Moral (Normative) Framework for the Judgment of Actions and Decisions in the Construction Industry and Engineering: Part II.

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, Omar J

    2016-12-02

    The construction industry is typically characterized as a fragmented, multi-organizational setting in which members from different technical backgrounds and moral values join together to develop a particular business or project. The most challenging obstacle in the construction process is to achieve a successful practice and to identify and apply an ethical framework to manage the behavior of involved specialists and contractors and to ensure the quality of all completed construction activities. The framework should reflect a common moral ground for myriad people involved in this process to survive and compete ethically in today's turbulent construction market. This study establishes a framework for moral judgment of behavior and actions conducted in the construction process. The moral framework provides the basis of judging actions as "moral" or "immoral" based on three levels of moral accountability: personal, professional, and social. The social aspect of the proposed framework is developed primarily from the essential attributes of normative business decision-making models identified in the literature review and subsequently incorporates additional attributes related to professional and personal moral values. The normative decision-making models reviewed are based primarily on social attributes as related to moral theories (e.g., utilitarianism, duty, rights, virtue, etc.). The professional and moral attributes are established by identifying a set of common moral values recognized by professionals in the construction industry and required to prevent common construction breaches. The moral framework presented here is the complementary part of the ethical framework developed in Part I of this article and is based primarily on the personal behavior or the moral aspect of professional responsibility. The framework can be implemented as a form of preventive personal ethics, which would help avoid ethical dilemmas and moral implications in the first place

  3. Automatic analysis of auditory nerve electrically evoked compound action potential with an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Charasse, Basile; Thai-Van, Hung; Chanal, Jean Marc; Berger-Vachon, Christian; Collet, Lionel

    2004-07-01

    The auditory nerve's electrically evoked compound action potential is recorded in deaf patients equipped with the Nucleus 24 cochlear implant using a reverse telemetry system (NRT). Since the threshold of the NRT response (NRT-T) is thought to reflect the psychophysics needed for programming cochlear implants, efforts have been made by specialized management teams to develop its use. This study aimed at developing a valid tool, based on artificial neural networks (ANN) technology, for automatic estimation of NRT-T. The ANN used was a single layer perceptron, trained with 120 NRT traces. Learning traces differed from data used for the validation. A total of 550 NRT traces from 11 cochlear implant subjects were analyzed separately by the system and by a group of physicians with expertise in NRT analysis. Both worked to determine 37 NRT-T values, using the response amplitude growth function (AGF) (linear regression of response amplitudes obtained at decreasing stimulus intensity levels). The validity of the system was assessed by comparing the NRT-T values automatically determined by the system with those determined by the physicians. A strong correlation was found between automatic and physician-obtained NRT-T values (Pearson r correlation coefficient >0.9). ANOVA statistics confirmed that automatic NRT-Ts did not differ from physician-obtained values (F = 0.08999, P = 0.03). Moreover, the average error between NRT-Ts predicted by the system and NRT-Ts measured by the physicians (3.6 stimulation units) did not differ significantly from the average error between NRT-Ts measured by each of the three physicians (4.2 stimulation units). In conclusion, the automatic system developed in this study was found to be as efficient as human experts for fitting the amplitude growth function and estimating NRT-T, with the advantage of considerable time-saving.

  4. Anti-hypertensive Herbs and their Mechanisms of Action: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Al Disi, Sara S.; Anwar, M. Akhtar; Eid, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapies for treatment and management of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is increasing. Plants contain a bounty of phytochemicals that have proven to be protective by reducing the risk of various ailments and diseases. Indeed, accumulating literature provides the scientific evidence and hence reason d'etre for the application of herbal therapy in relation to CVDs. Slowly, but absolutely, herbal remedies are being entrenched into evidence-based medical practice. This is partly due to the supporting clinical trials and epidemiological studies. The rationale for this expanding interest and use of plant based treatments being that a significant proportion of hypertensive patients do not respond to Modern therapeutic medication. Other elements to this equation are the cost of medication, side-effects, accessibility, and availability of drugs. Therefore, we believe it is pertinent to review the literature on the beneficial effects of herbs and their isolated compounds as medication for treatment of hypertension, a prevalent risk factor for CVDs. Our search utilized the PubMed and ScienceDirect databases, and the criterion for inclusion was based on the following keywords and phrases: hypertension, high blood pressure, herbal medicine, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), nitric oxide, vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, hydrogen sulfide, nuclear factor kappa-B, oxidative stress, and epigenetics/epigenomics. Each of the aforementioned keywords was co-joined with herb in question, and where possible with its constituent molecule(s). In this first of a two-part review, we provide a brief introduction of hypertension, followed by a discussion of the molecular and cellular mechanisms. We then present and discuss the plants that are most commonly used in the treatment and management of hypertension. PMID:26834637

  5. A DNAPL emergency remedial action program in a developing country: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nobre, M.M. . Dept. of Geology); Daus, A.D. )

    1993-10-01

    At the 44th Annual National Ground Water Association Convention in Las Vegas, a poster was presented that described a large DNAPL ground-water contamination problem at an industrial complex that produces chlorinated hydrocarbons in Brazil. The industrial complex lies above a major drinking water aquifer. Ground-water monitoring wells were installed in an effort to define the extent of the dissolve-phase ground-water plume. Field and laboratory data were analyzed, a ground-water flow model was developed, and a feasibility study was conducted to identify, evaluate, and select emergency interim remedial measures. Interim remedial measures were implemented less than six months from installation of the first monitoring well and included ground-water extraction and treatment to provide hydraulic control of the plume and prevent further migration of contaminants to downgradient receptors. In the subsequent year since the first interim ground-water extraction well was installed a number of key tasks have been completed. Ground-water extraction and monitoring identified a preferred pathway for contaminant migration. The remedial strategy for the site includes developing an efficient ground-water hydraulic control program based on collapse of the plume width and shortening the overall plume length (in progress). After an efficient hydraulic control program has been installed and verified, efforts will focus on source mass reduction. Long-term hydraulic control is anticipated to be an integral part of the remediation program.

  6. Undiagnosed Diseases Network International (UDNI): White paper for global actions to meet patient needs.

    PubMed

    Taruscio, Domenica; Groft, Stephen C; Cederroth, Helene; Melegh, Béla; Lasko, Paul; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Baynam, Gareth; McCray, Alexa; Gahl, William A

    2015-12-01

    In 2008, the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) Undiagnosed Disease Program (UDP) was initiated to provide diagnoses for individuals who had long sought one without success. As a result of two international conferences (Rome 2014 and Budapest 2015), the Undiagnosed Diseases Network International (UDNI) was established, modeled in part after the NIH UDP. Undiagnosed diseases are a global health issue, calling for an international scientific and healthcare effort. To meet this demand, the UDNI has built a consensus framework of principles, best practices and governance; the Board of Directors reflects its international character, as it includes experts from Australia, Canada, Hungary, Italy, Japan and the USA. The UDNI involves centers with internationally recognized expertise, and its scientific resources and know-how aim to fill the knowledge gaps that impede diagnosis. Consequently, the UDNI fosters the translation of research into medical practice. Active patient involvement is critical; the Patient Advisory Group is expected to play an increasing role in UDNI activities. All information for physicians and patients will be available at the UDNI website.

  7. 76 FR 22404 - Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... ACTION Initiative is to streamline the discovery and development process for new analgesic drug products..., academic, and industry practices, and knowledge gained through workshops, the Grantee will be...

  8. CAN-DOO: The Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, B.; Sherman, J. P.; Perry, L. B.; Markham, J.; Kelly, G.

    2011-12-01

    The urgency of climate change demands a greater understanding of our climate system, not only by the leaders of today, but by the scientists, policy makers, and citizens of tomorrow. Unfortunately, a large segment of the population currently possesses inadequate knowledge of climate science. In direct response to a need for greater scientific literacy with respect to climate science, researchers from Appalachian State University's Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) group, with support from NASA, have developed CAN-DOO: the Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach. CAN-DOO addresses climate science literacy by 1) Developing the infrastructure for sustaining and expanding public outreach through long-term climate measurements capable of complementing existing NASA measurements, 2) Enhancing public awareness of climate science and NASA's role in advancing our understanding of the Earth System, and 3) Introducing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics principles to homeschooled, public school, and Appalachian State University students through applied climate science activities. Project partners include the Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation, Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, and local elementary schools. In partnership with Grandfather Mountain, climate science awareness is promoted through citizen science activities, interactive public displays, and staff training. CAN-DOO engages students by involving them in the entire scientific investigative process as applied to climate science. We introduce local elementary and middle school students, homeschooled students throughout North Carolina, and undergraduate students in a new Global Climate Change course and select other courses at Appalachian State University to instrument assembly, measurement techniques, data collection, hypothesis testing, and drawing conclusions. Results are placed in the proper context via comparisons with other student

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  10. Special Educators' Social Networks: A Multiple Case Study in a Finnish Part-Time Special Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuomainen, Jenna; Palonen, Tuire; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the networking roles and practices of special educators with the methods of social network analysis. This multiple case study included three special educators in a Finnish part-time special education context. The results revealed that although the special educators had central positions in the formal teacher communities as…

  11. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions Which Is To Be Placed in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions Which Is To Be Placed in Public Dockets D Appendix D to Part 307... (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. D Appendix D to Part 307—Notice of Limitations on the Payment...

  12. Classifying chemical mode of action using gene networks and machine learning: a case study with the herbicide linuron.

    PubMed

    Ornostay, Anna; Cowie, Andrew M; Hindle, Matthew; Baker, Christopher J O; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    The herbicide linuron (LIN) is an endocrine disruptor with an anti-androgenic mode of action. The objectives of this study were to (1) improve knowledge of androgen and anti-androgen signaling in the teleostean ovary and to (2) assess the ability of gene networks and machine learning to classify LIN as an anti-androgen using transcriptomic data. Ovarian explants from vitellogenic fathead minnows (FHMs) were exposed to three concentrations of either 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), flutamide (FLUT), or LIN for 12h. Ovaries exposed to DHT showed a significant increase in 17β-estradiol (E2) production while FLUT and LIN had no effect on E2. To improve understanding of androgen receptor signaling in the ovary, a reciprocal gene expression network was constructed for DHT and FLUT using pathway analysis and these data suggested that steroid metabolism, translation, and DNA replication are processes regulated through AR signaling in the ovary. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that FLUT and LIN shared more regulated gene networks in common compared to DHT. Using transcriptomic datasets from different fish species, machine learning algorithms classified LIN successfully with other anti-androgens. This study advances knowledge regarding molecular signaling cascades in the ovary that are responsive to androgens and anti-androgens and provides proof of concept that gene network analysis and machine learning can classify priority chemicals using experimental transcriptomic data collected from different fish species.

  13. Should Neural Networks Be Studied to Assist the Decision Functions of Tactical Action Officers?.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) such as expert systems and neural networks could be instrumental in providing multi-level, real-time decision... neural networks are addressed concerning what they are along with an elementary explanation of how they work. Synopses of their capabilities and

  14. The Role of Action Research in the Development of Learning Networks for Entrepreneurs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Valerie; Mullally, Martina; O'Gorman, Bill; Fuller-Love, Nerys

    2012-01-01

    Developing sustainable learning networks for entrepreneurs is the core objective of the Sustainable Learning Networks in Ireland and Wales (SLNIW) project. One research team drawn from the Centre for Enterprise Development and Regional Economy at Waterford Institute of Technology and the School of Management and Business from Aberystwyth…

  15. Networks in Action: New Actors and Practices in Education Policy in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiroma, Eneida Oto

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of networks in the policy-making process in education and discusses the potential of network analysis as an analytical tool for education policy research. Drawing on publically available data from personal or institutional websites, this paper reports the findings from research carried out between 2005 and 2011.…

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved, reactor licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1995. Volume 14, Numbers 3 and 4, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved, material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1995: Volume 14, Numbers 3 and 4, Part 3

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees (non-medical). Volume 14, No. 1, Part 3, Quarterly progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to Material Licensees (non-Medical) with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  19. Communication and cybercoping: coping with chronic illness through communicative action in online support networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Nam; Lee, Seungyoon

    2014-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication, specifically blogs, has expanded the range of the communicative action of patients with chronic disease from information seeking to information forwarding. The authors examine the effects of these 2 types of communicative action on perceived affective and physical coping outcomes. Using a survey dataset of 254 chronic disease patients, the authors tested 2 models using structural equation modeling: first, the effects of communicative action about chronic illness on coping outcomes; and second, the mediating role of emotion-focused and problem-focused coping processes. Findings indicate overall positive effects of communicative action on coping processes and outcomes, yet with different magnitudes of effects depending on the dimensions of communication behavior, the coping process, and outcome. Implications for patients and health care providers are discussed.

  20. Pennsylvania Action Research Network (PA-ARN) Staff Development through Five Regional Staff Development Centers. Final Report. July 1997-June 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., McKeesport.

    The Pennsylvania Action Research Network project was initiated in 1995-1996 to provide Pennsylvania literacy educators with the following: a better method for taking published research findings and testing and adapting them in their own classrooms; a way to study their own research ideas on a daily-action basis; and a systematic way to share and…

  1. S100A12 Is Part of the Antimicrobial Network against Mycobacterium leprae in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Realegeno, Susan; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Dang, Angeline Tilly; Lu, Jing; Teles, Rosane; Liu, Philip T.; Schenk, Mirjam; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Modlin, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering antimicrobial mechanisms in macrophages infected with intracellular pathogens, such as mycobacteria, is critical to host defense against the infection. To uncover the unique and shared antimicrobial networks induced by the innate and adaptive immune systems, gene expression profiles generated by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) from human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) activated with TLR2/1 ligand (TLR2/1L) or IFN-γ were analyzed. Weighed gene correlation network analysis identified modules of genes strongly correlated with TLR2/1L or IFN-γ that were linked by the “defense response” gene ontology term. The common TLR2/1L and IFN-γ inducible human macrophage host defense network contained 16 antimicrobial response genes, including S100A12, which was one of the most highly induced genes by TLR2/1L. There is limited information on the role of S100A12 in infectious disease, leading us to test the hypothesis that S100A12 contributes to host defense against mycobacterial infection in humans. We show that S100A12 is sufficient to directly kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. We also demonstrate that S100A12 is required for TLR2/1L and IFN-γ induced antimicrobial activity against M. leprae in infected macrophages. At the site of disease in leprosy, we found that S100A12 was more strongly expressed in skin lesions from tuberculoid leprosy (T-lep), the self-limiting form of the disease, compared to lepromatous leprosy (L-lep), the progressive form of the disease. These data suggest that S100A12 is part of an innate and adaptive inducible antimicrobial network that contributes to host defense against mycobacteria in infected macrophages. PMID:27355424

  2. Action selection in growing state spaces: control of network structure growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Gómez, Vicenç; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical processes taking place on a network depend on its topology. Influencing the growth process of a network therefore has important implications on such dynamical processes. We formulate the problem of influencing the growth of a network as a stochastic optimal control problem in which a structural cost function penalizes undesired topologies. We approximate this control problem with a restricted class of control problems that can be solved using probabilistic inference methods. To deal with the increasing problem dimensionality, we introduce an adaptive importance sampling method for approximating the optimal control. We illustrate this methodology in the context of formation of information cascades, considering the task of influencing the structure of a growing conversation thread, as in Internet forums. Using a realistic model of growing trees, we show that our approach can yield conversation threads with better structural properties than the ones observed without control.

  3. Agricultural Extension, Collective Action and Innovation Systems: Lessons on Network Brokering from Peru and Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellin, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: New approaches to extension service delivery are needed that stimulate increased agricultural production, contribute to collective action and which also foster the emergence of agricultural innovation systems. Research in Peru and Mexico explores some of these new approaches. Design/methodology/approach: In both countries, a qualitative…

  4. Elucidating compound mechanism of action by network perturbation analysis | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Genome-wide identification of the mechanism of action (MoA) of small-molecule compounds characterizing their targets, effectors, and activity modulators represents a highly relevant yet elusive goal, with critical implications for assessment of compound efficacy and toxicity. Current approaches are labor intensive and mostly limited to elucidating high-affinity binding target proteins.

  5. Ace: Action-Communication-Expression. IMPACT II: Houston's Teacher-to-Teacher Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Margie

    The Action-Communication-Expression program, an extension of a speech communication class in a Houston (Texas) high school, involves visual and concrete communication, such as photography, script writing, and filmmaking. Students in two speech classes work in small groups of four or five, independently of the teacher, after receiving initial…

  6. COST action TD1407: network on technology-critical elements (NOTICE)--from environmental processes to human health threats.

    PubMed

    Cobelo-García, A; Filella, M; Croot, P; Frazzoli, C; Du Laing, G; Ospina-Alvarez, N; Rauch, S; Salaun, P; Schäfer, J; Zimmermann, S

    2015-10-01

    The current socio-economic, environmental and public health challenges that countries are facing clearly need common-defined strategies to inform and support our transition to a sustainable economy. Here, the technology-critical elements (which includes Ga, Ge, In, Te, Nb, Ta, Tl, the Platinum Group Elements and most of the rare-earth elements) are of great relevance in the development of emerging key technologies-including renewable energy, energy efficiency, electronics or the aerospace industry. In this context, the increasing use of technology-critical elements (TCEs) and associated environmental impacts (from mining to end-of-life waste products) is not restricted to a national level but covers most likely a global scale. Accordingly, the European COST Action TD1407: Network on Technology-Critical Elements (NOTICE)-from environmental processes to human health threats, has an overall objective for creating a network of scientists and practitioners interested in TCEs, from the evaluation of their environmental processes to understanding potential human health threats, with the aim of defining the current state of knowledge and gaps, proposing priority research lines/activities and acting as a platform for new collaborations and joint research projects. The Action is focused on three major scientific areas: (i) analytical chemistry, (ii) environmental biogeochemistry and (iii) human exposure and (eco)-toxicology.

  7. Inferring Genetic Networks and Identifying Compound Mode of Action via Expression Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Timothy S.; di Bernardo, Diego; Lorenz, David; Collins, James J.

    2003-07-01

    The complexity of cellular gene, protein, and metabolite networks can hinder attempts to elucidate their structure and function. To address this problem, we used systematic transcriptional perturbations to construct a first-order model of regulatory interactions in a nine-gene subnetwork of the SOS pathway in Escherichia coli. The model correctly identified the major regulatory genes and the transcriptional targets of mitomycin C activity in the subnetwork. This approach, which is experimentally and computationally scalable, provides a framework for elucidating the functional properties of genetic networks and identifying molecular targets of pharmacological compounds.

  8. Complementary Schools in Action: Networking for Language Development in East London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneddon, Raymonde

    2014-01-01

    In a challenging economic and political context, complementary schools in East London are mentoring each other and forming networks across communities to gain recognition and status for community languages in education and the wider community. As issues of power and status impact in different ways on differently situated communities, complementary…

  9. The Multilingual Education (MLE) Network Phenomenon: Advocacy and Action for Minoritized Language Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudell, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a new phenomenon in language activism variously called the multilingual education working group or the multilingual education network, and abbreviated as MLEN. After an analysis of the conceptual and organizational contexts for these activist groups, the six MLENs in existence as of 2013 are described. The groups are then…

  10. Getting Ideas into Action: Building Networked Improvement Communities in Education. Carnegie Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryk, Anthony S.; Gomez, Louis M.; Grunow, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    In this Carnegie essay by Anthony Bryk, Louis Gomez and Alicia Grunow, the authors argue that the social organization of the research enterprise is badly broken and a very different alternative is needed. They instead support a science of improvement research and introduce the idea of a networked improvement community that creates the purposeful…

  11. INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support): summary and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kumanyika, S

    2013-10-01

    This supplement presents the foundational elements for INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support). As explained in the overview article by Swinburn and colleagues, INFORMAS has a compelling rationale and has set forth clear objectives, outcomes, principles and frameworks for monitoring and benchmarking key aspects of food environments and the policies and actions that influence the healthiness of food environments. This summary highlights the proposed monitoring approaches for the 10 interrelated INFORMAS modules: public and private sector policies and actions; key aspects of food environments (food composition, labelling, promotion, provision, retail, prices, and trade and investment) and population outcomes (diet quality). This ambitious effort should be feasible when approached in a step-wise manner, taking into account existing monitoring efforts, data sources, country contexts and capacity, and when adequately resourced. After protocol development and pilot testing of the modules, INFORMAS aims to be a sustainable, low-cost monitoring framework. Future directions relate to institutionalization, implementation and, ultimately, to leveraging INFORMAS data in ways that will bring key drivers of food environments into alignment with public health goals.

  12. 36 CFR Exhibit B to Part 906 - Guidelines for Establishing Strategy To Implement Affirmative Action Personnel Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... affirmative action policy in advertisements and employment literature. (3) Utilization of minority media in... review of minority, female, Vietnam era veteran, and handcapped employees to identify underutilized...

  13. Marine Protected Area Networks: Assessing Whether the Whole Is Greater than the Sum of Its Parts

    PubMed Central

    Grorud-Colvert, Kirsten; Claudet, Joachim; Tissot, Brian N.; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Carr, Mark H.; Day, Jon C.; Friedlander, Alan M.; Lester, Sarah E.; de Loma, Thierry Lison; Malone, Daniel; Walsh, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic impacts are increasingly affecting the world's oceans. Networks of marine protected areas (MPAs) provide an option for increasing the ecological and economic benefits often provided by single MPAs. It is vital to empirically assess the effects of MPA networks and to prioritize the monitoring data necessary to explain those effects. We summarize the types of MPA networks based on their intended management outcomes and illustrate a framework for evaluating whether a connectivity network is providing an outcome greater than the sum of individual MPA effects. We use an analysis of an MPA network in Hawai'i to compare networked MPAs to non-networked MPAs to demonstrate results consistent with a network effect. We assert that planning processes for MPA networks should identify their intended outcomes while also employing coupled field monitoring-simulation modeling approaches, a powerful way to prioritize the most relevant monitoring data for empirically assessing MPA network performance. PMID:25084458

  14. The influence of expertise on brain activation of the action observation network during anticipation of tennis and volleyball serves.

    PubMed

    Balser, Nils; Lorey, Britta; Pilgramm, Sebastian; Naumann, Tim; Kindermann, Stefan; Stark, Rudolf; Zentgraf, Karen; Williams, A Mark; Munzert, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    In many daily activities, and especially in sport, it is necessary to predict the effects of others' actions in order to initiate appropriate responses. Recently, researchers have suggested that the action-observation network (AON) including the cerebellum plays an essential role during such anticipation, particularly in sport expert performers. In the present study, we examined the influence of task-specific expertise on the AON by investigating differences between two expert groups trained in different sports while anticipating action effects. Altogether, 15 tennis and 16 volleyball experts anticipated the direction of observed tennis and volleyball serves while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The expert group in each sport acted as novice controls in the other sport with which they had only little experience. When contrasting anticipation in both expertise conditions with the corresponding untrained sport, a stronger activation of AON areas (SPL, SMA), and particularly of cerebellar structures, was observed. Furthermore, the neural activation within the cerebellum and the SPL was linearly correlated with participant's anticipation performance, irrespective of the specific expertise. For the SPL, this relationship also holds when an expert performs a domain-specific anticipation task. Notably, the stronger activation of the cerebellum as well as of the SMA and the SPL in the expertise conditions suggests that experts rely on their more fine-tuned perceptual-motor representations that have improved during years of training when anticipating the effects of others' actions in their preferred sport. The association of activation within the SPL and the cerebellum with the task achievement suggests that these areas are the predominant brain sites involved in fast motor predictions. The SPL reflects the processing of domain-specific contextual information and the cerebellum the usage of a predictive internal model to solve the anticipation task.

  15. [Mechanism of action for deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)].

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Oyama, Genko

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become an important treatment option for carefully screened medication resistant neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. DBS therapy is not always applied deep to the brain; does not have to be applied exclusively to the brain; and the mechanism for DBS is not simply stimulation of structures. The applications and target locations for DBS devices are rapidly expanding, with many new regions of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and muscles now possibly accessed through this technology. We will review the idea of "electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)"; discuss the importance of the complex neural networks underpinning the effects of DBS; discuss the expansion of brain targets; discuss the use of fiber based targets; and discuss the importance of tailoring DBS therapy to the symptom, rather than the disease.

  16. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Tradeoff on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part II: Ecological Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    In ecological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations, as well as environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances, so that the phenotype stability of ecological networks can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. However, it is difficult to analyze the network robustness of ecological systems because they are complex nonlinear partial differential stochastic systems. This paper develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance sensitivity in ecological networks. We found that the phenotype robustness criterion for ecological networks is that if intrinsic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations and environmental disturbances. These results in robust ecological networks are similar to that in robust gene regulatory networks and evolutionary networks even they have different spatial-time scales.

  17. Intracellular sodium sensing: SIK1 network, hormone action and high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Bertorello, Alejandro M

    2010-12-01

    Sodium is the main determinant of body fluid distribution. Sodium accumulation causes water retention and, often, high blood pressure. At the cellular level, the concentration and active transport of sodium is handled by the enzyme Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whose appearance enabled evolving primitive cells to cope with osmotic stress and contributed to the complexity of mammalian organisms. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is a platform at the hub of many cellular signaling pathways related to sensing intracellular sodium and dealing with its detrimental excess. One of these pathways relies on an intracellular sodium-sensor network with the salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) at its core. When intracellular sodium levels rise, and after the activation of calcium-related signals, this network activates the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and expel the excess of sodium from the cytosol. The SIK1 network also mediates sodium-independent signals that modulate the activity of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, like dopamine and angiotensin, which are relevant per se in the development of high blood pressure. Animal models of high blood pressure, with identified mutations in components of multiple pathways, also have alterations in the SIK1 network. The introduction of some of these mutants into normal cells causes changes in SIK1 activity as well. Some cellular processes related to the metabolic syndrome, such as insulin effects on the kidney and other tissues, also appear to involve the SIK1. Therefore, it is likely that this protein, by modulating active sodium transport and numerous hormonal responses, represents a "crossroad" in the development and adaptation to high blood pressure and associated diseases.

  18. Ketamine Decreases Resting State Functional Network Connectivity in Healthy Subjects: Implications for Antidepressant Drug Action

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Martin; Lehmann, Mick; Metzger, Coraline; Grimm, Simone; Boeker, Heinz; Boesiger, Peter; Henning, Anke; Seifritz, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Increasing preclinical and clinical evidence underscores the strong and rapid antidepressant properties of the glutamate-modulating NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. Targeting the glutamatergic system might thus provide a novel molecular strategy for antidepressant treatment. Since glutamate is the most abundant and major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, pathophysiological changes in glutamatergic signaling are likely to affect neurobehavioral plasticity, information processing and large-scale changes in functional brain connectivity underlying certain symptoms of major depressive disorder. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI), the „dorsal nexus “(DN) was recently identified as a bilateral dorsal medial prefrontal cortex region showing dramatically increased depression-associated functional connectivity with large portions of a cognitive control network (CCN), the default mode network (DMN), and a rostral affective network (AN). Hence, Sheline and colleagues (2010) proposed that reducing increased connectivity of the DN might play a critical role in reducing depression symptomatology and thus represent a potential therapy target for affective disorders. Here, using a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover rsfMRI challenge in healthy subjects we demonstrate that ketamine decreases functional connectivity of the DMN to the DN and to the pregenual anterior cingulate (PACC) and medioprefrontal cortex (MPFC) via its representative hub, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). These findings in healthy subjects may serve as a model to elucidate potential biomechanisms that are addressed by successful treatment of major depression. This notion is further supported by the temporal overlap of our observation of subacute functional network modulation after 24 hours with the peak of efficacy following an intravenous ketamine administration in treatment-resistant depression. PMID:23049758

  19. Graph analysis of functional brain networks for cognitive control of action in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leemans, Alexander; Heitger, Marcus H; Leunissen, Inge; Dhollander, Thijs; Sunaert, Stefan; Dupont, Patrick; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2012-04-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury show clear impairments in behavioural flexibility and inhibition that often persist beyond the time of injury, affecting independent living and psychosocial functioning. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that patients with traumatic brain injury typically show increased and more broadly dispersed frontal and parietal activity during performance of cognitive control tasks. We constructed binary and weighted functional networks and calculated their topological properties using a graph theoretical approach. Twenty-three adults with traumatic brain injury and 26 age-matched controls were instructed to switch between coordination modes while making spatially and temporally coupled circular motions with joysticks during event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results demonstrated that switching performance was significantly lower in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with control subjects. Furthermore, although brain networks of both groups exhibited economical small-world topology, altered functional connectivity was demonstrated in patients with traumatic brain injury. In particular, compared with controls, patients with traumatic brain injury showed increased connectivity degree and strength, and higher values of local efficiency, suggesting adaptive mechanisms in this group. Finally, the degree of increased connectivity was significantly correlated with poorer switching task performance and more severe brain injury. We conclude that analysing the functional brain network connectivity provides new insights into understanding cognitive control changes following brain injury.

  20. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions Which Is To Be Placed in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND... (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. D Appendix D to Part 307—Notice of Limitations on the Payment of... of Claims for Response Actions Filed Pursuant to Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions Which Is To Be Placed in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND... (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. D Appendix D to Part 307—Notice of Limitations on the Payment of... of Claims for Response Actions Filed Pursuant to Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions Which Is To Be Placed in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND... (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. D Appendix D to Part 307—Notice of Limitations on the Payment of... of Claims for Response Actions Filed Pursuant to Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions Which Is To Be Placed in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND... (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. D Appendix D to Part 307—Notice of Limitations on the Payment of... of Claims for Response Actions Filed Pursuant to Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA...

  4. Impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, A; Rakkiyappan, R; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach. The array of neural networks are coupled in a random fashion which is governed by Bernoulli random variable. The aim of this paper is to obtain the synchronization criteria, which is suitable for both exactly known and partly unknown transition probabilities such that the coupled neural network is synchronized with mixed time-delay. The considered impulsive effects can be synchronized at partly unknown transition probabilities. Besides, a multiple integral approach is also proposed to strengthen the Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities. By making use of Kronecker product and some useful integral inequalities, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was designed for handling the coupled neural network with mixed delay and then impulsive synchronization criteria are solvable in a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the theoretical results.

  5. Action Research Monographs. Complete Set. Pennsylvania Action Research Network, 1998-99. A Section 353 Project of the Pennsylvania Department of Education, Bureau of Adult Basic and Literacy Education. A Learning from Practice Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., McKeesport.

    This publication consists of the complete set of 23 monographs developed by the Pennsylvania Action Research Network to supplement the 67 monographs produced over the past 3 years. The specific audience are literacy, General Educational Development (GED), and English-as-a Second Language (ESL) practitioners. The titles are: "Use of…

  6. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  7. Different types of laughter modulate connectivity within distinct parts of the laughter perception network.

    PubMed

    Wildgruber, Dirk; Szameitat, Diana P; Ethofer, Thomas; Brück, Carolin; Alter, Kai; Grodd, Wolfgang; Kreifelts, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Laughter is an ancient signal of social communication among humans and non-human primates. Laughter types with complex social functions (e.g., taunt and joy) presumably evolved from the unequivocal and reflex-like social bonding signal of tickling laughter already present in non-human primates. Here, we investigated the modulations of cerebral connectivity associated with different laughter types as well as the effects of attention shifts between implicit and explicit processing of social information conveyed by laughter using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Complex social laughter types and tickling laughter were found to modulate connectivity in two distinguishable but partially overlapping parts of the laughter perception network irrespective of task instructions. Connectivity changes, presumably related to the higher acoustic complexity of tickling laughter, occurred between areas in the prefrontal cortex and the auditory association cortex, potentially reflecting higher demands on acoustic analysis associated with increased information load on auditory attention, working memory, evaluation and response selection processes. In contrast, the higher degree of socio-relational information in complex social laughter types was linked to increases of connectivity between auditory association cortices, the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and brain areas associated with mentalizing as well as areas in the visual associative cortex. These modulations might reflect automatic analysis of acoustic features, attention direction to informative aspects of the laughter signal and the retention of those in working memory during evaluation processes. These processes may be associated with visual imagery supporting the formation of inferences on the intentions of our social counterparts. Here, the right dorsolateral precentral cortex appears as a network node potentially linking the functions of auditory and visual associative sensory cortices with those of the

  8. Planning Ahead: Object-Directed Sequential Actions Decoded from Human Frontoparietal and Occipitotemporal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gallivan, Jason P.; Johnsrude, Ingrid S.; Randall Flanagan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Object-manipulation tasks (e.g., drinking from a cup) typically involve sequencing together a series of distinct motor acts (e.g., reaching toward, grasping, lifting, and transporting the cup) in order to accomplish some overarching goal (e.g., quenching thirst). Although several studies in humans have investigated the neural mechanisms supporting the planning of visually guided movements directed toward objects (such as reaching or pointing), only a handful have examined how manipulatory sequences of actions—those that occur after an object has been grasped—are planned and represented in the brain. Here, using event-related functional MRI and pattern decoding methods, we investigated the neural basis of real-object manipulation using a delayed-movement task in which participants first prepared and then executed different object-directed action sequences that varied either in their complexity or final spatial goals. Consistent with previous reports of preparatory brain activity in non-human primates, we found that activity patterns in several frontoparietal areas reliably predicted entire action sequences in advance of movement. Notably, we found that similar sequence-related information could also be decoded from pre-movement signals in object- and body-selective occipitotemporal cortex (OTC). These findings suggest that both frontoparietal and occipitotemporal circuits are engaged in transforming object-related information into complex, goal-directed movements. PMID:25576538

  9. Uncovering the Molecular Mechanism of Actions between Pharmaceuticals and Proteins on the AD Network

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jingyuan; Wang, Quan; Ruan, Jishou

    2015-01-01

    This study begins with constructing the mini metabolic networks (MMNs) of beta amyloid (Aβ) and acetylcholine (ACh) which stimulate the Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Then we generate the AD network by incorporating MMNs of Aβ and ACh, and other MMNs of stimuli of AD. The panel of proteins contains 49 enzymes/receptors on the AD network which have the 3D-structure in PDB. The panel of drugs is formed by 5 AD drugs and 5 AD nutraceutical drugs, and 20 non-AD drugs. All of these complexes formed by these 30 drugs and 49 proteins are transformed into dyadic arrays. Utilizing the prior knowledge learned from the drug panel, we propose a statistical classification (dry-lab). According to the wet-lab for the complex of amiloride and insulin degrading enzyme, and the complex of amiloride and neutral endopeptidase, we are confident that this dry-lab is reliable. As the consequences of the dry-lab, we discover many interesting implications. Especially, we show that possible causes of Tacrine, donepezil, galantamine and huperzine A cannot improve the level of ACh which is against to their original design purpose but they still prevent AD to be worse as Aβ deposition appeared. On the other hand, we recommend Miglitol and Atenolol as the safe and potent drugs to improve the level of ACh before Aβ deposition appearing. Moreover, some nutrients such as NADH and Vitamin E should be controlled because they may harm health if being used in wrong way and wrong time. Anyway, the insights shown in this study are valuable to be developed further. PMID:26650760

  10. Including Internet insurance as part of a hospital computer network security plan.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Cyber attacks on a hospital's computer network is a new crime to be reckoned with. Should your hospital consider internet insurance? The author explains this new phenomenon and presents a risk assessment for determining network vulnerabilities.

  11. Twitter K-H networks in action: Advancing biomedical literature for drug search.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Ahmed Abdeen; Wu, Xindong; Erickson, Robert; Fandy, Tamer

    2015-08-01

    The importance of searching biomedical literature for drug interaction and side-effects is apparent. Current digital libraries (e.g., PubMed) suffer infrequent tagging and metadata annotation updates. Such limitations cause absence of linking literature to new scientific evidence. This demonstrates a great deal of challenges that stand in the way of scientists when searching biomedical repositories. In this paper, we present a network mining approach that provides a bridge for linking and searching drug-related literature. Our contributions here are two fold: (1) an efficient algorithm called HashPairMiner to address the run-time complexity issues demonstrated in its predecessor algorithm: HashnetMiner, and (2) a database of discoveries hosted on the web to facilitate literature search using the results produced by HashPairMiner. Though the K-H network model and the HashPairMiner algorithm are fairly young, their outcome is evidence of the considerable promise they offer to the biomedical science community in general and the drug research community in particular.

  12. Novel sulfated xylogalactoarabinans from green seaweed Cladophora falklandica: Chemical structure and action on the fibrin network.

    PubMed

    Arata, Paula X; Quintana, Irene; Raffo, María Paula; Ciancia, Marina

    2016-12-10

    The water-soluble sulfated xylogalactoarabinans from green seaweed Cladophora falklandica are constituted by a backbone of 4-linked β-l-arabinopyranose units partially sulfated mainly on C3 and also on C2. Besides, partial glycosylation mostly on C2 with single stubs of β-d-xylopyranose, or single stubs of β-d-galactofuranose or short chains comprising (1→5)- and/or (1→6)-linkages, was also found. These compounds showed anticoagulant activity, although much lower than that of heparin. The effect of a purified fraction (F1) on the fibrin network was studied in detail. It modifies the kinetics of fibrin formation, suggesting an impaired polymerization process. Scanning electron microscopy showed a laxer conformation, with larger interstitial pores than the control. Accordingly, this network was lysed more easily. These fibrin properties would reduce the time of permanence of the clot in the blood vessel, inducing a lesser thrombogenic state. One of the possible mechanisms of its anticoagulant effect is direct thrombin inhibition.

  13. Social Networking in Libraries: New Tricks of the Trade, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nicole A.

    2008-01-01

    Social networking sites cast a wide net, not only in the sheer number of sites that exist on the Internet but also in terms of their application and usefulness. The last column, in "PSQ" v.4 (3), examined sites that could assist professionals with outreach, networking, and collaboration. In this second column dedicated to social networking sites,…

  14. Action potential shape change in an electrically coupled network during propagation: a computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Steven D; Spencer, Andrew N

    2008-06-01

    We applied compartmental computer modeling to test a model of spike shape change in the jellyfish, Polyorchis penicillatus, to determine whether adaptive spike shortening can be attributed to the inactivation properties of a potassium channel. We modeled the jellyfish outer nerve-ring as a continuous linear segment, using ion channel and membrane properties derived in earlier studies. The model supported action potentials that shortened as they propagated away from the site of initiation and this was found to be largely independent of potassium channel inactivation. Spike broadening near the site of initiation was found to be due to a depolarization plateau that collapsed as two spikes spread from the point of initiation. The lifetime of this plateau was found to depend critically on the inward current flux and the space constant of the membrane. These data suggest that the spike shape changes may be due not only to potassium channel inactivation, but also to the passive properties of the membrane.

  15. Actionable Science Lessons Emerging from the Department of Interior Climate Science Center Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, G.; Meadow, A. M.; Mikels-Carrasco, J.

    2015-12-01

    The DOI Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science (ACCCNRS) has recommended that co-production of actionable science be the core programmatic focus of the Climate Science Center enterprise. Efforts by the Southeast Climate Science Center suggest that the complexity of many climate adaptation decision problems (many stakeholders that can influence implementation of a decision; the problems that can be viewed at many scales in space and time; dynamic objectives with competing values; complex, non-linear systems) complicates development of research-based information that scientists and non-scientists view as comprehensible, trustworthy, legitimate, and accurate. Going forward, organizers of actionable science efforts should consider inclusion of a broad set of stakeholders, beyond formal decisionmakers, and ensure that sufficient resources are available to explore the interests and values of this broader group. Co-produced research endeavors should foster agency and collaboration across a wide range of stakeholders. We recognize that stakeholder agency may be constrained by scientific or political power structures that limit the ability to initiate discussion, make claims, and call things into question. Co-production efforts may need to be preceded by more descriptive assessments that summarize existing climate science in ways that stakeholders can understand and link with their concerns. Such efforts can build rapport and trust among scientists and non-scientists, and may help stakeholders and scientists alike to frame adaptation decision problems amenable to a co-production effort. Finally, university and government researchers operate within an evaluation structure that rewards researcher-driven science that, at the extreme, "throws information over the fence" in the hope that information users will make better decisions. Research evaluation processes must reward more consultative, collaborative, and collegial research approaches if

  16. Thermodynamics based on the principle of least abbreviated action: Entropy production in a network of coupled oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Morales, Vladimir Pellicer, Julio; Manzanares, Jose A.

    2008-08-15

    We present some novel thermodynamic ideas based on the Maupertuis principle. By considering Hamiltonians written in terms of appropriate action-angle variables we show that thermal states can be characterized by the action variables and by their evolution in time when the system is nonintegrable. We propose dynamical definitions for the equilibrium temperature and entropy as well as an expression for the nonequilibrium entropy valid for isolated systems with many degrees of freedom. This entropy is shown to increase in the relaxation to equilibrium of macroscopic systems with short-range interactions, which constitutes a dynamical justification of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Several examples are worked out to show that this formalism yields the right microcanonical (equilibrium) quantities. The relevance of this approach to nonequilibrium situations is illustrated with an application to a network of coupled oscillators (Kuramoto model). We provide an expression for the entropy production in this system finding that its positive value is directly related to dissipation at the steady state in attaining order through synchronization.

  17. Genes of primary sulfate assimilation are part of the glucosinolate biosynthetic network in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yatusevich, Ruslan; Mugford, Sarah G; Matthewman, Colette; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Frerigmann, Henning; Delaney, Sean; Koprivova, Anna; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-04-01

    Glucosinolates are plant secondary metabolites involved in responses to biotic stress. The final step of their synthesis is the transfer of a sulfo group from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) onto a desulfo precursor. Thus, glucosinolate synthesis is linked to sulfate assimilation. The sulfate donor for this reaction is synthesized from sulfate in two steps catalyzed by ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APK). Here we demonstrate that R2R3-MYB transcription factors, which are known to regulate both aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana, also control genes of primary sulfate metabolism. Using trans-activation assays we found that two isoforms of APK, APK1, and APK2, are regulated by both classes of glucosinolate MYB transcription factors; whereas two ATPS genes, ATPS1 and ATPS3, are differentially regulated by these two groups of MYB factors. In addition, we show that the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductases APR1, APR2, and APR3, which participate in primary sulfate reduction, are also activated by the MYB factors. These observations were confirmed by analysis of transgenic lines with modulated expression levels of the glucosinolate MYB factors. The changes in transcript levels also affected enzyme activities, the thiol content and the sulfate reduction rate in some of the transgenic plants. Altogether the data revealed that the MYB transcription factors regulate genes of primary sulfate metabolism and that the genes involved in the synthesis of activated sulfate are part of the glucosinolate biosynthesis network.

  18. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting Yu; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Wu, Pui Kei; Hsiao, Wen-Luan Wendy; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS) is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO) method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role. PMID:23781264

  19. Transport Vesicle Tethering at the Trans Golgi Network: Coiled Coil Proteins in Action

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Pak-yan P.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network (TGN). How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress toward understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed. PMID:27014693

  20. Linking Perception, Cognition, and Action: Psychophysical Observations and Neural Network Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Luis; Merchant, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that perception, decision making, and movement planning are in reality tightly interwoven brain processes. However, how they are implemented in neural circuits is still a matter of debate. We tested human subjects in a temporal categorization task in which intervals had to be categorized as short or long. Subjects communicated their decision by moving a cursor into one of two possible targets, which appeared separated by different angles from trial to trial. Even though there was a 1 second-long delay between interval presentation and decision communication, categorization difficulty affected subjects’ performance, reaction (RT) and movement time (MT). In addition, reaction and movement times were also influenced by the distance between the targets. This implies that not only perceptual, but also movement-related considerations were incorporated into the decision process. Therefore, we searched for a model that could use categorization difficulty and target separation to describe subjects’ performance, RT, and MT. We developed a network consisting of two mutually inhibiting neural populations, each tuned to one of the possible categories and composed of an accumulation and a memory node. This network sequentially acquired interval information, maintained it in working memory and was then attracted to one of two possible states, corresponding to a categorical decision. It faithfully replicated subjects’ RT and MT as a function of categorization difficulty and target distance; it also replicated performance as a function of categorization difficulty. Furthermore, this model was used to make new predictions about the effect of untested durations, target distances and delay durations. To our knowledge, this is the first biologically plausible model that has been proposed to account for decision making and communication by integrating both sensory and motor planning information. PMID:25029193

  1. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions.

  2. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  3. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  4. Framework for waveband switching in multigranular optical networks: part I-multigranular cross-connect architectures [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaojun; Anand, Vishal; Qiao, Chunming

    2006-12-01

    Optical networks using wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) are the foremost solution to the ever-increasing traffic in the Internet backbone. Rapid advances in WDM technology will enable each fiber to carry hundreds or even a thousand wavelengths (using dense-WDM, or DWDM, and ultra-DWDM) of traffic. This, coupled with worldwide fiber deployment, will bring about a tremendous increase in the size of the optical cross-connects, i.e., the number of ports of the wavelength switching elements. Waveband switching (WBS), wherein wavelengths are grouped into bands and switched as a single entity, can reduce the cost and control complexity of switching nodes by minimizing the port count. This paper presents a detailed study on recent advances and open research issues in WBS networks. In this study, we investigate in detail the architecture for various WBS cross-connects and compare them in terms of the number of ports and complexity and also in terms of how flexible they are in adjusting to dynamic traffic. We outline various techniques for grouping wavelengths into bands for the purpose of WBS and show how traditional wavelength routing is different from waveband routing and why techniques developed for wavelength-routed networks (WRNs) cannot be simply applied to WBS networks. We also outline how traffic grooming of subwavelength traffic can be done in WBS networks. In part II of this study [Cao , submitted to J. Opt. Netw.], we study the effect of wavelength conversion on the performance of WBS networks with reconfigurable MG-OXCs. We present an algorithm for waveband grouping in wavelength-convertible networks and evaluate its performance. We also investigate issues related to survivability in WBS networks and show how waveband and wavelength conversion can be used to recover from failures in WBS networks.

  5. Building beyond the Evaluation Of Environmental Education and Sustainable Development in African Schools and Communities: The Women Global Green Action Network (WGGAN) Africa Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enie, Rosemary Olive Mbone

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Community Health Education and School Sanitation (CHESS) Project, an initiative by the Women Global Green Action Network International to support community-based environmental projects in Africa. The CHESS Project uses women, children and youth to develop more sustainable health and sanitation systems in urban and rural…

  6. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 73 - List of Some Offenses for Which Disciplinary Action May Be Taken

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Engaging in wasteful actions or behavior in the performance of assigned duties; conducting non-Government... refusal to carry out lawful orders or assignments given. 4. Disruptive behavior, such as: a. Inflicting or... with the Department, are conducting operations or activities that are regulated by the Department,...

  7. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 73 - List of Some Offenses for Which Disciplinary Action May Be Taken

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Engaging in wasteful actions or behavior in the performance of assigned duties; conducting non-Government... refusal to carry out lawful orders or assignments given. 4. Disruptive behavior, such as: a. Inflicting or... with the Department, are conducting operations or activities that are regulated by the Department,...

  8. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 73 - List of Some Offenses for Which Disciplinary Action May Be Taken

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Engaging in wasteful actions or behavior in the performance of assigned duties; conducting non-Government... refusal to carry out lawful orders or assignments given. 4. Disruptive behavior, such as: a. Inflicting or... with the Department, are conducting operations or activities that are regulated by the Department,...

  9. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  10. Effect of Neoprene Coatings on the Cyclic Fatigue of Specimens and Parts Subjected to the Action of Fretting-Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-07

    scale stand tests were con- 2?00 kjg/cm 2 and amplitude 0.05 mm: ducted on a series of parts a - unprotected surfaces, N - subjected to industrial...Ii I. 2ever partj (nozzle) passed through . ’ul- scale testo; to ’allure on the ;tand. irv,: attachment of’ the given part to the lon part the tand...aurfacec of these three nozzle". In addition to the full- scale tests on the nozzles, stand tests wr"- ctonducted on another part - a vessel made of

  11. Componential Network for the Recognition of Tool-Associated Actions: Evidence from Voxel-based Lesion-Symptom Mapping in Acute Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, Markus; Dressing, Andrea; Bormann, Tobias; Schmidt, Charlotte S M; Kümmerer, Dorothee; Beume, Lena; Saur, Dorothee; Mader, Irina; Rijntjes, Michel; Kaller, Christoph P; Weiller, Cornelius

    2016-08-06

    The study aimed to elucidate areas involved in recognizing tool-associated actions, and to characterize the relationship between recognition and active performance of tool use.We performed voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping in a prospective cohort of 98 acute left-hemisphere ischemic stroke patients (68 male, age mean ± standard deviation, 65 ± 13 years; examination 4.4 ± 2 days post-stroke). In a video-based test, patients distinguished correct tool-related actions from actions with spatio-temporal (incorrect grip, kinematics, or tool orientation) or conceptual errors (incorrect tool-recipient matching, e.g., spreading jam on toast with a paintbrush). Moreover, spatio-temporal and conceptual errors were determined during actual tool use.Deficient spatio-temporal error discrimination followed lesions within a dorsal network in which the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the lateral temporal cortex (sLTC) were specifically relevant for assessing functional hand postures and kinematics, respectively. Conversely, impaired recognition of conceptual errors resulted from damage to ventral stream regions including anterior temporal lobe. Furthermore, LTC and IPL lesions impacted differently on action recognition and active tool use, respectively.In summary, recognition of tool-associated actions relies on a componential network. Our study particularly highlights the dissociable roles of LTC and IPL for the recognition of action kinematics and functional hand postures, respectively.

  12. A Bayesian network model for predicting aquatic toxicity mode of action using two dimensional theoretical molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Martin, Todd M; Barron, Mace G

    2016-11-01

    The mode of toxic action (MoA) has been recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity, but development of predictive MoA classification models in aquatic toxicology has been limited. We developed a Bayesian network model to classify aquatic toxicity MoA using a recently published dataset containing over one thousand chemicals with MoA assignments for aquatic animal toxicity. Two dimensional theoretical chemical descriptors were generated for each chemical using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool. The model was developed through augmented Markov blanket discovery from the dataset of 1098 chemicals with the MoA broad classifications as a target node. From cross validation, the overall precision for the model was 80.2%. The best precision was for the AChEI MoA (93.5%) where 257 chemicals out of 275 were correctly classified. Model precision was poorest for the reactivity MoA (48.5%) where 48 out of 99 reactive chemicals were correctly classified. Narcosis represented the largest class within the MoA dataset and had a precision and reliability of 80.0%, reflecting the global precision across all of the MoAs. False negatives for narcosis most often fell into electron transport inhibition, neurotoxicity or reactivity MoAs. False negatives for all other MoAs were most often narcosis. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was undertaken for each MoA to examine the sensitivity to individual and multiple descriptor findings. The results show that the Markov blanket of a structurally complex dataset can simplify analysis and interpretation by identifying a subset of the key chemical descriptors associated with broad aquatic toxicity MoAs, and by providing a computational chemistry-based network classification model with reasonable prediction accuracy.

  13. An Ethical (Descriptive) Framework for Judgment of Actions and Decisions in the Construction Industry and Engineering-Part I.

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, Omar J; Abdou, Alaa

    2017-03-20

    The construction industry is usually characterized as a fragmented system of multiple-organizational entities in which members from different technical backgrounds and moral values join together to develop a particular business or project. The greatest challenge in the construction process for the achievement of a successful practice is the development of an outstanding reputation, which is built on identifying and applying an ethical framework. This framework should reflect a common ethical ground for myriad people involved in this process to survive and compete ethically in today's turbulent construction market. This study establishes a framework for ethical judgment of behavior and actions conducted in the construction process. The framework was primarily developed based on the essential attributes of business management identified in the literature review and subsequently incorporates additional attributes identified to prevent breaches in the construction industry and common ethical values related to professional engineering. The proposed judgment framework is based primarily on the ethical dimension of professional responsibility. The Ethical Judgment Framework consists of descriptive approaches involving technical, professional, administrative, and miscellaneous terms. The framework provides the basis for judging actions as either ethical or unethical. Furthermore, the framework can be implemented as a form of preventive ethics, which would help avoid ethical dilemmas and moral allegations. The framework can be considered a decision-making model to guide actions and improve the ethical reasoning process that would help individuals think through possible implications and consequences of ethical dilemmas in the construction industry.

  14. A water quality monitoring network design methodology for the selection of critical sampling points: Part I.

    PubMed

    Strobl, R O; Robillard, P D; Shannon, R D; Day, R L; McDonnell, A J

    2006-01-01

    The principal instrument to temporally and spatially manage water resources is a water quality monitoring network. However, to date in most cases, there is a clear absence of a concise strategy or methodology for designing monitoring networks, especially when deciding upon the placement of sampling stations. Since water quality monitoring networks can be quite costly, it is very important to properly design the monitoring network so that maximum information extraction can be accomplished, which in turn is vital when informing decision-makers. This paper presents the development of a methodology for identifying the critical sampling locations within a watershed. Hence, it embodies the spatial component in the design of a water quality monitoring network by designating the critical stream locations that should ideally be sampled. For illustration purposes, the methodology focuses on a single contaminant, namely total phosphorus, and is applicable to small, upland, predominantly agricultural-forested watersheds. It takes a number of hydrologic, topographic, soils, vegetative, and land use factors into account. In addition, it includes an economic as well as logistical component in order to approximate the number of sampling points required for a given budget and to only consider the logistically accessible stream reaches in the analysis, respectively. The methodology utilizes a geographic information system (GIS), hydrologic simulation model, and fuzzy logic.

  15. Exploring the bases for a mixed reality stroke rehabilitation system, Part I: A unified approach for representing action, quantitative evaluation, and interactive feedback

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although principles based in motor learning, rehabilitation, and human-computer interfaces can guide the design of effective interactive systems for rehabilitation, a unified approach that connects these key principles into an integrated design, and can form a methodology that can be generalized to interactive stroke rehabilitation, is presently unavailable. Results This paper integrates phenomenological approaches to interaction and embodied knowledge with rehabilitation practices and theories to achieve the basis for a methodology that can support effective adaptive, interactive rehabilitation. Our resulting methodology provides guidelines for the development of an action representation, quantification of action, and the design of interactive feedback. As Part I of a two-part series, this paper presents key principles of the unified approach. Part II then describes the application of this approach within the implementation of the Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (AMRR) system for stroke rehabilitation. Conclusions The accompanying principles for composing novel mixed reality environments for stroke rehabilitation can advance the design and implementation of effective mixed reality systems for the clinical setting, and ultimately be adapted for home-based application. They furthermore can be applied to other rehabilitation needs beyond stroke. PMID:21875441

  16. Caregiver Action Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... back from Iraq, he depends on me.” “My wife has been diagnosed with MS.” We CAN help ... and I’m his primary caregiver.” “Since my wife’s stroke, I handle everything.” “It’s been 10 years ...

  17. Social Networking in Libraries: New Tricks of the Trade, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nicole A.

    2008-01-01

    While not a brand new phenomenon, online social networking sites continue to be exceedingly popular and seem to be where students spend much of their time. Not only are participants blogging, texting, chatting, sharing files, gaming, and existing virtually online, they also are forming communities and new cultures and exhibiting new informational…

  18. ASIST 2001. Information in a Networked World: Harnessing the Flow. Part II: SIG and Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Abstracts and descriptions of Special Interest Group (SIG) and Panel Sessions include such topics as: knowledge management; information networks; courseware; accreditation; Web site design; information retrieval and processing; digital imaging; electronic journals; human computer interaction; digital libraries; digital divide; information science;…

  19. Variable-Length Message Transmission for Distributed Loop Computer Networks (Part I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reames, C. C.; Liu, M. T.

    An introduction to the problems of variable-length message transmission in distributed loop computer networks, with a summary of previous accomplishments in the area, begins this technically-oriented document. An improved technique, overcoming some of the inadequacies in presently used techniques, is proposed together with a conceptual model of…

  20. A Network Pharmacology Approach to Understanding the Mechanisms of Action of Traditional Medicine: Bushenhuoxue Formula for Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-yong; Cao, Dong-sheng; Ye, Fa-qing; Xiang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has unique therapeutic effects for complex chronic diseases. However, for the lack of an effective systematic approach, the research progress on the effective substances and pharmacological mechanism of action has been very slow. In this paper, by incorporating network biology, bioinformatics and chemoinformatics methods, an integrated approach was proposed to systematically investigate and explain the pharmacological mechanism of action and effective substances of TCM. This approach includes the following main steps: First, based on the known drug targets, network biology was used to screen out putative drug targets; Second, the molecular docking method was used to calculate whether the molecules from TCM and drug targets related to chronic kidney diseases (CKD) interact or not; Third, according to the result of molecular docking, natural product-target network, main component-target network and compound-target network were constructed; Finally, through analysis of network characteristics and literature mining, potential effective multi-components and their synergistic mechanism were putatively identified and uncovered. Bu-shen-Huo-xue formula (BSHX) which was frequently used for treating CKD, was used as the case to demonstrate reliability of our proposed approach. The results show that BSHX has the therapeutic effect by using multi-channel network regulation, such as regulating the coagulation and fibrinolytic balance, and the expression of inflammatory factors, inhibiting abnormal ECM accumulation. Tanshinone IIA, rhein, curcumin, calycosin and quercetin may be potential effective ingredients of BSHX. This research shows that the integration approach can be an effective means for discovering active substances and revealing their pharmacological mechanisms of TCM. PMID:24598793

  1. Thiamethoxam induced mouse liver tumors and their relevance to humans. Part 1: mode of action studies in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Green, Trevor; Toghill, Alison; Lee, Robert; Waechter, Felix; Weber, Edgar; Noakes, James

    2005-07-01

    Thiamethoxam, a neonicotinoid insecticide, which is not mutagenic either in vitro or in vivo, caused an increased incidence of liver tumors in mice when fed in the diet for 18 months at concentrations in the range 500 to 2500 ppm. A number of dietary studies of up to 50 weeks duration have been conducted in order to identify the mode of action for the development of the liver tumors seen at the end of the cancer bioassay. Both thiamethoxam and its major metabolites have been tested in these studies. Over the duration of a 50-week thiamethoxam dietary feeding study in mice, the earliest change, within one week, is a marked reduction (by up to 40%) in plasma cholesterol. This was followed 10 weeks later by evidence of liver toxicity including single cell necrosis and an increase in apoptosis. After 20 weeks there was a significant increase in hepatic cell replication rates. All of these changes persisted from the time they were first observed until the end of the study at 50 weeks. They occurred in a dose-dependent manner and were only observed at doses (500, 1250, 2500 ppm) where liver tumors were increased in the cancer bioassay. There was a clear no-effect level of 200 ppm. The changes seen in this study are consistent with the development of liver cancer in mice and form the basis of the mode of action. When the major metabolites of thiamethoxam, CGA322704, CGA265307, and CGA330050 were tested in dietary feeding studies of up to 20 weeks duration, only metabolite CGA330050 induced the same changes as those seen in the liver in the thiamethoxam feeding study. It was concluded that thiamethoxam is hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic as a result of its metabolism to CGA330050. Metabolite CGA265307 was also shown to be an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase and to increase the hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride. It is proposed that CGA265307, through its effects on nitric oxide synthase, exacerbates the toxicity of CGA330050 in thiamethoxam treated mice.

  2. Action simulation plays a critical role in deceptive action recognition.

    PubMed

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Borgomaneri, Sara; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe; Avenanti, Alessio

    2013-01-09

    The ability to infer deceptive intents from nonverbal behavior is critical for social interactions. By combining single-pulse and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in healthy humans, we provide both correlational and causative evidence that action simulation is actively involved in the ability to recognize deceptive body movements. We recorded motor-evoked potentials during a faked-action discrimination (FAD) task: participants watched videos of actors lifting a cube and judged whether the actors were trying to deceive them concerning the real weight of the cube. Seeing faked actions facilitated the observers' motor system more than truthful actions in a body-part-specific manner, suggesting that motor resonance was sensitive to deceptive movements. Furthermore, we found that TMS virtual lesion to the anterior node of the action observation network, namely the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC), reduced perceptual sensitivity in the FAD task. In contrast, no change in FAD task performance was found after virtual lesions to the left temporoparietal junction (control site). Moreover, virtual lesion to the IFC failed to affect performance in a difficulty-matched spatial-control task that did not require processing of spatiotemporal (acceleration) and configurational (limb displacement) features of seen actions, which are critical to detecting deceptive intent in the actions of others. These findings indicate that the human IFC is critical for recognizing deceptive body movements and suggest that FAD relies on the simulation of subtle changes in action kinematics within the motor system.

  3. Heat and power networks in process design, part II, design procedure for equipment selection and process matching

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, D.W.; Linnhoff, B.

    1983-09-01

    In Part I, criteria for heat engine and heat pump placement in chemical process networks were derived, based on the ''temperature interval'' (T.I) analysis of the heat exchanger network problem. Using these criteria, this paper gives a method for identifying the best outline design for any combined system of chemical process, heat engines, and heat pumps. The method eliminates inferior alternatives early, and positively leads on to the most appropriate solution. A graphical procedure based on the T.I. analysis forms the heart of the approach, and the calculations involved are simple enough to be carried out on, say, a programmable calculator. Application to a case study is demonstrated. Optimization methods based on this procedure are currently under research.

  4. Network of communities in the fight against AIDS: local actions to address health inequities and promote health in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Edmundo, Kátia; Guimarães, Wanda; Vasconcelos, Maria do Socorro; Baptista, Ana Paula; Becker, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    When combined with major social inequities, the AIDS epidemic in Brazil becomes much more complex and requires effective and participatory community-based interventions. This article describes the experience of a civil society organisation, the Centre for Health Promotion (CEDAPS), in the slum communities (favelas) of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Using a community-based participatory approach, 55 community organisations were mobilised to develop local actions to address the increasing social vulnerability to HIV/AIDS of people living in squatter communities. This was done through on-going prevention initiatives based on the local culture and developed by a Network of Communities. The community movement has created a sense of "ownership" of social actions. The fight against AIDS has been a mobilising factor in engaging and organising communities and has contributed to raising awareness of health rights. Local actions included targeting the determinants of local vulnerability, as suggested by health promotion workers.

  5. National Plant Diagnostic Network, Taxonomic training videos: Introduction to Aphids - Part 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Training is a critical part of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) identification. This video provides visual instruction on important subject areas for aphid examination and identification. Aphid topics such as classification, morphology, plant disease transmission, and references are discussed. This dis...

  6. Effects of Hofmeister salt series on gluten network formation: Part II. Anion series.

    PubMed

    Tuhumury, H C D; Small, D M; Day, L

    2016-12-01

    Different anion salts from the Hofmeister series were used to investigate their effects on gluten network formation. The effects of these anion salts on the mixing properties of the dough and the rheological and chemical properties of gluten samples extracted from the dough with these respective salts were compared. The aim of this work was to determine how different anion salts influence the formation of the gluten structure during dough mixing. It was found that the Hofmeister anion salts affected the gluten network formation by interacting directly with specific amino acid residues that resulted in changes in gluten protein composition, specifically the percentage of the unextractable polymeric protein fractions (%UPP). These changes consequently led to remarkable differences in the mixing profiles and microstructural features of the dough, small deformation rheological properties of the gluten and a strain hardening behaviour of both dough and gluten samples.

  7. Mobile satellite business networks: A part of the European mobile system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deMateo, M. L.; Jongejans, A.; Loisy, C.; VanHimbeeck, C.; Marchal, J. P.; Borella, A.; Sartori, M.

    1995-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is presently procuring an L-band payload EMS, to be embarked on the ITALSAT-2 satellite due for launch in early 1996, in order to promote a regional European mobile system. One of the Land Mobile Communication systems supported by EMS is the MSBN (Mobile Satellite Business Network) voice and data system which will offer the services of a business network on a seamless European coverage. This paper will first recall the characteristics of the MSBN system, which is based on quasi-synchronized CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) techniques in both directions, and then describe the CDMA receivers implementation. Main validation test results will also be reported confirming predicted performances.

  8. LINKEDIN TRILOGY: Part 1. Top 10 Reasons You Should NOT Join LinkedIn Professional Network!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    Disclaimer: I have been an active "free" user of LinkedIn for 5.463 years with more than 3000 (1st degree) connections from all over the world. I have no vested interest in LinkedIn other than as a user of the services it provides. Despite the fact that LinkedIn was originally designed as a network for business professionals, not…

  9. Posterior parietal cortex as part of a neural network for directed attention in rats.

    PubMed

    Reep, Roger L; Corwin, James V

    2009-02-01

    A rodent model of directed attention has been developed based upon behavioral analysis of contralateral neglect, pharmacological manipulations, and anatomical analysis of neural circuitry. In each of these three domains the rodent model exhibits striking similarities to humans. We hypothesize that there is a specific thalamo-cortical-basal ganglia network that subserves spatial attentional functions. Key components of this network are medial agranular and posterior parietal cortex, dorsocentral striatum, and the lateral posterior thalamic nucleus. Several issues need to be addressed before we can hope to realistically understand or model the functions of this network. Among these are the roles of medial versus lateral posterior parietal cortex; cholinergic mechanisms in attention; interhemispheric interactions; the role of synchronous firing at the cortical, striatal, and thalamic levels; interactions between cortical and thalamic projections to the striatum; interactions between cortical and nigral inputs to the thalamus; the role of collicular inputs to the lateral posterior thalamic nucleus; the role of cerebral cortex versus superior colliculus in driving the motor output expressed as orienting behavior during directed attention; the extent to which the circuitry we describe for directed attention also plays a role in other forms of attention.

  10. Automatic finite-element mesh generation using artificial neural networks. Part 1: Prediction of mesh density

    SciTech Connect

    Chedid, R.; Najjar, N.

    1996-09-01

    One of the inconveniences associated with the existing finite-element packages is the need for an educated user to develop a correct mesh at the preprocessing level. Procedures which start with a coarse mesh and attempt serious refinements, as is the case in most adaptive finite-element packages, are time consuming and costly. Hence, it is very important to develop a tool that can provide a mesh that either leads immediately to an acceptable solution, or would require fewer correcting steps to achieve better results. In this paper, the authors present a technique for automatic mesh generation based on artificial neural networks (ANN). The essence of this technique is to predict the mesh density distribution of a given model, and then supply this information to a Kohonen neural network which provides the final mesh. Prediction of mesh density is accomplished by a simple feedforward neural network which has the ability to learn the relationship between mesh density and model geometric features. It will be shown that ANN are able to recognize delicate areas where a sharp variation of the magnetic field is expected. Examples of 2-D models are provided to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed technique.

  11. Network Pharmacology Studies on the Bioactive Compounds and Action Mechanisms of Natural Products for the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Yuan, Guoqi; Pan, Yuxiang; Wang, Cong; Chen, Haixia

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a kind of chronic and metabolic disease, which can cause a number of diseases and severe complications. Network pharmacology approach is introduced to study DM, which can combine the drugs, target proteins and disease and form drug-target-disease networks. Network pharmacology has been widely used in the studies of the bioactive compounds and action mechanisms of natural products for the treatment of DM due to the multi-components, multi-targets, and lower side effects. This review provides a balanced and comprehensive summary on network pharmacology from current studies, highlighting different bioactive constituents, related databases and applications in the investigations on the treatment of DM especially type 2. The mechanisms related to type 2 DM, including α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory, targeting β cell dysfunction, AMPK signal pathway and PI3K/Akt signal pathway are summarized and critiqued. It suggests that the network pharmacology approach cannot only provide a new research paradigm for natural products, but also improve the current antidiabetic drug discovery strategies. Furthermore, we put forward the perspectives on the reasonable applications of network pharmacology for the therapy of DM and related drug discovery. PMID:28280467

  12. Network Pharmacology Studies on the Bioactive Compounds and Action Mechanisms of Natural Products for the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus: A Review.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Yuan, Guoqi; Pan, Yuxiang; Wang, Cong; Chen, Haixia

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a kind of chronic and metabolic disease, which can cause a number of diseases and severe complications. Network pharmacology approach is introduced to study DM, which can combine the drugs, target proteins and disease and form drug-target-disease networks. Network pharmacology has been widely used in the studies of the bioactive compounds and action mechanisms of natural products for the treatment of DM due to the multi-components, multi-targets, and lower side effects. This review provides a balanced and comprehensive summary on network pharmacology from current studies, highlighting different bioactive constituents, related databases and applications in the investigations on the treatment of DM especially type 2. The mechanisms related to type 2 DM, including α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory, targeting β cell dysfunction, AMPK signal pathway and PI3K/Akt signal pathway are summarized and critiqued. It suggests that the network pharmacology approach cannot only provide a new research paradigm for natural products, but also improve the current antidiabetic drug discovery strategies. Furthermore, we put forward the perspectives on the reasonable applications of network pharmacology for the therapy of DM and related drug discovery.

  13. Antisecretory Action of the Extract of the Aerial Parts of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) Occurs through Antihistaminic and Anticholinergic Pathways.

    PubMed

    André Perfusion, Amang; Tan, Paul V; Ernestine, Nkwengoua; Barthélemy, Nyasse

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to find out the possible antiulcer mechanism of action of Eremomastax speciosa. Method. Carbachol- and histamine-induced hypersecretion, associated with the pylorus ligation technique, were used in rats. Gastric mucosal ulceration, mucus production, pH, gastric volume, and acidity were measured. Results. Histamine and carbachol raised gastric acidity to 86.50 and 84.80 mEq/L, respectively, in the control rats, and the extracts (200 mg/kg) reduced gastric acidity to 34.60 and 39.00 mEq/L, respectively. Intraduodenal aqueous extract (400 mg/kg) in histamine- and carbachol-treated rats produced significant (P < 0.001) decreases in acid secretion to 28.50 and 28.80 mEq/L, respectively, and 100 percent inhibition of gastric ulceration. Augmented histamine-induced gastric acid secretion (90.20 mEq/L) was significantly reduced to 52.60 and 27.50 mEq/L by the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of the aqueous extract, respectively. The extract significantly reduced (P < 0.001) the volume of gastric secretion and significantly increased mucus production. The ulcer inhibition potential of the extract significantly dropped to 25-44% (oral extract) and to 29-37% (duodenal extract) in carbachol/indomethacin-treated rats. Conclusion. The aqueous extract of E. speciosa has both cytoprotective and antisecretory effects. The antisecretory effect may involve a mechanism common to both cholinergic and histaminergic pathways.

  14. Antisecretory Action of the Extract of the Aerial Parts of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) Occurs through Antihistaminic and Anticholinergic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    André Perfusion, Amang; Tan, Paul V.; Ernestine, Nkwengoua; Barthélemy, Nyasse

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to find out the possible antiulcer mechanism of action of Eremomastax speciosa. Method. Carbachol- and histamine-induced hypersecretion, associated with the pylorus ligation technique, were used in rats. Gastric mucosal ulceration, mucus production, pH, gastric volume, and acidity were measured. Results. Histamine and carbachol raised gastric acidity to 86.50 and 84.80 mEq/L, respectively, in the control rats, and the extracts (200 mg/kg) reduced gastric acidity to 34.60 and 39.00 mEq/L, respectively. Intraduodenal aqueous extract (400 mg/kg) in histamine- and carbachol-treated rats produced significant (P < 0.001) decreases in acid secretion to 28.50 and 28.80 mEq/L, respectively, and 100 percent inhibition of gastric ulceration. Augmented histamine-induced gastric acid secretion (90.20 mEq/L) was significantly reduced to 52.60 and 27.50 mEq/L by the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of the aqueous extract, respectively. The extract significantly reduced (P < 0.001) the volume of gastric secretion and significantly increased mucus production. The ulcer inhibition potential of the extract significantly dropped to 25–44% (oral extract) and to 29–37% (duodenal extract) in carbachol/indomethacin-treated rats. Conclusion. The aqueous extract of E. speciosa has both cytoprotective and antisecretory effects. The antisecretory effect may involve a mechanism common to both cholinergic and histaminergic pathways. PMID:24695819

  15. A network pharmacology approach to discover active compounds and action mechanisms of San-Cao Granule for treatment of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shizhang; Niu, Ming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jiabo; Su, Haibin; Luo, Shengqiang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Guo, Yanlei; Liu, Liping; Liu, Fengqun; Zhao, Qingguo; Chen, Hongge; Xiao, Xiaohe; Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance San-Cao Granule (SCG) has been used in patients with liver fibrosis for many years and has shown good effect. However, its mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear because of its complex chemical system. The purpose of our study is to establish a comprehensive and systemic method that can predict the mechanism of action of SCG in antihepatic fibrosis. Materials and methods In this study, a “compound–target–disease” network was constructed by combining the SCG-specific and liver fibrosis–specific target proteins with protein–protein interactions, and network pharmacology was used to screen out the underlying targets and mechanisms of SCG for treatment of liver fibrosis. Then, some key molecules of the enriched pathway were chosen to verify the effects of SCG on liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide (TAA). Results This systematic approach had successfully revealed that 16 targets related to 11 SCG compounds were closely associated with liver fibrosis therapy. The pathway-enrichment analysis of them showed that the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway is relatively important. Animal experiments also proved that SCG could significantly ameliorate liver fibrosis by inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad pathway. Conclusion SCG could alleviate liver fibrosis through the molecular mechanisms predicted by network pharmacology. Furthermore, network pharmacology could provide deep insight into the pharmacological mechanisms of Chinese herbal formulas. PMID:26929602

  16. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 1): Integrating Knowledge, education, and action for a better world?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental sciences/studies movement, with more than 1000 programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, is unified by a common interest-ameliorating environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. Unfortunately, environmental programs have struggled in their efforts to integrate knowledge across disciplines and educate students to become sound problem solvers and leaders. We examine the environmental program movement as a policy problem, looking at overall goals, mapping trends in relation to those goals, identifying the underlying factors contributing to trends, and projecting the future. We argue that despite its shared common interest, the environmental program movement is disparate and fragmented by goal ambiguity, positivistic disciplinary approaches, and poorly rationalized curricula, pedagogies, and educational philosophies. We discuss these challenges and the nature of the changes that are needed in order to overcome them. In a subsequent article (Part 2) we propose specific strategies for improvement. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  17. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part I: Forward models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of coastal processes, including waves, currents, and sediment transport, can be obtained from a variety of detailed geophysical-process models with many simulations showing significant skill. This capability supports a wide range of research and applied efforts that can benefit from accurate numerical predictions. However, the predictions are only as accurate as the data used to drive the models and, given the large temporal and spatial variability of the surf zone, inaccuracies in data are unavoidable such that useful predictions require corresponding estimates of uncertainty. We demonstrate how a Bayesian-network model can be used to provide accurate predictions of wave-height evolution in the surf zone given very sparse and/or inaccurate boundary-condition data. The approach is based on a formal treatment of a data-assimilation problem that takes advantage of significant reduction of the dimensionality of the model system. We demonstrate that predictions of a detailed geophysical model of the wave evolution are reproduced accurately using a Bayesian approach. In this surf-zone application, forward prediction skill was 83%, and uncertainties in the model inputs were accurately transferred to uncertainty in output variables. We also demonstrate that if modeling uncertainties were not conveyed to the Bayesian network (i.e., perfect data or model were assumed), then overly optimistic prediction uncertainties were computed. More consistent predictions and uncertainties were obtained by including model-parameter errors as a source of input uncertainty. Improved predictions (skill of 90%) were achieved because the Bayesian network simultaneously estimated optimal parameters while predicting wave heights.

  18. In vitro activity of novel dual action MDR anthranilamide modulators with inhibitory activity on CYP-450 (Part 2).

    PubMed

    Labrie, Philippe; Maddaford, Shawn P; Lacroix, Jacques; Catalano, Concettina; Lee, David K H; Rakhit, Suman; Gaudreault, René C

    2007-06-01

    Synthesis and in vitro cytotoxicity assays of new anthranilamide MDR modulators have been performed to assess their inhibition potency on the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter. Previous studies showed that the replacement of the aromatic spacer group between nitrogen atoms (N(1) and N(2)) in the P-gp inhibitor XR9576 with ethyl or propyl chain is optimal for P-gp inhibition potency. To confirm that observation, the ethyl or the propyl linker arm was replaced with a pyrrolidine or an alicyclic group such as cyclohexyl. In addition, an arylpiperazinyl group and two methoxyl groups onto the anthranilic part were introduced to assess their effect on the anti P-gp activity. Five molecules were prepared and evaluated on CEM/VLB500. All new anthranilamides were more potent than verapamil, most of them exhibited a lower cytotoxicity than XR9576. Compound 5 was the most potent and its inhibition activity was similar to XR9576. Interestingly, in vitro biotransformation studies of compounds 4 and 5 using human CYP-450 isoforms revealed, that conversely to XR9576, compounds 4 and 5 inhibited CYP3A4, an enzyme that colocalizes with P-gp in the intestine and contributes to tumor cell chemoresistance by enhancing the biodisposition of numerous drugs, notably paclitaxel. In that context, 5 might be suitable for further drug development.

  19. Impaired Action Potential Initiation in GABAergic Interneurons Causes Hyperexcitable Networks in an Epileptic Mouse Model Carrying a Human NaV1.1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na+ channels in interneurons and persistent Na+ currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. PMID:25378155

  20. Greenhouse gas network design using backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling - Part 1: Methodology and Australian test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziehn, T.; Nickless, A.; Rayner, P. J.; Law, R. M.; Roff, G.; Fraser, P.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the generation of optimal atmospheric measurement networks for determining carbon dioxide fluxes over Australia using inverse methods. A Lagrangian particle dispersion model is used in reverse mode together with a Bayesian inverse modelling framework to calculate the relationship between weekly surface fluxes and hourly concentration observations for the Australian continent. Meteorological driving fields are provided by the regional version of the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) at 12 km resolution at an hourly time scale. Prior uncertainties are derived on a weekly time scale for biosphere fluxes and fossil fuel emissions from high resolution BIOS2 model runs and from the Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS), respectively. The influence from outside the modelled domain is investigated, but proves to be negligible for the network design. Existing ground based measurement stations in Australia are assessed in terms of their ability to constrain local flux estimates from the land. We find that the six stations that are currently operational are already able to reduce the uncertainties on surface flux estimates by about 30%. A candidate list of 59 stations is generated based on logistic constraints and an incremental optimization scheme is used to extend the network of existing stations. In order to achieve an uncertainty reduction of about 50% we need to double the number of measurement stations in Australia. Assuming equal data uncertainties for all sites, new stations would be mainly located in the northern and eastern part of the continent.

  1. National Plant Diagnostic Network, Taxonomic training videos: Introduction to Aphids - Part 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Training is a critical part of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) identification. This video provides visual instruction on important subject areas for aphid regulatory issues. Here the subject of aphids as they relate to disease transmission, biology, identification, and pathways is addressed. Aphid topi...

  2. Effects of Hofmeister salt series on gluten network formation: Part I. Cation series.

    PubMed

    Tuhumury, H C D; Small, D M; Day, L

    2016-12-01

    Different cationic salts were used to investigate the effects of the Hofmeister salt series on gluten network formation. The effects of cationic salts on wheat flour dough mixing properties, the rheological and the chemical properties of the gluten extracted from the dough with different respective salts, were investigated. The specific influence of different cationic salts on the gluten structure formation during dough mixing, compared to the sodium ion, were determined. The effects of different cations on dough and gluten of different flours mostly followed the Hofmeister series (NH4(+), K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)). The impacts of cations on gluten structure and dough rheology at levels tested were relatively small. Therefore, the replacement of sodium from a technological standpoint is possible, particularly by monovalent cations such as NH4(+), or K(+). However the levels of replacement need to take into account sensory attributes of the cationic salts.

  3. A model for lignin alteration - Part I: A kinetic reaction-network model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, D.F.; Ortoleva, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A new quantitative model is presented which simulates the maturation of lignin-derived sedimentary organic matter under geologic conditions. In this model, compositionally specific reactants evolve to specific intermediate and mobile products through balanced, nth order processes, by way of a network of sequential and parallel reactions. The chemical kinetic approach is based primarily on published observed structural transformations of naturally matured, lignin-derived, sedimentary organic matter. Assuming that Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork coal in the Piceance Basin is primarily lignin-derived, the model is calibrated for the Multi-Well Experiment(MWX) Site in this basin. This kind of approach may be applied to other selectively preserved chemical components of sedimentary organic matter. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  5. A Multiple Case Study Discovering Part-Time Faculties' Perceptions of Their Professional Needs, Working Conditions, Social Network, and Job Satisfaction at Three Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner-Harlee, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This study employed a multiple case study design to evaluate the perspectives of part-time faculties at three community colleges in the Northeast. The purpose of this study was to discover how needs, working conditions, and social networks influence the part-time faculties' job satisfaction. Maslow (1954), Bourdieu (1986), and Herzberg, Mausner,…

  6. PA impairment due to HIV infection. Part II: Building a professional support network. Forum.

    PubMed

    Behar, M; Bogstad, J R; Gage, L; James, D A; Mott, J S

    1989-11-01

    Several members of the AAPA's Lesbian and Gay Physician Assistants Caucus who participated in the roundtable PAs and HIV-Antibody Testing: The Need for Guidelines When the Practitioner Is at Risk (1989;13[5]:146-158) met with members of the 12-Step/Caduceus Caucus to begin developing a cooperative effort to assist PAs who test positive for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus, and to explore other HIV-associated impairment issues. Part II focuses on concerns of the provider who is HIV-antibody positive as well as ways PA groups can cooperate to raise the profession's conciousness further and recommend guidelines and policy.

  7. Adaptive pattern recognition by mini-max neural networks as a part of an intelligent processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szu, Harold H.

    1990-01-01

    In this decade and progressing into 21st Century, NASA will have missions including Space Station and the Earth related Planet Sciences. To support these missions, a high degree of sophistication in machine automation and an increasing amount of data processing throughput rate are necessary. Meeting these challenges requires intelligent machines, designed to support the necessary automations in a remote space and hazardous environment. There are two approaches to designing these intelligent machines. One of these is the knowledge-based expert system approach, namely AI. The other is a non-rule approach based on parallel and distributed computing for adaptive fault-tolerances, namely Neural or Natural Intelligence (NI). The union of AI and NI is the solution to the problem stated above. The NI segment of this unit extracts features automatically by applying Cauchy simulated annealing to a mini-max cost energy function. The feature discovered by NI can then be passed to the AI system for future processing, and vice versa. This passing increases reliability, for AI can follow the NI formulated algorithm exactly, and can provide the context knowledge base as the constraints of neurocomputing. The mini-max cost function that solves the unknown feature can furthermore give us a top-down architectural design of neural networks by means of Taylor series expansion of the cost function. A typical mini-max cost function consists of the sample variance of each class in the numerator, and separation of the center of each class in the denominator. Thus, when the total cost energy is minimized, the conflicting goals of intraclass clustering and interclass segregation are achieved simultaneously.

  8. 77 FR 43567 - Medical Area Body Network

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 95 Medical Area Body Network AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... Medical Body Area Network (``MBAN'') coordinator(s) for the 2360-2390 MHz band. Although the ] Commission... multiple MBAN coordinators could delay coordination and compromise accuracy, as well as increase costs...

  9. The spatiotemporal substrates of autobiographical recollection: Using event-related ICA to study cognitive networks in action.

    PubMed

    Tailby, Chris; Rayner, Genevieve; Wilson, Sarah; Jackson, Graeme

    2017-03-02

    Higher cognitive functions depend upon dynamically unfolding brain network interactions. Autobiographical recollection - the autonoetic re-experiencing of context rich, emotionally laden, personally experienced episodes - is an excellent example of such a process. Autobiographical recollection unfolds over time, with different cognitive processes engaged at different times throughout. In this paper we apply a recently developed analysis technique - event related independent components analysis (eICA) - to study the spatiotemporal dynamics of neural activity supporting autobiographical recollection. Participants completed an in-scanner autobiographical recollection paradigm in which the recalled episodes varied in chronological age and emotional content. By combining eICA with these cognitive manipulations we show that the brain-wide response to autobiographical recollection comprises brain networks with (i) different sensitivities to psychological aspects of the to-be-recollected material and (ii) distinct temporal profiles of activity during recollection. We identified networks with transient activations (in language and cognitive control related regions) and deactivations (in auditory and sensorimotor regions) to each autobiographical probe question, as well as networks with responses that are sustained over the course of the recollection period. These latter networks together overlapped spatially with the broader default mode network (DMN), indicating subspecialisation within the DMN. The vividness of participants' recollection was associated with the magnitude of activation in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and deactivation in visual association cortices. We interpret our results in the context of current theories of the spatial and temporal organisation of the human autobiographical memory system. Our findings demonstrate the utility of eICA as a tool for studying higher cognitive functions. The application of eICA to high spatial and temporal resolution

  10. Implementation of the WHO Global Strategy for Occupational Health for All. Plan of action: covering the specific period 1996-2001. Part I.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The WHO Executive Board, at its Ninety-Seventh Session, in January 1996, recognized the vital role of occupational health in sustainable development and public health as a whole, endorsed the WHO Global Strategy for Occupational Health for All (Resolution EB97.R6). In May 1996, the World Health Assembly discussed occupational health and adopted a resolution on the WHO Global Strategy for Occupational Health for All (WHA49.12), requesting the Director-General to promote the implementation of the Global Strategy for Occupational Health for All within the framework of the Ninth General Programme of Work. Member States were urged to devise national programmes on occupational health for all, based on the global strategy, with special attention to pull occupational health services for the working population, including migrant workers, workers in small enterprises, in the informal sector, and for other occupational groups at high risk and with special needs, including children at work. Therefore, the draft Plan of Action for the Implementation of the WHO Global Strategy for Occupational Health for All has been prepared. The description of all 10 objectives of the global strategy, at both the international and national levels, are merged with appropriate activities of WHO and other contributing organizations. The Global Network of the WHO Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health is given a special role in the implementation of the global strategy.

  11. Greenhouse gas network design using backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling - Part 1: Methodology and Australian test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziehn, T.; Nickless, A.; Rayner, P. J.; Law, R. M.; Roff, G.; Fraser, P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the generation of optimal atmospheric measurement networks for determining carbon dioxide fluxes over Australia using inverse methods. A Lagrangian particle dispersion model is used in reverse mode together with a Bayesian inverse modelling framework to calculate the relationship between weekly surface fluxes, comprising contributions from the biosphere and fossil fuel combustion, and hourly concentration observations for the Australian continent. Meteorological driving fields are provided by the regional version of the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) at 12 km resolution at an hourly timescale. Prior uncertainties are derived on a weekly timescale for biosphere fluxes and fossil fuel emissions from high-resolution model runs using the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) model and the Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS) respectively. The influence from outside the modelled domain is investigated, but proves to be negligible for the network design. Existing ground-based measurement stations in Australia are assessed in terms of their ability to constrain local flux estimates from the land. We find that the six stations that are currently operational are already able to reduce the uncertainties on surface flux estimates by about 30%. A candidate list of 59 stations is generated based on logistic constraints and an incremental optimisation scheme is used to extend the network of existing stations. In order to achieve an uncertainty reduction of about 50%, we need to double the number of measurement stations in Australia. Assuming equal data uncertainties for all sites, new stations would be mainly located in the northern and eastern part of the continent.

  12. Automated water analyser computer supported system (AWACSS) Part I: Project objectives, basic technology, immunoassay development, software design and networking.

    PubMed

    Tschmelak, Jens; Proll, Guenther; Riedt, Johannes; Kaiser, Joachim; Kraemmer, Peter; Bárzaga, Luis; Wilkinson, James S; Hua, Ping; Hole, J Patrick; Nudd, Richard; Jackson, Michael; Abuknesha, Ram; Barceló, Damià; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; de Alda, Maria J López; Sacher, Frank; Stien, Jan; Slobodník, Jaroslav; Oswald, Peter; Kozmenko, Helena; Korenková, Eva; Tóthová, Lívia; Krascsenits, Zoltan; Gauglitz, Guenter

    2005-02-15

    A novel analytical system AWACSS (automated water analyser computer-supported system) based on immunochemical technology has been developed that can measure several organic pollutants at low nanogram per litre level in a single few-minutes analysis without any prior sample pre-concentration nor pre-treatment steps. Having in mind actual needs of water-sector managers related to the implementation of the Drinking Water Directive (DWD) (98/83/EC, 1998) and Water Framework Directive WFD (2000/60/EC, 2000), drinking, ground, surface, and waste waters were major media used for the evaluation of the system performance. The instrument was equipped with remote control and surveillance facilities. The system's software allows for the internet-based networking between the measurement and control stations, global management, trend analysis, and early-warning applications. The experience of water laboratories has been utilised at the design of the instrument's hardware and software in order to make the system rugged and user-friendly. Several market surveys were conducted during the project to assess the applicability of the final system. A web-based AWACSS database was created for automated evaluation and storage of the obtained data in a format compatible with major databases of environmental organic pollutants in Europe. This first part article gives the reader an overview of the aims and scope of the AWACSS project as well as details about basic technology, immunoassays, software, and networking developed and utilised within the research project. The second part article reports on the system performance, first real sample measurements, and an international collaborative trial (inter-laboratory tests) to compare the biosensor with conventional anayltical methods.

  13. Copper(I) cyanide networks: synthesis, structure, and luminescence behavior. Part 2. Piperazine ligands and hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Jung; Murray, Courtney A; Tronic, Tristan A; deKrafft, Kathryn E; Ley, Amanda N; deButts, Jordan C; Pike, Robert D; Lu, Haiyan; Patterson, Howard H

    2008-08-04

    A variety of photoluminescent, and in some cases thermochromic, metal-organic networks of CuCN were self-assembled in aqueous reactions with amine ligands: (CuCN) 2(Pip) ( 1a), (CuCN) 20(Pip) 7 ( 1b), (CuCN) 7(MePip) 2 ( 2), (CuCN) 2(Me 2Pip) ( 3a), (CuCN) 4(Me 2Pip) ( 3b), (CuCN) 7(EtPip) 2 ( 4), (CuCN) 4(Et 2Pip) ( 5), (CuCN) 3(BzPip) 2 ( 6a), (CuCN) 5(BzPip) 2 ( 6b), (CuCN) 7(BzPip) 2 ( 6c), (CuCN) 4(BzPip) ( 6d), (CuCN) 2(Bz 2Pip) ( 7), (CuCN)(Ph 2CHPip) ( 8a), (CuCN) 2(Ph 2CHPip) ( 8b), (CuCN) 3(HMTA) 2 ( 9a), (CuCN) 5(HMTA) 2 ( 9b), and (CuCN) 5(HMTA) ( 9c) (Pip = piperazine, MePip = N-methylpiperazine, Me 2Pip = N, N'-dimethylpiperazine, EtPip = N-ethylpiperazine, Et 2Pip = N, N'-diethylpiperazine, BzPip = N-benzylpiperazine, Bz 2Pip = N, N'-dibenzylpiperazine, Ph 2CHPip = N-(diphenylmethyl)piperazine, and HMTA = hexamethylenetetramine). New X-ray structures are reported for 1b, 2, 3b, 4, 5, 6a, 6d, 7, 8b, 9b, and 9c. An important structural theme is the formation of (6,3) (CuCN) 2(piperazine) sheets with or without threading of independent CuCN chains. Strong luminescence at ambient temperature is observed for all but complexes 6 and 7. All luminescent compounds show a broad emission band in the blue region at about 450 nm attributable to metal-to-ligand charge transfer behavior based on the large Stokes shift between excitation and emission maxima. 3, 8, and 9 are thermochromic due to an additional lower energy emission band, which is absent at 77 K.

  14. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  15. A network-based classification model for deriving novel drug-disease associations and assessing their molecular actions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Yoon, Youngmi

    2014-01-01

    The growing number and variety of genetic network datasets increases the feasibility of understanding how drugs and diseases are associated at the molecular level. Properly selected features of the network representations of existing drug-disease associations can be used to infer novel indications of existing drugs. To find new drug-disease associations, we generated an integrative genetic network using combinations of interactions, including protein-protein interactions and gene regulatory network datasets. Within this network, network adjacencies of drug-drug and disease-disease were quantified using a scored path between target sets of them. Furthermore, the common topological module of drugs or diseases was extracted, and thereby the distance between topological drug-module and disease (or disease-module and drug) was quantified. These quantified scores were used as features for the prediction of novel drug-disease associations. Our classifiers using Random Forest, Multilayer Perceptron and C4.5 showed a high specificity and sensitivity (AUC score of 0.855, 0.828 and 0.797 respectively) in predicting novel drug indications, and displayed a better performance than other methods with limited drug and disease properties. Our predictions and current clinical trials overlap significantly across the different phases of drug development. We also identified and visualized the topological modules of predicted drug indications for certain types of cancers, and for Alzheimer's disease. Within the network, those modules show potential pathways that illustrate the mechanisms of new drug indications, including propranolol as a potential anticancer agent and telmisartan as treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  16. The anabolic action of intermittent parathyroid hormone on cortical bone depends partly on its ability to induce nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gohin, S; Carriero, A; Chenu, C; Pitsillides, A A; Arnett, T R; Marenzana, M

    2016-03-01

    There is strong evidence that vasodilatory nitric oxide (NO) donors have anabolic effects on bone in humans. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), the only osteoanabolic drug currently approved, is also a vasodilator. We investigated whether the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME might alter the effect of PTH on bone by blocking its vasodilatory effect. BALB/c mice received 28 daily injections of PTH[1-34] (80 µg/kg/day) or L-NAME (30 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination. Hindlimb blood perfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging. Bone architecture, turnover and mechanical properties in the femur were analysed respectively by micro-CT, histomorphometry and three-point bending. PTH increased hindlimb blood flow by >30% within 10 min of injection (P < 0.001). Co-treatment with L-NAME blocked the action of PTH on blood flow, whereas L-NAME alone had no effect. PTH treatment increased femoral cortical bone volume and formation rate by 20% and 110%, respectively (P < 0.001). PTH had no effect on trabecular bone volume in the femoral metaphysis although trabecular thickness and number were increased and decreased by 25%, respectively. Co-treatment with L-NAME restricted the PTH-stimulated increase in cortical bone formation but had no clear-cut effects in trabecular bone. Co-treatment with L-NAME did not affect the mechanical strength in femurs induced by iPTH. These results suggest that NO-mediated vasorelaxation plays partly a role in the anabolic action of PTH on cortical bone.

  17. Cutting State Diagnosis for Shearer through the Vibration of Rocker Transmission Part with an Improved Probabilistic Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Si, Lei; Wang, Zhongbin; Liu, Xinhua; Tan, Chao; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve more accurate and reliable identification of shearer cutting state, this paper employs the vibration of rocker transmission part and proposes a diagnosis method based on a probabilistic neural network (PNN) and fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA). The original FOA is modified with a multi-swarm strategy to enhance the search performance and the modified FOA is utilized to optimize the smoothing parameters of the PNN. The vibration signals of rocker transmission part are decomposed by the ensemble empirical mode decomposition and the Kullback-Leibler divergence is used to choose several appropriate components. Forty-five features are extracted to estimate the decomposed components and original signal, and the distance-based evaluation approach is employed to select a subset of state-sensitive features by removing the irrelevant features. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated via the simulation studies of shearer cutting state diagnosis and the comparison results indicate that the proposed method outperforms the competing methods in terms of diagnosis accuracy. PMID:27058540

  18. On the Numerical Discretization in Space and Time: Part 1 - Hamilton's Law of Varying Action Involving Lagrangian/Hamiltonian/Total Energy Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Har, Jason; Tamma, K. K.

    2010-08-01

    The focus in Part 1 of this exposition is strictly restricted to holonomic-sceleronomic systems, and the applications of interest are elastodynamics, which are routinely encountered in a wide class of structural dynamics problems in engineering. Restricting attention to these considerations, new and different perspectives and equivalences are described which deal with finite element space discretization aspects employing three distinctly different frameworks with scalar formalism. It encompasses the Lagrangian mechanics, the Hamiltonian mechanics, and as an alternative, the framework with a built-in measurable quantity based on the Total Energy. Historically, traditional practices routinely employ the weighted residual method or equivalently the principle of virtual work in dynamics for developing finite element formulations. In contrast, the present developments stem from Hamilton's law of varying action (HLVA) as a starting point and involve distinctly different scalar descriptive functions (the Lagrangian [ℒ( q , [qdot] ) : TQ →ℝ], the Hamiltonian [ℋ( p , q ) : T* Q →ℝ], or the Total Energy [ℰ( q , [qdot] ):TQ →ℝ]). These developments naturally embody the weak form in space and the statement of the weighted residual in time. Complicated structural dynamical systems such as a rotating bar and the Timoshenko beam are particularly shown here simply for illustration. In Part 2, we describe the satisfaction of conservation properties of the fully discretized equations of motion in space and time with particular attention to the Total Energy framework (in contrast to the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian), primarily because it is very natural and is computationally attractive and meaningful to conducting the time discretization [1] process. Instead of starting from the continuous form of representations, the particular focus is upon directly employing the discrete formulations for enabling algorithmic designs for the class of LMS methods for linear

  19. Excitatory Actions of Ventral Root Stimulation During Network Activity Generated by the Disinhibited Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Bonnot, Agnes; Chub, Nikolai; Pujala, Avinash; O'Donovan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    To further understand the excitatory effects of motoneurons on spinal network function, we investigated the entrainment of disinhibited rhythms by ventral root (VR) stimulation in the neonatal mouse spinal cord. A brief train of stimuli applied to a VR triggered bursting reliably in 31/32 experiments. The same roots that entrained disinhibited bursting could also produce locomotor-like activity with a similar probability when the network was not disinhibited. The ability of VR stimulation to entrain the rhythm persisted in nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic antagonists but was blocked by the AMPAR antagonist NBQX. Bath application of the type I mGluR1 receptor antagonist CPCCOEt reduced the ability of both dorsal root and VR stimulation to entrain the disinhibited rhythm and abolished the ability of either type of stimulation to evoke locomotor-like activity. Calcium imaging through the lateral aspect of the cord revealed that VR stimulation and spontaneously occurring bursts were accompanied by a wave of activity that originated ventrally and propagated dorsally. Imaging the cut transverse face of L5 revealed that the earliest VR-evoked optical activity began ventrolaterally. The optical activity accompanying spontaneous bursts could originate ventrolaterally, ventromedially, or throughout the mediolateral extent of the ventral horn or very occasionally dorsally. Collectively, our data indicate that VR stimulation can entrain disinhibited spinal network activity and trigger locomotor-like activity through a mechanism dependent on activation of both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The effects of entrainment appear to be mediated by a ventrolaterally located network that is also active during spontaneously occurring bursts. PMID:19321640

  20. Excitatory actions of ventral root stimulation during network activity generated by the disinhibited neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bonnot, Agnes; Chub, Nikolai; Pujala, Avinash; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    To further understand the excitatory effects of motoneurons on spinal network function, we investigated the entrainment of disinhibited rhythms by ventral root (VR) stimulation in the neonatal mouse spinal cord. A brief train of stimuli applied to a VR triggered bursting reliably in 31/32 experiments. The same roots that entrained disinhibited bursting could also produce locomotor-like activity with a similar probability when the network was not disinhibited. The ability of VR stimulation to entrain the rhythm persisted in nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic antagonists but was blocked by the AMPAR antagonist NBQX. Bath application of the type I mGluR1 receptor antagonist CPCCOEt reduced the ability of both dorsal root and VR stimulation to entrain the disinhibited rhythm and abolished the ability of either type of stimulation to evoke locomotor-like activity. Calcium imaging through the lateral aspect of the cord revealed that VR stimulation and spontaneously occurring bursts were accompanied by a wave of activity that originated ventrally and propagated dorsally. Imaging the cut transverse face of L(5) revealed that the earliest VR-evoked optical activity began ventrolaterally. The optical activity accompanying spontaneous bursts could originate ventrolaterally, ventromedially, or throughout the mediolateral extent of the ventral horn or very occasionally dorsally. Collectively, our data indicate that VR stimulation can entrain disinhibited spinal network activity and trigger locomotor-like activity through a mechanism dependent on activation of both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The effects of entrainment appear to be mediated by a ventrolaterally located network that is also active during spontaneously occurring bursts.

  1. Stimulus dependence of the action of small-molecule inhibitors in the CD3/CD28 signalling network.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Karsten; Ganser, Alexander; André, Thomas; Roth, Günter; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram; Brock, Roland

    2008-09-01

    Cells in the body are exposed simultaneously to a multitude of various signals. Inside a cell, molecular signalling networks integrate this information into a physiologically meaningful response. Interestingly, in the cellular testing of drug candidates, this complexity is largely ignored. Compounds are tested for cells that are challenged with one stimulus only. The activation of T lymphocytes through engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex and CD28 coreceptor is a prominent example for a cellular response that depends on the integration of signals. We investigated the cellular response characteristics of this network at different strengths of receptor and coreceptor activation. A novel cellular microarray-based approach, in which various combinations of antibodies directed against the CD3 complex and CD28 were spotted, was employed for analysing the stimulus dependence of activation of the transcription factor NFAT and actin reorganisation. For both responses, quantitative differences in inhibitor activity were observed. Remarkably, for IL-2 expression, which was detected by standard ELISA, low doses of the Src-family kinase inhibitor PP2 strongly potentiated IL-2 expression at high-level, but not at low-level, CD28 co-engagement. Therefore, for a physiologically highly relevant signalling network, the cellular response might vary qualitatively with only quantitative variations of a stimulus. This level of complexity should be considered in early cellular drug testing.

  2. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  3. [Femicide Across Europe COST Action, a transnational cooperation network for the study of and approach to femicide in Europe].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-García, Laura; Boira, Santiago; Marcuello, Chaime; Vives Cases, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Femicide or the murder of women because of their gender is a recognised public health problem as well as a serious violation of human rights. Its magnitude worldwide is still unknown, given the methodological difficulties to differentiate these murders from other female homicides. The European Union programme entitled «European Cooperation in Science and Technology» (COST) launched the «Femicide across Europe» COST Action in 2013, establishing an optimal European framework for transnational cooperation among experts addressing great social and public health challenges such as femicide. This field note describes the main objectives, the participating groups of experts and the mid-term results of this experience.

  4. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1A: Citations with abstracts, sections 1 through 9

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

  5. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1B: Citations with abstracts, sections 10 through 16

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

  6. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients.

  7. Method of forming and assembly of parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2010-12-28

    A method of assembling two or more parts together that may be metal, ceramic, metal and ceramic parts, or parts that have different CTE. Individual parts are formed and sintered from particles that leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled, sintered parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  8. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  9. Free-space optics technology employed in an UMTS release 4 bearer independent core network access part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibac, Ionut

    2005-08-01

    The UMTS Bearer Independent Core Network program introduced the 3rd Generation Partnership Program Release 4 BICN architecture into the legacy UMTS TDM-switched network. BICN is the application of calI server archltecture for voice and circuit switched data, enabling the provisioning of traditional circuit-switched services using a packet-switched transport network. Today"s business climate has made it essential for service providers to develop a comprehensive networking strategy that means introduction of RCBICN networks. The R4-BICN solution to the evolution of the Core Network in UMTS will enable operators to significantly reduce the capital and operational costs of delivering both traditional voice sewices and new multimedia services. To build the optical backbone, which can support the third generation (3G) packetized infrastructure, the operators could choose a fibre connection, or they could retain the benefits of a wireless connectivity by using a FSO - Free Space Optical lmk, the only wireless technology available that is capable of achieving data rates up to 2.4 Gbit/s. FSO offers viable alternatives for both core transmission networks and for replacing microwaves links in NodeB - RNC access networks. The paper and presentation aim to demonstrate the manner in which FSO products and networks are employed into R4-BICN design solutions.

  10. COST Action TU1206 "SUB-URBAN - A European network to improve understanding and use of the ground beneath our cities"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Diarmad; de Beer, Johannes; Lawrence, David; van der Meulen, Michiel; Mielby, Susie; Hay, David; Scanlon, Ray; Campenhout, Ignace; Taugs, Renate; Eriksson, Ingelov

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable urbanisation is the focus of SUB-URBAN, a European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action TU1206 - A European network to improve understanding and use of the ground beneath our cities. This aims to transform relationships between experts who develop urban subsurface geoscience knowledge - principally national Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs), and those who can most benefit from it - urban decision makers, planners, practitioners and the wider research community. Under COST's Transport and Urban Development Domain, SUB-URBAN has established a network of GSOs and other researchers in over 20 countries, to draw together and evaluate collective urban geoscience research in 3D/4D characterisation, prediction and visualisation. Knowledge exchange between researchers and City-partners within 'SUB-URBAN' is already facilitating new city-scale subsurface projects, and is developing a tool-box of good-practice guidance, decision-support tools, and cost-effective methodologies that are appropriate to local needs and circumstances. These are intended to act as catalysts in the transformation of relationships between geoscientists and urban decision-makers more generally. As a result, the importance of the urban sub-surface in the sustainable development of our cities will be better appreciated, and the conflicting demands currently placed on it will be acknowledged, and resolved appropriately. Existing city-scale 3D/4D model exemplars are being developed by partners in the UK (Glasgow, London), Germany (Hamburg) and France (Paris). These draw on extensive ground investigation (10s-100s of thousands of boreholes) and other data. Model linkage enables prediction of groundwater, heat, SuDS, and engineering properties. Combined subsurface and above-ground (CityGML, BIMs) models are in preparation. These models will provide valuable tools for more holistic urban planning; identifying subsurface opportunities and saving costs by reducing uncertainty in

  11. Treating the Synapse in Major Psychiatric Disorders: The Role of Postsynaptic Density Network in Dopamine-Glutamate Interplay and Psychopharmacologic Drugs Molecular Actions

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; De Berardis, Domenico; Fornaro, Michele; Fiengo, Annastasia Lucia Carmela; Martinotti, Giovanni; Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine-glutamate interplay dysfunctions have been suggested as pathophysiological key determinants of major psychotic disorders, above all schizophrenia and mood disorders. For the most part, synaptic interactions between dopamine and glutamate signaling pathways take part in the postsynaptic density, a specialized ultrastructure localized under the membrane of glutamatergic excitatory synapses. Multiple proteins, with the role of adaptors, regulators, effectors, and scaffolds compose the postsynaptic density network. They form structural and functional crossroads where multiple signals, starting at membrane receptors, are received, elaborated, integrated, and routed to appropriate nuclear targets. Moreover, transductional pathways belonging to different receptors may be functionally interconnected through postsynaptic density molecules. Several studies have demonstrated that psychopharmacologic drugs may differentially affect the expression and function of postsynaptic genes and proteins, depending upon the peculiar receptor profile of each compound. Thus, through postsynaptic network modulation, these drugs may induce dopamine-glutamate synaptic remodeling, which is at the basis of their long-term physiologic effects. In this review, we will discuss the role of postsynaptic proteins in dopamine-glutamate signals integration, as well as the peculiar impact of different psychotropic drugs used in clinical practice on postsynaptic remodeling, thereby trying to point out the possible future molecular targets of “synapse-based” psychiatric therapeutic strategies. PMID:28085108

  12. The Neural Basis of Predicting the Outcomes of Imagined Actions

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Andrew; Nee, Derek Evan; Brown, Joshua W.

    2011-01-01

    A key feature of human intelligence is the ability to predict the outcomes of one’s own actions prior to executing them. Action values are thought to be represented in part in the dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), yet current studies have focused on the value of executed actions rather than the anticipated value of a planned action. Thus, little is known about the neural basis of how individuals think (or fail to think) about their actions and the potential consequences before they act. We scanned individuals with fMRI while they thought about performing actions that they knew would likely be rewarded or unrewarded. Here we show that merely imagining an unrewarded action, as opposed to imagining a rewarded action, increases activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, independently of subsequent actions. This activity overlaps with regions that respond to actual unrewarded actions. The findings show a distinct network that signals the prospective outcomes of one’s possible actions. A number of clinical disorders such as schizophrenia and drug abuse involve a failure to take the potential consequences of an action into account prior to acting. Our results thus suggest how dysfunctions of the mPFC may contribute to such failures. PMID:22131965

  13. Bridging the gap between modules in isolation and as part of networks: A systems framework for elucidating interaction and regulation of signalling modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Govind; Krishnan, J.

    2016-07-01

    While signalling and biochemical modules have been the focus of numerous studies, they are typically studied in isolation, with no examination of the effects of the ambient network. In this paper we formulate and develop a systems framework, rooted in dynamical systems, to understand such effects, by studying the interaction of signalling modules. The modules we consider are (i) basic covalent modification, (ii) monostable switches, (iii) bistable switches, (iv) adaptive modules, and (v) oscillatory modules. We systematically examine the interaction of these modules by analyzing (a) sequential interaction without shared components, (b) sequential interaction with shared components, and (c) oblique interactions. Our studies reveal that the behaviour of a module in isolation may be substantially different from that in a network, and explicitly demonstrate how the behaviour of a given module, the characteristics of the ambient network, and the possibility of shared components can result in new effects. Our global approach illuminates different aspects of the structure and functioning of modules, revealing the importance of dynamical characteristics as well as biochemical features; this provides a methodological platform for investigating the complexity of natural modules shaped by evolution, elucidating the effects of ambient networks on a module in multiple cellular contexts, and highlighting the capabilities and constraints for engineering robust synthetic modules. Overall, such a systems framework provides a platform for bridging the gap between non-linear information processing modules, in isolation and as parts of networks, and a basis for understanding new aspects of natural and engineered cellular networks.

  14. Bridging the gap between modules in isolation and as part of networks: A systems framework for elucidating interaction and regulation of signalling modules.

    PubMed

    Menon, Govind; Krishnan, J

    2016-07-21

    While signalling and biochemical modules have been the focus of numerous studies, they are typically studied in isolation, with no examination of the effects of the ambient network. In this paper we formulate and develop a systems framework, rooted in dynamical systems, to understand such effects, by studying the interaction of signalling modules. The modules we consider are (i) basic covalent modification, (ii) monostable switches, (iii) bistable switches, (iv) adaptive modules, and (v) oscillatory modules. We systematically examine the interaction of these modules by analyzing (a) sequential interaction without shared components, (b) sequential interaction with shared components, and (c) oblique interactions. Our studies reveal that the behaviour of a module in isolation may be substantially different from that in a network, and explicitly demonstrate how the behaviour of a given module, the characteristics of the ambient network, and the possibility of shared components can result in new effects. Our global approach illuminates different aspects of the structure and functioning of modules, revealing the importance of dynamical characteristics as well as biochemical features; this provides a methodological platform for investigating the complexity of natural modules shaped by evolution, elucidating the effects of ambient networks on a module in multiple cellular contexts, and highlighting the capabilities and constraints for engineering robust synthetic modules. Overall, such a systems framework provides a platform for bridging the gap between non-linear information processing modules, in isolation and as parts of networks, and a basis for understanding new aspects of natural and engineered cellular networks.

  15. The Learning Exchange Network: An Evolutionary Step in Providing Support for Self-Directed Learning. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Allan Thomas

    1985-01-01

    The Learning Exchange Network is explored to show how it (1) takes advantage of the strong points of the previous models for self-directed learners; (2) counters the liabilities of the previous models; (3) serves the smaller populations of semirural areas; and (4) includes an implementation plan. The practicality of the network is discussed. (CT)

  16. Evaluation of water quality parameters for the Mamasin dam in Aksaray City in the central Anatolian part of Turkey by means of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatip, Hatim; Kömür, M. Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Sustaining the human ecological benefits of surface water requires carefully planned strategies for reducing the cumulative risks posed by diverse human activities. The municipality of Aksaray city plays a key role in developing solutions to surface water management and protection in the central Anatolian part of Turkey. The responsibility to provide drinking water and sewage works, regulate the use of private land and protect public health provides the mandate and authority to take action. The present approach discusses the main sources of contamination and the result of direct wastewater discharges into the Melendiz and Karasu rivers, which recharge the Mamasın dam sites by the use of artificial neural network (ANN) modeling techniques. The present study illustrates the ability to predict and/or approve the output values of previously measured water quality parameters of the recharge and discharge areas at the Mamasin dam site by means of ANN techniques. Using the ANN model is appreciated in such environmental research. Here, the ANN is used for estimating if the field parameters are agreeable to the results of this model or not. The present study simulates a situation in the past by means of ANN. But in case any field measurements of some relative parameters at the outlet point “discharge area” have been missed, it could be possible to predict the approximate output values from the detailed periodical water quality parameters. Because of the high variance and the inherent non-linear relationship of the water quality parameters in time series, it is difficult to produce a reliable model with conventional modeling approaches. In this paper, the ANN modeling technique is used to establish a model for evaluating the change in electrical conductivity (EC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) values in recharge (input) and discharge (output) areas of the dam water under pollution risks. A general ANN modeling scheme is also recommended for the water parameters. The modeling

  17. Method of forming and assembly of metal parts and ceramic parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN

    2011-11-22

    A method of forming and assembling at least two parts together that may be metal, ceramic, or a combination of metal and ceramic parts. Such parts may have different CTE. Individual parts that are formed and sintered from particles leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  18. Neural basis of understanding communicative actions: Changes associated with knowing the actor’s intention and the meanings of the actions

    PubMed Central

    Möttönen, Riikka; Farmer, Harry; Watkins, Kate E.

    2016-01-01

    People can communicate by using hand actions, e.g., signs. Understanding communicative actions requires that the observer knows that the actor has an intention to communicate and the meanings of the actions. Here, we investigated how this prior knowledge affects processing of observed actions. We used functional MRI to determine changes in action processing when non-signers were told that the observed actions are communicative (i.e., signs) and learned the meanings of half of the actions. Processing of hand actions activated the left and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, BA 44 and 45) when the communicative intention of the actor was known, even when the meanings of the actions remained unknown. These regions were not active when the observers did not know about the communicative nature of the hand actions. These findings suggest that the left and right IFG play a role in understanding the intention of the actor, but do not process visuospatial features of the communicative actions. Knowing the meanings of the hand actions further enhanced activity in the anterior part of the IFG (BA 45), the inferior parietal lobule and posterior inferior and middle temporal gyri in the left hemisphere. These left-hemisphere language regions could provide a link between meanings and observed actions. In sum, the findings provide evidence for the segregation of the networks involved in the neural processing of visuospatial features of communicative hand actions and those involved in understanding the actor’s intention and the meanings of the actions. PMID:26752450

  19. Integrating Climate Change Scenarios and Co-developed Policy Scenarios to Inform Coastal Adaptation: Results from a Tillamook County, Oregon Knowledge to Action Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, E.; Ruggiero, P.; Serafin, K.; Bolte, J.; Mills, A.; Corcoran, P.; Stevenson, J.; Lach, D.

    2014-12-01

    Local decision-makers often lack both the information and tools to reduce their community's overall vulnerability to current and future climate change impacts. Managers are restricted in their actions by the scale of the problem, inherent scientific uncertainty, limits of information exchange, and the global nature of available data, rendering place-based strategies difficult to generate. Several U.S. Pacific Northwest coastal communities are already experiencing chronic erosion and flooding, hazards only to be exacerbated by sea level rise and changing patterns of storminess associated with climate change. To address these issues, a knowledge to action network (KTAN) consisting of local Tillamook County stakeholders and Oregon State University researchers, was formed to project future flooding and erosion impacts and determine possible adaptation policies to reduce vulnerability. Via an iterative scenario planning process, the KTAN has developed four distinct adaptation policy scenarios, including 'Status Quo', 'Hold The Line', 'ReAlign', and 'Laissez-Faire'. These policy scenarios are being integrated with a range of climate change scenarios within the modeling framework Envision, a multi-agent GIS-based tool, which allows for the combination of physical processes data, probabilistic climate change information, coastal flood and erosion models, and stakeholder driven adaptation strategies into distinct plausible future scenarios. Because exact physical and social responses to climate change are impossible to ascertain, information about the differences between possible future scenarios can provide valuable information to decision-makers and the community at large. For example, the fewest projected coastal flood and erosion impacts to buildings occur under the 'ReAlign' policy scenario (i.e., adaptation strategies that move dwellings away from the coast) under both low and high climate change scenarios, especially in comparison to the 'Status Quo' or 'Hold The

  20. Can the whole be less than the sum of its parts? Pathway analysis in genome-scale metabolic networks using elementary flux patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kaleta, Christoph; de Figueiredo, Luís Filipe; Schuster, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Elementary modes represent a valuable concept in the analysis of metabolic reaction networks. However, they can only be computed in medium-size systems, preventing application to genome-scale metabolic models. In consequence, the analysis is usually constrained to a specific part of the known metabolism, and the remaining system is modeled using abstractions like exchange fluxes and external species. As we show by the analysis of a model of the central metabolism of Escherichia coli that has been previously analyzed using elementary modes, the choice of these abstractions heavily impacts the pathways that are detected, and the results are biased by the knowledge of the metabolic capabilities of the network by the user. In order to circumvent these problems, we introduce the concept of elementary flux patterns, which explicitly takes into account possible steady-state fluxes through a genome-scale metabolic network when analyzing pathways through a subsystem. By being similar to elementary mode analysis, our concept now allows for the application of many elementary-mode-based tools to genome-scale metabolic networks. We present an algorithm to compute elementary flux patterns and analyze a model of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and adjacent reactions in E. coli. Thus, we detect several pathways that can be used as alternative routes to some central metabolic pathways. Finally, we give an outlook on further applications like the computation of minimal media, the development of knockout strategies, and the analysis of combined genome-scale networks. PMID:19541909

  1. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions, Which Is To Be Placed in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. C Appendix C to... Claims for Response Actions Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA authorize the Fund to...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions, Which Is To Be Placed in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. C Appendix C to... Claims for Response Actions Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA authorize the Fund to...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions, Which Is To Be Placed in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. C Appendix C to... Claims for Response Actions Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA authorize the Fund to...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions, Which Is To Be Placed in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. C Appendix C to... Claims for Response Actions Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA authorize the Fund to...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 307 - Notice of Limitations on the Payment of Claims for Response Actions, Which Is To Be Placed in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Pt. 307, App. C Appendix C to... Claims for Response Actions Sections 111(a)(2) and 122(b)(1) of CERCLA authorize the Fund to...

  6. Charter Schools As Seen by Those Who Know Them Best: Students, Teachers, and Parents. Charter Schools in Action Project, Final Report--Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanourek, Gregg; And Others

    Although charter schools have provoked much interest, there has not been a systematic nationwide effort to ask the clients and teachers of charter schools what they think about them. During the 1996-97 school year, Hudson Institute's Charter Schools in Action Project gathered quantitative data that describe 50 charter schools enrolling…

  7. Human-Systems Integration (HSI) and the Network Integration Evaluations (NIEs), Part 3: Mitigating Cognitive Load in Network-Enabled Mission Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    that cognitive work more reliable. Practically speaking , operational integration involves incorporating new mission command materiel solutions into...echelons. • Formal KM training has not been provided to personnel requiring KM skills . 2.3.2 Recommendations The following recommendations are...training for affected personnel. • Consideration should be given to including KM skills in the Mission Command DMG course. This action would assist in

  8. Network Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Describes interconnection methods, speed, and comparative equipment costs of networking starter kits. These kits supply network-connection devices that plug into or connect to each computer that is part of a network; they may also provide interconnection cables and installation software needed to set up a network. Reviews 20 kits that use a…

  9. The evaluation of evidence in the forensic investigation of fire incidents (Part I): an approach using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, A; Taroni, F; Delemont, O; Semadeni, C; Davison, A C

    2005-01-06

    The forensic investigation of the origin and cause of a fire incident is a particularly demanding area of expertise. As the available evidence is often incomplete or vague, uncertainty is a key element. The present study is an attempt to approach this through the use of Bayesian networks, which have been found useful in assisting human reasoning in a variety of disciplines in which uncertainty plays a central role. The present paper describes the construction of a Bayesian network (BN) and its use for drawing inferences about propositions of interest, based upon a single, possibly non replicable item of evidence: detected residual quantities of a flammable liquid in fire debris.

  10. Systems biology and the origins of life? Part I. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? Reproduction, identity and sensitivity to signals of biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The set of these two theoretical papers offers an alternative to the hypothesis of a primordial RNA-world. The basic idea of these papers is to consider that the first prebiotic systems could have been networks of catalysed reactions encapsulated by a membrane. In order to test this hypothesis it was attempted to list the main obligatory features of living systems and see whether encapsulated biochemical networks could possibly display these features. The traits of living systems are the following: the ability they have to reproduce; the fact they possess an identity; the fact that biological events should be considered in the context of a history; the fact that living systems are able to evolve by selection of alterations of their structure and self-organization. The aim of these two papers is precisely to show that encapsulated biochemical networks can possess these properties and can be considered good candidates for the first prebiotic systems. In the present paper it is shown that if the proteinoids are not very specific catalysts and if some of the reactions of the network are autocatalytic whereas others are not, the resulting system does not reach a steady-state and tends to duplicate. In the same line, these biochemical networks possess an identity, viz. an information, defined from the probability of occurrence of these nodes. Moreover interaction of two ligands can increase, or decrease, this information. In the first case, the system is defined as emergent, in the second case it is considered integrated. Another property of living systems is that their behaviour is defined in the context of a time-arrow. For instance, they are able to sense whether the intensity of a signal is reached after an increase, or a decrease. This property can be mimicked by a simple physico-chemical system made up of the diffusion of a ligand followed by its chemical transformation catalysed by a proteinoid displaying inhibition by excess substrate. Under these conditions the

  11. Supporting the development of interpersonal skills in nursing, in an undergraduate mental health curriculum: reaching the parts other strategies do not reach through action learning.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Anna; McNay, Lisa; Dewar, Belinda; McCaig, Marie

    2014-09-01

    The centrality of therapeutic relationships is considered to be the cornerstone of effective mental health nursing practice. Strategies that support the development of these skills and the emotional aspects of learning need to be developed. Action learning is one such strategy. This article reports on a qualitative research study on the introduction of Action Learning Sets (ALS) into a Pre-registration Mental Health Nursing Programme. This teaching and learning methodology was chosen to support the emotional aspects of learning and mental health nursing skills. Four themes were identified: developing skills of listening and questioning in 'real time', enhanced self-awareness, being with someone in the moment--there is no rehearsal and doing things differently in practice. Students and lecturers found the experience positive and advocate for other Pre-registration Mental Health Nursing Programmes to consider the use of ALS within the curriculum.

  12. 25 Action Learning Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA.

    This booklet on action-learning reflects an interest in preparing youth for the world of real experiences. Arranged in two major parts, the first offers information on the background and development of action-learning. Included in this section are the conclusions of the Panel on Youth of the President's Science Advisory Committee, the National…

  13. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  14. Investigating the effectiveness of many-core network processors for high performance cyber protection systems. Part I, FY2011.

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Naegle, John Hunt; Wright, Brian J.; Benner, Robert E., Jr.; Shelburg, Jeffrey Scott; Pearson, David Benjamin; Johnson, Joshua Alan; Onunkwo, Uzoma A.; Zage, David John; Patel, Jay S.

    2011-09-01

    This report documents our first year efforts to address the use of many-core processors for high performance cyber protection. As the demands grow for higher bandwidth (beyond 1 Gbits/sec) on network connections, the need to provide faster and more efficient solution to cyber security grows. Fortunately, in recent years, the development of many-core network processors have seen increased interest. Prior working experiences with many-core processors have led us to investigate its effectiveness for cyber protection tools, with particular emphasis on high performance firewalls. Although advanced algorithms for smarter cyber protection of high-speed network traffic are being developed, these advanced analysis techniques require significantly more computational capabilities than static techniques. Moreover, many locations where cyber protections are deployed have limited power, space and cooling resources. This makes the use of traditionally large computing systems impractical for the front-end systems that process large network streams; hence, the drive for this study which could potentially yield a highly reconfigurable and rapidly scalable solution.

  15. Texas Teacher Center Activities and Networking with Special Attention to School-Based Teacher Educator (SBTE) Activities: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucks, Susan F.; Hall, Gene E.

    This document is the second in a series of evaluation reports by the Research and Development Center for Teacher Education at the University of Texas at Austin, assessing the state of teacher centering in Texas and the effects of the University of Houston's Project on School-Based Teacher Educators (SBTE), initiated to create a network of teacher…

  16. Utilizing artificial neural networks in MATLAB to achieve parts-per-billion mass measurement accuracy with a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Williams, D Keith; Kovach, Alexander L; Muddiman, David C; Hanck, Kenneth W

    2009-07-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry has the ability to realize exceptional mass measurement accuracy (MMA); MMA is one of the most significant attributes of mass spectrometric measurements as it affords extraordinary molecular specificity. However, due to space-charge effects, the achievable MMA significantly depends on the total number of ions trapped in the ICR cell for a particular measurement, as well as relative ion abundance of a given species. Artificial neural network calibration in conjunction with automatic gain control (AGC) is utilized in these experiments to formally account for the differences in total ion population in the ICR cell between the external calibration spectra and experimental spectra. In addition, artificial neural network calibration is used to account for both differences in total ion population in the ICR cell as well as relative ion abundance of a given species, which also affords mean MMA values at the parts-per-billion level.

  17. Networks in Social Policy Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedres, Balázs; Scotti, Marco

    2012-08-01

    1. Introduction M. Scotti and B. Vedres; Part I. Information, Collaboration, Innovation: The Creative Power of Networks: 2. Dissemination of health information within social networks C. Dhanjal, S. Blanchemanche, S. Clemençon, A. Rona-Tas and F. Rossi; 3. Scientific teams and networks change the face of knowledge creation S. Wuchty, J. Spiro, B. F. Jones and B. Uzzi; 4. Structural folds: the innovative potential of overlapping groups B. Vedres and D. Stark; 5. Team formation and performance on nanoHub: a network selection challenge in scientific communities D. Margolin, K. Ognyanova, M. Huang, Y. Huang and N. Contractor; Part II. Influence, Capture, Corruption: Networks Perspectives on Policy Institutions: 6. Modes of coordination of collective action: what actors in policy making? M. Diani; 7. Why skewed distributions of pay for executives is the cause of much grief: puzzles and few answers so far B. Kogut and J.-S. Yang; 8. Networks of institutional capture: a case of business in the State apparatus E. Lazega and L. Mounier; 9. The social and institutional structure of corruption: some typical network configurations of corruption transactions in Hungary Z. Szántó, I. J. Tóth and S. Varga; Part III. Crisis, Extinction, World System Change: Network Dynamics on a Large Scale: 10. How creative elements help the recovery of networks after crisis: lessons from biology A. Mihalik, A. S. Kaposi, I. A. Kovács, T. Nánási, R. Palotai, Á. Rák, M. S. Szalay-Beko and P. Csermely; 11. Networks and globalization policies D. R. White; 12. Network science in ecology: the structure of ecological communities and the biodiversity question A. Bodini, S. Allesina and C. Bondavalli; 13. Supply security in the European natural gas pipeline network M. Scotti and B. Vedres; 14. Conclusions and outlook A.-L. Barabási; Index.

  18. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  19. Tips for a physician in getting the right job part III: Networking and social media, references, and recruiters.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-10-01

    It is important that physicians are appropriately aggressive in obtaining the best possible job, and not sitting back passively and expecting employers to come hunting for them. Networking is very important to learn of new job opportunities and in some cases to be introduced to prospective employers. Social media sites may be useful for networking and for researching job opportunities and the people in certain organizations. Recruiters can be helpful for many physicians in finding the right job. However, some recruiters can be bothersome and be more interested in making a commission than in obtaining the best match between the employer and employee. Having stellar references who will give an enthusiastic recommendation for the job seeker, both in writing and on the phone, is very important.

  20. Earth and environmental science in the 1980's: Part 1: Environmental data systems, supercomputer facilities and networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Overview descriptions of on-line environmental data systems, supercomputer facilities, and networks are presented. Each description addresses the concepts of content, capability, and user access relevant to the point of view of potential utilization by the Earth and environmental science community. The information on similar systems or facilities is presented in parallel fashion to encourage and facilitate intercomparison. In addition, summary sheets are given for each description, and a summary table precedes each section.

  1. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  2. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  4. Semipurified Ethyl Acetate Partition of Methanolic Extract of Melastoma malabathricum Leaves Exerts Gastroprotective Activity Partly via Its Antioxidant-Antisecretory-Anti-Inflammatory Action and Synergistic Action of Several Flavonoid-Based Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ismail Suhaimy, Noor Wahida; Noor Azmi, Ahmad Khusairi; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Cheema, Manraj Singh

    2017-01-01

    Recent study has demonstrated the gastroprotective activity of crude methanolic extract of M. malabathricum leaves. The present study evaluated the gastroprotective potential of semipurified extracts (partitions): petroleum ether, ethyl acetate (EAMM), and aqueous obtained from the methanolic extract followed by the elucidation of the gastroprotective mechanisms of the most effective partition. Using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer assay, all partitions exerted significant gastroprotection, with EAMM being the most effective partition. EAMM significantly (i) reduced the volume and acidity (free and total) while increasing the pH of gastric juice and enhanced the gastric wall mucus secretion when assessed using the pylorus ligation assay, (ii) increased the enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant activity of the stomach tissue, (iii) lost its gastroprotective activity following pretreatment with N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; NO blocker) or carbenoxolone (CBXN; NP-SH blocker), (iv) exerted antioxidant activity against various in vitro oxidation assays, and (v) showed moderate in vitro anti-inflammatory activity via the LOX-modulated pathway. In conclusion, EAMM exerts a remarkable NO/NP-SH-dependent gastroprotective effect that is attributed to its antisecretory and antioxidant activities, ability to stimulate the gastric mucus production and endogenous antioxidant system, and synergistic action of several gastroprotective-induced flavonoids. PMID:28168011

  5. Semipurified Ethyl Acetate Partition of Methanolic Extract of Melastoma malabathricum Leaves Exerts Gastroprotective Activity Partly via Its Antioxidant-Antisecretory-Anti-Inflammatory Action and Synergistic Action of Several Flavonoid-Based Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ismail Suhaimy, Noor Wahida; Noor Azmi, Ahmad Khusairi; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Tohid, Siti Farah Md; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin

    2017-01-01

    Recent study has demonstrated the gastroprotective activity of crude methanolic extract of M. malabathricum leaves. The present study evaluated the gastroprotective potential of semipurified extracts (partitions): petroleum ether, ethyl acetate (EAMM), and aqueous obtained from the methanolic extract followed by the elucidation of the gastroprotective mechanisms of the most effective partition. Using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer assay, all partitions exerted significant gastroprotection, with EAMM being the most effective partition. EAMM significantly (i) reduced the volume and acidity (free and total) while increasing the pH of gastric juice and enhanced the gastric wall mucus secretion when assessed using the pylorus ligation assay, (ii) increased the enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant activity of the stomach tissue, (iii) lost its gastroprotective activity following pretreatment with N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; NO blocker) or carbenoxolone (CBXN; NP-SH blocker), (iv) exerted antioxidant activity against various in vitro oxidation assays, and (v) showed moderate in vitro anti-inflammatory activity via the LOX-modulated pathway. In conclusion, EAMM exerts a remarkable NO/NP-SH-dependent gastroprotective effect that is attributed to its antisecretory and antioxidant activities, ability to stimulate the gastric mucus production and endogenous antioxidant system, and synergistic action of several gastroprotective-induced flavonoids.

  6. 17 CFR Appendix D to Part 30 - Information That a Foreign Board of Trade Should Submit When Seeking No-Action Relief To Offer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS Pt. 30, App. D Appendix D to Part 30—Information... trading of futures contracts on a group or index of securities on contract markets and derivatives... United States, a Futures Contract on a Foreign Non-Narrow-Based Security Index Traded on That...

  7. How action selection can be embodied: intracranial gamma band recording shows response competition during the Eriksen flankers test

    PubMed Central

    Caruana, Fausto; Uithol, Sebo; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sartori, Ivana; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Avanzini, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings in monkeys suggest that action selection is based on a competition between various action options that are automatically planned by the motor system. Here we discuss data from intracranial EEG recordings in human premotor cortex (PMC) during a bimanual version of the Eriksen flankers test that suggest that the same principles apply to human action decisions. Recording sites in the dorsal PMC show an early but undifferentiated activation, a delayed response that depends on the experimental conditions and, finally, a movement related activation during action execution. Additionally, we found that the medial part of the PMC show a significant increase in response for ipsilateral trials, suggesting a role in inhibiting the wrong response. The ventral PMC seems to be involved in action execution, rather than action selection. Together these findings suggest that the human PMC is part of a network that specifies, selects, and executes actions. PMID:25206328

  8. Small Group Dynamics in the Evolution of Global Network Terrorism: A Comprehensive, People-Based Approach. Part A: Select Publications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-07

    immediate aftermath. 2. continuing to work together (e.g.. on Abdullah Sungkar’s chicken farm in Malaysia ) or to play soccer together after demobili/ation...founders (Al Mukmin in Java and Lukman Al-I lakicm in Malaysia ), 4. being related b) kinship or marriage to someone else in the network (e.g.. there...Democracy with Fairness, but not in any "automatic" \\\\ a\\. Stop wasting millions of dollars studying the Koran and trying to figure out what terrorists

  9. Method of forming and assembly of metal and ceramic parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B

    2014-04-22

    A method of forming and assembling at least two parts together that may be metal, ceramic, or a combination of metal and ceramic parts. Such parts may have different CTE. Individual parts that are formed and sintered from particles leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  10. Action for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranly, Donald P.

    The origins, development, and effectiveness of Action for Children's Television (ACT) are examined in this pamphlet. The strategies used by ACT to obtain change at the congressional level and within television stations and networks include the following: a "tuneout" day when people are urged to turn off their television sets, a boycott…

  11. Study on mechanics of bodies under the action of sound pollution in industrial halls. Part II: Analysis of sound pressure inside the hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arghir, M.; Lăpuşan, I. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, it is taking into account all these phenomena of sounds propagation in given space. Within the framework of the given research is a study in industrial park "Teraplast" from Bistriţa-Năsăud county. This is industrial products for pvc constructions. From the submissions made to the workshops of processing industrial park "Teraplast" has been found, that noise is produced mainly in the power pumps hall. The registrations were made during a normal working days. The recorders made, for one minute, with recorder (NL32, Japanese society RION) in the pump's hall 12 positions were introduced in a high- capacity computer. This second part of the paper contains a natural continuation of the study conducted in the first part. Through the composition of sound waves for each pump in part according to the construction of the hall, gives the sound field generated by sources of power pumps during simultaneous operation. Field of noise sources inside the hall of power pumps determines an acoustic pressure on the walls of the hall. Taking into consideration the frequencies that are threatening the construction of the hall, will be presented successively acoustic pressure what special expertise to the hall walls the pressures of 230Hz, 350Hz, 800Hz and 1400Hz. This study is important for the acoustic pressure made from the "Teraplast" enterprise inside, and outside the halls.

  12. Changes in cochlear responses in guinea pig with changes in perilymphatic K+. Part I: summating potentials, compound action potentials and DPOAEs.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Simon; Patuzzi, Robert

    2008-03-01

    We have measured the effects of changing perilymphatic K+ by perfusing scala tympani in guinea pigs with salt solutions high or low in K+, while monitoring the distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in the ear canal (a measure of mechanical vibration of the organ of Corti), the summating potential (SP) evoked by high-frequency tone-bursts (taken to be a measure of pre-synaptic electrical activity of the inner hair cells) and the compound action potential (CAP) of the auditory nerve (taken to be a measure of post-synaptic neural activity). We have attempted to investigate the osmotic effects of our perfusates by comparison with simple hyperosmotic sucrose perfusates and iso-osmotic versions of perfusates, and for the effects of changes in other ions (e.g. Na+ and Cl-) by keeping these constant in some perfusates while elevating K+. We have found that changing the K+ concentration over the range 0-30mM elevated the SP and CAP thresholds almost equally in normal animals, and not at all in animals devoid of outer hair cells (OHCs), showing that OHCs are sensitive to the perfusates we have used, but the inner hair cells (IHCs) and the type I afferent dendrites are not, presumably because IHCs are shielded from perilymph by supporting cells, and the membranes of the afferent dendrite membranes exposed directly to our perfusates are dominated by Cl(-) permeability, rather than by K+ permeability. This view is supported by experiments in which the perilymphatic Cl(-) concentration was reduced, producing a large elevation in CAP threshold, but a much smaller elevation of SP threshold, suggesting disruption of action potential initiation. The view that threshold elevations with changes in perilymphatic K+ are due almost solely to a disruption of OHC function and a consequent change in the mechanical sensitivity of the organ of Corti was supported by measurements of amplitude of the 2f1-f2 distortion product otoacoustic emission. During elevations in K+, DPOAEs

  13. Vitamin D and the omega-3 fatty acids control serotonin synthesis and action, part 2: relevance for ADHD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Rhonda P; Ames, Bruce N

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin regulates a wide variety of brain functions and behaviors. Here, we synthesize previous findings that serotonin regulates executive function, sensory gating, and social behavior and that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior all share in common defects in these functions. It has remained unclear why supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D improve cognitive function and behavior in these brain disorders. Here, we propose mechanisms by which serotonin synthesis, release, and function in the brain are modulated by vitamin D and the 2 marine omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Brain serotonin is synthesized from tryptophan by tryptophan hydroxylase 2, which is transcriptionally activated by vitamin D hormone. Inadequate levels of vitamin D (∼70% of the population) and omega-3 fatty acids are common, suggesting that brain serotonin synthesis is not optimal. We propose mechanisms by which EPA increases serotonin release from presynaptic neurons by reducing E2 series prostaglandins and DHA influences serotonin receptor action by increasing cell membrane fluidity in postsynaptic neurons. We propose a model whereby insufficient levels of vitamin D, EPA, or DHA, in combination with genetic factors and at key periods during development, would lead to dysfunctional serotonin activation and function and may be one underlying mechanism that contributes to neuropsychiatric disorders and depression. This model suggests that optimizing vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid intake may help prevent and modulate the severity of brain dysfunction.

  14. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, R.L.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  15. 1,4-Dihydropyridine scaffold in medicinal chemistry, the story so far and perspectives (part 2): action in other targets and antitargets.

    PubMed

    Carosati, E; Ioan, P; Micucci, M; Broccatelli, F; Cruciani, G; Zhorov, B S; Chiarini, A; Budriesi, R

    2012-01-01

    1,4-Dihydropyridines were introduced in the last century for the treatment of coronary diseases. Then medicinal chemists decorated the 1,4-DHP nucleus, the most studied scaffold among L-type calcium channel blockers, achieving diverse activities at several receptors, channels and enzymes. We already described (Ioan et al. Curr. Med. Chem. 2011, 18, 4901-4922) the effects of 1,4-DHPs at ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors. In this paper we continue the analysis of the wide range of biological effects exerted by compounds belonging to this chemical class. In particular, focus is given to the ability of 1,4-DHPs to revert multi drug resistance that, after over 20 years of research, continues to be of great interest. We also describe activities on other targets and the action of 1,4-DHPs against several diseases. Finally, we report and review the interaction of 1,4-DHPs with the hERG channel, transporters and phase I metabolizing enzymes. This work is a starting point for further exploration of the 1,4-DHP core activities on targets, off-targets and antitargets.

  16. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view.

  17. Estimation of the ozone decrease possibility in the lower part of the D region under the action of a powerful radiowave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, S. Z.; Kozlov, S. I.; Tasenko, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of the influence of a powerful radiowave on the ozone concentration in the lower part of the ionospheric D region is discussed on the basis of experiments at the Sura heating facility in March 2009, the results of which were published relatively recently by a group of authors. The results, which were obtained with the use of exact equations of the mesospheric ozone photochemistry, substantially disagree with some conclusions derived by the authors but do not completely deny their hypothesis on the possible influence on the ozone of internal gravity waves formed at heights of the ionospheric E region.

  18. 75 FR 63382 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Amendment to the Bank Secrecy Act Regulations; Defining...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... 31 CFR Part 103 RIN 1506-AA93 Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Amendment to the Bank Secrecy Act... Crimes Enforcement Network (``FinCEN''), Treasury. ACTION: Final rule; extension of compliance date... to recordkeeping requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.\\8\\ In light of...

  19. 75 FR 75593 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Confidentiality of Suspicious Activity Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... 31 CFR Part 103 RIN 1506-AA99 Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Confidentiality of Suspicious Activity Reports AGENCY: The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (``FinCEN''), Treasury. ACTION: Final... functions to promote the integrity of financial markets and mitigate risks of financial crime....

  20. 75 FR 6560 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Expansion of Special Information Sharing Procedures To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... 31 CFR Part 103 RIN 1506-AB04 Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Expansion of Special Information... Network (``FinCEN''), Treasury. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: FinCEN is issuing this final rule to amend... enforcement agencies, and State and local law enforcement agencies, to submit requests for information...

  1. Developmental engineering: a new paradigm for the design and manufacturing of cell-based products. Part II: from genes to networks: tissue engineering from the viewpoint of systems biology and network science.

    PubMed

    Lenas, Petros; Moos, Malcolm; Luyten, Frank P

    2009-12-01

    The field of tissue engineering is moving toward a new concept of "in vitro biomimetics of in vivo tissue development." In Part I of this series, we proposed a theoretical framework integrating the concepts of developmental biology with those of process design to provide the rules for the design of biomimetic processes. We named this methodology "developmental engineering" to emphasize that it is not the tissue but the process of in vitro tissue development that has to be engineered. To formulate the process design rules in a rigorous way that will allow a computational design, we should refer to mathematical methods to model the biological process taking place in vitro. Tissue functions cannot be attributed to individual molecules but rather to complex interactions between the numerous components of a cell and interactions between cells in a tissue that form a network. For tissue engineering to advance to the level of a technologically driven discipline amenable to well-established principles of process engineering, a scientifically rigorous formulation is needed of the general design rules so that the behavior of networks of genes, proteins, or cells that govern the unfolding of developmental processes could be related to the design parameters. Now that sufficient experimental data exist to construct plausible mathematical models of many biological control circuits, explicit hypotheses can be evaluated using computational approaches to facilitate process design. Recent progress in systems biology has shown that the empirical concepts of developmental biology that we used in Part I to extract the rules of biomimetic process design can be expressed in rigorous mathematical terms. This allows the accurate characterization of manufacturing processes in tissue engineering as well as the properties of the artificial tissues themselves. In addition, network science has recently shown that the behavior of biological networks strongly depends on their topology and has

  2. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  3. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  4. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  5. Tyre-road grip coefficient assessment - Part II: online estimation using instrumented vehicle, extended Kalman filter, and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Pablo; Mántaras, Daniel A.; Fidalgo, Eloy; Álvarez, Javier; Riva, Paolo; Girón, Pablo; Compadre, Diego; Ferran, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the limit of safe driving conditions by identifying the maximal friction coefficient in a real vehicle. The study will focus on finding a method to determine this limit before reaching the skid, which is valuable information in the context of traffic safety. Since it is not possible to measure the friction coefficient directly, it will be estimated using the appropriate tools in order to get the most accurate information. A real vehicle is instrumented to collect information of general kinematics and steering tie-rod forces. A real-time algorithm is developed to estimate forces and aligning torque in the tyres using an extended Kalman filter and neural networks techniques. The methodology is based on determining the aligning torque; this variable allows evaluation of the behaviour of the tyre. It transmits interesting information from the tyre-road contact and can be used to predict the maximal tyre grip and safety margin. The maximal grip coefficient is estimated according to a knowledge base, extracted from computer simulation of a high detailed three-dimensional model, using Adams® software. The proposed methodology is validated and applied to real driving conditions, in which maximal grip and safety margin are properly estimated.

  6. TecDEM: A MATLAB based toolbox for tectonic geomorphology, Part 1: Drainage network preprocessing and stream profile analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Faisal; Gloaguen, Richard

    2011-02-01

    We present TecDEM, a software shell implemented in MATLAB that applies tectonic geomorphologic tasks to digital elevation models (DEMs). The first part of this paper series describes drainage partitioning schemes and stream profile analysis. The graphical user interface of TecDEM provides several options: determining flow directions, stream vectorization, watershed delineation, Strahler order labeling, stream profile generation, knickpoints selection, Concavity, Steepness and Hack indices calculations. The knickpoints along selected streams as well as stream profile analysis, and Hack index per stream profile are computed using a semi-automatic method. TecDEM was used to extract and investigate the stream profiles in the Kaghan Valley (Northern Pakistan). Our interpretations of the TecDEM results correlate well with previous tectonic evolution models for this region. TecDEM is designed to assist geoscientists in applying complex tectonic geomorphology tasks to global DEM data.

  7. The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 is part of a p53–microRNA-34 network

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Jordan A.; Tenga, Alexa; Hills, Justin; Hoyer, Jessica D.; Cherian, Milu T.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 2 (NR4A2) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is over-expressed in cancer and promotes cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and chemoresistance. Increased expression and function of NR4A2 have been attributed to various signaling pathways, but little is known about microRNA (miRNA) regulation of NR4A2 in cancer. To investigate the posttranscriptional regulation of NR4A2, we used a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) reporter screen and identified miR-34 as a putative regulator of NR4A2. By using computer predictions, we identified and confirmed an miRNA recognition element in the 3′ UTR of NR4A2 that was responsible for miR-34–mediated suppression. We next demonstrated that overexpression of exogenous miR-34 or activation of the p53 pathway, which regulates endogenous miR-34 expression, decreased NR4A2 expression. Consistent with previous reports, overexpression of NR4A2 blocked the induction of p53 target genes, including mir-34a. This was a phenotypic effect, as NR4A2 overexpression could rescue cells from p53-induced inhibition of proliferation. In summary, our results are the first characterization of a cancer-related miRNA capable of regulating NR4A2 and suggest a network and possible feedback mechanism involving p53, miR-34, and NR4A2. PMID:27121375

  8. Availability analysis of the traveling-wave maser amplifiers in the deep space network. Part 1: The 70-meter antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issa, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the reliability and availability analyses of the individual S- and X-band traveling-wave maser (TWM) assemblies and their operational configurations in the 70-meter antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) are described. For the period 1990 through 1991, the TWM availability parameters for the Telemetry Data System are: mean time between failures (MTBF), 930 hr; mean time to restore services (MTTRS), 1.4 hr; and the average availability, 99.85 percent. In previously published articles, the performance analysis of the TWM assemblies was confined to the determination of the parameters specified above. However, as the mean down time (MDT) for the repair of TWM's increases, the levels of the TWM operational availabilities and MTTRS are adversely affected. A more comprehensive TWM availability analysis is presented to permit evaluation of both MTBF and MDT effects. Performance analysis of the TWM assemblies, based on their station monthly failure reports, indicates that the TWM's required MTBF and MDT levels of 3000 hr and 36 to 48 hr, respectively, have been achieved by the TWM's only at the Canberra Deep Space Station (DSS 43). The Markov Process technique is employed to develop suitable availability measures for the S- and X-band TWM configurations when each is operated in a two-assembly standby mode. The derived stochastic expressions allow for the evaluation of those configurations' simultaneous availability for the Antenna Microwave Subsystem. The application of these expressions to demonstrate the impact of various levels of TWM maintainability (or MDT) on their configurations' operational availabilities is presented for each of the 70-m antenna stations.

  9. Action representation: crosstalk between semantics and pragmatics.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Marc Jeannerod pioneered a representational approach to movement and action. In his approach, motor representations provide both, declarative knowledge about action and procedural knowledge for action (action semantics and action pragmatics, respectively). Recent evidence from language comprehension and action simulation supports the claim that action pragmatics and action semantics draw on common representational resources, thus challenging the traditional divide between declarative and procedural action knowledge. To account for these observations, three kinds of theoretical frameworks are discussed: (i) semantics is grounded in pragmatics, (ii) pragmatics is anchored in semantics, and (iii) pragmatics is part and parcel of semantics.

  10. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings…

  11. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  12. Executive Mind, Timely Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbert, William R.

    1983-01-01

    The idea of "Executive Mind" carries with it the notion of purposeful and effective action. Part I of this paper characterizes three complements to "Executive Mind"--"Observing Mind,""Theorizing Mind," and "Passionate Mind"--and offers historical figures exemplifying all four types. The concluding…

  13. Justifying Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helskog, Guro Hansen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I use a general philosophy of science perspective in looking at the problem of justifying action research. First I try to clarify the concept of justification, by contrasting it with the concept of validity, which seems to be used almost as a synonym in some parts of the literature. I discuss the need for taking a stand in relation…

  14. 77 FR 47513 - Definition of Enforcement Action

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 502 Definition of Enforcement Action AGENCY: National Indian... Commission) is amending its regulation setting out definitions to add a definition of ``enforcement action... definition of ``enforcement action'' needed to be added to Part 502. On December 27, 2011, the...

  15. Re-investigation of slip rate along the southern part of the Sumatran Fault Zone using SuMo GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermawan, I.; Lubis, A. M.; Sahputra, R.; Hill, E.; Sieh, K.; Feng, L.; Salman, R.; Hananto, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Sumatran Fault Zone (SFZ) accommodates a significant component of the strike-slip motion of oblique convergence along the Sumatra subduction zone. Previous studies have suggested that the slip rates of the SFZ increase from south to north. However, recent work shows that the slip rates may not vary along the SFZ [Bradley et al., 2015]. New data are needed to help confirm these results, and to assess slip-rate variability and fault segmentation in more detail. This information is vital for seismic hazard assessment for the region. We have therefore installed and operated the SuMo (Sumatran Fault Monitoring) network, a dense GPS campaign network focused around the SFZ. From 2013-2015 we selected and installed 32 GPS monuments over the southern part of the SFZ. The network comprises of three transects. The first transect is around the location of the great 1900 earthquake, at the Musi segment. Two transects cover the Manna segment, which saw its last great earthquake in 1893, and the Kumering segment, which saw two great earthquakes in 1933 (M 7.5) and 1994 (M 7.0). We have now conducted three GPS campaign surveys for these stations (3-4 days of measurement for each occupation site), and established 5 semi-permanent cGPS stations in the area. The processed data show that the campaigns sites are still too premature to be used for estimating slip rates, but from the preliminary results for the semi-permanent stations we may see our first signal of deformation. More data from future survey campaigns will help us to estimated revised slip rates. In addition to the science goals for our project, we are this year starting a project called "SuMo Goes to School," which will aim to disseminate information on our science to the schools that house the SuMo GPS stations. The SuMo project also achieves capacity building by training students from Bengkulu University in geodesy and campaign GPS survey techniques.

  16. NOBELS Action Verbs and Synonyms, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanham, Frank W.; Weber, Cathryn P.

    1970-01-01

    A taxonomy and a list of 108 verbs and their synonyms were compiled as first steps in developing a common language for describing the content of business and office education. By synthesizing the initial data, 57 principal verbs and their 162 synonyms proved adequate for describing 4,548 office tasks. Educational implications will be discussed in…

  17. Science Action Labs Part 2: Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed; Shevick, Florence, Ed.

    This book contains innovative hands-on science laboratory activities designed to teach 4th- through 9th-graders about the environment. The background materials and instructions included in each activity are written for students to work together in teams. Activities cover subjects such as smog, symbiosis, soil, trees, ecosystems, recycling,…

  18. Science Action Labs Part 1: Sciencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed; Adams, Linda, Ed.

    This book contains innovative hands-on science laboratory activities that teach basic scientific method skills and are designed to be used directly with 4th- through 9th-grade students. The background materials and instructions included in each activity are written for students to work together in teams. Lab titles are: observation lab,…

  19. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  20. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  1. Quantum physics and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    There is a widely used and successful theory of ``chemical reaction networks,'' which provides a framework describing systems governed by mass action kinetics. Computer science and population biology use the same ideas under a different name: ``stochastic Petri nets.'' But if we look at these theories from the perspective of quantum theory, they turn out to involve creation and annihilation operators, coherent states and other well-known ideas--yet in a context where probabilities replace amplitudes. I will explain this connection as part of a detailed analogy between quantum mechanics and stochastic mechanics which we've produced several results on recently, including the recent analytical results uniting quantum physics and complex networks. Our general idea is about merging concepts from quantum physics and complex network theory to provide a bidirectional bridge between both disciplines. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  2. 77 FR 47517 - Enforcement Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 573 Enforcement Actions AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC or Commission) is... INFORMATION CONTACT: Melissa Schlichting, National Indian Gaming Commission, 1441 L Street NW., Suite...

  3. Complexity, action, and black holes

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; ...

    2016-04-18

    In an earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" we conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the `Wheeler-DeWitt' patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  4. Complexity, action, and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Our earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the "Wheeler-DeWitt" patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  5. Naturally occurring CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells are an essential, IL-10-independent part of the immunoregulatory network in Schistosoma mansoni egg-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Martin; Tompkins, Fae; Leng, Jin; Hesse, Matthias

    2006-05-01

    In acute and chronic schistosomiasis, survival of the host requires a carefully balanced immune response against highly immunogenic parasite eggs. We characterized the phenotype, distribution, and functional role of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) naturally occurring regulatory T cells (naTregs) in schistosome egg-induced inflammation. In adoptive transfer experiments and by intracellular staining for Foxp3, we demonstrate significant frequencies of naTregs in hepatic granulomas and draining lymphoid tissues of mice infected with the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. Strikingly, egg-induced inflammation does not change the normal ratio between naTregs and effector CD4(+) T cells at the inflammatory site or in lymphoid organs in acute or chronic disease. However, increasing frequencies of CD103-expressing cells in the naTreg compartment indicate a change in phenotype for naTregs with disease progression. Because CD103 was described recently as an activation marker for naTregs, we speculate that naTregs in chronic schistosomiasis are potentially more suppressive. Furthermore, we found that most naTregs do not contribute to egg-induced IL-4 and IL-10 production. Importantly, depletion of CD25(+) naTregs strongly enhances the frequency of IL-4-producing effector T cells in acute egg-induced inflammation. It does not change clonal expansion of activated CD4(+) T cells. This regulation of egg-induced cytokine production does not require the presence of IL-10. These data demonstrate that naTregs limit egg-induced effector-cytokine production in our model. Our results identify naTregs as an important, IL-10-independent part of the regulatory network in schistosome egg-induced inflammation.

  6. Network reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1985-01-01

    Network control (or network management) functions are essential for efficient and reliable operation of a network. Some control functions are currently included as part of the Open System Interconnection model. For local area networks, it is widely recognized that there is a need for additional control functions, including fault isolation functions, monitoring functions, and configuration functions. These functions can be implemented in either a central or distributed manner. The Fiber Distributed Data Interface Medium Access Control and Station Management protocols provide an example of distributed implementation. Relative information is presented here in outline form.

  7. 7 CFR 12.11 - Action based upon advice or action of USDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Action based upon advice or action of USDA. 12.11 Section 12.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.11 Action based upon advice or action of USDA. The provisions of part...

  8. 7 CFR 12.11 - Action based upon advice or action of USDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Action based upon advice or action of USDA. 12.11 Section 12.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.11 Action based upon advice or action of USDA. The provisions of part...

  9. 7 CFR 12.11 - Action based upon advice or action of USDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Action based upon advice or action of USDA. 12.11 Section 12.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.11 Action based upon advice or action of USDA. The provisions of part...

  10. 7 CFR 12.11 - Action based upon advice or action of USDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Action based upon advice or action of USDA. 12.11 Section 12.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.11 Action based upon advice or action of USDA. The provisions of part...

  11. 7 CFR 12.11 - Action based upon advice or action of USDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Action based upon advice or action of USDA. 12.11 Section 12.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION General Provisions § 12.11 Action based upon advice or action of USDA. The provisions of part...

  12. 45 CFR 1232.7 - Remedial action, voluntary action and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial action, voluntary action and self... action and self-evaluation. (a) Remedial action. (1) If the Director finds that a recipient has... violation of section 504 or this part and where another recipient exercises control over the recipient...

  13. Conducting indirect-treatment-comparison and network-meta-analysis studies: report of the ISPOR Task Force on Indirect Treatment Comparisons Good Research Practices: part 2.

    PubMed

    Hoaglin, David C; Hawkins, Neil; Jansen, Jeroen P; Scott, David A; Itzler, Robbin; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Boersma, Cornelis; Thompson, David; Larholt, Kay M; Diaz, Mireya; Barrett, Annabel

    2011-06-01

    Evidence-based health care decision making requires comparison of all relevant competing interventions. In the absence of randomized controlled trials involving a direct comparison of all treatments of interest, indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis provide useful evidence for judiciously selecting the best treatment(s). Mixed treatment comparisons, a special case of network meta-analysis, combine direct evidence and indirect evidence for particular pairwise comparisons, thereby synthesizing a greater share of the available evidence than traditional meta-analysis. This report from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Indirect Treatment Comparisons Good Research Practices Task Force provides guidance on technical aspects of conducting network meta-analyses (our use of this term includes most methods that involve meta-analysis in the context of a network of evidence). We start with a discussion of strategies for developing networks of evidence. Next we briefly review assumptions of network meta-analysis. Then we focus on the statistical analysis of the data: objectives, models (fixed-effects and random-effects), frequentist versus Bayesian approaches, and model validation. A checklist highlights key components of network meta-analysis, and substantial examples illustrate indirect treatment comparisons (both frequentist and Bayesian approaches) and network meta-analysis. A further section discusses eight key areas for future research.

  14. Interagency collaboration in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains: Federal-university climate service networks for producing actionable information for climate change adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. J.; McNie, E.; Averyt, K.; Morisette, J. T.; Derner, J. D.; Ojima, D. S.; Dilling, L.; Barsugli, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Several federal agencies in north-central United States are each working to develop and disseminate useful climate information to enhance resilience to climate change. This talk will discuss how the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) the North Central Climate Science Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Western Water Assessment RISA, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Climate Hub, are building and managing a collaborative research and climate-service network in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. This presentation will describe the evolution of the interagency collaboration and the partnership with universities to build a climate service network. Such collaboration takes time and intention and must include the right people and organizations to effectively bridge the gap between use-inspired research and application. In particular, we will discuss a focus on the Upper Missouri Basin, developing research to meet needs in a basin that has had relatively less attention on risks of climate change and adaptation to those risks. Each organization has its own mission, stakeholders, and priorities, but there are many commonalities and potential synergies. Together, these organizations, and their agency scientists and university partners, are fostering cross-agency collaboration at the regional scale to optimize efficient allocation of resources while simultaneously enabling information to be generated at a scale that is relevant to decision makers. By each organization knowing the others needs and priorities, there are opportunities to craft research agendas and strategies for providing services that take advantage of the strengths and skills of the different organizations. University partners are key components of each organization, and of the collaboration, who bring in expertise beyond that in the agencies, in particular connections to social scientists, extension services.

  15. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  16. Legislative Actions Affecting Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Council for Postsecondary Education, Olympia.

    Legislative actions pertaining to Washington public higher education during the last two years are described. The reports list the major resolutions passed, laws enacted, and legislative appropriations. State legislation dealt with: establishment of the Washington library network; retirement systems; bookkeeping transactions; travel expenses; bond…

  17. Conscious Action/Zombie Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co‐conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do. PMID:27667859

  18. Conscious Action/Zombie Action.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    I argue that the neural realizers of experiences of trying (that is, experiences of directing effort towards the satisfaction of an intention) are not distinct from the neural realizers of actual trying (that is, actual effort directed towards the satisfaction of an intention). I then ask how experiences of trying might relate to the perceptual experiences one has while acting. First, I assess recent zombie action arguments regarding conscious visual experience, and I argue that contrary to what some have claimed, conscious visual experience plays a causal role for action control in some circumstances. Second, I propose a multimodal account of the experience of acting. According to this account, the experience of acting is (at the very least) a temporally extended, co-conscious collection of agentive and perceptual experiences, functionally integrated and structured both by multimodal perceptual processing as well as by what an agent is, at the time, trying to do.

  19. Nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening: identification of a signaling molecule network involved in fulvestrant action and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, N; Wittner, B S; Shioda, K; Hitora, T; Ito, T; Ramaswamy, S; Isselbacher, K J; Sgroi, D C; Shioda, T

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown screening of cancer cell cultures is an effective approach to predict drug targets or therapeutic/prognostic biomarkers, interactions among identified targets often remain obscure. Here, we introduce the nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening that generates a map of target interactions through systematic iterations of in silico prediction of targets and their experimental validation. An initial RNAi knockdown screening of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells targeting 6560 proteins identified four signaling molecules required for their fulvestrant-induced apoptosis. Signaling molecules physically or functionally interacting with these four primary node targets were computationally predicted and experimentally validated, resulting in identification of four second-generation nodes. Three rounds of further iterations of the prediction–validation cycle generated third, fourth and fifth generation of nodes, completing a 19-node interaction map that contained three predicted nodes but without experimental validation because of technical limitations. The interaction map involved all three members of the death-associated protein kinases (DAPKs) as well as their upstream and downstream signaling molecules (calmodulins and myosin light chain kinases), suggesting that DAPKs play critical roles in the cytocidal action of fulvestrant. The in silico Kaplan–Meier analysis of previously reported human breast cancer cohorts demonstrated significant prognostic predictive power for five of the experimentally validated nodes and for three of the prediction-only nodes. Immunohistochemical studies on the expression of 10 nodal proteins in human breast cancer tissues not only supported their prognostic prediction power but also provided statistically significant evidence of their synchronized expression, implying functional interactions among these nodal proteins. Thus, the Nodes-and-Connections approach to RNAi knockdown screening yields

  20. Using Action Learning to Consolidate Coaching Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Clare; Powell, Anne

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to answer the questions: (1) How can action learning aid in strategic change?; (2) What are the benefits of using action learning as part of a broader learning intervention?; (3) What are the issues to consider when introducing action learning into a corporate environment?; and (4) How can you engage people in reflection as a…

  1. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks - Part I: Stationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations, using thermal networks, of shield temperatures and radiative and conductive heat losses of a super-insulated cryogenic storage tank operating at 77 K. Interactions between radiation and conductive heat transfer modes in the shields are investigated, by calculation of local shield temperatures. As a new method, fluid networks are introduced for calculation of stationary residual gas pressure distribution in the evacuated multilayer super-insulation. Output from the fluid network is coupled to the iterative thermal network calculations. Parameter tests concern thickness and emissivity of shields, degree of perforation, residual gas sources like desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls, and permeation from the inner container to the evacuated insulation space. Variations of either a conductive (thickness of Al-film on Mylar) or a radiative parameter (thermal emissivity) exert crosswise influences on the radiative or conductive heat losses of the tank, respectively.

  2. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  3. Method for triggering an action

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-10-17

    A method for triggering an action of at least one downhole device on a downhole network integrated into a downhole tool string synchronized to an event comprises determining latency, sending a latency adjusted signal, and performing the action. The latency is determined between a control device and the at least one downhole device. The latency adjusted signal for triggering an action is sent to the downhole device. The action is performed downhole synchronized to the event. A preferred method for determining latency comprises the steps: a control device sends a first signal to the downhole device; after receiving the signal, the downhole device sends a response signal to the control device; and the control device analyzes the time from sending the signal to receiving the response signal.

  4. 76 FR 7102 - Simplified Network Application Processing System, On-line Registration and Account Maintenance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security 15 CFR Part 748 RIN 0694-AE98 Simplified Network Application Processing System, On-line Registration and Account Maintenance AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) amends the Export...

  5. Determination of constitutive properties fromspherical indentation data using neural networks. Part i:the case of pure kinematic hardening in plasticity laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, N.; Tsakmakis, Ch.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper the power of neural networks in identifying material parameters fromdata obtained by spherical indentation is demonstrated for an academic problem (pure kinematichardening, given Youngs modulus) . To obtain a data basis for the training and validation of theneural network, numerous finite element simulations were carried out for various sets of materialparameters. The constitutive model describing finite deformation plasticity is formulated withnonlinear kinematic hardening of Armstrong-Frederick type. It was shown by Huber and Tsakmakis, 1998a that the depth-load response of a cyclic indentation process, consisting ofloading, unloading and reloading of the indenter displays a typical hysteresis loop for givenmaterial parameters. The inverse problem of leading the depth-load response back to the relatedparameters in the constitutive equations is solved using a neutral network.

  6. Development of Land Segmentation, Stream-Reach Network, and Watersheds in Support of Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) Modeling, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and Adjacent Parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martucci, Sarah K.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Hopkins, Katherine J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Maryland Department of the Environment, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are collaborating on the Chesapeake Bay Regional Watershed Model, using Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN to simulate streamflow and concentrations and loads of nutrients and sediment to Chesapeake Bay. The model will be used to provide information for resource managers. In order to establish a framework for model simulation, digital spatial datasets were created defining the discretization of the model region (including the Chesapeake Bay watershed, as well as the adjacent parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia outside the watershed) into land segments, a stream-reach network, and associated watersheds. Land segmentation was based on county boundaries represented by a 1:100,000-scale digital dataset. Fifty of the 254 counties and incorporated cities in the model region were divided on the basis of physiography and topography, producing a total of 309 land segments. The stream-reach network for the Chesapeake Bay watershed part of the model region was based on the U.S. Geological Survey Chesapeake Bay SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) model stream-reach network. Because that network was created only for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the rest of the model region uses a 1:500,000-scale stream-reach network. Streams with mean annual streamflow of less than 100 cubic feet per second were excluded based on attributes from the dataset. Additional changes were made to enhance the data and to allow for inclusion of stream reaches with monitoring data that were not part of the original network. Thirty-meter-resolution Digital Elevation Model data were used to delineate watersheds for each

  7. Systems biology and the origins of life? part II. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? networks of catalysed chemical reactions: non-equilibrium, self-organization and evolution.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The present article discusses the possibility that catalysed chemical networks can evolve. Even simple enzyme-catalysed chemical reactions can display this property. The example studied is that of a two-substrate proteinoid, or enzyme, reaction displaying random binding of its substrates A and B. The fundamental property of such a system is to display either emergence or integration depending on the respective values of the probabilities that the enzyme has bound one of its substrate regardless it has bound the other substrate, or, specifically, after it has bound the other substrate. There is emergence of information if p(A)>p(AB) and p(B)>p(BA). Conversely, if p(A)networks of catalysed chemical reactions. Such networks are, in fact, networks of networks, viz. meta-networks. In this formal representation, nodes are chemical reactions catalysed by poorly specific proteinoids, and links can be identified to the transport of metabolites from proteinoid to proteinoid. The concepts of integration and emergence can be applied to such situations and can be used to define the identity of these networks and therefore their evolution. Defined as open non-equilibrium structures, such biochemical networks possess two remarkable properties: (1) the probability of occurrence of their nodes is dependant upon the input and output of matter

  8. Investigation into the use of satellite remote sensing data products as part of a multi-modal marine environmental monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Edel; Smeaton, Alan F.; O'Connor, Noel E.; Regan, Fiona

    2012-09-01

    In this paper it is investigated how conventional in-situ sensor networks can be complemented by the satellite data streams available through numerous platforms orbiting the earth and the combined analyses products available through services such as MyOcean. Despite the numerous benefits associated with the use of satellite remote sensing data products, there are a number of limitations with their use in coastal zones. Here the ability of these data sources to provide contextual awareness, redundancy and increased efficiency to an in-situ sensor network is investigated. The potential use of a variety of chlorophyll and SST data products as additional data sources in the SmartBay monitoring network in Galway Bay, Ireland is analysed. The ultimate goal is to investigate the ability of these products to create a smarter marine monitoring network with increased efficiency. Overall it was found that while care needs to be taken in choosing these products, there was extremely promising performance from a number of these products that would be suitable in the context of a number of applications especially in relation to SST. It was more difficult to come to conclusive results for the chlorophyll analysis.

  9. 38 CFR 18.406 - Remedial action, voluntary action and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., voluntary action and self-evaluation. 18.406 Section 18.406 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Basis of Handicap General Provisions § 18.406 Remedial action, voluntary action and self-evaluation. (a... section 504 or this part and where another recipient exercises control over the recipient that...

  10. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  11. Definition, analysis and development of an optical data distribution network for integrated avionics and control systems. Part 2: Component development and system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, H. W.; Morrison, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Fiber optic transmission is emerging as an attractive concept in data distribution onboard civil aircraft. Development of an Optical Data Distribution Network for Integrated Avionics and Control Systems for commercial aircraft will provide a data distribution network that gives freedom from EMI-RFI and ground loop problems, eliminates crosstalk and short circuits, provides protection and immunity from lightning induced transients and give a large bandwidth data transmission capability. In addition there is a potential for significantly reducing the weight and increasing the reliability over conventional data distribution networks. Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) is a candidate method for data communication between the various avionic subsystems. With WDM all systems could conceptually communicate with each other without time sharing and requiring complicated coding schemes for each computer and subsystem to recognize a message. However, the state of the art of optical technology limits the application of fiber optics in advanced integrated avionics and control systems. Therefore, it is necessary to address the architecture for a fiber optics data distribution system for integrated avionics and control systems as well as develop prototype components and systems.

  12. Resistive Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed text on resistive networks was developed under contract with the United States Office of Education as part of a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series, this one being Number 3. (DH)

  13. Leading School Networks: Hybrid Leadership in Action?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    A range of different constructs are used to describe and define the way that leadership operates in education settings. This range can be presented as binary categories of leadership, in which either one, or the other form of leadership is preferred, but not both. An example of this is the contrast made between solo and distributed leadership. A…

  14. Professor Points: Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karacalik, Mary

    2009-01-01

    For years this author has been a keen advocate of co-operative talk as a way of learning and has felt confident that her pupils are learning from each other. She creates opportunities for her Year two class to talk and work in pairs and groups across the curriculum, with many such interactions occurring each day. As part of an action research…

  15. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  16. ERP correlates of action effect prediction and visual sensory attenuation in voluntary action.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gethin; Waszak, Florian

    2011-06-01

    Sensory attenuation of voluntary action effects has been widely reported in both somatosensory and auditory domains. However, relatively little research has focused on physiological measures of sensory attenuation of visual action effects. One previous study found, perhaps surprisingly, that both auditory and visual sensory attenuation were manifested as decreased ERP amplitude over the vertex. The present study aimed to extend these findings using a novel paradigm in which voluntary actions were either associated with a visual action effect or to no effect. Crucially, this allowed us to explore both sensory attenuation (by comparing ERPs to action-triggered versus externally triggered stimuli) and action effect prediction (by comparing actions that triggered a stimulus with actions that did not). With regard to sensory attenuation, we found that attenuation of cortical responses to visual action effects was manifested in a reduced activation of a frontoparietal network, from 150 ms after stimulus. Differences between actions that produced an effect and those that did not were observed in lateralized motor potentials and may reflect the cortical correlates of the action effect prediction. We also observed a re-activation of lateralized motor activity following onset of the action effect, suggesting a common representation of action effects in visual and motor cortices. Taken together, these findings help to elucidate the cortical mechanisms of voluntary action as well as their sensory consequences and inform how our interaction with the external world is processed and controlled.

  17. Action Research in Workplace Education: A Handbook for Literacy Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice

    Based on a research project that sought to train instructors to conduct action research in a real-life context, this handbook was created to help literacy instructors to use action research in workplace education programs. The handbook is organized in three parts. The first part describes action research as a type of practice-based research. It…

  18. Exploring the Action Landscape via Trial World-Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joglekar, Yogesh N.; Tham, Weng Kian

    2011-01-01

    The Hamilton action principle, also known as the principle of least action, and Lagrange equations are an integral part of intermediate and advanced undergraduate mechanics. Although the Hamilton principle is oft stated as "the action for any nearby trial world-line is greater than the action for the classical world-line," the landscape of action…

  19. OSI Network Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ethan

    1990-01-01

    Management of heterogeneous networks is complicated by the persistence of proprietary management schemes. The need for integration of network management capabilities is pressing. The International Organization for Standardization is developing standards for managing networks as part of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) effort. OSI management…

  20. Virtualized Network Control (VNC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, Thomas; Guok, Chin; Ghani, Nasir

    2013-01-31

    The focus of this project was on the development of a "Network Service Plane" as an abstraction model for the control and provisioning of multi-layer networks. The primary motivation for this work were the requirements of next generation networked applications which will need to access advanced networking as a first class resource at the same level as compute and storage resources. A new class of "Intelligent Network Services" were defined in order to facilitate the integration of advanced network services into application specific workflows. This new class of network services are intended to enable real-time interaction between the application co-scheduling algorithms and the network for the purposes of workflow planning, real-time resource availability identification, scheduling, and provisioning actions.

  1. Achievements and opportunities from ESF Research Networking Programme: Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes, and COST Action 639: Greenhouse gas budget of soils under changing climate and land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeckx, P.; Rasse, D.; Jandl, R.

    2009-04-01

    One of the activities of the European Science Foundation (ESF, www.esf.org) is developing European scale Research Networking Programmes (RNPs). RNPs lay the foundation for nationally funded research groups to address major scientific and research infrastructure issues, in order to advance the frontiers of existing science. MOLTER (www.esf.org/molter or www.molter.no) is such an RNP. MOLTER stands for "Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes" aims at stimulating the use of isotopic and organic chemistry to study carbon stabilization and biogeochemistry in terrestrial ecosystems and soils in particular. The understanding of the formation, stabilization and decomposition of complex organic compounds in the environment is currently being revolutionized by advanced techniques in identification, quantification, and origin tracing of functional groups and individual molecules. MOLTER focuses on five major research themes: - Molecular composition and turnover time of soil organic matter; - Plant molecular structures as drivers of C stabilisation in soils; - Fire transformations of plant and soil molecular structures - Molecular markers in soils; - Dissolved organic molecules in soils: origin, functionality and transport. These research themes are covered via the following activities: - Organisation of international conferences; - Organisation of specific topical workshops; - Organisation of summer schools for PhD students; - Short- and long-term exchange grants for scientists. MOLTER is supported by research funding or performing agencies from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The ESF is also the implementing agency of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology, www.cost.esf.org), one of the longest-running European instruments supporting cooperation among scientists and researchers across Europe. COST Action 639 "Greenhouse gas budget of

  2. A fractal model of HIV transmission on complex socio-geographic networks. Part 2: spread from a ghettoized 'core group' into a 'general population'.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R

    1994-01-01

    "Study of the initial stages of HIV transmission along a 'sociogeographic network'--a large, complex, spatially focused social network with possibly fractal geometry--is extended to include interaction between a low-dimensional ghettoized 'core group' within which the disease spreads very rapidly and a higher dimensional, more loosely structured 'general population' in which spread is relatively slow. A mathematical modeling exercise suggests that contextually modulated interaction between them can be highly nonlinear and may greatly increase the initial rate of disease transmission within the general population. This work contributes to a growing body of literature which suggests that programs to control HIV infection within the majority heterosexual population of the United States will fail spectacularly without particular focus on the coupled physical and social stabilization and rehabilitation of the urban ghettoes of marginalized populations which are the present, and rapidly expanding, disease epicenters. Evidence suggests their continued disintegration can both increase disease rates within the epicenters and increase the coupling between core groups and general populations by creating large numbers of spatially or economically displaced refugees."

  3. Medicare Program; Revisions to Payment Policies Under the Physician Fee Schedule and Other Revisions to Part B for CY 2017; Medicare Advantage Bid Pricing Data Release; Medicare Advantage and Part D Medical Loss Ratio Data Release; Medicare Advantage Provider Network Requirements; Expansion of Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Model; Medicare Shared Savings Program Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-11-15

    This major final rule addresses changes to the physician fee schedule and other Medicare Part B payment policies, such as changes to the Value Modifier, to ensure that our payment systems are updated to reflect changes in medical practice and the relative value of services, as well as changes in the statute. This final rule also includes changes related to the Medicare Shared Savings Program, requirements for Medicare Advantage Provider Networks, and provides for the release of certain pricing data from Medicare Advantage bids and of data from medical loss ratio reports submitted by Medicare health and drug plans. In addition, this final rule expands the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program model.

  4. Mixed care networks of community-dwelling older adults with physical health impairments in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Broese van Groenou, Marjolein; Jacobs, Marianne; Zwart-Olde, Ilse; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2016-01-01

    As part of long-term care reforms, home-care organisations in the Netherlands are required to strengthen the linkage between formal and informal caregivers of home-dwelling older adults. Information on the variety in mixed care networks may help home-care organisations to develop network type-dependent strategies to connect with informal caregivers. This study first explores how structural (size, composition) and functional features (contact and task overlap between formal and informal caregivers) contribute to different types of mixed care networks. Second, it examines to what degree these network types are associated with the care recipients' characteristics. Through home-care organisations in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, we selected 74 frail home-dwelling clients who were receiving care in 2011-2012 from both informal and formal caregivers. The care networks of these older adults were identified by listing all persons providing help with five different types of tasks. This resulted in care networks comprising an average of 9.7 caregivers, of whom 67% were formal caregivers. On average, there was contact between caregivers within 34% of the formal-informal dyads, and both caregivers carried out at least one similar type of task in 29% of these dyads. A principal component analysis of size, composition, contact and task overlap showed two distinct network dimensions from which four network types were constructed: a small mixed care network, a small formal network, a large mixed network and a large formal network. Bivariate analyses showed that the care recipients' activities of daily living level, memory problems, social network, perceived control of care and level of mastery differed significantly between these four types. The results imply that different network types require different actions from formal home-care organisations, such as mobilising the social network in small formal networks, decreasing task differentiation in large formal networks and assigning

  5. Superintendents in Classrooms: From Collegial Conversation to Collaborative Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon; Tedder, Jane; Lachman, Andrew; Elmore, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This article, presents a discussion about Connecticut Superintendents' Network. Established and facilitated by the Connecticut Center for School Change, a school reform organization, the Network is grounded in a theory of action concerning professional development for administrators. The Network's goals are: (1) to develop superintendents'…

  6. 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Infrastructure Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Read about the EPA's infrastructure actions for the 2008 Ozone NAAQS. These actions are regarding states' failure to submit SIPs addressing various parts of the standards. Here you can read the federal register notices, fact sheets, and the docket folder.

  7. Affirmative Action in the People's Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrin, Jack

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 presidential elections will be, in part, a referendum on affirmative action, with partisan battle lines drawn. When the issue is framed for the voter as a choice between group equality or individual merit, affirmative action loses. Recent history suggests that a majority of Americans reject explicit group preferences. (SLD)

  8. World Plan of Action: Decade for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Equity Action League, Washington, DC.

    The World Plan of Action adopted by the United Nations World Conference of the International Women's Year in Mexico City in July 1975 is presented in condensed form. The major purpose is to provide guidelines for national action over the ten-year period 1975-1985 as part of a sustained, long-term effort to achieve the objectives of International…

  9. Action Research: Informing Professional Practice within Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Gregory S. C.; Lavery, Shane D.

    2014-01-01

    This research paper explores the experiences of three teacher-researchers, "Simone", "Damian" and "Michael", who undertook an action research project in their respective schools as part of their postgraduate studies. The paper initially outlines the construct of action research in the light of its applicability to…

  10. 76 FR 80846 - Definition of Enforcement Action

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 502 RIN 3141-AA43 Definition of Enforcement Action AGENCY... proposes to amend NIGC regulations to include definitions for ``enforcement action''. The Indian Gaming... regulations, and tribal gaming ordinances. However, current NIGC regulations do not provide a definition...

  11. Solving Wicked Problems through Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crul, Liselore

    2014-01-01

    This account of practice outlines the Oxyme Action Learning Program which was conducted as part of the Management Challenge in my final year of the MSc in Coaching and Behavioral Change at Henley Business School. The central research questions were: (1) how action learning can help to solve wicked problems and (2) what the effect of an action…

  12. Protective Action Guides (PAGs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Protective Action Guide (PAG) manual contains radiation dose guidelines that would trigger public safety measures. EPA developed Protective Action Guides to help responders plan for radiation emergencies.

  13. Network gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, John

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the construction of a new framework for probing discrete emergent geometry and boundary-boundary observables based on a fundamentally a-dimensional underlying network structure. Using a gravitationally motivated action with Forman weighted combinatorial curvatures and simplicial volumes relying on a decomposition of an abstract simplicial complex into realized embeddings of proper skeletons, we demonstrate properties such as a minimal volume-scale cutoff, the necessity of a term playing the role of a positive definite cosmological constant as a regulator for nondegenerate geometries, and naturally emergent simplicial structures from Metropolis network evolution simulations with no restrictions on attachment rules or regular building blocks. We see emergent properties which echo results from both the spinfoam formalism and causal dynamical triangulations in quantum gravity, and provide analytical and numerical results to support the analogy. We conclude with a summary of open questions and intent for future work in developing the program.

  14. Worldwide glacier monitoring as part of policy-related climate observation: development and strategy of the Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeberli, W.; Zemp, M.

    2011-12-01

    Internationally coordinated observation of long-term glacier fluctuations as a key indication of global climate changes has a long tradition, starting already in 1894. With the development of the Global Climate Observing System in support of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, glaciers and ice caps became an Essential Climate Variable within the Global Terrestrial Observing System. A corresponding Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) was indeed established as a pilot project to this program. The basic principles followed by GTN-G and similar networks are to be relevant, feasible, comprehensive and understandable to a wider scientific community and the public. Following recommendations by the International Council for Sciences, a contribution should be made to free and unrestricted international sharing of high-quality, long-term and standardized data and information products. A tiered strategy was adopted in order to bridge the gap between detailed process studies at selected field sites with global coverage through satellite remote sensing. Efforts were also made to ensure continuity of long-term measurement series by combining traditional approaches with modern, future-oriented technologies. Today, the GTN-G is jointly run by three operational bodies in glacier monitoring, which are the World Glacier Monitoring Service, the US National Snow and Ice Data Center, and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space initiative. With an online service, GTN-G provides fast access to regularly updated information on glacier fluctuation and inventory data. Currently, this includes global information from 100,000 glaciers mainly based on aerial photographs and outlines from 95,000 glaciers mainly based on satellite images, length change series from 1,800 glaciers, mass balance series from 250 glaciers, information on special events (e.g., hazards, surges, calving instabilities) from 130 glaciers, as well as 13,000 photographs from some 500

  15. 75 FR 55392 - Employment Network Report Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Employment Network Report Card AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of... public comments on Employment Network quality assurance, including a ticket consumer Employment...

  16. Exploring the brain basis of joint action: co-ordination of actions, goals and intentions.

    PubMed

    Newman-Norlund, Roger D; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-01-01

    Humans are frequently confronted with goal-directed tasks that can not be accomplished alone, or that benefit from co-operation with other agents. The relatively new field of social cognitive neuroscience seeks to characterize functional neuroanatomical systems either specifically or preferentially engaged during such joint-action tasks. Based on neuroimaging experiments conducted on critical components of joint action, the current paper outlines the functional network upon which joint action is hypothesized to be dependant. This network includes brain areas likely to be involved in interpersonal co-ordination at the action, goal, and intentional levels. Experiments focusing specifically on joint-action situations similar to those encountered in real life are required to further specify this model.

  17. Use of Action Research in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Moch, Susan D; Vandenbark, R Todd; Pehler, Shelley-Rae; Stombaugh, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this article is to describe action research in nursing education and to propose a definition of action research for providing guidelines for research proposals and criteria for assessing potential publications for nursing higher education. Methods. The first part of this project involved a search of the literature on action research in nursing higher education from 1994 to 2013. Searches were conducted in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Applying the criteria identified, 80 publications were reviewed. The second part of the project involved a literature review of action research methodology from several disciplines to assist in assessing articles in this review. Results. This article summarizes the nursing higher education literature reviewed and provides processes and content related to four topic areas in nursing higher education. The descriptions assist researchers in learning more about the complexity of both the action research process and the varied outcomes. The literature review of action research in many disciplines along with the review of action research in higher education provided a framework for developing a nursing-education-centric definition of action research. Conclusions. Although guidelines for developing action research and criteria for publication are suggested, continued development of methods for synthesizing action research is recommended.

  18. Use of Action Research in Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    Pehler, Shelley-Rae; Stombaugh, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this article is to describe action research in nursing education and to propose a definition of action research for providing guidelines for research proposals and criteria for assessing potential publications for nursing higher education. Methods. The first part of this project involved a search of the literature on action research in nursing higher education from 1994 to 2013. Searches were conducted in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Applying the criteria identified, 80 publications were reviewed. The second part of the project involved a literature review of action research methodology from several disciplines to assist in assessing articles in this review. Results. This article summarizes the nursing higher education literature reviewed and provides processes and content related to four topic areas in nursing higher education. The descriptions assist researchers in learning more about the complexity of both the action research process and the varied outcomes. The literature review of action research in many disciplines along with the review of action research in higher education provided a framework for developing a nursing-education-centric definition of action research. Conclusions. Although guidelines for developing action research and criteria for publication are suggested, continued development of methods for synthesizing action research is recommended. PMID:28078138

  19. Recombinant protein-co-PEG networks as cell-adhesive and proteolytically degradable hydrogel matrixes. Part I: Development and physicochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Simone C; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-01

    Toward the development of synthetic bioactive materials to support tissue repair, we present here the design, production, and characterization of genetically engineered protein polymers carrying specific key features of the natural extracellular matrix, as well as cross-linking with functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to form hybrid hydrogel networks. The repeating units of target recombinant protein polymers contain a cell-binding site for ligation of cell-surface integrin receptors and substrates for plasmin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteases implicated in wound healing and tissue regeneration. Hydrogels were formed under physiological conditions via Michael-type conjugate addition of vinyl sulfone groups of end-functionalized PEG with thiols of cysteine residues, representing designed chemical cross-linking sites within recombinant proteins. Cross-linking kinetics was shown to increase with the pH of precursor solutions. The elastic moduli (G') and swelling ratios (Q(m)) of the resulting hydrogels could be varied as a function of the stoichiometry of the reacting groups and precursor concentration. Optima of G' and Q(m), maximum and minimum, respectively, were obtained at stoichiometry ratios r slightly in excess of 1 (r = cysteine/vinyl sulfone). The pool of technologies utilized here represents a promising approach for the development of artificial matrixes tailored for specific medical applications.

  20. Probabilistic evidential assessment of gunshot residue particle evidence (Part I): likelihood ratio calculation and case pre-assessment using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Taroni, F

    2009-10-30

    Well developed experimental procedures currently exist for retrieving and analyzing particle evidence from hands of individuals suspected of being associated with the discharge of a firearm. Although analytical approaches (e.g. automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDS) microanalysis) allow the determination of the presence of elements typically found in gunshot residue (GSR) particles, such analyses provide no information about a given particle's actual source. Possible origins for which scientists may need to account for are a primary exposure to the discharge of a firearm or a secondary transfer due to a contaminated environment. In order to approach such sources of uncertainty in the context of evidential assessment, this paper studies the construction and practical implementation of graphical probability models (i.e. Bayesian networks). These can assist forensic scientists in making the issue tractable within a probabilistic perspective. The proposed models focus on likelihood ratio calculations at various levels of detail as well as case pre-assessment.

  1. Parental Social Network and Child's Friendship Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlendorff, Harald; Oswald, Hans

    This study analyzed the relation between the friendship networks of parents and the peer networks of their children. Subjects were 255 second- through fifth-grade children of an inner-city primary school in the western part of Berlin, Germany, who were interviewed about friends. In the interview, children were asked to name other children with…

  2. Tactile perception during action observation.

    PubMed

    Vastano, Roberta; Inuggi, Alberto; Vargas, Claudia D; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Jacono, Marco; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that tactile perception becomes less acute during movement to optimize motor control and to prevent an overload of afferent information generated during action. This empirical phenomenon, known as "tactile gating effect," has been associated with mechanisms of sensory feedback prediction. However, less attention has been given to the tactile attenuation effect during the observation of an action. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how the observation of a goal-directed action influences tactile perception as during overt action. In a first experiment, we recorded vocal reaction times (RTs) of participants to tactile stimulations during the observation of a reach-to-grasp action. The stimulations were delivered on different body parts that could be either congruent or incongruent with the observed effector (the right hand and the right leg, respectively). The tactile stimulation was contrasted with a no body-related stimulation (an auditory beep). We found increased RTs for tactile congruent stimuli compared to both tactile incongruent and auditory stimuli. This effect was reported only during the observation of the reaching phase, whereas RTs were not modulated during the grasping phase. A tactile two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task was then conducted in order to quantify the changes in tactile sensitivity during the observation of the same goal-directed actions. In agreement with the first experiment, the tactile perceived intensity was reduced only during the reaching phase. These results suggest that tactile processing during action observation relies on a process similar to that occurring during action execution.

  3. Seeing or doing? Influence of visual and motor familiarity in action observation.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Merino, Beatriz; Grèzes, Julie; Glaser, Daniel E; Passingham, Richard E; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-10-10

    The human brain contains specialized circuits for observing and understanding actions. Previous studies have not distinguished whether this "mirror system" uses specialized motor representations or general processes of visual inference and knowledge to understand observed actions. We report the first neuroimaging study to distinguish between these alternatives. Purely motoric influences on perception have been shown behaviorally, but their neural bases are unknown. We used fMRI to reveal the neural bases of motor influences on action observation. We controlled for visual and knowledge effects by studying expert dancers. Some ballet moves are performed by only one gender. However, male and female dancers train together and have equal visual familiarity with all moves. Male and female dancers viewed videos of gender-specific male and female ballet moves. We found greater premotor, parietal, and cerebellar activity when dancers viewed moves from their own motor repertoire, compared to opposite-gender moves that they frequently saw but did not perform. Our results show that mirror circuits have a purely motor response over and above visual representations of action. We understand actions not only by visual recognition, but also motorically. In addition, we confirm that the cerebellum is part of the action observation network.

  4. Mechanism of action of a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate ingredients in the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Part II: comparison with a professional treatment for tooth hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Charig, Andrew J; Thong, Stephen; Flores, Florita; Gupta, Shivank; Major, Elizabeth; Winston, Anthony E

    2009-01-01

    Tooth hypersensitivity can occur when gum recession causes exposure of dentin. Tiny tubules, which permeate dentin, provide open passageways from the mouth to the intradental nerve in the pulpal cavity. Under such circumstances, stimuli in the mouth can cause pressure on the intradental nerve, leading to pain. Sealing the outside of the tubules with an impermeable substance can effectively treat hypersensitivity. One such clinically proven composition is a professionally applied tooth desensitizer, which has been shown to initially produce a layer of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) on the surface of dentin. Under the influence of fluoride, ACP reforms as hydroxyapatite (HAP), which has essentially the same composition as tooth mineral. Three fluoride toothpastes that deliver calcium and phosphate salts to the teeth also have been demonstrated in clinical trials to relieve hypersensitivity. This study compared the mechanism of action of these toothpastes to that of the professional desensitizer. A single application of the professional desensitizer or multiple applications of any of the three toothpastes was shown to reduce dentin permeability. A conventional fluoride toothpaste also was found to inhibit fluid flow through the dentin but to a lesser degree than the other toothpastes. The desensitizer and the three toothpastes were found to occlude the dentinal tubules with a layer of calcium phosphate that had a calcium-to-phosphate ratio consistent with the formation of ACP or HAP. The morphology of the coherent mineral layer formed by Arm & Hammer Enamel Care Sensitive was similar, especially to that produced by the desensitizer. In contrast, the conventional toothpaste left localized areas of surface residue composed of silica particles. The mechanism of action of the three toothpastes that deliver calcium and phosphate salts is the same as that of the professional desensitizer.

  5. Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindling, Jerome

    2010-04-01

    This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p.) corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  6. Low-cost computing and network communication for a point-of-care device to perform a 3-part leukocyte differential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powless, Amy J.; Feekin, Lauren E.; Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Alapat, Daisy V.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    Point-of-care approaches for 3-part leukocyte differentials (granulocyte, monocyte, and lymphocyte), traditionally performed using a hematology analyzer within a panel of tests called a complete blood count (CBC), are essential not only to reduce cost but to provide faster results in low resource areas. Recent developments in lab-on-a-chip devices have shown promise in reducing the size and reagents used, relating to a decrease in overall cost. Furthermore, smartphone diagnostic approaches have shown much promise in the area of point-of-care diagnostics, but the relatively high per-unit cost may limit their utility in some settings. We present here a method to reduce computing cost of a simple epi-fluorescence imaging system using a Raspberry Pi (single-board computer, <$40) to perform a 3-part leukocyte differential comparable to results from a hematology analyzer. This system uses a USB color camera in conjunction with a leukocyte-selective vital dye (acridine orange) in order to determine a leukocyte count and differential from a low volume (<20 microliters) of whole blood obtained via fingerstick. Additionally, the system utilizes a "cloud-based" approach to send image data from the Raspberry Pi to a main server and return results back to the user, exporting the bulk of the computational requirements. Six images were acquired per minute with up to 200 cells per field of view. Preliminary results showed that the differential count varied significantly in monocytes with a 1 minute time difference indicating the importance of time-gating to produce an accurate/consist differential.

  7. Action Research: Rethinking Lewin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Linda; Watkins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Explores both historical and contemporary definitions of action research. Describes the process and goals of action research in the tradition of Lewin. Presents a case study of an action-research project involving two teams in a high-technology corporation that depicts the process in action. (Author/CCM)

  8. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks. Part II: Unsteady-state conditions (cool-down period)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2006-12-01

    This paper analyses the cool-down period of a 300 L super-insulated cryogenic storage tank for liquid nitrogen. Storage tank and evacuated shields are the same as described in part I of this paper where stationary states were investigated. The aim of the present paper is to introduce thermal resistance networks as a tool to quantitatively understand and control also unsteady-states like cool-down of super-insulations. Numerical simulations using thermal resistance networks have been performed to determine time dependence of local shield temperatures and heat loss components. Coupling between radiation and solid conduction is investigated under these conditions. Using the numerical results, we have checked an experimental method suggested in the literature to separate heat losses through the insulation from losses through thermal bridges by measurement of unsteady-state evaporation rates. The results of the simulations confirm that it takes the outer shields much longer to reach stationary temperature; cool-down does not proceed uniformly in the super-insulation. Coupling between different heat transfer modes again is obvious. Thermal emissivity is important also during the early phase of cool-down. Using the obtained numerical results, the experimental method to separate heat loss components could only roughly been confirmed for thick metallic foils.

  9. The effects of an action's "age-of-acquisition" on action-sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Gilead, Michael; Liberman, Nira; Maril, Anat

    2016-11-01

    How does our brain allow us comprehend abstract/symbolic descriptions of human action? Whereas past research suggested that processing action language relies on sensorimotor brain regions, recent work suggests that sensorimotor activation depends on participants' task goals, such that focusing on abstract (vs. concrete) aspects of an action activates "default mode network" (rather than sensorimotor) regions. Following a Piagetian framework, we hypothesized that for actions acquired at an age wherein abstract/symbolic cognition is fully-developed, even when participants focus on the concrete aspects of an action, they should retrieve abstract-symbolic mental representations. In two studies, participants processed the concrete (i.e., "how") and abstract (i.e., "why") aspects of late-acquired and early-acquired actions. Consistent with previous research, focusing on the abstract (vs. concrete) aspects of an action resulted in greater activation in the "default mode network". Importantly, the activation in these regions was higher when processing later-acquired (vs. earlier acquired) actions-also when participants' goal was to focus on the concrete aspects of the action. We discuss the implications of the current findings to research on the involvement of concrete representations in abstract cognition.

  10. Dense Ocean Floor Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis; DONET/ DONET2, Part2 -Development and data application for the mega thrust earthquakes around the Nankai trough-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Y.; Kawaguchi, K.; Araki, E.; Matsumoto, H.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, M.; Kamiya, S.; Ariyoshi, K.; Baba, T.; Ohori, M.; Hori, T.; Takahashi, N.; Kaneko, S.; Donet Research; Development Group

    2010-12-01

    Yoshiyuki Kaneda Katsuyoshi Kawaguchi*, Eiichiro Araki*, Shou Kaneko*, Hiroyuki Matsumoto*, Takeshi Nakamura*, Masaru Nakano*, Shinichirou Kamiya*, Keisuke Ariyoshi*, Toshitaka Baba*, Michihiro Ohori*, Narumi Takakahashi*, and Takane Hori** * Earthquake and Tsunami Research Project for Disaster Prevention, Leading Project , Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) **Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) DONET (Dense Ocean Floor Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis) is the real time monitoring system of the Tonankai seismogenic zones around the Nankai trough southwestern Japan. We were starting to develop DONET to perform real time monitoring of crustal activities over there and the advanced early warning system. DONET will provide important and useful data to understand the Nankai trough maga thrust earthquake seismogenic zones and to improve the accuracy of the earthquake recurrence cycle simulation. Details of DONET concept are as follows. 1) Redundancy, Extendable function and advanced maintenance system using the looped cable system, junction boxes and the ROV/AUV. DONET has 20 observatories and incorporated in a double land stations concept. Also, we are developed ROV for the 10km cable extensions and heavy weight operations. 2) Multi kinds of sensors to observe broad band phenomena such as long period tremors, very low frequency earthquakes and strong motions of mega thrust earthquakes over M8: Therefore, sensors such as a broadband seismometer, an accelerometer, a hydrophone, a precise pressure gauge, a differential pressure gauge and a thermometer are equipped with each observatory in DONET. 3) For speedy detections, evaluations and notifications of earthquakes and tsunamis: DONET system will be deployed around the Tonankai seismogenic zone. 4) Provide data of ocean floor crustal deformations derived from pressure sensors: Simultaneously, the development of data

  11. Markets on Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroczkai, Zoltan; Anghel, Marian; Bassler, Kevin; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2003-03-01

    The dynamics of human, and most biological populations is characterized by competition for resources. By its own nature, this dynamics creates the group of "elites", formed by those agents who have strategies that are the most successful in the given situation, and therefore the rest of the agents will tend to follow, imitate, or interact with them, creating a social structure of leadership in the agent society. These inter-agent communications generate a complex social network with small-world character which itself forms the substrate for a second network, the action network. The latter is a highly dynamic, adaptive, directed network, defined by those inter-agent communication links on the substrate along which the passed information /prediction is acted upon by the other agents. By using the minority game for competition dynamics, here we show that when the substrate network is highly connected, the action network spontaneously develops hubs with a broad distribution of out-degrees, defining a robust leadership structure that is scale-free. Furthermore, in certain, realistic parameter ranges, facilitated by information passing on the action network, agents can spontaneously generate a high degree of cooperation making the collective almost maximally efficient.

  12. Metabolic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Farina, Lorenzo; Colosimo, Alfredo; Giuliani, Alessandro

    The use of the term `network' is more and more widespread in all fields of biology. It evokes a systemic approach to biological problems able to overcome the evident limitations of the strict reductionism of the past twenty years. The expectations produced by taking into considerations not only the single elements but even the intermingled `web' of links connecting different parts of biological entities, are huge. Nevertheless, we believe that the lack of consciousness that networks, beside their biological `likelihood', are modeling tools and not real entities, could be detrimental to the exploitation of the full potential of this paradigm. Like any modeling tool the network paradigm has a range of application going from situations in which it is particularly fit to situations in which its application can be largely misleading. In this chapter we deal with an aspect of biological entities that is particularly fit for the network approach: the intermediate metabolism. This fit derives both from the existence of a privileged formalization in which the relative role of nodes (metabolites) and arches (enzymes) is immediately suggested by the system architecture. Here we will discuss some applications of both graph theory based analysis and multidimensional statistics method to metabolic network studies with the emphasis on the derivation of biologically meaningful information.

  13. Mobilizing grassroots action.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Zero Population Growth, Inc. (ZPG), was very busy in 1994 spreading its message about the dangers of rapid population growth. ZPG's Field and Outreach Program is vital to the success of the organization. Organization activists staffed tables at more than 170 events in 1994, while the Speakers Network gave 159 presentations. ZPG was represented on Earth Day, World Population Day, during World Population Awareness Week, and at Cairo town meetings, as well as at the HORDE rock festival and the 25th anniversary of the Woodstock Music Festival. Campus contacts developed at these latter two concerts formed the basic for ZPG's Campus Outreach Project. In 1994, the Field department focused upon the International Conference on Population and Development to be held in Cairo, Egypt. ZPG encouraged people to get involved in conference preparations by helping to plan and implement town meetings in eleven major US cities. Members were contacted by ZPG via flyers and phone calls about meetings in their areas. ZPG activists and chapters then provided leadership for many of the meetings which drew thousands of participants and were widely praised by national leaders. Throughout 1994, ZPG's 21 chapters provided members with a vehicle for collective action and a source of information about the population conference, population growth, and wasteful consumption. Chapter activists also helped secure the signatures of thousands of people on Population Priority Petitions; the final list of names was delivered to US Vice President Al Gore in November.

  14. The case of pretense: observing actions and inferring goals.

    PubMed

    Schubotz, Ricarda I; von Cramon, D Yves

    2009-04-01

    When we observe an action, we know almost immediately what goal is pursued by the actor. Strikingly, this applies also to pretend action (pantomime), which provides relevant information about the manipulation itself but not about the manipulated objects. The present fMRI study addressed the issue of goal inference from pretend action as compared with real action. We found differences as well as commonalities for the brain correlates of inferring goals from both types of action. They differed with regard to the weights of the underlying action observation network, indicating the exploitation of object information in the case of real actions and manipulation information in the case of pretense. However, goal inferences from manipulation information resulted in a common network for both real and pretend action. Interestingly, this latter network also comprised areas that are not identified by action observation and that might be due to the processing of scene gist and to the evaluation of fit of putative action goals. These findings suggest that observation of pretense emphasizes the requirement to internally simulate the observed act but rule out fundamental differences of how observers cope with real and pretend action.

  15. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  16. Mechanism of action of a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate ingredients in the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Part III: Prevention of dye penetration through dentin vs a calcium- and phosphate-free control.

    PubMed

    Winston, Anthony E; Charig, Andrew J; Thong, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the pain of dental hypersensitivity resulting from gum recession is from the movement of fluid within the exposed tubules of dentin, causing changes in pressure on the nerve within the pulpal cavity. One method of treating hypersensitivity is to occlude the tubules, preventing fluid movement. This article discusses the use of a dye penetration technique, which establishes this mechanism of action for a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste containing calcium and phosphate. Two groups of intact teeth were perfectly sealed with enamel paint. Windows 100-micro to 200-micro deep were opened on opposite sides of each tooth at the dentin-enamel junction and briefly etched using 20% polyacrylic acid. One batch of teeth was treated eight times for 30 mins each with a 1:3 slurry of the desensitizing toothpaste and another set with a similar slurry prepared from a calcium- and phosphate-free control. A 0.85% aqueous solution of acid red fuchsin dye was applied to each window and allowed to dry. After a brief rinse, the teeth were sectioned across the windows. Almost no dye penetration was seen in teeth treated with the desensitizing toothpaste; however, extensive penetration through the dentin was visible in the control-treated teeth. The differences in dye penetration for the two sets of teeth were significant by both subjective (P < .001) and objective (P < .01) measures. Tubule occlusion because of calcium and phosphate ions from the desensitizing toothpaste accounts for its tooth desensitizing efficacy.

  17. Efficient computation of optimal actions.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2009-07-14

    Optimal choice of actions is a fundamental problem relevant to fields as diverse as neuroscience, psychology, economics, computer science, and control engineering. Despite this broad relevance the abstract setting is similar: we have an agent choosing actions over time, an uncertain dynamical system whose state is affected by those actions, and a performance criterion that the agent seeks to optimize. Solving problems of this kind remains hard, in part, because of overly generic formulations. Here, we propose a more structured formulation that greatly simplifies the construction of optimal control laws in both discrete and continuous domains. An exhaustive search over actions is avoided and the problem becomes linear. This yields algorithms that outperform Dynamic Programming and Reinforcement Learning, and thereby solve traditional problems more efficiently. Our framework also enables computations that were not possible before: composing optimal control laws by mixing primitives, applying deterministic methods to stochastic systems, quantifying the benefits of error tolerance, and inferring goals from behavioral data via convex optimization. Development of a general class of easily solvable problems tends to accelerate progress--as linear systems theory has done, for example. Our framework may have similar impact in fields where optimal choice of actions is relevant.

  18. Efficient computation of optimal actions

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    Optimal choice of actions is a fundamental problem relevant to fields as diverse as neuroscience, psychology, economics, computer science, and control engineering. Despite this broad relevance the abstract setting is similar: we have an agent choosing actions over time, an uncertain dynamical system whose state is affected by those actions, and a performance criterion that the agent seeks to optimize. Solving problems of this kind remains hard, in part, because of overly generic formulations. Here, we propose a more structured formulation that greatly simplifies the construction of optimal control laws in both discrete and continuous domains. An exhaustive search over actions is avoided and the problem becomes linear. This yields algorithms that outperform Dynamic Programming and Reinforcement Learning, and thereby solve traditional problems more efficiently. Our framework also enables computations that were not possible before: composing optimal control laws by mixing primitives, applying deterministic methods to stochastic systems, quantifying the benefits of error tolerance, and inferring goals from behavioral data via convex optimization. Development of a general class of easily solvable problems tends to accelerate progress—as linear systems theory has done, for example. Our framework may have similar impact in fields where optimal choice of actions is relevant. PMID:19574462

  19. In Bacillus subtilis LutR is part of the global complex regulatory network governing the adaptation to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Irigül-Sönmez, Öykü; Köroğlu, Türkan E; Öztürk, Büşra; Kovács, Ákos T; Kuipers, Oscar P; Yazgan-Karataş, Ayten

    2014-02-01

    The lutR gene, encoding a product resembling a GntR-family transcriptional regulator, has previously been identified as a gene required for the production of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin in Bacillus subtilis. To understand the broader regulatory roles of LutR in B. subtilis, we studied the genome-wide effects of a lutR null mutation by combining transcriptional profiling studies using DNA microarrays, reverse transcription quantitative PCR, lacZ fusion analyses and gel mobility shift assays. We report that 65 transcriptional units corresponding to 23 mono-cistronic units and 42 operons show altered expression levels in lutR mutant cells, as compared with lutR(+) wild-type cells in early stationary phase. Among these, 11 single genes and 25 operons are likely to be under direct control of LutR. The products of these genes are involved in a variety of physiological processes associated with the onset of stationary phase in B. subtilis, including degradative enzyme production, antibiotic production and resistance, carbohydrate utilization and transport, nitrogen metabolism, phosphate uptake, fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, protein synthesis and translocation, cell-wall metabolism, energy production, transfer of mobile genetic elements, induction of phage-related genes, sporulation, delay of sporulation and cannibalism, and biofilm formation. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay performed in the presence of both SinR and LutR revealed a close overlap between the LutR and SinR targets. Our data also revealed a significant overlap with the AbrB regulon. Together, these findings reveal that LutR is part of the global complex, interconnected regulatory systems governing adaptation of bacteria to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase.

  20. Women's Action Almanac: A Complete Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to provide answers to questions on women's issues and programs, the guide is arranged into two parts. Part 1, which comprises about three-fourths of the guide, contains background information and answers to often asked questions on 84 issues, such as abortion, affirmative action, battered women, divorce, incest, and insurance. Each entry…

  1. realfriends: A Student Social Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zoost, Steven

    2012-01-01

    "realfriends" is a social action project created by Grade 12 English students in Windsor, Nova Scotia. Its purpose was to create a face-to-face social network that would help change the school climate into a more social space. Interest in socializing is nothing new for teenagers, but these students articulated a worry that people their…

  2. Teachers Doing Research: The Power of Action through Inquiry. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnaford, Gail, Ed.; Fischer, Joseph, Ed.; Hobson, David, Ed.

    This collection of papers describes the processes of doing teacher action research. There are nine chapters in three parts. Part 1, "Ways of Doing Teacher Action Research," includes (1) "Action and Reflection: Narrative and Journaling in Teacher Research" (David Hobson); (2) "Action Research Rationale and Planning:…

  3. On the importance of being first: serial order effects in the interaction between action plans and ongoing actions.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Lisa R; Gallimore, Jonathan M; Feiszli, Kevin R; Logan, Gordon D

    2014-02-01

    When we plan sequences of actions, we must hold some elements of the sequence in working memory (WM) while we execute others. Research shows that execution of an action can be delayed if it partly overlaps (vs. does not overlap) with another action plan maintained in WM (partial repetition cost). However, it is not known whether all features of the action maintained in WM interfere equally with current actions. Most serial models of memory and action assume that interference will be equal, because all action features in the sequence should be activated to an equal degree in parallel; others assume that action features earlier in the sequence will interfere more than those later in the sequence, because earlier features will be more active. Using a partial repetition paradigm, this study examined whether serial position of action features in action sequences maintained in WM have an influence on current actions. Two stimulus events occurred in a sequence, and participants planned and maintained an action sequence to the first event (action A) in WM while executing a speeded response to the second event (action B). Results showed delayed execution of action B when it matched the first feature in the action A sequence (partial repetition cost), but not when it matched the last feature. These findings suggest that serial order is represented in the action plan prior to response execution, consistent with models that assume that serial order is represented by a primacy gradient of parallel feature activation prior to action execution.

  4. 15 CFR 8b.6 - Remedial action, voluntary action, and self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... self-evaluation. 8b.6 Section 8b.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE General Provisions § 8b.6 Remedial action, voluntary action, and self-evaluation. (a... or this part and where another recipient exercises control over the recipient that has...

  5. Set Goals & Select Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This phase of the Local Climate Action Framework will help users articulate the goals for their climate, energy, and sustainability programs, as well as to identify the actions that are most appropriate to help meet those goals.

  6. American Lead Action Memorandum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ACTION MEMORANDUM— Request for a Time-Critical Removal Action andExemption from the $2 Million and 12-Month Statutory Limits at the AmericanLead Site, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana (Site ID #B56J)

  7. 76 FR 63527 - National Energy Action Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Part VII The President Proclamation 8730--National Energy Action Month, 2011 Proclamation 8731--German... National Energy Action Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation... National Energy Action Month. I call upon the citizens of the United States to recognize this month...

  8. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Adile Askim; Akbulut, Yavuz; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Ceylan, Beril; Kuzu, Elif Bugra; Donmez, Onur; Izmirli, Ozden Sahin

    2013-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC) can be defined as "individuals' motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions". Since academic staff and teachers in ICT related fields have crucial roles in training action-competent individuals, this…

  9. Hierarchical human action recognition around sleeping using obscured posture information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Yuta; Sashida, Takehiko; Aoki, Yoshimitsu

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new approach for human action recognition around sleeping with the human body parts locations and the positional relationship between human and sleeping environment. Body parts are estimated from the depth image obtained by a time-of-flight (TOF) sensor using oriented 3D normal vector. Issues in action recognition of sleeping situation are the demand of availability in darkness, and hiding of the human body by duvets. Therefore, the extraction of image features is difficult since color and edge features are obscured by covers. Thus, first in our method, positions of four parts of the body (head, torso, thigh, and lower leg) are estimated by using the shape model of bodily surface constructed by oriented 3D normal vector. This shape model can represent the surface shape of rough body, and is effective in robust posture estimation of the body hidden with duvets. Then, action descriptor is extracted from the position of each body part. The descriptor includes temporal variation of each part of the body and spatial vector of position of the parts and the bed. Furthermore, this paper proposes hierarchical action classes and classifiers to improve the indistinct action classification. Classifiers are composed of two layers, and recognize human action by using the action descriptor. First layer focuses on spatial descriptor and classifies action roughly. Second layer focuses on temporal descriptor and classifies action finely. This approach achieves a robust recognition of obscured human by using the posture information and the hierarchical action recognition.

  10. Will you accept the government's friend request? Social networks and privacy concerns.

    PubMed

    Siegel, David A

    2013-01-01

    Participating in social network websites entails voluntarily sharing private information, and the explosive growth of social network websites over the last decade suggests shifting views on privacy. Concurrently, new anti-terrorism laws, such as the USA Patriot Act, ask citizens to surrender substantial claim to privacy in the name of greater security. I address two important questions regarding individuals' views on privacy raised by these trends. First, how does prompting individuals to consider security concerns affect their views on government actions that jeopardize privacy? Second, does the use of social network websites alter the effect of prompted security concerns? I posit that prompting individuals to consider security concerns does lead to an increased willingness to accept government actions that jeopardize privacy, but that frequent users of websites like Facebook are less likely to be swayed by prompted security concerns. An embedded survey experiment provides support for both parts of my claim.

  11. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  12. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  13. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and…

  14. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  15. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  16. Deriving motor primitives through action segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hemeren, Paul E; Thill, Serge

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment is to further understand the effect of levels of processing (top-down vs. bottom-up) on the perception of movement kinematics and primitives for grasping actions in order to gain insight into possible primitives used by the mirror system. In the present study, we investigated the potential of identifying such primitives using an action segmentation task. Specifically, we investigated whether or not segmentation was driven primarily by the kinematics of the action, as opposed to high-level top-down information about the action and the object used in the action. Participants in the experiment were shown 12 point-light movies of object-centered hand/arm actions that were either presented in their canonical orientation together with the object in question (top-down condition) or upside down (inverted) without information about the object (bottom-up condition). The results show that (1) despite impaired high-level action recognition for the inverted actions participants were able to reliably segment the actions according to lower-level kinematic variables, (2) segmentation behavior in both groups was significantly related to the kinematic variables of change in direction, velocity, and acceleration of the wrist (thumb and finger tips) for most of the included actions. This indicates that top-down activation of an action representation leads to similar segmentation behavior for hand/arm actions compared to bottom-up, or local, visual processing when performing a fairly unconstrained segmentation task. Motor primitives as parts of more complex actions may therefore be reliably derived through visual segmentation based on movement kinematics.

  17. Parts Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuqua, Lou; Fuqua, Debbie

    Designed to address the skills that an auto parts specialist must master in order to be effective in the market place, this manual consists of 13 units of instruction. Covered in the units are orientation; human relations; communications; safety; parts and systems identification; stocking, shipping, and receiving; inventory control; cataloging and…

  18. What Every PDS Partner Should Know about Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garin, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the process of an action research project undertaken by a PDS partnership. Participants in a one day professional development seminar shared their perspectives on action research within a PDS network, and findings indicate that participants valued the collaborative effort and opportunities to share their research efforts.…

  19. The Development of Attention Skills in Action Video Game Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, M. W. G.; Green, C. S.; Bavelier, D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research suggests that action video game play improves attentional resources, allowing gamers to better allocate their attention across both space and time. In order to further characterize the plastic changes resulting from playing these video games, we administered the Attentional Network Test (ANT) to action game players and…

  20. Why Not Network Centric Acquisition?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    can be turned into actionable knowledge both - internally through organizational learning and experience factories - Inter-organizationally via joint...organizational and inter- organizational learning from risk and failure. © 2003 by Carnegie Mellon University page 27 Are Networks and Communities...exchange of Requests for Comments over the ARAPANET © 2003 by Carnegie Mellon University page 29 Inter- Organizational Learning and Knowledge Networks

  1. Religious Uses of the College Union: Whose Temple Is It? Part One and Part Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David E.; Nelson, Stephen J.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship of college unions and student personnel services to religious groups on campus is examined in this two part article. In part one, attention is focused on the purposes of the college union, important concepts in the nation's religious history, and actions of the courts. It is noted that legal actions and court cases have focused on…

  2. Estrogen actions in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, M E

    2009-01-01

    This brief review summarizes the current state of the field for estrogen receptor actions in the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). It is organized into three parts: a short Introduction and overview of the current view of how estrogen works on blood vessels; a summary of the current status of clinical information regarding HRT and cardiovascular effects; and an update on state-of-the-art mouse models of estrogen action using estrogen receptor knockout mice.

  3. Chiral Asymmetry and the Spectral Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfäffle, Frank; Stephan, Christoph A.

    2013-07-01

    We consider orthogonal connections with arbitrary torsion on compact Riemannian manifolds. For the induced Dirac operators, twisted Dirac operators and Dirac operators of Chamseddine-Connes type we compute the spectral action. In addition to the Einstein-Hilbert action and the bosonic part of the Standard Model Lagrangian we find the Holst term from Loop Quantum Gravity, a coupling of the Holst term to the scalar curvature and a prediction for the value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter.

  4. Propagation of Action Potentials: An Active Participation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsten, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Describes an active participation exercise that demonstrates the propagation of action potentials (the ability to transmit information through the neural network, dependent upon chemical interactions in the brain). Students assume the structure and function of the network by lining up around the room and communicating through hand signals and…

  5. Passive Responses Resembling Action Potentials: A Device for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian A.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a network of entirely passive electrical components that gives a response to an electrical shock similar to an action potential. The network of resistors, capacitors, and diodes was developed to produce responses that would mimic those observed, for example, when a dark-grown pea epicotyl is shocked…

  6. Protecting the Rights of Young Children Affected and Infected by HIV/AIDS in Africa: Updating Strategies and Reinforcing Existing Networks. Action Research in Family and Early Childhood Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Early Childhood and Family Education Unit.

    This monograph summarizes the issues discussed at an international workshop convened to identify strategies, lines of action, and innovative approaches to respond to the needs of young children faced by the African HIV/AIDS pandemic. The monograph provides background information on the HIV/AIDS pandemic; describes current initiatives and results…

  7. Actionable pathways: interactive discovery of therapeutic targets using signaling pathway models

    PubMed Central

    Salavert, Francisco; Hidago, Marta R.; Amadoz, Alicia; Çubuk, Cankut; Medina, Ignacio; Crespo, Daniel; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of actionable targets is crucial for targeted therapies and is also a constituent part of the drug discovery process. The success of an intervention over a target depends critically on its contribution, within the complex network of gene interactions, to the cellular processes responsible for disease progression or therapeutic response. Here we present PathAct, a web server that predicts the effect that interventions over genes (inhibitions or activations that simulate knock-outs, drug treatments or over-expressions) can have over signal transmission within signaling pathways and, ultimately, over the cell functionalities triggered by them. PathAct implements an advanced graphical interface that provides a unique interactive working environment in which the suitability of potentially actionable genes, that could eventually become drug targets for personalized or individualized therapies, can be easily tested. The PathAct tool can be found at: http://pathact.babelomics.org. PMID:27137885

  8. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks. Part III: Unsteady-state conditions (evacuation period)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2006-12-01

    This paper analyses the evacuation period of a 300 L super-insulated cryogenic storage tank for liquid nitrogen. Storage tank and radiation shields are the same as in part I of this paper. The present analysis extends application of stationary fluid networks to unsteady-states to determine local, residual gas pressures between shields and the evacuation time of a multilayer super-insulation. Parameter tests comprise magnitude of desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls and their influence on length of the evacuation period. Calculation of the integrals over time-dependent desorption rates roughly confirms weight losses of radiation shields obtained after heating and out-gassing the materials, as reported in the literature. After flooding the insulation space with dry N 2-gas, the evacuation time can enormously be reduced, from 72 to 4 h, to obtain a residual gas pressure of 0.01 Pa in-between shields of this storage tank. Permeation of nitrogen through container walls is of no importance for residual gas pressures. The simulations finally compare freezing H 2O-layers adsorbed on shields, spacers and container walls with flooding of the materials.

  9. Watching novice action degrades expert motor performance: Causation between action production and outcome prediction of observed actions by humans

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tsuyoshi; Ganesh, Gowrishankar

    2014-01-01

    Our social skills are critically determined by our ability to understand and appropriately respond to actions performed by others. However despite its obvious importance, the mechanisms enabling action understanding in humans have remained largely unclear. A popular but controversial belief is that parts of the motor system contribute to our ability to understand observed actions. Here, using a novel behavioral paradigm, we investigated this belief by examining a causal relation between action production, and a component of action understanding - outcome prediction, the ability of a person to predict the outcome of observed actions. We asked dart experts to watch novice dart throwers and predict the outcome of their throws. We modulated the feedbacks provided to them, caused a specific improvement in the expert's ability to predict watched actions while controlling the other experimental factors, and exhibited that a change (improvement) in their outcome prediction ability results in a progressive and proportional deterioration in the expert's own darts performance. This causal relationship supports involvement of the motor system in outcome prediction by humans of actions observed in others. PMID:25384755

  10. What Kind of Actions Are Appropriate? Eco-School Teachers' and Instructors' Ranking of Sustainability-Promoting Actions as Content in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagell, Ulrica; Almers, Ellen; Askerlund, Per; Apelqvist, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Based on the consideration that learning about different action alternatives and strategies are essential parts of ESD, this quantitative study focuses Eco-School teachers' and instructors' views on including different sustainability-promoting actions in teaching practices. Direct actions, and actions that take place in the private sphere were…

  11. National Biofuels Action Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Leading the Federal Interagency Biomass Research and Development Initiative October 2008 National Biofuels Action Plan Biomass Research and...REPORT DATE OCT 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE National Biofuels Action Plan 5a. CONTRACT...goal of the National Biofuels Action Plan is to maximize the environmental and economic benefi ts of biofuels use by advancing sustainable practices

  12. Endocrine system: part 1.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Carolyn; Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    2014-05-27

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series and is the first of two articles on the endocrine system, examines the structure and function of the organs of the endocrine system. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health. The role of the endocrine system and the types, actions and control of hormones are explored. The gross structure of the pituitary and thyroid glands are described along with relevant physiology. Several disorders of the thyroid gland are outlined. The second article examines growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands.

  13. Action principles in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Tipler, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Physical theories have their most fundamental expression as action integrals. This suggests that the total action of the universe is the most fundamental physical quantity, and hence finite. In this article it is argued that finite universal action implies that the universe is spatially closed. Further, the possible spatial topologies, the types of matter that can dominate the early universe dynamics, and the form of any quadratic additions to the lagrangian of general relativity are constrained. Initial and final cosmological curvature singularities are required to avoid a universal action singularity.

  14. Autonomous mental development in high dimensional context and action spaces.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ameet; Weng, Juyang

    2003-01-01

    Autonomous Mental Development (AMD) of robots opened a new paradigm for developing machine intelligence, using neural network type of techniques and it fundamentally changed the way an intelligent machine is developed from manual to autonomous. The work presented here is a part of SAIL (Self-Organizing Autonomous Incremental Learner) project which deals with autonomous development of humanoid robot with vision, audition, manipulation and locomotion. The major issue addressed here is the challenge of high dimensional action space (5-10) in addition to the high dimensional context space (hundreds to thousands and beyond), typically required by an AMD machine. This is the first work that studies a high dimensional (numeric) action space in conjunction with a high dimensional perception (context state) space, under the AMD mode. Two new learning algorithms, Direct Update on Direction Cosines (DUDC) and High-Dimensional Conjugate Gradient Search (HCGS), are developed, implemented and tested. The convergence properties of both the algorithms and their targeted applications are discussed. Autonomous learning of speech production under reinforcement learning is studied as an example.

  15. Perception-action in children with ASD

    PubMed Central

    von Hofsten, Claes; Rosander, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    How do disturbances to perception and action relate to the deficiencies expressed by children with autism? The ability to predict what is going to happen next is crucial for the construction of all actions and children develop these predictive abilities early in development. Children with autism, however, are deficient in the ability to foresee future events and to plan movements and movement sequences. They are also deficient in the understanding of other people's actions. This includes communicative actions as they are ultimately based on movements. Today there are two promising neurobiological interpretation of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). First, there is strong evidence that the Mirror Neuron System (MNS) is impaired. As stated by this hypothesis, action production and action understanding are intimately related. Both these functions rely on predictive models of the sensory consequences of actions and depend on connectivity between the parietal and premotor areas. Secondly, action prediction is accomplished through a system that includes a loop from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) through the cerebellum and back to the premotor and motor areas of the brain. Impairment of this loop is probably also part of the explanation of the prediction problems in children with ASD. Both the cortico-cerebellar loop and the MNS rely on distant neural connections. There are multiple evidence that such connections are weak in children with autism. PMID:23248590

  16. Asynchronous networks: modularization of dynamics theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Field, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Building on the first part of this paper, we develop the theory of functional asynchronous networks. We show that a large class of functional asynchronous networks can be (uniquely) represented as feedforward networks connecting events or dynamical modules. For these networks we can give a complete description of the network function in terms of the function of the events comprising the network: the modularization of dynamics theorem. We give examples to illustrate the main results.

  17. Building Social Capital for Educational Action Research: The Contribution of Bridget Somekh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, John

    2010-01-01

    The article will review some of Bridget Somekh's action research projects as attempts to build networks of trust and reciprocity across a range of educational stake-holders. It will also examine Bridget's wider role within the education action research movement as a whole, looking at her achievements as a facilitator of networks of action…

  18. Monitoring individual and joint action outcomes in duet music performance.

    PubMed

    Loehr, Janeen D; Kourtis, Dimitrios; Vesper, Cordula; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Günther

    2013-07-01

    We investigated whether people monitor the outcomes of their own and their partners' individual actions as well as the outcome of their combined actions when performing joint actions together. Pairs of pianists memorized both parts of a piano duet. Each pianist then performed one part while their partner performed the other; EEG was recorded from both. Auditory outcomes (pitches) associated with keystrokes produced by the pianists were occasionally altered in a way that either did or did not affect the joint auditory outcome (i.e., the harmony of a chord produced by the two pianists' combined pitches). Altered auditory outcomes elicited a feedback-related negativity whether they occurred in the pianist's own part or the partner's part, and whether they affected individual or joint action outcomes. Altered auditory outcomes also elicited a P300 whose amplitude was larger when the alteration affected the joint outcome compared with individual outcomes and when the alteration affected the pianist's own part compared with the partner's part. Thus, musicians engaged in joint actions monitor their own and their partner's actions as well as their combined action outcomes, while at the same time maintaining a distinction between their own and others' actions and between individual and joint outcomes.

  19. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  20. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)